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Sample records for 755-nm alexandrite laser

  1. Effects of the 755-nm Alexandrite laser on fine dark facial hair: review of 90 cases.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Belkiz; Saklamaz, Ali

    2012-05-01

    Laser hair removal is a relatively effective method for thick hair. Despite the risk for induction of fine hair growth, application of laser for fine dark hair is sometimes inevitable. We investigate the effects of 755-nm Alexandrite laser on fine dark facial hair and evaluate the induction rates of fine hair growth and case satisfaction. In the present study, the thickening rate of hairs (33.33%) was found to be higher than the previously published rates. However, reduction of hair density can be obtained when the laser sessions are continued.

  2. Treatment of trichostasis spinulosa with 0.5-millisecond pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Ashraf; Kashmar, Mouhamad

    2011-11-01

    Trichostasis spinulosa (TS) is a follicular disorder in which multiple hairs in a keratinous sheath project above the skin surface. Current treatments provide temporary relief and side effects are common. We report the successful treatment of TS in 20 patients using a short-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser. The 20 patients (skin types II-V) presented with TS lesions on the tip of their nose. All patients received a single treatment (one to three passes) with the laser with cold air cooling but without anaesthesia or analgesia. Treatment parameters were as follows: pulse duration 0.5 ms, fluence 15-17 J/cm(2), and spot size 5 mm. The entire procedure required less than 5 min to perform. The patients were followed up for 3 months for any adverse effects or recurrence. In all patients the lesions disappeared immediately after treatment with minimal or no pain. Erythema was minimal and lasted 5-20 min in all patients. Patients were very satisfied. The treated areas were still clear 4 to 5 weeks later, and a second treatment was not considered necessary. There were adverse effects other than the erythema and there was no recurrence within the follow-up period of 3 months. A single treatment with a short-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser appears to be a rapid, minimally painful, and effective treatment for TS in patients of skin types II to V.

  3. Combination of 595-nm pulsed dye laser, long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion treatment for keratosis pilaris: retrospective analysis of 26 Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Choi, Min Ju; Zheng, Zhenlong; Chung, Won Soon; Kim, Young Koo; Cho, Sung Bin

    2013-06-01

    Keratosis pilaris (KP) has beenpresented as small keratotic follicular papules with or without surrounding erythema. Various treatments with laser or light therapy have been used for the management of KP with various clinical outcomes. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy and safety of a combination therapy for KP. A total of 29 anatomical sites with KP in 26 patients were treated using a 595-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) with nonpurpuragenic fluences, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion. Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing preand posttreatment clinical photographs and patient satisfaction rates. Evaluation of the clinical results three months after the treatments showed that 12 of the 29 anatomical sites (41.4%) demonstrated Grade 3 clinical improvement, ten (34.5%) had Grade 2 clinical improvement, four (13.8%) showed Grade 1 improvement, and three (10.3%) showed Grade 4 improvement. We observed that KP lesions improved not only in erythema and skin texture, but also in brownish dyschromias. Potential adverse events were not observed, except prolonged posttherapy scaling. Our observations demonstrate that combination therapy using a 595-nm PDL, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion can have a positive therapeutic effect on KP.

  4. Complete resolution of minocycline pigmentation following a single treatment with non-ablative 1550-nm fractional resurfacing in combination with the 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Vangipuram, Ramya K; DeLozier, Whitney L; Geddes, Elizabeth; Friedman, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    Pigmentation secondary to minocycline ingestion is an uncommon adverse event affecting 3.7-14.8% of treated individuals for which few effective therapies are available. Three patterns of minocycline pigmentation have a characteristic clinical and histological appearance. The pigment composition in each variety is different and occurs at varying skin depths. Accordingly, a tailored approach according to the type of minocycline pigmentation is crucial for treatment success. The purpose of this intervention was to evaluate the efficacy of non-ablative fractional photothermolysis in combination with the Q-switched alexandrite laser for the treatment of type I minocycline pigmentation on the face. A patient with type I minocycline pigmentation was treated with non-ablative 1550-nm fractional photothermolysis followed immediately by 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser and then observed clinically to determine the outcome of this modality. The patient was seen in clinic 1 month later following her single treatment session and 100% clearance of all blue facial pigment was observed. Non-ablative fractional photothermolysis in combination with the 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser should be considered for treatment of type I minocycline pigmentation.

  5. Extensive angiokeratoma circumscriptum - successful treatment with 595-nm variable-pulse pulsed dye laser and 755-nm long-pulse pulsed alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Ján; Šimaljaková, Mária; Babál, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Angiokeratomas are rare vascular mucocutaneous lesions characterized by small-vessel ectasias in the upper dermis with reactive epidermal changes. Angiokeratoma circumscriptum (AC) is the rarest among the five types in the current classification of angiokeratoma. We present a case of an extensive AC in 19-year-old women with Fitzpatrick skin type I of the left lower extremity, characterized by a significant morphological heterogeneity of the lesions, intermittent bleeding, and negative psychological impact. Histopathological examination after deep biopsy was consistent with that of angiokeratoma. The association with metabolic diseases (Fabry disease) was excluded by ophthalmological, biochemical, and genetic examinations. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has not detected deep vascular hyperplasia pathognomic for verrucous hemangioma. The combined treatment with 595-nm variable-pulse pulsed dye laser (VPPDL) and 755-nm long-pulse pulsed alexandrite laser (LPPAL) with dynamic cooling device led to significant removal of the pathological vascular tissue of AC. Only a slight degree of secondary reactions (dyspigmentations and texture changes) occurred. No recurrence was observed after postoperative interval of 9 months. We recommend VPPDL and LPPAL for the treatment of extensive AC.

  6. Prospective Comparison of Dual Wavelength Long-Pulsed 755-nm Alexandrite/1,064-nm Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet Laser versus 585-nm Pulsed Dye Laser Treatment for Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Min; Kim, Jung-In; Kim, Han-Saem; Choi, Young-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Rosacea treatments including oral/topical medications and laser therapy are numerous but unsatisfactory. Objective To compare the effectiveness of the dual wavelength long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite/1,064-nm neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser (LPAN) with that of 585-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) for rosacea. Methods This was a randomized, single-blinded, comparative study. Full face received four consecutive monthly treatments with LPAN or PDL, followed-up for 6 months after the last treatment. Erythema index was measured by spectrophotometer, and digital photographs were evaluated by consultant dermatologists for physician's global assessment. Subjective satisfaction surveys and adverse effects were recorded. Results Forty-nine subjects with rosacea enrolled and 12 dropped out. There were no significant differences between LPAN and PDL in the mean reduction of the erythema index (p=0.812; 3.6% vs. 2.8%), improvement of physician's global assessment (p=1.000; 88.9% vs. 89.5%), and subject-rated treatment satisfaction (p=0.842; 77.8% vs. 84.2%). PDL showed more adverse effects including vesicles than LPAN (p=0.046; 26.3% vs. 0.0%). No other serious or permanent adverse events were observed in both treatments. Conclusion Both LPAN and PDL may be effective and safe treatments for rosacea. PMID:27746641

  7. Treatment endpoints for resistant port wine stains with a 755 nm laser.

    PubMed

    Izikson, Leonid; Anderson, R Rox

    2009-03-01

    Laser therapy of port wine stains (PWS) resistant to pulsed dye laser is challenging and controversial. Based on the theory of selective photothermolysis, vessels in such lesions may be specifically targeted with the laser wavelength of 755 nm. There is much deeper penetration of the near-infrared light and it is difficult to visualize laser-induced changes within the deeper dermis. The recognition of an appropriate immediate endpoint response with this wavelength would be helpful. This is a clinical observations report. We present examples of an appropriate PWS tissue response endpoint based on our clinical observations in resistant PWS treated with a 755 nm laser at high fluences (40-100 J/cm(2)), 1.5-ms pulse duration, with dynamic cooling device (DCD) cooling. Mild-to-moderate PWS lightening was associated with the immediate endpoint of a transient gray color that gradually evolved into persistent deep purpura within several minutes. We also discuss the clinical endpoints that represent undertreatment and overtreatment of PWS. It is important to attain, and maintain, the correct endpoint when treating PWS with this deeply penetrating near-infrared laser at high fluences in order to (a) induce lesional lightening, and (b) avoid deep dermal burns that may produce scarring. Judicious use of the 755 nm laser can be beneficial for resistant PWS.

  8. Femtosecond Kerr-lens mode-locked Alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Akbari, Reza; Major, Arkady

    2016-06-27

    The generation of 170 fs pulses at 755 nm from a Kerr-lens mode-locked Alexandrite laser was demonstrated. The laser was pumped at 532 nm and produced 780 mW of average output power with 9.8% of optical-to-optical efficiency. To the best of our knowledge, these are the shortest pulses that have been produced from a mode-locked Alexandrite laser to date.

  9. Green pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, Jerry W.; Brown, David C.

    2005-04-01

    Initial experiments with pulsed and CW pumping an alexandrite laser rod at 532 nm are presented. This pumping architecture holds promise for the production of scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  10. Case reports: clearance of lentigines in Japanese men with the long-pulsed alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Redbord, Kelley Pagliai; Hanke, C William

    2007-06-01

    Benign pigmented lesions can be effectively treated with multiple modalities including lasers. The treatment of pigmented lesions in phototype IV skin is more complicated and challenging given the risk of pigmentation changes and scarring. We present the novel use of the long-pulsed Alexandrite 755 nm laser for the treatment of solar lentigines in sun-reactive phototype IV skin of patients of Japanese decent. Our Japanese patients cleared with one treatment with no pigmentary changes or scarring. No recurrences were noted to date. The long-pulsed Alexandrite 755-nm laser is a novel, safe, and effective treatment of solar lentigines in Japanese patients.

  11. Comparison between sequentional treatment with diode and alexandrite lasers versus alexandrite laser alone in the treatment of hirsutism.

    PubMed

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Naieni, Farahnaz Fatemi; Siadat, Amir Hossein; Rad, Leila

    2011-11-01

    Laser systems that are commonly used for the treatment of hirsutism include the ruby laser (694 nm), the diode laser (800 nm), the alexandrite laser (755 nm) and the Nd:YAG laser (1084 nm). The diode laser and alexandrite laser are considered effective in treatment of hirsutism in dark-skinned patients. The response of hairs to these laser systems is variable and not complete. In this study, we compared the efficacy of these two laser systems for permanent hair removal. This was a randomized, controlled clinical trial that was performed with women of the age range 15-45 years old. After obtaining informed consent, the samples were randomized into two groups using random allocation software. The first group was treated with alexandrite laser alone (four sessions, two months apart). The second group was treated sequentially with diode laser for the first two sessions and alexandrite laser for the next two sessions. Overall, 111 patients (57 patients in the alexandrite laser group and 54 patients in the sequential diode-alexandrite laser group) were evaluated. There was no significant difference regarding mean of hair reduction between the two groups during the courses of treatment. Except for the first session, there was no significant difference regarding percent of patient satisfaction between the two groups (P value >0.05). Comparison between the two groups showed no significant difference one month, three months and six months after the last treatment (P value >0.05). Regarding the results of our study, there is no significant difference between sequential treatment with diode and alexandrite lasers versus alexandrite laser alone in the treatment of hirsutism. We suggest that in further studies, the efficacy of sequential treatment with other laser systems is evaluated against single treatment methods.

  12. InP/AlGaInP quantum dot semiconductor disk lasers for CW TEM00 emission at 716 - 755 nm.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Peter J; Hastie, Jennifer E; Calvez, Stephane; Krysa, Andrey B; Dawson, Martin D

    2009-11-23

    Multiple layers of InP QDs, self-assembled during epitaxial growth, were incorporated into the active region of an (Al(x)Ga(1-x))(0.51)In(0.49)P based semiconductor disk laser with monolithic Al(x)Ga(1-x)As distributed Bragg reflector. Three gain structure samples were selected from the epitaxial wafer, bonded to single-crystal diamond heatspreaders and optically pumped at 532 nm within a high finesse external laser cavity. Laser emission with peak wavelengths at 716, 729, and 739 nm, respectively, was achieved from the three samples; the latter demonstrating tuning from 729 to 755 nm. Maximum continuous wave output power of 52 mW at 739 nm was achieved with 0.2% output coupling; the threshold and slope efficiency were 220 mW and 5.7% respectively.

  13. Anterior uveitis following eyebrow epilation with alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Karabela, Yunus; Eliaçık, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Ocular tissues are known to be sensitive to damage from exposure to laser emissions. This study reports the case of a female patient with acute unilateral anterior uveitis caused by alexandrite laser-assisted hair removal of the eyebrows. We report a 38-year-old female who presented with unilateral eye pain, redness, and photophobia after receiving alexandrite (755 nm) laser epilation of both eyebrows. Best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes. Right eye examination was normal. Left eye examination showed conjunctival injection and 2+/3+ cells in the anterior chamber. Intraocular pressure and fundus examination were normal. Topical steroids and cycloplegic drops were prescribed for 3 weeks. At the end of the 3-week follow-up, best corrected visual acuity was 20/20, and intraocular pressure and fundus examination were normal in both eyes. The left eye was white, and the anterior chamber was clear. The patient continues to be monitored. In conclusion, without adequate protective eyewear, laser hair removal of the eyebrows with alexandrite laser can lead to ocular damage.

  14. Anterior uveitis following eyebrow epilation with alexandrite laser

    PubMed Central

    Karabela, Yunus; Eliaçık, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Ocular tissues are known to be sensitive to damage from exposure to laser emissions. This study reports the case of a female patient with acute unilateral anterior uveitis caused by alexandrite laser-assisted hair removal of the eyebrows. We report a 38-year-old female who presented with unilateral eye pain, redness, and photophobia after receiving alexandrite (755 nm) laser epilation of both eyebrows. Best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes. Right eye examination was normal. Left eye examination showed conjunctival injection and 2+/3+ cells in the anterior chamber. Intraocular pressure and fundus examination were normal. Topical steroids and cycloplegic drops were prescribed for 3 weeks. At the end of the 3-week follow-up, best corrected visual acuity was 20/20, and intraocular pressure and fundus examination were normal in both eyes. The left eye was white, and the anterior chamber was clear. The patient continues to be monitored. In conclusion, without adequate protective eyewear, laser hair removal of the eyebrows with alexandrite laser can lead to ocular damage. PMID:26379448

  15. Comparison of Alexandrite and Diode Lasers for Hair Removal in Dark and Medium Skin: Which is Better?

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Farhad Hamad; Jaafar, Mohamad Suhimi; Ismail, Asaad Hamid; Mutter, Kussay Nugamesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To improve laser hair removal (LHR) for dark skin, the fluence rate reaching the hair follicle in LHR is important. This paper presents the results of a comparative study examining the function of wavelength on dark skin types using 755 nm alexandrite and 810 nm diode lasers. Methods: The structure of the skin was created using a realistic skin model by the Advanced Systems Analysis Program. Result: In this study, the alexandrite laser (755 nm) and diode laser (810 nm) beam–skin tissue interactions were simulated. The simulation results for both lasers differed. The transmission ratio of the diode laser to the dark skin dermis was approximately 4% more than that of the alexandrite laser for the same skin type. For the diode laser at skin depth z = 0.67 mm, the average transmission ratios of both samples were 36% and 27.5%, but those for the alexandrite laser at the same skin depth were 32% and 25%. Conclusion: Both lasers were suitable in LHR for dark skin types, but the diode laser was better than the alexandrite laser because the former could penetrate deeper into the dermis layer. PMID:25653820

  16. Study of laser-induced damage to large core silica fiber by Nd:YAG and Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Hokansson, Adam; Whelan, Dan; Clancy, Michael

    2009-02-01

    As a continuation of our earlier study at 2.1 μm wavelength, we have investigated the laser damage to several types of step-index, large core (1500 μm) silica fibers at two new wavelengths by high power long pulsed Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and Alexandrite (755 nm) lasers. It was observed that fibers with different designs showed a significant difference in performance at these wavelengths. We will also report a correlation of damage to the fibers between the two laser wavelengths. The performance analyses of different fiber types under the given test conditions will enable optimization of fiber design for specific applications.

  17. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris J.; van der Slot, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  18. Q-Switched Alexandrite Laser-induced Chrysiasis

    PubMed Central

    Victor Ross, E.

    2015-01-01

    -switched laser. Also, treatment with a long-pulsed laser should be entertained in patients with either idiopathic or laser-induced chrysiasis. (JClinAesthetDermatol. 2015;8(9):48-53.) Chrysiasis is a distinctive blue-gray pigmentation of light exposed skin occurring in individuals who are receiving parenteral gold therapy.1 The 755nm Q-switched alexandrite laser is effective for the treatment of facial lentigines since the melanin granules absorb a high proportion of the laser energy and other chromophores offer little competitive absorption.2 The authors describe a woman who developed chrysiasis at Q-switched alexandrite laser treatment sites and whose dyschromia was successfully treated with a sequential series of laser sessions using a long-pulsed alexandrite laser, followed by a nonablative fractional laser and an ablative carbon dioxide laser. PMID:26430491

  19. Alexandrite laser pumped by semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Scheps, R.; Gately, B.M.; Myers, J.F. ); Krasinski, J.S. ); Heller, D.F. )

    1990-06-04

    We report the first operation of a direct diode-pumped tunable chromium-doped solid-state laser. A small alexandrite (Cr:BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) crystal was longitudinally pumped by two visible laser diodes. The threshold pump power was 12 mW using the {ital R}{sub 1} line at 680.4 nm for the pump transition, and the slope efficiency was 25%. The measured laser output bandwidth was 2.1 nm.

  20. Alexandrite laser pumped by semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheps, Richard; Gately, Bernard M.; Myers, Joseph F.; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Heller, Donald F.

    1990-06-01

    We report the first operation of a direct diode-pumped tunable chromium-doped solid-state laser. A small alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) crystal was longitudinally pumped by two visible laser diodes. The threshold pump power was 12 mW using the R1 line at 680.4 nm for the pump transition, and the slope efficiency was 25%. The measured laser output bandwidth was 2.1 nm.

  1. Photorejuvenation using long-pulsed alexandrite and long-pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers: a pilot study of clinical outcome and patients' satisfaction in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Bok; Shin, Ji Yeon; Cheon, Min Suk; Oh, Shin Taek; Cho, Baik Kee; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2012-05-01

    Long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite and long-pulsed 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers have been used for photorejuvenation of the face. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of long-pulsed alexandrite and long-pulsed Nd:YAG lasers for photorejuvenation in Korea. One hundred and sixteen Korean patients with photo-aged facial skin were enrolled. Sixty-two patients with facial pigmentation underwent long-pulsed alexandrite laser treatment. Eleven patients that wanted to improve facial pigmentation with minimal pain had quasi-long-pulsed alexandrite laser treatment. Forty three patients had long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser therapy. Outcome assessments included standard photographs and global evaluation by blinded investigators. The self-assessment grade was provided in questionnaires. Forty-four percent of patients reported excellent or good improvement of their pigmentary lesions (>50% improvement) using a long-pulsed alexandrite laser. Of patients who underwent long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment, 36% reported excellent or good improvement in skin tightening, 50% in facial flushing and 45% in pigmentary lesions. We conclude that long-pulsed alexandrite and long-pulsed Nd:YAG lasers are safe and effective for facial photorejuvenation in Koreans.

  2. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  3. Experiment on laser performance of Alexandrite crystals

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG Shoudu; ZHANG Kemin

    1984-07-01

    The electron vibration laser output in Alexandrite crystals has been obtained. The free oscillation threshold is 170 J, the laser output energy is 140 mJ, and the center wavelength is 7526 A. The emission is linearly polarized in the crystallographic b direction and the laser performance improves at elevated temperatures. Using a quartz double-refraction filter as a tuning element, tunable emission has been observed at room temperature.

  4. Alexandrite laser source for atmospheric lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelon, J.; Loth, C.; Flamant, P.; Megie, G.

    1986-01-01

    During the past years, there has been a marked increase in interest in the applications of vibronic solid state lasers to meteorology and atmospheric physics. Two airborne lidar programs are now under development in France. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) method with vibronic solid state lasers is very attractive for water vapor, temperature and pressure measurements. Alexandrite laser and titanium-sapphire are both suitable for these applications. However, only alexandrite rods are commercially available. The requirements on the laser source for airborne dial applications are two fold: (1) a restriction on laser linewidth and a requirement on stability and tunability with a good spectral purity; and (2) a requirement on the time separation between the two pulses. These constraints are summarized.

  5. Temporary hair loss using the long-pulsed alexandrite laser at 20 milliseconds.

    PubMed

    Raulin, C; Greve, B

    2000-03-01

    Facial hypertrichosis presents an enormous psychological burden for women. Temporary hair removal (waxing, plucking, etc.) and electrolysis are prolonged and unsatisfactory methods of treatment. For a few years several laser systems with varying wavelengths, pulse durations and energy fluences have been used successfully in laser epilation. In the retrospective study on hand, we report on results of 30 female patients with hypertrichosis in the facial area treated with the long pulse alexandrite laser at 20 msec (Cynosure PhotoGenica LPIR/Apogee; 755 nm; 20 msec; up to 30 J/cm2; 10 or 12.5 mm beam diameter) over an 18 month treatment period. After an average of 8 treatments, an average clearance rate of 75% could be achieved. Fair hair (white/blond/red) only showed a clearance rate of 10%. Hypo- and hyperpigmentation did not appear. The most frequent adverse effects were the occasional appearance of scattered crusting (17%), which healed without consequences, and folliculitis (13%). The average post-treatment observation time lasted 3.25 months. The long-pulsed alexandrite laser at a pulse duration of 20 msec is an effective and safe method of treatment of hypertrichosis in the facial region of women. Black hair responds considerably better to the laser treatment than fair hair. A longer post-treatment observation time is necessary, though, in order to provide evidence for the permanence of the success of the method.

  6. Treatment of tattoos with a picosecond alexandrite laser: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Saedi, Nazanin; Metelitsa, Andrei; Petrell, Kathleen; Arndt, Kenneth A; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To study a picosecond 755-nm alexandrite laser for the removal of tattoos to confirm the efficacy of this therapy, focusing on the effect of therapy on the target lesion as well as the surrounding tissues and quantifying the number of necessary treatments. DESIGN Fifteen patients with tattoos were enrolled. Treatments were scheduled approximately 6 ± 2 weeks apart. Standard photographs using 2-dimensional imaging were taken at baseline, before each treatment, and 1 month and 3 months after the last treatment. SETTING Dermatology clinic at SkinCare Physicians in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. PATIENTS Fifteen patients with darkly pigmented tattoos. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Treatment efficacy was assessed by the level of tattoo clearance in standard photographs. These photographs were assessed by a blinded physician evaluator and based on a 4-point scale. Efficacy was also assessed based on physician and patient satisfaction measured on a 4-point scale. RESULTS Twelve of 15 patients with tattoos (80%) completed the study. All 12 patients obtained greater than 75% clearance. Nine patients (75%) obtained greater than 75% clearance after having 2 to 4 treatments. The average number of treatment sessions needed to obtain this level of clearance was 4.25. All 12 patients (100%) were satisfied or extremely satisfied with the treatment. Adverse effects included pain, swelling, and blistering. Pain resolved immediately after therapy, while the swelling and blistering resolved within 1 week. Hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation were reported at the 3-month follow-up. CONCLUSION The picosecond 755-nm alexandrite laser is a safe and very effective procedure for removing tattoo pigment.

  7. High efficiency cw laser-pumped tunable alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.T.; Shand, M.L.

    1983-10-01

    High efficiency cw alexandrite laser operation has been achieved. With longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity, a 51% output power slope efficiency has been measured. Including the transmission at the input coupler mirror, a quantum yield of 85% has been attained above threshold. Tunability from 726 to 802 nm has also been demonstrated. The low loss and good thermal properties make alexandrite ideal for cw laser operation.

  8. Laser lithotripsy of gallstones: alexandrite and rhodamine-6G versus coumarin dye laser: fragmentation and fiber burn-off in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberger, Juergen; Bredt, Marion; Mueller, Gudrun; Hahn, Eckhart G.; Ell, Christian

    1993-05-01

    In the following study three different pulsed laser lithotripsy systems were compared for the fine fragmentation of identical sets of natural and synthetic gallstones `in vitro.' Using a pulsed coumarin dye laser (504 nm), a pulsed rhodamine 6G dye laser (595 nm), and a pulsed Alexandrite laser (755 nm) a total of 184 concrements of known chemical composition, size, and weight were disintegrated to a fragment size of laser parameters. All stones could be reliably disintegrated using the three laser systems at the different settings tested. Even though in our experimental set up the rhodamine 6G dye laser showed the best results, theses were not statistically significant to results obtained with the coumarin dye and the Alexandrite laser at high pulse energies. The mean fiber burn-off of the Alexandrite laser at 80 mJ (Do80:195 mm/cm3 stone vol.) was however 5 to 81 fold higher than with all other laser systems, a fact of clinical relevance as far as possible side effects of the quartz material in the bile duct are not yet known.

  9. Alexandrite-laser performance at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Guch, S. Jr.; Jones, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    The performance of a flash-pumped alexandrite laser operating in a long-pulse mode has been characterized at temperatures from 34 to 310 /sup 0/C. Laser gain and efficiency increased monotonically up to 225 /sup 0/C, with a peak pulse energy there more than four times the value at 34 /sup 0/C. The output wavelength also increased monotonically from the 34 /sup 0/C value of 752 nm to a maximum of 790 nm at 310 /sup 0/C.

  10. Stable, red laser pumped, multi-kilohertz Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvy, Hamish; Withford, Michael J.; Piper, James A.

    2006-04-01

    Operation of a miniature Alexandrite laser pulse-pumped at 671 nm by a Q-switched, frequency-doubled, diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser is reported. Average power output ∼150 mW at 765 nm with optical-to-optical slope efficiencies of 28% has been demonstrated for gain-switched operation of the Alexandrite laser at 80 kHz. Q-switched pump-pulse stacking has been used to reduce output pulse width by a factor of 6 and increase peak power by a factor of 38 over gain-switched operation.

  11. Tattoo removal with the alexandrite laser: a clinical and histologic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard E.; Goldman, Mitchel P.

    1993-07-01

    The incident of tattoos in the United States is estimated to be in the range of 9 to 11% of the adult population. Various studies have shown that of these persons having tattoos, as many as 50 to 80% regret having gotten the tattoo and may desire tattoo removal. Previous treatment modalities have all used methods which require tissue destruction in order to remove the tattoo ink. The primary problems with use of these modalities has been the unpredictability of scarring. Also, residual tattoo pigment remaining after completion of the treatment process has been a problem. In response to these problems, the Q-switched lasers have been developed which target the tattoo pigments specifically rather than the tissue containing the tattoo pigment. The alexandrite laser (made by Candela Laser Corporation) has a wavelength of 755 nm and a pulse width of 100 nsec plus or minus 10 nsec. Reflectance studies have indicated that black, blue and green ink should absorb this wavelength relatively well, while red ink would not be expected to absorb this wavelength well. The mechanism of action of this laser is selective absorption of the laser energy by the tattoo pigment resulting in fragmentation of the pigment and then engulfment by tissue macrophages which remove the fragmented tattoo pigment. Preliminary studies using a Yucatan mini pig confirmed these expectations with black ink being easier to remove than blue and green, and red ink being minimally responsive. Higher fluences were more effective.

  12. Narrowband alexandrite laser injection seeded with frequency dithered diode laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary; Lee, H. S.; Prasad, Coorg

    1991-01-01

    Narrowband radiation is produced from a pulsed alexandrite laser when injection seeded with the output of a low power, tunable, continuous wave single mode diode laser. Injection seeded power oscillators are easier to frequency stabilize than etalon narrowed lasers, are more efficient and less prone to optical damage. AlGaAs diode lasers are available with wavelengths from 760 to 770 nm in the oxygen A band that can be used for differential absorption lidar remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature. Diodes with room temperature output at 740 nm may be cooled sufficiently to emit in the water vapor absorption band at 720-730 nm for humidity remote sensing. The diode laser linewidth of 200 MHz is sufficient to seed 2 or 3 longitudinal modes of the multi-transverse mode alexandrite laser, giving the pulsed laser a bandwidth of 0.007 to 0.014/cm.

  13. High efficiency >26 W diode end-pumped Alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Teppitaksak, Achaya; Minassian, Ara; Thomas, Gabrielle M; Damzen, Michael J

    2014-06-30

    We show for the first time that multi-ten Watt operation of an Alexandrite laser can be achieved with direct red diode-pumping and with high efficiency. An investigation of diode end-pumped Alexandrite rod lasers demonstrates continuous-wave output power in excess of 26W, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous diode end-pumping systems, and slope efficiency 49%, the highest reported for a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser. Wavelength tuning from 730 to 792nm is demonstrated using self-seeding feedback from an external grating. Q-switched laser operation based on polarization-switching to a lower gain axis of Alexandrite has produced ~mJ-pulse energy at 1kHz pulse rate in fundamental TEM(00) mode.

  14. Simultaneous visible and near-infrared emission from a pulse-stretched alexandrite laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boczar, Bruce; Thevar, Thanga; Rousseva, Ivelina; Kramer, Norman; Pryor, Brian; Frost, Rick

    2004-07-01

    An efficient method to make multi-spectral laser light having any selected pulsed duration in the range of 100 ns to 1 μs has been demonstrated in the laboratory. This laser system, based on the alexandrite tunable solid-state gain medium, which is tunable in its fundamental between 720 and 800 nm, was constructed near the gain maximum of 755 nm. A novel intracavity pulse-stretcher provides control of the pulse duration up to about 5 μs using the Pockels effect. In the demonstration prototype, however, the pulse duration was restricted to 500 ns to maintain the peak power needed for efficient nonlinear conversion. Following an amplification stage, Raman shifting in hydrogen gas was used to achieve efficient wavelength conversion to 1100 nm. The Raman shifted beam was frequency doubled to 550 nm using two BBO crystals arranged for walk-off compensation. The result was a convenient source of light whose spectral content, pulse duration, as well as other parameters, could be critically controlled.

  15. Injection Seeding Of A Q-Switched Alexandrite Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukowski, Barbara J. K.; Glesne, Thomas R.; Schwemmer, Geary; Czechanski, James P.; Kay, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    Experiment demonstrates that standing-wave, Q-switched, tunable alexandrite laser can be injection-seeded to increase stability of output frequency and significantly reduce bandwidth from 750 GHz to 180 MHz. Injecting laser acts as oscillator or master, while Q-switched laser into which ouput of seed laser injected acts as amplifier or slave.

  16. Laser alexandrite crystals grown by horizontal oriented crystallization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, V. V.; Tsvetkov, E. G.; Yurkin, A. M.

    2008-05-01

    Comparative studies were performed for alexandrite crystals, Al 2BeO 4:Cr 3+, employed in solid state lasers and grown by the horizontal oriented crystallization (HOC) technique and alexandrite crystals grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method. It was shown that the structural quality and possibilities of generation of stimulated emission HOC-crystals are similar to Cz-crystals, whereas their damage threshold is about three times higher. The obtained results and considerably lower cost price of HOC-alexandrite crystals prove their advantageous application in powerful laser systems, which require large laser rods with a higher resistance to laser beam. It is emphasized that application of HOC technique is promising for growth of laser crystals of other high-temperature oxide compounds.

  17. Remote sensing with a tunable alexandrite laser transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Kagann, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A high-resolution, tunable alexandrite laser system is described. Two alexandrite lasers are continuously tunable from 725-790 nm and have a bandwidth of 0.02/cm. The stability of the two lasers is evaluated. The line shape of the laser emission and spectral purity of the system were measured. The data reveal that the output consists of three axial modes with an overall width of 0.026/cm, and the spectral impurity of the alexandrite laser output is less than 0.01 percent. The ground-based lidar system is utilized for measuring atmospheric pressure profiles; the integrated absorption in the wings of lines in the O2 A band is studied to produce the profiles. An example of lidar-collected atmospheric pressure data is presented and compared with radiosonde data; only a 0.3 percent deviation between the data is observed.

  18. High efficiency CW green-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, J. W.; Brown, D. C.

    2006-02-01

    High power, CW and pulsed alexandrite lasers were produced by pumping the laser rod with a high quality diode pumped 532 nm laser sources. This pumping architecture provides stable performance with output power > 1.4 W at 767nm in the free running mode and 0.78W at 1000 Hz. An output of 80 mW at 375.5 nm was achieved at 500 Hz. This approach holds promise for the production of a scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  19. Diode-pumped Alexandrite ring laser for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, A.; Jungbluth, B.; Strotkamp, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.; Poprawe, R.; Höffner, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present design and performance data of a diode-pumped Q-switched Alexandrite ring laser in the millijoule regime, which is longitudinally pumped by laser diode bar modules in the red spectral range. As a first step, a linear resonator was designed and characterized in qcw operation as well as in Q-switched operation. Based on these investigations, two separate linear cavities were set up, each with one Alexandrite crystal longitudinally pumped by one diode module. The two cavities are fused together and form a ring cavity which yields up to 6 mJ pulse burst energy in the qcw regime at 770 nm.

  20. Injection seeded single mode alexandrite ring laser for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. Sang; Notari, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Along with many spectroscopic applications, atmospheric lidar measurements require a tunable, narrow band laser with a very high degree of spectral purity. A standing wave pulsed alexandrite laser tuned by injection seeding with an AlGaAs laser diode has demonstrated high stability. The standing wave cavity, however, poses several difficulties in light of the single mode operation and efficient seeding beam into the cavity. In order to overcome these problems and to operate the high power alexandrite laser in a single axial mode with a high spectral purity, a new ring laser system is being developed. The design features of the ring laser and some measurements of the laser characteristics are presented.

  1. Alexandrite laser transmitter development for airborne water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas H.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    In the DIAL technique, the water vapor concentration profile is determined by analyzing the lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned 'on' and 'off' a water vapor absorption line. Desired characteristics of the on-line transmitted laser beam include: pulse energy greater than or equal to 100 mJ, high-resolution tuning capability (uncertainty less than 0.25 pm), good spectral stability (jitter less than 0.5 pm about the mean), and high spectral purity (greater than 99 percent). The off-line laser is generally detuned less than 100 pm away from the water vapor line. Its spectral requirements are much less stringent. In our past research, we developed and demonstrated the airborne DIAL technique for water vapor measurements in the 720-nm spectral region using a system based on an alexandrite laser as the transmitter for the on-line wavelength and a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser for the off-line wavelength. This off-line laser has been replaced by a second alexandrite laser. Diode lasers are used to injection seed both lasers for frequency and linewidth control. This eliminates the need for the two intracavity etalons utilized in our previous alexandrite laser and thereby greatly reduces the risk of optical damage. Consequently, the transmitted pulse energy can be substantially increased, resulting in greater measurement range, higher data density, and increased measurement precision. In this paper, we describe the diode injection seed source, the two alexandrite lasers, and the device used to line lock the on-line seed source to the water vapor absorption feature.

  2. Potential of solar-simulator-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, Russell J.

    1990-01-01

    An attempt was made to pump an alexandrite laser rod using a Tamarak solar simulator and also a tungsten-halogen lamp. A very low optical laser cavity was used to achieve the threshold minimum pumping-power requirement. Lasing was not achieved. The laser threshold optical-power requirement was calculated to be approximately 626 W/sq cm for a gain length of 7.6 cm, whereas the Tamarak simulator produces 1150 W/sq cm over a gain length of 3.3 cm, which is less than the 1442 W/sq cm required to reach laser threshold. The rod was optically pulsed with 200 msec pulses, which allowed the alexandrite rod to operate at near room temperature. The optical intensity-gain-length product to achieve laser threshold should be approximately 35,244 solar constants-cm. In the present setup, this product was 28,111 solar constants-cm.

  3. High power continuous-wave Alexandrite laser with green pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Major, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    We report on a continuous-wave (CW) Alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) laser, pumped by a high power green source at 532 nm with a diffraction limited beam. An output power of 2.6 W at 755 nm, a slope efficiency of 26%, and wavelength tunability of 85 nm have been achieved using 11 W of green pump. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest CW output power of a high brightness laser pumped Alexandrite laser reported to date. The results obtained in this experiment can lead to the development of a high power tunable CW and ultrafast sources of the near-infrared or ultraviolet radiation through frequency conversion.

  4. Tunable ultraviolet laser source from a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuhang; Liu, Jingjiao; Wang, Lijun

    2007-11-01

    A tunable ultraviolet laser source in the spectrum range of 0.36-0.388 μm was obtained as second harmonics from a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser whose output covers the wave range over 0.72-0.78 μm. A LBO crystal was used as frequency doubling crystal. The phase mateching angle in the wide spectrum range of the crystal was calculated, and the crystal was cut in the way that the normal incidence at the center wavelength of the fundamental wave at the crystal. The output spectrum line was measured and the highest second harmonics conversion efficiency reached 1.2% from long pulse fundamental wave at the center wavelength.

  5. Broadly tunable, longitudinally diode-pumped Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strotkamp, M.; Witte, U.; Munk, A.; Hartung, A.; Gausmann, S.; Hengesbach, S.; Traub, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.; Hoeffner, J.; Jungbluth, B.

    2014-02-01

    We present design and first performance data of a broadly tunable Alexandrite laser longitudinally pumped by a newly developed high brightness single emitter diode laser module with output in the red spectral range. Replacing the flashlamps, which are usually used for pumping Alexandrite, will increase the efficiency and maintenance interval of the laser. The pump module is designed as an optical stack of seven single-emitter laser diodes. We selected an optomechanical concept for the tight overlay of the radiation using a minimal number of optical components for collimation, e.g. a FAC and a SAC lens, and focusing. The module provides optical output power of more than 14 W (peak pulse output in the focus) with a beam quality of M2 = 41 in the fast axis and M2 = 39 in the slow axis. The Alexandrite crystal is pumped from one end at a repetition rate of 35 Hz and 200μs long pump pulses. The temperature of the laser crystal can be tuned to between 30 °C and 190 °C using a thermostat. The diode-pumped Alexandrite laser reaches a maximum optical-optical efficiency of 20 % and a slope efficiency of more than 30 % in fundamental-mode operation (M2 < 1.10). When a Findlay-Clay analysis with four different output couplers is conducted, the round-trip loss of the cavity is determined to be around 1 %. The wavelength is tunable to between 755 and 788 nm via crystal temperature or between 745 and 805 nm via an additional Brewster prism.

  6. Design and performance of a 250 Hz alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sam, R.C.; Yeh, J.J.; Leslie, K.R.; Rapoport, W.R.

    1988-06-01

    The design, analysis, and performance of a 250 Hz alexandrite laser are described. Built as the wavelength selective laser for a molecular laser isotope separation program, the laser has to satisfy specifications on its tuning band, linewidth, output energy, temporal behavior, and repetition rate required by the process. The key design feature is the use of a tandem rod oscillator with concave curvature on rod ends for thermal lensing compensation. A model was developed to project the stability range and beam quality relative to repetition rate. The performance results of a delivered system are presented and future developments are discussed.

  7. Narrow-band tunable alexandrite laser with passive Q switching

    SciTech Connect

    Tyryshkin, I S; Ivanov, N A; Khulugurov, V M

    1998-06-30

    An alexandrite laser with a self-injection of narrow-band radiation into its cavity was developed. A Fabry - Perot interferometer and a diffraction grating were used as dispersive components in an additional cavity. The cavity was switched by an LiF crystal with F{sub 3}{sup -} colour centres. The laser generated a single pulse of {approx} 180 ns duration and of 1.5 mJ energy, and with a spectrum 5 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup -1} wide. The laser emitted in the spectral range 720 - 780 nm. (lasers, active media)

  8. Czochralski growth and laser performance of alexandrite crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X.; Zhang, B.; Wu, L.; Chen, M.

    1986-08-15

    Alexandrite (BeAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/:Cr/sup 3 +/) crystals have been growing by the Czochralski technique and continually tunable laser output with energy of 304 mJ and slope efficiency of 0.46% in the wavelength range from 735 to 786 nm has been obtained using c-axis rods. Tunable Q-switch pulse output and LiIO/sub 3/ double-frequency have been also obtained.

  9. Czochralski growth and laser performance of alexandrite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xing-an; Zhang, Bang-xing; Wu, Lu-sheng; Chen, Mei-Ling

    1986-08-01

    Alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) crystals have been growing by the Czochralski technique and continually tunable laser output with energy of 304 mJ and slope efficiency of 0.46% in the wavelength range from 735 to 786 nm has been obtained using c-axis rods. Tunable Q-switch pulse output and LiIO3 double-frequency have been also obtained.

  10. Investigation of the pump wavelength influence on pulsed laser pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvy, H.; Withford, M. J.; Mildren, R. P.; Piper, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    Recent theoretical modelling and experimental results have shown that excess lattice phonon energy created dur ing the non-radiative energy transfer from the 4T2 pump manifold to the 2E storage level in Alexandrite when pumped with wavelengths shorter than ˜645 nm causes chaotic lasing output. Shorter pump wavelengths have also been associated with increased non-radiative energy decay and reduced laser efficiency. We report studies of fluorescence emission spectra of Alexandrite illuminated at a range of wavelengths from green to red, which demonstrate reduced fluorescence yield for shorter pump wavelengths at elevated crystal temperatures. Investigations of pulsed laser pumping of Alexandrite over the same spectral range demonstrated reduced pump threshold energy for longer pump wavelengths. High repetition rate pulsed pumping of Alexandrite at 532, 578 and 671 nm showed stable and efficient laser performance was only achieved for red pumping at 671 nm. These results support the theoretical model and demonstrate the potential for scalable, red laser pumped, all-solid-state Alexandrite lasers.

  11. Megahertz pulse-burst alexandrite laser diagnostic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luff, Jon David

    Megahertz pulse-burst laser systems coupled with megahertz-rate framing cameras have proven (over the last ten years) to be very robust in imaging of high-speed reacting and nonreacting supersonic flows. These Nd:YAG systems produce 20--30 pulses (at variable rates from 500 kHz to 1 MHz) with 50--100 mJ/pulse (lambda = 1064nm) and have been used with narrow, spectral-linewidth, iodine, atomic filters to image turbulence in supersonic boundary layers with great success (when operating at lambda = 532nm). To extend this pulse-burst capability at other wavelengths (wavelengths outside of the 5--30 GHz tuning range of Nd:YAG: lambda = 1064 nm fundamental, and lambda = 532 nm second harmonic), two unique, tunable, megahertz-rate alexandrite laser systems were designed and built. This dissertation documents these two systems and discusses the potential for tunable, megahertz, pulse-burst systems that have more tuning range than Nd:YAG. These tunable alexandrite systems substantially extend the wavelength range of pulse-burst laser technology, but, to date, have pulse-energy limitations. Tunable from 710 nm to 800 nm (in the fundamental), these lasers provide researchers one laser to reach multiple molecular or atomic resonances with variable pulse-burst pulse separations. The molecular and atomic species of interest in reacting and nonreacting flows are presented in Chapter 1, providing a road-map for the development of these tunable lasers. This dissertation presents the design and development of these systems, including mode control, Herriott cell design for pulse separation, and the megahertz-tuning ringmaster-oscillator. Chapter 2 covers the physics of alexandrite as a solid-state, lamp-pumped, tunable medium and compares it to the tunability of Ti:sapphire. Chapter 3 and 4 present the pulse-burst alexandrite systems. The first system, built in Princeton's Applied Physics group (PAPG) (Chapter 3), produced 1-5 mJ total pulse-packet energy of 20--30 pulses, or

  12. Soft X-Ray Emission from Alexandrite Laser-Matter-Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-15

    34AD-A267 905 NRL/MR/6681--93-7359 Soft X-ray Emission from Alexandrite Laser-Matter-Interaction P. G. BURKHALTER Dvnamit s of Solids Branch Condensed...Soft X-ray Emission from Alexandrite Laser-Matter-Interaction 6. AUTHOR(S) P.G. Burkhalter, D.J. Harter*, E.F. Gabl**, P. Bado**, and D.A. Newman*** 7...Proscribed by ANSI Std 230-13 290-102 SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM ALEXANDRITE LASER-MATTER-INTERACTION Accesion For NTIS CRA&I DTIC TAB Unannounced 5

  13. Intracavity frequency doubling of {mu}s alexandrite laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkmann, R.; Schoof, K.

    1994-12-31

    Intracavity second harmonic generation (SHG) with a three mirror folded cavity configuration was investigated with a flashlamp pumped, Q-switched Alexandrite laser. The authors therefore used different nonlinear optical crystals to convert the fundamental 750 nm radiation into the near UV spectral ,range (3 75 nm). The laser pulses were stretched into the {mu}s time domain by an electronic feedback system regulating the losses of the resonator. They investigated the conversion efficiency for different pulse lengths as well as the effect of pulse-lengthening due to the nonlinearity of the intracavity losses introduced by the optical crystal used. Working with BBO-crystals, they were able to achieve a second harmonic output of 25 mJ per pulse at 375 mn with a temporal rectangular pulse of 1 {mu}s in length and a stable nearly gaussian shaped beam profile.

  14. Tuning and scanning control system for high resolution alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James C.; Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1988-01-01

    An alexandrite laser is spectrally narrowed and tuned by the use of three optical elements. Each element provides a successively higher degree of spectral resolution. The digitally controlled tuning and scanning control servo system simultaneously positions all three optical elements to provide continuous high resolution laser spectral tuning. The user may select manual, single, or continuous modes of automated scanning of ranges up to 3.00/cm and at scan rates up to 3.85/cm/min. Scanning over an extended range of up to 9.999/cm may be achieved if the highest resolution optic is removed from the system. The control system is also capable of being remotely operated by another computer or controller via standard RS-232 serial data link.

  15. Injection seeding of a Q-switched alexandrite laser: Study of frequency stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Lamarr A.

    1992-01-01

    AlGaAs diode lasers were used to injection seed a pulsed Q-switched alexandrite laser which produces a narrowband of radiation. Injection seeding is a method for achieving linewidths of less than 500 mega-Hz in the output of the broadband, tunable solid state laser. When the laser was set at a current of 59.8 milli-A and a temperature of 14.04 C, the wavelength was 767.6 nano-m. The Q-switched alexandrite laser was injection seeded and frequency stabilization was studied. The linewidth requirement was met, but the stability requirement was not due to drifting in the feedback voltage. Improvements on injection seeding should focus on increasing the feedback voltage to the laser diode, filtering the laser diode by using temperature controlled narrowband filters, and the use of diamond (SiC) grating placed inside the alexandrite laser's resonator cavity.

  16. Low-magnification unstable resonators used with ruby and alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Walling, J.C.

    1986-11-01

    Low-magnification unstable resonators that utilize radially birefringent elements and that have been shown to be suitable for use with ruby and alexandrite lasers are described. From these resonators, 400 mJ of energy in a Q-switched pulse with --2.5 x diffraction-limited output has been obtained from alexandrite, and 250-mJ Q-switched output that is near diffraction limited has been obtained from ruby.

  17. Moire modulation transfer function of alexandrite rods and their thresholds as lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kafri, O.; Samelson, H.; Chin, T.; Heller, D.F.

    1986-04-01

    We show that there is a simple correlation between the modulation transfer function (MTF) of alexandrite laser rods and the thresholds of these rods as cw lasers. Thus the MTF provides a novel and important way to evaluate material (before or after fabrication) for use in solid-state lasers. This approach should be generally applicable to all solid-state laser materials.

  18. Stabilization and spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    A description of an optical system used to lock the alexandrite laser frequency on a water vapor absorption line is presented. The laser spectral characteristics, which include the spectral purity, the effect of the laser linewidth on the absorption, and the laser wavelength stability, are evaluated.

  19. Lasing properties of chromium-aluminum-doped forsterite pumped with an alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, E.G.; Jani, M.G.; Powell, R.C. ); Verdun, H.R. ); Pinto, A. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on the lasing properties of chromium-aluminum-doped forsterite that were investigated using a tunable alexandrite laser as the pump source. Results of measurements of the lasing threshold, slope efficiency, spectral, and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, and the time delay between the alexandrite pump pulse and the laser emission are presented for pump wavelengths of 770, 746, and 730 nm and different pump beam energies. Laser rate equations are developed to model the lasing center as a four-level system and applied to the case of 746 nm pumping.

  20. Alexandrite laser characterization and airborne lidar developments for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, P.; Higdon, N. S.; Grossmann, B. E.; Browell, E. V.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of an Alexandrite laser used for making water vapor DIAL measurements have been evaluated. The optical servo-system used to lock the laser wavelength on a water vapor absorption line is described. A brief description of the DIAL system is given and the data obtained with this lidar during flight tests in March 1990 are also presented.

  1. Faun tail nevus and spinal dysraphism: cosmetic improvement with alexandrite laser epilation.

    PubMed

    Kaptanoglu, Asli Feride; Kaptanoglu, Erkan

    2011-12-01

    Faun-tail presents as an abnormal lumbosacral hypertrischosis and may be associated with spinal dysrasphism. In addition to the problems due to spinal anomalies, patient's physico-social life may also be affected. Here, we report a case of 13 years old female patient with Faun-tail in association with sypinal dysraphism, in which cosmetic improvement was achieved with the help of Alexandrite laser. Alexandrite laser can be the method of choice for permanent hair removal method due to its safe, effective and easy to apply properties.

  2. Faun Tail Nevus and Spinal Dysraphism: Cosmetic Improvement with Alexandrite Laser Epilation

    PubMed Central

    Kaptanoglu, Erkan

    2011-01-01

    Faun-tail presents as an abnormal lumbosacral hypertrischosis and may be associated with spinal dysrasphism. In addition to the problems due to spinal anomalies, patient's physico-social life may also be affected. Here, we report a case of 13 years old female patient with Faun-tail in association with sypinal dysraphism, in which cosmetic improvement was achieved with the help of Alexandrite laser. Alexandrite laser can be the method of choice for permanent hair removal method due to its safe, effective and easy to apply properties. PMID:22346261

  3. Use of an Intravitreal Dexamethasone Implant (Ozurdex) in a Case with Accidental Foveal Photocoagulation by Alexandrite Laser.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Muhammed Nurullah; Çallı, Ümit; Göktaş, Eren; Bulut, Kezban; Kandemir, Baran; Özertürk, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Alexandrite laser is one of the most common methods of hair removal. Its utilization is gradually increasing due to easy accessibility and high effectiveness. However, the disuse of protective goggles during the application of this laser is a serious problem. In this case report, we presented a 35-year-old male patient who had foveal injury by alexandrite laser. The inflammatory process secondary to the foveal injury and subsequent macular edema were treated with Ozurdex because of its potent antiedematous effect.

  4. Wavemeter measurements of frequency stability of an injection seeded alexandrite laser for pressure and temperature lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. R.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Korb, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GSFC pressure-temperature lidar is a differential absorption lidar operating in the oxygen A band absorption region (760 to 770 nm), and utilizes two tunable pulsed alexandrite lasers. For obtaining temperature measurements with an accuracy of less than or = 1 K, it has been determined that the stability of the online laser frequency over a period of time corresponding to a set of measurements, 0.1 to 30 min, has to be better than +/- 0.002/cm. In addition, the requirements on laser spectral bandwidth and spectral purity are less than or = 0.02/cm and greater than or = 99.9 percent, respectively. Injection seeding with a stabilized AlGaAs diode laser was used to achieve the required frequency stability and spectral bandwidth. A high resolution Fizeau wavemeter was employed to determine the frequency stability of the pulsed alexandrite laser and determine its bandwidth, mode structure. We present the results of measurements of the frequency stability and the spectrum of the injection seeded alexandrite laser.

  5. Laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, there have been numerous advances in hair laser removal that utilize melanin as a chromophore. All of the devices on the market may be used in patients with light skin (phototypes I-III) and yield hair reduction near 75%. The ruby (694 nm) laser, alexandrite (755 nm) laser, and diode (810 nm) laser, as well as intense pulsed light are commonly used devices for hair laser removal. The long-pulsed Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser represents the safest device for hair removal in dark-skinned patients because of its long wavelength, although the diode laser, alexandrite laser, and intense pulse light may be used. For treatment of light hair, combination radiofrequency and optical devices as well as photodynamic therapy are under investigation.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of hot molecular oxygen in flames using an alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Johannes; Zhou, Bo; Zetterberg, Johan; Li, Zhongshan; Alden, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The use of an alexandrite laser for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and imaging of molecular oxygen in thermally excited vibrational states is demonstrated. The laser radiation after the third harmonic generation was used to excite the B-X (0-7) band at 257 nm in the Schumann-Runge system of oxygen. LIF emission was detected between 270 and 380 nm, revealing distinct bands of the transitions from B(0) to highly excited vibrational states in the electronic ground state, X (v > 7). At higher spectral resolution, these bands reveal the common P- and R-branch line splitting. Eventually, the proposed LIF approach was used for single-shot imaging of the two-dimensional distribution of hot oxygen molecules in flames.

  7. Er:YAG and alexandrite laser radiation propagation in the root canal and its effect on bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Duskova, Jana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shoji, Shigeru; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal

    1999-05-01

    The goal of the study was to verify differences between the alexandrite and Er:YAG laser energy distribution in the root canal and in the surrounding dentin and bone tissues. For the experiment, two lasers were prepared: the Er:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm) with a delivery system fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide ended by a special sapphire tip and the alexandrite laser (λ=0.75 μm) with a silicon fiber. The Er:YAG laser was operated in a free-running mode, the length of the generated pulses was 250 μsec and the output energy ranged from 100 to 350 mJ. The pulse length of the free- running alexandrite laser was 70 μsec and the output energy was ranged from 80 up to 200 mJ. For the experiment prepared root canals of molars were used. It was ascertained that the radiation of the alexandrite laser passes through the root canal and hits the surrounding tissue. Nocardia asteroids, Filaments, Micrococcus albus, Lactobacillus sp and Streptococcus sanguis colonies were treated by the Er:YAG or alexandrite laser radiation. The surface was checked by scanning electron microscopy. From the result it follows that the Er:YAG laser destroyed microbial colonies but the differences is in the depth of the affected area.

  8. Frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser for use in periodontology: a scanning electron microscopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas

    1996-12-01

    During prior studies it could be demonstrated that engaging a frequency double Alexandrite-laser allows a fast and strictly selective ablation of supra- and subgingival calculus. Furthermore, the removal of unstained microbial plaque was observed. First conclusions were drawn following light microscopic investigations on undecalcified sections of irradiated teeth. In the present study the cementum surface after irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite-laser was observed by means of a scanning electron microscope. After irradiation sections of teeth were dried in alcohol and sputtered with gold. In comparison irradiated cementum surfaces of unerupted operatively removed wisdom teeth and tooth surfaces after the selective removal of calculus were investigated. A complete removal of calculus was observed as well as a remaining smooth surface of irradiated cementum.

  9. Synthesis of magnetite particles by pulsed alexandrite laser processing of metallic glass precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Sorescu, M.; Schafer, S.A.; Knobbe, E.T.

    1996-12-31

    Samples of Fe{sub 78}B{sub 13}Si{sub 9} and Fe{sub 81}B{sub 13.5}Si{sub 3.5}C{sub 2} metallic glasses were irradiated with a pulsed alexandrite laser ({lambda} = 750 nm, {tau} = 60 {micro}s) using different laser fluences. Kinetics of laser-induced phase transformations and fluence dependence of magnetic properties were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Low laser fluences were found to induce changes in magnetic texture and onset of crystallization. High laser fluences, however, correlated with additional oxidation effects and the formation of stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles in the irradiated alloy system. An activation energy of 11.9 eV was estimated for the laser-driven synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. Pulsed alexandrite laser processing is an intriguing alternative technique for the controlled synthesis of iron oxide phases from ferromagnetic glass precursors.

  10. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  11. Use of an Intravitreal Dexamethasone Implant (Ozurdex) in a Case with Accidental Foveal Photocoagulation by Alexandrite Laser

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Muhammed Nurullah; Çallı, Ümit; Göktaş, Eren; Bulut, Kezban; Kandemir, Baran; Özertürk, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Alexandrite laser is one of the most common methods of hair removal. Its utilization is gradually increasing due to easy accessibility and high effectiveness. However, the disuse of protective goggles during the application of this laser is a serious problem. In this case report, we presented a 35-year-old male patient who had foveal injury by alexandrite laser. The inflammatory process secondary to the foveal injury and subsequent macular edema were treated with Ozurdex because of its potent antiedematous effect. PMID:27293415

  12. Alexandrite-pumped alexandrite regenerative amplifier for femtosecond pulse amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, A.; Fermann, M.E.; Stock, M.L.; Harter, D.J.; Squier, J.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate a regenerative amplifier incorporating alexandrite as the gain medium that is pumped by an alexandrite laser. Temperature-altered gain permitted the 728-nm alexandrite pump laser, operating at room temperature, to pump a 780{endash}800-nm alexandrite laser that was maintained at elevated temperatures. 200-fs pulses from a Ti:sapphire oscillator were amplified to the millijoule level. This system also amplified femtosecond pulses from a frequency-doubled Er-doped fiber laser. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  13. Theoretical and experimental analysis of injection seeding a Q-switched alexandrite laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. R.; Lee, H. S.; Glesne, T. R.; Monosmith, B.; Schwemmer, G. K.

    1991-01-01

    Injection seeding is a method for achieving linewidths of less than 500 MHz in the output of broadband, tunable, solid state lasers. Dye lasers, CW and pulsed diode lasers, and other solid state lasers have been used as injection seeders. By optimizing the fundamental laser parameters of pump energy, Q-switched pulse build-up time, injection seed power and mode matching, one can achieve significant improvements in the spectral purity of the Q-switched output. These parameters are incorporated into a simple model for analyzing spectral purity and pulse build-up processes in a Q-switched, injection-seeded laser. Experiments to optimize the relevant parameters of an alexandrite laser show good agreement.

  14. Applications of a single-longitudinal-mode alexandrite laser for diagnostics of parameters of combustion interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. S.; Afzelius, M.; Zetterberg, J.; Aldén, M.

    2004-10-01

    We report on the applications of a single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) pulsed alexandrite laser system for diagnostics of parameters of flow/combustion interest. The laser system is characterized by its narrow linewidth, high peak power, and broad tunablity. The absolute frequency of the laser output was monitored by a wavelength diagnostic system, which included a high-resolution confocal etalon and a molecular iodine laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system. Different nonlinear frequency conversion schemes were used to cover a large frequency range from the infrared to the deep UV. The versatility of the laser system for flow/combustion diagnostics is demonstrated in three applications, namely filtered Rayleigh scattering, high-resolution Doppler-free two-photon LIF of CO, and infrared LIF and polarization spectroscopy of CO2. The potential impacts of using this SLM laser system in laser flow/combustion diagnostic applications are discussed.

  15. Alexandrite effect spectropyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2006-08-01

    Alexandrite crystal is commonly used for making alexandrite laser, and it also has a less-known phenomenon called the alexandrite effect that refers to the color change between different light sources. A novel spectropyrometer for temperature measurement of a radiating body utilizing the alexandrite effect is introduced. The alexandrite effect method for temperature measurement is based on the relationship between the temperature of blackbody and the hue-angle in the CIELAB color space. The alexandrite effect spectropyrometer consists of an optical probe, a spectrometer, a computer, and an alexandrite filter. It measures the spectral power distribution of a radiating body through the alexandrite filter, calculates the hue-angle, and determines the temperature. The spectropyrometer is suitable for temperature measurement of any radiating body with or without spectral lines in its spectral power distribution from 1000 K to 100000 K. The spectropyrometer is particularly useful for high to ultrahigh temperature measurement of any radiating bodies with spectral line emissions, such as electric arcs and discharges, plasmas, and high temperature flames.

  16. Optimization of the alexandrite laser tuning elements for a water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of some of the developments completed on an alexandrite laser for making water vapor DIAL measurements is presented in this paper. A computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons has been implemented and recently tested in an aircraft environment. Long-term frequency drift (i.e., 2 hours) of less than 0.7 pm has been observed in the laboratory. An alignment technique to get the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons is also developed.

  17. Alexandrite laser frequency doubling in. beta. -BaB/sub 2/O/sub 4/ crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Yeh, J.

    1988-10-01

    Efficient and tunable coherent ultraviolet (360--390 nm) generation in ..beta..-BaB/sub 2/O/sub 4/ crystals using type-I phase matching at room temperature is presented. The phase-matching angle is characterized with an alexandrite laser with a wavelength tuning range of 725--785 nm. The crystal angular bandwidth of 0.9 mrad-cm and spectral bandwidth of 1.15 nm-cm are also measured. UV output pulse energy of 105 mJ at 378 nm with 31% energy conversion efficiency is achieved.

  18. Airborne Lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile with tunable Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Milrod, J.; Walden, H.

    1986-01-01

    The first remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile made from an airborne platform are described. The measurements utilize a differential absorption lidar and tunable solid state Alexandrite lasers. The pressure measurement technique uses a high resolution oxygen A band where the absorption is highly pressure sensitive due to collision broadening. Absorption troughs and regions of minimum absorption were used between pairs of stongly absorption lines for these measurements. The trough technique allows the measurement to be greatly desensitized to the effects of laser frequency instabilities. The lidar system was set up to measure pressure with the on-line laser tuned to the absorption trough at 13147.3/cm and with the reference laser tuned to a nonabsorbing frequency near 13170.0/cm. The lidar signal returns were sampled with a 200 range gate (30 vertical resoltion) and averaged over 100 shots.

  19. Characterization of cobalt doped ZnSe and ZnS crystals as saturable absorbers for alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Robert A.; Kernal, John; Fedorov, Vladimir V.; Mirov, Sergey B.

    2006-02-01

    Cobalt doped ZnSe and ZnS crystals have been studied to determine their effectiveness for passive Q-switching for 700-800nm spectral range (Alexandrite laser). Samples were prepared using Bridgeman technique for single-step growth of Co doped crystals as well as after growth thermal diffusion of Co in undoped crystals. ZnS:Co:Cr crystals, which have been produced using the Bridgeman technique, show maximum initial absorption coefficients of 17 cm -1 at 725nm. Experimental results are reported on effective thermal diffusion of Co 2+ in ZnSe and ZnS polycrystals and thermal diffusion constants of cobalt ions in ZnSe and ZnS are estimated. The nonlinear saturation properties of cobalt doped ZnSe and ZnS crystals have been investigated experimentally. The induced transparency measurements were performed using electro-optically Q-switched, alexandrite laser radiation at 731, 741, and 778 nm with a pulse duration of about 70 ns. The induced transmission measurements were analyzed using a four-level absorber model and the absorption cross sections have been estimated at both 731nm and 741nm to be 9.5 × 10 -18 cm2 and 8.2 × 10 -18 cm2, respectively. Absorption cross sections calculated from saturation measurements at 4A II--> 4T I(4P) transition are in agreement with results earlier reported for mid-infrared spectral region 4A II--> 4T II of Co 2+ ions. The described Co-doped crystals are very promising as passive Q-switches for alexandrite laser resonators. Co 2+ centers feature high cross section of saturation and their absorption bands are nicely matched to the spectral emission of the tunable alexandrite laser. An efficient ZnS:Co:Cr passive Q-switching of the alexandrite laser cavity was realized with output energy of 15 mJ and 50 ns pulse duration.

  20. Periodontal treatment with the frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser in dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas; Reichart, Peter

    2000-03-01

    While earlier periodontal investigations have proved the frequency doubled Alexandrite laser to eliminate efficiently and selectively dental calculus as well as bacteria the aim of this study was to demonstrate the safety of this laser for removal of dental calculus with respect to the dental pulp. Four adult Labrador dogs were treated with a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (laboratory prototype, q-switched, fiber guided, wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 1 microsecond, pulse repetition rate 70 Hz, water cooling) to remove dental calculus. After performing a modified Widman flap procedure the buccal surface of nine teeth in the lower and upper right jaw were irradiated for four minutes per tooth. Three different laser fluences up to four times higher than the fluence required for calculus removal were used (1.5, 3 and 6 J/cm2). At three other sites of the right jaw deep cavities were prepared with a dental drill and filled with compomere material (DyractR, Dentsply, Germany) to serve as a positive control with regard to possible pulpal reactions. The corresponding teeth of the lower and upper left jaw served as controls. Animals were sacrificed one day, one week, four weeks and six weeks after treatment. Teeth were separated, fixed in formalin and decalcified. After embedding and sectioning the histological sections were stained and investigated by a totally blinded investigator (P.A.R). Histological investigations revealed that irradiation with the frequency doubled Alexandrite laser for periodontal treatment with fluences of 1.5 J/cm2 -- those fluences necessary for the selective removal of dental calculus and microbial plaque -- had no adverse side effects to the pulpal tissues. Moreover this pulpal safety study demonstrated that even applying fluences two or four times higher than those suggested for calculus removal do not lead to observable changes or alterations in the odontoblast cell layer or the pulpal tissues. No inflammatory reactions and no

  1. Fibre-coupled red diode-pumped Alexandrite TEM00 laser with single and double-pass end-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabzadah, E. A.; Damzen, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report the investigation of an Alexandrite laser end-pumped by a fibre-coupled red diode laser module. Power, efficiency, spatial, spectral, and wavelength tuning performance are studied as a function of pump and laser cavity parameters. It is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of greater than 1 W power and also highest laser slope efficiency (44.2%) in a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser with diffraction-limited TEM00 mode operation. Spatial quality was excellent with beam propagation parameter M 2 ~ 1.05. Wavelength tuning from 737-796 nm was demonstrated using an intracavity birefringent tuning filter. Using a novel double pass end-pumping scheme to get efficient absorption of both polarisation states of the scrambled fibre-delivered diode pump, a total output coupled power of 1.66 W is produced in TEM00 mode with 40% slope efficiency.

  2. High average power, narrow band 248 nm alexandrite laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Kuper, J.W.; Chin, T.C.; Papanestor, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    A compact line-narrowed 248 nm solid state laser source operating at 15 mJ {at} 100 Hz PRF was demonstrated. Constraints due to thermal loading of components were addressed. Tradeoffs between pulse energy and repetition rate were investigated. A method for overcoming thermal dephasing in the THG material was achieved by scanning a slab shaped crystal.

  3. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kozub, John A; Shen, Jin-H; Joos, Karen M; Prasad, Ratna; Hutson, M Shane

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-µm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 µm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 µm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 µm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (~100-µm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies>1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (~300-µm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications.

  4. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, John A.; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Shane Hutson, M.

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-μm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 μm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 μm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 μm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (˜100-μm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies >1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (˜300-μm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications.

  5. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    PubMed Central

    Kozub, John A.; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Shane Hutson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-μm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43  μm), pulse energy (up to 3  mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600  μm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09  μm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (∼100-μm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies >1  mJ). When the beam is softly focused (∼300-μm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications. PMID:26456553

  6. Diode-pumped Alexandrite lasers in Q-switched and cavity-dumped Q-switched operation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G M; Minassian, A; Sheng, X; Damzen, M J

    2016-11-28

    We present the first study of Q-switched Alexandrite lasers under continuous-wave diode-pumping with operation up to 10 kHz repetition rates in TEM00, with spatial quality M2 1.15. With a pulsed-diode dual-end-pumped design, pulse energy is scaled to a record level of 3 mJ. We also demonstrate, for the first time, cavity-dumped Q-switching of diode-pumped Alexandrite lasers under continuous-wave and pulsed diode-pumping, up to 10 kHz. Pulse energy of 510 μJ is demonstrated with 3 ns pulse duration and 170 kW peak power, in TEM00 with M2 < 1.2. Second harmonic generation of the cavity-dumped Q-switched pulses was used to generate UV wavelength 379 nm with conversion efficiency of 47%.

  7. Treatment of persistent Mongolian spots with Q-switched alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kagami, Shinji; Asahina, Akihiko; Uwajima, Yuta; Miyamoto, Akie; Yamada, Daisuke; Shibata, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Mizuho; Masui, Yuri; Sato, Shinichi

    2012-11-01

    Mongolian spots are congenital and confluent hyperpigmented areas that are usually grayish blue in color. They are found most frequently in the sacral region in infants and typically disappear during childhood. Occasionally, they persist to adulthood. We retrospectively examined outcomes of laser treatment of persistent Mongolian spots. We used Q-switched alexandrite laser to treat persistent Mongolian spots of 16 Japanese patients at 14 years old or older. A good therapeutic outcome was achieved overall; however, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation were observed in two patients, respectively. While laser treatment was effective for all seven patients with extrasacral Mongolian spots, four out of ten patients with sacral Mongolian spots were refractory to treatment. Of these patients, two received laser irradiation only twice and abandoned treatment, simply because of unsatisfactory results without any adverse events. The other two patients received treatments at intervals of 3 months, which resulted in postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. Contrary to children, who generally show good response after two or three sessions of irradiation, we should consider more frequent irradiation, longer intervals between treatment sessions, and use of bleaching creams in the treatment of persistent sacral Mongolian spots in adults.

  8. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, Nabil M.

    1987-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for three different sets of relaxation rates. These rates correspond to: (1) Far Infrared (FIR) Raman lasers in the diabatic collision regime without consideration of coupled population decay in a closed system, (2) Raman FIR lasers in the diabatic collision regime with coupled population conserving decay, and (3) IR Raman gain in cesium vapor. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  9. Partial unilateral lentiginosis treated with alexandrite Q-switched laser: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pretel, Maider; Irarrazaval, Isabel; Aguado, Leyre; Lera, José Miguel; Navedo, María; Giménez de Azcárate, Ana

    2013-08-01

    Partial unilateral lentiginosis (PUL) is a rare pigmentary disorder characterized by multiple lentigines grouped within an area of normal skin, often in a segmental pattern and appearing at birth or in childhood. There is no established standard treatment for this condition. We present two cases of PUL succesfully treated with alexandrite Q-switched laser. In our cases, this laser proved to be a safe and effective treatment for cosmetically disfiguring lentigines. Special precautions are needed when treating dark-skinned patients because side effects are more likely. We propose that this modality be considered in the treatment of this rare disorder.

  10. Effects of hair removal alexandrite laser on biometric parameters of the skin.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Shiva; Abolhasani, Ehsan; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammadali

    2016-04-01

    The effects of alexandrite laser (AL) on skin parameters such as melanin content, skin layer depth, elasticity, and density have not been investigated through biometric methods. We aim to assess the effect of AL on the skin parameters through biometric devices to determine whether it has positive effects on treated region. In this pretest-posttest study, we recruited patients who attended Laser Clinic of Skin and Stem Cell Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, from January through December 2014. Patients had to be free of any dermatologic conditions and lesion at the site of treatment or any contraindication to laser therapy. Baseline measurements were performed and patients received four sessions of AL therapy (spot size, 12 mm; fluence, 12 J/cm(2); and pulse width, 5 Hz) with 4-week intervals. Four weeks after the last treatment session, the same parameters were assessed that included skin color, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), dermis and epidermis density and depth (through skin ultrasonography), melanin content, erythema intensity, and skin elasticity. Biometric parameters of 33 patients (27 females [81.8%]), with mean (SD) age of 35.7 (9.5) years were evaluated. The mean percent changes of skin parameters were as follows: skin color, 5.88% through Visioface and by 56.8% through Colorimeter devices (became lighter); melanin content, -15.95%; TEWL, -2.96%; elasticity, +14.88%; dermis depth -19.01%; and dermis density, +1580.11% (P < 0.001 for changes in each parameter). AL could decrease melanin content of the skin and make the skin thinner while it could increase elasticity and density of epidermis and dermis, which might indicate increased collagen content of skin.

  11. Experimental retinectomy with a 6.1 μm Q-switched Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Kozub, John; Ivanov, Borislav; Agarwal, Anita; Shen, Jin H.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: It is hypothesized that 6.1 μm produced by a portable laser would be useful for incising tissue layers such as performing a retinectomy in detached retina with extensive anterior proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Methods: An alexandrite laser system, which provides a high-intensity Q-switched pulse (780 nm, 50-100 ns duration, 10 Hz), is wavelength-shifted by a two-stage stimulated Raman conversion process into the 6-7 μm range (Light Age, Inc.). Fresh cadaver porcine retinas were lased with 6.1 μm using a 200 μm diameter spot at 0.6 mJ after removal of the vitreous. Specimens were examined grossly and prepared for histological examination. Results: The Raman-shifted alexandrite laser produced a smooth Gaussian profile. A narrow spectrum was produced at 6.1 μm. A full-thickness retinal incision with minimal thermal damage was obtained at a low energy level of 0.6 mJ in the retinas. However, the depth of the incision did vary from an incomplete incision to a full-thickness incision involving the underlying choroidal layer in attached retinas. Conclusions: The 6.1 μm mid-infrared energy produced by a portable laser is capable of incising detached retinas with minimal thermal damage.

  12. Optic nerve sheath fenestration using a Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    PubMed Central

    Kozub, John; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Hutson, M. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Optic nerve sheath fenestration is an established procedure for relief of potentially damaging overpressure on the optic nerve resulting from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Prior work showed that a mid-IR free-electron laser could be delivered endoscopically and used to produce an effective fenestration. This study evaluates the efficacy of fenestration using a table-top mid-IR source based on a Raman-shifted alexandrite (RSA) laser. Study Design/Materials and Methods Porcine optic nerves were ablated using light from an RSA laser at wavelengths of 6.09, 6.27 and 6.43 μm and pulse energies up to 3 mJ using both free-space and endoscopic beam delivery through 250-μm I.D. hollow-glass waveguides. Waveguide transmission was characterized, ablation thresholds and etch rates were measured, and the efficacy of endoscopic fenestration was evaluated for ex vivo exposures using both optical coherence tomography and histological analysis. Results Using endoscopic delivery, the RSA laser can effectively fenestrate porcine optic nerves. Performance was optimized at a wavelength of 6.09 μm and delivered pulse energies of 0.5-0.8 mJ (requiring 1.5-2.5 mJ to be incident on the waveguide). Under these conditions, the ablation threshold fluence was 0.8 ± 0.2 J/cm2, the ablation rate was 1-4 μm/pulse, and the margins of ablation craters showed little evidence of thermal or mechanical damage. Nonetheless, nominally identical exposures yielded highly variable ablation rates. This led to fenestrations that ranged from too deep to too shallow – either damaging the underlying optic nerve or requiring additional exposure to cut fully through the sheath. Of 48 excised nerves subjected to fenestration at 6.09 μm, 16 ex vivo fenestrations were judged as good, 23 as too deep, and 9 as too shallow. Conclusions Mid-IR pulses from the RSA laser, propagated through a flexible hollow waveguide, are capable of cutting through porcine optic nerve sheaths in

  13. Generation of 0. 7--0. 8. mu. picosecond pulses in an alexandrite laser with passive mode locking

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsyn, V.N.; Matrosov, V.N.; Orekhova, V.P.; Pestryakov, E.V.; Sevast'yanov, B.K.; Trunov, V.I.; Zenin, V.N.; Remigailo, Y.L.

    1982-03-01

    Picosecond pulses of 0.7--0.8 ..mu.. wavelengths were generated in an alexandrite laser as a result of electronic--vibrational transitions /sup 4/T/sub 2/ ..-->.. /sup 4/A/sub 2/+h..omega../sub phonon/. Passive mode locking was ensured by the use of DS1 and DTTS saturable absorbers. The duration of the pulses generated using DS1 was 8 psec at wavelengths of 0.725--0.745 ..mu.., whereas the duration of the pulses generated using DTTS was 90 psec in the range 0.75--0.775 ..mu...

  14. Light and scanning electron microscope investigations comparing calculus removal using an Er:YAG laser and a frequency-doubled alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas; Sadegh, Hamid M. M.; Goldin, Dan S.

    1997-05-01

    With respect to lasers emitting within the mid-IR spectral domain fiber applicators are being developed. Intended is the use of these lasers in periodontal therapy and their application inside the gingival pocket. Aim of the study presented here is to compare the effect of an Er:YAG laser on dental calculus with the results following irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser. The surface of freshly extracted wisdom teeth and of extracted teeth suffering from severe periodontitis were irradiated with both laser wavelengths using a standardized application protocol. Calculus on the enamel surface, at the enamel cementum junction and on the root surface was irradiated. For light microscope investigations undecalcified histological sections were prepared after treatment. For the scanning electron microscope teeth were dried in alcohol and sputtered with gold. Investigations revealed that with both laser systems calculus can be removed. Using the frequency doubled Alexandrite laser selective removal of calculus is possible while engaging the Er:YAG laser even at lowest energies necessary for calculus removal healthy cementum is ablated without control.

  15. Tunable near ultraviolet laser system from a frequency doubled alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, N.P.; Gettemy, D.J.; Johnson, T.M.

    1983-09-01

    A laser system which is capable of producing radiation tunable over the region from approximately 0.36-0.40 ..mu.. is described. The laser produces in excess of 5.0 mJ per pulse in a about 0.1 ..mu..s pulse length.

  16. Comparison of long-pulsed alexandrite laser and topical tretinoin-ammonium lactate in axillary acanthosis nigricans: A case series of patients in a before-after trial

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Amirhoushang; Noormohammadpour, Pedram; Goodarzi, Azadeh; Mirshams Shahshahani, Mostafa; Hejazi, Seyede Pardis; Hosseini, Elhamsadat; Azizpour, Arghavan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a brown to black, velvety hyperpigmentation of the skin that usually involves cutaneous folds. Treatment of AN is important regarding cosmetic reasons and various therapeutic modalities have been used for these purposes. The goal of this study was to compare the effectiveness of long-pulsed alexandrite laser and topical tretinoin-ammonium lactate for treatment of axillary-AN. Methods: Fifteen patients with bilateral axillary-AN were studied in Razi Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Diagnosis was confirmed by two independent dermatologists. Each side skin lesion was randomly allocated to either topical mixed cream of tretinoin 0.05%- ammonium lactate 12% or long-pulsed alexandrite laser. Duration of treatment was 14 weeks. At endpoint, the mean percent reduction from baseline in pigmentation area was compared between the two groups. Results: The study population consisted of 15 patients three males and 12, females. The mean age of patients was 28.5±4.9 years. The mean percent reduction was 18.3±10.6%, in tretinoin/ammonium lactate group and 25.7±11.8% in laser group (P=0.004). Conclusion: These findings indicate that the application of alexandrite laser is a relative effective method for treatment of axillary-AN. However, this issue requires further studies with prolonged follow-up period. PMID:27999648

  17. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor. Progress report, January-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for three different sets of relaxation rates. These rates correspond to: (1) Far Infrared (FIR) Raman lasers in the diabatic collision regime without consideration of coupled population decay in a closed system, (2) Raman FIR lasers in the diabatic collision regime with coupled population conserving decay, and (3) IR Raman gain in cesium vapor. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  18. Role of lasertripsy in the management of ureteral calculi: experience with alexandrite laser system in 232 patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, P; Wolff, J M; Mattelaer, P; Jakse, G

    1996-08-01

    In 232 patients with ureteral stones, lasertripsy was used as primary treatment or as second-line therapy after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). In all patients, a semirigid 6.5F ureteroscope or a flexible 6F ureteroscope was used. Lithotripsy was performed employing an alexandrite laser with an energy of 50 to 65 mJ. The immediate success rate was 67.5% for stones in the upper ureter, 86.1% for those in the midureter, and 94.5% for those in the distal ureter. In 16.5% of the treatments, it was necessary to insert a double-J stent. A perforation of the ureter happened in two patients (0.9%), but no laser-related complications were seen. Stone fragmentation was not dependent on stone composition or size. Using small semirigid or flexible ureteroscopes, lasertripsy of ureteral stones is a minimally invasive treatment with an insignificant complication rate. In case of midureteral stones, our results revealed a higher immediate stone-free rate than is reported in the literature after treatment by SWL, and we can therefore recommend lasertripsy as primary treatment. For upper ureteral stones, lasertripsy can be recommended as a helpful auxillary procedure. Furthermore, in cases of distal ureteral stones, lasertripsy challenges SWL as the primary treatment.

  19. Q-switching of an alexandrite laser by (F/sup +//sub 2/)/sub A/ color centers in NaF

    SciTech Connect

    Kolyago, S.S.; Matrosov, V.N.; Pestryakov, E.V.; Trunov, V.I.; Gusev, Y.L.; Shkadarevich, A.P.

    1985-12-01

    Investigations were made of the characteristics of (F/sup +//sub 2/)/sub A/ color centers in NaF and of the spectral and lasing properties of an alexandrite laser Q-switched by centers of this type. When a Lyot filter and a switch having an initial transmission of approx.70% were used in this laser resonator, pulses of 80--100 nsec duration with a spectral width of approx.0.1 cm/sup -1/ and a tuning range of 0.73--0.783 ..mu.. were obtained under pulse-periodic conditions (12.5 Hz).

  20. Laser-generated acoustic wave studies on tattoo pigment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Lorna M.; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.

    1996-01-01

    A Q-switched alexandrite laser (180 ns at 755 nm) was used to irradiate samples of agar embedded with red, black and green tattoo dyes. The acoustic waves generated in the samples were detected using a PVDF membrane hydrophone and compared to theoretical expectations. The laser pulses were found to generate acoustic waves in the black and green samples but not in the red pigment. Pressures of up to 1.4 MPa were produced with irradiances of up to 96 MWcm-2 which is comparable to the irradiances used to clear pigment embedded in skin. The pressure gradient generated across pigment particles was approximately 1.09 X 1010 Pam-1 giving a pressure difference of 1.09 +/- 0.17 MPa over a particle with mean diameter 100 micrometers . This is not sufficient to permanently damage skin which has a tensile strength of 7.4 MPa.

  1. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  2. Automated alexandrite transmitter for airborne DIAL experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the performance characteristics and development status of an automated dual alexandrite laser transmitter that is to be carried aloft by NASA's ER-2 research aircraft for water vapor DIAL experiments; these efforts are part of NASA's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE). The LASE transmitter encompasses control unit, thermal unit, and two lamp driver unit subsystems. Major reductions in system size and weight relative to commercially available alexandrite lasers were necessary; a total weight of only 330 lbs has been achieved. Attention is given to subsystem flight test results.

  3. Safety and efficacy of a novel diffractive lens array using a picosecond 755 nm alexandrite laser for treatment of wrinkles

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, David H.; Weiss, Margaret A.; Mahoney, Anne Marie; Beasley, Karen L.; Halvorson, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Picosecond lasers have been reported to be effective for removal of tattoo pigment. This prospective study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the treatment of peri‐oral and ‐ocular wrinkles using a novel diffractive lens array coupled with a picosecond 755 nm alexandrite laser. Methods Forty female subjects presenting with wrinkles from photodamage were enrolled in an IRB approved study. Subjects received four picosecond diffractive lens array treatments to the full face at 1 month intervals. Six subjects were biopsied (two subjects at 1 month, two subjects at 3 months, and two subjects at 6 months). Digital photographic images were taken at 1, 3, and 6 months post‐final treatment visits. Images were graded by blinded physicians for fine lines/wrinkles, erythema, dyschromia, and global improvement. Data on discomfort level, satisfaction, and side effects were recorded. Results Overall blinded physician rated global improvement ranged from improved to much improved at 1‐, 3‐, and 6‐month time points. At baseline the average Fitzpatrick wrinkle score was 5.48. At the 6‐month follow‐up the average score was 3.47. The overall average change in score from pre‐treatment to post‐treatment was 1.97. Subject self‐assessment at 6 months indicated that 90% of subjects were extremely or satisfied with their results. Unanticipated adverse events were absent with anticipated post‐treatment erythema lasting for just several hours. Conclusions A novel diffractive lens array used with a picosecond 755 nm alexandrite laser for treatment of wrinkles is highly effective and safe for wrinkles and other signs of photoaging. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:40–44, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27681221

  4. A Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy application based on Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium assumption for the elemental analysis of alexandrite gemstone and copper-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Giacomo, A.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Santagata, A.; Senesi, G. S.; Rossi, M.; Ghiara, M. R.; Capitelli, F.; De Pascale, O.

    2012-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an appealing technique to study laser-induced plasmas (LIPs), both from the basic diagnostics point of view and for analytical applications. LIPs are complex dynamic systems, expanding at supersonic velocities and undergoing a transition between different plasma regimes. If the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition is valid for such plasmas, several analytical methods can be employed and fast quantitative analyses can be performed on a variety of samples. In the present paper, a discussion about LTE is carried out and an innovative application to the analysis of the alexandrite gemstone is presented. In addition, a study about the influence of plasma parameters on the performance of LTE-based methods is reported for bronze and brass targets.

  5. Amplification of ultrashort pulses with Nd:glass amplifiers pumped by alexandrite free running laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mourou, G.A.; Squier, J.; Coe, J.S.; Harter, D.J.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described of producing an ultra-high peak power pulse, the method comprising the steps of: receiving a short optical pulse having a predetermined duration from an optical oscillator; stretching in time the short optical pulse by a factor of approximately between 100 and 10,000 to produce a timestretched optical pulse to be amplified; amplifying the time-stretched optical pulse in a solid state amplifying media, said step of amplifying additionally including the step of combining the time-stretched optical pulse with an optical energy generated by a laser used to pump the solid-state amplifying media; and compressing in time the amplified time-stretched optical pulse, whereby the amplitude of the resulting amplified time-stretched compressed optical pulse is increased.

  6. Picosecond pulse duration laser treatment for dermal melanocytosis in Asians : A retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Takafumi; Ohshiro, Toshio; Sasaki, Katsumi; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-06-29

    Background and aims: Recently novel picosecond duration lasers (ps-lasers) have been developed for the treatment of multicolored and recalcitrant tattoos, and safety and efficacy have been reported. We therefore hypothesized that the ps-laser could be an alternative treatment for dermal pigmented lesions and performed a retrospective review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the ps-laser. Subjects and methods: A retrospective photographic review of 10 patients with dermal pigmented lesions was performed (ages from 4 months to 52 yr), 6 nevus of Ota, 3 ectopic Mongolian spots and 1 Mongolian spots. The patients were treated in the Ohshiro Clinic with picosecond 755 nm alexandrite laser (ps-Alex laser) and picosecond 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser (ps-Nd:YAG laser) from April 2014 to December 2015 (ps-Alex laser, 7 patients; ps-Nd:YAG laser, 3 patients, 1 to 3 treatment sessions). Improvement was evaluated as percentage of pigmentation clearance comparing the baseline findings with those at 3 months after the final treatment using a five category grading scale: Poor, 0-24%; Fair, 25-49%; Good, 50-74%; Excellent, 75-94%; and Complete, 95-100% improvement. Adverse events were also assessed. Results: All ten patients obtained clinical improvement ranging from fair to excellent. Treatment with the ps-Alex laser caused transient hyperpigmentation followed by improvement to complete resolution at 3 months follow-up. The ps-Nd:YAG laser caused severe transient erythema and swelling but no post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the 755 nm and 1064 nm ps-lasers are efficacious for the treatment of dermal pigment lesions, with minimum adverse events.

  7. Picosecond pulse duration laser treatment for dermal melanocytosis in Asians : A retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Ohshiro, Toshio; Sasaki, Katsumi; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Recently novel picosecond duration lasers (ps-lasers) have been developed for the treatment of multicolored and recalcitrant tattoos, and safety and efficacy have been reported. We therefore hypothesized that the ps-laser could be an alternative treatment for dermal pigmented lesions and performed a retrospective review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the ps-laser. Subjects and methods: A retrospective photographic review of 10 patients with dermal pigmented lesions was performed (ages from 4 months to 52 yr), 6 nevus of Ota, 3 ectopic Mongolian spots and 1 Mongolian spots. The patients were treated in the Ohshiro Clinic with picosecond 755 nm alexandrite laser (ps-Alex laser) and picosecond 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser (ps-Nd:YAG laser) from April 2014 to December 2015 (ps-Alex laser, 7 patients; ps-Nd:YAG laser, 3 patients, 1 to 3 treatment sessions). Improvement was evaluated as percentage of pigmentation clearance comparing the baseline findings with those at 3 months after the final treatment using a five category grading scale: Poor, 0–24%; Fair, 25–49%; Good, 50–74%; Excellent, 75–94%; and Complete, 95–100% improvement. Adverse events were also assessed. Results: All ten patients obtained clinical improvement ranging from fair to excellent. Treatment with the ps-Alex laser caused transient hyperpigmentation followed by improvement to complete resolution at 3 months follow-up. The ps-Nd:YAG laser caused severe transient erythema and swelling but no post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the 755 nm and 1064 nm ps-lasers are efficacious for the treatment of dermal pigment lesions, with minimum adverse events. PMID:27721561

  8. Multi-methodological investigation of kunzite, hiddenite, alexandrite, elbaite and topaz, based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and conventional analytical techniques for supporting mineralogical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Manuela; Dell'Aglio, Marcella; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Gaudiuso, Rosalba; Senesi, Giorgio Saverio; De Pascale, Olga; Capitelli, Francesco; Nestola, Fabrizio; Ghiara, Maria Rosaria

    2014-02-01

    Gem-quality alexandrite, hiddenite and kunzite, elbaite and topaz minerals were characterized through a multi-methodological investigation based on EMPA-WDS, LA-ICP-MS, and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). With respect to the others, the latter technique enables a simultaneous multi-elemental composition without any sample preparation and the detection of light elements, such as Li, Be and B. The criteria for the choice of minerals were: (a) the presence of chromophore elements in minor contents and/or as traces; (b) the presence of light lithophile elements (Li, Be and B); (c) different crystal chemistry complexity. The results show that LIBS can be employed in mineralogical studies for the identification and characterization of minerals, and as a fast screening method to determine the chemical composition, including the chromophore and light lithophile elements.

  9. Positronium Annihilation Gamma Ray Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    laser was done for both high power and good mode. Alexandrite laser, PAL 101 A custom made Alexandrite laser was purchased from Lightage. Work...Calibration for the Alexandrite laser is being verified and other behavioral aspects are currently explored and measured. Optics Four beamsplitters, CVI...safely. The 1.0m and 0.5 meter spectrometer can be used simultaneously with the Alexandrite laser and room is available in front of the Alexandrite

  10. Control of hair growth using long-pulsed alexandrite laser is an efficient and cost effective therapy for patients suffering from recurrent pilonidal disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Adil Abbas; Javed, Ammar Asrar; Govindan, Karthikeyan Srinivasan; Rafiq, Sadia; Thomas, Kay; Baker, Lynne; Kenealy, John

    2016-07-01

    Pilonidal sinus (PNS) and its surgical management have a profound impact on hospital resources in terms of finances and productive man-hours. Surgical treatment has been the mainstay of treatment of both acute and chronic pilonidal sinus but recurrence is common. The control of hair growth in the sinus region plays an important role in preventing recurrence. Here, we discuss our experience of treating 19 patients suffering from recurrent pilonidal sinus with laser depilation and its long-term cost effectiveness. This is a retrospective study on patients who had recurrence of pilonidal sinus following multiple surgical treatments. They were treated using long-pulsed alexandrite laser for depilation in the sinus area, an outpatient procedure. Their clinical characteristics and outcomes were then evaluated. There was a significant reduction in hair density after laser treatment (p < 0.001). The disease-free period after laser treatment was significantly longer than that one after surgical treatment (p < 0.001). The average cost of repeated surgical treatment per disease-free month was significantly higher than that of laser treatment (p < 0.001). Evidence suggests the role of natal cleft hair growth in the evolution of the pilonidal disease; therefore, control of hair growth should be considered as an adjunct to the initial treatment via surgery. Compared to surgical treatment of recurrences, laser depilation is an efficient and cost-effective method of preventing recurrence and reducing morbidity and loss of man-hours. We suggest that laser depilation of the pilonidal sinus should be funded by clinical commissioning groups.

  11. Laser therapy of pigmented lesions: pro and contra.

    PubMed

    Bukvić Mokos, Zrinka; Lipozenčić, Jasna; Ceović, Romana; Stulhofer Buzina, Daška; Kostović, Krešimir

    2010-01-01

    Although frequently performed, laser removal of pigmented lesions still contains certain controversial issues. Epidermal pigmented lesions include solar lentigines, ephelides, café au lait macules and seborrheic keratoses. Dermal lesions include melanocytic nevi, blue nevi, drug induced hyperpigmentation and nevus of Ota and Ito. Some lesions exhibit both an epidermal and dermal component like Becker's nevus, postinflammatory hyperpigmentations, melasma and nevus spilus. Due to the wide absorption spectrum of melanin (500-1100 nm), several laser systems are effective in removal of pigmented lesions. These lasers include the pigmented lesion pulsed dye laser (510 nm), the Q-switched ruby laser (694 nm), the Q-switched alexandrite laser (755 nm) and the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm), which can be frequency-doubled to produce visible green light with a wavelength of 532 nm. The results of laser therapy are usually successful. However, there are still many controversies regarding the use of lasers in treating certain pigmented lesions. Actually, the essential question in removing pigmented lesions with lasers is whether the lesion has atypical features or has a malignant potential. Dermoscopy, used as a routine first-level diagnostic technique, is helpful in most cases. If there is any doubt whether the lesion is benign, then a biopsy for histologic evaluation is obligatory.

  12. A randomized, split-face clinical trial of Q-switched alexandrite laser versus Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of bilateral nevus of Ota.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiang; Li, Yong; Jiang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Different types of Q-switched (QS) lasers have been used successfully to treat nevus of Ota. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy and complication of QS alexandrite (QS Alex) laser versus QS neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) (QS Nd:YAG) laser for bilateral nevus of Ota. Seventeen patients with bilateral nevus of Ota were treated randomly with QS Alex in one half of face and QS Nd:YAG in the other half with an interval of at least 3 months between each. Subjective assessment was made by both patients and dermatologists. Patients were also examined for evidence of complications. All patients experienced improvement (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the two sides (p > 0.05). The pain after a short period of laser therapy was more severe for QS Alex than for QS Nd:YAG laser. Vesicles developed in 1 patient after QS Alex therapy. Both QS Alex laser and QS Nd:YAG laser were equally effective at improving bilateral nevus of Ota. Patients tolerate QS Nd:YAG laser better than QS Alex laser.

  13. Multilayer waveguide-grating mirror in the Fabry - Perot cavity of an alexandrite solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratyuk, V A; Mikhailov, V A; Lyndin, N M; Sychugov, V A; Parriaux, O

    1999-02-28

    A multilayer waveguide-grating optical component for laser cavities was proposed, made, and investigated. It is found that corrugation of all the layers of the component makes it possible to obtain a high coefficient of narrow-band (with respect to wavelength) reflection of moderate-power light beams. The possibility of the operation of the component in the laser cavity in narrow-band filter regime is noted. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Spectroscopic properties of alexandrite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Richard C.; Xi, Lin; Gang, Xu; Quarles, Gregory J.; Walling, John C.

    1985-09-01

    Details of the optical-spectroscopic properties of alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) crystals were studied by different laser-spectroscopy techniques. The temperature dependences of the fluorescence lifetimes and widths of the zero-phonon lines were found to be quite different for Cr3+ ions in the mirror and inversion crystal-field sites. The results indicate that direct phonon-absorption processes dominate both thermal line broadening and lifetime quenching for ions in the mirror sites while phonon-scattering processes dominate the line broadening of inversion-site ions and leave their lifetime independent of temperature. Tunable-dye-laser site-selection methods were used to obtain the excitation spectra of the Cr3+ ions in inversion sites at low temperature and to identify six types of exchange-coupled pairs of Cr3+ ions in the lattice. Time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy was used to monitor the energy transfer between Cr3+ ions in mirror and inversion sites at both low and high temperature. Finally, high-power, picosecond pulse excitation was used to produce two-photon absorption, and the resulting emission spectrum was found to exhibit a new fluorescence band in the 400-nm spectral region.

  15. Regenerative amplification in alexandrite of pulses from specialized oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bado, P.; Pessot, M.; Squier, J.; Mourou, G.A.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The authors describe an alexandrite regenerative amplifier used to amplify the output of various specialized oscillators. Nanosecond pulses from a narrow frequency CW-pumped dye laser, picosecond pulses from a gain-switched diode laser, and femtosecond pulses from a synchronously pumped dye laser were amplified by six-ten orders of magnitude in a single stage while conserving the temporal and spectral profiles characteristic to the oscillators.

  16. Patient compliance as a major determinant of laser tattoo removal success rates: a 10-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Jow, Tiffany; Brown, Alia; Goldberg, David J

    2010-08-01

    The use and success of high-energy, short-pulse, Q-switched lasers for tattoo removal has been well demonstrated. Three types of lasers are currently commercially available for tattoo removal: the Q-switched ruby laser (694 nm), the Q-switched alexandrite laser (755 nm) and the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm and 1064 nm). Multiple parameters such as tattoo type, color, location, and patient skin type dictate which laser is optimal in each patient. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of these modalities, there are few papers that address some of the long-term issues of tattoo removal, such as patient compliance, and how these issues impact on the success rates of optimal tattoo removal treatments. In this retrospective study, 10-year data from a single center are presented. Our data include parameters such as clearance rates, number of treatments, wavelength of the utilized laser, and fluence and spot-size setting. In addition, potential complications such as scarring, hypopigmentation, and pain were analyzed. Finally, we examine the patient compliance that accompanied tattoo removal and the reasons behind the typically low success rates for total tattoo clearance.

  17. Transcutaneous laser treatment of leg veins.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Arne A; Pitassi, Luiza H U; Campos, Valeria; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Dierickx, Christine C

    2014-03-01

    Leg telangiectasias and reticular veins are a common complaint affecting more than 80% of the population to some extent. To date, the gold standard remains sclerotherapy for most patients. However, there may be some specific situations, where sclerotherapy is contraindicated such as needle phobia, allergy to certain sclerosing agents, and the presence of vessels smaller than the diameter of a 30-gauge needle (including telangiectatic matting). In these cases, transcutaneous laser therapy is a valuable alternative. Currently, different laser modalities have been proposed for the management of leg veins. The aim of this article is to present an overview of the basic principles of transcutaneous laser therapy of leg veins and to review the existing literature on this subject, including the most recent developments. The 532-nm potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser, the 585-600-nm pulsed dye laser, the 755-nm alexandrite laser, various 800-983-nm diode lasers, and the 1,064-nm neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and various intense pulsed light sources have been investigated for this indication. The KTP and pulsed dye laser are an effective treatment option for small vessels (<1 mm). The side effect profile is usually favorable to that of longer wavelength modalities. For larger veins, the use of a longer wavelength is required. According to the scarce evidence available, the Nd:YAG laser produces better clinical results than the alexandrite and diode laser. Penetration depth is high, whereas absorption by melanin is low, making the Nd:YAG laser suitable for the treatment of larger and deeply located veins and for the treatment of patients with dark skin types. Clinical outcome of Nd:YAG laser therapy approximates that of sclerotherapy, although the latter is associated with less pain. New developments include (1) the use of a nonuniform pulse sequence or a dual-wavelength modality, inducing methemoglobin formation and enhancing the optical absorption

  18. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, Nabil M.

    1987-01-01

    The third phase of research will focus on the propagation and energy extraction of the pump and SERS beams in a variety of configurations including oscillator structures. In order to address these questions a numerical code capable of allowing for saturation and full transverse beam evolution is required. The method proposed is based on a discretized propagation energy extraction model which uses a Kirchoff integral propagator coupled to the three level Raman model already developed. The model will have the resolution required by diffraction limits and will use the previous density matrix results in the adiabatic following limit. Owing to its large computational requirements, such a code must be implemented on a vector array processor. One code on the Cyber is being tested by using previously understood two-level laser models as guidelines for interpreting the results. Two tests were implemented: the evolution of modes in a passive resonator and the evolution of a stable state of the adiabatically eliminated laser equations. These results show mode shapes and diffraction losses for the first case and relaxation oscillations for the second one. Finally, in order to clarify the computing methodology used to exploit the speed of the Cyber's computational speed, the time it takes to perform both of the computations previously mentioned to run on the Cyber and VAX 730 must be measured. Also included is a short description of the current laser model (CAVITY.FOR) and a flow chart of the test computations.

  19. Comparison of clinical efficacy and complications between Q-switched alexandrite laser and Q-switched Nd:YAG laser on nevus of Ota: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Panxi; Yu, Nanze; Diao, Wenqi; Yang, Xiaonan; Feng, Yongqiang; Qi, Zuoliang

    2016-04-01

    Although the application of Q-switched lasers on nevus of Ota (OTA) is well demonstrated, debates about clinical option between Q-switched alexandrite laser (QSA) and Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (QSNY) still remain. This systematic review and meta-analysis estimated the overall successful rate of OTA pigment clearance and complication rate of QSA and QSNY and evaluated which laser could produce a better result. English articles evaluating pigment clearance and complications of QSA and/or QSNY on OTA were screened through predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria and analyzed. The successful rate of pigment clearance and complication rate of QSA and QSNY were respectively calculated using a random-effects or fixed-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. The successful rate and complication rate of QSA and QSNY were compared statistically. Of the 140 articles searched, 13 met inclusion criteria. Totally, 2153 OTA patients treated by QSA and 316 patients treated by QSNY were analyzed. In QSA and QSNY groups, respectively, the successful rate of OTA pigment clearance was 48.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 19.9-76.8%) and 41% (95% CI 9.7-72.2%), while the complication rate was 8.0% (95% CI 3.9-12.2%) and 13.4% (95% CI 7.7-19.0%). When compared with QSNY, QSA had a significantly higher successful rate (P = 0.017), and a lower complication rate (P = 0.000). According to this review, QSA may surpass QSNY in treatment for OTA as it had a superior successful rate of pigment clearance and a lower complication rate than QSNY did.

  20. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    This work focused on understanding the effects of arbitrary transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates on the susceptibilities of coherently driven three-level systems. The approximation of a single relaxation rate often made in previous work is strongly invalidated by the variation in the spontaneous emission lifetime between various atomic level pairs in systems such as cesium. It is of great importance to the problem of nonlinear infrared generation to determine the dependence of both real and imaginary susceptibility on relaxation rates. The imaginary susceptibility on the pump transition determines the absorption of pump photons and the imaginary susceptibility on the laser transition determines the spectral dependence of the gain. This is of particular importance for pure Raman emission (i.e., absorption at linecenter of the gain transition) as it determines the tunability characteristics we are aiming to predict. The real susceptibility is important when cavities are used at the signal field as this will determine the loaded resonance of the Raman oscillator. Researchers show that in some cases which result from having different relaxation rates mode splitting may result, allowing more than one frequency to have the same Raman wavelength, possibly resulting in a temporal instability.

  1. Theoretical studies of resonance enhanced stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1986-10-01

    This work focused on understanding the effects of arbitrary transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates on the susceptibilities of coherently driven three-level systems. The approximation of a single relaxation rate often made in previous work is strongly invalidated by the variation in the spontaneous emission lifetime between various atomic level pairs in systems such as cesium. It is of great importance to the problem of nonlinear infrared generation to determine the dependence of both real and imaginary susceptibility on relaxation rates. The imaginary susceptibility on the pump transition determines the absorption of pump photons and the imaginary susceptibility on the laser transition determines the spectral dependence of the gain. This is of particular importance for pure Raman emission (i.e., absorption at linecenter of the gain transition) as it determines the tunability characteristics we are aiming to predict. The real susceptibility is important when cavities are used at the signal field as this will determine the loaded resonance of the Raman oscillator. Researchers show that in some cases which result from having different relaxation rates mode splitting may result, allowing more than one frequency to have the same Raman wavelength, possibly resulting in a temporal instability.

  2. Alexandrite lidar for the atmospheric water vapor detection and development of powerful tunable sources in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uchiumi, M.; Maeda, M.; Muraoka, K.; Uchino, O.

    1992-01-01

    New tunable solid-state lasers, such as alexandrite and Ti-sapphire lasers, provide a powerful technique to detect various molecules in the atmosphere whose absorption bands are in the infrared region. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system to measure the tropospheric water vapor has been investigated by many authors, in an early stage, by dye and ruby lasers. Using the alpha band of water vapor, the longest detection range can be obtained with high accuracy, and the alexandrite laser is the most suitable laser for this purpose. In this paper, we describe the detection of water vapor in the atmosphere by an alexandrite lidar, and the development of powerful tunable sources based on Raman lasers in the infrared region.

  3. 3D noninvasive, high-resolution imaging using a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and rapid wavelength-cycling lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Gross, Daniel; Klosner, Marc; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-05-01

    Globally, cancer is a major health issue as advances in modern medicine continue to extend the human life span. Breast cancer ranks second as a cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) provides high molecular contrast at greater depths in tissue without the use of ionizing radiation. In this work, we describe the development of a PA tomography (PAT) system and a rapid wavelength-cycling Alexandrite laser designed for clinical PAI applications. The laser produces 450 mJ/pulse at 25 Hz to illuminate the entire breast, which eliminates the need to scan the laser source. Wavelength cycling provides a pulse sequence in which the output wavelength repeatedly alternates between 755 nm and 797 nm rapidly within milliseconds. We present imaging results of breast phantoms with inclusions of different sizes at varying depths, obtained with this laser source, a 5-MHz 128-element transducer and a 128-channel Verasonics system. Results include PA images and 3D reconstruction of the breast phantom at 755 and 797 nm, delineating the inclusions that mimic tumors in the breast.

  4. An alexandrite regenerative amplifier for water vapor and temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thro, P.-Y.; Boesenberg, J.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is a powerful method for determining meteorological parameters, but it requires high quality of the laser source: high energy, very narrow bandwidth, high wavelength stability, and spectral purity. Although many efforts have been made to improve the lasers in view of these aspects, a satisfactory solution has not been demonstrated up to now. We describe a regenerative amplifier, using a Ti:sapphire laser as master oscillator and an alexandrite laser as slave amplifier, which is expected to meet the requirements for water vapor concentration and temperature measurements.

  5. Optoelectronic Workshops. Dynamical Instabilities in Homogeneously Broadened Lasers (9th) (23 August 1988)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-23

    Broadened Lasers: Dye Lasers Karl Koch Modulation Techniques: Alexandrite Lasers Stephen Chakmakjian Summary Carlos R. Stroud B. CECOM Center for Night... alexandrite , another phonon assisted homogeneously broadened laser. He described in some detail modulation spectroscopic techniques developed in Rochester that...measurement determines the population cycling rate slow decay from level 1 may cause instabilities Single Laser AM Experiments ruby alexandrite modulator

  6. Comparison of Epidermal/Dermal Damage Between the Long-Pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG and 755 nm Alexandrite Lasers Under Relatively High Fluence Conditions: Quantitative and Histological Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hwan; Park, So Ra; Jo, Jeong Ho; Park, Sung Yun; Seo, Young Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare degrees of epidermal/dermal tissue damage quantitatively and histologically after laser irradiation, to find ideal treatment conditions with relatively high fluence for skin rejuvenation. Background data: A number of recent studies have evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of therapeutic lasers under relatively low fluence conditions. Methods: We transmitted the long-pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG and 755 nm Alexandrite lasers into pig skin according to different fluences and spot diameters, and estimated epidermal/dermal temperatures. Pig skin specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological assessments. The fluence conditions comprised 26, 30, and 36 J/cm2, and the spot diameter conditions were 5, 8, and 10 mm. Pulse duration was 30 ms for all experiments. Results: Both lasers produced reliable thermal damage on the dermis without any serious epidermal injuries, under relatively high fluence conditions. The 1064 nm laser provided more active fibrous formations than the 755 nm laser, while higher risks for tissue damages simultaneously occurred. Conclusions: The ideal treatment conditions for skin rejuvenation were 8 mm diameter with 30 J/cm2 and 10 mm diameter with 26 J/cm2 for the 1064 nm laser, and 8 mm diameter with 36 J/cm2 and 10 mm diameter with 26 J/cm2 for the 755 nm laser. PMID:24992273

  7. Nonradiative transition dynamics in alexandrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The first direct picosecond time-resolved measurement of the nonradiative transition dynamics between the excited 4T2 pump band and the metastable 2E storage level of the trivalent chromium ion in alexandrite is reported. The nonradiative relaxation times of 17 ps for intra-4T2 vibrational transitions, and 27 ps for 4T2-2E electronic transition are obtained. The thermal repopulation rate of the 4T2 state from the metastable 2E level is of the order 3.5 x 10 to the 9th per s.

  8. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  9. Turnable Blue-Green LIDAR Transmitter Demonstration: Injection Laser Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-30

    energy/power requirements of the application. U6.2 Tunable Gas Lasers vs Solid State Solid state lasers such as Alexandrite exhibit broadband tuning...the solid state vs gas laser debate is &-5 R90-927764 average power. Insofar as broadly tunable lasers such as Alexandrite and Ti-sapphire are concerned... Alexandrite ( 700 nm - 800 nm ) and Ti-sappire ( 700 nm - 1000 nm ) lasers each are compatible with relatively good atmospheric transmission, an

  10. Annealing effects on optical properties of natural alexandrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes Scalvi, Rosa M.; Li, Máximo Siu; Scalvi, Luis V. A.

    2003-11-01

    Natural alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) crystals are investigated as regards the effects of annealing on their optical properties. Optical absorption spectra are measured from the ultraviolet (190 nm) to the near infrared (900 nm), for a sample subjected to consecutive annealing processes, where time and temperature are varied. Besides this, luminescence spectra are simultaneously obtained for this sample, excited with a Kr+ laser source, tuned on an ultraviolet multi-line mode (337.5, 350.7 and 356.4 nm). We observe from absorption as well as from emission data that annealing mainly influences the distribution of Cr3+ and Fe3+ ions, located on sites of a mirror plane (Cs symmetry), which are responsible for the optical properties of alexandrite. The results obtained lead to the conclusion that annealing induces a modification of the population of Cr3+ on Cs sites as well as on sites located on an inversion plane (Ci). Annealing could improve the optical properties of this material, as regards its application as a tunable laser.

  11. Theoretical studies of resonance enhanced stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor. Progress report, July-December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The third phase of research will focus on the propagation and energy extraction of the pump and SERS beams in a variety of configurations including oscillator structures. In order to address these questions a numerical code capable of allowing for saturation and full transverse beam evolution is required. The method proposed is based on a discretized propagation energy extraction model which uses a Kirchoff integral propagator coupled to the three level Raman model already developed. The model will have the resolution required by diffraction limits and will use the previous density matrix results in the adiabatic following limit. Owing to its large computational requirements, such a code must be implemented on a vector array processor. One code on the Cyber is being tested by using previously understood two-level laser models as guidelines for interpreting the results. Two tests were implemented: the evolution of modes in a passive resonator and the evolution of a stable state of the adiabatically eliminated laser equations. These results show mode shapes and diffraction losses for the first case and relaxation oscillations for the second one. Finally, in order to clarify the computing methodology used to exploit the speed of the Cyber's computational speed, the time it takes to perform both of the computations previously mentioned to run on the Cyber and VAX 730 must be measured. Also included is a short description of the current laser model (CAVITY.FOR) and a flow chart of the test computations.

  12. Chirped pulse amplification of 300 fs pulses in an Alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Pessot, M.; Squier, J.; Bado, P.; Mourou, G. ); Harter, D.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the amplification of femtosecond dye laser pulses up to the 3.5 mJ level in an alexandrite regenerative amplifier. An expansion/compression system using diffraction gratings allows chirped pulse amplification techniques to be used to produce peak powers upwards of 1 GW. Limitations in the chirped pulse amplification of ultrashort pulses due to intracavity dispersive elements are discussed.

  13. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 84, July - August 1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    Tsvetkov, Ye.G. (IAESOAN). Photostimulated condensation of potassium vapor by an alexandrite laser with an intracavity potassium cuvette. IAESOAN...Shkadarevich, A.P. (IFANB). Use of an alexandrite laser for intracavity4 spectroscopy. DBLRA, no. 6, 1986, 504-507. IN 74 Al 690. Byk, A.P.; Voropay...A.N. (). Alexandrite laser spectrum analyzer for the diagnostics of gases and plasma. ZPSBA, vol. 45, no. 1, 1986, 133-136. 703. Kop’yev, P.S

  14. CrLiCaAlF6 Laser Pumped by Visible Laser Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    first demonstration of diode pumping was reported the polarization of the orthogonally polarized beams for alexandrite [1]. Recently a new Cr-doped...the fractional power of to perform as well as the more mature alexandrite laser. each that will be reflected by the second polarization beam For...gradually "dialed out" of higher than in alexandrite . These advantages, coupled the pump axis while the laser diode power was simulta- with highly

  15. DURIP97 Infrared Cavity Ringdown Laser Absorption Spectroscopy: Metal-Containing Clusters and HEDM Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    tunable pulsed Alexandrite ring laser, we are able to generate tunable visible radiation with ca. 40 MHz bandwidth. This tunable visible light is...Since the proposal was funded we have designed a new approach around a different high resolution pulsed laser - the Light Age Alexandrite System. This... Alexandrite Laser/Pulsed Ring Oscillator System Light Age Inc. 199,180.00 HI Hurricane I Computer System Human Ingenuity Industries 1,403.05 Tektronix

  16. Excited-state absorption in the lasing wavelength region of Alexandrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Walling, J.C.

    1982-07-01

    The excited-state absorption cross section sigma/sub 2/ /sub a/ (E) in the gain wavelength region of alexandrite has been determined and is shown to limit the vibronic laser range at both high and low energy. The maximum in vibronic laser emission is due to a minimum in sigma/sub 2/ /sub a/ (E) near 13 000 cm/sup -1/. sigma/sub 2/ /sub a/ (E) is less than 10/sup -20/ cm/sup 2/ between 12 000 and 14 000 cm/sup -1/.

  17. Four-wave mixing in alexandrite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazzawi, Ali M.; Tyminski, Jacek K.; Powell, Richard C.; Walling, John C.

    1984-12-01

    Degenerate four-wave mixing was observed in alexandrite crystals (BeAl2O4: Cr3+), and the signal beam efficiency and decay rate were measured as functions of pump beam-crossing angle, wavelength, and power. The results are consistent with scattering from excited-state population gratings related to the difference in dispersion of the Cr3+ ions in the ground and metastable states. These gratings can be selectively established with Cr3+ ions in the inversion or mirror sites depending on the excitation wavelength. Strong scattering occurs only for pump beams polarized parallel to the b direction of the crystal.

  18. Photodynamics and Physics behind Tunable Solid-State Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-28

    present the first room-temperature vibronic pulsed laser operation of Cr3 + in forsterite (Mg2Si04). Forsterite, like alexandrite , is a member of...the possibilities of the system. Forsterite. like alexandrite , is a member of the ouvtne family of crystals and is a naturally occurring gem. The...a unique property of this system, since most of the systems, including alexandrite . läse in only one preferred direction. The chromium-activated

  19. Development of New Laser Protective Dyes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-31

    Squaric Acid 40 mg 1065 0.84 Squaric Acid 10 mg 1065 0.84 + Endgroup 40 mg B-3 Dyes to Cover the 700-800 nm Reion ( Alexandrite ) In order to determine...together, they cover the tuning range of the Alexandrite laser (700 to 800 nm), which is finding increased use in both military and commercial

  20. Topical meeting on tunable solid state lasers. Digest of technical papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included lidar remote sensing, advances in alexandrite technology, photoluminescence, tunable laser materials selection, flash-pumped titanium lasers, color center lasers, Q-switching, alexandrite lasers, transparent glass ceramics, diode-pumped solid-state lasers for NASA space station lidar experiments, sources for optically pumped solid-state lasers, laser tuning, and monochromator wavelength measurement devices.

  1. Mid-IR Transition Metal Lasers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    alexandrite was demonstrated in 1979. [2] Cr4+ and Cr2+ infrared laser materials took even longer to be discovered. However, transition metal laser...already been mentioned. Other transition metal laser ions such as Cr3+ in alexandrite [19] and Ti3+ in YAlO3 [20] have excited state absorption (ESA...Washington, DC. 19. Shand, M.L., J.C. Walling, and R.C. Morris, Excited-state absorption in the pump region of alexandrite , Journal of Applied Physics

  2. A Laser Trap for Neutral Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-17

    alexandrite laser operating in DO , 1473 OITIow OFr I NOV ’IS 13 OBSOLETE S/N 0 102- I.F- 0 14- 6601 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF TNIS PAGE (WhenOnt...development and characterization of the new alexandrite laser, demonstration of the trap at low densities, and deter- mination of the spatial and...range and the trap depth down by vr). We have used spa- tial filtering to reliably and stabily operate our new cw alexandrite laser as well as argon and

  3. Tunable solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, R.; Budgor, A.B.; Pinto, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included transition-metal-doped lasers, line-narrowed alexandrite lasers, NASA specification, meteorological lidars, laser materials spectroscopy, laser pumped single pass gain, vibronic laser materials growth, crystal growth methods, vibronic laser theory, cross-fertilization through interdisciplinary fields, and laser action of color centers in diamonds.

  4. Complementary Therapies for Idiopathic Hirsutism: Topical Licorice as Promising Option

    PubMed Central

    Faghihi, Gita; Iraji, Fariba; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Saffar, Bahar; Saffaei, Ali; Pourazizi, Mohsen; Aslani, Abolfazl; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutism is one of the most prevalent health problems in women. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of 755 nm alexandrite hair removal laser with that of alexandrite laser plus topical licorice on the improvement of idiopathic hirsutism. A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study was performed on 90 female subjects. The patients were divided into two groups: alexandrite laser plus 15% licorice gel (group A) and placebo (group B). Each subject received one of both products over one side of the face, twice daily for 24 weeks on the hirsute locations. Each group underwent five sessions of alexandrite laser at 6-week intervals. To minimize the effects of confounding variables, the test was performed on two separate zones of patients' skin. The mean ± SD numbers of terminal hairs in group A were 7.05 ± 4.55 for zone 1 and 6.06 ± 3.70 for zone 2. In group B, they were 3.18 ± 1.75 for zone 1 and 2.49 ± 1.63 for zone 2. The difference in the mean number of terminal hairs was statistically significant between the two groups (p < 0.001), and there were no serious adverse reactions. The treatment of idiopathic hirsutism with 755 nm alexandrite laser plus topical licorice is more effective than alexandrite laser only. PMID:26273313

  5. Complementary Therapies for Idiopathic Hirsutism: Topical Licorice as Promising Option.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Gita; Iraji, Fariba; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Saffar, Bahar; Saffaei, Ali; Pourazizi, Mohsen; Aslani, Abolfazl; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutism is one of the most prevalent health problems in women. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of 755 nm alexandrite hair removal laser with that of alexandrite laser plus topical licorice on the improvement of idiopathic hirsutism. A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study was performed on 90 female subjects. The patients were divided into two groups: alexandrite laser plus 15% licorice gel (group A) and placebo (group B). Each subject received one of both products over one side of the face, twice daily for 24 weeks on the hirsute locations. Each group underwent five sessions of alexandrite laser at 6-week intervals. To minimize the effects of confounding variables, the test was performed on two separate zones of patients' skin. The mean ± SD numbers of terminal hairs in group A were 7.05 ± 4.55 for zone 1 and 6.06 ± 3.70 for zone 2. In group B, they were 3.18 ± 1.75 for zone 1 and 2.49 ± 1.63 for zone 2. The difference in the mean number of terminal hairs was statistically significant between the two groups (p < 0.001), and there were no serious adverse reactions. The treatment of idiopathic hirsutism with 755 nm alexandrite laser plus topical licorice is more effective than alexandrite laser only.

  6. Laser Damage in Thin Film Optical Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    OTHER RELEVANT ISSUES The damage thresholds of refractory oxides used as AR coatings for alexandrite laser rods were determined and measured by...used and a limited number of TiO 2/SiO2 coatings were put on alexandrite substrates. Single layer AR coatings of MgF2 and NaAIF 6 were also tested for...measurements were made using an alexandrite laser at a wavelength of 790 nm. with a pulse duration of 200 nsec at 30Hz for 2 seconds. The near spot

  7. Thermal annealing-induced electric dipole relaxation in natural alexandrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalvi, Rosa M. Fernandes; Li, Maximo Siu; Scalvi, Luis V. A.

    2005-02-01

    Electrical properties of natural alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) are investigated by the thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) technique. Samples are submitted to consecutive annealing processes and TSDC is carried out after each annealing, yielding bands with different parameters. These bands are fitted by a continuous distribution of relaxation parameters: activation energy and pre-exponential factor of the Arrhenius equation. It has been observed that annealing influences the dipole relaxation behavior, since it promotes a modification of Fe3+ and Cr3+ impurity distributions on sites of distinct symmetry: Al1 and Al2. In order to have a reference for comparison, TSDC is also carried out on a synthetic alexandrite sample, where the only impurity present is Cr3+ ion.

  8. New neptunium(V) borates that exhibit the alexandrite effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2012-01-02

    A new neptunium(V) borate, K[(NpO(2))B(10)O(14)(OH)(4)], was synthesized using boric acid as a reactive flux. The compound possesses a layered structure in which Np(V) resides in triangular holes, creating a hexagonal-bipyramidal environment around neptunium. This compound is unusual in that it exhibits the Alexandrite effect, a property that is typically restricted to neptunium(IV) compounds.

  9. Temperature dependence of the excited state absorption of alexandrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Jenssen, H.P.

    1983-03-01

    The temperature dependence from 28 to 290/sup 0/C of the excited-state absorption cross section sigma /SUB 2a/ (E) in the gain wavelength region of alexandrite has been determined from the temperature dependence of the single pass gain (SPG) and of the fluorescence. sigma /SUB 2a/ (E) and the emission cross section increase with temperature at approximately the same rate.

  10. Intracavity Raman lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y.B.; Ackerhalt, J.R.; Krasinski, J.S.; Heller, D.F.

    1989-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of intracavity Raman lasers are presented. Advantages of intracavity Raman lasers, particularly for low-emission cross section and broadly tunable vibronic gain media, are described. Experimental studies of a hydrogen gas Raman laser pumped inside the cavity of an alexandrite laser are presented. A theoretical model of the dynamics of a unidirectional intracavity Raman ring laser is developed and solved analytically. This model is adapted to simulate experiments.

  11. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  12. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  13. Morphology of synthetic chrysoberyl and alexandrite crystals: Analysis of experimental data and theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromalova, N. A.; Eremin, N. N.; Dorokhova, G. I.; Urusov, V. S.

    2012-07-01

    A morphological analysis of chrysoberyl and alexandrite crystals obtained by flux crystallization has been performed. Seven morphological types of crystals are selected. The surface energies of the faces of chrysoberyl and alexandrite crystals and their isostructural analogs, BeCr2O4 and BeFe2O4, have been calculated by atomistic computer modeling using the Metadise program. A "combined" approach is proposed which takes into account both the structural geometry and the surface energy of the faces and thus provides better agreement between the theoretical and experimentally observed faceting of chrysoberyl and alexandrite crystals.

  14. High efficiency hydrocarbon-free resonance transition potassium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, Jason; Hager, Gordon; Krupke, William F.

    2009-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high efficiency potassium laser using a 0.15 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser as the pump source. The laser uses naturally occurring helium as the buffer gas. We achieve a 64% slope efficiency and a 57% optical to optical conversion. A pulsed laser model shows good agreement with the data.

  15. Alexandrite as a high-temperature pressure calibrant, and implications for the ruby-fluorescence scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahren, A. H.; Kruger, M. B.; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    The wavelength shifts of the R1 and R2 fluorescence lines of alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr(+3)) have been experimentally calibrated against the ruby-fluorescence scale as a function of both hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic pressures between 0 and 50 GPa, and simultaneously as a function of temperatures between 290 and 550 K. It is found that the pressure-temperature cross derivative of the fluorescence wavelength shifts are negligible for both ruby and alexandrite.

  16. Tunable chromium lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, L.L.; Payne, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    During the decade that has passed since the discovery of the alexandrite laser, many other tunable vibronic sideband lasers based on Cr/sup 3 +/ have been developed. These lasers span the wavelength range from 700 nm to at least 1235 nm. Experimental and theoretical research has provided an understanding of the important factors that influence the performance of these Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers and other solid state vibronic lasers. The intrinsic performance levels of some of the most promising Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers are evaluated from extrapolated slope efficiency measurements. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. [The use of lasers in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Lecocq, C; Pirard, D; del Marmol, V; Berlingin, E

    2013-01-01

    Albert Einstein is undoubtedly the father of lasers. But it is not until 1964 that the first dermatological lasers were introduced. The Nd-YAG laser, the CO2 laser were developed by Kumar Patel. In a 40 year period lasers not only were diversified but have also become safer and miniaturized. This article hopes to strengthen general practionners' and specialist's knowledge of the different categories of available lasers. The most frequently used ones are ablative lasers (CO2-Erbium), vascular lasers (Nd-YAG, KTP, pulsed dye laser) and the pigment lasers (Q-Switched Nd-YAG, Alexandrite). A description of these lasers and their indications in dermatology will be discussed.

  18. Alexandrite-like effect in purple flowers analyzed with newly devised round RGB diagram.

    PubMed

    Kasajima, Ichiro

    2016-07-11

    The gemstone alexandrite is known for its feature to change color depending on the spectral quality of the incident light. Thus, the stone looks green when illuminated by white LED light but looks red when illuminated by incandescent light. This effect (alexandrite effect) is caused by a special relationship between the spectral quality of the incident light and the absorbance spectrum of the stone. Here we report an alexandrite-like effect in the petals of torenia and cyclamen flowers. These flowers are purple in sunlight but magenta (reddish) in incandescent light, and violet (bluish purple) in white LED light. The m-n, triangle and round diagrams are devised to calculate the colors of visible light spectra, based on the RGB color-matching function. Using these calculations, the alexandrite-like effect in purple flowers was successfully analyzed in terms of the interaction between the incident light spectrum and the absorbance spectrum of their purple anthocyanin. This analysis allows both logical and intuitive understanding of the colors exhibited by any object showing alexandrite-like properties.

  19. Laser Tattoo Removal: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Stephanie GY; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for tattoo removal have evolved significantly over the years. The commonly used Quality-switched (QS) ruby, alexandrite, and Nd:YAG lasers are the traditional workhorses for tattoo removal. Newer strategies using combination laser treatments, multi-pass treatments, and picosecond lasers offer promising results. The tattoo color and skin type of the patient are important considerations when choosing the appropriate laser. Standard protocols can be developed for the effective and safe treatment of tattoos. PMID:25949017

  20. Laser tattoo removal: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Ho, Stephanie Gy; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for tattoo removal have evolved significantly over the years. The commonly used Quality-switched (QS) ruby, alexandrite, and Nd:YAG lasers are the traditional workhorses for tattoo removal. Newer strategies using combination laser treatments, multi-pass treatments, and picosecond lasers offer promising results. The tattoo color and skin type of the patient are important considerations when choosing the appropriate laser. Standard protocols can be developed for the effective and safe treatment of tattoos.

  1. Lasers '83. Proceedings of the international conference

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of the semiconductor diode laser, laser material processing, nonlinear spectroscopy, recent advancements in diode lasers, laser-driven particle accelerators, laser applications in the atmospheric sciences, laser-assisted collisions, novel (garnet and alexandrite) solid state laser materials, IR molecular lasers, devices and components for fiber-optic communications, free-electron lasers and masers, and picosecond optical phenomena. Also covered are laser-stimulated materials surface processes, color center laser developments, blue-green and metal vapor lasers, laser chemistry, nonlinear effects, high energy lasers, excimer lasers, laser trapping of ions, optical cavities and propagation, laser isotope separation, laser trapping of atoms, laser applications in biochemistry, tunable coherent short wavelength radiation, laser spectroscopy, picosecond studies of condensed phase molecular systems, and combustion and plasma diagnostics.

  2. Alexandrite-like effect in purple flowers analyzed with newly devised round RGB diagram

    PubMed Central

    Kasajima, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The gemstone alexandrite is known for its feature to change color depending on the spectral quality of the incident light. Thus, the stone looks green when illuminated by white LED light but looks red when illuminated by incandescent light. This effect (alexandrite effect) is caused by a special relationship between the spectral quality of the incident light and the absorbance spectrum of the stone. Here we report an alexandrite-like effect in the petals of torenia and cyclamen flowers. These flowers are purple in sunlight but magenta (reddish) in incandescent light, and violet (bluish purple) in white LED light. The m-n, triangle and round diagrams are devised to calculate the colors of visible light spectra, based on the RGB color-matching function. Using these calculations, the alexandrite-like effect in purple flowers was successfully analyzed in terms of the interaction between the incident light spectrum and the absorbance spectrum of their purple anthocyanin. This analysis allows both logical and intuitive understanding of the colors exhibited by any object showing alexandrite–like properties. PMID:27404088

  3. Alexandrite-like effect in purple flowers analyzed with newly devised round RGB diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasajima, Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    The gemstone alexandrite is known for its feature to change color depending on the spectral quality of the incident light. Thus, the stone looks green when illuminated by white LED light but looks red when illuminated by incandescent light. This effect (alexandrite effect) is caused by a special relationship between the spectral quality of the incident light and the absorbance spectrum of the stone. Here we report an alexandrite-like effect in the petals of torenia and cyclamen flowers. These flowers are purple in sunlight but magenta (reddish) in incandescent light, and violet (bluish purple) in white LED light. The m-n, triangle and round diagrams are devised to calculate the colors of visible light spectra, based on the RGB color-matching function. Using these calculations, the alexandrite-like effect in purple flowers was successfully analyzed in terms of the interaction between the incident light spectrum and the absorbance spectrum of their purple anthocyanin. This analysis allows both logical and intuitive understanding of the colors exhibited by any object showing alexandrite–like properties.

  4. Target identification using laser imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, J.; Baker, M.; Barrett, J.; Ellis, B.N.; Kacerek, J.; Yee, J.

    1994-12-31

    Solid state lasers have been utilized for many varied applications. This application describes how the high peak power, short pulse capability of an alexandrite laser, in combination with a generation 3 image intensified receiver can solve the problem of very long range target identification. Applications have relevance to both commercial and military uses where day/night all weather imaging is required. Wavelength diversity provides single and multispectral system capability, therefore allowing discrimination of targets against varied backgrounds.

  5. Lasers '86; Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Lasers and Applications, Orlando, FL, Nov. 3-7, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Mcmillan, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Laser physics, technology, and applications are examined in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include VUV and X-ray lasers, vibrational energy transfer and kinetics, medical applications, ultrashort lasers and spectroscopy, surface and material interactions, lasers in atmospheric physics, and fiber-optic systems. Consideration is given to alexandrite lasers, four-wave mixing and nonlinear optics, chemical lasers, semiconductor lasers, photothermal and photoacoustic spectroscopy, dye lasers, optical phase conjugation and SBS, excimer lasers, SDI laser applications, remote-sensing with lasers, FELs, and applications in chemistry. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  6. Clinical application of versapulse laser in the treatment of skin pigmentation diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Li; Yuan, Wai-Hua; Yuan, Wei-Wei; Fu, Qiang

    1998-11-01

    387 cases of various skin pigmentous diseases were treated by Versapulse 'C' laser in our department Versapulse 'C' laser consist of 4 kinds of laser with wavelength of VP532nm, Q532nrn, Q755nm, Q1064nm. The vascular lesions, prot wine strain, cherry angioma, strawberry nevus, perckles, solar lentigines, melasma and junctional moles were treated by VP532 or Q532 laser; the nevus of Ota and tattoo were treated by Q755 or Q1064 laser. Satisfactory results were obtained in this paper, we also discussed the therapeutic and the main points of varying diseases with varying laser of wavelength, the use of FMLA anesthesia, controlled cold therapy an the physical protection to laser.

  7. Tunable lasers- an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, B.D.; Buser, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    This overview of tunable lasers describes their applicability to spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and middle infrared ranges; to rapid on-line diagnostics by ultrashort cavity lasers; to exploration, by the free electron laser, for its wide tuning in the far infrared to submillimeter region; to remote detection, in areas such as portable pollution monitors, on-line chemical analyzers, auto exhaust analyzers, and production line controls; to photochemistry; and to other potential areas in diagnostics, communications, and medical and biological sciences. The following lasers are characterized by their tunability: solid state lasers, primarily alexandrite, with a tuning range of ca 1000 Angstroms; color center lasers; semiconductor lasers; dye lasers; gas lasers, where high-pressure CO/sub 2/ discharges are the best known example for a wide tunability range, and research is continuing in systems such as the alkali dimers; and, at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometers, the possibilities beyond Cerenkov and free electron lasers.

  8. Optical properties of Cr3+ -doped oxides: Different behavior of two centers in alexandrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lastra, J. M.; Aramburu, J. A.; Barriuso, M. T.; Moreno, M.

    2006-09-01

    This work is aimed at explaining the different color exhibited by the two Cr3+ centers in the alexandrite gemstone as well as ruby and emerald. Although the average Cr3+-O2- distance in ruby, emerald, and the Cs center in alexandrite is known to be practically the same, it is shown that the different values of the ligand field parameter 10Dq of the four Cr3+ centers mainly come from the electrostatic potential of the rest of lattice ions, VR(r) , seen by the CrO69- complex where active electrons are localized. This VR(r) potential, which strongly depends on the point symmetry group around the impurity, leads to an additional contribution to 10Dq not considered in the traditional ligand field theory. While for the Cs center (10Dq=2.19eV) and ruby (10Dq=2.24eV) , VR(r) has a similar shape along any Cr3+-O2- direction this is no longer true for the Ci center in alexandrite where the highest 10Dq value (equal to 2.53eV ) is measured.

  9. Picosecond-time-resolved studies of nonradiative relaxation in ruby and alexandrite

    SciTech Connect

    Gayen, S.K.; Wang, W.B.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamics of the nonradiative transitions between the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ pump band and the /sup 2/E storage level of the Cr/sup 3 +/ ion in ruby and alexandrite crystals is studied using the picosecond excite-and-probe absorption technique. A 527-nm picosecond pulse excites the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ state of the Cr/sup 3 +/ ion, and an infrared picosecond probe pulse monitors the subsequent growth and decay of population in the excited states as a function of pump-probe delay. An upper limit of 7 ps is determined for the nonradiative lifetime of the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ state in ruby. A vibrational relaxation time of 25 ps for the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ band in alexandrite is estimated. The time to attain thermal equilibrium population between the /sup 2/E and /sup 4/T/sub 2/ levels of alexandrite following excitation of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ band is estimated to be approx. 100 ps.

  10. High-energy transversely pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the results from our transversely pumped alkali laser. This system uses an Alexandrite laser to pump a stainless steel laser head. The system uses methane and helium as buffer gasses. Using rubidium, the system produced up to 40 mJ of output energy when pumped with 63 mJ. Slope efficiency was 75%. Using potassium as the lasing species the system produced 32 mJ and a 53% slope efficiency.

  11. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  12. Characterization of laser beam interaction with carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janićijević, Milovan; Srećković, Milesa; Kaluđerović, Branka; Bojanić, Slobodan; Družijanić, Dragan; Dinulović, Mirko; Kovačević, Aleksander

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents simulation and experimental results for the exposure of some carbon-based materials to alexandrite and Nd3+:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser radiation. Simulation of the heating effects was carried out using the COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5 package for samples of carbon-based P7295-2 fiber irradiated using an alexandrite laser and carbon-based P4396-2 fiber irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser, as well as by applying finite element modeling for P7295-2 samples irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser. In the experimental part, P7295-2 samples were exposed to alexandrite laser radiation while samples of carbon-based composite 3D C/C were exposed to Nd3+:YAG laser radiation. Micrographs of the laser induced craters were obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the images analyzed using the ImageJ software. The results obtained enable identification of the laser-material interaction spots, and characterization of the laser induced changes in the materials investigated.

  13. First-principles calculation of ground and excited-state absorption spectra of ruby and alexandrite considering lattice relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinta; Sasaki, Tomomi; Taniguchi, Rie; Ishii, Takugo; Ogasawara, Kazuyoshi

    2009-02-01

    We performed first-principles calculations of multiplet structures and the corresponding ground-state absorption and excited-state absorption spectra for ruby (Cr3+:α-Al2O3) and alexandrite (Cr3+:BeAl2O4) which included lattice relaxation. The lattice relaxation was estimated using the first-principles total energy and molecular-dynamics method of the CASTEP code. The multiplet structure and absorption spectra were calculated using the configuration-interaction method based on density-functional calculations. For both ruby and alexandrite, the theoretical absorption spectra, which were already in reasonable agreement with experimental spectra, were further improved by consideration of lattice relaxation. In the case of ruby, the peak positions and peak intensities were improved through the use of models with relaxations of 11 or more atoms. For alexandrite, the polarization dependence of the U band was significantly improved, even by a model with a relaxation of only seven atoms.

  14. Amplification of broad-band chirped pulses up to the 100-mJ level using alexandrite-pumped neodymium-doped glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gamache, C.; Husson, D.; Seznec, S.; Descamps, D.; Migus, A. |

    1996-08-01

    In this work, the authors are concerned by the amplification of broad-band energetic pulses in laser-pumped Nd:glasses, with obvious applications to ultrashort pulse technology, but also to a front end for the envisioned Megajoules Nd:glass laser facility devoted to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) studies and ignition demonstration. An alexandrite laser is used to longitudinally end-pump mixed Nd:glass rods in a multipass arrangement in order to amplify chirped pulses in the 50--100-mJ range at a 1-Hz repetition rate. This system has a broad-band capability of up to 8--10 nm output bandwidth. The authors have developed a model, which in the specific case of amplification of chirped-pulse, takes into account the exact configuration of the rods, their spectral properties, and the longitudinal pumping geometry. An agreement between experiment and theory is obtained by assuming a pump quantum efficiency of the order of 60%.

  15. Lasers '85; Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Dec. 2-6, 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Charles P.

    The present conference on laser technology development encompasses issues in such areas as VUV and X-ray lasers; optical phase conjugation and nonlinear optics; laser applications in medicine; methods for optical processing; laser and nonlinear spectroscopy; ultrashort-pulse lasers and their applications; frequency selection in pulsed lasers; and interactions between laser beams, material surfaces, and material volumes. Also treated are laser applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative program, chemical laser design and performance, the lasing of biophysical materials, laser diagnostics in fluids and plasma, semiconductor laser diodes and arrays, solid state lasers, radiation- and solar-pumped lasers, laser cavities and propagation, remote sensing with lasers and fiber-optics, coupled resonators and diode lasers, industrial applications of lasers, excimer lasers, optoelectronics, CO2 lasers, fiber-optic sensors, alexandrite lasers, free electron lasers, and IR and visible wavelength lasers.

  16. Lasers '85; Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Dec. 2-6, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on laser technology development encompasses issues in such areas as VUV and X-ray lasers; optical phase conjugation and nonlinear optics; laser applications in medicine; methods for optical processing; laser and nonlinear spectroscopy; ultrashort-pulse lasers and their applications; frequency selection in pulsed lasers; and interactions between laser beams, material surfaces, and material volumes. Also treated are laser applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative program, chemical laser design and performance, the lasing of biophysical materials, laser diagnostics in fluids and plasma, semiconductor laser diodes and arrays, solid state lasers, radiation- and solar-pumped lasers, laser cavities and propagation, remote sensing with lasers and fiber-optics, coupled resonators and diode lasers, industrial applications of lasers, excimer lasers, optoelectronics, CO/sub 2/ lasers, fiber-optic sensors, alexandrite lasers, free electron lasers, and IR and visible wavelength lasers.

  17. Near infrared laser ocular bioeffects

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.J.; Beatrice, E.S.

    1989-05-01

    Thresholds for laser chorioretinal injury in the red end of the visible spectrum and the near-infrared (IR-A) spectral regions are presented. An unpredicted wavelength dependence of the injury threshold for single Q-switched pulses is demonstrated. Four lasers were used to determine thresholds at 40 wavelengths between 532 nm and 1064 nm: a ruby laser, a neodymium:YAG-pumped dye laser, an erbium:YLF laser and an alexandrite laser. Despite many careful and repeated efforts to determine a cause for the variation due to possible variations in the lasers or other aspects of the experimental technique and due to biological absorption properties of the eye, there is no complete or obvious explanation for the significant variations of threshold with small changes in wavelength. The implications of these findings for laser safety standards are presented.

  18. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  19. Improved Thermoelectrically Cooled Laser-Diode Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glesne, Thomas R.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Cooling decreases wavelength and increases efficiency and lifetime. Two improved thermoelectrically cooled laser-diode assemblies incorporate commercial laser diodes providing combination of both high wavelength stability and broad wavelength tuning which are broadly tunable, highly stable devices for injection seeding of pulsed, high-power tunable alexandrite lasers used in lidar remote sensing of water vapor at wavelengths in vicinity of 727 nanometers. Provide temperature control needed to take advantage of tunability of commercial AlGaAs laser diodes in present injection-seeding application.

  20. Solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weksler, M.; Shwartz, J.

    1988-06-01

    Results are presented for direct solar pumping of a ND:YAG rod laser. Stable CW output of more than 60 W was obtained with a slope efficiency exceeding 2 percent. A compound parabolic concentrator, designed to increase the solar radiation coupled into the laser rod, was used in these experiments. The results are consistent with predictions based on a simple solar-pumped laser model, which is also presented. Using this model, it is shown that existing laser materials with broad-band absorption characteristics (e.g., alexandrite and Nd:Cr:GSGG) have a potential for better than 10 percent overall conversion efficiency when solar pumped.

  1. Absorption and fluorescence of alexandrite and of titanium in sapphire and glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Hess, R. V.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    The fluorescence and absorption data for titanium in crystalline sapphire and titanium doped into two silicate and one phosphate glass structures are analyzed. It is observed that the Ti-doped silicate glass sample exhibits no absorption related to the Ti(III) ion, the Ti-doped phosphate glass is deep blue, the absorption line width of the glass samples are a factor of two larger than that of sapphire, and the absorption peak for the Ti in the glass shifted about 100 nm to the red from the Ti:sapphire absorption peak. This shift reveals that the Ti(III) ion is sensitive to the crystalline environment and not to the glass environment. The photoluminescence spectra for Ti-doped sapphire and alexandrite are compared. It is detected that the Ti:sapphire exhibits a broader spectrum than that for alexandrite with a peak at 750 nm. The three zero phonon transitions of Ti:Al2O3 at liquid nitrogen temperatures are studied.

  2. Laser Spectroscopy Investigations of Materials for Solid State Laser Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    July 1987. R.C. Powell, A. Suchocki, G.D. Gilliland, and G.J. Quarles, "Four-Wave Mixing in Cr 3 +-Doped Laser Crystals: Ruby, Emerald , Alexandrite...34Spectroscopy and Four-Wave Mixing in Emerald ", Opt. Soc. Am. Meeting, Rochester, October 1987. G.D. Gilliland, R.C. Powell, and L. Esterowitz...University, May 1985. "Laser Spectroscopic Studies of Europium-Doped Glasses and Emerald ", G.J. Quarles, Ph.D. Thesis, Oklahoma State University, Dec

  3. Theoretical calculations of the pressure-induced shift of a photoacoustic phase signal in alexandrite (BeAl 2O 4:Cr 3+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanic, B. R.; Zekovic, Lj. D.; Radenkovic, B.

    1993-12-01

    The effect of pressure on the phase (δ) of the photoacoustic signal in alexandrite was considered theoretically. It is shown that increase of pressure induces a non-linear increase of δ. The possibility of using the normalized phase difference shift of the photoacoustic signal in alexandrite upon pressure as a new method for high-pressure measurement in the diamond anvil cell is discussed.

  4. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  5. Birefringence of solid-state laser media: broadband tuning discontinuities and application to laser line narrowing

    SciTech Connect

    Krasinski, J.S.; Band, Y.B.; Chin, T.; Heller, D.F.; Morris, R.C.; Papanestor, P.

    1989-04-15

    Spectral consequences that result from using birefringent media with broadband gain inside of laser cavities containing polarizing elements are described. We show that the laser intensity is modulated as a function of the output frequency unless the cavity elements are carefully aligned so that their polarization axis coincides with a principal optical axis of the gain medium. Analysis of the tuning characteristics of a birefringent polarization-dependent gain medium is exploited to provide a simple method for line narrowing the laser output. By introduction of an intracavity birefringent compensator the narrow-band output can be continuously tuned. Experimental results for alexandrite lasers are presented.

  6. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  7. Optical properties and surface structure comparison of tooth whitening using four laser systems and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Pavel; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Housova, Devana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kokta, Milan R.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of various laser techniques for bleaching teeth in office vital whitening. Hydrogen peroxide (30% concentration) and carbamide peroxide (10% solution) were used for chemical activation of bleaching process. Extracted non-carcious upper central incisors were exposed to laser radiation. Four different laser systems (Nd:YAG laser SHG, wavelength 0.53 μm, CTE:YAG laser, wavelength 2.7 μm, Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1.06 μm, and alexandrite laser, wavelength 0.75 μm) were applied to accelerate the speed of the process. The end of chemical exposition was verified by the change of bleaching agent color. The color change was determined by stereomicroscope (Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan), the quality of surface structure was checked by scanning electron microscope Joel, Japan). The speed of bleaching rnaged from 630 s (chemical methods only) to 250-340 s (chemicals + alexandrite laser radiation). The Alexandrite laser application was considered an elective process to decrease the time of bleaching without modifying the surface.

  8. Steady-state 2. pi. pulses under conditions of passive locking of laser modes

    SciTech Connect

    Komarov, K.P.; Ugozhaev, V.D.

    1984-06-01

    A theoretical study is made of laser mode locking in the regime of self-induced transparency of a passive filter. It is shown that there is a solution in the form of ultrashort steady-state 2..pi.. pulses. The range of stability of this regime and its characteristics are determined. By way of example, estimates are obtained of parameters of a steady-state pulse emitted by an alexandrite laser with a potassium absorption cell.

  9. Spectral narrowing of solid state lasers by narrow-band PTR Bragg mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T.; Rapaport, A.; Chen, Y.; Smirnov, V.; Hemmer, M.; Glebov, L. B.; Richardson, M. C.; Bass, M.

    2006-05-01

    Dramatic spectral narrowing of normally broad band lasers, Ti:Sapphire,Cr:LiSAF, and alexandrite was achieved by simply replacing the output mirror with a reflective, volumetric Bragg grating recorded in photo thermal refractive (PTR) glass. The output power of each laser was changed very slightly from that obtained using dielectric coated output mirrors with the same output coupling as the Bragg grating while spectral brightness increased by about three orders of magnitude.

  10. Spacecraft Power Beaming and Solar Cell Annealing Using High-Energy Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    powered lasers are used in industry for cutting, welding , and etching, and are also being considered for many military missions. The concept of the...Fluoride (HF) 2.8 Deuterium Fluoride (DF) 3.8 Carbon Dioxide ( CO2 ) 10.6 Table 2.1 Common High-Energy Lasers 6 Although iodine, HF/DF, and CO2 lasers...that are used for lidar research, active tracking, and other purposes. There is a 9 J CO2 laser, a 0.35 J tunable alexandrite laser, a 6 W tunable

  11. Czochralski growth of tunable laser crystal BeAl(sub)2O(sub)4:Cr(sup)3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Hou, Y.; Wang, S.; Shen, Y.; Jin, Z.

    1986-03-01

    Optically homogeneous alexandrite blanks, 100 mm in length and 20 mm in diameter, were grown by Czochralski technique using RF heating. These blanks were fabricated into 90 mm long 5 mm diameter c-axis laser rods. Tunable laser output was obtained experimentally. Spectroscopic characteristics of the crystal were presented. Problems such as prevention of BeO contamination, chrysoberyl formation kinetics and melt aging are also discussed.

  12. Laser research and development in the Northeast; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Sept. 16, 17, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor, D.W.; Chicklis, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    The development and scaling of excimer lasers with emphasis on both electron-beam and discharge pumpings; a chemical means of generating laser action in the visible region; the use of stimulated Raman techniques to improve the beam quality output of systems employing excimer lasers; the research and development of CO/sub 2/ lasers; a CO/sub 2/ laser amplifier for radar applications; medical laser usage; and laser monitors for trace species in environmental and industrial processes are examined. Consideration is given to high power laser research and development for laser energetics; linear and nonlinear frequency converters; 450 nm laser operation in Tm(3+):YLF; alexandrite lasers and their applications; and the performance limitations of vibronic lasers. Topics discussed include the laser ignition of oil spills; the application of laser rangers to submunitions; the design and application of laser intensity stabilizers; and a 535 nm active atomic line filter that uses the Tl metastable state as an absorbing medium.

  13. Optoacoustic 3D whole-body tomography: experiments in nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Fronheiser, Matt; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Conjusteau, André; Liopo, Anton; Motamedi, Massoud; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2009-02-01

    We developed a 3D whole-body optoacoustic tomography system for applications in preclinical research on mice. The system is capable of generating images with resolution better than 0.6 mm. Two pulsed lasers, an Alexandrite laser operating at 755 nm and a Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm and 1064nm were used for light delivery. The tomographic images were obtained while the objects of study (phantoms or mice) were rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezo-composite transducers. During the scan, the mouse was illuminated orthogonally to the array with two wide beams of light from a bifurcated fiber bundle. Illumination at 532 nm showed superficial vasculature, but limited penetration depth at this wavelength prevented the detection of deeper structures. Illumination at 755 and 1064 nm showed organs and blood vessels, respectively. Filtering of the optoacoustic signals using high frequency enhancing wavelets further emphasized the smaller blood vessels.

  14. Real-time optoacoustic imaging of breast cancer using an interleaved two laser imaging system coregistered with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermilov, Sergey A.; Fronheiser, Matthew P.; Nadvoretsky, Vyacheslav; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, André; Mehta, Ketan; Otto, Pamela; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-02-01

    We present results from a clinical case study on imaging breast cancer using a real-time interleaved two laser optoacoustic imaging system co-registered with ultrasound. The present version of Laser Optoacoustic Ultrasonic Imaging System (LOUIS) utilizes a commercial linear ultrasonic transducer array, which has been modified to include two parallel rectangular optical bundles, to operate in both ultrasonic (US) and optoacoustic (OA) modes. In OA mode, the images from two optical wavelengths (755 nm and 1064 nm) that provide opposite contrasts for optical absorption of oxygenated vs deoxygenated blood can be displayed simultaneously at a maximum rate of 20 Hz. The real-time aspect of the system permits probe manipulations that can assist in the detection of the lesion. The results show the ability of LOUIS to co-register regions of high absorption seen in OA images with US images collected at the same location with the dual modality probe. The dual wavelength results demonstrate that LOUIS can potentially provide breast cancer diagnostics based on different intensities of OA images of the lesion obtained at 755 nm and 1064 nm. We also present new data processing based on deconvolution of the LOUIS impulse response that helps recover original optoacoustic pressure profiles. Finally, we demonstrate the image analysis tool that provides automatic detection of the tumor boundary and quantitative metrics of the optoacoustic image quality. Using a blood vessel phantom submerged in a tissue-like milky background solution we show that the image contrast is minimally affected by the phantom distance from the LOUIS probe until about 60-65 mm. We suggest using the image contrast for quantitative assessment of an OA image of a breast lesion, as a part of the breast cancer diagnostics procedure.

  15. Surface changes of implants after laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Sadegh, Hamid M. M.; Goldin, Dan S.; Hennig, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    Periimplantitis is one of the major factors for the loss of dental implants. Due to the minor defense ability of the tissue surrounding the implant compared to natural teeth treatment of periimplantitis in the early stage is very important. Reducing bacteria with a laser might be the most successful step in therapy of periimplantitis. Aim of the study was to observe changes in surface morphology of seven different implants after irradiation with three different lasers. Two kinds of flat round samles were prepared by the manufacturers either identical to the body surface or to the cervical area of the corresponding implants. The samples were irradiated using different power settings. The lasers used were a CO2 laser (Uni Laser 450P, ASAH Medico Denmark; fiber guided, wavelength 10.6 μm, max. average power 8.3 W, "soft-pulse" and cw) an Er:YAG laser (KaVo Key Laser II, wavelength 2.94 μm, pulse duration 250-500μs, pulse energy 60-500 mJ, pulse repetition rate 1-15 Hz, focus diameter 620 μm, air-water cooling; Biberach, Germany; a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (laboratory prototype, q-switched, fiber guided, wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 1 μs, pulse repetition rate 30 Hz, water cooling). After irradiation the implant surfaces were investigated with a Scanning Electron Microscope. Ablation thresholds were determined. After CO2 laser irradiation no changes in surface morphology were observed whereas using the pulsed Er:YAG laser or frequency doubled Alexandrite laser even at low energies loss of integrity or melting of the surface was observed. The changes in surface morphology seem to depend very strongly on the type of surface coating.

  16. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) review: Quarterly report, January-March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.

    1988-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period January-March 1988, contains articles on the spectra of scattered laser radiation from laser-produced plasmas and on the bounce coating of ablation layers on fusion targets. The advanced technology section has reports on a novel technique for characterizing surface breakdown on semiconductor devices and on a versatile alexandrite regenerative amplifier. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users. Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. 49 refs., 30 figs.

  17. Effects of pump modulation on a four-level laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chakmakjian, S.H.; Koch, K.; Papademetriou, S.; Stroud, C.R. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A theory is developed to describe the way in which modulations in the pump intensity produce modulations in the gain of a four-level, homogeneously broadened laser amplifier. The theory is tested by carrying out an experiment using an alexandrite crystal pumped by a c-w dye laser. A second dye laser is used to measure the gain in the inverted laser transition. The dependence of the magnitude and the bandwidth of the gain on the pumping rate is determined. Agreement between theory and experiment is good.

  18. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.H. . Dept. of Physics); Lee, J.H. . Langley Research Center)

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the efficiencies and threshold pump intensities of various solid-state laser materials that have been estimated to compare their performance characteristics as direct solar-pumped CW lasers. Among the laser materials evaluated in this research, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6%; however, it does not seem to be practical for solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AMO) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12% when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  19. Effects of pump modulation on a four-level laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chakmakjian, S.H.; Koch, K.; Papademetriou, S.; Stroud, C.R. Jr. )

    1989-09-01

    A theory is developed to describe the way in which modulations in the pump intensity produce modulations in the gain of a four-level, homogeneously broadened laser amplifier. The theory is tested by carrying out an experiment using an alexandrite crystal pumped by a cw dye laser. A second dye laser is used to measure the gain in the inverted laser transition. The dependence of the magnitude and the bandwidth of the gain on the pumping rate is determined. Agreement between theory and experiment is good.

  20. Cr laser research at AlliedSignal

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Applied Physics Laboratory of AlliedSignal, Inc. has been developing Cr lasers and applications for a number of years. This operation has resulted in new laser designs and in improved engineering and packaging which are critical to acceptable performance in the field. Although most of the work has been part of military programs, AlliedSignal, with partners, has recently been offering its lasers to commercial programs as a supplier to the OEM market. This paper will present several laser systems which have recently been developed at AlliedSignal. These systems will include those based on alexandrite and Cr:LiSAF. The examples chosen will show the versatility of these laser materials.

  1. Laser-spectroscopy investigations of materials for solid-state-laser systems. Final report, 16 January 1985-15 January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1988-02-01

    Some of the results of major importance from this work are: (1) development of a method for producing laser-induced grating optical devices in glasses; (2) elucidation of the effects of Mg on inhibiting the photorefractive response of lithium niobate; (3) demonstration of tunable single-pass gain from a closed-shell ion in the visible spectral region; (4) demonstration of the decrease in fluorescence quenching in fiber crystals; (5) demonstration of the effects of thermal annealing on the infrared absorption and visible emission in Ti-sapphire laser crystals; and (6) measurement of the pump band to metastable-state relaxation rate in alexandrite laser crystals.

  2. Experimental investigation of a pulsed Rb–Ar excimer-pumped alkali laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongling; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Fengfeng; Wang, Mingqiang; Tian, Zhaoshuo; Peng, Qinjun; Cui, Dafu; Xu, Zuyan

    2017-03-01

    We present experimental results of an exciplex-pumped alkali laser (XPAL) at 780 nm based on the 52P3/2 → 52S1/2 transition of the Rb atom in mixtures of Rb vapor and Ar. A laboratory-built Ti:sapphire laser with a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz and a pulse width of 100 ns is used as the pump source. The maximum laser pulse energy of 0.26 µJ at 780 nm is obtained under an absorbed pump pulse energy of 42 µJ at 755 nm in mixtures of Rb vapor and Ar at a temperature of 423 K, corresponding to an optical conversion efficiency of 0.62%. Further experiments show that the output laser at 780 nm can always be detected for pump wavelengths ranging from 754 to 759 nm, indicating that Rb–Ar mixtures can be effectively pumped by commercial laser diodes (LDs) with a bandwidth of 5 nm.

  3. Organization of the topical meeting on tunable solid-state lasers. Held in North Falmouth, Massachusetts on May 1-3 1989. Final report, 30 August 1988-30 August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-30

    Progress and interest in solid-state lasers generally, and in tunable solid state-lasers specifically, continues to expand. Applications of these lasers include spectroscopy, remote sensing, ranging and imaging, and medicine. New solid-state materials are providing lasers with higher output power, broader tunability, and more-efficient pumping schemes. The quantum electronics and crystal-chemistry properties of these new materials are leading to enhanced laser performance. At the meeting, sessions were held on sapphire, novel laser schemes, Cr lasers, forsterite and excited-state absorption, solid-state lasers for specialized applications, alexandrite lasers, Cr-related issues, diode pumped lasers, nonlinear frequency conversion, 1.3-micrometer Nd lasers, infrared lasers and energy transfer, 2-micrometer lasers, rare earth laser materials, and Er lasers.

  4. Pump power stability range of single-mode solid-state lasers with rod thermal lensing

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; La Porta, P.; Magni, V.

    1987-11-01

    The pump power stability range of solid-state laser resonators operating in the TEM/sub 00/ mode has been thoroughly investigated. It has been shown that, for a very general resonator containing intracavity optical systems, rod thermal lensing engenders a pump power stability range which is a characteristic parameter of laser material and pump cavity, but is independent of resonator configuration. Stability ranges have been calculated and critically discussed for Nd:YAG, Nd:Glasses, Nd:Cr:GSGG, and alexandrite. The independence of the pump power stability range from the resonator configuration has been experimentally demonstrated for a CW Nd:YAG laser.

  5. Surface heat transfer coefficient, heat efficiency, and temperature of pulsed solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, K.; Weber, H.

    1988-08-01

    The temperature of solid-state lasers is a critical parameter. Efficiency and output power are strongly influenced by it. The two parameters which determine the temperature are the heat generation efficiency (HGE) and the surface heat transfer coefficient (SHTC) of the laser rod. These parameters allow the scaling of the rod temperature up to high pumping powers. Moreover, from the temperature inside the rod, the temperature gradients and the mechanical stress can be evaluated. Using transient temperature measurements, the SHTC and the HGE were determined for air- and water-cooled Nd:YAG and alexandrite lasers. The SHTC can be confirmed by theoretical considerations.

  6. Cr/sup 3+/-doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Krupke, W.F.

    1989-03-07

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF/sub 6/:Cr/sup 3+/, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr/sup 3+/ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slope efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high-slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd/sup 3+/ or Tm/sup 3+/ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility.

  7. Cr/sup 3 +/-doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    DOEpatents

    Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Krupke, W.F.

    1988-03-31

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF/sub 6/:Cr/sup 3 +/, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slope efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd/sup 3 +/ or Tm/sup 3 +/ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility. 4 figs.

  8. Cr.sup.3+ -doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen A.; Chase, Lloyd L.; Newkirk, Herbert W.; Krupke, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF.sub.6 :Cr.sup.3+, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr.sup.3+ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slop efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd.sup.3+ or Tm.sup.3+ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility.

  9. Site partitioning of Cr3+ in the trichroic alexandrite BeAl2O4:Cr3+ crystal: contribution from x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bordage, Amélie; Rossano, Stéphanie; Horn, Adolf Heinrich; Fuchs, Yves

    2012-06-06

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at the Cr K-edge of a trichroic crystal of alexandrite BeAl(2)O(4):Cr(3+) for different orientations of the crystal with respect to the polarization and direction of the x-ray incident beam have been performed. Analysis of the experimental spectra with the help of first-principles calculations of x-ray absorption spectra allowed us to estimate the proportion of chromium Cr(3+) cations among the two different octahedral sites of the alexandrite structure (70% in the C(s) site-30% in the C(i) site). The methodology presented in this work opens up new possibilities in the field of mineralogy for the study of complex minerals containing several sites potentially occupied by several transition elements or for solid solutions.

  10. Site partitioning of Cr3+ in the trichroic alexandrite BeAl2O4:Cr3+ crystal: contribution from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordage, Amélie; Rossano, Stéphanie; Horn, Adolf Heinrich; Fuchs, Yves

    2012-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at the Cr K-edge of a trichroic crystal of alexandrite BeAl2O4:Cr3+ for different orientations of the crystal with respect to the polarization and direction of the x-ray incident beam have been performed. Analysis of the experimental spectra with the help of first-principles calculations of x-ray absorption spectra allowed us to estimate the proportion of chromium Cr3+ cations among the two different octahedral sites of the alexandrite structure (70% in the Cs site-30% in the Ci site). The methodology presented in this work opens up new possibilities in the field of mineralogy for the study of complex minerals containing several sites potentially occupied by several transition elements or for solid solutions.

  11. Fluoride laser crystals: old and new

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenssen, Hans P.; Cassanho, Arlete

    2006-02-01

    The development of oxide and fluoride materials as gain materials of choice for solid state lasers ranges from early materials such as Calcium Fluoride and Calcium Tungstate crystals to the now ubiquitous Nd hosts YLF, YAG and Vanadate. Among Tunable laser materials, MgF II - an early favorite, gave way to superior oxides such as Alexandrite and Ti:Sapphire only to be followed by development of still newer tunable fluoride media, notably, fluoride colquiriites such as Cr-doped LiSAF and LiCaF. Newer fluoride crystals, such as Barium Yttrium Fluoride BaY II F 8 (BYF), KY 3F 10 (KYF) and the tunable Cr doped LiCaGaF 6 are attractive laser materials, but their growth has not been optimized. Key advantages of two of these new crystals are discussed. Crystal growth results for BYF and Cr:LiCaGaF 6 as well as some material characterization are presented.

  12. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  13. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  14. Theory of the optimally coupled Q-switched laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The general equations describing Q-switched laser operation are transcendental in nature and require numerical solutions, which greatly complicates the optimization of real devices. Here, it is shown that, using the mathematical technique of Lagrange multipliers, one can derive simple analytic expressions for all of the key parameters of the optimally coupled laser, i.e., one which uses an optimum reflector to obtain maximum laser efficiency for a given pump level. These parameters can all be expressed as functions of a single dimensionless variable z, defined as the ratio of the unsaturated small-signal gain to the dissipative (nonuseful) optical loss, multiplied by a few simple constants. Laser design tradeoff studies and performance projections can be accomplished quickly with the help of several graphs and a simple hand calculator. Sample calculations for a high-gain Nd:YAG and a low-gain alexandrite laser are presented as illustrations of the technique.

  15. Solar cells made by laser-induced diffusion directly from phosphine gas

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, G.B.; Tarrant, D.; Pollock, G.; Pressley, R.; Press, R.

    1981-12-15

    A new method for making p-n junctions based on immersion in a transparent dopant gas followed by irradiation with a pulsed laser is presented. An alexandrite laser was used, operating at 0.73 ..mu..m where photolysis of the dopant gas PH/sub 3/ does not occur. Multiple pulses of 2.2--2.7 J/cm/sup 2/ were used to make Si solar cells with total area efficiencies up to 8.6% without benefit of antireflection coatings.

  16. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhance Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a real atomic level which is nearly resonant with the pump field can greatly enhance the Raman emission cross section. In order to accurately calculate the Raman gain in systems where resonance enhancement plays a dominant role, expressions for the pump and signal susceptibilities must be derived. These expressions should be valid for arbitrary field strengths in order to allow for pump and signal saturation. In addition, the theory should allow for arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates. This latter point is extremely vital for three level atomic systems such as the alkali earth metals since they do not have population reservoirs and can have widely varying spontaneous lifetimes on the three pertinent transitions. Moreover, the dephasing rates are strong functions of electron states and are therefore also different for the three coupled pairs of levels. These considerations are not as important when molecular systems are concerned since the large reservoir of rotational states serve to produce essentially equal longitudinal recovery rates for the population of the three levels. The three level system with three arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates was solved. There is no need for setting either pair of rates equal and the expressions are valid for arbitrarily strong fields.

  17. Theoretical studies of resonance enhance stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor. Semiannual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a real atomic level which is nearly resonant with the pump field can greatly enhance the Raman emission cross section. In order to accurately calculate the Raman gain in systems where resonance enhancement plays a dominant role, expressions for the pump and signal susceptibilities must be derived. These expressions should be valid for arbitrary field strengths in order to allow for pump and signal saturation. In addition, the theory should allow for arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates. This latter point is extremely vital for three level atomic systems such as the alkali earth metals since they do not have population reservoirs and can have widely varying spontaneous lifetimes on the three pertinent transitions. Moreover, the dephasing rates are strong functions of electron states and are therefore also different for the three coupled pairs of levels. These considerations are not as important when molecular systems are concerned since the large reservoir of rotational states serve to produce essentially equal longitudinal recovery rates for the population of the three levels. The three level system with three arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates was solved. There is no need for setting either pair of rates equal and the expressions are valid for arbitrarily strong fields.

  18. Purplish-red almandine garnets with alexandrite-like effect: causes of colors and color-enhancing treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krambrock, K.; Guimarães, F. S.; Pinheiro, M. V. B.; Paniago, R.; Righi, A.; Persiano, A. I. C.; Karfunkel, J.; Hoover, D. B.

    2013-07-01

    Fine gem-quality, purplish-red garnets from the Tocantins State, Brazil, were investigated for their crystal chemistry and optical properties by several spectroscopic techniques, including electron microprobe analysis, Mössbauer, Raman spectroscopy and optical absorption. Although most garnets are purplish-red, some specimens show color zoning, with deep red color in the core and purple in the outer parts. Electron microprobe analysis showed that these garnets are principally almandine-pyrope solid solution at the rim. However, at the red core, they contain also up to 7 % of spessartine. Mössbauer spectroscopy reveals that the iron content is predominantly Fe2+ (>99 %) in the natural garnets. The optical absorption spectra are dominated by spin-allowed and unusual high-intense spin-forbidden transitions from eightfold coordinated Fe(II) in the near infrared and visible spectral region, respectively. For the red core, in addition, three sharp bands centered in the blue part of the visible spectral range and a broad charge transfer band in the near-UV region are observed. All garnets with purplish colors show also a remarkable color-changing effect from purple in daylight light to red in incandescent light called alexandrite-like effect. Heat treatments in the 700-900 °C temperature range in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres lead to reversible and irreversible color changes which are discussed based on the microscopic changes in the Fe ion coordination and valence states.

  19. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray single-crystal diffractometry, and electronic structure calculations on natural alexandrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Sven-Ulf; Grodzicki, Michael; Lottermoser, Werner; Redhammer, Günther J.; Tippelt, Gerold; Ponahlo, Johann; Amthauer, Georg

    2007-09-01

    Natural alexandrite Al2BeO4:Cr from Malyshevo near Terem Tschanka, Sverdlovsk, Ural, Russia, has been characterized by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray single-crystal diffractometry and by electronic structure calculations in order to determine oxidation state and location of iron. The sample contains 0.3 wt% of total iron oxide. The 57Fe Mössbauer spectrum can be resolved into three doublets. Two of them with hyperfine parameters typical for octahedrally coordinated high-spin Fe3+ and Fe2+, respectively, are assigned to iron substituting for Al in the octahedral M2-site. The third doublet is attributed to Fe3+ in hematite. Electronic structure calculations in the local spin density approximation are in reasonable agreement with experimental data provided that expansion and/or distortion of the coordination octahedra are presumed upon iron substitution. The calculated hyperfine parameters of Fe3+ are almost identical for the M1 and M2 positions, but the calculated ligand-field splitting is by far too large for high-spin Fe3+ on M1.

  20. Mid-IR laser system for advanced neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, M.; Wu, C.; Heller, D. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present work on a laser system operating in the near- and mid-IR spectral regions, having output characteristics designed to be optimal for cutting various tissue types. We provide a brief overview of laser-tissue interactions and the importance of controlling certain properties of the light beam. We describe the principle of operation of the laser system, which is generally based on a wavelength-tunable alexandrite laser oscillator/amplifier, and multiple Raman conversion stages. This configuration provides robust access to the mid-IR spectral region at wavelengths, pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates that are attractive for neurosurgical applications. We summarize results for ultra-precise selective cutting of nerve sheaths and retinas with little collateral damage; this has applications in procedures such as optic-nerve-sheath fenestration and possible spinal repair. We also report results for cutting cornea, and dermal tissues.

  1. [Treatment of ureteral lithiasis using the laser].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Marcellán, F J; Ibarz Servio, L; Ramón Dalmau, M

    1991-06-01

    A review of the history of lasertripsy from continuous to intermittent Nd:YAG, Alexandrite, or liquid-dye laser is undertaken. Certain calculi require intraureteral fragmentation owing to stone hardness or location. Within a period spanning 20 months, we have treated 350 patients (199 males, 151 females) utilizing dye laser through a very fine caliber 7.5 F ureteroscope. Twenty-six had bilateral calculi. The calculi were located in the upper third in 10% (37), middle third in 25% (93), and lower third in 65% (241). Complete fragmentation was achieved in 341 (93%), push up + ESWL was performed in 24 (6.4%), and two calculi (0.6%) required ultrasonic fragmentation. No patient required surgery and there were no severe complications.

  2. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occurring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Nd/sup 3+/ in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  3. generation of picosecond pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsyn, V.N.; Matrosov, V.N.; Pestryakov, E.V.; Trunov, V.I.

    1986-07-01

    Results are reported of investigations aimed at generating nanosecond radiation pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media having broad gain lines. Passive mode locking is accomplished for the first time in a BeLa:Nd/sup 3/ laser at a wavelength 1.354 microm, and in a YAG:Nd/sup 3/ laser on a 1.32-microm transition. The free lasing and mode-locking regimes were investigated in an alexandrite (BeA1/sub 2/O/sub 4/:Cr/sup 3/) laser in the 0.72-0.78-microm range and in a synchronously pumped laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers in LiF in the 1.12-1.24-microm region. The features of nonlinear perception of IR radiation by the eye, using a developed picosecond laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers, are investigated for the first time.

  4. Excited-state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occuring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelength resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed form the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  5. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliewer, Michael L.; Powell, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics in laser-pumped, rare-earth-doped, solid-state laser materials are investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It is found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited-state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process is an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  6. BeAl6O10: Cr3+: a promising active medium for femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. V.; Pestryakov, Efim V.; Trunov, V. I.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Alimpiev, A. I.

    2003-10-01

    The new laser crystals BeAl6O10:Cr3+ were grown, spectral-luminescence and CW laser properties were investigated and compared with those of well-known laser medium-alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+). CW laser generation on vibronic transition 4T2-4A2 of Cr3+ ions in BeAl6O10 crystals was realized in the range of 800-880 nm under Ar+ laser pumping. The emission cross-section of laser transition was estimated about 6×10-20 cm2. We confirmed these crystals are perspective for generation of femtosecond pulses in the near IR region under LD pumping.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation of materials for frequency-agile laser systems. Final report, 15 January 1982-14 January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This research involves the use of laser-spectroscopy techniques such as four-wave mixing, multiphoton absorption, time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy, and holography to characterize dynamical optical processes such as energy transfer, exciton migration, radiation-less relaxation, and the photorefractive effect. In addition, a significant effort was spent in the synthesis and characterization of new types of materials for tunable laser applications. The materials investigated include alexandrite, titanium-doped sapphire, lithium niobate, neodymium pentaphosphate, rhodium-doped rubidium calcium fluoride, manganese silicate, and neodymium-doped garnet crystals and glasses.

  8. Laser Remote Measurements of atmospheric pollutants (Las-R-Map): UV-Visible Laser system description and data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, V.; Wyk, H. V.

    Laser radar more popularly known as LIDAR LIght Detection And Ranging is becoming one of the most powerful techniques for active remote sensing of the earth s atmosphere Around the globe several new lidar systems have been developed based on the scientific interest Particularly the DIfferential Absorption Lidar DIAL technique is only one which can provide the better accuracy of measuring atmospheric pollutants Using modern advanced techniques and instrumentation a mobile DIAL system called laser remote measurements of atmospheric pollutants hear after referred as Las-R-Map is designed at National Laser Centre NLC --Pretoria 25 r 45 prime S 28 r 17 prime E Las-R-Map is basically used for measuring atmospheric pollutants applying the principle of absorption by constituents The system designed primarily to focus on the following pollutant measurements such as SO 2 CH 4 CO 2 NO 2 and O 3 In future the system could be used to measure few particulate matter between 2 5 mu m and 10 mu m Benzene Hg 1 3-butadiene H 2 S HF and Volatile Organic Compounds VOC Las-R-map comprises of two different laser sources Alexandrite and CO 2 optical receiver data acquisition and signal processor It uses alexandrite laser in the UV-Visible region from 200 nm to 800 nm and CO 2 laser in the Far-IR region from 9 2 mu m to 10 8 mu m Such two different laser sources make feasibility for studying the wide range of atmospheric pollutants The present paper is focused on technical details

  9. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.; Albrecht, G.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  10. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Albrecht, G.; Beach, R.

    1994-12-31

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  11. Nonradiative relaxation in tunable solid-state laser crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gayen, S.K.; Wang, W.B.; Pettricevic, V.; Alfano, R.R.

    1985-12-01

    The picosecond excite-and-probe adsorption technique is used to study the nonradiative transition dynamics between the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ and the /sup 2/ E excited states of two trivalent-chromium-ion-activated laser crystals -- ruby and alexandrite. A 527-nm 7-ps pulse excites the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ pump band of the Cr/sup 3 +/ ion in these crystals, and the subsequent population kinetics among excited states is monitored by an infrared picosecond probe pulse as a function of pump-probe delay. In ruby, a resolution-limited sharp rise in the excited-state population followed by a long-lifetime decay is observed. This leads to an upper limit of 7 ps for the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ state nonradiative lifetime in ruby. In alexandrite, a longer risetime followed by a multicomponent decay is observed. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining the observed induced absorption and kinetics from excited states of the Cr/sup 3 +/ ion in these crystals. In alexandrite, vibrational relaxation rate for transition from the higher-lying vibrational states of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ to the bottom of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ energy parabola is estimated to be approx. 6 x 10/sup 10/ (relaxation time approx. 17 ps). Transition rate from the bottom of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ parabola to the /sup 2/E is found to be of the order of 3.7 x 10/sup 10//s (relaxation time approx. 27 ps), while the thermal refilling rate of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ from /sup 2/E is approx. 3.5 x 10/sup 9//s. The infrared absorption cross section from the excited /sup 4/T/sub 2/ state is estimated to about an order-of-magnitude higher than that from the metastable /sup 2/E level.

  12. Determination of the variation of the fluorescence line positions of ruby, strontium tetraborate, alexandrite, and samarium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet with pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Selva Vennila; Zaug, Joseph M.; Chen, Bin; Yan, Jinyuan; Knight, Jason W.; Jeanloz, Raymond; Clark, Simon M.

    2011-07-01

    The pressure and temperature dependent fluorescence line-shift of strontium tetraborate has been measured concurrently with x-ray diffraction from the pressure standards sodium chloride or gold. Temperature was found to have a small effect on the fluorescence line-shift under pressure. We found a maximum pressure uncertainty of ±1.8 GPa at 25 GPa (7.2%) and 857 K when making no temperature correction. The fluorescence line-shifts for ruby, Alexandrite, and samarium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet were also determined, using our strontium tetraborate calibration to determine pressure and a thermocouple to measure temperature. Fluorescence measurements were extended up to 800 K for ruby and Alexandrite. Temperature was found to have a small effect on the fluorescence line-shift of samarium-doped yittrium aluminum garnet. We found a maximum uncertainty of ±2.7 GPa at 25 GPa (11.1%) and 857 K when no temperature correction was applied. We determined equations relating to the fluorescence line position from these data, which include a cross derivative term to account for the combined effect of pressure and temperature. We present a method to independently determine pressure and/or temperature from combined fluorescence line-shift measurements of a pair of optical sensors.

  13. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In H.; Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors consider the relation between the threshold pumping intensity, the material properties, the resonator parameters, and the ultimate slope efficiencies of various solid-state laser materials for solar pumping. They clarify the relation between the threshold pump intensity and the material parameters and the relation between the ultimate slope efficiency and the laser resonator parameters such that a design criterion for the solar-pumped solid-state laser can be established. Among the laser materials evaluated, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6 percent; however, it does not seem to be practical for a solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AM0) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12 percent when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  14. Efficiency and Plume Dynamics for Mid-IR Laser Ablation of Cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, Aroshan; Ivanov, Borislav; Hutson, M. Shane

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports ablation experiments on porcine corneal tissue using the Vanderbilt Mark III Free Electron Laser (FEL) and a tabletop Raman-shifted Alexandrite laser. These experiments were designed to test previous models that suggested wavelength and intensity dependent ablation mechanisms. In one test, we compare ablation efficiency and plume dynamics for two FEL wavelengths (λ=2.77, 6.45 μm) chosen such that different components of the tissue matrix act as the primary chromophore (water or protein respectively), while keeping the total absorption constant. We find small differences in ablation efficiency (with slightly more efficient ablation at 2.77 μm); no difference in shockwave propagation; and slightly more particulate matter in the plume at 6.45 μm. In a second test, we find that the Raman-shifted Alexandrite laser has similar ablation efficiency to the FEL in the 6-7 μm range -- despite a ˜500-fold higher intensity. Although these results do not confirm the previous model predictions, the findings do suggest that the Raman-shifted laser can be a viable alternative to the FEL for surgical applications.

  15. Comparative analysis of the use of various solid-state laser media for the self-starting of four-wave PCW generation in a loop laser resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetanin, Sergei N.

    2013-01-01

    A generalised theory has been used to carry out a comparative analysis of the use of various four-level and quasi-threelevel media for the self-starting of degenerate four-wave mixing PCW generation directly in a laser medium placed in a loop resonator. It has been shown that quasi-three-level media can compete with four-level media at long upper laser level lifetimes and increased pump intensities. The most attractive solid-state laser media for four-wave PCW generation have been identified that have the highest deposited energy at a given pump intensity. In addition to neodymium-doped crystals, which are already widely used for four-wave PCW generation, promising materials are fourlevel chromium-doped media, e.g. alexandrite and Cr : LiCAF, and quasi-three-level media with the longest upper laser level lifetime, such as Yb : YAG and Tm, Ho : YAG, at high pump intensities.

  16. Laser- and light-based hair removal: an update.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David J

    2007-03-01

    A variety of laser technologies are now able to successfully remove unwanted hair. Successful removal is based on an understanding of laser physics and appropriate wavelengths, pulse durations and cooling of the skin. Although ruby lasers were among the first to be used, alexandrite, diode and neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers, as well as a variety of broad-spectrum intense pulsed light sources, are currently more commonly used for the treatment of unwanted hair. Darker skin types are more difficult to treat but can also be treated. Complications can occur after laser hair removal but can be reduced through an understanding of the fundamentals of laser removal. These complications include the obvious, such as scarring and pigmentary changes, and the not so obvious, such as reticulate erythema and uveitis. Laser hair removal is now widely accepted as a successful approach to remove unwanted hair in both men and women. The future will involve office-based laser and light source hair removal, as well as a variety of laser and light-based home devices.

  17. Nonradiative relaxation in tunable solid state laser crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of nonradiative transitions between the 4T2 and 2E excited states of trivalent-chromium-ion-activated ruby (containing 0.04 percent Cr2O3 by weight) and alexandrite (containing 0.4 at. percent chromium ion) laser crystals were studied using the technique described by Gayen et al. (1985). In this technique, a 527-nm pulse excites the 4T2 band of the Cr(3+), and the subsequent population kinetics among excited states is monitored by an IR picosecond probe pulse as a function of pump-probe delay. In ruby, a resolution-limited sharp rise in the excited state population was followed by a long-lifetime decay, leading to an upper limit of 7 ps for the 4T2-state nonradiative lifetime. In alexandrite, a longer rise time was followed by a multicomponent decay. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining the induced absorption and the transition dynamics observed in these crystals.

  18. Hair removal.

    PubMed

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available systems. Evidence has been found for long-term hair removal efficacy beyond 6 months after repetitive treatments with alexandrite, diode, and long-pulse Nd:YAG lasers, whereas the current long-term evidence is sparse for IPL devices. Treatment parameters must be adjusted to patient skin type and chromophore. Longer wavelengths and cooling are safer for patients with darker skin types. Hair removal with lasers and IPL sources are generally safe treatment procedures when performed by properly educated operators. However, safety issues must be addressed since burns and adverse events do occur. New treatment procedures are evolving. Consumer-based treatments with portable home devices are rapidly evolving, and presently include low-level diode lasers and IPL devices.

  19. Thermochromism, the Alexandrite effect, and dynamic Jahn-Teller distortions in Ho2Cu(TeO3)2(SO4)2.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N; Babo, Jean-Marie; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2013-11-18

    A 3d-4f heterobimetallic material with mixed anions, Ho2Cu(TeO3)2(SO4)2, has been prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Ho2Cu(TeO3)2(SO4)2 exhibits both thermochromism and the Alexandrite effect. Variable temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy reveal that changes in the Cu(II) coordination geometry result in negative thermal expansion of axial Cu-O bonds that plays a role in the thermochromic transition of Ho2Cu(TeO3)2(SO4)2. Magnetic studies reveal an effective magnetic moment of 14.97 μB. which has a good agreement with the calculated value of 15.09 μB.

  20. Lasers for Treatment of Melasma and Post-Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Sarkar, Rashmi; Garg, Vijay K; Arya, Latika

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpigmentary disorders, especially melasma and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), cause significant social and emotional stress to the patients. Although many treatment modalities have been developed for melasma and PIH, its management still remains a challenge due to its recurrent and refractory nature. With the advent of laser technology, the treatment options have increased especially for dermal or mixed melasma. To review the literature on the use of cutaneous lasers for melasma and PIH. We carried out a PubMed search using following terms “lasers, IPL, melasma, PIH”. We cited the use of various lasers to treat melasma and PIH, including Q-switched Nd:YAG, Q-switched alexandrite, pulsed dye laser, and various fractional lasers. We describe the efficacy and safety of these lasers for the treatment of hyperpigmentation. Choosing the appropriate laser and the correct settings is vital in the treatment of melasma. The use of latter should be restricted to cases unresponsive to topical therapy or chemical peels. Appropriate maintenance therapy should be selected to avoid relapse of melasma. PMID:23060704

  1. Ten-years experience of laser use in aesthetic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulev, Valerii S.; Dobrjakova, Olga B.; Dobrjakov, Boris S.

    2001-10-01

    A collaboration of the laser physicist and aesthetic surgeons has started 10 years ago. Within the period 1992 - 2000 we have carried out the investigation of the influence of the pulsed radiation, emitted by lasers having as active mediums crystals of the aluminum-yttrium garnet and alexandrite, on the cultures of the alive tissue and the fibrosis capsules around foreign bodies in the animals. Besides, we have studied the clinical protocol: in majority, patients were women after mammary augmentation. The laser tatoo non-invasive removals were marked at the beginning of the pulse of the Q-switch neodymium yttrium-aluminum garnet laser radiation used in human. It was obtained that this laser radiation broke the cell proliferation without any mutations and morphology changes. It was also noticed much evidence that the high functional fibroblast activities were registered in fibrosis capsules of not exposed animals to the laser radiation. It was also noticed that the use of laser radiation affected the speed and quality of the productive inflammation. The softening of the fibrous capsule around the mammary implant and the reduction of the pronounced rubbers were the clinical effects of the laser radiation.

  2. All fiber laser using a ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alberto Varguez; Pérez, Georgina Beltrán; Aguirre, Severino Muñoz; Mixcóatl, Juan Castillo

    2008-04-01

    Mode-locked laser have a number of potential applications, depending on the wavelength and pulse width. They could be used as sources in communications systems for time division multiplexing (TDM) or wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) as spectroscopic tools in the laboratory for time-resolved studies of fast nonlinear phenomena in semiconductors, or as seeds for solid-state amplifers such as Nd:Glass, color center alexandrite, or Ti:Sapphire. Short pulses also have potential use in electro-optic sampling systems, as a source for pulsed sensors, or as tunable seed pulses for lasers in medical applications. Applications such as optical coherent tomography could take advantage of the broad bandwidth of a mode-locked fiber laser rather that the temporal ultra-short pulse width. This work shows the characterization of active mode-locking all-fiber laser by using an acousto-optic frequency shifter to the ring cavity, an erbium doped fiber (EDF) and polarization controllers (PC). The results shows a highly stable mode-locked, low noise of pulse generation with repetition rate of 10 MHz and width of 1.6 ns

  3. Development of the megahertz planar laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic for plasma turbulence visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuritsyn, Aleksey; Levinton, Fred M.

    2004-10-01

    A megahertz laser-induced fluorescence-based diagnostic system for measuring ion density fluctuations in two spatial dimensions is described. Well resolved spatial and temporal two-dimensional (2D) images of turbulent structures will be useful in understanding ion turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas which is a key factor in the performance of fusion experimental devices. A sheet beam of a megahertz repetition rate tunable Alexandrite laser is used to excite ion emission from argon plasma. The fluorescence emitted from the plane of the laser beam is detected with a narrow band interference filter and intensified ultrafast charge coupled device camera providing 2D images of relative ion density fluctuations every microsecond. It is expected that the edge plasma on fusion devices will be accessible to this technique.

  4. A six-color four-laser mobile platform for multi-spectral fluorescence imaging endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, John F.; Tate, Tyler; Keenan, Molly; Swan, Elizabeth; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    The properties of multi-spectral fluorescence imaging using deep-UV-illumination have recently been explored using a fiber-coupled thermal source at 280 nm. The resulting images show a remarkable level of contrast thought to result from the signal being overwhelmingly generated in the uppermost few cell layers of tissue, making this approach valuable for the study of diseases that originate in the endothelial tissues of the body. With a view to extending the technique with new wavelengths, and improving beam quality for efficient small core fiber coupling we have developed a mobile self-contained tunable solid-state laser source of deep UV light. An alexandrite laser, lasing at around 750 nm is frequency doubled to produce 375 nm and then tripled to produce 250 nm light. An optical deck added to the system allows other laser sources to be incorporated into the UV beam-line and a lens system has been designed to couple these sources into a single delivery fiber with core diameters down to 50 microns. Our system incorporates five wavelengths [250 nm, 375 nm, 442 nm (HeCd), 543 nm (HeNe) and 638 nm (diode laser)] as the illumination source for a small diameter falloposcope designed for the study of the distal Fallopian tube origins of high grade serous ovarian cancer. The tunability of alexandrite offers the potential to generate other wavelengths in the 720-800, 360-400 and 240-265 nm ranges, plus other non-linear optical conversion techniques taking advantage of the high peak powers of the laser.

  5. Tunable infrared solid-state laser materials based on Cr/sup 3 +/ in low ligand fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, P.T.; Andrews, L.; Lempick, A.; McCollum, B.

    1982-08-01

    A new class of solid-state tunable lasers based on Cr/sup 3 +/ in low ligand field materials is described. Spectroscopic and calculated laser properties have been obtained for the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ emission in two low field crystals: K/sub 2/Na Sc/sub 1-x/ Cr/sub x/F/sub 6/ and Al/sub 1-x/ Cr/sub x/ (PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. A comparison is made with two d/sup 3/ laser materials (Cr/sup 3 +/:alexandrite and V/sup 2 +/:MgF/sub 2/). The prospect of expanding this class of materials is assessed.

  6. Thermomechanical and thermo-optical properties of the LiCaAlF sub 6 :Cr sup 3+ laser material (US)

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, B.W.; Payne, S.A.; Marion, J.E.; Hughes, R.S.; Davis, L.E. )

    1991-05-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic thermomechanical and thermo-optical properties of the new laser material LiCaAlF{sub 6}:Cr{sup 3+} (known as Cr:LiCAF) are performed. Thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, thermal expansion, elastic constants, fracture toughness, and dispersion and temperature variation of the refractive index are all characterized for this material. In addition, the magnitude of the thermal lensing induced in a flash-lamp-pumped laser rod of Cr:LiCAF is measured and compared with the results obtained for an alexandrite laser rod in the same laser head. We find that the thermal lensing of Cr:LiCAF is favorably small and that the thermomechanical properties are expected to be adequate for applications at low and medium average power.

  7. Simulation of tunable Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiSAF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiu-Fen; Hsieh, Shang-Wei; Kuo, Yen-Kuang

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we numerically investigate the passive Q-switching performance of the tunable Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiSAF laser over its entire tuning range. Specifically, the optical performance of the Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiSAF laser as functions of the initial population in the ground state of the Cr:YSO saturable absorber, the pumping rate, the reflectivity of the output coupler, and the dissipative loss inside the laser cavity are studied. Simulation results show that the Cr:YSO is an effective saturable absorber Q switch for the Cr:LiSAF laser over its entire tuning range. Unlike the Cr:YSO Q-switched alexandrite laser and the Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiCAF laser, the Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiSAF laser has similar passive Q-switching performance when the laser polarization is along each of the three principal axes of the Cr:YSO. The results obtained numerically in this work are in good agreement with those obtained experimentally by other researchers. Our simulation results indicate that, a Q-switched laser pulse with an output energy of 10 mJ and a pulse width of 17 ns may be obtained at 850 nm, the peak of its tuning spectrum.

  8. Solar cells made by laser-induced diffusion directly from phosphine gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, G. B.; Tarrant, D.; Pollock, G.; Pressley, R.; Press, R.

    1981-12-01

    A method for making p-n junctions is presented, which is based on immersion in a transparent dopant gas followed by irradiation with a pulsed laser. An alexandrite laser operating at 0.73 micron is used where photolysis of the dopant gas PH3 does not occur, and multiple pulses of 2.2-2.7 J/sq cm are used to make Si solar cells with a total area efficiency up to 8.6% without benefit of anti-reflection coatings. Use of other gases should allow p-type doping, and the spatial localization inherent in the process could make the method applicable to structures such as interdigitated solar cells, transistors, and integrated circuits.

  9. Development of the Megahertz Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for Plasma Turbulence Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksey Kuritsyn; Fred M. Levinton

    2004-04-27

    A megahertz LIF-based diagnostic system for measuring ion density fluctuations in two spatial dimensions is described. Well resolved spatial and temporal 2D images of turbulent structures will be useful in understanding ion turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas which is a key factor in the performance of fusion experimental devices. A sheet beam of a megahertz repetition rate tunable Alexandrite laser is used to excite ion emission from argon plasma. The fluorescence emitted from the plane of the laser beam is detected with a narrow band interference filter and intensified ultra-fast CCD camera providing 2D images of relative ion density fluctuations every microsecond. It is expected that the edge plasma on fusion devices will be accessible to this technique.

  10. Development and applications of tunable, narrow band lasers and stimulated Raman scattering devices for atmospheric lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    The main thrust of the program was the study of stimulated Raman processes for application to atmospheric lidar measurements. This has involved the development of tunable lasers, the detailed study of stimulated Raman scattering, and the use of the Raman-shifted light for new measurements of molecular line strengths and line widths. The principal spectral region explored in this work was the visible and near-IR wavelengths between 500 nm and 1.5 microns. Recent alexandrite ring laser experiments are reported. The experiments involved diode injection-locking, Raman shifting, and frequency-doubling. The experiments succeeded in producing tunable light at 577 and 937 nm with line widths in the range 80-160 MHz.

  11. Theory of the optimally coupled Q-switched laser

    SciTech Connect

    Degnan, J.J.

    1989-02-01

    The general equations describing Q-switched laser operation are transcendental in nature and require numerical solutions. This greatly complicates the optimization of real devices. In this paper, we demonstrate that, using the mathematical technique of Lagrange multipliers, one can derive simple analytic expressions for all of the key parameters of the optimally coupled laser, i.e., one which uses an optimum reflector to obtain maximum laser efficiency for a given pump level. These parameters (which include the optimum reflectivity, output energy, extraction efficiency, pulsewidth, peak power, etc.) can all be expressed as functions of a single dimensionless variable z, defined as the ratio of the unsaturated small-signal gain to the dissipative (non-useful) optical loss, multiplied by a few simple constants. Laser design tradeoff studies and performance projections can be accomplished quickly with the help of several graphs and a simple hand calculator. Sample calculations for a high-gain Nd:YAG and a low-gain alexandrite laser are presented as illustrations of the technique.

  12. Thin hollow glass waveguide for near IR radiation delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Michal; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Katsumasa; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2008-02-01

    The delivery of the radiation by thin fiber is required for some application, especially in medical internals treatment. Therefore a new 100 μm and 250 μm inner diameter hollow glass waveguides were developed and investigated for the possibility to transport high power near infrared laser radiation without damage of these delivery systems. As laser sources two Nd:YAG laser systems working in Q-switched regime at wavelength 1.06 μm and 1.34 μm were utilized. Delivered radiation characterization was performed. By Alexandrite laser (755 nm) pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been generating 1.06 μm wavelength radiation with 6 ns length of pulse and maximum output energy 0.7 mJ (116.7 kW). The laser was Q-switched using LiF:F 2- saturable absorber. Second laser system was Nd:YAG/V:YAG microchip pumped by laser diode operating at 808 nm. The radiation at 1.3 μm wavelength has been generated with 250 Hz repetition rate. Pulse length was 6 ns and mean output power 25 mW. Corresponding pulse energy and peak power was 0.1 mJ and 16.7 kW, respectively. Both lasers were operating in fundamental TEM 00 mode (M2 ~ 1). For delivery a special cyclic olefin polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguides with the inner/outer diameters 100/190 μm and 250/360 μm were used. The delivery system was consisted of lens, protector, and waveguide. As results the transmission more than 55% and reasonable spatial profile of laser output radiation were found. From these measurements it can be recommended using of this system for near infrared powerful radiation delivery as well as for medical treatment.

  13. Failure of Q-switched ruby laser to eradicate atypical-appearing solar lentigo: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, P K; Rosenberg, C N; Tsao, H; Sober, A J

    1998-02-01

    Cutaneous lasers, including argon, Q-switched Nd:YAG, Q-switched ruby, Q-switched alexandrite, and short pulsed dye lasers, have been used to treat solar lentigines and other benign melanocytic lesions. However, the effects of these lasers at standard fluences on atypical melanocytic lesions have not been examined. We describe two patients in whom the Q-switched ruby laser failed to successfully treat clinically atypical-appearing solar lentigines. In both, clinically atypical-appearing melanocytic lesions were treated with excellent initial cosmetic results. In the first patient, the pigmentation returned several months after treatment and continued to increase in size and color. A biopsy specimen 30 months after Q-switched ruby laser therapy revealed a lentigo maligna melanoma. In the second patient, the lesion recurred 6 months after Q-switched ruby laser therapy, and a biopsy specimen 1 year after treatment showed an early lentigo maligna. Thus Q-switched ruby lasers and other cutaneous lasers capable of targeting melanin may be inadequate to eliminate lentigo maligna and other atypical melanocytic lesions completely. These cases emphasize the importance of careful clinical assessment before any laser surgery and the need to advise patients to return for evaluation should pigmentation return.

  14. Nd:SrWO4 Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Sulc, Jan; Doroschenko, Maxim E.; Skornyakov, Vadim V.; Kravtsov, Sergey B.; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Zverev, Peter G.

    2004-09-01

    Properties of the laser operation and simultaneously stimulated Raman scattering in the new SRS-active neodymium doped SrWO4 crystal coherently end-pumped by alexandrite 752 nm laser radiation were investigated. The maximum generated energy 90 mJ from the free-running Nd3+:SrWO4 laser at 1057 nm wavelength was obtained with the output coupler reflectivity 52%. The slope efficiency reached s = 0.52, the beam characteristic parameters M2 and divergence q were 2.5 +/- 0.1, and 1.5 +/- 0.1 mrad, respectively. Maximal output energy of 1.46 mJ for the fundamental wavelength was obtained for Q-switched Nd3+:SrWO4 oscillator with a double Fabry-Perrot as the output coupler (R = 48%), and with the 5% initial transmission of LiF:F2- saturable absorber. Up to 0.74 mJ energy was registered at the first Stokes frequency. The pulse duration was 5 ns and 2.4 ns for the fundamental and Stokes radiation, respectively. The energy of 1.25 mJ at 1170 nm was obtained for closed Raman resonator with special mirrors. For the case of mode-locking, two dye saturable absorbers (ML51 dye in dichlorethan and 3955 dye in ethanol) were used and SRS radiation in the form of pulse train was observed. The influence of the various Raman laser output couplers reflectivity as well as the initial transmissions of passive absorbers were investigated with the goal of the output energy maximization at the Stokes wavelength. In the output, the total measured energy was 1.8 mJ (for ML51 dye) and 2.4 mJ (for 3955 dye). The SRS output at 1170 nm was approximately 20% of total energy.

  15. OSA Proceedings on Advanced Solid-State Lasers. Vol. 10 - Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Hilton Head, SC, Mar. 18-20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, G.; Chase, L. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA )

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advanced solid-state lasers discusses Cr(3+), Cr(4+), short-pulse, titanium, F-center, mid-IR, and diode-pumped lasers, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to the stabilization and a spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements, crystal growth and spectroscopy of Cr:LiBaAlF6, a Q-switched tunable forsterite laser, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of chromium-doped forsterite. Topics addressed include efficient frequency doubling of a self-starting additive-pulse mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, recent advances in Ti:Al2O3 unstable-resonator lasers, all-solid-state operation of a CW Ti:Al2O3 laser, and upconversion studies of flashlamp-pumped Cr,T,Ho:YAG. Also discussed are the top output parameters of an Ho-laser, spectroscopy and the 3-micron laser potential of Er crystals, the pulsed operation of microchip lasers, and blue optical parametric generation in LiB3O5.

  16. 760nm: a new laser diode wavelength for hair removal modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölz, Martin; Zorn, Martin; Pietrzak, Agnieszka; Kindsvater, Alex; Meusel, Jens; Hülsewede, Ralf; Sebastian, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    A new high-power semiconductor laser diode module, emitting at 760 nm is introduced. This wavelength permits optimum treatment results for fair skin individuals, as demonstrated by the use of Alexandrite lasers in dermatology. Hair removal applications benefit from the industry-standard diode laser design utilizing highly efficient, portable and light-weight construction. We show the performance of a tap-water-cooled encapsulated laser diode stack with a window for use in dermatological hand-pieces. The stack design takes into account the pulse lengths required for selectivity in heating the hair follicle vs. the skin. Super-long pulse durations place the hair removal laser between industry-standard CW and QCW applications. The new 760 nm laser diode bars are 30% fill factor devices with 1.5 mm long resonator cavities. At CW operation, these units provide 40 W of optical power at 43 A with wall-plug-efficiency greater than 50%. The maximum output power before COMD is 90 W. Lifetime measurements starting at 40 W show an optical power loss of 20% after about 3000 h. The hair removal modules are available in 1x3, 1x8 and 2x8 bar configurations.

  17. Visualization of plasma turbulence with laser-induced fluorescence (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, Fred M.; Trintchouk, Fedor

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence is a key factor limiting the performance of fusion devices. Plasma edge turbulence determines the boundary values of the plasma density and temperature, which in turn determine the internal gradients and controls global plasma transport. In recent years, significant progress has been made in modeling turbulence behavior in plasmas and its effect on transport. Progress has also been made in diagnostics for turbulence measurement; however, there is still a large gap in our understanding of it. An approach to improve this situation is to experimentally visualize the turbulence, that is, a high resolution 2-D image of the plasma density. Visualization of turbulence can improve the connection to theory and help validate theoretical models. One method that has been successfully developed to visualize turbulence in gases and fluids is planar laser-induced fluorescence. We have recently applied this technique to visualize turbulence and structures in a plasma. This was accomplished using an Alexandrite laser that is tunable between 700 and 800 nm, and from 350 to 400 nm with second harmonic generation. The fluorescence light from an argon ion transition has been imaged onto an intensified charged coupled device camera that is gated in synchronization with the laser. Images from the plasma show a rotating structure at 30 kHz in addition to small scale turbulence.

  18. Nd:SrWO 4 and Nd:BaWO 4 Raman lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, J.; Jelínková, H.; Basiev, T. T.; Doroschenko, M. E.; Ivleva, L. I.; Osiko, V. V.; Zverev, P. G.

    2007-09-01

    Properties of the laser operation and simultaneously stimulated Raman scattering in the SRS-active neodymium doped SrWO4 and BaWO4 crystals coherently end-pumped at wavelength 752 nm by pulsed free-running alexandrite laser radiation were investigated. The Nd3+ ion emission at wavelength λNd ˜ 1.06 μm was corresponding to 4F3/2 → 4I11/2 transition. To reach the SRS-self-conversion threshold inside Raman crystal the Nd3+ lasers were operating in a Q-switching regime. For Q-switching LiF:F2- crystal as a saturable absorber was used. Raman self-conversion at wavelength ˜1.17 μm was successfully reached with both tungstate crystals. The shortest generated pulse (1.3 ns FWHM) and highest peak power (615 kW) was obtained with Nd:BaWO4 Raman laser Q-switched by LiF:F2- crystal with initial transmission T0 = 60%. Up to 0.8 mJ was registered at the first Stokes wavelength 1169 nm. Using Q-switched Nd:SrWO4 laser higher energy in Raman emission was obtained (1.23 mJ) but generated pulse was longer (2.9 ns FWHM) resulting in lower peak power (430 kW).

  19. An Internet-based survey on characteristics of laser tattoo removal and associated side effects.

    PubMed

    Klein, Annette; Rittmann, Ines; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Landthaler, Michael; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Tattoo removal by laser therapy is a frequently performed procedure in dermatological practices. Quality-switched ruby, alexandrite, or Nd:YAG lasers are the most suitable treatment devices. Although these techniques are regarded as safe, both temporary and permanent side effects might occur. Little has been published on the frequency of complications associated with laser tattoo removal. We performed an Internet survey in German-speaking countries on characteristics of laser tattoo removal and associated side effects. A total number of 157 questionnaires entered the final analysis. Motivations for laser tattoo removal were mainly considering the tattoo as youthful folly (29%), esthetic reasons (28%), and 6% indicated medical problems. One third of participants were unsatisfied with the result of laser tattoo removal, and a complete removal of the tattoo pigment was obtained in 38% only. Local transient side effects occurred in nearly all participants, but an important rate of slightly visible scars (24%) or even important scarring (8%) was reported. Every fourth participant described mild or intense tan when the laser treatment was performed, and the same number of people indicated UV exposure following laser therapy, which should normally be avoided in these circumstances. As reported in the literature, nearly half of the participants experienced hypopigmentation in the treated area. Our results show that from the patients' point of view there is an important rate of side effects occurring after laser tattoo removal. Appropriate pretreatment counseling with regard to realistic expectations, possible side effects, and the application of test spots is mandatory to ensure patient satisfaction. Laser treatment should be performed by appropriately trained personnel only.

  20. Comparative analysis of the use of various solid-state laser media for the self-starting of four-wave PCW generation in a loop laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, Sergei N

    2013-01-31

    A generalised theory has been used to carry out a comparative analysis of the use of various four-level and quasi-threelevel media for the self-starting of degenerate four-wave mixing PCW generation directly in a laser medium placed in a loop resonator. It has been shown that quasi-three-level media can compete with four-level media at long upper laser level lifetimes and increased pump intensities. The most attractive solid-state laser media for four-wave PCW generation have been identified that have the highest deposited energy at a given pump intensity. In addition to neodymium-doped crystals, which are already widely used for four-wave PCW generation, promising materials are fourlevel chromium-doped media, e.g. alexandrite and Cr : LiCAF, and quasi-three-level media with the longest upper laser level lifetime, such as Yb : YAG and Tm, Ho : YAG, at high pump intensities. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  1. Laser-spectroscopy characterization of materials for frequency-agile solid-state laser systems. Final report, 15 Jan 88-14 Jan 91

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1991-03-15

    This research involves the use of laser spectroscopy techniques to investigate materials which include laser crystals such as Cr{sup 3+}-doped alexandrite, emerald, garnets, and glass ceramics as well as Nd{sup 3+}-doped garnets and germinates and Ho{sup 3+}-doped fluorides. In addition, photorefractive processes were studied in potassium niobate crystals and in rare earth doped glasses. Some of the results of major importance from this work are: (1) The characterization of the properties of laser-induced gratings in glasses; (2) The elucidation of the effects of dopant ions on the photorefractive response of potassium niobate; (3) The observation of a new type of picosecond nonlinear optical response in potassium niobate associated with scattering from a Nb hopping mode; (4) The characterization of the properties of energy migration and radiationless relaxation processes in Cr{sup 3+} doped laser crystals; (5) The characterization of the pumping dynamics and lasing properties of Ho{sup 3+} in BaYb{sub 2}F{sub 8}; and (6) The characterization of the pumping dynamics and lasing properties of several Nd{sup 3+}-doped crystals.

  2. The development of laser surgery and medicine in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingzhe

    2005-07-01

    The first Chinese ruby laser was created in 1961 and it was adopted for the retina coagulation experiment in 1965. Since 1970's, lasers had been widely applied clinically including the diseases suitable to physical therapy or acupuncture. The Chinese HpD was first produced in 1981 and first case of PDT was treated using Chinese HpD and Chinese lasers in the same year. Its success brought attention establishing a research group supported by the government in 1982. A nationwide systemic research project on PDT was then carried out. The step taken for PDT also accelerated the development of various fields of laser medicine and surgery. Laser treatments had been commonly adopted in the clinics and hospitals for the diseases of the superficial lesions and the lesions can be reached by the endoscopes non-invasively in 1980's. Since 1990's, the interventional laser therapies adopted mainly were percutaneous laser angioplasty, laser treatments through laparoscope, thoracoscope, arthroscope, neuro-endoscope etc. Ultrasound guided percutaneous laser heat coagulation for small hepatic cancer revealed good results and ultrasound guided percutaneous PDT for advanced large liver cancer revealed unexpected results after five years follow-up. At present: There are more long-term follow-up patients in the clinical trial; more advanced commercial available lasers and new techniques are adopted. Since the popularization of scanning electron microscope, laser scanning confocal microscope, laser induced auto-fluorescence system, high sensitivity fluorescence microscopic imaging system etc. in the laboratories, the basic studies can be more advanced and some times, the sub-cellular level can be reached; ultra-structure histo-morphology and gene studies are involved. In dermatology, Q-switched Alexandrite laser and other Q-switched lasers are used mainly for the treatment of skin pigmentation and vascular diseases; pulsed dye laser, ultra-pulsed CO2 laser are used in resurfacing, facial

  3. Control of Hazards to Health From Laser Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Helium-neon Diode Ruby Rhodamine 6G dye Alexandrite GaA1As4 Gallium-arsenide Nd:glass Nd:YAG5 Erbium:YAG Hydrogen fluoride Deuterium fluoride...633 Ruby Pulsed VIS 694 Alexandrite Dermatology; tattoo pigmentation breakup; blood vessel reduction; treatment of Pulsed VIS 720 - 800...d or at the exit pu p Equation 44 ⎥ ⎤ ⎢ ⎡=⎥ ⎤ ⎢ ⎡= HorED loglogλ ⎦⎣⎦⎣ MPEMPE EXAMPLE 36. Alexandrite Calculate the worst-case OD

  4. Design and performance of a multiterawatt, subpicosecond neodymium glass laser

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, F.G.; Perry, M.D.

    1990-09-01

    Broad-band solid-state materials such as Nd:Glass, Ti:Sapphire and Alexandrite, exhibit saturation fluences on the order of Joules/cm{sup 2}. Unfortunately, the large stored energy density of these solid state materials cannot be accessed directly with short pulses due to beam filamentation caused by the intensity dependent refractive index. This limits the power density in a solid state amplifier to only a few GW/cm{sup 2}. The application of chirped- pulsed amplification (CPA) to solid-state lasers circumvents this problem. With the CPA technique, a chirped, comparatively long pulse is produced and compressed to a short pulse only after amplification. The intensity in the amplifiers is kept below the level for significant nonlinear phase distortion. In this paper, we present the design and performance of a small scale Nd:Glass laser system employing chirped-pulse amplification to produce subpicosecond pulses exhibiting peak power exceeding 10 TW. 30 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Novel inclusion in laser crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaoshan; Wang Siting; Jin Zhongru; Shen Yafang; Chen Jiaguang

    1986-12-01

    In growing alexandrite crystals, a novel inclusion has been found. The inclusions are quantitatively analyzed by an electronic probe and the mechanism for forming inclusions is suggested. In our Bridgman MgF/sub 2/ crystals, the inclusions in <001> direction have also been observed.

  6. Nd:YAG laser systems with radiation delivery by thin hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Michal; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Katsumasa; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2008-04-01

    The goal of the work was the investigation of hollow waveguide utilization for near infrared laser radiation delivery. As basic delivery unit, a new thin cyclic olefin polymer coated silver hollow glass waveguide with diameters 100/190 μm or 250/360 μm and length up to 20 cm was used. Four near infrared laser sources were based on the Nd:YAG crystals. The first one - Nd:YAG laser passively Q-switched by LiF:F 2- saturable absorber - was coherently pumped by Alexandrite radiation. The system generated 1.06 μm wavelength radiation with 6 ns length of pulse and 0.7 mJ maximum output energy. The second and third laser systems were compact longitudinally diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers generating radiation at wavelength 1.06 μm and 1.44 μm. These lasers were operating in a free-running regime under pulsed pumping (pulse repetition rate 50 Hz). Mean output power 160 mW (90 mW) with pulse length 0.5 ms (1 ms) was generated at wavelength 1.06 μm (1.44 μm). The last radiation source was the Nd:YAG/V:YAG microchip laser pumped by laser diode and generating the radiation at 1.34 μm wavelength. The output power, pulse length, and repetition rate were 25 mW, 6 ns, and 250 Hz, respectively. All lasers were generating beam with gaussian TEM 00 profile. These radiations were focused into thin a waveguide and delivery radiation characteristics were investigated. It was recognized that the output spatial structure is significantly modified in all cases. However a compact delivery system can be useful for near infrared powerful radiation delivery in some special technological and medical applications.

  7. Q -switched laser at 912 nm using ground-state-depleted neodymium in yttrium orthosilicate

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Albrecht, G.; Solarz, R.; Krupke, W.; Comaskey, B.; Mitchell, S. ); Brandle, C.; Berkstresser, G. )

    1990-09-15

    A ground-state-depleted laser is demonstrated in the form of a {ital Q}-switched oscillator operating at 912 nm. By using Nd{sup 3+} as the active ion and Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} as the host material, the laser transition is from the lowest-lying Stark level of the Nd{sup 3+} {sup 4}{ital F}{sub 3/2} level to a Stark level 355 cm{sup {minus}1} above the lowest-lying one in the {sup 4}{ital I}{sub 9/2} manifold. The necessity of depleting the ground {sup 4}{ital I}{sub 9/2} manifold is evident for this level scheme as transparency requires a 10% inversion. To achieve the high excitation levels required for the efficient operation of this laser, bleach-wave pumping using an alexandrite laser at 745 nm has been employed. With KNbO{sub 3}, noncritical phase matching is possible at 140{degree} C using {ital d}{sub 32} and is demonstrated.

  8. Quantum electronic properties of the Na/sub 3/Ga/sub 2/Li/sub 3/F/sub 12/:Cr/sup 3+/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Payne, S.A.; Staver, P.R.; Ramponi, A.J.; Chase, L.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1988-06-01

    Few of the existing Cr/sup 3+/ vibronic lasers have achieved the slope efficiency and tuning range expected based on their known spectroscopic properties. In order to discover the causes of this behavior, the performance of chromium doped gallium fluoride garnet, Na/sub 3/Ga/sub 2/Li/sub 3/F/sub 12/:Cr/sup 3+/, as a laser material has been investigated experimentally. The data reported here include absorption and emission spectra, emission rates, quantum efficiency, laser wavelength tuning range, laser output slope efficiencies, and excited state absorption spectra. Similar properties of the alexandrite laser material were studied for comparison. The results indicate that the performance of the gallium fluoride garnet laser is severely limited by Cr/sup 3+/ excited state absorption (ESA). A model is presented to account for the unexpected nature of the ESA, which appears to be a common problem for all Cr/sup 3+/ vibronic lasers. Criteria are suggested for choosing Cr/sup 3+/ hosts for which the effects of ESA will be minimized.

  9. Laser apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A laser apparatus having a pump laser device for producing pump laser energy upon being excited is disclosed. The pump laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the pump laser energy. A source laser device is used for producing source laser energy upon being excited by the pump laser energy. The source laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the source laser energy. The source laser's resonating cavity is coupled within a portion of the pump laser's resonating cavity.

  10. Atomic Line Filter for SDI Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-13

    narrowband detection schemes must be used in conjunction with a tuned narrowband laser source. We developed a frequency locked alexandrite laser designed to...Switched Alexandrite Laser Injection Seeded by a Rubidium Absorption Frequency Matched Diode Laser* ..................................... 46 5. Combat ID...with a tuned narrowband laser source. We developed a frequency locked alexandrite laser designed to match the acceptance band of a passive rubidium based

  11. A ground state depleted laser in neodymium doped yttrium orthosilicate

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Albrecht, G.; Solarz, R.; Krupke, W.; Comaskey, B.; Mitchell, S.; Brandle, C.; Berkstresser, G.

    1990-01-16

    A ground state depleted (GSD){sup 1,2} laser has been demonstrated in the form of a Q-switched oscillator operating at 912 nm. Using Nd{sup 3+} as the active ion and Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} as the host material, the laser transition is from the lowest lying stark level of the Nd{sup 3t}F{sub 3/2} level to a stark level 355 cm{sup {minus}1} above the lowest lying one in the {sup 4}I{sub 9/2} manifold. The necessity of depleting the ground {sup 4}I{sub 9/2} manifold is evident for this level scheme as transparency requires a 10% inversion. To achieve the high excitation levels required for the efficient operation of this laser, bleach wave pumping using an alexandrite laser at 745 nm has been employed. The existence of a large absorption feature at 810 nm also allows for the possibility of AlGaAs laser diode pumping. Using KNbO{sub 3}, noncritical phase matching is possible at 140{degree}C using d{sub 32} and has been demonstrated. The results of Q-switched laser performance and harmonic generation in KNbO{sub 3} will be presented. Orthosilicate can be grown in large boules of excellent optical quality using a Czochralski technique. Because of the relatively small 912 nm emission cross section of 2-3 {times} 10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2} (orientation dependent) fluences of 10-20 J/cm{sup 2} must be circulated in the laser cavity for the efficient extraction of stored energy. This necessitates very aggressive laser damage thresholds. Results from the Reptile laser damage facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be presented showing Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} bulk and AR sol-gel coated surface damage thresholds of greater than 40 J/cm{sup 2} for 10 nsec, 10 Hz, 1.06 {mu} pulses. 16 refs., 18 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Identification of New Potential Scientific and Technology Areas for DoD Application. Summary of Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-02

    out that apart from private funding for alexandrite laser development there has been no new program in solid-state laser material research in the...34Developing High Power Solid State Lasers", M . Bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix: Alexandrite Lasers .... ............ . A-13 2...34Diode Pumping of Solid State Lasers". Their briefing charts are i w reproduced herein. Dr. Bass discussed Alexandrite as an example of the development

  13. Crystal growth of a series of lithium garnets Ln3Li 5Ta 2O 12 ( Ln=La, Pr, Nd): Structural properties, Alexandrite effect and unusual ionic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roof, Irina P.; Smith, Mark D.; Cussen, Edmund J.; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2009-02-01

    We report the single crystal structures of a series of lanthanide containing tantalates, Ln3Li 5Ta 2O 12 ( Ln=La, Pr, Nd) that were obtained out of a reactive lithium hydroxide flux. The structures of Ln3Li 5Ta 2O 12 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, where the Li + positions and Li + site occupancies were fixed based on previously reported neutron diffraction data for isostructural compounds. All three oxides crystallize in the cubic space group Ia3¯d (No. 230) with lattice parameters a=12.7735(1), 12.6527(1), and 12.5967(1) Å for La 3Li 5Ta 2O 12, Pr 3Li 5Ta 2O 12, and Nd 3Li 5Ta 2O 12, respectively. A UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum of Nd 3Li 5Ta 2O 12 was collected to explain its unusual Alexandrite-like optical behavior. To evaluate the transport properties of Nd 3Li 5Ta 2O 12, the impedance data were collected in air in the temperature range 300⩽ T(°C)⩽500.

  14. Crystal growth of a series of lithium garnets Ln{sub 3}Li{sub 5}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 12} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd): Structural properties, Alexandrite effect and unusual ionic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Roof, Irina P.; Smith, Mark D.; Cussen, Edmund J.; Loye, Hans-Conrad zur

    2009-02-15

    We report the single crystal structures of a series of lanthanide containing tantalates, Ln{sub 3}Li{sub 5}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 12} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd) that were obtained out of a reactive lithium hydroxide flux. The structures of Ln{sub 3}Li{sub 5}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 12} were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, where the Li{sup +} positions and Li{sup +} site occupancies were fixed based on previously reported neutron diffraction data for isostructural compounds. All three oxides crystallize in the cubic space group Ia3-bard (No. 230) with lattice parameters a=12.7735(1), 12.6527(1), and 12.5967(1) A for La{sub 3}Li{sub 5}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 12}, Pr{sub 3}Li{sub 5}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 12}, and Nd{sub 3}Li{sub 5}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 12}, respectively. A UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum of Nd{sub 3}Li{sub 5}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 12} was collected to explain its unusual Alexandrite-like optical behavior. To evaluate the transport properties of Nd{sub 3}Li{sub 5}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 12}, the impedance data were collected in air in the temperature range 300{<=}T(deg. C){<=}500. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of garnets Ln{sub 3}Li{sub 5}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 12} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd). TaO{sub 6} polyhedra are shown in yellow and Ln{sup 3+} are shown as light blue spheres. Octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated Li{sup +} ions are shown in green and brown, respectively. Oxygen atoms are omitted for clarity.

  15. Laser clock

    SciTech Connect

    Facklam, R.L.

    1983-05-26

    A laser clock includes a linear laser in one embodiment of the clock and a ring laser gyro in the other embodiment. The linear laser is frequency stabilized and utilizes a single active medium in the form of a low pressure gas, such as He-Ne, with a Doppler broadened gain curve. The ring laser gyro is a four frequency laser with a Faraday rotor. Detector and electronic circuitry associated with the laser of each embodiment detects a beat frequency and convert it to a clock signal.

  16. Blue Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION 13 4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE BLUE LASER 18 4.1 Operational and Processing Experience 18 4.2 Performance Testing 20 5...34 -. - . •. SECTION 3 BLUE HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION This section presents an overview of the steps taken in creating a HCL. There is...to the laser assembly. These steps can actually be considered as the final steps in laser fabrication because some of them involve adding various

  17. 654 nm broad area lasers for QCW operation with a maximal facet load of 76 mW/μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumpf, B.; Pohl, M.; Pittroff, W.; Staske, R.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2013-03-01

    Compared to diode lasers emitting in the near infrared, the development of high power diode lasers in the red spectral range is more challenging due to the applicable compound semiconductors, the limited stability of the laser facets, and the small barrier heights for electrons and holes. For CW applications, their mounting requires excellent heat removal or expansion matched submounts. For QCW operation with small duty cycles and about 2 W per 100 μm stripe width emitter, like for the pumping of Q-switched alexandrite (Cr3+:BeAl2O4) lasers at 654 nm, a compromise is the application of aluminum nitride as heat sink. The presented broad area (BA) lasers are based on a GaInP single quantum well embedded in AlGaInP waveguide layers. The structure provides a vertical far field angle of 31° (FWHM). The material data can be compiled as follows: transparency current density jT = 220 A/cm2, internal efficiency ƞi = 0.83, internal losses αi = 1.0 cm-1. BA lasers with a stripe width of 100 μm and a length of 1.5 mm were fabricated, facet coated including a passivation procedure, and mounted on AlN submounts. In QCW operation (100 μs, 35 Hz) at 15°C, the devices had threshold currents of about 600 mA, slope efficiencies up to 1.3 W/A and conversion efficiencies of 0.36. A maximal output of 6.3 W was measured. At lower temperatures of -10°C the maximal peak power was determined to 7.6 W, i.e. a facet load of 76 mW/μm. The devices showed reliable operation over 1,000 h at a peak power of 2.7 W.

  18. Pulsed self-Raman laser operation in Nd:SrMoO 4 at 1.57 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Jan; Jelínková, Helena; Nejezchleb, Karel; Škoda, Václav; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Ivleva, Ludmila I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Zverev, Peter G.

    2008-02-01

    The goal of our research was the construction of the laser emitting short pulses with high peak power in "eye-safe" region around wavelength 1.5 μm. We use Raman self-conversion of giant pulses at wavelength 1.3 μm in Nd 3+-doped Raman active crystal SrMoO 4 (diameter 4.4 mm, length 42 mm). Fundamental laser wavelength was obtained using this advanced solid-state medium Nd 3+:SrMoO 4, lasing at 1378.1 nm, and pumped at wavelength 752nm by free-running alexandrite laser. High-peak power required for efficient Raman conversion was reached by Q-switching of the Nd 3+:SrMoO 4 laser by V:YAG solid-state saturable absorber (initial transmission 93% @ 1380 nm). Specially designed resonator mirrors were used to ensure proper feed-back for Raman laser. The resonator pump mirror was concave with 0.5m curvature and with high transmission at 752nm and high reflectivity in the range from 1250nm to 1580 nm; the reflectivity of the output coupler was 3% @ 1380nm and 25% @ 1570 nm. Both mirrors have reflectivity around 1 μm as small as possible to prevent lasing at other Nd 3+ lines. With the described laser system, simultaneous generation of wavelengths 1378.1nm and 1569.8nm was obtained. The single pulse output energy 0.8mJ at 1569.8nm was reached. The length of the generated pulse at this wavelength was measured to be 8.7 ns (FWHM). These values correspond with the peak power of 92 kW in eye-safe region.

  19. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  20. Laser microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  1. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  2. Laser sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatenko, A. A.; Revina, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The review is devoted to the major advances in laser sampling. The advantages and drawbacks of the technique are considered. Specific features of combinations of laser sampling with various instrumental analytical methods, primarily inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are discussed. Examples of practical implementation of hybrid methods involving laser sampling as well as corresponding analytical characteristics are presented. The bibliography includes 78 references.

  3. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  4. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  5. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  6. Biophysical mechanisms responsible for pulsed low-level laser excitation of neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Chris; Konrad, Peter; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Jansen, E. Duco

    2006-02-01

    Background/Objective: The traditional method of stimulating neural activity has been based on electrical methods and remains the gold standard to date despite inherent limitations. We have previously shown a new paradigm to in vivo neural activation based on pulsed infrared light, which provides a contact-free, spatially selective, artifact-free method without incurring tissue damage that may have significant advantages over electrical stimulation in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The goal of this study was to investigate the physical mechanism of this phenomenon, which we propose is a photo-thermal effect from transient tissue temperature changes resulting in direct or indirect activation of transmembrane ion channels causing propagation of the action potential. Methods: Rat sciatic nerve preparation was stimulated in vivo with the Holmium:YAG laser (2.12μm), Free Electron Laser (2.1μm), Alexandrite laser (690nm), and the prototype for a solid state commercial laser nerve stimulator built by Aculight (1.87μm) to determine contributions of photobiological responses from laser tissue interactions, including temperature, pressure, electric field, and photochemistry, underlying the biophysical mechanism of stimulation. Single point temperature measurements were made with a microthermocouple adjacent to the excitation site, while an infrared camera was used for 2-D radiometry of the irradiated surface. Displacement from laser-induced pressure waves or thermoelastic expansion was measured using a PS-OCT system. Results: Results exclude a direct photochemical, electric field, or pressure wave effect as the mechanism of optical stimulation. Measurements show relative small contributions from thermoelastic expansion (300 nm) with the laser parameters used for nerve stimulation. The maximum change in tissue temperature is about 9°C (average increase of 3.66 °C) at stimulation threshold radiant exposures. Conclusion: Neural activation with pulsed

  7. Biocavity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  8. Laser apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Owen; Stogran, Edmund M.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus is described wherein an active laser element, such as the disc of a face-pumped laser, is mounted in a housing such that the weight of the element is supported by glass spheres which fill a chamber defined in the housing between the walls of the housing and the edges of the laser element. The uniform support provided by the spheres enable the chamber and the pump side of the laser element to be sealed without affecting the alignment or other optical properties of the laser element. Cooling fluid may be circulated through the sealed region by way of the interstices between the spheres. The spheres, and if desired also the cooling fluid may contain material which absorbs radiation at the wavelength of parasitic emissions from the laser element. These parasitic emissions enter the spheres through the interface along the edge surface of the laser element and it is desirable that the index of refraction of the spheres and cooling fluid be near the index of refraction of the laser element. Thus support, cooling, and parasitic suppression functions are all accomplished through the use of the arrangement.

  9. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  10. Review of Laser Ablation Process for Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2003-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The original method developed by researchers at Rice University utilized a "double pulse laser oven" process. A graphite target containing about 1 atomic percent of metal catalysts is ablated inside a 1473K oven using laser pulses (10 ns pulse width) in slow flowing argon. Two YAG lasers with a green pulse (532 nm) followed by an IR pulse (1064 nm) with a 50 ns delay are used for ablation. This set up produced single wall carbon nanotube material with about 70% purity having a diameter distribution peaked around 1.4 nm. The impurities consist of fullerenes, metal catalyst clusters (10 to 100 nm diameter) and amorphous carbon. The rate of production with the initial set up was about 60 mg per hour with 10Hz laser systems. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to improve the rate, consistency and study effects of different process parameters on the quality and quantity of SWCNTs. These variations include one to three YAG laser systems (Green, Green and IR), different pulse widths (nano to microseconds as well as continuous) and different laser wavelengths (Alexandrite, CO, CO2, free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). It is noted that yield from the single laser (Green or IR) systems is only a fraction of the two laser systems. The yield seemed to scale up with the repetition rate of the laser systems (10 to 60 Hz) and depended on the beam uniformity and quality of the laser pulses. The shift to longer wavelength lasers (free electron, CO and CO2) did not improve the quality, but increased the rate of production because these lasers are either continuous (CW) or high repetition rate pulses (kHz to MHz). The average power and the peak power of the lasers seem to influence the yields. Very high peak powers (MegaWatts per square centimeter) are noted to increase ablation of bigger particles with reduced yields of SWCNTs. Increased average powers

  11. Multimegajoule laser design. [Glass lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, K.R.; Ozarski, R.G.; Hagen, W.F.; Holzrichtr, J.F.

    1985-08-01

    New technologies make multimegajoule glass lasers economically feasible. We have devised new laser architectures using harmonic switchout, target-plane holographic injection, phase conjugation, continuous apodization, and higher amplifier efficiencies. Our plan for building a multimegajoule laser for a recurring cost under $300 million relies on the following manufacturing economies of scale: high-volume glass production, rapid harmonic-crystal growth, capacitor sizing and packing to increase energy capacity, and part standardization.

  12. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  13. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  14. Co Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    newsletter setvice covering the moj-t recent research findings in 25 areas of industrial, technological , and sociological interest— invaluable information...service will be backdated to furnish you microfiche of reports issued earlier. Because of contractual arrangements with several Special Technology ...pressure electrical CO laser and, thereby, to develop the technology for high pres- sure, scalable, electric CO lasers exhibiting properties of

  15. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  16. High throughput laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2016-12-27

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  17. Narrow-Linewidth Megahertz-Repetition-Rate Optical Parametric Oscillator for High-Speed Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Luff et al. [7] have reported an alexandrite system, which utilizes the combination of a long-pulse 170 ns Q-switched oscillator, a Har- riott...and R. B. Miles, “Development of a tunable megahertz pulse- burst alexandrite laser system,” presented at the 34th AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers

  18. Laser goniometer

    DOEpatents

    Fairer, George M.; Boernge, James M.; Harris, David W.; Campbell, DeWayne A.; Tuttle, Gene E.; McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  19. Laser propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rom, F. E.; Putre, H. A.

    1972-01-01

    The use of an earth-based high-power laser beam to provide energy for earth-launched rocket vehicle is investigated. The laser beam energy is absorbed in an opaque propellant gas and is converted to high-specific-impulse thrust by expanding the heated propellant to space by means of a nozzle. This laser propulsion scheme can produce specific impulses of several thousand seconds. Payload to gross-weight fractions about an order of magnitude higher than those for conventional chemical earth-launched vehicles appear possible. There is a potential for a significant reduction in cost per payload mass in earth orbit.

  20. Explosive laser

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Davis, W.C.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO$sub 2$ and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO$sub 2$ lasing. (auth)

  1. [Laser myringotomy].

    PubMed

    Hassmann-Poznańska, Elzbieta; Skotnicka, Bozena

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was assessment of the qualities of laser-assisted myringotomy (LAM) as a treatment for acute and secretory otitis media. Laser-assisted myringotomy was performed on 65 children (113 ears) mean age 6.2 years diagnosed with secretory otitis media (80%), recurrent secretory otitis media (11%) and acute otitis media (9%). Myringotomy was performed under general anesthesia using the OtoLAM device (ESC/Sharplan, Israel). In 64 ears pressure equalisation tubes were inserted after fenestration of the tympanic membrane with laser. Adenoidectomy alone or with tonsillectomy was performed at the same time in 51 cases. Laser tympanostomies remained patent for 7-32 days. All tympanostomies healed with no noticeable scarring. LAM appears to be a safe, and easy to performed, alternative technique in the treatment of otitis media.

  2. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  3. Laser barometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

  4. Laser Cutting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    lasers that are optically modified to produce high beam quality at reduced power levels for precision drilling and trepanning. * Nd:YAG lasers with...a smooth, dross-free cut face while the marking consists of a series of precisely placed shallow pits where surface finish and dross are not usually...neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) pulsed cutting data because the technique is considered vital in meeting the detailed precision cutting

  5. Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Amoco Laser Company, a subsidiary of Amoco Corporation, has developed microlasers for the commercial market based on a JPL concept for optical communications over interplanetary distances. Lasers emit narrow, intense beams of light or other radiation. The beams transmit communication signals, drill, cut or melt materials or remove diseased body tissue. The microlasers cover a broad portion of the spectrum, and performance is improved significantly. Current applications include medical instrumentation, color separation equipment, telecommunications, etc.

  6. Laser Angioplasty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The principal method of dealing with coronary artery blockage is bypass surgery. A non-surgical alternative available to some patients is balloon angioplasty. For several years, medical researchers have been exploring another alternative that would help a wider circle of patients than the balloon treatment and entail less risk than bypass surgery. A research group is on the verge of an exciting development: laser angioplasty with a 'cool' type of laser, called an excimer laser, that does not damage blood vessel walls and offers non-surgical cleansing of clogged arteries with extraordinary precision. The system is the Dymer 200+ Excimer Laser Angioplasty System, developed by Advanced Intraventional Systems. Used in human clinical tests since 1987, the system is the first fully integrated 'cool' laser capable of generating the requisite laser energy and delivering the energy to target arteries. Thirteen research hospitals in the U.S. have purchased Dymer 200+ systems and used them in clinical trials in 121 peripheral and 555 coronary artery cases. The success rate in opening blocked coronary arteries is 85 percent, with fewer complications than in balloon angioplasty. Food and Drug Administration approval for the system is hoped for in the latter part of 1990. * Advanced Intraventional Systems became Spectranetics in 1994 and discontinued the product.

  7. Laser optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weijian; Adair Gerke, Stephen; Wei Ng, Kar; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the interaction between optical field and mechanical motion. So far, this interaction has relied on the detuning between a passive optical resonator and an external pump laser. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator supporting the mirror of a laser and the optical field generated by the laser itself. The optically active cavity greatly enhances the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we use an electrically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity. We observe >550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micromechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical, and correspondingly a 23 nm laser wavelength sweep. In addition to its immediate applications as a high-speed wavelength-swept source, this scheme also offers a new approach for integrated on-chip sensors. PMID:26333804

  8. Laser Physics and Laser Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    effect which limits the power throughout of a device; terbium qallium garnet (TGG), a Faraday isolator material; potassium niobate (KNbO 31 a nonlinear...extending the range of materials grown in fiber form. Two materials to be emphasized are terbium gallium garnet for optical isolators and potassium niobate...for doubling gallium arsenide diode lasers. References 1. R.H. Stolen, "Fiber Raman Lasers", Fiber and Integrated Optics, 3 (1980). 2. E. Ipoen and

  9. Laser therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used ...

  10. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  11. Laser Physics and Laser-Tissue Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Welch, A. J.; Torres, Jorge H.; Cheong, Wai-Fung

    1989-01-01

    Within the last few years, lasers have gained increasing use in the management of cardiovascular disease, and laser angioplasty has become a widely performed procedure. For this reason, a basic knowledge of lasers and their applications is essential to vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists. To elucidate some fundamental concepts regarding laser physics, we describe how laser light is generated and review the properties that make lasers useful in medicine. We also discuss beam profile and spotsize, as well as dosimetric specifications for laser angioplasty. After considering laser-tissue interaction and light propagation in tissue, we explain how the aforementioned concepts apply to direct laser angioplasty and laser-balloon angioplasty. An understanding of these issues should prove useful not only in performing laser angioplasty but in comparing the reported results of various laser applications. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1989;16:141-9) PMID:15227198

  12. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  13. Laser construction

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.W.; Osterhage, R.J.; Summa, K.M.

    1989-02-14

    A laser device is described comprising an elongated laser medium of crystal material having a cylindrical shape modified to have a flat face formed on one side thereof, a highly heat conducting mounting member having a flat surface on a portion thereof, the medium being mounted on the mounting member with the flat face of the medium in face-to-face relation with the flat surface on the mounting member, a heat sink member having a surface for attaching the mounting member to, a pump source including an array of laser diodes each having opposite ends and positioned in side-by-side single file relation, a second highly heat conducting mounting member having a surface on which the array of laser diodes is positioned, the second mounting member being mounted on the heat sink member wherein the array of laser diodes are in substantial alignment with the axis of the medium along the side thereof opposite from the flat face of the medium.

  14. Laser cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.

    2014-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding of the cosmos, which in turn points to even deeper questions to be further addressed. Concurrently the laser technology has undergone dramatic revolutions, providing exciting opportunity for science applications. History has shown that the symbiosis between direct observations and laboratory investigation is instrumental in the progress of astrophysics. We believe that this remains true in cosmology. Current frontier phenomena related to particle astrophysics and cosmology typically involve one or more of the following conditions: (1) extremely high energy events;(2) very high density, high temperature processes; (3) super strong field environments. Laboratory experiments using high intensity lasers can calibrate astrophysical observations, investigate underlying dynamics of astrophysical phenomena, and probe fundamental physics in extreme limits. In this article we give an overview of the exciting prospect of laser cosmology. In particular, we showcase its unique capability of investigating frontier cosmology issues such as cosmic accelerator and quantum gravity.

  15. Laser barometer

    DOEpatents

    Abercrombie, Kevin R.; Shiels, David; Rash, Tim

    2001-02-06

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  16. Excimer lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Hess, L. D.; Stephens, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation into the possibility of achieving CW discharge pumped excimer laser oscillation is reported. Detailed theoretical modeling of capillary discharge pumping of the XeF and KXe and K2 excimer systems was carried out which predicted the required discharge parameters for reaching laser threshold on these systems. Capillary discharge pumping of the XeF excimer system was investigated experimentally. The experiments revealed a lower excimer level population density than predicted theoretically by about an order of magnitude. The experiments also revealed a fluorine consumption problem in the discharge in agreement with theory.

  17. Graviton laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the possibility of creating a graviton laser. The lasing medium would be a system of contained, ultra cold neutrons. Ultra cold neutrons are a quantum mechanical system that interacts with gravitational fields and with the phonons of the container walls. It is possible to create a population inversion by pumping the system using the phonons. We compute the rate of spontaneous emission of gravitons and the rate of the subsequent stimulated emission of gravitons. The gain obtainable is directly proportional to the density of the lasing medium and the fraction of the population inversion. The applications of a graviton laser would be interesting.

  18. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  19. Excimer lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Hess, L. D.; Stephens, R. R.; Pepper, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a two-year investigation into the possibility of developing continuous wave excimer lasers are reported. The program included the evaluation and selection of candidate molecular systems and discharge pumping techniques. The K Ar/K2 excimer dimer molecules and the xenon fluoride excimer molecule were selected for study; each used a transverse and capillary discharges pumping technique. Experimental and theoretical studies of each of the two discharge techniques applied to each of the two molecular systems are reported. Discharge stability and fluorine consumption were found to be the principle impediments to extending the XeF excimer laser into the continuous wave regime. Potassium vapor handling problems were the principal difficulty in achieving laser action on the K Ar/K2 system. Of the four molecular systems and pumping techniques explored, the capillary discharge pumped K Ar/K2 system appears to be the most likely candidate for demonstrating continuous wave excimer laser action primarily because of its predicted lower pumping threshold and a demonstrated discharge stability advantage.

  20. Laser Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical Technology, Incorporated developed a fully automatic laser machining process that allows more precise balancing removes metal faster, eliminates excess metal removal and other operator induced inaccuracies, and provides significant reduction in balancing time. Manufacturing costs are reduced as a result.

  1. Laser Photochemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    reaction due to decreased adsorption of the species on the catalytic surface. For example, i. . . 41 in the catalytic decomposition of formic acid ...over platinum (Ulmstead and Lin, 1978), the preexcitation of the gaseous formic acid molecules (by a 10 W/cm2 CW CO2 laser) resulted in a 50% increase...attention is given to selective and thermal excitation and the role of multiphonon couplings, heterogeneous catalysis , and chemical vapor deposition and

  2. Making a Laser Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how to construct a laser level. This laser level can be made using a typical 4' (or shorter) bubble level and a small laser point. The laser unit is detachable, so the bubble level can also be used in the conventional way. However, the laser level works better than a simple bubble level. Making this inexpensive device is an…

  3. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  4. Project LASER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA formally launched Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering and Research) in March 1990, a program designed to help teachers improve science and mathematics education and to provide 'hands on' experiences. It featured the first LASER Mobile Teacher Resource Center (MTRC), is designed to reach educators all over the nation. NASA hopes to operate several MTRCs with funds provided by private industry. The mobile unit is a 22-ton tractor-trailer stocked with NASA educational publications and outfitted with six work stations. Each work station, which can accommodate two teachers at a time, has a computer providing access to NASA Spacelink. Each also has video recorders and photocopy/photographic equipment for the teacher's use. MTRC is only one of the five major elements within LASER. The others are: a Space Technology Course, to promote integration of space science studies with traditional courses; the Volunteer Databank, in which NASA employees are encouraged to volunteer as tutors, instructors, etc; Mobile Discovery Laboratories that will carry simple laboratory equipment and computers to provide hands-on activities for students and demonstrations of classroom activities for teachers; and the Public Library Science Program which will present library based science and math programs.

  5. Laser nitriding and laser carburizing of surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Peter

    2003-11-01

    Laser irradiation of surfaces with short pulses in reactive atmospheres (nitrogen, methane) can lead to very effective nitrification and carburization via complicated laser-surface-gas-plasma-interactions. This laser nitriding and laser carburizing and their basic underlying phenomena will be presented and partly explained by results of example materials (iron, titanium, aluminum, silicon) where nitride and carbide coatings can be formed by fast and easily by Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG laser, Free Electron Laser and also by femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. This implies laser pulse durations from the nanosecond to the femtosecond regime and wavelengths from ultra-violet to infrared. The resulting surfaces, thin films, coatings and their properties are investigated by combining Mossbauer Spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Nanoindentation, Resonant Nuclear Reaction Analysis, and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy.

  6. Theoretical Issues Involving Traps for Neutral Spin-Polarized Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-15

    of 4 "corner cube" laser trap for potassium atoms based on a near-resoDapt CW TtIf’ ("doughnut mode) alexandrite laser beam with cooling rovided b e...Allied alexandrite laser, is now available and since the multiphoton ionization rate 2 is particularly low for K. ! ° ° . . . .. . i .. . ..... 4.4 -Jr...waist ., wo so the trap has something like an hourglass shape. I -~~~~~ o - w ° 4 . 4.~ The Allied alexandrite laser is not yet commercially available

  7. Laser therapy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  8. Lasers in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Described are the characteristics of the laser and its effects on the body. Discussed are examples of laser treatments, including angioplasty, ophthalmology, and dermatology. A discussion of lasers of clinical interest and their applications is presented. (YP)

  9. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  10. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    2005-11-01

    Contributors; 1. Monolithic phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays D. Botez; 2. High power coherent, semiconductor laser master oscillator power amplifiers and amplifier arrays D. F. Welch and D. G. Mehuys; 3. Microoptical components applied to incoherent and coherent laser arrays J. R. Leger; 4. Modeling of diode laser arrays G. R. Hadley; 5. Dynamics of coherent semiconductor laser arrays H. G. Winfuland and R. K. Defreez; 6. High average power semiconductor laser arrays and laser array packaging with an emphasis for pumping solid state lasers R. Solarz; 7. High power diode laser arrays and their reliability D. R. Scifres and H. H. Kung; 8. Strained layer quantum well heterostructure laser arrays J. J. Coleman; 9. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser arrays C. J. Chang-Hasnain; 10. Individually addressed arrays of diode lasers D. Carlin.

  11. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat cancer: carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) lasers, argon lasers, and neodymium: yttrium -aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) ... can be used with endoscopes. CO 2 and argon lasers can cut the skin’s surface without going ...

  12. Laser Weapons for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-27

    IPG fiber lasers , 10 kW/ fiber 7 • Output wavelength is tunable (can operate in atmospheric window) Free Electron Lasers ...Multiple kilowatts over multiple kilometers • Laser power converters can be highly efficient, > 60 % • Fiber lasers are highly compact and... lasers - Free electron lasers • Background • Laser candidates • Additional capabilities - Power beaming 3 Laser Lethality -

  13. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  14. Handbook of molecular lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheo, Peter K.

    The technology and applications of molecular lasers (MLs) are examined in chapters contributed by leading experts. Topics addressed include ML emission spectra, CO2 TEA lasers, RF-discharge-excited CO2 lasers, high-energy short-pulse CO2 lasers, high-power electron-beam-controlled CO2 lasers, HF/DF chemical lasers, optically pumped FIR MLs, and transients and instabilities in FIR MLs. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  15. New laser protective eyewear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLear, Mark

    1996-04-01

    Laser technology has significantly impacted our everyday life. Lasers are now used to correct your vision, clear your arteries, and are used in the manufacturing of such diverse products as automobiles, cigarettes, and computers. Lasers are no longer a research tool looking for an application. They are now an integral part of manufacturing. In the case of Class IV lasers, this explosion in laser applications has exposed thousands of individuals to potential safety hazards including eye damage. Specific protective eyewear designed to attenuate the energy of the laser beam below the maximum permissible exposure is required for Class 3B and Class IV lasers according to laser safety standards.

  16. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  17. [Laser physics].

    PubMed

    Banús Gassol, J M

    2008-11-01

    The commission of this article plunged me into doubt. First I should confess that I don't find excuse to escape this part if somebody wants to minimally deepen in the knowledge of the biological effects of this energy source. Secondly, when we talk about results, we use terms made and defined by Physics. Often we have polemics about results, and what really happens is that we don't reach agreements because we refer to different terms to explain the same observation; in conclusion we cannot understand each other because we do not know the adequate terms; for example, hypoxemia as oxygen deficit, which is true in an anemic patient as well as in a low oxygen saturation rate. In consequence, a good review of these concepts seems necessary to me. The third reason is the confusion that exists in our environment, I think sometimes of interest, about properties and effects of different types of laser. Only a minimal knowledge of physics will help us to state the scientific basis for understanding. The problems, nevertheless, accumulate due to the fact that the universe to which this article is directed is formed by urologists. What Physics education should we suppose they have? Superficial? Medium? Is it a collective with a uniform knowledge, being it whatever it is? The implication is clear. The article depth will depend on the answers to these questions. Nevertheless, the aim of the authors is to give a base enough to know what the laser is and how it acts. For that, the answer I gave to my questions is that the reader should understand the article and have enough base for, at least, reading critically the articles about laser published in urological journals.

  18. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afzal, R. S.; Dallas, J. L.; Yu, A. W.; Mamakos, W. A.; Lukemire, A.; Schroeder, B.; Malak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), scheduled to launch in 2001, is a laser altimeter and lidar for tile Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results for this space- based remote sensing instrument are presented.

  19. Studies on lasers and laser devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Siegman, A. E.; Young, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this grant was to study lasers, laser devices, and uses of lasers for investigating physical phenomena are studied. The active projects included the development of a tunable, narrowband XUV light source and its application to the spectroscopy of core excited atomic states, and the development of a technique for picosecond time resolution spectroscopy of fast photophysical processes.

  20. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, H.; Yoneda, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-02-01

    .] -- Ultracold Ytterbium atoms in optical lattices / S. Sugawa ... [et al.] -- Ultracold polar molecules in the rovibrational ground state / J. Deiglmayr ... [et al.] -- Polar molecules near quantum degeneracy / J. Ye and D. S. Jin -- Production of a quantum gas of rovibronic ground-state molecules in an optical lattice / J. G. Danzl ... [et al.] -- Recent progress in x-ray nonlinear optics / K. Tamasaku, K. Sawada, and T. Ishikawa -- Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - laser spectroscopy in unconventional environments / S. Svanberg -- Laser spectroscopy on relativistic ion beams / S. Reinhardt ... [et al.] -- Single frequency microcavity lasers and applications / L. Xu ... [et al.].

  1. Tropospheric Lidar: Development of Techniques and Practical Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    We report the successful development of a hydrogen Raman shifted tunable narrow line alexandrite laser transmitter for near-IR H(2)O spectroscopy...Fourier analysis of the alexandrite laser radiation showed a 10 MHz fundamental linewidth and 20 MHz raman linewidth. As a first test of the transmitter...preliminary work that was done for the development of the system. This research is supported by the US Army Research Office. Purchase of the alexandrite laser was made possible by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

  2. Reverse laser drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Thomas R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a method for laser drilling small diameter, closely-spaced, and accurately located holes in a body of material which is transparent or substantially transparent to the laser radiation employed whereby the holes are drilled through the thickness of the body from the surface opposite to that on which the laser beam impinges to the surface of laser beam impingement.

  3. Laser photobiology and photomedicine

    SciTech Connect

    Martellucci, S.; Chester, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the physical and biological basis of photobiology and photomedicine; the biological effects and applications of laser technology; photochemotherapy; photobiology and dermatology; surgical and ophthalmological applications of lasers; laser safety; and diagnostics and technological aspects of recent laser developments.

  4. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  5. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  6. Obstacles to Laser Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-04-25

    The growth of laser development & technology has been remarkable. Unfortunately, a number of traps or obstacles to laser safety have also developed with that growth. The goal of this article is to highlight those traps, in the hope that an aware laser user will avoid them. These traps have been the cause or contributing factor of many a preventable laser accident.

  7. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  8. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  9. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam.

  10. Solar driven lasers for power satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taussio, R.; Cassady, P.; Klosterman, E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological feasibility of using multimagawatt lasers for space power transmission is discussed. Candidate lasers include electric discharge lasers, direct optically pumped lasers, and free electron lasers.

  11. What is a Laser?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Lucile; Schwob, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The first laser was built more than 50 years ago, inMay 1960: it was a pulsed ruby laser. It was a simple laboratory curiosity and nobody knew what its usefulness could be. Other devices were rapidly demonstrated, and the variety and number of lasers in the world increased at a huge rate. Currently, the annual laser world market is worth about 6 billion dollars. Thanks to the remarkable properties of laser light, laser applications increase steadily in the domains of industry, building, medicine, telecommunications, etc. One can find many lasers in research laboratories, and they are used more and more in our everyday life and almost everybody has already seen a laser beam. The goal of the first chapter of this book is to explain simply what a laser is, how it is built and how it operates. Firstly, let us point out the outstanding properties of the laser light.

  12. Lasers in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2011-01-01

    Laser technology has advanced tremendously since the first gas lasers were incorporated into early flow cytometers. Gas lasers have been largely replaced by solid-state laser technology, making virtually any desirable visible light wavelength available for flow cytometry. Multiwavelength, white light, and wavelength tunable lasers are poised to enhance our analytical capabilities even further. In this chapter, I summarize the role that lasers play in cytometry, and the practical characteristics that make a laser appropriate for flow cytometry. I then review the latest single wavelength lasers available for flow cytometry, and how they can be used to excite the ever-expanding array of available fluorochromes. Finally, I review the contribution and potential of the latest tunable laser technology to flow cytometry, and show several examples of these novel sources integrated into production instruments. Technical details and critical parameters for successful application of these lasers for biomedical analysis are covered in depth.

  13. Surgical lasers in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Mindak, Marek K.

    1997-10-01

    Almost every laser for medical applications was first tried in dermatology. The efficiency of YAG, CO2, and Argon lasers on this area and their potential advantages over conventional methods were mostly evaluated by cosmetic effect of laser therapy. The indications for different laser treatment in such dermatological cases as: angiomas, telangiectasias, pigmented lesions, nevus flammeus congenitus, deep cavernous angiomas, skin neoplasms and condylomata acuminata are discussed in this paper and the results of the laser therapy are also presented.

  14. Laser Reliability Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    Lasers, Quality Level 1 - Group 2 32 5.3-3 Kolmogorov-Smirnoff Test - Helium/Neon Lasers, Quality Level 1 33 5.3-4 Welbull Analysis...institutions through- out the United States and Canada. The collected laser data were grouped, analyzed, and statistically tested for homogeneity...sources were Initially contacted by letter questionnaires In which personnel were requested to describe any laser component life test or laser system

  15. Mercury Bromide Laser Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-04

    Discharge", Optics Lett., 2(3), (March 1978). 7. R. Burnham, "Discharge Pumped Mercuric Halide Dissociation Lasers", Appl. Phys. Lett., 33: 15 (July 1978...laser and fluorescence signals. Neutral density filters served to prevent saturation of the detector during the laser measurements. F. Laser Output as a...REFERENCES . E. J. Schimitschek and J. E. Celto, " Mercuric Bromide Dissociation Laser in an Electric Discharge," Optics Lett. 2(3), March 1978. This

  16. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  17. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  18. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  19. Laser Surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has produced a laser-aided system for surveying land boundaries in difficult terrain. It does the job more accurately than conventional methods, takes only one-third the time normally required, and is considerably less expensive. In surveying to mark property boundaries, the objective is to establish an accurate heading between two "corner" points. This is conventionally accomplished by erecting a "range pole" at one point and sighting it from the other point through an instrument called a theodolite. But how do you take a heading between two points which are not visible to each other, for instance, when tall trees, hills or other obstacles obstruct the line of sight? That was the problem confronting the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service. The Forest Service manages 187 million acres of land in 44 states and Puerto Rico. Unfortunately, National Forest System lands are not contiguous but intermingled in complex patterns with privately-owned land. In recent years much of the private land has been undergoing development for purposes ranging from timber harvesting to vacation resorts. There is a need for precise boundary definition so that both private owners and the Forest Service can manage their properties with confidence that they are not trespassing on the other's land.

  20. Lasers in aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, I. N.; Dezhin, V. N.; Kutakhov, V. P.; Petukhov, A. V.; Sidorin, V. M.; Sukhar, I. M.

    The way in which lasers are being incorporated into the military aircraft of the United States and the countries of Western Europe is discussed. Descriptions are given of laser weapons-guiding systems (including ranger finders and systems for target illumination), laser systems for navigation and flight-safety assurance (gyroscopes, velocity gauges, altimeters, systems providing meteorological data, proximity warning systems), and laser systems for air reconnaissance, communications, and control. Attention is also given to the Glissada laser guide path system, developed in the USSR. The physics of the systems is emphasized in the description and the principles underlying the operation of a laser are discussed in the introduction.

  1. Lasers in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-08-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20(th) century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  2. Maser and laser engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    This book is intended to be a textbook for an upper division one-semester electrical engineering course. Students are expected to have had some undegraduate course work in modern physics and in electromagnetic field theory. General aspects regarding devices based on quantum electronics are considered along with gas masers, solid masers, gas lasers, solid lasers, semiconductor lasers, liquid lasers, modulation techniques for lasers, and opto-electrical demodulators and energy convertors. Attention is given to quantum electric harmonic generators, Raman lasers, optical parametric interactions, holograms, optical terms, crystallographic terms, band theory, Schroedinger formulation and Dirac formation, and the quantum number of electrons in a hydrogen atom.

  3. Laser peening of metals- enabling laser technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; Daly, J.; Harrisson, J.

    1997-11-13

    Laser peening, a surface treatment for metals, employs laser induced shocks to create deep and intense residual stresses in critical components. In many applications this technology is proving to be superior to conventional treatments such as shot peening. The laser peening process has generated sufficiently impressive results to move it from a laboratory demonstration phase into a significant industrial process. However until now this evolution has been slowed because a laser system meeting the average power requirements for a high throughput process has been lacking.

  4. Rapid, high‐fluence multi‐pass q‐switched laser treatment of tattoos with a transparent perfluorodecalin‐infused patch: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Michael P.; Costner, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Perfluorodecalin (PFD) has previously been shown to rapidly dissipate the opaque, white micro‐bubble layer formed after exposure of tattoos to Q‐switched lasers [1]. The current pilot study was conducted to qualitatively determine if the use of a transparent PFD‐infused silicone patch would result in more rapid clearance of tattoos than conventional through‐air techniques. Materials and Methods Black or dark blue tattoos were divided into two halves in a single‐site IRB‐approved study with 17 subjects with Fitzpatrick skin types I–III. One half of each tattoo served as its own control and was treated with one pass of a standard Q‐switched Alexandrite laser (755 nm). The other half of the tattoo was treated directly through a transparent perfluorodecalin (PFD) infused patch (ON Light Sciences, Dublin, CA). The rapid whitening reduction effect of the Patch routinely allowed three to four laser passes in a total of approximately 5 minutes. Both sides were treated at highest tolerated fluence, but the optical clearing, index‐matching, and epidermal protection properties of the PFD Patch allowed significantly higher fluence compared to the control side. Standard photographs were taken at baseline, immediately prior to treatment with the PFD Patch in place, and finally before and after each treatment session. Treatments were administered at 4‐ to 6‐week intervals. Results In a majority of subjects (11 of 17), tattoos treated through a transparent PFD‐infused patch showed more rapid tattoo clearance with higher patient and clinician satisfaction than conventional treatment. In no case did the control side fade faster than the PFD Patch side. No unanticipated adverse events were observed. Conclusions Rapid multi‐pass treatment of tattoos with highest tolerated fluence facilitated by a transparent PFD‐infused patch clears tattoos more rapidly than conventional methods. Lasers Surg. Med. 47:613–618, 2015. © 2015 The

  5. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollberg, Leo; Bergquist, James Charles; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    Degenerate gases. Probing vortex pair sizes in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless regime on a two-dimensional lattice of Bose-Einstein condensates / V. Schweikhard ... [et al.]. Interacting Bose-Einstein condensates in random potentials / P. Bouyer ... [et al.]. Towards quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms in optical lattices / I. Bloch -- Precision measurement and fundamental physics. T-violation and the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the mercury atom / E. N. Fortson -- Quantum information and control I. Quantum information processing and ramsey spectroscopy with trapped ions / C. F. Roos ... [et al.]. Quantum non-demolition counting of photons in a cavity / S. Haroche ... [et al.] -- Ultra-fast control and spectroscopy. Frequency-Comb- assisted mid-infrared spectroscopy / P. de Natale ... [et al.] -- Precision measurement and applications. Precision gravity tests by atom interferometry / G. M. Tino ... [et al.] -- Novel spectroscopic applications. On a variation of the proton-electron mass ratio / W. Ubachs ... [et al.] -- Quantum information and control II. Quantum interface between light and atomic ensembles / H. Krauter ... [et al.] -- Degenerate Fermi gases. An atomic Fermi gas near a P-wave Feshbach resonance / D. S. Jin, J. P. Gaebler and J. T. Stewart. Bragg scattering of correlated atoms from a degenerate Fermi gas / R. J. Ballagh, K. J. Challis and C. W. Gardiner -- Spectroscopy and control of atoms and molecules. Stark and Zeeman deceleration of neutral atoms and molecules / S. D. Hogan ... [et al.]. Generation of coherent, broadband and tunable soft x-ray continuum at the leading edge of the driver laser pulse / A. Jullien ... [et al.]. Controlling neural atoms and photons with optical conveyor belts and ultrathin optical fibers / D. Meschede. W. Alt and A. Rauschenbeutel -- Spectroscopy on the small scale. Wide-field cars-microscopy / C. Heinrich ... [et al.]. Atom nano-optics and nano-lithography / V. I. Balykin ... [et al

  6. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  7. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  8. Phased laser array for generating a powerful laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2004-02-17

    A first injection laser signal and a first part of a reference laser beam are injected into a first laser element. At least one additional injection laser signal and at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are injected into at least one additional laser element. The first part of a reference laser beam and the at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are amplified and phase conjugated producing a first amplified output laser beam emanating from the first laser element and an additional amplified output laser beam emanating from the at least one additional laser element. The first amplified output laser beam and the additional amplified output laser beam are combined into a powerful laser beam.

  9. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  10. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C.; Buican, Tudor N.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

  11. Slender tip laser scalpel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-01-06

    A laser scalpel includes a ribbon optical waveguide extending therethrough and terminating at a slender optical cutting tip. A laser beam is emitted along the height of the cutting tip for cutting tissue therealong.

  12. Laser device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J. D.

    1985-06-25

    A simplified, relatively inexpensive laser device, wherein the laser elements are fixed in a body exoskeleton of electrical insulating material having a low coefficient of thermal expansion. The preferred embodiment includes a shotgun type laser filter having parallel bores which receive the laser flashlamp and laser rod in fixed relation in a body chamber. The reflector surrounds the laser filter and retains the filter within the body chamber. In the preferred method of this invention, several controlled lasing pulses are generated with each illumination pulse of the flashlamp, substantially increasing the efficiency of the laser device. The number of pulses is generally controlled by increasing the voltage to the flashlamp. The rapid multiple lasing pulses generate an elongated plasma in a fluid medium, such as the vitreous fluid body of an eye which makes the laser device extemely efficient for treating glaucoma and other medical treatments.

  13. Laser Radar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Laser and radar instruments aboard NASA aircraft provide measurements of the snow and ice surface and down to the bedrock under the ice. Lasers, with a shorter wavelength, measure the surface eleva...

  14. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Wells, William E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  15. Laser surgery - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  16. Laser programs highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

  17. MESSENGER Laser Altimeter

    NASA Video Gallery

    MESSENGER's Mercury Laser Altimeter sends out laser pulses that hit the ground and return to the instrument. The amount of light that returns for each pulse gives the reflectance at that point on t...

  18. Carbon dioxide slab laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tulip, J.

    1988-01-12

    A gas slab laser is described comprising: first and second elongated electrodes each including a planar light reflecting surface disposed so as to form a light guide only in a plane perpendicular to the planar surface and to define a gas discharge gap therebetween; a laser gas disposed in the gap; and means for applying a radio frequency current between the first and second electrodes to establish a laser-exciting discharge in the laser gas.

  19. CO2 laser modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  20. Laser shaping of cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil N.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Helidonis, Emmanuel S.; Kavvalos, George; Christodoulou, P. N.; Naoumidi, I.; Velegrakis, G.; Ovchinnikov, Yuriy M.; Shechter, A.

    1994-09-01

    The carbon dioxide laser has been used for the first time to change the cartilage's shape. After the laser irradiation the cartilage has the tendency to retain its new form. Different types of laser modified cartilage structures were studied. The inferred physical mechanism for cartilage shaping using the stresses relaxation process is presented. The clinical significance of the results for corrective laser surgery is discussed.

  1. Tunable semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Tunable semiconductor lasers are disclosed requiring minimized coupling regions. Multiple laser embodiments employ ring resonators or ring resonator pairs using only a single coupling region with the gain medium are detailed. Tuning can be performed by changing the phase of the coupling coefficient between the gain medium and a ring resonator of the laser. Another embodiment provides a tunable laser including two Mach-Zehnder interferometers in series and a reflector coupled to a gain medium.

  2. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  3. Laser cutting system

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  4. Laser Assisted Microsurgical Anastomosis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-22

    Miami School of Medicine This Paper describes new experimental microsurgical procedures that * utilize laser infrared energy emitted at 10.6 um to...dioxide laser microsurgical technique takes advantage of the very high absorption of laser energy (at 10.6 um) by water in soft tissue to effect successful...describes a new surgical technique that utilizes laser heat energy to repair transected rat sciatic nerves, and nerve grafts. The energy emitted at

  5. Laser Detection of Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, C. K. N.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the use of laser spectroscopy in determining the presence of specific gaseous constituents. Three of currently used modes for laser detection of pollution are reviewed; (1) long-path measurements; (2) laser raman (differential absorption) measurements; and (3) optoacoustic detection. (HM)

  6. Laser bottom hole assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  7. Velocimetry with diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mul, F. F. M.; Jentink, H. W.; Koelink, M.; Greve, J.; Aarnoudse, J. G.

    The history of the application of diode lasers in velocimetry is reviewed. Some problems arising when using those lasers, e.g., mode hopping and wavelength shifts caused by temperature effects, are discussed, together with coherence effects encountered with diode lasers. The application in dual-beam velocimetry, in direct-contact velocimetry and in velocimetry using self-mixing will be discussed.

  8. Argon laser for otosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Wojciech; Pospiech, Lucyna; Jankowska-Kuc, Malgorzata

    1995-03-01

    Up to now, among different kinds of lasers an argon laser is mostly used for otosclerosis. Exposure conditions at use of the laser beam are still not well defined. In order to achieve the optimum conditions a series of experiments has been made. Obtained results are presented in this paper.

  9. Laser power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Edmund J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of previous studies related to laser power transmission is presented. Particular attention is given to the use of solar pumped lasers for space power applications. Three general laser mechanisms are addressed: photodissociation lasing driven by sunlight, photoexcitation lasing driven directly by sunlight, and photoexcitation lasing driven by thermal radiation.

  10. LaserFest Celebration

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  11. Laser Fundamentals and Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pelt, W. F.; And Others

    As a result of work performed at the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory with respect to lasers, this manual was prepared in response to the increasing use of lasers in high schools and colleges. It is directed primarily toward the high school instructor who may use the text for a short course in laser fundamentals. The definition of the…

  12. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiš, S.; Cihelka, J.; Matulková, I.

    2010-12-01

    Three types of lasers (double-heterostructure 66 K InAsSb/InAsSbP laser diode, room temperature, multi quantum wells with distributed feedback (MQW with DFB) (GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb based) diode laser and vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) (GaSb based) have been characterized using Fourier transform emission spectroscopy and compared. The photoacoustic technique was employed to determine the detection limit of formaldehyde (less than 1 ppmV) for the strongest absorption line of the v3 + v5 band in the emission region of the GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb diode laser. The detection limit (less than 10 ppbV) of formaldehyde was achieved in the 2820 cm-1 spectral range in case of InAsSb/InAsSbP laser (fundamental bands of v1, v5). Laser sensitive detection (laser absorption together with high resolution Fourier transform infrared technique including direct laser linewidth measurement, infrared photoacoustic detection of neutral molecules (methane, form-aldehyde) is discussed. Additionally, very sensitive laser absorption techniques of such velocity modulation are discussed for case of laser application in laboratory research of molecular ions. Such sensitive techniques (originally developed for lasers) contributed very much in identifying laboratory microwave spectra of a series of anions (C6H-, C4H-, C2H-, CN-) and their discovery in the interstellar space (C6H-, C4H-).

  13. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  14. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  15. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  16. Zeeman laser gyroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Azarova, V V; Golyaev, Yu D; Saveliev, I I

    2015-02-28

    The history of invention and development of Zeeman laser gyroscopes, specific features of their optical scheme and operation principle are described. The construction and element base of modern laser angular velocity sensors with Zeeman-based frequency biasing are considered. The problems and prospects of their development are discussed. (laser gyroscopes)

  17. Excimer Lasers In Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittel, Frank K.; Saidi, Iyad S.; Pettit, George H.; Wisoff, P. J.; Sauerbrey, Roland A.

    1989-06-01

    Excimer lasers emit light energy, short optical pulses at ultraviolet wavelengths, that results in a unique laser tissue interaction. This has led to an increasing number of studies into medical applications of these lasers in fields such as ophthalmology, urology, cardiology and neurology.

  18. Solar pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Weaver, W. R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A solar pumped laser is described in which the lasant is a gas that will photodissociate and lase when subjected to sunrays. Sunrays are collected and directed onto the gas lasant to cause it to lase. Applications to laser propulsion and laser power transmission are discussed.

  19. Laser material processing system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  20. Diode laser and endoscopic laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullins, Kenneth E

    2002-05-01

    Two functionally important differences exist between the diode laser and the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (used more commonly in small animal surgery). Diode laser energy is delivered through a quartz fiber instead of being reflected through an articulated arm or waveguide. Quartz fibers are generally more flexible and resilient than waveguides and can be inserted through an endoscope for minimally invasive procedures. Laser-tissue interaction is the other significant difference. The CO2 laser is completely absorbed by water, which limits the effect to visible tissue. The diode wavelength is minimally absorbed by water and may affect tissue as deep as 10 mm below the surface in the free-beam mode. With proper respect for the tissue effect, these differences can be used to the advantage of the patient.

  1. Chalcogenide glass microsphere laser.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Gregor R; Murugan, G Senthil; Wilkinson, James S; Zervas, Michalis N; Hewak, Daniel W

    2010-12-06

    Laser action has been demonstrated in chalcogenide glass microsphere. A sub millimeter neodymium-doped gallium lanthanum sulphide glass sphere was pumped at 808 nm with a laser diode and single and multimode laser action demonstrated at wavelengths between 1075 and 1086 nm. The gallium lanthanum sulphide family of glass offer higher thermal stability compared to other chalcogenide glasses, and this, along with an optimized Q-factor for the microcavity allowed laser action to be achieved. When varying the pump power, changes in the output spectrum suggest nonlinear and/or thermal effects have a strong effect on laser action.

  2. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  3. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  4. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  5. Laser assisted deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of laser-based processing techniques to solar cell metallization are discussed. Laser-assisted thermal or photolytic maskless deposition from organometallic vapors or solutions may provide a viable alternative to photovoltaic metallization systems currently in use. High power, defocused excimer lasers may be used in conjunction with masks as an alternative to direct laser writing to provide higher throughput. Repeated pulsing with excimer lasers may eliminate the need for secondary plating techniques for metal film buildup. A comparison between the thermal and photochemical deposition processes is made.

  6. Stabilized Zeeman split laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of a stablized Zeeman split laser for use in a polarization profilometer is discussed. A Hewlett-Packard laser was modified to stabilize the Zeeman split beat frequency thereby increasing the phase measurement accuracy from the Hewlett-Packard 3 degrees to an accuracy of .01 degrees. The addition of a two layered inductive winding converts the laser to a current controlled oscillator whose frequency is linearly related to coil current. This linear relationship between coil current and laser frequency permits phase locking the laser frequency to a stable crystal controlled reference frequency. The stability of the system is examined and the equipment operation procedures are outlined.

  7. Lasers in otorhinolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais Clemente, Manuel P.

    1992-03-01

    Lasers are now commonly accepted and widely used surgical instruments in otorhinolaryngology. There have been a great number of technological advances with lasers that have contributed to the expansion of this new surgical modality with an increased number of medical applications. Surgical strategies have also changed and are more favorable toward conservative surgery in which less tissues is removed than with more radical resections. This combination of improving technology and medical attitudes has changed the field of otorhinolaryngology, and resulted in an expanding use of laser surgery. Since 1973 we have been using the carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of diseases of the upper aero digestive systems, learning this new surgical technique from the pioneer work of Strong, Jako, and Vaughan. It is our conviction that a laser surgeon must have a thorough knowledge of laser biophysics, instrumentation, safety protocols, and surgical indications, and have the technical skills to perform laser surgery. Laser technology continues to improve at an increased speed, and it is imperative to update knowledge of current and potential applications of lasers in our specialty. It is the purpose of this article to present our clinical experience of 18 years with the use of lasers in surgery of ORL, emphasizing the carbon dioxide laser.

  8. Laser surgery: using the carbon dioxide laser.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V. C.

    1982-01-01

    In 1917 Einstein theorized tha through an atomic process a unique kind of electromagnetic radiation could be produced by stimulated emission. When such radiation is in the optical or infrared spectrum it is termed laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) light. A laser, a high-intensity light source, emits a nearly parallel electromagnetic beam of energy at a given wavelength that can be captured by a lens and concentrated in the focal spot. The wavelength determines how the laser will be used. The carbon dioxide laser is now successfully employed for some surgical procedures in gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, neurosurgery, and plastic and general surgery. The CO2 laser beam is directed through the viewing system of an operating microscope or through a hand-held laser component. Its basic action in tissue is thermal vaporization; it causes minimal damage to adjacent tissues. Surgeons require special training in the basic methods and techniques of laser surgery, as well as in the safety standards that must be observed. Images FIG. 5 PMID:7074503

  9. Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprangle, Philip; Ting, Antonio; Esarey, Eric; Fisher, Amon; Mourou, Gerald

    1993-02-01

    The Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS) utilizes a high peak power or high average power laser to generate within a vacuum chamber a laser beam travelling in one direction to interact with an electron beam traveling in an opposite direction in order to generate high-power x-rays. A ring resonator formed by a plurality of mirrors directs the laser beam in a closed loop to impact with the electron beam to produce x-rays. Concave mirrors in the ring resonator focus the laser beam upon the point where the laser beam interacts with the electron beam to intensify the laser energy at that point. When a Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator (RF linac) is used to produce the electron beam, x-rays having a short pulse length are generated. When a betatron is used as an electron source, x-rays having a long pulse length are generated.

  10. Laser safety in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.

    1997-05-01

    One of the major causes of anxiety in the dental clinic is the dental handpiece. Because dentists wish to provide a method which can replace the drill there has often been a premature use of the laser in dentistry. Various lasers have been introduced into the clinic before research has shown the laser used is of clinical benefit. Any new treatment method must not compromise the health of the patient being treated. Thus a method of evaluating the clinical abilities of dentists and their understanding the limitations of the laser used must be developed. Dentist must be trained in the basic interaction of the laser on oral tissues. The training has to concentrate on the variation of the laser wavelength absorption in the different tissues of the oral cavity. Because of the differences in the optical properties of these tissues great care must be exercised by practitioners using lasers on patients.

  11. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Somayeh; Torkan, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the beginning of the treatment, when separators are placed, to the time of resin residues removal from the tooth surface at the end of orthodontic treatment. This article outlines some of the most common usages of laser beam in orthodontics and also provides a comparison between laser and other conventional method that were the standard of care prior to the advent of laser in this field. PMID:25606324

  12. Lasers in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Nalcaci, Ruhi; Cokakoglu, Serpil

    2013-01-01

    Many types of dental lasers are currently available that can be efficiently used for soft and hard tissue applications in the field of orthodontics. For achieving the desired effects in the target tissue, knowledge of laser characteristics such as power, wavelength and timing, is necessary. Laser therapy is advantageous because it often avoids bleeding, can be pain free, is non-invasive and is relatively quick. The high cost is its primary disadvantage. It is very important to take the necessary precautions to prevent possible tissue damage when using laser dental systems. Here, we reviewed the main types and characteristics of laser systems used in dental practice and discuss the applications of lasers in orthodontics, harmful effects and laser system safety. PMID:24966719

  13. Raman fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supradeepa, V. R.; Feng, Yan; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.

    2017-02-01

    High-power fiber lasers have seen tremendous development in the last decade, with output powers exceeding multiple kilowatts from a single fiber. Ytterbium has been at the forefront as the primary rare-earth-doped gain medium owing to its inherent material advantages. However, for this reason, the lasers are largely confined to the narrow emission wavelength region of ytterbium. Power scaling at other wavelength regions has lagged significantly, and a large number of applications rely upon the diversity of emission wavelengths. Currently, Raman fiber lasers are the only known wavelength agile, scalable, high-power fiber laser technology that can span the wavelength spectrum. In this review, we address the technology of Raman fiber lasers, specifically focused on the most recent developments. We will also discuss several applications of Raman fiber lasers in laser pumping, frequency conversion, optical communications and biology.

  14. Lasers in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Mavrogiannis, M; Thomason, J M; Seymour, R A

    2004-11-01

    Since the development of the ruby laser by Maiman in 1960, lasers have been widely employed in medicine for a number of years. The purpose of this paper is to summarize potential applications for lasers in dentistry, with special regard to periodontology. This article briefly describes clinical applications of lasers and laser safety. Particularly, the use of a diode laser seems to be promising, especially in already compromised transplant patients, who need to be treated with a technique where the operative and post-operative blood loss, post-operative discomfort and the recurrence of drug-induced gingival overgrowth need to be kept to a minimum or eliminated. Therefore, the use of lasers in periodontology may lead to an alteration in present clinical practice and help to establish the best management strategy because, by maintaining periodontal health, the life quality of patients can be improved.

  15. Lasers in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Ulrich

    1991-11-01

    The infrared-laser systems like the Er:YAG, the cw CO2, the Nd:YAG, and the UV- excimer lasers are being investigated for preparing tooth-hard substances. The infrared lasers cause thermal damage to the enamel, the dentin, and the pulp with the exception of the Er:YAG laser. No thermal damage occurs using the Er:YAG laser under practical conditions because of the special thermomechanical ablation process. The ablation rates of the UV- excimer lasers are to low for practical use. Enhancing the ablation efficiency by high- repetition rates causes thermal side effects to occur. Therefore, only the Er:YAG laser has the potential to partially replace the mechanical drill.

  16. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  17. Nanofabrication with pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Kabashin, Av; Delaporte, Ph; Pereira, A; Grojo, D; Torres, R; Sarnet, Th; Sentis, M

    2010-02-24

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser-matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  18. Space qualified laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Frank; Schwander, Thomas; Lange, Robert; Smutny, Berry

    2006-04-01

    Tesat-Spacecom has developed a series of fiber coupled single frequency lasers for space applications ranging from onboard metrology for space borne FTIR spectrometers to step tunable seed lasers for LIDAR applications. The cw-seed laser developed for the ESA AEOLUS Mission shows a 3* 10 -11 Allen variance from 1 sec time intervals up to 1000 sec. Q-switched lasers with stable beam pointing under space environments are another field of development. One important aspect of a space borne laser system is a reliable fiber coupled laser diode pump source around 808nm. A dedicated development concerning chip design and packaging yielded in a 5*10 6h MTTF (mean time to failure) for the broad area emitters. Qualification and performance test results for the different laser assemblies will be presented and their application in the different space programs.

  19. Lasers in oral surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Ulrich; Hibst, Raimund

    1994-12-01

    The indications of lasers in oral surgery are defined by the laser-tissue interaction types. These are mainly thermal effects depending especially on the absorption of laser light in varying biological tissues. In histological sections different laser effects are demonstrated on oral mucosa, bone and cartilage, which have a great influence on wound healing and subsequently on clinical indications of the different wavelengths. On the one hand the good coagulation effect of the Nd:YAG laser is wanted for hemostasis in soft tissue surgery. On the other hand, for the treatment of precancerous dysplasias or neoplasias an effective cutting with a coagulation effect like using the CO2 laser is necessary. However, the excision of benign mucosal lesions as well as performing osteotomies or shaping of cartilage should be undertaken with the Er:YAG laser without greater coagulation and consequently without any delay of wound healing.

  20. Micromachining with copper lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Martyn R. H.; Bell, Andy; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Rutterford, Graham; Chudzicki, J.; Kearsley, Andrew J.

    1997-04-01

    In recent years the copper laser has undergone extensive development and has emerged as a leading and unique laser for micromachining. The copper laser is a high average power (10 - 250 W), high pulse repetition rate (2 - 32 kHz), visible laser (511 nm and 578 nm) that produces high peak power (typically 200 kW), short pulses (30 ns) and very good beam quality (diffraction limited). This unique set of laser parameters results in exceptional micro-machining in a wide variety of materials. Typical examples of the capabilities of the copper laser include the drilling of small holes (10 - 200 micrometer diameter) in materials as diverse as steel, ceramic, diamond and polyimide with micron precision and low taper (less than 1 degree) cutting and profiling of diamond. Application of the copper laser covers the electronic, aerospace, automotive, nuclear, medical and precision engineering industries.

  1. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  2. Lasers in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Forbes, A.; Bingham, R.; Kellett, B. J.; Mathye, A.

    2008-05-01

    A variety of laser applications in space, past, present, future and far future are reviewed together with the contributions of some of the scientists and engineers involved, especially those that happen to have South African connections. Historically, two of the earliest laser applications in space, were atmospheric LIDAR and lunar ranging. These applications involved atmospheric physicists, several astronauts and many of the staff recruited into the Soviet and North American lunar exploration programmes. There is a strong interest in South Africa in both LIDAR and lunar ranging. Shortly after the birth of the laser (and even just prior) theoretical work on photonic propulsion and space propulsion by laser ablation was initiated by Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz and Eugen Saenger. Present or near future experimental programs are developing in the following fields: laser ablation propulsion, possibly coupled with rail gun or gas gun propulsion; interplanetary laser transmission; laser altimetry; gravity wave detection by space based Michelson interferometry; the de-orbiting of space debris by high power lasers; atom laser interferometry in space. Far future applications of laser-photonic space-propulsion were also pioneered by Carl Sagan and Robert Forward. They envisaged means of putting Saenger's ideas into practice. Forward also invented a laser based method for manufacturing solid antimatter or SANTIM, well before the ongoing experiments at CERN with anti-hydrogen production and laser-trapping. SANTIM would be an ideal propellant for interstellar missions if it could be manufactured in sufficient quantities. It would be equally useful as a power source for the transmission of information over light year distances. We briefly mention military lasers. Last but not least, we address naturally occurring lasers in space and pose the question: "did the Big Bang lase?"

  3. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  4. Frequency comb swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a ~−1.2dB sensitivity roll off over ~3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have −10dB and −5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0–3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed. PMID:19997365

  5. Laser treatment in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2004-07-01

    This presentation is designed as a brief overview of laser use in gynecology, for non-medical researchers involved in development of new laser techniques. The literature of the past decade is reviewed. Differences in penetration, absorption, and suitable delivery media for the beams dictate clinical application. The use of CO2 laser in the treatment of uterine cervical intraepithelial lesions is well established and indications as well as techniques have not changed over 30 years. The Cochrane Systematic Review from 2000 suggests no obviously superior technique. CO2 laser ablation of the vagina is also established as a safe treatment modality for VAIN. CO2 laser permits treatment of lesions with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding by destruction of the endometrial lining using various techniques has been the subject of a 2002 Cochran Database Review. Among the compared treatment modalities are newer and modified laser techniques. Conclusion by reviewers is that outcomes and complication profiles of newer techniques compare favorably with the gold standard of endometrial resection. The ELITT diode laser system is one of the new successful additions. CO2 laser is also the dominant laser type used with laparoscopy for ablation of endometriotic implants. Myoma coagulation or myolysis with Nd:Yag laser through the laparoscope or hysteroscope is a conservative treatment option. Even MRI guided percutaneous approaches have been described. No long-term data are available.

  6. Photobiomodulation in laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Rong, Dong-Liang; Huang, Jin; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Laser surgery provides good exposure with clear operating fields and satisfactory preliminary functional results. In contrast to conventional excision, it was found that matrix metalloproteinases and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases -1 mRNA expression is higher, myofibroblasts appeared and disappeared slower in laser excision wounds. It has been suggested that the better anatomical and functional results achieved following laser cordectomy may be explained by the fact that such procedures result in better, more rapid healing processes to recover vocal cord for early glottic tumors and better. In this paper, the role of photobiomodulation in laser surgery will be discussed by the cultured monolayer normal human skin fibroblast model of the photobiomodulation of marginal irradiation of high intensity laser beam, the photobiomodulation related to the irradiated tissue, the biological information model of photobiomodulation and the animal models of laser surgery. Although high intensity laser beam is so intense that it destroys the irradiated cells or tissue, its marginal irradiation intensity is so low that there is photobiomodulation on non-damage cells to modulate the regeneration of partly damaged tissue so that the surgery of laser of different parameters results in different post-surgical recovery. It was concluded that photobiomodulation might play an important role in the long-term effects of laser surgery, which might be used to design laser surgery.

  7. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-09

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  8. Lasers in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qian; Juzeniene, Asta; Chen, Jiyao; Svaasand, Lars O.; Warloe, Trond; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Moan, Johan

    2008-05-01

    It is hard to imagine that a narrow, one-way, coherent, moving, amplified beam of light fired by excited atoms is powerful enough to slice through steel. In 1917, Albert Einstein speculated that under certain conditions atoms could absorb light and be stimulated to shed their borrowed energy. Charles Townes coined the term laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) in 1951. Theodore Maiman investigated the glare of a flash lamp in a rod of synthetic ruby, creating the first human-made laser in 1960. The laser involves exciting atoms and passing them through a medium such as crystal, gas or liquid. As the cascade of photon energy sweeps through the medium, bouncing off mirrors, it is reflected back and forth, and gains energy to produce a high wattage beam of light. Although lasers are today used by a large variety of professions, one of the most meaningful applications of laser technology has been through its use in medicine. Being faster and less invasive with a high precision, lasers have penetrated into most medical disciplines during the last half century including dermatology, ophthalmology, dentistry, otolaryngology, gastroenterology, urology, gynaecology, cardiology, neurosurgery and orthopaedics. In many ways the laser has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of a disease. As a surgical tool the laser is capable of three basic functions. When focused on a point it can cauterize deeply as it cuts, reducing the surgical trauma caused by a knife. It can vaporize the surface of a tissue. Or, through optical fibres, it can permit a doctor to see inside the body. Lasers have also become an indispensable tool in biological applications from high-resolution microscopy to subcellular nanosurgery. Indeed, medical lasers are a prime example of how the movement of an idea can truly change the medical world. This review will survey various applications of lasers in medicine including four major categories: types of lasers, laser

  9. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-02-11

    A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser safety audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe use of Lasers references this requirement in several sections: (1) Section 1.3.2 LSO Specific Responsibilities states under Hazard Evaluation, ''The LSO shall be responsible for hazards evaluation of laser work areas''; (2) Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''; and (3) Appendix D, under Survey and Inspections, it states, ''the LSO will survey by inspection, as considered necessary, all areas where laser equipment is used''. Therefore, for facilities using Class 3B and or Class 4 lasers, audits for laser safety compliance are expected to be conducted. The composition, frequency and rigueur of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms. In many institutions, a sole Laser Safety Officer (LSO) or a number of Deputy LSO's perform these audits. For that matter, there are institutions that request users to perform a self-assessment audit. Many items on the common audit list and the associated findings are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the LSO or auditor in particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage is an example; to one set of eyes a particular arrangement might be completely adequate, while to another the installation may be inadequate. In order to provide more consistency, the National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (NIF-LLNL) has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. These criteria are distributed to laser users, and they serve two broad purposes: first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor, and second, it is an

  10. Laser materials production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianinoni, I.; Musci, M.

    1985-09-01

    The characteristics and the perspectives of the new photochemical laser techniques for materials production will be briefly analysed and some recent experimental results both on large area deposition of thin films and on synthesis of powders will be reported. As an example of an IR laser process, the cw CO 2 laser-induced deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon will be described in some detail. The results of some UV experiments for semiconductor, metal and insulating film depositions will also be discussed. The features of the process for laser-driven synthesis of powders and the characteristics of the produced particles will be evidenced, and some of their technological applications will be outlined. The requirements of the laser sources suitable for this kind of applications are in general the same as in gas-phase laser chemistry, however it will be pointed out how some parameters are more significant for this specific use.

  11. Pulsed excimer laser processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, D.

    1985-01-01

    The status of pulsed excimer laser processing of PV cells is presented. The cost effective feasibility of fabricating high efficiency solar cells on Czochralski wafers using a pulsed excimer laser for junction formation, surface passivation, and front metallization. Laser annealing results were promising with the best AR coated cell having an efficiency of 16.1%. Better results would be expected with larger laser spot size because there was some degradation in open circuit voltage caused by laser spot overlap and edge effects. Surface heating and photolytic decomposition by the laser was used to deposit tungsten from the reaction of tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen. The line widths were 5 to 10 mils, and the depositions passed the tape adhesion test. Thinner lines are practical using an optimized optical system.

  12. Pulsed excimer laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D.

    1985-06-01

    The status of pulsed excimer laser processing of PV cells is presented. The cost effective feasibility of fabricating high efficiency solar cells on Czochralski wafers using a pulsed excimer laser for junction formation, surface passivation, and front metallization. Laser annealing results were promising with the best AR coated cell having an efficiency of 16.1%. Better results would be expected with larger laser spot size because there was some degradation in open circuit voltage caused by laser spot overlap and edge effects. Surface heating and photolytic decomposition by the laser was used to deposit tungsten from the reaction of tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen. The line widths were 5 to 10 mils, and the depositions passed the tape adhesion test. Thinner lines are practical using an optimized optical system.

  13. Laser/tissue interaction.

    PubMed

    Dederich, D N

    1991-01-01

    When laser light impinges on tissue, it can reflect, scatter, be absorbed, or transmit to the surrounding tissue. Absorption controls to a great degree the extent to which reflection, scattering and transmission occur, and wavelength is the primary determinant of absorption. The CO2 laser is consistently absorbed by most materials and tissues and the Nd-YAG laser wavelength is preferentially absorbed in pigmented tissues. The factors which determine the initial tissue effect include the laser wavelength, laser power, laser waveform, tissue optical properties, and tissue thermal properties. There are almost an infinite number of combinations of these factors possible, many of which would result in unacceptable damage to the tissues. This underscores the need to thoroughly test any particular combination of these factors on the conceptual, in-vitro, and in-vivo level before a treatment is offered.

  14. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser.

    PubMed

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-29

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M(2) reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  15. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  16. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  17. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser–matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics. PMID:20672069

  18. Laser rocket system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. S.; Forsyth, J. B.; Skratt, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The laser rocket systems investigated in this study were for orbital transportation using space-based, ground-based and airborne laser transmitters. The propulsion unit of these systems utilizes a continuous wave (CW) laser beam focused into a thrust chamber which initiates a plasma in the hydrogen propellant, thus heating the propellant and providing thrust through a suitably designed nozzle and expansion skirt. The specific impulse is limited only by the ability to adequately cool the thruster and the amount of laser energy entering the engine. The results of the study showed that, with advanced technology, laser rocket systems with either a space- or ground-based laser transmitter could reduce the national budget allocated to space transportation by 10 to 345 billion dollars over a 10-year life cycle when compared to advanced chemical propulsion systems (LO2-LH2) of equal capability. The variation in savings depends upon the projected mission model.

  19. Micro-laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.

    2003-07-22

    A micro-laser is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide and at least one amplifying medium in the waveguide. PBG features are positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings and allow introduction of amplifying mediums into the highly resonant guided micro-laser microcavity. The micro-laser may be positioned on a die of a bulk substrate material with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a micro-laser is disclosed. A method for tuning the micro-laser is also disclosed. The micro-laser may be used as an optical regenerator, or a light source for data transfer or for optical computing.

  20. Lasers in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-01-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20th century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics. PMID:23066266

  1. Portable laser laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, J. T.

    1994-07-01

    A Portable Laser Laboratory (PLL) is being designed and built for the CALIOPE Program tests which will begin in October of 1994. The PLL is designed to give maximum flexibility for evolving laser experiments and can be readily moved by loading it onto a standard truck trailer. The internal configuration for the October experiments will support a two line DIAL system running in the mid-IR. Brief descriptions of the laser and detection systems are included.

  2. Thallium Mercury Laser Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    THALLIUM MERCURY LASER DEVELOPMENT C. S. Liu and D. W. Feldman FINAL REPORT (PHASE III) (Period between Feb. 1, 1980 and Jan. 31, 1981) 0 Contract No...Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15235 Approved for public release;IDistribution Unlimited 1/i;THALLIUM MERCURY LASER DEVELOPMENT * , , IS C. S./Liu tRD. W /eldman...9 ’ t4 THALLIUM MERCURY LASER DEVELOPMENT C. S. Liu and D. W. Feldman Westinghouse R&D Center Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15235 1

  3. Excimer laser chemical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.; Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques need to be developed to maintain XeF and XeCl laser performance over long periods of time without degradation resulting from chemical processes occurring within the laser. The dominant chemical issues include optical damage, corrosions of laser materials, gas contamination, and control of halogen concentration. Each of these issues are discussed and summarized. The methods of minimizing or controlling the chemical processes involved are presented.

  4. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    acousto - optic beam deflector for greater absolute accuracy. The detection system was also upgraded to a response time of • 1 usec. The... 2 C. SUMMARY OF RESULTS.., 3 D . GENERAL PLAN 5 II. Nd:YAG FIBER PREPARATION 7 A. FIBER GROWTH 7 B. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF Nd:YAG...A. INTRODUCTION 25 B. GENERAL FORMALISM 26 C. FREE-SPACE LASERS 35 D . FIBER LASERS 43 1. Fiber Laser Configuration 43 2 . F

  5. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  6. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  7. Precision laser aiming system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Brandon R.; Todd, Steven N.

    2009-04-28

    A precision laser aiming system comprises a disrupter tool, a reflector, and a laser fixture. The disrupter tool, the reflector and the laser fixture are configurable for iterative alignment and aiming toward an explosive device threat. The invention enables a disrupter to be quickly and accurately set up, aligned, and aimed in order to render safe or to disrupt a target from a standoff position.

  8. Etalon laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.B.; Koenig, H.G.; Rice, R.R.

    1981-08-18

    A laser diode is disclosed that is suitable for integrated and fiber optic applications requiring single transverse and single longitudinal mode operation. The single transverse mode is provided by making a gallium arsenide double heterostructural laser diode with a narrow stripe width and a relatively long length. The single longitudinal mode operation is provided by cracking the diode transverse to the stripe at one or more locations to form internal etalons in the laser cavity.

  9. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  10. Hollow waveguide delivery systems for laser technological application [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, Helena; Němec, Michal; Šulc, Jan; Černý, Pavel; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    Hollow waveguides with internal coatings can be an attractive alternative to solid-core fibers. This paper reviews the results with the cyclic olefin polymer coated metal hollow glass waveguides which can be used as a delivery instrument in a wide band of wavelengths-from the visible up to the infrared. These waveguides have been shown to be capable of transmissions up to the 1.36 GW of Nd:YAG peak power and 5.8 W or 5.1 W of alexandrite or Er:YAG mean power, respectively. They can be utilized in many branches of medical or industrial applications.

  11. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R. J.

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  12. Laser Gyro Theory Extension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    7 AA096 14S ARI ZONA UNIV TUCSON OPTICA SCIENCES CENTER F/6 20/5 LASER GYRO THE.ORY ESTENS ION(U)7 C So M 0 SCULLY IF33615-79-C-17N4 UNCLASSIIED...GYRO We have been working with scientists at Litton Industries in the development of a Zeeman laser gyro (ZLAG). We have developed a vector laser...Hutchings and V. Sanders are with Litton Industries , Woodland rate measurements with laser gyros (Section II). The remain- Hills, CA 91364. ing

  13. Shuttle Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack L.; Harding, David J.; Garvin, James B.

    1999-01-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment that has flown twice; first on STS-72 in January 1996 and then on STS-85 in August 1997. Both missions produced successful laser altimetry and surface lidar data products from approximately 80 hours per mission of SLA data operations. A total of four Shuttle missions are planned for the SLA series. This paper documents SLA mission results and explains SLA pathfinder accomplishments at the mid-point in this series of Hitchhiker missions. The overall objective of the SLA mission series is the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for NASA operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future laser altimeter sensors will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA, including the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA) and the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). MBLA is the land and vegetation laser sensor for the NASA Earth System Sciences Pathfinder Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) Mission, and GLAS is the Earth Observing System facility instrument on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). The Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter, now well into a multi-year mapping mission at the red planet, is also directly benefiting from SLA data analysis methods, just as SLA benefited from MOLA spare parts and instrument technology experience [5] during SLA construction in the early 1990s.

  14. SYMMETRICAL LASER CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTAL GROWTH , SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), LASERS, SYNTHESIS, FERROELECTRIC CRYSTALS , FLUORESCENCE, IMPURITIES, BARIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONATES...STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS, TITANATES, STANNATES, SAMARIUM, MANGANESE, REFRACTORY MATERIALS, OXIDES, SINGLE CRYSTALS .

  15. A quantum laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Treps, Nicolas; Grosse, Nicolai; Bowen, Warwick P; Fabre, Claude; Bachor, Hans-A; Lam, Ping Koy

    2003-08-15

    The measurement sensitivity of the pointing direction of a laser beam is ultimately limited by the quantum nature of light. To reduce this limit, we have experimentally produced a quantum laser pointer, a beam of light whose direction is measured with a precision greater than that possible for a usual laser beam. The laser pointer is generated by combining three different beams in three orthogonal transverse modes, two of them in a squeezed-vacuum state and one in an intense coherent field. The result provides a demonstration of multichannel spatial squeezing, along with its application to the improvement of beam positioning sensitivity and, more generally, to imaging.

  16. Laser Surface Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamuthu, D. S.

    1980-10-01

    Experimental procedures and current state-of-the-art are presented for laser surface treating methods such as alloying, cladding, grain refining, and transformation hardening using a cw CO2 laser. Microstructural and x-ray analyses of the treated surfaces indicate that a laser beam can locally enhance surface properties. Laser alloying offers the possibility to selectively modify a low cost workpiece surface so that it has the desired high quality surface properties characteristic of high performance alloys. Laser cladding offers feasibility to apply high melting cladding alloys on low melting workpieces, to reduce the amount of dilution of cladding alloy with the workpieces, and the potential to apply dense ceramic claddings to metallic workpieces. Laser grain refining offers potential to either minimize or eliminate surface defects such as inclusions, intermetallic compounds, and pores, and to provide a refined grain structure. Laser transformation hardening provides the treated workpieces with a hard martensitic surface that has compressive stresses for enhanced fatigue life; in addition, reduction in wear rate of treated surfaces is achieved. This experimental study indicates that the use of lasers for surface treatment has several limitations. Further studies will provide better understanding for maximum utilization of laser surface treating processes.

  17. Dental lasers and science.

    PubMed

    Zakariasen, K L; Dederich, D N

    1991-07-01

    We have attempted to accomplish two purposes in this article. First, we have presented the case that extensive scientific investigation must form the base of our profession, that it must be an ongoing, continuous process and that laser dentistry must be developed through extensive scientific inquiry--as all of our treatment modalities should be. Second, we have presented many examples of the science involved in the development of laser dentistry. Lasers do have far-reaching potential for application to dentistry. We, as a profession, must insist that such laser development is done properly, not foisted upon us based on anecdotal reports and incomplete research.

  18. Deep space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Srinivasan, Meera; Shaw, Matthew; Piazzolla, Sabino; Wright, Malcolm W.; Farr, William H.

    2016-03-01

    A number of laser communication link demonstrations from near Earth distances extending out to lunar ranges have been remarkably successful, demonstrating the augmented channel capacity that is accessible with the use of lasers for communications. The next hurdle on the path to extending laser communication and its benefits throughout the solar system and beyond is to demonstrate deep-space laser communication links. In this paper, concepts and technology development being advanced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in order to enable deep-space link demonstrations to ranges of approximately 3 AU in the next decade, will be discussed.

  19. Optofluidic random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakiran Bhaktha, B. N.; Bachelard, Nicolas; Noblin, Xavier; Sebbah, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Random lasing is reported in a dye-circulated structured polymeric microfluidic channel. The role of disorder, which results from limited accuracy of photolithographic process, is demonstrated by the variation of the emission spectrum with local-pump position and by the extreme sensitivity to a local perturbation of the structure. Thresholds comparable to those of conventional microfluidic lasers are achieved, without the hurdle of state-of-the-art cavity fabrication. Potential applications of optofluidic random lasers for on-chip sensors are discussed. Introduction of random lasers in the field of optofluidics is a promising alternative to on-chip laser integration with light and fluidic functionalities.

  20. Spaceborne laser radar.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, T.

    1972-01-01

    Development of laser systems to acquire and track targets in applications such as the rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft. A scan technique is described whereby a narrow laser beam is simultaneously scanned with an equally narrow receiver field-of-view without the aid of mechanical gimbals. Equations are developed in order to examine the maximum acquisition and tracking rates, and the maximum target range for a scanning laser radar system. A recently built prototype of a small, lightweight, low-power-consuming scanning laser radar is described.

  1. Laser eye protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Ralph G.; Labo, Jack A.; Mayo, Michael W.

    1990-07-01

    Laser applications have proliferated in recent years and as to be expected their presence is no longer confined to the laboratory or places where access to their radiation can be easily controlled. One obvious application where this is so is in military operations where various devices such as laser range finders target designators and secure communications equipment elevate the risk of exposure specifically eye exposure to unacceptable levels. Although the need for eye protection in the laboratory and other controlled areas has been appreciated since the invention of the laser the use of lasers in circumstances where safety or the risk of temporary loss of vision which can not always be ensured by administrative procedures has made adequate eye protection essential. It is the critical nature of many military operations that has driven the search for eye protection against both nuclear and laser radiation. At the same time the requirement to maintain useful vision during irradiation as well as advances in laser technology have complicated the problem enormously. Pertinent aspects of the problem such as laser characteristics- -pulse width repetition rate laser wavelength tunability or agility as well as laser power or energy have been placed in perspective. In addition possible effects on vision for various exposures have been estimated as have the characteristics required of eye protective devices. Various classes of devices are discussed and advantages and disadvantages noted. 1.

  2. Trends in laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Frank; van Nunen, Joris; Held, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Laser Micromachining is well established in industry. Depending on the application lasers with pulse length from μseconds to femtoseconds and wavelengths from 1064nm and its harmonics up to 5μm or 10.6μm are used. Ultrafast laser machining using pulses with pico or femtosecond duration pulses is gaining traction, as it offers very precise processing of materials with low thermal impact. Large-scale industrial ultrafast laser applications show that the market can be divided into various sub segments. One set of applications demand low power around 10W, compact footprint and are extremely sensitive to the laser price whilst still demanding 10ps or shorter laser pulses. A second set of applications are very power hungry and only become economically feasible for large scale deployments at power levels in the 100+W class. There is also a growing demand for applications requiring fs-laser pulses. In our presentation we would like to describe these sub segments by using selected applications from the automotive and electronics industry e.g. drilling of gas/diesel injection nozzles, dicing of LED substrates. We close the presentation with an outlook to micromachining applications e.g. glass cutting and foil processing with unique new CO lasers emitting 5μm laser wavelength.

  3. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  4. Lasers and avionic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willams, J. S.

    1983-07-01

    Interrogative applications of laser technology are considered, taking into account the extent to which a centralized source of information can be used to service a number of functions which need to be performed in an airframe, and, in addition, also the potential of the laser as probing device. Aspects of laser technology and air vehicle communications are discussed along with laser based techniques for processing and storage of information. Attention is given to data transmission within the aircraft, communications external to the air vehicle, Fourier optics, holographic methods, real-time processing, Bragg cells and spectrum analysis, optical bistable devices, and optical data storage.

  5. Laser applications in phlebology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Mancini, S.; Postiglione, Marco; Postiglione, M. G.

    2001-06-01

    PURPOSE: review of laser used in phlebology METHOD: critical analysis of scientific data taken from the literature and based on 25 years personal experience. RESULTS: we have three groups of laser applications in phlebology: for the diagnosis, as physical therapy and as surgical therapy. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: the laser-doppler studies the microcirculations, the no-surgical therapy shown positive results in the treatment of venous ulcers and for the wound healing. It could be indicate also as antiphlogistic and anti-edema therapy, in superficial thrombophlebitis. The surgical laser is useful for the surgical cleaning of ulcers, for haemorroids, angiomas and telangiectases.

  6. Laser adaptive holographic hydrophone

    SciTech Connect

    Romashko, R V; Kulchin, Yu N; Bezruk, M N; Ermolaev, S A

    2016-03-31

    A new type of a laser hydrophone based on dynamic holograms, formed in a photorefractive crystal, is proposed and studied. It is shown that the use of dynamic holograms makes it unnecessary to use complex optical schemes and systems for electronic stabilisation of the interferometer operating point. This essentially simplifies the scheme of the laser hydrophone preserving its high sensitivity, which offers the possibility to use it under a strong variation of the environment parameters. The laser adaptive holographic hydrophone implemented at present possesses the sensitivity at a level of 3.3 mV Pa{sup -1} in the frequency range from 1 to 30 kHz. (laser hydrophones)

  7. Lighting with laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Chandrajit; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are much more efficient than compact fluorescent lamps and hence are rapidly capturing the market for general illumination. LEDs are also replacing halogen lamps or even newer xenon based lamps in automotive headlamps. Because laser diodes are inherently much brighter and often more efficient than corresponding LEDs, there is great research interest in developing laser diode based illumination systems. Operating at higher current densities and with smaller form factors, laser diodes may outperform LEDs in the future. This article reviews the possibilities and challenges in the integration of visible laser diodes in future illumination systems.

  8. Laser processing with specially designed laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asratyan, A. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Feofanov, I. N.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Krasovskii, V. I.; Lyabin, N. A.; Pogosyan, L. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Zakharyan, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of using laser systems to form beams with special spatial configurations has been studied. The laser systems applied had a self-conjugate cavity based on the elements of copper vapor lasers (LT-5Cu, LT-10Cu, LT-30Cu) with an average power of 5, 10, or 30 W. The active elements were pumped by current pulses of duration 80-100 ns. The duration of laser generation pulses was up to 25 ns. The generator unit included an unstable cavity, where one reflector was a special mirror with a reflecting coating. Various original optical schemes used were capable of exploring spatial configurations and energy characteristics of output laser beams in their interaction with micro- and nanoparticles fabricated from various materials. In these experiments, the beam dimensions of the obtained zones varied from 0.3 to 5 µm, which is comparable with the minimum permissible dimensions determined by the optical elements applied. This method is useful in transforming a large amount of information at the laser pulse repetition rate of 10-30 kHz. It was possible to realize the high-precision micromachining and microfabrication of microscale details by direct writing, cutting and drilling (with the cutting width and through-hole diameters ranging from 3 to 100 µm) and produce microscale, deep, intricate and narrow grooves on substrate surfaces of metals and nonmetal materials. This system is used for producing high-quality microscale details without moving the object under treatment. It can also be used for microcutting and microdrilling in a variety of metals such as molybdenum, copper and stainless steel, with a thickness of up to 300 µm, and in nonmetals such as silicon, sapphire and diamond with a thickness ranging from 10 µm to 1 mm with different thermal parameters and specially designed laser beam.

  9. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W.

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  10. Laser peening with fiber optic delivery

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Ault, Earl R.; Scheibner, Karl F.

    2004-11-16

    A system for processing a workpiece using a laser. The laser produces at least one laser pulse. A laser processing unit is used to process the workpiece using the at least one laser pulse. A fiber optic cable is used for transmitting the at least one laser pulse from the laser to the laser processing unit.

  11. Robotic Laser Coating Removal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    completion of this evaluation a 6 kW CO2 laser from Rofin -Sinar was selected for use in the RLCRS. This laser provided the highest quality laser ...DATA AND ASSUMPTIONS................................................................B-1 iii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Six kW CO2 laser ...for proposal (RFP) that was distributed throughout the laser industry. In response to this RFP, 15 laser systems (nine CO2 , three Nd:YAG, and three

  12. Laser surgery of the skin.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D J

    1989-11-01

    The carbon dioxide laser, the argon laser and the pulse-dye laser are used to remove a variety of skin lesions. Advantages of laser surgery include a relatively bloodless operating field and minimal postoperative discomfort and swelling. Warts, tattoos, actinic cheilitis, skin cancer, xanthelasma, ingrown toenails, keloids and port-wine stains are among the lesions that can be removed with laser surgery. The tunable pulse-dye laser is particularly useful in the treatment of vascular lesions.

  13. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  14. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  15. Tunable dysprosium laser.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Matthew R; Jackson, Stuart D

    2016-10-01

    We report the demonstration of a tunable dysprosium laser. The experiment employed in-band pumping of a Dy3+-doped fluoride fiber and a simple resonator design involving a ruled diffraction grating. The laser produced tuning between 2.95 and 3.35 μm, limited by the availability of optics.

  16. Dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye laser amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant. 3 figs.

  17. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  18. Athermal laser design.

    PubMed

    Bovington, Jock; Srinivasan, Sudharsanan; Bowers, John E

    2014-08-11

    This paper discusses circuit based and waveguide based athermalization schemes and provides some design examples of athermalized lasers utilizing fully integrated athermal components as an alternative to power hungry thermo-electric controllers (TECs), off-chip wavelength lockers or monitors with lookup tables for tunable lasers. This class of solutions is important for uncooled transmitters on silicon.

  19. Surface treatments by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Benzerga, R.; Basillais, Armelle; Georges, Cecile; Fariaut, Francois; Semmar, Nadjib; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal

    2003-07-01

    Laser treatments of various metals are studying depending on the laser wavelength, pulse time duration and shape, and fluence (laser/metal interaction regime). Low fluence excimer UV laser melting process of gold layer is shown to improve the corrosion resistance of multilayer (Au/Ni/Cu alloy) electrical contacts. For this application the homogenity of the laser beam as well as the initial Cu substrate roughness are found to be limiting parameters of the process. Carburization of Al alloy, performed in C3H6 atmosphere with a KrF laser induces the incorporation of carbon atoms over about 4 μm depth. The crystalline Al4C3 synthesized at the surface leads to a strengthening of the light Al alloy, which is of great interest for application in car industry. The study shows that diffusion of C atom in the target is possible because of a plasma presence on the surface which supports the molten bath life time and induces dissociation of the ambient gas. In the last example of laser metal surface treatment presented in that paper, a commonly used steel is treated in air with different lasers at a fluence above the plasma formation threshold. It is seen that the machining oils covering the surface before the treatment can be efficiently removed and that new compounds (nitride, carbide and oxides) are formed at the surface.

  20. CO2 laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, R E

    2001-07-01

    The CO2 Laser offers a variety of unique features in resurfacing facial photodamage and acne scarring. These include hemostasis, efficient removal of the epidermis in a single pass, thermally induced tissue tightening, and safe, predictable tissue interaction. Knowledge of these mechanisms will result in the capability of using the CO2 laser effectively and safely whether the goal is superficial or deep treatment.

  1. Learning about Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Larry

    2011-01-01

    The word laser is an acronym. It stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers, invented in 1958, are used to cut and fuse materials, accurately survey long distances, communicate across fiber-optic phone lines, produce 3D pictures, make special effects, help navigation, and read bar codes for cash registers. A laser…

  2. Free-Electron Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brau, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of free-electron lasers as a source of coherent radiation over a broad range of wavelengths from the far-infrared to the far-ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. Discusses some applications of these lasers, including medicine and strategic defense. (TW)

  3. Dielectric laser accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, R. Joel; Noble, Robert J.; Bane, Karl; Dowell, David H.; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Spencer, James E.; Tantawi, Sami; Wu, Ziran; Byer, Robert L.; Peralta, Edgar; Soong, Ken; Chang, Chia-Ming; Montazeri, Behnam; Wolf, Stephen J.; Cowan, Benjamin; Dawson, Jay; Gai, Wei; Hommelhoff, Peter; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Jing, Chunguang; McGuinness, Christopher; Palmer, Robert B.; Naranjo, Brian; Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Mizrahi, Amit; Schachter, Levi; Sears, Christopher; Werner, Gregory R.; Yoder, Rodney B.

    2014-10-01

    The use of infrared lasers to power optical-scale lithographically fabricated particle accelerators is a developing area of research that has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The physics and technology of this approach is reviewed, which is referred to as dielectric laser acceleration (DLA). In the DLA scheme operating at typical laser pulse lengths of 0.1 to 1 ps, the laser damage fluences for robust dielectric materials correspond to peak surface electric fields in the GV /m regime. The corresponding accelerating field enhancement represents a potential reduction in active length of the accelerator between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Power sources for DLA-based accelerators (lasers) are less costly than microwave sources (klystrons) for equivalent average power levels due to wider availability and private sector investment. Because of the high laser-to-particle coupling efficiency, required pulse energies are consistent with tabletop microJoule class lasers. Combined with the very high (MHz) repetition rates these lasers can provide, the DLA approach appears promising for a variety of applications, including future high-energy physics colliders, compact light sources, and portable medical scanners and radiative therapy machines.

  4. Lasers, A Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-02

    TA1675 Muncheryan , Hrand 14. Laser Fundamentals and Applications, 1486 Indianapolis , IN: H.W. Sams , c1975 . 2...Francisco , CA: the cmd , 1970. • TK787 1.3 Van Pelt , W.F . , et al . Laser Fundamentals and Experiments . US Washington , DC: U.S. Bur of Radiological

  5. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  6. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  7. Focusing laser scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, W. R.; Weaver, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Economical laser scanner assembled from commercially available components, modulates and scans focused laser beam over area up to 5.1 by 5.1 cm. Scanner gives resolution comparable to that of conventional television. Device is highly applicable to area of analog and digital storage and retrieval.

  8. Laser hair removal pearls.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal.

  9. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  10. Silicon Stokes terahertz laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, S. G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Hovenier, J. N.; Klaassen, T. O.; Carder, D. A.; Phillips, P. J.; Redlich, B.; Riemann, H.; Zhukavin, R. Kh.; Shastin, V. N.

    2007-04-10

    A Raman-type silicon laser at terahertz frequencies has been realized. Stokes-shifted stimulated emission has been observed from silicon crystals doped by antimony donors when optically excited by an infrared free electron laser. The Raman lasing was obtained due to resonant scattering on electronic states of a donor atom.

  11. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  12. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  13. Laser biostimulation in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utz, Irina A.; Lagutina, L. E.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper the method and apparatus for percutaneous laser irradiation of blood (PLIB) in vessels (veins) are described. Results of clinical investigations of biostimulating effects under PLIB by red laser light (633 nm) in Cubiti and Saphena Magna veins are presented.

  14. Lasers for Training Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, C. A.

    A breadboard model of a laser display system is described in detail and its operating procedure is outlined. The system consists of: a Model 52 argon krypton ion laser and power supply; an optical breadboard comprising a pocket cell light modulator, a galvonmeter beam deflector for vertical scanning, a unique multiple reflection beam steerer for…

  15. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  16. Laser Programs Highlight 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.R.

    1997-01-31

    Our contributions to laser science and technology and corresponding applications range from concept to design of the National Ignition Facility, transfer of Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation technology to the private sector, and from new initiatives in industry and defense to micro-optics for improving human vision.

  17. Solid state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rines, Glen A. (Inventor); Moulton, Peter F. (Inventor); Harrison, James (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength-tunable, injection-seeded, dispersion-compensated, dispersively-pumped solid state laser includes a lasing medium; a highly reflective mirror; an output coupler; at least one isosceles Brewster prism oriented to the minimum deviation angle between the medium and the mirror for directing light of different wavelengths along different paths; means for varying the angle of the highly reflective mirror relative to the light from at least one Brewster angle for selecting a predetermined laser operating wavelength; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the lasing medium; a laser injection seeding port disposed between the dispersion compensation apparatus and one of the mirror and coupler and including a reflective surface at an acute non-Brewster angle to the laser beam for introducing a seed input; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the laser medium including opposite chirality optical elements; the lasing medium including a pump surface disposed at an acute angle to the laser beam to define a discrete path for the pumping laser beam separate from the pumped laser beam.

  18. Tunable Infrared Semiconductor Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-20

    is a thulium fiber laser that has output of 20Watts at 1.908 µm with a collimated output beam diameter of about 5 mm. With a cylindrical lens, a...the device onto a copper heat sink and then to the cold finger of liquid nitrogen Dewar. In characterization, a thulium fiber laser at 1.908 nm

  19. Lasers in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Passanezi, Euloir; Damante, Carla Andreotti; de Rezende, Maria L Rubo; Greghi, Sebastião L Aguiar

    2015-02-01

    About 50 years ago, lasers started to be used in periodontal treatment following evidence that wounds produced in animals healed more quickly after being irradiated with low-intensity lasers. Increased production of growth factors, stimulated mainly by red and infrared lasers, may participate in this process by influencing the behavior of various types of cells. High-intensity lasers have been used as an alternative to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in root biomodification and to reduce dentin hypersensivity; low-intensity lasers are frequently employed to improve tissue repair in regenerative procedures and in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. Despite the abundance of promising data on the advantages of their use, there is still controversy regarding the real benefits of lasers and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in periodontal and peri-implant treatment. A huge variation in the parameters of laser application among studies makes comparisons very difficult. An overview of the current concepts and findings on lasers in periodontal therapy is presented with emphasis on data collected from Latin-American researchers.

  20. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.