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Sample records for 76-68 glass beads

  1. Leaching studies using PNL 76-68 glass beads and UO/sub 2/ rods with Umtanum basalt and Nugget sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, F.; Rego, J.; Failor, R.; Coles, D.

    1984-02-01

    We have performed a 440-day leaching experiment, Bead Leach II, using PNL 76-68 glass beads and simulated uranium fuel rods in the presence of repository host rocks. The experiment was conducted in a single pass continuous-flow apparatus consisting of 72 channels. The experimental conditions were: 25/sup 0/C and 75/sup 0/C, flow rates of 1, 10, and 300 m1/d, and leachant solutions consisting of simulated basalt groundwater, brine, and sodium bicarbonate solution. The two host rocks studied were Umtanum basalt and Nugget sandstone. The Bead Leach II experiment began in late 1980 and the leaching phase was concluded in December, 1981. Analysis of the leachates and of the two rock types was carried out subsequently and the results are presented in two reports. Part I was published in March, 1983, and it included results of the leaching of PNL 76-68 glass beads with the basalt groundwater. Part II includes results of the leaching of PNL 76-68 glass beads with brine and bicarbonate solution and the leaching of UO/sub 2/ pellets with basalt groundwater, brine, and bicarbonate solution. Results are in the form of leach rates, cumulative fractions leached, and adsorption profiles on basalt and sandstone. The radionuclides studied were Pu and Np in the case of the glass beads and uranium in the case of the simulated uranium fuel rods. 5 references, 21 figures, 44 tables.

  2. Leaching study of PNL 76-68 glass beads using the LLNL continuous-flow method and the PNL modified IAEA method. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, D.G.; Mensing, R.W.; Rego, J.; Weed, H.C.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1982-10-04

    A long-term single-pass continuous-flow (SPCF) leaching test was conducted on the glass waste form PNL 76-68. Leaching rates of Np, Pu and various stable elements were measured at 25 and 75/sup 0/C with three different solutions and three different flow rates. The SPCF leaching results were compared with results of a modified IAEA leach test performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). Elemental leach rates and their variation with temperature, flow rate and solution composition were established. The LLNL and PNL leach test results appear to agree within experimental uncertainties. The magnitude of the leach rates determined for Np and the glass matrix elements is 10/sup -5/ grams of glass/cm/sup 2/ geometric solid surface area/day. The rates increase with temperature and with solution flow rate, and are similar in brine and distilled water but higher in a bicarbonate solution. Other cations exhibit somewhat different behavior, and Pu in particular yields a much lower apparent leach rate, probably because of sorption or precipitation effects after release from the glass matrix. After the initial few days, most elements are leached at a constant rate. Matrix dissolution appears to be the most probable rate controlling step for the leaching of most elements. 23 figures, 12 tables.

  3. Leaching study of PNL 76-68 glass beads using the LLNL continuous-flow method and the PNL-modified IAEA method. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Coles, D.G.; Mensing, R.W.; Rego, J.; Weed, H.C.

    1982-08-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has conducted a long-term single-pass continuous-flow (SPCF) leaching test of the glass waste form PNL 76-68. Leaching rates of Np, Pu, and various stable elements were measured at 25/sup 0/ and 75/sup 0/C with three different solutions and three different flow rates. The purposes of the study were: (1) to compare SPCF leaching results with the results of a modified IAEA leach test performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL); (2) to establish elemental leach rates and their variation with temperature, flow rate and solution composition; and (3) to gain insight into the leaching mechanisms. The LLNL and PNL leach tests yielded results which appear to agree within experimental uncertainties. The magnitude of the leach rates determined for Np and the glass matrix elements is 10/sup -5/ grams of glass/cm/sup 2/ geometric solid surface area/day. The rates increase with temperature and with solution flow rate, and are similar in brine and distilled water but higher in a bicarbonate solution. Other cations exhibit somewhat different behavior, and Pu in particular yields a much lower apparent leach rate, probably because of sorption or precipitation effects after release from the glass matrix. After the initial few days, most elements are leached at a constant rate. Matrix dissolution appears to be the most probable rate controlling step for the leaching of most elements.

  4. Glass-bead peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Peen plating of aluminum, copper, and nickel powders was investigated. Only aluminum was plated successfully within the range of peen plating conditions studied. Optimum plating conditions for aluminum were found to be: (1) bead/powder mixture containing 25 to 35% powder by weight, (2) peening intensity of 0.007A as measured by Almen strip, and (3) glass impact bead diameter of at least 297 microns (0.0117 inches) for depositing-100 mesh aluminum powder. No extensive cleaning or substrate preparation is required beyond removing loose dirt or heavy oil.

  5. Ultrasonic Characterization of Glass Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassila, I.; Siiriä, S.; Gates, F. K.; Hæggström, E.

    2008-02-01

    We report on the progress in developing a method for an in-line granule size measurement using ultrasonic through transmission method. The knowledge of granule size is important in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms where the current optical and rheological methods have limitations such as fouling of the optical windows. The phase velocity of a wave propagated through interstitial air between glass balls of 1, 2 and 10 mm in diameter was 254±5 m/s, 261±3 m/s and 320±9 m/s, respectively. The power spectral density of the received signals showed that high frequencies were attenuated more in case of smaller beads due to increased scattering.

  6. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  7. Cooling Rates of Lunar Volcanic Glass Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Youxue; Peslier, Anne; Lange, Rebecca; Dingwell, Donald; Neal, Clive

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  8. 10 CFR 76.68 - Plant changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Plant changes. 76.68 Section 76.68 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.68 Plant changes. (a) The Corporation may make changes to the plant or to the plant's operations as described...

  9. 10 CFR 76.68 - Plant changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Plant changes. 76.68 Section 76.68 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.68 Plant changes. (a) The Corporation may make changes to the plant or to the plant's operations as described...

  10. 10 CFR 76.68 - Plant changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Plant changes. 76.68 Section 76.68 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.68 Plant changes. (a) The Corporation may make changes to the plant or to the plant's operations as described...

  11. 10 CFR 76.68 - Plant changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Plant changes. 76.68 Section 76.68 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.68 Plant changes. (a) The Corporation may make changes to the plant or to the plant's operations as described...

  12. 10 CFR 76.68 - Plant changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Plant changes. 76.68 Section 76.68 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.68 Plant changes. (a) The Corporation may make changes to the plant or to the plant's operations as described...

  13. Vane Rheology of Cohesionless Glass Beads

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Poloski, Adam P.; Saez, Avelino E.

    2008-02-12

    The rheology of a single coarse granular powder has been studied with shear vane rotational viscometry. The torque required to maintain constant rotation of a vane tool in a confined bed of glass beads (with a mean particle size of 203 micrometers) is measured as a function of vane immersion depth and rotational speed. The resulting torque profiles exhibit both Coulombic behavior at low rotational rates and fluid-like behavior at high rotational rates. Analyzing vane shaft and end effects allows the flow dynamics at the cylindrical and top and bottom disk surfaces of vane rotation to be determined. Disk surfaces show a uniform torque profile consistent with Coulombic friction over most of the rotational rates studied. In contrast, cylindrical surfaces show both frictional and collisional torque contributions, with significant dynamic torque increases at deep immersion depths and fast vane rotation. A recently proposed constitutive equation is used to model the flow behavior. Semi-quantitative prediction is achieved at rotational rates both below 0.5 rad/s and above 10 rad/s. At slow vane speeds, the bed appears to be governed by a Janssen type normal stress distribution such that pressure saturates at deep immersions. This occurs because internal stresses are transmitted to the vane and container walls. For fast vane rotation, the particles in the vicinity of the vane behave as if they were fully fluidized, and the normal stress distributions influencing granular rheology are primarily lithostatic. Prediction at rotational rates from 0.5 rad/s to 10 rad/s is complicated by changes in the granular microstructure and stress fields resulting from partial fluidization of the bed. Overall, it is possible to characterize the quasi-static and partially fluidized flow regimes with a vane rheometer. Knowledge of how the granular normal stress profile changes as the granular material is fluidized could enable prediction in the intermediate flow regime.

  14. Analysis of early medieval glass beads - Glass in the transition period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmit, Žiga; Knific, Timotej; Jezeršek, David; Istenič, Janka

    2012-05-01

    Glass beads from graves excavated in Slovenia and dated archaeologically to the 7th-10th century AD were analysed by the combined PIXE-PIGE method. The results indicate two groups of glass; natron glass made in the Roman tradition and glass made with alkalis from the ash of halophytic plants, which gradually replaced natron glass after c. 800 AD. The alkalis used in the second group of glass seem to be in close relation to a variant of the Venetian white glass that appeared several centuries later. The origin of this glass may be traced to glass production in Mesopotamia and around the Aral Sea. All the mosaic beads with eye decoration, as well as most of the drawn-segmented and drawn-cut beads analysed, are of plant-ash glass, which confirms their supposed oriental origin.

  15. "Micro-robots" pick up a glass bead

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    "Micro-robots", which are really collections of particles animated by magnetic fields, pick up a glass bead and move it around the screen. Each movement is precisely controlled. The "asters" were designed by Alexey Snezkho and Igor Aronson at Argonne National Laboratory. Video courtesy Nature Materials. Read the full story at http://go.usa.gov/KAT

  16. Hydraulic and acoustic investigation of sintered glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueven, Ibrahim; Luding, Stefan; Steeb, Holger

    2013-06-01

    In the present contribution, we are focussing on the hydraulical and acoustical charcterization of sintered glass beads. For the experiments sintered mono-and weakly polydisperse glass bead samples were applied. Depending on the particle size, degree of particle dispersion and sample treatment during the sintering process, the produced cylindircal samples exhibit different hydraulic and acoustic properties. The more general focus of our research lies on the physical behaviour of oil-water emulsions in porous media by means of combined electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation. For this purpose, a hydraulic multi-task measuring cell was developed. This cell allows carrying out simple hydraulic permeability and challenging ultrasound experiments in porous materials saturated with Pickering emulsions. In the first phase of our experiments, hydraulical and acoustical measurements of cylindrical sintered glass bead samples were performed in order to determine their intrinsic permeabilities and effective ultrasound velocities. The intrinsic permeability ks, a coupling parameter between the solid matrix and the pore fluid, has a huge influence on wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. For the assessment of permeabilities, particle size distributions and porosities of the investigated glass beads were determined.

  17. Platelet retention by albuminated glass and polystyrene beads.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D L; Atwood, A I; Andrade, J D

    1976-11-01

    Ex vivo platelet retention by albuminated glass and polystyrene beads has been evaluated as a function of flow rate, bead surface area, blood exposure time and albumin treatment. The stability of the albumin coatings as well as scanning electron microscopy of the various surfaces before and after blood exposure has also been included. Results indicate that platelet retention is sensitive to changes in the above parameters and that albumin pretreatment of different substrates can decrease platelet retention. This decrease is substrate dependent in that platelet retention is different for the albuminated glass and polystyrene substrates. Chemical analysis of the substrate materials by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as bulk chemical analysis is also reported.

  18. Copper blue in an ancient glass bead: a XANES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, J. P.; Figueiredo, M. O.

    2006-06-01

    The blue colour in ancient soda-lime glasses has been attributed to the presence of copper and/or cobalt but the origin of different shades is not yet fully interpreted. As a contribution to this question, a non-destructive X-ray absorption study at [ Cu]K-edge was undertaken on the blue (turquoise) layer from a “Nueva Cadiz” type tubular glass bead dated pre-XVII century where copper is the unique colouring agent. Minerals configuring two distinct blue tonalities due to Cu (2+) in similar square coordination were selected as basic model compounds: azurite, which is a classical navy-blue pigment used in ancient wall paintings over plaster, and chalcanthite, displaying exactly the same turquoise-blue tonality of tubular glass beads manufactured since the Egyptian Antiquity. Theoretical modelling of the XAFS spectra was undertaken using the FEFF code. The IFEFFIT software package was used for fitting the calculated spectra to experimental data. EXAFS results are discussed in view of the crystal structures of copper minerals chosen to model the speciation state and structural situation of that element prevailing in the turquoise-blue archaeological glass. Special attention is focused on the difficulties in theoretical modelling [ Cu]K-XANES spectra of ancient glasses with different colourings.

  19. Conscientisation in Castalia: A Freirean Reading of Hermann Hesse's "The Glass Bead Game"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers Hermann Hesse's novel, "The Glass Bead Game," in the light of Paulo Freire's educational philosophy. "The Glass Bead Game" is set in Castalia, a "pedagogical province" of the 23rd century. It is argued that the central character in the book, Joseph Knecht, undergoes a complex process of conscientisation. Knecht develops an…

  20. Evaluation of the Seismic Characterision of Select Engineered Nanoparticles in Saturated Glass Beads

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory testing apparatus was developed for the study of seismic body wave propagation through nanoparticles dispersed in pore fluid that is essentially saturating glass beads. First, the responses of water-saturated glass bead specimens were studied to establish baseline si...

  1. Effects of different sizes of glass beads on the release of sporocysts from Eimeria tenella oocysts.

    PubMed

    You, Myung-Jo

    2014-06-01

    The oocyst wall is severed by means of mechanical injury or chemical agents. This study reports the percentage of in vitro sporocyst release following mechanical shaking in the presence of varying sizes of glass beads. Glass beads measured 0.5, 1, and 3 mm in diameter and were shaken with the oocysts for different times ranging from 5 sec to 5 min. Approximately 80% of sporocysts were released with 5 min of shaking in the presence of 3 mm glass beads, as well as 30 sec with 0.5 mm beads and 1 mm glass beads. The release of sporocysts of E. tenella was most efficient using 1 mm glass beads and treatment times of 30 sec to 1 min. Therefore, the use of 1 mm glass beads with 30 sec to 1 min of agitation is recommended in order to maximize sporocyst release and recovery and to improve the yield of viable sporozoites for use in biochemical, tissue culture, and immunological applications of coccidia.

  2. Influence of surface characteristics of modified glass beads as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs) on the aerosolization performance.

    PubMed

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of surface characteristics (surface roughness and specific surface area) of surface-modified glass beads as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs) on the aerosolization, and thus, the in vitro respirable fraction often referred to as fine particle fraction (FPF). By processing glass beads in a ball mill with different grinding materials (quartz and tungsten carbide) and varying grinding time (4 h and 8 h), and by plasma etching for 1 min, glass beads with different shades of surface roughness and increased surface area were prepared. Compared with untreated glass beads, the surface-modified rough glass beads show increased FPFs. The drug detachment from the modified glass beads is also more reproducible than from untreated glass beads indicated by lower standard deviations for the FPFs of the modified glass beads. Moreover, the FPF of the modified glass beads correlates with their surface characteristics. The higher the surface roughness and the higher the specific surface area of the glass beads the higher is the FPF. Thus, surface-modified glass beads make an ideal carrier for tailoring the performance of DPIs in the therapy of asthma and chronically obstructive pulmonary diseases.

  3. Mineralogical and chemical analyses of ancient glass beads from Taiwan and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Y. S.; Liu, Y. C.

    2015-12-01

    Large numbers of monochrome glass beads with different colors, shapes, and stylistics excavated from the archaeological sites of Taiwan, which were dated mainly from the 2nd century AD to the early Historical Period of Taiwan. Archaeologically, these glass beads were more prevalent in eastern and northern Taiwan and were generally believed to be non-native, as well as were brought into Taiwan through the maritime exchange and/or trade activities between Taiwan and Southeast Asia/China since the Neolithic Age. Nevertheless, ancient glass beads have been little studies in Taiwan, aspects of these glass beads are not well detailed. In this work, non-destructive micro-Raman spectroscopy and μXRF are used in combination to examine 56 ancient glass beads excavated from six archaeological sites, eastern Taiwan, to unravel the mineralogical and chemical compositions and to help decipher the raw materials used and the provenance of beads. Micro-Raman measurements indicate the presence of hematite, zincite, siderite, sphalerite, lead tin yellow type II, adularia, chalcedony, anatase, rutite, ankerite, graphite, calcite, etc. Hematite, zincite, siderite, sphalerite, lead tin yellow type II, and rutile were found to be colorants/opacifiers. Among these crystalline phases, lead tin yellow type II was first detected in the ancient glass bead unearthed from Taiwan, which is accordant with results of chemical analysis. The chemical results obtained by μXRF show SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O, K2O, MgO, CaO, and PbO as the most abundant oxides. It is found that Na2O, Na2O, K2O, Al2O3, and MgO are the main/minor fluxes. According to the results, the three most frequent types are mineral soda alumina glass, soda plant ash glass, and lead silicate glass. The provenance of ancient beads unearthed from archaeological sites of Taiwan is possibility of multiple sources.

  4. Feasibility of using glass-bead thermoluminescent dosimeters for radiotherapy treatment plan verification

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Tom J; Distefano, Gail; Bradley, David A; Spyrou, Nicholas M; Nisbet, Andrew; Clark, Catharine H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of using glass beads as novel thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) for radiotherapy treatment plan verification. Methods: Commercially available glass beads with a size of 1-mm thickness and 2-mm diameter were characterized as TLDs. Five clinical treatment plans including a conventional larynx, a conformal prostate, an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) prostate and two stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) lung plans were transferred onto a CT scan of a water-equivalent phantom (Solid Water®, Gammex, Middleton, WI) and the dose distribution recalculated. The number of monitor units was maintained from the clinical plan and delivered accordingly. The doses determined by the glass beads were compared with those measured by a graphite-walled ionization chamber, and the respective expected doses were determined by the treatment-planning system (TPS) calculation. Results: The mean percentage difference between measured dose with the glass beads and TPS was found to be 0.3%, −0.1%, 0.4%, 1.8% and 1.7% for the conventional larynx, conformal prostate, IMRT prostate and each of the SBRT delivery techniques, respectively. The percentage difference between measured dose with the ionization chamber and glass bead was found to be −1.2%, −1.4%, −0.1%, −0.9% and 2.4% for the above-mentioned plans, respectively. The results of measured doses with the glass beads and ionization chamber in comparison with expected doses from the TPS were analysed using a two-sided paired t-test, and there was no significant difference at p < 0.05. Conclusion: It is feasible to use glass-bead TLDs as dosemeters in a range of clinical plan verifications. Advances in knowledge: Commercial glass beads are utilized as low-cost novel TLDs for treatment-plan verification. PMID:26258442

  5. Effects of glass bead size, vortexing speed and duration on Eimeria acervulina oocyst excystation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jang-Ock; Talha, Abul Fatah Shah Muhammad; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2014-03-01

    Improved methods for efficient excystation of Eimeria should be developed and standardized for future Eimeria-related studies. Here, the effects of different glass bead sizes (0.5, 1, 2, and 2.5 mm), and various vortex speeds (1000, 2000, and 3000 rpm) and durations (30 s, 1, 3, and 5 min) have been examined for Eimeria (E.) acervulina oocyst excystation. At 3000 rpm, all glass beads, regardless of size, efficiently ruptured E. acervulina oocysts at 5 min. At 2000 and 3000 rpm, all four glass bead sizes increasingly ruptured oocysts in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, at 1000 rpm the excystation efficiency was not related with the glass bead size or with vortexing duration. It appeared that the 1mm glass beads are most efficient for E. acervulina DNA extraction at a 3000 rpm vortexing speed for 3 and 5 min. The 2 mm glass beads delicately released the highest number of intact sporocysts at 2000 rpm for 3 min. Therefore, our data can provide valuable information for the efficient mechanical excystation of E. acervulina.

  6. In situ measurement of ferric iron in lunar glass beads using Fe-XAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanta, Molly C.; Dyar, M. Darby; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Sutton, Stephen R.; Thomson, Bradley J.

    2017-03-01

    Through use of a new X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) calibration for Fe3+ analysis in silicate glasses, the first direct measurements of ferric iron in natural lunar picritic glasses are presented. Lunar glass beads from the Apollo sample collection contain up to 60.0% Fe3+. No correlation with melt chemical properties, such as Mg# or weight % TiO2, or physical properties, such as bead diameter, was observed. Fe3+/ΣFe is negatively correlated with NBO/T. These elevated Fe3+/ΣFe values reflect eruption and post-eruption oxidation due to magmatic degassing of H or OH. Glass beads observed to be zoned to lower Fe3+/ΣFe rims may represent a subsequent reduction in the lunar vacuum prior to cooling through the glass transition temperature.

  7. Rhenium-coated glass beads for intracolonic administration attenuate TNBS-induced colitis in mice: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Siczek, Krzysztof; Zatorski, Hubert; Pawlak, Wojciech; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    In search for novel effective treatments in inflammatory bowel diseases, a new strategy employing glass beads coated with rhenium nanolayer has been developed and validated in the mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Briefly, mice were randomly divided into 5 experimental groups: control (vehicle alone, Group 1); control treated with rhenium-coated glass beads (Group 2); TNBS (Group 3); TNBS treated with rhenium-coated glass beads (Group 4); and TNBS treated with uncoated glass beads (Group 5). Mice from Group 2, 4 and 5 were treated with respective beads (once daily, 5 beads / animal, i.c.) between D3-D6 post-TNBS/vehicle and evaluation of colonic damage was performed on D7, based on macroscopic scoring and clinical parameters. Severe colonic inflammation developed in post-TNBS mice (Group 3) [P <0.001 vs. control (Group 1) for macroscopic score], which was significantly attenuated by treatment with rhenium-coated glass beads (Group 4) [P <0.01 vs. TNBS (Group 3), for macroscopic score]. Neither rhenium-coated glass beads had any effect in control animals (Group 2), nor uncoated glass beads influenced TNBS-induced colitis (Group 5). In conclusion, a novel and attractive strategy for the treatment of colonic inflammation has been proposed; therapy with rhenium-coated glass beads already proved effective in the mouse model of TNBS-induced colitis, now requires further characterization in clinical conditions.

  8. Preparation and characterization of physically modified glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Redlinger-Pohn, Jakob Dominik; Kappl, Michael; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work is the physical modification and characterization of the surface topography of glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). By surface modification the contact area between drug and carrier and thereby interparticle forces may be modified. Thus the performance of DPIs that relies on interparticle interactions may be improved. Glass beads were chosen as model carriers because various prospects of physical surface modification may be applied without affecting other factors also impacting interparticle interactions like particle size and shape. To generate rough surfaces glass beads were processed mechanically by friction and impaction in a ball mill with different grinding materials that were smaller and harder with respect to the glass beads. By varying the grinding time (4 h, 8 h) and by using different grinding media (tungsten carbide, quartz) surfaces with different shades of roughness were generated. Depending on the hardness of the grinding material and the grinding time the surface roughness was more or less pronounced. Surface roughness parameters and specific surface area were determined via several complementary techniques in order to get an enhanced understanding of the impact of the modifying procedure on the surface properties of the glass beads.

  9. An Abiotic Glass-Bead Collector Exhibiting Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Youhei; Kanda, Masato; Yamamoto, Daigo; Shioi, Akihisa

    2015-09-01

    Animals relocate objects as needed by active motion. Active transport is ubiquitous in living organisms but has been difficult to realize in abiotic systems. Here we show that a self-propelled droplet can gather scattered beads toward one place on a floor and sweep it clean. This is a biomimetic active transport with loadings and unloadings, because the transport was performed by a carrier and the motion of the carrier was maintained by the energy of the chemical reaction. The oil droplet produced fluctuation of the local number density of the beads on the floor, followed by its autocatalytic growth. This mechanism may inspire the technologies based on active transport wherein chemical and physical substances migrate as in living organisms.

  10. A Study of the Rheology, Processing and Flow Induced Mesostructures of Glass Bead Filled Polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hine, P. J.; Embery, J. E.; Tassieri, M.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents some recent experimental results on the effects of the addition of glass beads (both coupled and uncoupled) on the linear and non-linear rheology, and hence processability, of a commercial polystyrene. Oscillatory, low strain, measurements showed an increase in viscosity with the addition of the glass beads, which varied depending on the testing frequency and degree of coupling. For the coupled beads, at low frequencies the increase in viscosity was well predicted by the Kreiger-Dougherty relationship, while at higher frequencies a smaller increase than this was seen, linked with a shift to lower frequencies of the lower frequency cross-over between G' and G″. For the uncoupled beads, the viscosity was found to shift vertically with no change in the position of the G',G″ cross-over. For the non-linear shear and extension measurements, at low shear rates and low strains the increase in viscosity agreed well with the linear results, whereas at high strain rates and strains, more disparity was seen, which in non-linear extension was been linked to voiding. For non-linear shear measurements, the plateau viscosities of the pure polystyrene were found to fit the Cox-Merz rule, while the glass bead filled materials did not. The deviations in behaviour of the filled materials were found to be closely linked to the characteristic relaxation times of the polymer, particularly the reptation time τd and the Rouse time τR.

  11. Spontaneous passage of glass beads from the canine gallbladder: facilitation by sphincterotomy.

    PubMed

    Hutton, S W; Sievert, C E; Vennes, J A; Shafer, R B; Duane, W C

    1988-04-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which ablation of the sphincter of Oddi prevents gallstone formation, we assessed passage of glass beads out of the gallbladders of dogs with sphincterotomy and sham sphincterotomy. One month after bead implantation, dogs with an intact sphincter passed 52%, 26%, 22%, 10%, 0%, and 0% of beads with diameters of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. For the same respective bead diameters, dogs with a sphincterotomy passed 90%, 90%, 88%, 75%, 75%, and 42% of beads (p less than 0.05 for all bead diameters). No beads were in the common bile duct of any dog. In separate dogs studied by cholescintigraphy, sphincterotomy significantly increased gallbladder ejection fraction from 0.46 to 0.76 (p less than 0.01). In addition, sphincterotomy significantly lowered resting gallbladder volume from 24.4 to 15.8 ml (p less than 0.025) and lowered cholecystokinin-stimulated gallbladder volume from 13.3 to 5.9 ml (p less than 0.025). These data indicate that even with an intact sphincter, small solids can pass from the gallbladder and into the duodenum. Sphincterotomy facilitates passage of solids, apparently by general improvement in gallbladder emptying. Facilitated passage of crystals, microliths, or small stones seems the most likely explanation for prevention of gallstone formation by sphincterotomy.

  12. Life, Death and Transformation: Education and Incompleteness in Hermann Hesse's "The Glass Bead Game"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Peter

    2008-01-01

    At the end of the main part of Hermann Hesse's classic novel, "The Glass Bead Game," the central character, Joseph Knecht, dies suddenly. In this article, I consider the educational significance of Hesse's portrayal of Knecht's death. This pivotal moment in the book tells readers much about the process of educational transformation. I argue that…

  13. Modeling the evolution of complex conductivity during calcite precipitation on glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Philippe; Li, Shuai; Jougnot, Damien; Revil, André; Wu, Yuxin

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYWhen pH and alkalinity increase, calcite frequently precipitates and hence modifies the petrophysical properties of porous media. The complex conductivity method can be used to directly monitor calcite precipitation in porous media because it is sensitive to the evolution of the mineralogy, pore structure and its connectivity. We have developed a mechanistic grain polarization model considering the electrochemical polarization of the Stern and diffuse layer surrounding calcite particles. Our complex conductivity model depends on the surface charge density of the Stern layer and on the electrical potential at the onset of the diffuse layer, which are computed using a basic Stern model of the calcite/water interface. The complex conductivity measurements of Wu et al. (2010) on a column packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> where calcite precipitation occurs are reproduced by our surface complexation and complex conductivity models. The evolution of the size and shape of calcite particles during the calcite precipitation experiment is estimated by our complex conductivity model. At the early stage of the calcite precipitation experiment, modeled particles sizes increase and calcite particles flatten with time because calcite crystals nucleate at the surface of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and grow into larger calcite grains around <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. At the later stage of the calcite precipitation experiment, modeled sizes and cementation exponents of calcite particles decrease with time because large calcite grains aggregate over multiple <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, a percolation threshold is achieved, and small and discrete calcite crystals polarize.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25350105','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25350105"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and Ge-doped optical fibres as thermoluminescence dosimeters for small field photon dosimetry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jafari, S M; Alalawi, A I; Hussein, M; Alsaleh, W; Najem, M A; Hugtenburg, R P; Bradley, D A; Spyrou, N M; Clark, C H; Nisbet, A</p> <p>2014-11-21</p> <p>An investigation has been made of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and optical fibres as novel dosimeters for small-field photon radiation therapy dosimetry. Commercially available <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> of largest dimension 1.5 mm and GeO2-doped SiO2 optical fibres of 5 mm length and 120 µm diameter were characterized as thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results were compared against Monte-Carlo simulations with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and a high-resolution 2D-array of liquid-filled ionization chambers. Measurements included relative output factors and dose profiles for square-field sizes of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 10 cm. A customized Solid-Water® phantom was employed, and the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and fibres were placed at defined positions along the longitudinal axis to allow accurate beam profile measurement. Output factors and the beam profile parameters were compared against those calculated by BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc. The output factors and field width measurements were found to be in agreement with reference measurements to within better than 3.5% for all field sizes down to 2 cm2 for both dosimetric systems, with the <span class="hlt">beads</span> showing a discrepancy of no more than 2.8% for all field sizes. The results confirm the potential of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and fibres as thermoluminescent dosimeters for use in small photon radiation field sizes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23586397','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23586397"><span>Environmental impact of metal and metalloid leaching from highway marking <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sandhu, Nimrat K; Axe, Lisa; Jahan, Kauser; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V; Coolahan, Kelsey</p> <p>2013-05-07</p> <p>Recently, metals and metalloids have been observed at elevated concentrations in <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> imported to the US. Average total concentrations in imported batches ranged from 103 to 683 mg kg(-1) for As, 62 to 187 mg kg(-1) for Sb, and 23 to 179 mg kg(-1) for Pb. The labile fraction associated with the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> resulted in leached concentrations as great as 538 μg L(-1) for As, 1092 μg L(-1) for Pb, and 160 μg L(-1) for Sb. Sequential extraction was conducted as well to better understand the form of metals and metalloids associated with the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Only 0.23% of As, 3.40% of Pb, 2.37% of Ba, and 1.92% of Mn were extracted in the exchangeable (As, Mn, and Ba) and the oxidizable forms (Pb), whereas greater than 97% of metals and metalloids present were associated with the <span class="hlt">glass</span> matrix. Nonparametric statistics were applied to test total concentrations that resulted in exceedances in the groundwater quality criteria. Results demonstrated that the As, Pb, and Sb limits were exceeded for 98%, 58%, and 15% of the samples tested respectively suggesting a potential environmental impact to groundwater used as a drinking water source.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ChJOL..30..471C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ChJOL..30..471C"><span>Genetic transformation of Platymonas ( Tetraselmis) subcordiformis (Prasinophyceae, Chlorophyta) using particle bombardment and <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> agitation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cui, Yulin; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Fuchao; Chen, Yingjie; Zheng, Guoting; Qin, Song</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>Platymonas ( Tetraselmis) subcordiformis is a unicellular marine green alga. It was found to be very sensitive to the herbicide Basta through a sensitivity test indicating it could be employed as a selective agent. The bar gene is a practicable and selectable marker gene. The vector containing the expression cassette of the bar gene was transferred to P. subcordiformis by both particle bombardment and <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> agitation and transformants were then selected using Basta. Finally, Southern blotting analysis indicated that the bar gene had been successfully integrated into the nuclear genome of P. subcordiformis using both of the transgenic techniques, with the transformation efficiency of the <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> method being slightly higher than that of particle bombardment. This is the first report on stable transformation of P. subcordiformis, and will improve fundamental research and enlarge application of this alga.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMNS23B3895G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMNS23B3895G"><span>Stationary and Dynamic Permeability and Coupling Coefficient Measurements in Sintered <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gueven, I.; Steeb, H.; Luding, S.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Electrokinetic waves describe the coupling between seismic and electromagnetic waves that exist in porous media. The coupling between them arise from an electrochemical boundary layer between grain and fluid interface of saturated porous media. Acoustical waves cause a disturbance of the electrical fluid charge within the double layer, which therefore creates an electric streaming current (seismoelectric effect). Inversely, electromagnetic waves can generate mechanical signals (electroseismic effect). Electrokinetic conversion potentially combines high seismic resolution with good electromagnetic hydrocarbon sensitivity. The (stationary and frequency-dependent) streaming potential coefficient is a key property, which gives rise to the coupling between electromagnetic and acoustical waves. It depends strongly on the fluid conductivity, porosity, tortuosity, permeability, pore throat and zeta potential of porous media. We examine experimentally both, the stationary and dynamic permeabilities and coupling coefficients of sintered <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> systems. For this purpose a multi-purpose measuring cell was developed which allows us to carry out - besides common ultrasound experiments - also to perform stationary and frequency-dependent permeability and coupling coefficient measurements. For the experiments sintered mono- and slightly polydisperse <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> samples with different <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> diameters between 0.4 and 8mm and porosities ranging between 21 and 39% were used. The stationary and dynamic permeability and streaming potential measurements are supported by μCT scans which enable us a deeper insight into the porous medium. Based on the μCT scans of the produced sintered <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> samples essential influence parameters, like tortuosity, porosity, effective particle diameters and pore throats in different regions of the entire scanned region have been analyzed in detail to understand the laboratory experiments, cf. Illustration 1. In addition lattice Boltzmann</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/896067','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/896067"><span>The Contribution of Frictional Contacts to the Shear Strength of Coarse <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Powders and Slurries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Poloski, Adam P.; Bredt, Paul R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Saez, Avelino E.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>The shear strength of powders and slurries containing coarse particles using a vane impeller were examined as a function of vane size, vane immersion depth, container size, and interstitial fluid. Results show that for powders and concentrated slurry systems containing coarse particles, vane immersion depth and container diameter significantly impact the measured shear strength. An equation describing interparticle frictional and cohesive contributions to shear vane measurements was derived in an effort to describe experimental results. A Janssen stress distribution model for granular materials was the basis for this equation. The use of a Janssen stress distribution appears to explain the behavior of shear strength measurements at varying immersion depths with dry cohesionless <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, water saturated <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, and <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> dispersed in a non-Newtonian matrix of kaolin clay slurry. The presence of the Janssen stress distribution can affect the interpretation of shear vane results. Rather than shear strength being a material property as is the case with flocculated colloid slurries and polymer solutions, shear strength becomes a process property where vane depth, container size, and container material can result in significant measurement variations. Such parameters should be considered before using the shear vane results on applications involving granular material components.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H13E1407C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H13E1407C"><span>Cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in water saturated columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chrysikopoulos, C.; Syngouna, V. I.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>This study is focused on the cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in saturated columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (kGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model colloids. Virus and clay transport as well as virus-clay cotransport were examined at three pore water velocities (0.38, 0.74, and 1.21 cm/min). The results indicated that the mass recovery of viruses and clay colloids decreased as the pore water velocity decreased; whereas, for the cotransport experiments no clear trend was observed. Temporal moments of the breakthrough concentrations suggested that, in the absence of clay colloids, both MS2 and ΦX174 traveled faster than the conservative tracer only at the highest pore water velocity tested. For the other two velocities both viruses were slightly retarded. The presence of clays significantly influenced the irreversible virus deposition onto <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Both MS2 and ΦX174 were attached in greater amounts onto KGa-1b than STx-1b. Also, MS2 exhibited greater affinity than ΦX174 for both clays. The results suggest that Lewis acid-base interactions worked to the advantage of clay colloid attachment but did not significantly affect virus attachment onto <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Schematic illustration of the six concentration components involved in cotransport experiments of this study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26941457','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26941457"><span>Plant Roots Increase Bacterivorous Nematode Dispersion through Nonuniform <span class="hlt">Glass-bead</span> Media.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Trap, Jean; Bernard, Laetitia; Brauman, Alain; Pablo, Anne-Laure; Plassard, Claude; Ranoarisoa, Mahafaka Patricia; Blanchart, Eric</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Dispersion of bacterivorous nematodes in soil is a crucial ecological process that permits settlement and exploitation of new bacterial-rich patches. Although plant roots, by modifying soil structure, are likely to influence this process, they have so far been neglected. In this study, using an original three-compartment microcosm experimental design and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bars to mimic plant roots, we tested the ability of roots to improve the dispersion of bacterivorous nematode populations through two wet, nonuniform granular (<span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span>) media imitating contrasting soil textures. We showed that artificial roots increased migration time of bacterivorous nematode populations in the small-<span class="hlt">bead</span> medium, suggesting that plant roots may play an important role in nematode dispersion in fine-textured soils or when soil compaction is high.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_2 --> <div id="page_3" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="41"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4755703','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4755703"><span>Plant Roots Increase Bacterivorous Nematode Dispersion through Nonuniform <span class="hlt">Glass-bead</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Trap, Jean; Bernard, Laetitia; Brauman, Alain; Pablo, Anne-Laure; Plassard, Claude; Ranoarisoa, Mahafaka Patricia; Blanchart, Eric</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Dispersion of bacterivorous nematodes in soil is a crucial ecological process that permits settlement and exploitation of new bacterial-rich patches. Although plant roots, by modifying soil structure, are likely to influence this process, they have so far been neglected. In this study, using an original three-compartment microcosm experimental design and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bars to mimic plant roots, we tested the ability of roots to improve the dispersion of bacterivorous nematode populations through two wet, nonuniform granular (<span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span>) media imitating contrasting soil textures. We showed that artificial roots increased migration time of bacterivorous nematode populations in the small-<span class="hlt">bead</span> medium, suggesting that plant roots may play an important role in nematode dispersion in fine-textured soils or when soil compaction is high. PMID:26941457</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24361425','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24361425"><span>Phase and size separations occurring during the injection of model pastes composed of β-tricalcium phosphate powder, <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and aqueous solutions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tadier, S; Galea, L; Charbonnier, B; Baroud, G; Bohner, M</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> a few hundred micrometers in size were added to aqueous β-tricalcium phosphate pastes to simulate the effect of porogens and drug-loaded microspheres on the injectability of calcium phosphate cements and putties. The composition of the pastes was monitored during the injection process to assess the effect of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> content, <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> size and paste composition on the paste injectability. The results revealed that the injection process led to both liquid and <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> segregations: the liquid flowed faster than the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, which themselves flowed faster than the β-tricalcium phosphate microparticles. In fact, even the particle size distribution of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> was modified during injection. These results reveal that a good design of multiphasic injectable pastes is essential to prevent phase separation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008OptMa..30.1127Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008OptMa..30.1127Z"><span>Solid-state luminescence for the optical examination of archaeological <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zacharias, N.; Beltsios, K.; Oikonomou, A.; Karydas, A. G.; Bassiakos, Y.; Michael, C. T.; Zarkadas, Ch.</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>The work pertains to the application of solid-state luminescence as a characterization tool for glassy ceramic cultural artefacts. An archaeological <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> collection excavated at the city of Thebes, Greece and considered as unique in terms of typological variety and time span was examined with the application of luminescence techniques (thermoluminescence, optically stimulated luminescence). Additionally, X-rays fluorescence (XRF) was used to provide non-destructively the elemental concentration profile of the samples. The thermoluminescence signals following laboratory irradiation provided distinct groups of spectra types according to the color classification of the samples. For each sample, the signal sensitivity and growth were examined using both thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence recording. The study provides evidence for the usefulness of the combined application of luminescence and non-destructive, XRF-based, elemental analysis for the characterization of <span class="hlt">glass</span> assemblages. Finally, due to the satisfactory level of radiation-induced signal intensity, the work suggests the possibility of chronological estimation of ancient <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> using luminescence dating protocols.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25460700','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25460700"><span>Experimental investigation of virus and clay particles cotransport in partially saturated columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V</p> <p>2015-02-15</p> <p>Suspended clay particles in groundwater can play a significant role as carriers of viruses, because, depending on the physicochemical conditions, clay particles may facilitate or hinder the mobility of viruses. This experimental study examines the effects of clay colloids on the transport of viruses in variably saturated porous media. All cotransport experiments were conducted in both saturated and partially saturated columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, using bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 as model viruses, and kaolinite (KGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. The various experimental collision efficiencies were determined using the classical colloid filtration theory. The experimental data indicated that the mass recovery of viruses and clay colloids decreased as the water saturation decreased. Temporal moments of the various breakthrough concentrations collected, suggested that the presence of clays significantly influenced virus transport and irreversible deposition onto <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The mass recovery of both viruses, based on total effluent virus concentrations, was shown to reduce in the presence of suspended clay particles. Furthermore, the transport of suspended virus and clay-virus particles was retarded, compared to the conservative tracer. Under unsaturated conditions both clay particles facilitated the transport of ΦX174, while hindered the transport of MS2. Moreover, the surface properties of viruses, clays and <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> were employed for the construction of classical DLVO and capillary potential energy profiles, and the results suggested that capillary forces play a significant role on colloid retention. It was estimated that the capillary potential energy of MS2 is lower than that of ΦX174, and the capillary potential energy of KGa-1b is lower than that of STx-1b, assuming that the protrusion distance through the water film is the same for each pair of particles. Moreover, the capillary potential energy is several orders of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA547927','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA547927"><span>Granular Material Response to Dynamic Shock Compression: A Study of SiO2 in the Form of Sand and Soda Lime <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC SHOCK COMPRESSION: A STUDY OF SIO2 IN THE FORM OF SAND AND SODA LIME <span class="hlt">GLASS</span> <span class="hlt">BEADS</span> by James R. Santymire June 2011...Compression: A Study of SiO2 in the Form of Sand and Soda Lime <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Beads</span> 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) James R. Santymire 7. PERFORMING...technical sand’ composed of uniform sized, nearly spherical soda lime <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> as a viable alternative for modeling sand. This allows for the repetition</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17316660','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17316660"><span>Mixer-settler counter-current chromatography with a barricaded spiral disk assembly with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ito, Yoichiro; Qi, Lin; Powell, Jimmie; Sharpnack, Frank; Metger, Howard; Yost, James; Cao, Xue-Li; Dong, Yin-Mao; Huo, Liang-Sheng; Zhu, Xiao-Ping; Li, Ting</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>A novel spiral disk is designed by placing barricades at 6 mm intervals in the middle of the spiral channel to divide the channel into multiple sections. <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> are placed in every other section so that the planetary motion produces repetitive mixing and settling of polymer phase systems. Performance of this mixer-settler spiral disk assembly was examined for separation of lysozyme and myoglobin with a polymer phase system. The best results were obtained with a spiral disk equipped with barricades with openings ranging from 1.2 to 0.4 mm on each side at a high revolution speed up to 1200 rpm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900043794&hterms=trace+elements&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dtrace%2Belements','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900043794&hterms=trace+elements&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dtrace%2Belements"><span>Ion microprobe studies of trace elements in Apollo 14 volcanic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> - Comparisons to Apollo 14 mare basalts and petrogenesis of picritic magmas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.; Yurimoto, H.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Results are presented from trace element analysis, by ion microprobe techniques, of individual <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> representing seven compositionally distinct types of picritic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> from the Apollo 14 landing site. The picritic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> at the A-14 exhibited a wide range of primary magma compositions and a lack of petrogenetic linkage (via crystal fractionation) to crystalline basalts. The wide range of major and trace element characteristics of the picritic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> is consistent with derivation from mineralogically distinct sources which consist of varying proportions of olivine + orthopyroxene +/- clonopyroxene +/- ilmenite +/- plagioclase +/- KREEP component.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ApPhA..83..499F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ApPhA..83..499F"><span>Modelling the size of red-colouring copper nanoclusters in archaeological <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Figueiredo, M. O.; Veiga, J. P.; Mirão, J. P.</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>The origin of a red colour in ancient soda-lime <span class="hlt">glasses</span> has been attributed either to the presence of both copper clusters and cuprous oxide or to copper alone. As a contribution to this question, a non-destructive X-ray absorption study at the [ Cu]K-edge was undertaken on the red layer from a singular “rosette”-type archaeological <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> dated as pre-XVII century. On comparing with data collected from metallic copper and the mineral cuprite, cubic Cu2O, XANES spectra of the red <span class="hlt">glass</span> are identical to the first. Theoretical modelling of Cu 1s XANES spectra was undertaken using the FEFF code based on a multiple scattering formalism. A hypothetical tetragonal structure was simulated for Cu2O in order to remove the constraints arising from linear O-Cu-O bonds, unstable within the silica <span class="hlt">glass</span> matrix, and an ideal body-centred array was considered on the basis of real metallic Cu-Cu distances in the metal. Calculations were performed for atom clusters of variable size within real and hypothetical structures. A spherical cluster of about 5 Å radius, capped by 24 copper atoms already provides a calculated Cu 1s XANES spectrum that compares well with data collected from the red <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Post-edge details are noted in relation to the oxide, considering ionic states and effective valences of copper. The possibility of estimating the size of copper clusters through simulated structures is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1986S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1986S"><span>Cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in water saturated columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Syngouna, V. I.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>This study is focused on the cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in saturatedcolumns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦΧ174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (kGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model colloids.The effect of three pore water velocities (0.38, 0.74, and 1.21 cm/min) on virus transport and virus-clay cotransport was examined. The results indicated that the mass recovery of viruses and clay colloids decreased as the pore water velocity decreased; whereas, for the cotransport experiments no clear trend was observed. Temporal moments of the breakthrough concentrations suggested that, in the absence of clay colloids, both MS2 and ΦX174 traveled faster than the conservative tracer only at the highest pore water velocity tested. For the other two velocities both viruses were slightly retarded. The presence of clays significantly influenced the irreversible virus deposition. Both MS2 and ΦX174 were attached in greater amounts onto KGa-1b than STx-1b with MS2 exhibiting greater affinity than ΦX174 for both clays. The results suggest that electrostatic interactions play a vital role on virus adsorption onto both <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and clay colloids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMMR13A2238L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMMR13A2238L"><span>The seismic properties of sintered <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> media: effects of thermal cracking and fluid saturation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Y.; Jackson, I.; David, E.; Schmitt, D. R.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The stiffness of rocks is significantly affected by the presence of cracks as well as pore fluids, the latter potentially increasing the effective stiffness of cracks. Reversible pore-fluid flow within the crack network, occurring during seismic wave propagation, may result in strongly frequency dependent seismic properties. Theoretical models for fluid flow induced seismic wave dispersion have been proposed but have so far not been subject to thorough experimental testing. Soda-lime-silica <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, of ~300 μm diameter were sintered near the <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition temperature to produce a synthetic analogue for sedimentary rock with low porosity (~2%) and a simpler microstructure. Widely distributed cracks with uniformly low aspect ratio (~0.0007) and crack porosity ~0.2% were introduced by quenching heated cylindrical samples into liquid water at room temperature. Combined use of low-frequency (mHz-Hz) forced oscillation techniques at the Australian National University with ultrasonic pulse transmission methods (MHz) at the University of Alberta, is allowing a broadband measurement of seismic velocities and attenuation on a thermally cracked <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> sample. A recent upgrade of the data acquisition system on the apparatus for forced oscillation measurements is providing improved precision in determining shear and Young's moduli, measured at seismic frequencies, reveal a strong systematic variation with effective pressure (Peff=Pc-Pf) and some relaxation at longer oscillation periods tentatively attributed to fluid flow. Under water-saturated conditions, at low frequencies, both shear and Young's moduli are noticeably higher than under dry or argon-saturated conditions, possibly attributed to spatial restricted flow of water during forced-oscillation tests. Ongoing measurement of ultrasonic velocities should thus provide the 'intermediate' to 'high' frequency bounds on elastic moduli.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16038502','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16038502"><span>X-ray fluorescence analysis of rare earth elements in rocks using low dilution <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nakayama, Kenichi; Nakamura, Toshihiro</p> <p>2005-07-01</p> <p>Major and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Th and U) in igneous rocks were assayed with fused lithium borate <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Low dilution <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, which had a 1:1 sample-to-flux ratio, were prepared for determination of rare earth elements. Complete vitrification of 1:1 mixture required heating twice at 1200 degrees C with agitation. Extra pure reagents containing determinants were used for calibrating standards instead of the rock standard. The calibration curves of the 23 elements showed good linearity. Furthermore, the lower limits of detection corresponding to three times the standard deviation for blank measurements were 26 mass ppm for Na2O, 6.7 for MgO, 4.5 for Al2O3, 4.5 for SiO2, 18 for P2O5, 1.1 for K2O, 4.0 for CaO, 3.9 for TiO2, 1.6 for MnO, 0.8 for Fe2O3, 0.5 for Rb, 0.2 for Sr, 0.4 for Y, 0.5 for Zr, 3.3 for La, 6.5 for Ce, 2.7 for Pr, 2.1 for Nd, 1.7 for Sm, 0.7 for Gd, 2.7 for Dy, 0.5 for Th, and 0.6 for U. Using the present method, we determined the contents of these 23 elements in four rhyolitic and granitic rocks from Japan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24939683','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24939683"><span>The in vitro antibacterial effect of S53P4 bioactive <span class="hlt">glass</span> and gentamicin impregnated polymethylmethacrylate <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gergely, István; Zazgyva, Ancuta; Man, Adrian; Zuh, Sándor György; Pop, Tudor Sorin</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Osteomyelitis is a disease that is still difficult to treat, with considerable morbidity and associated costs. The current "gold standard" in treatment - debridement and implantation of antibiotic impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) <span class="hlt">beads</span> - presents the disadvantage of a second surgical intervention required for the removal of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. We comparatively investigated the in vitro antibacterial effect of S53P4 bioactive <span class="hlt">glass</span> (BAG) and gentamicin impregnated PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Bacterial viability was assessed hourly by Standard Plate Count during 24 hours of incubation, by determining the number of colony forming units (CFU) of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Both tested materials showed an antibacterial effect on all studied bacteria. In case of S. aureus, BAG granules were almost as effective as gentamicin impregnated PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span>, with no statistically significant differences. In contrast, PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span> had a superior antibacterial effect on S. epidermidis and K. pneumoniae. The antibacterial effect of BAG was greatly influenced by granule size and contact time. There was a statistically significant correlation between pH values and the number of CFU in the case of S53P4 BAG granules. As a biocompatible and biodegradable bone substitute, S53P4 bioactive <span class="hlt">glass</span> can be a good alternative in the local management of osteomyelitis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26786222','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26786222"><span>Car windshield fragments as cheap alternative <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> for homogenization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures in a resource-limited setting.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ochang, Ernest Afu; Collier, Dami; Bode-Sojobi, Ibidunni; Oladele, Rita; Oduyebo, Oyinlola O</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Tuberculosis is a global health problem which has been compounded by the emergence and rapid spread of drug resistant strains. Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis usually requires homogenization of cultures using 3-5mm <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. In resource limited settings, these important material may either not be readily available in the country as in our case requiring that one orders them from abroad or they may be too expensive. In both situations, this would impact on the usually lean budget. In our centre were we recently introduced tuberculosis culture and drug susceptibility testing using the Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS) technique, we successfully used <span class="hlt">glass</span> fragments from a broken car windshield obtained from a mechanic workshop to homogenize solid cultures to prepare positive controls. All cultures homogenized with these local <span class="hlt">beads</span> gave consistent MODS results. The challenge of the limited availability of resources for research in resource limited settings can be met by adapting available materials to achieve results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19821114','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19821114"><span>Combined elemental analysis of ancient <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> by means of ion beam, portable XRF, and EPMA techniques.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sokaras, D; Karydas, A G; Oikonomou, A; Zacharias, N; Beltsios, K; Kantarelou, V</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>Ion beam analysis (IBA)- and X-ray fluorescence (XRF)-based techniques have been well adopted in cultural-heritage-related analytical studies covering a wide range of diagnostic role, i.e., from screening purposes up to full quantitative characterization. In this work, a systematic research was carried out towards the identification and evaluation of the advantages and the limitations of laboratory-based (IBA, electron probe microanalyzer) and portable (milli-XRF and micro-XRF) techniques. The study focused on the analysis of an Archaic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> collection recently excavated from the city of Thebes (mainland, Greece), in order to suggest an optimized and synergistic analytical methodology for similar studies and to assess the reliability of the quantification procedure of analyses conducted in particular by portable XRF spectrometers. All the employed analytical techniques and methodologies proved efficient to provide in a consistent way characterization of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> composition, with analytical range and sensitivity depending on the particular technique. The obtained compositional data suggest a solid basis for the understanding of the main technological features related to the raw major and minor materials utilized for the manufacture of the Thebian ancient <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> collection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUSM...H32A12C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUSM...H32A12C"><span>Photo-visualization Study Illustrating the Effects of Interfacial Properties on Multiphase Flow in <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Micromodels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cianci, J. A.; Hwang, S. I.; Powers, S. E.</p> <p>2001-05-01</p> <p>The mechanics of mobilization and dynamics that affect the path and fate of the DNAPL in the subsurface are not fully understood. Dynamics such as fingering may short-circuit and ultimately lead to trapped pockets of DNAPL in the subsurface. These physical flow phenomena can be changed by adjusting chemical conditions of the NAPL/water interface, wettability properties of the subsurface particles, or by the introduction of biosurfactants to the subsurface system. This research focuses on multiphase flow phenomena in <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> micromodels as effected by surface tension and wettability changes. Two-dimensional <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> micromodels are constructed with 0.5-mm <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> with, water wetting and NAPL wetting capillary barriers. Images are captured on a streaming video feed and analyzed using integrated computer capture and analysis software. Under initially water-saturated conditions, transient conditions are characterized by overall model drainage dynamics, fingering dynamics, and pressure-saturation comparisons. Steady state attributes are qualified by spatial distribution of residual saturation, and quantified by size and shape analysis of the capturing pores, and blob analysis of the residual NAPL. Micro scale analysis is being performed to evaluate changes in curvature of liquid/<span class="hlt">bead</span> interfaces. The micromodels have been performing according to our expectations. Systems with lower interfacial tensions are characterized by lower capillary entry pressures and wider fingers, which are not easily short-circuited to form residual NAPL pockets. Residual blob sizes are smaller than in the system with a higher interfacial tension. It is anticipated by understanding differences in these pore scale processes, we can produce conditions such that the fingering dynamics of the system can be altered and, ultimately, the trapped pockets of residual NAPL can be minimized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.7858P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.7858P"><span>The <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Game: experimental sintering of rhyolitic ash reveals complex behaviour of irregular multiphase particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pope, Robyn; Tuffen, Hugh; Owen, Jacqueline; James, Mike; Wadsworth, Fabian</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Sintering of magmatic particles profoundly influences the permeability, strength and compaction of fragmented magma in conduits and pyroclastic deposits. It involves initial rounding and agglutination of particles, with formation of inter-particle necks, followed by progressive viscous collapse of pores. The sintering behaviour of ash particles within tuffisite veins, which may mediate shallow outgassing in silicic eruptions, is of particular interest. Experimental studies on homogeneous synthetic <span class="hlt">glasses</span>[1] have shown sintering rates to be time, temperature and grainsize-dependent, reflecting the influence of melt viscosity and pore-melt interfacial tension. A key objective is to reconstruct the temperature-time path of naturally sintered samples, so here we investigate the sintering of natural, angular ash fragments, to explore whether similar simple relationships emerge for more complex particle morphologies and internal textures. A <span class="hlt">glass</span>-rich ballistic rhyolite bomb from the Cordón Caulle 2011-2012 eruption was ground and sieved to create various grainsizes of angular ash particles. The bomb contains 70 wt.% SiO2, 0.25 wt.% H2O, and ~30 vol.% crystal phases, as phenocrysts and microlites of plagioclase and pyroxenes. Particles were spread thinly over a sapphire surface in an N2-purged heated stage, and heated to 900, 1000 and 1100 °C, corresponding to melt viscosities of 105.4-107.7 Pa.s. Images were collected every 10-600 s during isothermal sintering over tens of minutes to hours. Quantitative image analysis using ImageJ allowed quantification of evolving particle size and shape (diameter and roundness) and inter-particle neck width. The rate of particle rounding was expected to be highest for smallest particles, and to decrease through time, but unlike synthetic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> experiments, no simple trends emerged. When the temporal evolution of particle roundness was tracked, some particles showed an unexpected, systematic increase in rounding rate with time</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H41D1343A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H41D1343A"><span>Three-Phase Capillary Pressure, Hysteresis and Trapping in a Porous <span class="hlt">Glass-Bead</span> Column</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Andersson, L.; Schlüter, S.; Li, T.; Brown, K. I.; Helland, J. O.; Wildenschild, D.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) strategies employing water-alternate-gas (WAG) injections may improve oil mobility and production recovery. WAG injections for EOR create regions in the reservoir with simultaneous flow of oil, water and air dominated by capillary and gravity forces. As a result of the dynamics in the transition zones, the invading fluid may snap off compartments of the displaced fluid which could then be trapped in the pore space, contributing to the hysteresis of the three-phase capillary pressure curves. Three-phase capillary pressure curves are needed to model the three-phase transition zone movements in the reservoir. In reservoir simulation models, the common practice has been to implement three-phase capillary pressure curves based on two-phase gas-oil and oil-water capillary pressure data. However, experimental and modelling studies of three-phase fluid distributions at the pore scale have shown that this procedure is not always valid; three-phase capillary pressure curves exhibit hysteresis and depend on the saturation history of the three phases which cannot be derived from two-phase capillary pressure curves. We have developed three-phase experiments that provide capillary pressures and 3D-image data of fluid distributions in the entire saturation space of oil, water and air in water-wet porous <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> columns; a time-consuming and technically challenging exercise. The 3D data with a resolution of 6.38 μm were derived from high-resolution synchrotron x-ray computed micro-tomography (CMT), collected at the GSECARS beam line 13-BM-D at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. In particular, we discuss how three-phase pore-scale mechanisms, such as oil layer existence and multiple displacement events, affect the mobility and trapping of oil in the porous medium. We also show that wettability-alterations of the porous medium in contact with the three-phase fluid system and exposure to x-rays can be avoided by using iodine</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010NIMPB.268.2078M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010NIMPB.268.2078M"><span>Combined PIXE/PIGE and IBIL with external beam applied to the analysis of Merovingian <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mathis, F.; Othmane, G.; Vrielynck, O.; Calvo del Castillo, H.; Chêne, G.; Dupuis, T.; Strivay, D.</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>New improvements on our archaeometry line at the cyclotron of the Institute of Nuclear and Atomic Physics and of Spectrometry of the University of Liège have allowed the use of PIXE/PIGE and IBIL in-air for the analysis of cultural heritage objects. The extraction is performed through a 100 nm thick Si 3N 4 window. The detection set-up consists now of two X-ray and one γ-ray detectors, together with a fiber optic UV-visible spectrometer. This set-up has already been tested for the analysis of modern corundum [1] and is now adapted to the analysis of archaeological artefacts. In this work, we have used it to analyse 216 out of the 5000 Merovingian <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> that come from the necropolis of Bossut-Gottechain (Belgium), one of the most important ever found in Belgium. The IBA analyses confirmed the typological division of different <span class="hlt">beads</span> groups through chemical composition that gives us new insights on fabrication techniques of <span class="hlt">glass</span> matrices and colorants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26578491','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26578491"><span>Microscopic observation of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> movement in soft tissue-mimicking phantom under ultrasound PW mode scanning.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Lei; Funamoto, Kenichi; Tanabe, Masayuki; Hayase, Toshiyuki</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Previous studies have demonstrated that stones and calcification in soft tissue show special enhancement in response to color flow (CF) or pulse Doppler (PW) mode ultrasound scan. This phenomenon is known as the "twinkling sign (TS)". The authors conducted an in vitro experiment to investigate the mechanism of TS occurrence by observing a <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> in a transparent PVA-H soft tissue-mimicking phantom. The TS in PW mode showed a low-power and slow-velocity spectrum. At the same time, analysis of images by high-speed camera showed that the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> in the phantom oscillated following the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the PW mode ultrasound scan. The harmonic oscillations were confirmed, as well. The ultrasound radiation force-driven micro-oscillation possibly affects the ultrasound propagation around the scatterer and triggers random signals in the received echo signals. The results indicate that TS is a phenomenon based on complicated acoustic-mechanical interaction of multiple mechanisms. Further investigation is required for gaining a full understanding of the mechanism of TS occurrence and its clinical application.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16445183','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16445183"><span>Inactivation of algal blooms in eutrophic water of drinking water supplies with the photocatalysis of TiO2 thin film on hollow <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, S-C; Lee, D-K</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Photocatalytic inactivation of algae, Anabaena, Microcystis, and Melosira, was carried out with TiO2-coated Pyrex hollow <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> under the illumination of UV light (370 nm wavelength). After being irradiated with UV light in the presence of the TiO2-coated Pyrex <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, Anabaena and Microcystis, known as typical cyanobacteria, lost their photosynthetic activity, and the string of Anabaena cells and the colonies of Microcystis cells were completely separated into individual spherical ones. In the case of Melosira, which is a typical diatom, however, somewhat lower photocatalytic inactivation efficiency was obtained, which was believed to be due to the presence of the inorganic siliceous wall surrounding the cells of Melosira. The TiO2-coated hollow <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> could successfully be employed for the practical application in a eutrophicated river under sunlight. More than 50% of the chlorophyll-a concentration could be reduced by the action of TiO2 photocatalysis.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_3 --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="61"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24857560','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24857560"><span>Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>: modeling and experiments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I</p> <p>2014-06-17</p> <p>The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19155598','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19155598"><span>[Determination of sulfonamides in livestock products and seafoods by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> homogenization].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fujita, Mizuka; Taguchi, Shuzo; Obana, Hirotaka</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>A simple and rapid method using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was developed for the determination of 25 kinds of sulfonamides in livestock products and seafoods. The sulfonamides were extracted with acetonitrile by <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> homogenization and cleaned up with a tandem-connected ODS and basic alumina column. The quantification limits of 25 kinds of sulfonamides were 0.0025-0.005 microg/g. When two sulfonamides of specific samples were excluded, the recoveries and relative standard deviations were 70 to 120% and less than 15%. These results show that the developed method, which minimizes the matrix effect, offers high precision and should be useful for the determination of sulfonamides in livestock products and seafoods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AcSpe..96...40I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AcSpe..96...40I"><span>X-ray fluorescence analysis with micro <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> using milligram-scale siliceous samples for archeology and geochemistry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ichikawa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Toshihiro</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>A micro <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> technique was developed to assay precious siliceous samples for geochemical and archeological analyses. The micro-sized (approximately 3.5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in height) <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by mixing and fusing 1.1 mg of the powdered sample and 11.0 mg of the alkali lithium tetraborate flux for wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence determination of major oxides (Na2O, MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, P2O5, K2O, CaO, TiO2, MnO, and total Fe2O3). The preparation parameters, including temperature and agitation during the fusing process, were optimized for the use of a commercial platinum crucible rather than a custom-made crucible. The procedure allows preparation of minute sample amounts of siliceous samples using conventional fusing equipment. Synthetic calibration standards were prepared by compounding chemical reagents such as oxides, carbonates, and diphosphates. Calibration curves showed good linearity with r values > 0.997, and the lower limits of detection were in the 10s to 100s of μg g- 1 range (e.g., 140 μg g- 1 for Na2O, 31 μg g- 1 for Al2O3, and 8.9 μg g- 1 for MnO). Using the present method, we determined ten major oxides in igneous rocks, stream sediments, ancient potteries, and obsidian. This was applicable to siliceous samples with various compositions, because of the excellent agreement between the analytical and recommended values of six geochemical references. This minimal-scale analysis may be available for precious and limited siliceous samples (e.g., rock, sand, soil, sediment, clay, and archeological ceramics) in many fields such as archeology and geochemistry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017HydJ..tmp...38W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017HydJ..tmp...38W"><span>Magnetic-resonance imaging and simplified Kozeny-Carman-model analysis of <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> packs as a frame of reference to study permeability of reservoir rocks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Dayong; Han, Dongyan; Li, Wenqiang; Zheng, Zhanpeng; Song, Yongchen</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Permeability variation in reservoir rocks results from the combined effects of various factors, and makes porosity-permeability (ϕ-k) relationships more complex, or, in some cases, non-existent. In this work, the ϕ-k relationship of macroscopically homogeneous <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> packs is deduced based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement and Kozeny-Carman (K-C) model analysis; these are used as a frame of reference to study permeability of reservoir rocks. The results indicate: (1) most of the commonly used simplified K-C models (e.g. the simplified traditional (omitting specific surface area), high-order, threshold, and fractal models) are suitable for estimating permeability of <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> packs. The simplified traditional model does not present obvious dependence on rock samples. Whether for the <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> packs or clean natural sandstones, the sample coefficients almost remain invariant. Comparably, the high-order, the fractal, and the threshold models are strongly sample-specific and cannot be extrapolated from the <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> packs to natural sandstones; (2) the ϕ-k relationships of quartz sands and silty sandstones resemble those of the <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> packs, but they significantly deviate from the K-C models at low porosities due to small pore entry radius; (3) a small amount of intergranular cements (<10%v) does not affect the general variation trend of permeability with porosity but can potentially increase predictive errors of the K-C models, whereas in the case of more cements, the ϕ-k relationships of sandstones become uncertain and cannot be described by any of these K-C models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=106825','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=106825"><span>Comparison of C18-Carboxypropylbetaine and <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Bead</span> DNA Extraction Methods for Detection of Mycobacterium bovis in Bovine Milk Samples and Analysis of Samples by PCR</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cornejo, Brandon J.; Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; Thornton, Charles G.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Adams, L. Garry</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this prospective study was to compare two different milk preparation methods to assay for the presence of Mycobacterium bovis by PCR. Detection by a C18-carboxypropylbetaine (CB-18)-based sample processing method was compared to extraction of DNA from milk with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Samples from 17 skin test-positive cattle were analyzed. Following CB-18 processing and <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> extraction, the sensitivity of IS6110-based PCR was 94.1 and 58.8%, respectively (P < 0.025). Because CB-18 processing will permit the proficient use of PCR for diagnosis and surveillance of bovine tuberculosis, it will contribute to the more efficient detection and control of tuberculosis. PMID:9687483</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25940392','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25940392"><span>MRI investigation of water-oil two phase flow in straight capillary, bifurcate channel and monolayered <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> pack.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lanlan; Zhu, Ningjun; Zhao, Yuechao; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Dayong; Yang, Mingjun; Zhao, Jiafei; Song, Yongchen</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The study of immiscible fluid displacement between aqueous-phase liquids and non-aqueous-phase liquids in porous media is of great importance to oil recovery, groundwater contamination, and underground pollutant migration. Moreover, the attendant viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces are essential to describing the two-phase flows. In this study, magnetic resonance imaging was used to experimentally examine the detailed effects of the viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces on water-oil flows through a vertical straight capillary, bifurcate channel, and monolayered <span class="hlt">glass-bead</span> pack. Water flooding experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure and 37.8°C, and the evolution of the distribution and saturation of the oil as well as the characteristics of the two-phase flow were investigated and analyzed. The results showed that the flow paths, i.e., the fingers of the displacing phase, during the immiscible displacement in the porous medium were determined by the viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces as well as the sizes of the pores and throats. The experimental results afford a fundamental understanding of immiscible fluid displacement in a porous medium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H33C1378C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H33C1378C"><span>Βiocolloid and colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>: Effect of gravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Syngouna, V. I.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The role of gravitational force on biocolloid and colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with biocolloids (bacteriophages: ΦΧ174, MS2) and colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q=1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one dimensional, colloid transport model, accounting for gravity effects. The results revealed that flow direction has a significant influence on particle deposition. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for biocolloid and colloid deposition. Schematic illustration of a packed column with up-flow velocity having orientation (-i) with respect to gravity. The gravity vector components are: g(i)= g(-z) sinβ i, and g(-j)= -g(-z) cosβ j. Experimental setup showing the various column arrangements: (a) horizontal, (b) diagonal, and (c) vertical.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.2837G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.2837G"><span>Frequency-dependent streaming potential of porous media: Experimental measurement of Ottawa sand, Lochaline sand and quartz <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Glover, Paul; Walker, Emilie; Ruel, Jean; Yagout, Fuad</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>High quality frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient measurements have been made upon Ottawa sand, Lochaline sand and <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> packs using a new apparatus that is based on an electro-magnetic drive. The apparatus operates in the range 1 Hz to 1 kHz with samples of 25.4mm diameter up to 150 mm long. The results have been analysed using theoretical models that are either (i) based upon vibrational mechanics, (ii) treat the geological material as a bundle of capillary tubes, or (iii) treat the material as a porous medium. In each case we have considered the real and imaginary parts of the complex streaming potential coefficient as well as its magnitude. It is clear from the results that the complex streaming potential coefficient does not follow a Debye-type behaviour, differing from the Debye-type behaviour most markedly for frequencies above the transition frequency. The best fit to all the data was provided by the Pride (1994) model and its simplification by Walker and Glover (2010), which is satisfying as this model was conceived for porous media rather than capillary tube bundles. Theory predicts that the transition frequency is related to the inverse square of the effective pore radius. Values for the transition frequency were derived from each of the models for each sample and were found to be in good agreement with those expected from the independently measured effective pore radius of each material. The fit to the Pride model for all four samples was also found to be consistent with the independently measured steady-state permeability, while the value of the streaming potential coefficient in the low-frequency limit was found to be in good agreement with steady-state streaming potential coefficient data measured using a steady-state streaming potential rig as well as the corpus of steady-state determinations for quartz-based samples existing in the literature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27150790','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27150790"><span>Sonocatalytical degradation enhancement for ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole in the presence of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and single-walled carbon nanotubes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Hamadani, Yasir A J; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Flora, Joseph R V; Kim, Do-Hyung; Jang, Min; Sohn, Jinsik; Joo, Wanho; Yoon, Yeomin</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Sonocatalytic degradation experiments were carried out to determine the effects of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> (GBs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on ibuprofen (IBP) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) removal using low and high ultrasonic frequencies (28 and 1000kHz). In the absence of catalysts, the sonochemical degradation at pH 7, optimum power of 0.18WmL(-1), and a temperature of 15°C was higher (79% and 72%) at 1000kHz than at 28kHz (45% and 33%) for IBP and SMX, respectively. At the low frequency (28kHz) H2O2 production increased significantly, from 10μM (no GBs) to 86μM in the presence of GBs (0.1mm, 10gL(-1)); however, no enhancement was achieved at 1000kHz. In contrast, the H2O2 production increased from 10μM (no SWNTs) to 31μM at 28kHz and from 82μM (no SWNTs) to 111μM at 1000kHz in the presence of SWNTs (45mgL(-1)). Thus, maximum removals of IBP and SMX were obtained in the presence of a combination of GBs and SWNTs at the low frequency (94% and 88%) for 60min contact time; however, >99% and 97% removals were achieved for 40 and 60min contact times at the high frequency for IBP and SMX, respectively. The results indicate that both IBP and SMX degradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Additionally, the enhanced removal of IBP and SMX in the presence of catalysts was because GBs and SWNTs increased the number of free OH radicals due to ultrasonic irradiation and the adsorption capacity increase with SWNT dispersion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26747984','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26747984"><span>Cotransport of clay colloids and viruses through water-saturated vertically oriented columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>: Gravity effects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>The cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in vertically oriented laboratory columns packed with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> was investigated. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (ΚGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. A steady flow rate of Q=1.5 mL/min was applied in both vertical up (VU) and vertical down (VD) flow directions. In the presence of KGa-1b, estimated mass recovery values for both viruses were higher for VD than VU flow direction, while in the presence of STx-1b the opposite was observed. However, for all cases examined, the produced mass of viruses attached onto suspended clay particles were higher for VD than VU flow direction, suggesting that the flow direction significantly influences virus attachment onto clays, as well as packed column retention of viruses attached onto suspended clays. KGa-1b hindered the transport of ΦX174 under VD flow, while STx-1b facilitated the transport of ΦX174 under both VU and VD flow directions. Moreover, KGa-1b and STx-1b facilitated the transport of MS2 in most of the cases examined except of the case where KGa-1b was present under VD flow. Also, the experimental data were used for the estimation of virus surface-coverages and virus surface concentrations generated by virus diffusion-limited attachment, as well as virus attachment due to sedimentation. Both sedimentation and diffusion limited virus attachment were higher for VD than VU flow, except the case of MS2 and STx-1b cotransport. The diffusion-limited attachment was higher for MS2 than ΦΧ174 for all cases examined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9088E..0ZR','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9088E..0ZR"><span>An analysis of the nonlinear spectral mixing of didymium and soda-lime <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> using hyperspectral imagery (HSI) microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Resmini, Ronald G.; Rand, Robert S.; Allen, David W.; Deloye, Christopher J.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Nonlinear spectral mixing occurs when materials are intimately mixed. Intimate mixing is a common characteristic of granular materials such as soils. A linear spectral unmixing inversion applied to a nonlinear mixture will yield subpixel abundance estimates that do not equal the true values of the mixture's components. These aspects of spectral mixture analysis theory are well documented. Several methods to invert (and model) nonlinear spectral mixtures have been proposed. Examples include Hapke theory, the extended endmember matrix method, and kernel-based methods. There is, however, a relative paucity of real spectral image data sets that contain well characterized intimate mixtures. To address this, special materials were custom fabricated, mechanically mixed to form intimate mixtures, and measured with a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) microscope. The results of analyses of visible/near-infrared (VNIR; 400 nm to 900 nm) HSI microscopy image cubes (in reflectance) of intimate mixtures of the two materials are presented. The materials are spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span> of didymium <span class="hlt">glass</span> and soda-lime <span class="hlt">glass</span> both ranging in particle size from 63 μm to 125 μm. Mixtures are generated by volume and thoroughly mixed mechanically. Three binary mixtures (and the two endmembers) are constructed and emplaced in the wells of a 96-well sample plate: 0%/100%, 25%/75%, 50%/50%, 80%/20%, and 100%/0% didymium/soda-lime. Analysis methods are linear spectral unmixing (LSU), LSU applied to reflectance converted to single-scattering albedo (SSA) using Hapke theory, and two kernel-based methods. The first kernel method uses a generalized kernel with a gamma parameter that gauges non-linearity, applying the well-known kernel trick to the least squares formulation of the constrained linear model. This method attempts to determine if each pixel in a scene is linear or non-linear, and adapts to compute a mixture model at each pixel accordingly. The second method uses 'K-hype' with a polynomial (quadratic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4716701','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4716701"><span>Effects of air abrasion with alumina or <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nobuaki, ARAO; Keiichi, YOSHIDA; Takashi, SAWASE</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS) and Block HC (BHC)] were pretreated as follows: (a) no treatment (None), (b) application of a ceramic primer (CP), (c) alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB), (d) AB followed by CP (AB+CP), and (e) <span class="hlt">glass-beads</span> blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB) followed by CP (GBB+CP). The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS) and ResiCem (RC)]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0) and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C) were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05). Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p<0.05). AB showed significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than the None group, while CP did not (p<0.05). GBB exhibited smaller surface defects than did AB; however, their surface roughnesses were not significantly different (p>0.05). The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05), but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05). Conclusions Air abrasion with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP. PMID:26814465</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4484166','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4484166"><span>Comparative Evaluation of Marginal Discrepancy in Tooth Colored Self Cure Acrylic Provisional Restorations With and Without Reinforcement of <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Beads</span>: An In-Vitro Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yasangi, Manoj Kumar; Mannem, Dhanalakshmi; Neturi, Sirisha; Ravoori, Srinivas; Jyothi</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Context This invitro study was conducted to compare and evaluate marginal discrepancy in two types of tooth colored self cure provisional restorative materials {DPI&UNIFAST TRAD} before and after reinforcement of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare marginal discrepancy in two types of provisional restorative materials (DPI and UNI FAST TRAD) before and after reinforcement with <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Materials and Methods Tooth shaped resin copings were fabricated on custom made brass metal die. A total of 60 resin copings were fabricated in which 30 samples were prepared with DPI and 30 samples with UNIFAST material. Each group of 30 samples were divided in to two sub groups in which 15 samples were prepared with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> reinforcement and 15 samples without reinforcement. The marginal discrepancy was evaluated with photomicroscope {Reichet Polyvar 2 met} by placing the resin copings on custom made brass resin coping holder. Results Measurements obtained were statistically analysed by unpaired t-test to know any significance between two variables. Unreinforced DPI specimens had shown lower marginal discrepancy (442.82) than reinforced specimens (585.77). Unreinforced UNIFAST specimens have shown high values of marginal discrepancy (592.83) than reinforced specimens (436.35). p-value between reinforced and unreinforced specimens of DPI (p=0.0013) and UNIFAST (p= 0.0038) has shown statistical significance. Conclusion This in-vitro study revealed that unreinforced DPI specimens have shown lower marginal discrepancy than reinforced specimens and unreinforced UNIFAST specimens have shown higher values of marginal discrepancy than reinforced specimens. PMID:26155574</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.7909E..0CA','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.7909E..0CA"><span>Immobilization of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> for the detection of nucleic acid hybridization using fluorescence resonance energy transfer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Algar, W. Russ; Krull, Ulrich J.</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>The photoluminescence (PL) properties of quantum dots (QD) are of significant interest in the development of new methods for bioanalysis. Multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assays that use immobilized QDs as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are one such example, and offer several unique advantages over other methods. In this work, new interfacial chemistry is described for the immobilization of red-emitting CdSe/ZnS QDs on <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> for use in hybridization assays. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were chemically modified with a dithiolate surface ligand and the QDs immobilized via self-assembly. Further derivatization of the QDs with dithiolate-terminated probe oligonucleotides enabled a hybridization assay that could detect unlabeled target down to nanomolar levels with discrimination of single base-pair mismatches. The use of <span class="hlt">beads</span> as an immobilization platform afforded shorter analysis times and superior reusability compared to previous studies using optical fibers. Hybridization between probe, target, and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) labeled reporter oligonucleotides in a sandwich format generated a spectroscopic signal by introducing the proximity needed for FRET between the QDs and A647. The results indicate clear directions for the optimization of solid-phase hybridization assays, and are important for the future development of true multiplexed biosensors based on QDs and FRET.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22410788','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22410788"><span>On-<span class="hlt">bead</span> expression of recombinant proteins in an agarose gel matrix coated on a <span class="hlt">glass</span> slide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ka-Young; Byun, Ju-Young; Kim, Byung-Gee; Kim, Dong-Myung</p> <p>2012-05-07</p> <p>A system for expression and in situ display of recombinant proteins on a microbead surface is described. Biotinylated PCR products were immobilized on microbead surfaces, which were then embedded in a gel matrix and supplied with translation machinery and substrates. Upon the incubation of the gel matrix, target proteins encoded on the <span class="hlt">bead</span>-immobilized DNA were expressed and captured on the same <span class="hlt">bead</span>, thus allowing <span class="hlt">bead</span>-mediated linkage of DNA and encoded proteins. The new method combines the simplicity and convenience of solid-phase separation of genetic information with the benefits of cell-free protein synthesis, such as instant translation of genetic information, unrestricted substrate accessibility and flexible assay configuration design.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20358924','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20358924"><span>Prediction of TiO2 thin film growth on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a rotating plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Kyo-Seon</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>We calculated the concentration profiles of important chemical species for TiO2 thin film growth on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the TTIP + O2 plasmas and compared the predicted growth rates of thin films with the experimental measurements. The film thickness profile depends on the concentration profile of TiO(OC3H7)3 precursors in the gas phase because TiO(OC3H7)3 is the main precursor of the thin film. The TTIP concentration decreases with time, while the TiO(OC3H7)3 concentration increases, and they reach the steady state about 2 approximately 3 sec. The growth rate of TiO2 film predicted in this study was 9.2 nm/min and is in good agreements with the experimental result of 10.5 nm/min under the same process conditions. This study suggests that a uniform TiO2 thin film on particles can be obtained by using a rotating cylindrical PCVD reactor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15991726','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15991726"><span>Immobilization of TiO2 nanopowder on <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> for the photocatalytic decolorization of an azo dye C.I. Direct Red 23.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Daneshvar, N; Salari, D; Niaei, A; Rasoulifard, M H; Khataee, A R</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>TiO2 supported on <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> was prepared and its photocatalytic activity was determined by photooxidation of the commercial textile dye, C.I. Direct Red 23, in aqueous solution illuminated by a UV-C lamp (30 W). The progress of photocatalytic decolorization of the C.I. Direct Red 23 was studied by measuring the absorbance at lambda(max) = 507 nm by UV Vis spectrophotometer. The experiments indicated that both UV light and TiO2 were needed for the effective destruction of the dye. The effect of pH on the rate of decolorization efficiency was followed in the pH range 2-12. Acidic pH range was found to favor the decolorization rate. The addition of a proper amount of hydrogen peroxide improved the decolorization, whereas the excess hydrogen peroxide quenched the formation of hydroxyl radicals (*OH). The electrical energy consumption per order of magnitude for photocatalytic decolorization of the dye was lower in the UV/TiO2/H2O2 process than that in the UV/TiO2 process. In the real wastewater sample the efficiency of the method was determined by measuring the changes in the absorption spectra of the dye solution during photodegradation. Our results indicated that during the photooxidation process, the decolorization efficiency was more than 80% at irradiation time of 3 h.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21235231','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21235231"><span>Quantification of VX vapor in ambient air by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometric analysis of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> filled sampling tubes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Evans, Ronald A; Smith, Wendy L; Nguyen, Nam-Phuong; Crouse, Kathy L; Crouse, Charles L; Norman, Steven D; Jakubowski, E Michael</p> <p>2011-02-15</p> <p>An analysis method has been developed for determining low parts-per-quadrillion by volume (ppqv) concentrations of nerve agent VX vapor actively sampled from ambient air. The method utilizes <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> filled depot area air monitoring system (DAAMS) sampling tubes with isopropyl alcohol extraction and isotope dilution using liquid chromatography coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS) with positive ion electrospray ionization for quantitation. The dynamic range was from one-tenth of the worker population limit (WPL) to the short-term exposure limit (STEL) for a 24 L air sample taken over a 1 h period. The precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated using liquid-spiked tubes, and the collection characteristics of the DAAMS tubes were assessed by collecting trace level vapor generated in a 1000 L continuous flow chamber. The method described here has significant improvements over currently employed thermal desorption techniques that utilize a silver fluoride pad during sampling to convert VX to a higher volatility G-analogue for gas chromatographic analysis. The benefits of this method are the ability to directly analyze VX with improved selectivity and sensitivity, the injection of a fraction of the extract, quantitation using an isotopically labeled internal standard, and a short instrument cycle time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8058605','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8058605"><span>Entrapping efficiency and drug release profile of an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion formulation using a polydimethylsiloxane-coated <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Minagawa, T; Kohno, Y; Suwa, T; Tsuji, A</p> <p>1994-04-01</p> <p>Evaluation of entrapping efficiency is difficult for an o/w emulsion formulation containing a lipophilic oily drug, isocarbacyclin methyl ester (TEI-9090), by commonly employed techniques (dialysis, ultrafiltration, or gel filtration), because of its adsorption to the system materials. Employing this characteristic of TEI-9090, we developed an adsorption technique with polydimethylsiloxane-coated <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> (PDMS-GB). The assay is based on the quantitative adsorption of unentrapped TEI-9090 to the PDMS-GB. The entrapping efficiency of a 10% soybean oil emulsion containing [3H]TEI-9090 (1 microgram/mL) assayed by this method approached 100%. The PDMS-GB assay was performed for the emulsion diluted 100 times with physiological saline at different time intervals after dilution over a period of 24 hr. A plot of [3H]TEI-9090 in the emulsion particles versus time showed rapid release within 1 hr, followed by very slow release, reaching equilibrium. Applying first-order kinetics, the data were found to fit to a biexponential equation over the first hour of release. The terminal release resembled the first-order release of the drug from the phospholipid-rich infranatant, which was separated from the creamy layer by ultracentrifugation of the emulsion and contained 35% [3H]TEI-9090. These results suggest that the drug is released from two components in the emulsion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6918929','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6918929"><span>Particle velocity and solid volume fraction measurements with a new capacitive flowmeter at the Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility. [<span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bobis, J.P.; Porges, K.G.A.; Raptis, A.C.; Brewer, W.E.; Bernovich, L.T.</p> <p>1986-08-01</p> <p>The performance of a new capacitive flowmeter has been assessed experimentally in a gas-entrained solid flow stream at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) for solid feedrates in the range of 0.5 to 2 kg/s and solid-gas loadings up to 22, corresponding to a range of solid volume fractions extending from 0.004 to 0.016. Two types of nonintrusive instruments using the capacitive principle were fabricated at ANL and installed in the horizontal leg of a 12.3 m test section to sense the solids. An improved electrode geometry designed to maximize the coverage of the duct interior while minimizing the readout error due to a nonuniform electric field, was incorporated for one spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes on the outside surface of a ceramic liner and for another spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes mounted flush with the duct inside surface. The capacitive instruments measured the solid volume fraction and the average particle velocity. The results are compared with time-of-flight measurements of short-lived radioactive particles that duplicate closely the size and density of the 1000..mu.. <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> used in these flow tests. Results show that the solid volume fraction measurements agree with the theoretical models presented and that the particle velocity deduced from the cross-correlation scheme agreed to within 5% of the irradiated particle velocity technique for the 21 to 31 m/s range generated with the S/GFTF. 43 refs., 36 figs., 19 tabs.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27232418','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27232418"><span>A high-efficient batch-recirculated photoreactor packed with immobilized TiO2-P25 nanoparticles onto <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> for photocatalytic degradation of phenazopyridine as a pharmaceutical contaminant: artificial neural network modeling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shargh, Mahdie; Behnajady, Mohammad A</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this study, removal efficiency of phenazopyridine (PhP) as a model pharmaceutical contaminant was investigated in a batch-recirculated photoreactor packed with immobilized TiO2-P25 nanoparticles on <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Influence of various operational parameters such as irradiation time, initial concentration of PhP, volume of solution, volumetric flow rate, pH and power of light source was investigated. Results indicated that removal percentage increases with the rise of irradiation time, volumetric flow rate and power of light source but decreases with the rise of initial concentration of PhP and volume of solution. Highest removal percentage was obtained in the natural pH of PhP solution (pH = 5.9). Results of mineralization studies also showed a decreasing trend of total organic carbon (TOC) and producing mineralization products such as NO3(-), NO2(-) and NH4(+). Modeling of the process using artificial neural network showed that the most effective parameters in the degradation of PhP were volume of solution and power of light source. The packed bed photoreactor with TiO2-P25 nanoparticles coated onto <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> in consecutive repeats have the proper ability for PhP degradation. Therefore, this system can be a promising alternative for the removal of recalcitrant organic pollutants such as PhP from aqueous solutions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090010270','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090010270"><span>Fused <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Analysis of Diogenite Meteorites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mittlefehldt, D.W.; Beck, B.W.; McSween, H.Y.; Lee, C.T. A.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Bulk rock chemistry is an essential dataset in meteoritics and planetary science [1]. A common method used to obtain the bulk chemistry of meteorites is ICP-MS. While the accuracy, precision and low detection limits of this process are advantageous [2], the sample size used for analysis (approx.70 mg) can be a problem in a field where small and finite samples are the norm. Fused <span class="hlt">bead</span> analysis is another bulk rock analytical technique that has been used in meteoritics [3]. This technique involves forming a <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> from 10 mg of sample and measuring its chemistry using a defocused beam on a microprobe. Though the ICP-MS has lower detection limits than the microprobe, the fused <span class="hlt">bead</span> method destroys a much smaller sample of the meteorite. Fused <span class="hlt">bead</span> analysis was initially designed for samples with near-eutectic compositions and low viscosities. Melts generated of this type homogenize at relatively low temperatures and produce primary melts near the sample s bulk composition [3]. The application of fused <span class="hlt">bead</span> analysis to samples with noneutectic melt compositions has not been validated. The purpose of this study is to test if fused <span class="hlt">bead</span> analysis can accurately determine the bulk rock chemistry of non-eutectic melt composition meteorites. To determine this, we conduct two examinations of the fused <span class="hlt">bead</span>. First, we compare ICP-MS and fused <span class="hlt">bead</span> results of the same samples using statistical analysis. Secondly, we inspect the <span class="hlt">beads</span> for the presence of crystals and chemical heterogeneity. The presence of either of these would indicate incomplete melting and quenching of the <span class="hlt">bead</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=191205&keyword=LAMP&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77890128&CFTOKEN=15572156','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=191205&keyword=LAMP&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77890128&CFTOKEN=15572156"><span>COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF R3f GARNET <span class="hlt">BEAD</span> FILTRATION AND MULTIMEDIA FILTRATION SYSTEMS; FINAL REPORT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This report summarizes the results of tests conducted to date at the EPA T&E Facility on the R3f filtration system utilizing fine <span class="hlt">beads</span> (such as garnet <span class="hlt">beads</span> or <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>) and a conventional multimedia filtration system. Both systems have been designed and built by Enprotec, a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1712e0019J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1712e0019J"><span>Dispersion of fine phosphor particles by newly developed <span class="hlt">beads</span> mill</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Joni, I. Made; Panatarani, C.; Maulana, Dwindra W.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+ particles has advanced properties compare to conventional particles applied for compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) as three band phosphor. However, suspension of fine particles easily agglomerated during preparation of spray coating of the CFL tube. Therefore, it is introduced newly developed <span class="hlt">beads</span> mill system to disperse fine phosphor. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> mill consist of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, dispersing chamber (impellers), separator chamber, slurry pump and motors. The first important performance of <span class="hlt">beads</span> mill is the performance of the designed on separating the <span class="hlt">beads</span> with the suspended fine particles. We report the development of <span class="hlt">beads</span> mill and its separation performance vary in flow rate and separator rotation speeds. The 27 kg of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> with 30 µm in size was poured into dispersing chamber and then water was pumped continuously through the slurry pump. The samples for the separation test was obtained every 1 hours vary in rotation speed and slurry flow rate. The results shows that the separation performance was 99.99 % obtained for the rotation speed of >1000 rpm and flow rate of 8 L/minute. The performances of the system was verified by dispersing fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+ particles with concentration 1 wt.%. From the observed size distribution of particles after <span class="hlt">beads</span> mill, it is concluded that the current design of <span class="hlt">bead</span> mill effectively dispersed fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2784131','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2784131"><span>Single <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based electrochemical biosensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Changchun; Schrlau, Michael G.; Bau, Haim H.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A simple, robust, single <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based electrochemical biosensor was fabricated and characterized. The sensor’s working electrode consists of an electrochemically-etched platinum wire, with a nominal diameter of 25 μm, hermetically heat-fusion sealed in a pulled <span class="hlt">glass</span> capillary (micropipette). The sealing process does not require any epoxy or glue. A commercially available, densely functionalized agarose <span class="hlt">bead</span> was mounted on the tip of the etched platinum wire. The use of a pre-functionalized <span class="hlt">bead</span> eliminates the tedious and complicated surface functionalization process that is often the bottleneck in the development of electrochemical biosensors. We report on the use of a biotin agarose <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based, micropipette, electrochemical (Bio-BMP) biosensor to monitor H2O2 concentration and the use of a streptavidin <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based, micropipette, electrochemical (SA-BMP) biosensor to detect DNA amplicons. The Bio-BMP biosensor’s response increased linearly as the H2O2 concentration increased in the range from 1×10−6 to 1.2×10−4 M with a detection limit of 5×10−7 M. The SA-BMP was able to detect the amplicons of 1 pg DNA template of B. Cereus bacteria, thus providing better detection sensitivity than conventional gel-based electropherograms. PMID:19767195</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080012236','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080012236"><span>Crosslinked, porous, polyacrylate <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Uniformly-shaped, porous, round <span class="hlt">beads</span> are prepared by the co-polymerization of an acrylic monomer and a cross-linking agent in the presence of 0.05 to 5% by weight of an aqueous soluble polymer such as polyethylene oxide. Cross-linking proceeds at high temperature above about 50.degree. C or at a lower temperature with irradiation. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> of even shape and even size distribution of less than 2 micron diameter are formed. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> will find use as adsorbents in chromatography and as markers for studies of cell surface receptors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006880','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006880"><span>Small, porous polyacrylate <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping Siao (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Uniformly-shaped, porous, round <span class="hlt">beads</span> are prepared by the co-polymerization of an acrylic monomer and a cross-linking agent in the presence of 0.05 to 5% by weight of an aqueous soluble polymer such as polyethylene oxide. Cross-linking proceeds at high temperature above about 50.degree.C or at a lower temperature with irradiation. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> of even shape and even size distribution of less than 2 micron diameter are formed. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> will find use as adsorbents in chromatography and as markers for studies of cell surface receptors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006886','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006886"><span>Crosslinked, porous, polyacrylate <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping Siao (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Uniformly-shaped, porous, round <span class="hlt">beads</span> are prepared by the co-polymerization of an acrylic monomer and a cross-linking agent in the presence of 0.05 to 5% by weight of an aqueous soluble polymer such as polyethylene oxide. Cross-linking proceeds at high temperature above about 50.degree.C or at a lower temperature with irradiation. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> of even shape and even size distribution of less than 2 micron diameter are formed. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> will find use as adsorbents in chromatography and as markers for studies of cell surface receptors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApPhL.100o3702W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApPhL.100o3702W"><span>Optical trapping force reduction and manipulation of nanoporous <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Tao; Jiang, Fan; Oehrlein, Stefan; Zeng, Erliang; Kershner, Ryan; Cerrina, Franco</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>We studied the interaction of infrared optical traps with controlled-pore <span class="hlt">glass</span> (CPG) <span class="hlt">beads</span> in aqueous medium. The lateral optical trapping force and stiffness were experimentally found considerably smaller than those of their solid counterparts. The simulation using an average refractive index revealed significant losses of effective trapping efficiency, which quantitatively agreed well with experimentally fitted curves. This effect was ascribed to the reduced relative refractive index of medium-filled CPG <span class="hlt">beads</span> with respect to the medium. Combining optical trapping with mechanical confinements, we demonstrated a microfluidic platform allowing for the synthesis of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences on individual <span class="hlt">beads</span> of interest.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Coil&pg=5&id=EJ673818','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Coil&pg=5&id=EJ673818"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span>-Dazzled Baskets.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>St. Clair, Sharon</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Presents an art lesson used when teaching about North American Indians to fourth- and fifth-grade students. Explains that the students learn how to make baskets using a coil-wrap technique with colored yarns and <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Provides a step-by-step explanation of how to create the baskets. (CMK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000248&hterms=hand+circumference&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dhand%2Bcircumference','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000248&hterms=hand+circumference&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dhand%2Bcircumference"><span>Weld-<span class="hlt">Bead</span> Shaver</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Guirguis, Kamal; Price, Daniel S.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Hand-held power tool shaves excess metal from inside circumference of welded duct. Removes excess metal deposited by penetration of tungsten/inert-gas weld or by spatter from electron-beam weld. Produces smooth transition across joint. Easier to use and not prone to overshaving. Also cuts faster, removing 35 in. (89 cm) of weld <span class="hlt">bead</span> per hour.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6489106','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6489106"><span>XPS and ion beam scattering studies of leaching in simulated waste <span class="hlt">glass</span> containing uranium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Karim, D.P.; Pronko, P.P.; Marcuso, T.L.M.; Lam, D.J.; Paulikas, A.P.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glass</span> samples (consisting of 2 mole % UO/sub 3/ dissolved in a number of complex borosilicate simulated waste <span class="hlt">glasses</span> including Battelle <span class="hlt">76-68</span>) were leached for varying times in distilled water at 75/sup 0/C. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> surfaces were examined before and after leaching using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and back-scattered ion beam profiling. Leached samples showed enhanced surface layer concentrations of several elements including uranium, titanium, zinc, iron and rare earths. An experiment involving the leaching of two <span class="hlt">glasses</span> in the same vessel showed that the uranium surface enhancement is probably not due to redeposition from solution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1049822','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1049822"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span>-based microfluidic immunoassay for diagnosis of Johne's disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Foote, Robert; Shaw, Robert W; Eda, Shigetoshi</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Microfluidics technology offers a platform for development of point-of-care diagnostic devices for various infectious diseases. In this study, we examined whether serodiagnosis of Johne s disease (JD) can be conducted in a <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based microfluidic assay system. Magnetic micro-<span class="hlt">beads</span> were coated with antigens of the causative agent of JD, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The antigen-coated <span class="hlt">beads</span> were incubated with serum samples of JD-positive or negative serum samples and then with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody (SAB). To confirm binding of serum antibodies to the antigen, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were subjected to flow cytometric analysis. Different conditions (dilutions of serum and SAB, types of SAB, and types of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>) were optimized for a great degree of differentiation between the JD-negative and JD-positive samples. Using the optimized conditions, we tested a well-classified set of 155 serum samples from JD negative and JD-positive cattle by using the <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based flow cytometric assay. Of 105 JD-positive samples, 63 samples (60%) showed higher antibody binding levels than a cut-off value determined by using antibody binding levels of JD-negative samples. In contrast, only 43-49 JD-positive samples showed higher antibody binding levels than the cut-off value when the samples were tested by commercially-available immunoassays. Microfluidic assays were performed by magnetically immobilizing a number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> within a microchannel of a <span class="hlt">glass</span> microchip and detecting antibody on the collected <span class="hlt">beads</span> by laser-induced fluorescence. Antigen-coated magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> treated with bovine serum sample and fluorescently-labeled SAB were loaded into a microchannel to measure the fluorescence (reflecting level of antibody binding) on the <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the microfluidic system. When the results of five bovine serum samples obtained with the system were compared to those obtained with the flow cytometer, a high level of correlation (linear regression, r2 = 0.994) was</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150003249','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150003249"><span>Coated Aerogel <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel <span class="hlt">beads</span>, among other materials. A coated aerogel <span class="hlt">bead</span> and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JChEd..77..812K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JChEd..77..812K"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span>--Sand + Imagination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris K.</p> <p>2000-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glass</span> is older than recorded history, and yet it is as new as tomorrow! How, when, or where man first learned to make <span class="hlt">glass</span> is not known, but we do know that the ancient Egyptians were making <span class="hlt">glass</span> articles as early as 2,600 B.C.E. (The making of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> may have begun as much as 3000 years earlier.) They used it to make jewelry and luxury items, such as decorative bowls and perfume bottles, available only to the wealthy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810012663','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810012663"><span>Space processing of chalcogenide <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Firestone, R. F.; Schramm, S. W.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>A program was conducted to develop the technique of space processing for chalcogenide <span class="hlt">glass</span>, and to define the process and equipment necessary. In the course of this program, successful long term levitation of objects in a 1-g environment was achieved. <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> 4 mm diameter were containerless melted and fused together.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22266538','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22266538"><span>Development of a novel ultra cryo-milling technique for a poorly water-soluble drug using dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> and liquid nitrogen.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sugimoto, Shohei; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Nakanishi, Yasuo; Danjo, Kazumi</p> <p>2012-04-15</p> <p>A novel ultra cryo-milling micronization technique has been established using dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> and liquid nitrogen (LN2). Drug particles were co-suspended with dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> in LN2 and ground by stirring. Dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by storing dry ice pellets in LN2. A poorly water-soluble drug, phenytoin, was micronized more efficiently using either dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> or zirconia <span class="hlt">beads</span> compared to jet milling. Dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> retained their granular shape without pulverizing and sublimating in LN2 as the milling operation progressed. Longer milling times produced smaller-sized phenytoin particles. The agitation speed for milling was optimized. Analysis of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition temperature revealed that phenytoin particles co-ground with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) by dry ice milling were crystalline, whereas a planetary ball-milled mixtures process with zirconia <span class="hlt">beads</span> contained the amorphous form. The dissolution rate of phenytoin milled with PVP using dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> or zirconia <span class="hlt">beads</span> was significantly improved compared to jet-milled phenytoin or the physical mixture. Dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> together with LN2 were spontaneously sublimated at ambient condition after milling. Thus, the yield was significantly improved by dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> compared to zirconia <span class="hlt">beads</span> since the loss arisen from adhering to the surface of dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> could be completely avoided, resulting in about 85-90% of recovery. In addition, compounds milled using dry ice <span class="hlt">beads</span> are free from abraded contaminating material originating from the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and internal vessel wall.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070025090&hterms=glass&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dglass','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070025090&hterms=glass&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dglass"><span>Surface Coatings on Lunar Volcanic <span class="hlt">Glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas,-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>We are undertaking a detailed study of surface deposits on lunar volcanic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. These tiny deposits formed by vapor condensation during cooling of the gases that drove the fire fountain eruptions responsible for the formation of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Volcanic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> are present in most lunar soil samples in the returned lunar collection. The mare-composition <span class="hlt">beads</span> formed as a result of fire-fountaining approx.3.4-3.7 Ga ago, within the age range of large-scale mare volcanism. Some samples from the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 landing sites are enriched in volcanic spherules. Three major types of volcanic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> have been identified: Apollo 15 green <span class="hlt">glass</span>, Apollo 17 orange <span class="hlt">glass</span>, and Apollo 17 "black" <span class="hlt">glass</span>. The Apollo 15 green <span class="hlt">glass</span> has a primitive composition with low Ti. The high-Ti compositions of the orange and black <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are essentially identical to each other but the black <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are opaque because of quench crystallization. A poorly understood feature common to the Apollo 15 and 17 volcanic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> is the presence of small deposits of unusual materials on their exterior surfaces. For example, early studies indicated that the Apollo 17 orange <span class="hlt">glasses</span> had surface enrichments of In, Cd, Zn, Ga, Ge, Au, and Na, and possible Pb- and Zn-sulfides, but it was not possible to characterize the surface features in detail. Technological advances now permit us to examine such features in detail. Preliminary FE-TEM/X-ray studies of ultramicrotome sections of Apollo 15 green <span class="hlt">glass</span> indicate that the surface deposits are heterogeneous and layered, with an inner layer consisting of Fe with minor S and an outer layer of Fe and no S, and scattered Zn enrichments. Layering in surface deposits has not been identified previously; it will be key to defining the history of lunar fire fountaining.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=188323&keyword=lanthanide&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77987905&CFTOKEN=77389807','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=188323&keyword=lanthanide&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77987905&CFTOKEN=77389807"><span>Calibration <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration <span class="hlt">beads</span>. These <span class="hlt">beads</span> can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3914368','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3914368"><span>Seeds used for Bodhi <span class="hlt">beads</span> in China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Bodhi <span class="hlt">beads</span> are a Buddhist prayer item made from seeds. Bodhi <span class="hlt">beads</span> have a large and emerging market in China, and demand for the <span class="hlt">beads</span> has particularly increased in Buddhism regions, especially Tibet. Many people have started to focus on and collect Bodhi <span class="hlt">beads</span> and to develop a Bodhi <span class="hlt">bead</span> culture. But no research has examined the source plants of Bodhi <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Therefore, ethnobotanical surveys were conducted in six provinces of China to investigate and document Bodhi <span class="hlt">bead</span> plants. Reasons for the development of Bodhi <span class="hlt">bead</span> culture were also discussed. Methods Six provinces of China were selected for market surveys. Information was collected using semi-structured interviews, key informant interviews, and participatory observation with traders, tourists, and local residents. Barkhor Street in Lhasa was focused on during market surveys because it is one of the most popular streets in China. Results Forty-seven species (including 2 varieties) in 19 families and 39 genera represented 52 types of Bodhi <span class="hlt">beads</span> that were collected. The most popular Bodhi <span class="hlt">bead</span> plants have a long history and religious significance. Most Bodhi <span class="hlt">bead</span> plants can be used as medicine or food, and their seeds or fruits are the main elements in these uses. ‘Bodhi seeds’ have been historically used in other countries for making ornaments, especially seeds of the legume family. Many factors helped form Bodhi <span class="hlt">bead</span> culture in China, but its foundation was in Indian Buddhist culture. Conclusions As one of the earliest adornment materials, seeds played an important role for human production and life. Complex sources of Bodhi <span class="hlt">beads</span> have different cultural and historical significance. People bought and collected Bodhi <span class="hlt">beads</span> to reflect their love and admiration for the plants. Thus, the documentation of Bodhi <span class="hlt">bead</span> plants can serve as a basis for future investigation of Bodhi <span class="hlt">bead</span> culture and modern Buddhist culture. PMID:24479788</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5756445','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5756445"><span>Gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> composition for metal adsorption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Scott, C.D.; Woodward, C.A.; Byers, C.H.</p> <p>1990-12-18</p> <p>This patent describes a gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> consisting essentially of a sufficient amount of water and propylene glycol alginate to allow for <span class="hlt">bead</span> formation and a sufficient amount of bone gelatin to allow for metal absorption and chemically crosslinked in an alkaline medium to form a stable structure. A gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> contained therein a biological absorbent capable of removing metals from solution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA174202','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA174202"><span>Thermal Profile of Metallic <span class="hlt">Beads</span> in a <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Sterilizer,</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1986-08-01</p> <p>another commonly used chairside sterilization method, principally for endodontic instruments. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> sterilizer consists of a heated chamber containing...sterilization of endodontic instruments. However, several investigators have shown sterilization times ranging from 3 seconds to 14 minutes, are...et.al. The effect of autoclave sterilization on endodontic files. Oral Surg 55(2): 204-207, 1983. 3. Parkes, R. B. and Kolstad, R. A. Effects of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26767635','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26767635"><span>Combined Spectroscopic Analysis of <span class="hlt">Beads</span> from the Tombs of Kindoki, Lower Congo Province (Democratic Republic of the Congo).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rousaki, Anastasia; Coccato, Alessia; Verhaeghe, Charlotte; Clist, Bernard-Olivier; Bostoen, Koen; Vandenabeele, Peter; Moens, Luc</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis are commonly applied to archaeological objects as a fast and nondestructive way to characterize the materials. Here, micro-Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics on handheld XRF results were used to completely characterize <span class="hlt">beads</span> found during archaeological excavations in the Congo. Metallic objects, organogenic materials, and <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> were studied. Special attention was paid to the glassy materials, as they seem to be of European production. The matrix family and crystalline phases assemblage, as well as the results from principal components analysis on the elemental data, were used to define groups of <span class="hlt">beads</span> of similar composition, and therefore probably of similar origin. This research project establishes the feasibility of this approach to archaeological <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, and can be used to confirm and support the <span class="hlt">bead</span> typologies used by archaeologists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5459576','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5459576"><span>The effects of composition on <span class="hlt">glass</span> dissolution rates: The application of four models to a data base</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Geldart, R.W.; Kindle, C.H.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Four models have been applied to a data base to relate <span class="hlt">glass</span> dissolution in distilled water to composition. The data base is used to compare the precisions obtained from the models in fitting actual data. The usefulness of the data base in formulating a model is also demonstrated. Two related models in which the composite or pH-adjusted free energy of hydration of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> is the correlating parameter are compared with experimental data. In a structural model, the nonbridging oxygen content of the <span class="hlt">glasses</span> is used to correlate <span class="hlt">glass</span> dissolution rate to composition. In a model formulated for this report, the cation valence and the oxygen content of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> are compared with observed dissolution rates. The models were applied to the 28-day normalized silica release at 90/sup 0/C for over 285 <span class="hlt">glass</span> compositions with surface area to volume ratios of 10 m/sup -1/ (Materials Characterization Center MCC-1 <span class="hlt">glass</span> durability test using distilled water). These <span class="hlt">glasses</span> included the nonradioactive analogs of WV205 and SRL-165, as well as SRL-131, PNL <span class="hlt">76-68</span>, and a European <span class="hlt">glass</span>, UK209. Predicted <span class="hlt">glass</span> dissolution rates show similar fits to the data for all four models. The predictions of the models were also plotted for two subsets of the <span class="hlt">glasses</span>: waste <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and Savannah River Laboratory <span class="hlt">glasses</span>. The model predictions fit the data for these groups much better than they fit the data for the entire set of <span class="hlt">glasses</span>. 14 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080012235','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080012235"><span>Ionene modified small polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Linear ionene polyquaternary cationic polymeric segments are bonded by means of the Menshutkin reaction (quaternization) to biocompatible, extremely small, porous particles containing halide or tertiary amine sites which are centers for attachment of the segments. The modified <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the form of emulsions or suspensions offer a large, positively-charged surface area capable of irreversibly binding polyanions such as heparin, DNA, RNA or bile acids to remove them from solution or of reversibly binding monoanions such as penicillin, pesticides, sex attractants and the like for slow release from the suspension.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26485316','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26485316"><span>Adsorption of ochratoxin A from grape juice by yeast cells immobilised in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farbo, Maria Grazia; Urgeghe, Pietro Paolo; Fiori, Stefano; Marceddu, Salvatore; Jaoua, Samir; Migheli, Quirico</p> <p>2016-01-18</p> <p>Grape juice can be easily contaminated with ochratoxin A (OTA), one of the known mycotoxins with the greatest public health significance. Among the different approaches to decontaminate juice from this mycotoxin, microbiological methods proved efficient, inexpensive and safe, particularly the use of yeast or yeast products. To ascertain whether immobilisation of the yeast biomass would lead to successful decontamination, alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> encapsulating Candida intermedia yeast cells were used in our experiments to evaluate their OTA-biosorption efficacy. Magnetic calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> were also prepared by adding magnetite in the formulation to allow fast removal from the aqueous solution with a magnet. Calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> were added to commercial grape juice spiked with 20 μg/kg OTA and after 48 h of incubation a significant reduction (>80%), of the total OTA content was achieved, while in the subsequent phases (72-120 h) OTA was slowly released into the grape juice by alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Biosorption properties of alginate-yeast <span class="hlt">beads</span> were tested in a prototype bioreactor consisting in a <span class="hlt">glass</span> chromatography column packed with <span class="hlt">beads</span>, where juice amended with OTA was slowly flowed downstream. The adoption of an interconnected scaled-up bioreactor as an efficient and safe tool to remove traces of OTA from liquid matrices is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26966916','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26966916"><span>Three-dimensional Alginate-<span class="hlt">bead</span> Culture of Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Avila-Rodríguez, Dulce; Paisano-Cerón, Karina; Valdovinos-Ramírez, Irene; Solano-Agama, Carmen; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Mendoza-Garrido, María E</p> <p>2016-02-18</p> <p>A three-dimensional culture method is described in which primary pituitary adenoma cells are grown in alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Alginate is a polymer derived from brown sea algae. Briefly, the tumor tissue is cut into small pieces and submitted to an enzymatic digestion with collagenase and trypsin. Next, a cell suspension is obtained. The tumor cell suspension is mixed with 1.2% sodium alginate and dropped into a CaCl2 solution, and the alginate/cell suspension is gelled on contact with the CaCl2 to form spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The cells embedded in the alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> are supplied with nutrients provided by the culture media enriched with 20% FBS. Three-dimensional culture in alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> maintains the viability of adenoma cells for long periods of time, up to four months. Moreover, the cells can be liberated from the alginate by washing the <span class="hlt">beads</span> with sodium citrate and seeded on <span class="hlt">glass</span> coverslips for further immunocytochemical analyses. The use of a cell culture model allows for the fixation and visualization of the actin cytoskeleton with minimal disorganization. In summary, alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> provide a reliable culture system for the maintenance of pituitary adenoma cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Binomial+AND+Distribution&pg=3&id=EJ288759','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Binomial+AND+Distribution&pg=3&id=EJ288759"><span><span class="hlt">BEADS</span>: A Realistic Approach to Elementary Statistics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gamble, Andy</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Having students gather their own statistics is promoted. The <span class="hlt">BEADS</span> program provides an alternative; it simulated sampling from a binomial distribution. Illustrations from the program are included. (MNS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6899146','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6899146"><span>A comparison of the performance of nuclear waste <span class="hlt">glasses</span> by modeling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Grambow, B.; Strachan, D.M.</p> <p>1988-12-01</p> <p>Through a combination of data collection and computer modeling, the dissolution mechanism of nuclear waste <span class="hlt">glasses</span> has been investigated and more clearly defined. <span class="hlt">Glass</span> dissolution can be described as a dissolution/precipitation process in which <span class="hlt">glass</span> dissolves in aqueous solution and solids precipitate as the solubility products are exceeded. The dissolution process is controlled by activity of the rate-limiting specie H/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/. As a concentration of H/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/ increases, the rate of dissolution decreases until a final reaction rate is reached. Between the forward reaction rate (early time) and final reaction rate (very long time), <span class="hlt">glasses</span> may exhibit an intermediate root time dependence caused by a transport resistance for the diffusion of H/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/ within the gel layer on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> surface. In this report, three <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are studied: JSS-A, PNL <span class="hlt">76-68</span>, and SRL-131. Data from static and dynamic leach tests are assembled, plotted, and successfully modeled. The kinetic parameters for these <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are reported. With four parameters derived from experiments for each <span class="hlt">glass</span>, the model can be used to calculate the effects of changes in the initial composition of the water contacting the <span class="hlt">glass</span>. The effects of convective flow can also be modeled. Furthermore, <span class="hlt">glasses</span> of different compositions can be readily compared. 49 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988NIMPB..32..504A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988NIMPB..32..504A"><span>Ion-implantation-induced stress in <span class="hlt">glasses</span>: Variation of damage mode efficiency with changes in <span class="hlt">glass</span> structure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arnold, G. W.</p> <p>1988-05-01</p> <p>Ion implantation induces lateral stress in <span class="hlt">glass</span> due to the volume dilatation in the implanted near-surface region. Cantilever-beam experiments allow these quantities to be measured as a function of fluence. For fused silica the stress data for various incident ions are found to scale with atomic collision energy deposition. In sharp contrast, Pyrex (alkali-borosilicate) <span class="hlt">glass</span>, (1 - x)(Na, K) 2O· xB 2O 3·3SiO 2 <span class="hlt">glass</span>, and a sodalime (microscope slide) <span class="hlt">glass</span>, yield stress values which scale with energy deposition into electronic processes. More significantly, this mode of damage production is dominant for the nuclear waste <span class="hlt">glasses</span> PNL <span class="hlt">76-68</span> and SRP. The void space in fused silica allows room for displaced Si and/or O. For the complex alkali-containing silicates, the interstitial volume is restricted. In the latter case, the probability increases that permanent defects can be formed by ionization-induced bond-breaking and network relaxation. These data imply that alpha-particle ionization energy deposition may be an important factor in nuclear waste <span class="hlt">glass</span> radiation damage production, but the magnitude of this contribution has not yet been evaluated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1083767','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1083767"><span>Solid oxide fuel cell having a <span class="hlt">glass</span> composite seal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob</p> <p>2013-04-16</p> <p>A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a <span class="hlt">glass</span> composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) <span class="hlt">glass</span> disposed about a viscous <span class="hlt">glass</span> such that the AEAS <span class="hlt">glass</span> retains the viscous <span class="hlt">glass</span> in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS <span class="hlt">glass</span> provides geometric stability to the <span class="hlt">glass</span> composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous <span class="hlt">glass</span> provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or <span class="hlt">beads</span> of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> composite seal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780000518&hterms=gas+chromatography&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dgas%2Bchromatography','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780000518&hterms=gas+chromatography&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dgas%2Bchromatography"><span>Porous <span class="hlt">bead</span> packings for gas chromatography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pollock, G. E.; Woeller, F. H.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>Porous polyaromatic packing <span class="hlt">beads</span> have low polarity, high efficiency, short retention time, and may be synthesized in size range of 50 to 150 micrometers (100 to 270 mesh). Mechanically strong <span class="hlt">beads</span> may be produced using various materials depending on elements and compounds to be identified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AIPC.1664d0002N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AIPC.1664d0002N"><span>Expanded polylactide <span class="hlt">bead</span> foaming - A new technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nofar, M.; Ameli, A.; Park, C. B.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bead</span> foaming technology with double crystal melting peak structure has been recognized as a promising method to produce low-density foams with complex geometries. During the molding stage of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> foams, the double peak structure generates a strong <span class="hlt">bead-to-bead</span> sintering and maintains the overall foam structure. During recent years, polylactide (PLA) <span class="hlt">bead</span> foaming has been of the great interest of researchers due to its origin from renewable resources and biodegradability. However, due to the PLA's low melt strength and slow crystallization kinetics, the attempts have been limited to the manufacturing methods used for expanded polystyrene. In this study, for the first time, we developed microcellular PLA <span class="hlt">bead</span> foams with double crystal melting peak structure. Microcellular PLA <span class="hlt">bead</span> foams were produced with expansion ratios and average cell sizes ranging from 3 to 30-times and 350 nm to 15 µm, respectively. The generated high melting temperature crystals during the saturation significantly affected the expansion ratio and cell density of the PLA <span class="hlt">bead</span> foams by enhancing the PLA's poor melt strength and promoting heterogeneous cell nucleation around the crystals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15100857','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15100857"><span>An integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for protein analysis with magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based sampling capabilities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Choi, Jin-Woo; Oh, Kwang W; Thomas, Jennifer H; Heineman, William R; Halsall, H Brian; Nevin, Joseph H; Helmicki, Arthur J; Henderson, H Thurman; Ahn, Chong H</p> <p>2002-02-01</p> <p>This paper presents the development and characterization of an integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for fast and low-volume immunoassays using magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>, which are used as both immobilization surfaces and bio-molecule carriers. Microfluidic components have been developed and integrated to construct a microfluidic biochemical detection system. Magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based immunoassay, as a typical example of biochemical detection and analysis, has been successfully performed on the integrated microfluidic biochemical analysis system that includes a surface-mounted biofilter and electrochemical sensor on a <span class="hlt">glass</span> microfluidic motherboard. Total time required for an immunoassay was less than 20 min including sample incubation time, and sample volume wasted was less than 50 microl during five repeated assays. Fast and low-volume biochemical analysis has been successfully achieved with the developed biofilter and immunosensor, which is integrated to the microfluidic system. Such a magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based biochemical detection system, described in this paper, can be applied to protein analysis systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23388379','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23388379"><span>Nondestructive analysis of dragonfly eye <span class="hlt">beads</span> from the warring states period, excavated from a Chu tomb at the Shenmingpu site, Henan Province, China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yang, Yimin; Wang, Lihua; Wei, Shuya; Song, Guoding; Kenoyer, Jonathan Mark; Xiao, Tiqiao; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Changsui</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Dragonfly eye <span class="hlt">beads</span> are considered to be the earliest types of <span class="hlt">glass</span> objects in China, and in the past have been considered as evidence of culture interaction or trade between West and East Asia. In this article, synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography and μ-probe energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence were used to determine the chemical composition, microstructure, and manufacturing technology of four dragonfly eye <span class="hlt">beads</span>, excavated from a Chu tomb at the Shenmingpu site, Henan Province, China, dated stylistically to the Middle and Late Warring State Period (475 BC-221 BC). First, a nondestructive method was used to differentiate the material types including faience (glazed quartz), frit, glazed pottery (clay ceramic), and <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Three <span class="hlt">beads</span> were identified as faience and one <span class="hlt">bead</span> as glazed pottery. The glaze recipe includes quartz, saltpeter, plant ash, and various copper, and is classified as belonging to the K2O-CaO-SiO2 <span class="hlt">glass</span> system, which indicates that these <span class="hlt">beads</span> were not imported from the West. Based on computed tomography slices, the manufacturing technology of the faience eye <span class="hlt">beads</span> appears to include the use of an inner core, molding technology, and the direct application glazing method. These manufacturing features are consistent with the techniques used in China during this same time period for bronze mold-casting, proto-porcelain, and <span class="hlt">glass</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5345812','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5345812"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span> mediated separation of microparticles in droplets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sung, Ki-Joo; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina; Burns, Mark A.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Exchange of components such as particles and cells in droplets is important and highly desired in droplet microfluidic assays, and many current technologies use electrical or magnetic fields to accomplish this process. <span class="hlt">Bead</span>-based microfluidic techniques offer an alternative approach that uses the bead’s solid surface to immobilize targets like particles or biological material. In this paper, we demonstrate a <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based technique for exchanging droplet content by separating fluorescent microparticles in a microfluidic device. The device uses posts to filter surface-functionalized <span class="hlt">beads</span> from a droplet and re-capture the filtered <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a new droplet. With post spacing of 7 μm, <span class="hlt">beads</span> above 10 μm had 100% capture efficiency. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system using targeted particles that bind onto the functionalized <span class="hlt">beads</span> and are, therefore, transferred from one solution to another in the device. Binding capacity tests performed in the bulk phase showed an average binding capacity of 5 particles to each <span class="hlt">bead</span>. The microfluidic device successfully separated the targeted particles from the non-targeted particles with up to 98% purity and 100% yield. PMID:28282412</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=String+AND+theory&pg=5&id=EJ567976','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=String+AND+theory&pg=5&id=EJ567976"><span><span class="hlt">Beads</span> + String = Atoms You Can See.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hermann, Christine K. F.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Presents hands-on activities that give students a head start in learning the vocabulary and basic theory involved in understanding atomic structure. Uses <span class="hlt">beads</span> to represent protons, neutrons, and electrons and string to represent orbitals. (DDR)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26276456','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26276456"><span>Acupressure <span class="hlt">Bead</span> in the Eustachian Tube.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Igarashi, Kazunori; Matsumoto, Yu; Kakigi, Akinobu</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>In this article, we aim to enlighten practitioners and patients involved with acupressure <span class="hlt">beads</span> and to contribute to their safer use by reporting a unique case of insidious intrusion of an acupressure <span class="hlt">bead</span> into the eustachian tube. A metallic object was found in the eustachian tube of a patient while conducting a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The object was later confirmed to be an auricular acupressure <span class="hlt">bead</span>, and was successfully removed by performing a tympanoplasty and a canal wall down mastoidectomy. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> was assumed to have passed through an existing perforation of the tympanic membrane. According to previously published literature, tympanic membrane perforations exist in ∼1% of the population. Therefore, middle-ear foreign bodies are relatively common occurrences for otolaryngologists. However, metallic objects such as acupressure <span class="hlt">beads</span> are especially important in the sense that they can cause severe burns during MRI. To avoid potential complications, acupressure-<span class="hlt">bead</span> practitioners should be aware of the possibility that intrusions through the tympanic membrane could go unnoticed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AIPC.1027.1093H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AIPC.1027.1093H"><span>Modeling Aspects of Two-<span class="hlt">Bead</span> Microrheology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hohenegger, Christel; Forest, M. Gregory</p> <p>2008-07-01</p> <p>We revisit the Mason and Weitz (Phys. Rev. Lett., 74, 1995) and Levine and Lubensky (Phys. Rev. Lett., 85, 2000) analysis for one- and two-<span class="hlt">bead</span> microrheology. Our first motivation is the possibility of drawing inferences from experimental data about local diffusive properties of individual <span class="hlt">beads</span> and nonlocal dynamic moduli of the medium separating the two <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Our second motivation is the ability to perform direct numerical simulations of hydrodynamically coupled Brownian <span class="hlt">beads</span> in soft matter. For both goals, we first must have a model for the coupling between these two transport properties. We reformulate the coupled generalized Langevin equations (GLE) following the scalar GLE analysis of Fricks et al. (J. Appl. Math., 2008), assuming an exponential series parametrization of both local and nonlocal memory kernels. We then show the two-<span class="hlt">bead</span> GLE model can be represented as a vector Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, which allows for a fast and statistically accurate numerical simulation of coupled <span class="hlt">bead</span> paths (time series) and of ensemble-averaged statistics of the process. In this proceedings, we announce the framework to accomplish these two goals of inversion and direct simulation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22915363','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22915363"><span>NIST/ISAC standardization study: variability in assignment of intensity values to fluorescence standard <span class="hlt">beads</span> and in cross calibration of standard <span class="hlt">beads</span> to hard dyed <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hoffman, Robert A; Wang, Lili; Bigos, Martin; Nolan, John P</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Results from a standardization study cosponsored by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are reported. The study evaluated the variability of assigning intensity values to fluorophore standard <span class="hlt">beads</span> by <span class="hlt">bead</span> manufacturers and the variability of cross calibrating the standard <span class="hlt">beads</span> to stained polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span> (hard-dyed <span class="hlt">beads</span>) using different flow cytometers. Hard dyed <span class="hlt">beads</span> are generally not spectrally matched to the fluorophores used to stain cells, and spectral response varies among flow cytometers. Thus if hard dyed <span class="hlt">beads</span> are used as fluorescence calibrators, one expects calibration for specific fluorophores (e.g., FITC or PE) to vary among different instruments. Using standard <span class="hlt">beads</span> surface-stained with specific fluorophores (FITC, PE, APC, and Pacific Blue™), the study compared the measured intensity of fluorophore standard <span class="hlt">beads</span> to that of hard dyed <span class="hlt">beads</span> through cross calibration on 133 different flow cytometers. Using robust CV as a measure of variability, the variation of cross calibrated values was typically 20% or more for a particular hard dyed <span class="hlt">bead</span> in a specific detection channel. The variation across different instrument models was often greater than the variation within a particular instrument model. As a separate part of the study, NIST and four <span class="hlt">bead</span> manufacturers used a NIST supplied protocol and calibrated fluorophore solution standards to assign intensity values to the fluorophore <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Values assigned to the reference <span class="hlt">beads</span> by different groups varied by orders of magnitude in most cases, reflecting differences in instrumentation used to perform the calibration. The study concluded that the use of any spectrally unmatched hard dyed <span class="hlt">bead</span> as a general fluorescence calibrator must be verified and characterized for every particular instrument model. Close interaction between <span class="hlt">bead</span> manufacturers and NIST is recommended to have reliable and uniformly assigned</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/269308','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/269308"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> sealing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S.</p> <p>1996-04-01</p> <p>Hernetic <span class="hlt">glass</span> sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on <span class="hlt">glass</span> composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. <span class="hlt">Glass</span> sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by <span class="hlt">glass</span> composition and predicted calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Acids&pg=6&id=EJ997045','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Acids&pg=6&id=EJ997045"><span>The <span class="hlt">Beads</span> of Translation: Using <span class="hlt">Beads</span> to Translate mRNA into a Polypeptide Bracelet</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dunlap, Dacey; Patrick, Patricia</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>During this activity, by making <span class="hlt">beaded</span> bracelets that represent the steps of translation, students simulate the creation of an amino acid chain. They are given an mRNA sequence that they translate into a corresponding polypeptide chain (<span class="hlt">beads</span>). This activity focuses on the events and sites of translation. The activity provides students with a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BGD....1111391A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BGD....1111391A"><span><span class="hlt">Beaded</span> streams of Arctic permafrost landscapes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arp, C. D.; Whitman, M. S.; Jones, B. M.; Grosse, G.; Gaglioti, B. V.; Heim, K. C.</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaded</span> streams are widespread in permafrost regions and are considered a common thermokarst landform. However, little is known about their distribution, how and under what conditions they form, and how their intriguing morphology translates to ecosystem functions and habitat. Here we report on a Circum-Arctic inventory of <span class="hlt">beaded</span> streams and a watershed-scale analysis in northern Alaska using remote sensing and field studies. We mapped over 400 channel networks with <span class="hlt">beaded</span> morphology throughout the continuous permafrost zone of northern Alaska, Canada, and Russia and found the highest abundance associated with medium- to high-ice content permafrost in moderately sloping terrain. In the Fish Creek watershed, <span class="hlt">beaded</span> streams accounted for half of the drainage density, occurring primarily as low-order channels initiating from lakes and drained lake basins. <span class="hlt">Beaded</span> streams predictably transition to alluvial channels with increasing drainage area and decreasing channel slope, although this transition is modified by local controls on water and sediment delivery. Comparison of one <span class="hlt">beaded</span> channel using repeat photography between 1948 and 2013 indicate relatively stable form and 14C dating of basal sediments suggest channel formation may be as early as the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Contemporary processes, such as deep snow accumulation in stream gulches effectively insulates river ice and allows for perennial liquid water below most <span class="hlt">beaded</span> stream pools. Because of this, mean annual temperatures in pool beds are greater than 2 °C, leading to the development of perennial thaw bulbs or taliks underlying these thermokarst features. In the summer, some pools stratify thermally, which reduces permafrost thaw and maintains coldwater habitats. Snowmelt generated peak-flows decrease rapidly by two or more orders of magnitude to summer low flows with slow reach-scale velocity distributions ranging from 0.1 to 0.01 m s-1, yet channel runs still move water rapidly between pools</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020000780','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020000780"><span>Aerogel <span class="hlt">Beads</span> as Cryogenic Thermal Insulation System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>An investigation of the use of aerogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/cubic m) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10(exp -5) torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003PhRvE..67f6710I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003PhRvE..67f6710I"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span>-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ivanov, Sergei D.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Laaksonen, Aatto</p> <p>2003-06-01</p> <p>Molecular dynamics formulation of <span class="hlt">Bead</span>-Fourier path integral method for simulation of quantum systems at finite temperatures is presented. Within this scheme, both the <span class="hlt">bead</span> coordinates and Fourier coefficients, defining the path representing the quantum particle, are treated as generalized coordinates with corresponding generalized momenta and masses. Introduction of the Fourier harmonics together with the center-of-mass thermostating scheme is shown to remove the ergodicity problem, known to pose serious difficulties in standard path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The method is tested for quantum harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom (Coulombic potential). The simulation results are compared with the exact analytical solutions available for both these systems. Convergence of the results with respect to the number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> and Fourier harmonics is analyzed. It was shown that addition of a few Fourier harmonics already improves the simulation results substantially, even for a relatively small number of <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The proposed <span class="hlt">Bead</span>-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics is a reliable and efficient alternative to simulations of quantum systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18379932','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18379932"><span>Alternate polyelectrolyte coating of chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span> for extending drug release.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Srinatha, A; Pandit, Jayanta K</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In the present study, we addressed the factors modifying ciprofloxacin release from multiple coated <span class="hlt">beads</span>. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> were prepared by simple ionic cross-linking with sodium tripolyphoshate and coated with alginate and/or chitosan to prepare single, double, or multilayered <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The water uptake capacity depended on the nature of <span class="hlt">beads</span> (coated or uncoated) and pH of test medium. The number of coatings given to the <span class="hlt">beads</span> influenced ciprofloxacin release rate. The coating significantly decreased the drug release from the <span class="hlt">beads</span> in comparison to uncoated <span class="hlt">beads</span> (p < 0.001). When the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were given three coatings, viz., alginate, chitosan, and again alginate, the drug release appeared to follow the pattern exhibited by colon-targeted drug delivery systems with time dependent release behavior. The increase in coating formed a barrier for easy ingress of dissolution medium into the <span class="hlt">bead</span> matrix, reducing the diffusion of drug.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19023486','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19023486"><span>Heterogeneous immunoassays using magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> on a digital microfluidic platform.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sista, Ramakrishna S; Eckhardt, Allen E; Srinivasan, Vijay; Pollack, Michael G; Palanki, Srinivas; Pamula, Vamsee K</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>A digital microfluidic platform for performing heterogeneous sandwich immunoassays based on efficient handling of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> is presented in this paper. This approach is based on manipulation of discrete droplets of samples and reagents using electrowetting without the need for channels where the droplets are free to move laterally. Droplet-based manipulation of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> therefore does not suffer from clogging of channels. Immunoassays on a digital microfluidic platform require the following basic operations: <span class="hlt">bead</span> attraction, <span class="hlt">bead</span> washing, <span class="hlt">bead</span> retention, and <span class="hlt">bead</span> resuspension. Several parameters such as magnetic field strength, pull force, position, and buffer composition were studied for effective <span class="hlt">bead</span> operations. Dilution-based washing of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> was demonstrated by immobilizing the magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> using a permanent magnet and splitting the excess supernatant using electrowetting. Almost 100% <span class="hlt">bead</span> retention was achieved after 7776-fold dilution-based washing of the supernatant. Efficient resuspension of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> was achieved by transporting a droplet with magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> across five electrodes on the platform and exploiting the flow patterns within the droplet to resuspend the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. All the magnetic-<span class="hlt">bead</span> droplet operations were integrated together to generate standard curves for sandwich heterogeneous immunoassays on human insulin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) with a total time to result of 7 min for each assay.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15524967','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15524967"><span>Probing a nonequilibrium einstein relation in an aging colloidal <span class="hlt">glass</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abou, Bérengère; Gallet, François</p> <p>2004-10-15</p> <p>We present a direct experimental measurement of an effective temperature in a colloidal <span class="hlt">glass</span> of laponite, using a micrometric <span class="hlt">bead</span> as a thermometer. The nonequilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation, in the particular form of a modified Einstein relation, is investigated with diffusion and mobility measurements of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> embedded in the <span class="hlt">glass</span>. We observe an unusual nonmonotonic behavior of the effective temperature: starting from the bath temperature, it is found to increase up to a maximum value, and then decrease back, as the system ages. We show that the observed deviation from the Einstein relation is related to the relaxation times previously measured in dynamic light scattering experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050173954','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050173954"><span>Remote Sensing of Lunar Mineralogy: The <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Conundrum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pieters, C. M.; Tompkins, S.; Pieters, C. M.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The term "lunar <span class="hlt">glasses</span>" provokes different connotations depending on the context. Common usages include a) pyroclastic deposits consisting of "<span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>" derived from the deep interior, b) melt products created during impact events, and c) the ubiquitous and complex <span class="hlt">glass</span>-welded weathering products, agglutinates. Each is distinct due to a specific geologic origin and composition, but all contain quench <span class="hlt">glass</span> in some form. Spectral properties of a wide range of <span class="hlt">glass</span>-bearing lunar materials is presented elsewhere [1], Discussed here are new spectra for a depth sequence of samples from Apollo 17 core 74002 collected at Shorty Crater. The data provide new insight into why Fe-Ti-rich quench <span class="hlt">glass</span> is not directly observed remotely. Resolving this mystery allows the extensive <span class="hlt">glass</span>-rich deposits at Aristarchus to be recognized as low-Ti pyroclastic <span class="hlt">glass</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24571353','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24571353"><span>Covalent attachment of mechanoresponsive luminescent micelles to <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and polymers in aqueous conditions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Komatsu, Toru; Ueno, Tasuku; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Kato, Takashi; Nagano, Tetsuo</p> <p>2014-03-19</p> <p>Covalent attachment of mechanoresponsive luminescent organic or organometallic compounds to other materials is a promising approach to develop a wide variety of mechanoresponsive luminescent materials. Here, we report covalently linkable mechanoresponsive micelles that change their photoluminescence from yellow to green in response to mechanical stimulation under aqueous conditions. These micelles are composed of a dumbbell-shaped amphiphilic pyrene derivative having amine groups at the peripheral positions of its dendrons. Using a well-established cross-linker, the micelles were covalently linked via their peripheral amine groups to the surface of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, polylactic acid (PLA) <span class="hlt">beads</span>, and living cells under aqueous conditions. Vortexing of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> bearing the micelles in a <span class="hlt">glass</span> vial filled with water caused a photoluminescence color change from yellow to green. PLA <span class="hlt">beads</span> bearing the micelles showed no change in photoluminescence color under the same conditions. We ascribe this result to the lower density and stiffness of the PLA <span class="hlt">beads</span>, because the color of the PLA <span class="hlt">beads</span> changed on vortexing in the presence of bare <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. HeLa cells and HL-60 cells bearing the micelles showed no obvious photoluminescence color change under vortexing. The structure, photophysical properties, and mechanism of photoluminescence color change of the micellar assemblies were examined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/836212','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/836212"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span> and Process for Removing Dissolved Metal Contaminants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Summers, Bobby L., Jr.; Bennett, Karen L.; Foster, Scott A.</p> <p>2005-01-18</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">bead</span> is provided which comprises or consists essentially of activated carbon immobilized by crosslinked poly (carboxylic acid) binder, sodium silicate binder, or polyamine binder. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> is effective to remove metal and other ionic contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions. A method of making metal-ion sorbing <span class="hlt">beads</span> is provided, comprising combining activated carbon, and binder solution (preferably in a pin mixer where it is whipped), forming wet <span class="hlt">beads</span>, and heating and drying the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The binder solution is preferably poly(acrylic acid) and glycerol dissolved in water and the wet <span class="hlt">beads</span> formed from such binder solution are preferably heated and crosslinked in a convection oven.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26241717','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26241717"><span>Two Year Old With Water <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Ingestion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jackson, Jami; Randell, Kimberly A; Knapp, Jane F</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Foreign body ingestion is a common pediatric complaint. Two case reports describe intestinal obstruction in children from an ingestion of a single superabsorbent water ball, requiring surgical removal. We describe nonsurgical management of an asymptomatic child who ingested approximately 100 superabsorbent water <span class="hlt">beads</span>.Because of the risk for subsequent intestinal obstruction, the patient was admitted for whole bowel irrigation. This case report is the first describing use of whole bowel irrigation in the management of an asymptomatic patient with multiple water <span class="hlt">beads</span> ingestion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JNuM..476..140F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JNuM..476..140F"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fournier, Maxime; Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie; Inagaki, Yaohiro; Odorico, Michaël; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the <span class="hlt">glass</span> surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such <span class="hlt">glass</span> powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed <span class="hlt">glass</span> remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference <span class="hlt">glass</span> (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> were examined. Although crushed <span class="hlt">glass</span> grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (Sgeo) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (SBET) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale-contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in <span class="hlt">glass</span> (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a SBET/Sgeo ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to Sgeo should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to SBET should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of <span class="hlt">glass</span> reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2113074','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2113074"><span>Latex <span class="hlt">beads</span> as probes of a neural crest pathway: effects of laminin, collagen, and surface charge on <span class="hlt">bead</span> translocation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>In the trunk region of avian embryos, neural crest cells migrate along two pathways: dorsally just under the ectoderm, and ventrally between the neural tube and the somites. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that uncoated latex <span class="hlt">beads</span> are able to translocate along the ventral neural crest pathway after injection into young embryos; however, <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with fibronectin are restricted from the ventral route ( Bronner -Fraser, M.E., 1982, Dev. Biol., 91: 50-63). Here, we extend these observations to determine the effects of other macromolecules on <span class="hlt">bead</span> distribution. The data show that laminin-coated <span class="hlt">beads</span>, like fibronectin-coated <span class="hlt">beads</span>, are restricted from the ventral pathway. In contrast, <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with type I collagen translocate ventrally after injection. Because macromolecules have characteristic charge properties, changes in surface charge caused by coating the <span class="hlt">beads</span> may confound interpretation of the results. Electrostatic effects on <span class="hlt">bead</span> movement were examined by coating the latex <span class="hlt">beads</span> with polyamino acids in order to predictably alter the initial surface charge. The surface charge before injection was measured for <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with amino acid polymers or with various biologically important macromolecules; the subsequent translocation ability of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> was then monitored in the embryo. Polylysine-coated <span class="hlt">beads</span> (positively charged) were restricted from the ventral pathway as were fibronectin and laminin-coated <span class="hlt">beads</span>, even though fibronectin and laminin <span class="hlt">beads</span> were both negatively charged. In contrast, polytyrosine -coated <span class="hlt">beads</span> ( neutrally charged) translocated ventrally as did negatively charged collagen-coated or uncoated <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The results demonstrate that no correlation exists between the charge properties on the latex <span class="hlt">bead</span> surface and their subsequent ability to translocate along the ventral pathway. Therefore, an adhesion mechanism independent of surface charge effects must explain the restriction or translocation of latex <span class="hlt">beads</span> on a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080004711','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080004711"><span>Cross-linked polyvinyl pyridine coated <span class="hlt">glass</span> particle catalyst support and aqueous composition or polyvinyl pyridine adducted microspheres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Volksen, Willi (Inventor)</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Microspheres are produced by cobalt gamma radiation initiated polymerization of a dilute aqueous vinyl pyridine solution. Addition of cross-linking agent provides higher surface area <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Addition of monomers such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate acrylamide or methacrylamide increases hydrophilic properties and surface area of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. High surface area catalytic supports are formed in the presence of controlled pore <span class="hlt">glass</span> substrate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950065554&hterms=Cutting+tools&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DCutting%2Btools','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950065554&hterms=Cutting+tools&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DCutting%2Btools"><span>Cutting Tool For Shaving Weld <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hoffman, David S.; Mcferrin, David C.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.; Coby, John B., Jr.; Dawson, Sidney G.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Cutting tool proposed for use in shaving weld <span class="hlt">beads</span> flush with adjacent surfaces of weldments. Modified version of commercial pneumatically driven rotary cutting tool, cutting wheel of which turns at speeds sufficient for machining nickel alloys, titanium, and stainless steels. Equipped with forward-mounted handle and rear-mounted skid plate to maximize control and reduce dependence on skill of technician.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867652','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867652"><span>Gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> composition for metal adsorption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Scott, Charles D.; Woodward, Charlene A.; Byers, Charles H.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The invention is a gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> comprising propylene glycol alginate and bone gelatin and is capable of removing metals such as Sr and Cs from solution without adding other adsorbents. The invention could have application to the nuclear industry's waste removal activities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867723','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867723"><span>Gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> composition for metal adsorption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Scott, Charles D.; Woodward, Charlene A.; Byers, Charles H.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The invention is a gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> comprising propylene glycol alginate and bone gelatin and is capable of removing metals such as Sr and Cs from solution without adding other adsorbents. The invention could have application to the nuclear industry's waste removal activities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25439889','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25439889"><span>Wood mimetic hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> for enzyme immobilization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, Saerom; Kim, Sung Hee; Won, Keehoon; Choi, Joon Weon; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Hyung Joo; Yang, Yung-Hun; Lee, Sang Hyun</p> <p>2015-01-22</p> <p>Wood component-based composite hydrogels have potential applications in biomedical fields owing to their low cost, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. The controllable properties of wood mimetic composites containing three major wood components are useful for enzyme immobilization. Here, lipase from Candida rugosa was entrapped in wood mimetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing cellulose, xylan, and lignin by dissolving wood components with lipase in [Emim][Ac], followed by reconstitution. Lipase entrapped in cellulose/xylan/lignin <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a 5:3:2 ratio showed the highest activity; this ratio is very similar to that in natural wood. The lipase entrapped in various wood mimetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed increased thermal and pH stability. The half-life times of lipase entrapped in cellulose/alkali lignin hydrogel were 31- and 82-times higher than those of free lipase during incubation under denaturing conditions of high temperature and low pH, respectively. Owing to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and controllable properties, wood mimetic hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be used to immobilize various enzymes for applications in the biomedical, bioelectronic, and biocatalytic fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27523075','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27523075"><span>Effect of Cellulose Acetate <span class="hlt">Beads</span> on Interleukin-23 Release.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Yagi, Makoto; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Yoshiyuki</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Interleukin (IL)-23, which is released by activated monocytes and neutrophils, promotes production of high levels of IL-17 by T-helper 17 cells. Cellulose acetate (CA) <span class="hlt">beads</span> are used as carriers for granulocyte and monocyte (GM) adsorptive apheresis using Adacolumn. Contact between blood and CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> induces cytokine release; however, their inflammatory effects on IL-23 release are unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> on IL-23 release in vitro. We incubated peripheral blood with and without CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> and measured IL-23. Compared to blood samples incubated without CA <span class="hlt">beads</span>, blood samples incubated with CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> had significantly decreased amounts of IL-23. In conclusion, CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> inhibited IL-23 release from adsorbed GMs. The biological effects of this decrease in IL-23 release during GM adsorption to CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> need further clarification.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22215983','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22215983"><span>Mitotic spindle assembly around RCC1-coated <span class="hlt">beads</span> in Xenopus egg extracts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Halpin, David; Kalab, Petr; Wang, Jay; Weis, Karsten; Heald, Rebecca</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>During cell division the genetic material on chromosomes is distributed to daughter cells by a dynamic microtubule structure called the mitotic spindle. Here we establish a reconstitution system to assess the contribution of individual chromosome proteins to mitotic spindle formation around single 10 µm diameter porous <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> in Xenopus egg extracts. We find that Regulator of Chromosome Condensation 1 (RCC1), the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) for the small GTPase Ran, can induce bipolar spindle formation. Remarkably, RCC1 <span class="hlt">beads</span> oscillate within spindles from pole to pole, a behavior that could be converted to a more typical, stable association by the addition of a kinesin together with RCC1. These results identify two activities sufficient to mimic chromatin-mediated spindle assembly, and establish a foundation for future experiments to reconstitute spindle assembly entirely from purified components.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/197308','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/197308"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> recycling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dalmijn, W.L.; Houwelingen, J.A. van</p> <p>1995-12-31</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glass</span> recycling in the Netherlands has grown from 10,000 to 300,000 tonnes per annum. The various advantages and problems of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> cycle with reference to the state of the art in the Netherlands is given. Special attention is given to new technologies for the automated sorting of cullet with detection systems. In Western Europe the recycling of <span class="hlt">glass</span> has become a success story. Because of this, the percentage of <span class="hlt">glass</span> cullet used in <span class="hlt">glass</span> furnaces has increased. To meet the quality demands of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> industry, automated sorting for the removal of stones, non-ferrous metals and other impurities had to be developed and incorporated in <span class="hlt">glass</span> recycling plants. In Holland, Germany and other countries, the amount of <span class="hlt">glass</span> collected has reached a level that color-sorting becomes necessary to avoid market saturation with mixed cullet. Recently, two systems for color-sorting have been developed and tested for the separation of bottles and cullet in the size range of 20--50 mm. With the increased capacity of the new <span class="hlt">glass</span> recycling plants, 120,000--200,000 tpy, the quality systems have also to be improved and automated. These quality control systems are based on the automated sorting technology developed earlier for the <span class="hlt">glass</span> recycling plants. The data obtained are automatically processed and printed. The sampling system and its relation to the theory of Gy will be described. Results of both developments in <span class="hlt">glass</span> recycling plants will be described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=drugs&pg=4&id=EJ972159','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=drugs&pg=4&id=EJ972159"><span>A Controlled Drug-Delivery Experiment Using Alginate <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Farrell, Stephanie; Vernengo, Jennifer</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes a simple, cost-effective experiment which introduces students to drug delivery and modeling using alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Students produce calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> loaded with drug and measure the rate of release from the <span class="hlt">beads</span> for systems having different stir rates, geometries, extents of cross-linking, and drug molecular weight.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20390041','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20390041"><span>Metal-Containing Polystyrene <span class="hlt">Beads</span> as Standards for Mass Cytometry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdelrahman, Ahmed I; Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Baranov, Vladimir; Kinach, Robert; Dai, Sheng; Thickett, Stuart C; Tanner, Scott; Winnik, Mitchell A</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>We examine the suitability of metal-containing polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> for the calibration of a mass cytometer instrument, a single particle analyser based on an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a time of flight mass spectrometer. These metal-containing <span class="hlt">beads</span> are also verified for their use as internal standards for this instrument. These <span class="hlt">beads</span> were synthesized by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization with acrylic acid as a comonomer. Acrylic acid acts as a ligand to anchor the metal ions within the interior of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Mass cytometry enabled the <span class="hlt">bead-by-bead</span> measurement of the metal-content and determination of the metal-content distribution. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> synthesized by dispersion polymerization that involved three stages were shown to have narrower <span class="hlt">bead-to-bead</span> variation in their lanthanide content than <span class="hlt">beads</span> synthesized by 2-stage dispersion polymerization. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> exhibited insignificant release of their lanthanide content to aqueous solutions of different pHs over a period of six months. When mixed with KG1a or U937 cell lines, metal-containing polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span> were shown not to affect the mass cytometry response to the metal content of element-tagged antibodies specifically attached to these cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020086617','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020086617"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> Artworks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Several NASA technologies have played part in growth and cost containment of studio <span class="hlt">glass</span> art, among them a foam type insulation developed to meet a need for lightweight material that would reduce flame spread in aircraft fire. Foam comes in several forms and is widely used by <span class="hlt">glass</span> artists, chiefly as an insulator for the various types of ovens used in <span class="hlt">glass</span> working. Another Spinoff is alumina crucibles to contain molten <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Before alumina crucibles were used, <span class="hlt">glass</span> tanks were made of firebrick which tended to erode under high temperatures and cause impurities; this not only improved quality but made the process more cost effective. One more NASA technology that found its way into <span class="hlt">glass</span> art working is a material known as graphite board, a special form of graphite originally developed for rocket motor applications. This graphite is used to exact compound angles and creates molds for poured <span class="hlt">glass</span> artworks of dramatic design.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/60592','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/60592"><span>Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material - ATM-12 <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wald, J.W.</p> <p>1985-10-01</p> <p>The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) Approved Testing Material ATM-12 is a borosilicate <span class="hlt">glass</span> that incorporates elements typical of high-level waste (HLW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuels. The composition has been adjusted to match that predicted for HLW type <span class="hlt">76-68</span> <span class="hlt">glass</span> at an age of 300 y. Radioactive constituents contained in this <span class="hlt">glass</span> include depleted uranium, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> was produced by the MCC at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). ATM-12 <span class="hlt">glass</span> ws produced from July to November of 1984 at the request of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigations (NNWSI) Program and is the third in a series of <span class="hlt">glasses</span> produced for NNWSI. Most of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> produced was in the form of cast bars; special castings and crushed material were also produced. Three kilograms of ATM-12 <span class="hlt">glass</span> were produced from a feedstock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1150{sup 0}C in a platinum crucible, and formed into stress-annealed rectangular bars and the special casting shapes requested by NNWSI. Bars of ATM-12 were nominally 1.9 x 1.9 x 10 cm, with an average mass of 111 g each. Nineteen bars and 37 special castings were made. ATM-12 <span class="hlt">glass</span> has been provided to the NNWSI Program, in the form of bars, crushed powder and special castings. As of August 1985 approximately 590 g of ATM-12 is available for distribution. Requests for materials or services related to this <span class="hlt">glass</span> should be directed to the Materials Characterization Center Program Office, PNL.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PMB....52.4189C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PMB....52.4189C"><span>Model for the ultrasound reflection from micro-<span class="hlt">beads</span> and cells distributed in layers on a uniform surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Couture, O.; Cherin, E.; Foster, F. S.</p> <p>2007-07-01</p> <p>A model predicting the reflection of ultrasound from multiple layers of small scattering spheres is developed. Predictions of the reflection coefficient, which takes into account the interferences between the different sphere layers, are compared to measurements performed in the 10-80 MHz and 15-35 MHz frequency range with layers of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and spherical acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, respectively. For both types of scatterers, the reflection coefficient increases as a function of their density on the surface for less than three superimposed layers, at which point it saturates at 0.38 for <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and 0.02 for AML cells. Above three layers, oscillations of the reflection coefficient due to constructive or destructive interference between layers are observed experimentally and are accurately predicted by the model. The use of such a model could lead to a better understanding of the structures observed in layered tissue images.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000690&hterms=Glass+defects&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DGlass%2Bdefects','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000690&hterms=Glass+defects&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DGlass%2Bdefects"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> Research</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Weinberg, M. C.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Research efforts span three general areas of <span class="hlt">glass</span> science: <span class="hlt">glass</span> refining, gel-derived <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, and nucleation and crystallization of <span class="hlt">glasses</span>. Gas bubbles which are present in a <span class="hlt">glass</span> product are defects which may render the <span class="hlt">glass</span> totally useless for the end application. For example, optical <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, laser host <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, and a variety of other specialty <span class="hlt">glasses</span> must be prepared virtually defect free to be employable. Since a major mechanism of bubble removal, buoyant rise, is virtually inoperative in microgravity, <span class="hlt">glass</span> fining will be especially difficult in space. On the other hand, the suppression of buoyant rise and the ability to perform containerless melting experiments in space allows the opportunity to carry out several unique bubble experiments in space. Gas bubble dissolution studies may be performed at elevated temperatures for large bubbles with negligible bubble motion. Also, bubble nucleation studies may be performed without the disturbing feature of heterogeneous bubble nucleation at the platinum walls. Ground based research efforts are being performed in support of these potential flight experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840020896','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840020896"><span>Erosion of iron-chromium alloys by <span class="hlt">glass</span> particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The material loss upon erosion was measured for several iron-chromium alloys. Two types of erodent material were used: spherical <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and sharp particles of crushed <span class="hlt">glass</span>. For erosion with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> the erosion resistance (defined as the reciprocal of material loss rate) was linearly dependent on hardness. This is in accordance with the erosion behavior of pure metals, but contrary to the erosion behavior of alloys of constant composition that were subjected to different heat treatments. For erosion with crushed <span class="hlt">glass</span>, however, no correlation existed between hardness and erosion resistance. Instead, the erosion resistance depended on alloy composition rather than on hardness and increased with the chromium content of the alloy. The difference in erosion behavior for the two types of erodent particles suggested that two different material removal mechanisms were involved. This was confirmed by SEM micrographs of the eroded surfaces, which showed that for erosion with <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> the mechanism of material removal was deformation-induced flaking of surface layers, or peening, whereas for erosion with crushed <span class="hlt">glass</span> it was cutting or chopping.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18559861','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18559861"><span>Green stone <span class="hlt">beads</span> at the dawn of agriculture.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bar-Yosef Mayer, Daniella E; Porat, Naomi</p> <p>2008-06-24</p> <p>The use of <span class="hlt">beads</span> and other personal ornaments is a trait of modern human behavior. During the Middle and Upper Paleolithic periods, <span class="hlt">beads</span> were made out of shell, bone, ivory, egg shell, and occasionally of minerals. During the transition to agriculture in the Near East, stone, in particular green stone, was used for the first time to make <span class="hlt">beads</span> and pendants. We observed that a large variety of minerals of green colors were sought, including apatite, several copper-bearing minerals, amazonite and serpentinite. There seems to be an increase with time of distance from which the green minerals were sought. Because <span class="hlt">beads</span> in white, red, yellow, brown, and black colors had been used previously, we suggest that the occurrence of green <span class="hlt">beads</span> is directly related to the onset of agriculture. Green <span class="hlt">beads</span> and <span class="hlt">bead</span> blanks were used as amulets to ward off the evil eye and as fertility charms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JQSRT.179..105A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JQSRT.179..105A"><span>Discrete dipole approximation simulation of <span class="hlt">bead</span> enhanced diffraction grating biosensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arif, Khalid Mahmood</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>We present the discrete dipole approximation simulation of light scattering from <span class="hlt">bead</span> enhanced diffraction biosensor and report the effect of <span class="hlt">bead</span> material, number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> forming the grating and spatial randomness on the diffraction intensities of 1st and 0th orders. The dipole models of gratings are formed by volume slicing and image processing while the spatial locations of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> on the substrate surface are randomly computed using discrete probability distribution. The effect of <span class="hlt">beads</span> reduction on far-field scattering of 632.8 nm incident field, from fully occupied gratings to very coarse gratings, is studied for various <span class="hlt">bead</span> materials. Our findings give insight into many difficult or experimentally impossible aspects of this genre of biosensors and establish that <span class="hlt">bead</span> enhanced grating may be used for rapid and precise detection of small amounts of biomolecules. The results of simulations also show excellent qualitative similarities with experimental observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JChPh.144q4502T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JChPh.144q4502T"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Labardi, Massimiliano; Capaccioli, Simone; Paluch, M.; Wang, Li-Min</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation and the <span class="hlt">glass</span> stability of materials would benefit the screening of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. <span class="hlt">Glass</span> transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule <span class="hlt">glass</span> formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation via kinetics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27155640','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27155640"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Labardi, Massimiliano; Capaccioli, Simone; Paluch, M; Wang, Li-Min</p> <p>2016-05-07</p> <p>Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation and the <span class="hlt">glass</span> stability of materials would benefit the screening of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. <span class="hlt">Glass</span> transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule <span class="hlt">glass</span> formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation via kinetics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23016362','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23016362"><span>[Characteristics of chemical composition of <span class="hlt">glass</span> finds from the Qiemo tomb sites on the Silk Road].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cheng, Qian; Guo, Jin-Long; Wang, Bo; Cui, Jian-Feng</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>Qiemo was an ancient country on the south branch of the Silk Road. The Zagunluke tomb site is located at the Qiemo County of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and only colourless <span class="hlt">glass</span> cup were excavated from the 3rd cultural layer of the tomb site M133 and M49, dated between the 1st AD-6th AD. LA-ICP-AES was applied to analyse chemical composition of these <span class="hlt">glass</span> finds with the corning <span class="hlt">glass</span> as reference. According to the result, characteristics of chemical composition are very similar to typical soda-lime <span class="hlt">glass</span>, which indicates the <span class="hlt">glasses</span> were imported productions from the west. These soda-lime <span class="hlt">glasses</span> were divided into two groups in terms of flux source: natron <span class="hlt">glass</span> and plant ash <span class="hlt">glass</span>. This analytical research indicates the history of <span class="hlt">glass</span> trade and communication between the East and the West on the Silk Road.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030107526','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030107526"><span>Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dynys, F. W.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange <span class="hlt">beads</span>, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the <span class="hlt">beads</span> as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin <span class="hlt">beads</span> forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5385560','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5385560"><span>Deterministic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-in-droplet ejection utilizing an integrated plug-in <span class="hlt">bead</span> dispenser for single bead–based applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Hojin; Choi, In Ho; Lee, Sanghyun; Won, Dong-Joon; Oh, Yong Suk; Kwon, Donghoon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Jeon, Sangmin; Kim, Joonwon</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents a deterministic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-in-droplet ejection (BIDE) technique that regulates the precise distribution of microbeads in an ejected droplet. The deterministic BIDE was realized through the effective integration of a microfluidic single-particle handling technique with a liquid dispensing system. The integrated <span class="hlt">bead</span> dispenser facilitates the transfer of the desired number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> into a dispensing volume and the on-demand ejection of <span class="hlt">bead</span>-encapsulated droplets. Single bead–encapsulated droplets were ejected every 3 s without any failure. Multiple-<span class="hlt">bead</span> dispensing with deterministic control of the number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> was demonstrated to emphasize the originality and quality of the proposed dispensing technique. The dispenser was mounted using a plug-socket type connection, and the dispensing process was completely automated using a programmed sequence without any microscopic observation. To demonstrate a potential application of the technique, <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based streptavidin–biotin binding assay in an evaporating droplet was conducted using ultralow numbers of <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The results evidenced the number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the droplet crucially influences the reliability of the assay. Therefore, the proposed deterministic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-in-droplet technology can be utilized to deliver desired <span class="hlt">beads</span> onto a reaction site, particularly to reliably and efficiently enrich and detect target biomolecules. PMID:28393911</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130008965','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130008965"><span>Constraining the Flux of Impactors Postdating Heavy Bombardment Using U-Pb Ages of Impact <span class="hlt">Glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Nemchin, A. A.; Norman, M. L.; Ziegler, R. A.; Grange, M. L.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Spherules of <span class="hlt">glass</span> varying in size from a few micrometres to a few millimetres are common in the lunar regolith. While some of these <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> are products of pyroclastic fire fountains others originate as impact melt ejected from the target that breaks into small droplets and solidifies as spherical particles while raining back to the lunar surface. These <span class="hlt">glasses</span> preserve information about the chemical composition of the target and often contain sufficient amount of radioactive nuclides such as 40K to enable Ar-40-Ar-39 dating of individual <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Studies measuring the age of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> have been used in attempts to establish variations in the flux of impactors hitting the Moon, particularly during the period that postdates the formation of major impact basins [1,2]. These studies proposed a possibility of spike in the impact flux about 800 Ma [2] and over the last 400 Ma [1]. More recently U-Th-Pb isotopic systems have been also utilized to determine the age of impact <span class="hlt">glasses</span> from the Apollo 17 regolith [3]. Our aim is to extend the application of the U-Pb system in impact <span class="hlt">glasses</span> to spherules isolated from Apollo 14 soil 14163 in an attempt to further investigate the applicability of this isotopic system to the chronology of impact <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and gain additional information on the impact flux in the inner Solar system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23392210','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23392210"><span>Attomolar protein detection using a magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> surface coverage assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tekin, H Cumhur; Cornaglia, Matteo; Gijs, Martin A M</p> <p>2013-03-21</p> <p>We demonstrate a microfluidic method for ultra-sensitive protein detection in serum. First, 'large' (2.8 μm) antibody-functionalized magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> specifically capture antigen from a serum matrix under active microfluidic mixing. Subsequently, the large <span class="hlt">beads</span> loaded with the antigens are gently exposed to a surface pattern of fixed 'small' (1.0 μm) antibody-coated magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>. During the exposure, attractive magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> dipole-dipole interactions improve the contact between the two <span class="hlt">bead</span> types and help the antigen-antibody immunocomplex formation, while non-specific large <span class="hlt">bead</span> adsorption is limited by exploiting viscous drag forces in the microfluidic channel on the small-<span class="hlt">bead</span> pattern. This efficient antigen-antibody recognition and binding mechanism mimics a biological process of selective recognition of tissue molecules, like is the case when leukocytes roll and slow down on blood vessel walls by selectin-mediated adhesion. After exposure of the large <span class="hlt">beads</span> to the pattern of small <span class="hlt">beads</span>, the antigen concentration is detected by simply counting the number of surface pattern-bound large magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The new technique allows detection of proteins down to the sub-zeptomole range. In particular, we demonstrate detection of only 200 molecules of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) in a serum sample volume of 5 μL, corresponding to a concentration of 60 attomolar or 1 fg mL(-1).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23094984','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23094984"><span>Discovery of novel integrin ligands from combinatorial libraries using a multiplex "<span class="hlt">beads</span> on a <span class="hlt">bead</span>" approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cho, Choi-Fong; Amadei, Giulio A; Breadner, Daniel; Luyt, Leonard G; Lewis, John D</p> <p>2012-11-14</p> <p>The development of screening approaches to identify novel affinity ligands has paved the way for a new generation of molecular targeted nanomedicines. Conventional methods typically bias the display of the target protein to ligands during the screening process. We have developed an unbiased multiplex "<span class="hlt">beads</span> on a <span class="hlt">bead</span>" strategy to isolate, characterize, and validate high affinity ligands from OBOC libraries. Novel non-RGD peptides that target α(v)β(3) integrin were discovered that do not affect cancer or endothelial cell biology. The peptides identified here represent novel integrin-targeted agents that can be used to develop targeted nanomedicines without the risk of increased tumor invasion and metastasis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5876876','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5876876"><span>Solubility interpretations of leach tests on nuclear waste <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Strachan, D.M.; Krupka, K.M.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>A one-year leach test at 90/sup 0/C was conducted on specimens of PNL <span class="hlt">76-68</span> borosilicate <span class="hlt">glass</span>, a simulated nuclear waste <span class="hlt">glass</span>. The experimental method was MCC-1, one of the standard leach tests developed by the Materials Characterization Center (MCC). The leachant solutions included deionized water, a silicic acid/sodium bicarbonate solution, and a concentrated K-Mg-Na-Cl brine. Phase characterization techniques and geochemical codes were used to identify possible solubility and sorption controls for the constituents dissolved in the final leach solutions. In the non-brine solutions, an alteration layer of 30-50 ..mu..m is formed that consists mainly of an amorphous Fe(OH)/sub 3/. In addition, a zinc silicate phase precipitated on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> surface and appears to control the concentrations of dissolved Cs and Si. Calculations with the MINTEQ geochemical code identified possible equilbrium solubility controls for dissolved Fe, Ca, Si, Zn, Pb, P, and F. These calculations also permitted an estimation of the pH at the temperature of the leach experiments. The PHREEQE geochemical code was used to predict the steady state concentrations of Ca/sup 2 +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ in the final leachates by assuming their sorption on solid amorphous Fe(OH)/sub 3/. For the leach tests completed in the brine solution, a magnesium silicate phase precipitated on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> surface and may have been responsible for the observed decrease in the concentration of the dissolved Si. This solid phase was tentatively identified as sepiolite and/or possibly talc. These results were compared to mineral solubilities calculated from the MINTEQ geochemical code.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26688000','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26688000"><span>Ni(2+)-zeolite/ferrosphere and Ni(2+)-silica/ferrosphere <span class="hlt">beads</span> for magnetic affinity separation of histidine-tagged proteins.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vereshchagina, T A; Fedorchak, M A; Sharonova, O M; Fomenko, E V; Shishkina, N N; Zhizhaev, A M; Kudryavtsev, A N; Frank, L A; Anshits, A G</p> <p>2016-01-28</p> <p>Magnetic Ni(2+)-zeolite/ferrosphere and Ni(2+)-silica/ferrosphere <span class="hlt">beads</span> (Ni-ferrosphere <span class="hlt">beads</span> - NFB) of a core-shell structure were synthesized starting from coal fly ash ferrospheres having diameters in the range of 0.063-0.050 mm. The strategy of NFB fabrication is an oriented chemical modification of the outer surface preserving the magnetic core of parent <span class="hlt">beads</span> with the formation of micro-mesoporous coverings. Two routes of ferrosphere modification were realized, such as (i) hydrothermal treatment in an alkaline medium resulting in a NaP zeolite layer and (ii) synthesis of micro-mesoporous silica on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> surface using conventional methods. Immobilization of Ni(2+) ions in the siliceous porous shell of the magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> was carried out via (i) the ion exchange of Na(+) for Ni(2+) in the zeolite layer or (ii) deposition of NiO clusters in the zeolite and silica pores. The final NFB were tested for affinity in magnetic separation of the histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) directly from a cell lysate. Results pointed to the high affinity of the magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> towards the protein in the presence of 10 mM EDTA. The sorption capacity of the ferrosphere-based Ni-<span class="hlt">beads</span> with respect to GFP was in the range 1.5-5.7 mg cm(-3).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD0410633','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD0410633"><span><span class="hlt">GLASS</span> FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS,</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Contents: Fibrous <span class="hlt">glass</span> fillers Binders used in the <span class="hlt">glass</span> plastic industry Method of manufacturing <span class="hlt">glass</span> plastics and <span class="hlt">glass</span> plastic articles Properties of fiberglass Primary areas for use of <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibre reinforced plastics</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1823b0118S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1823b0118S"><span>Adsorption of CO2 by alginate immobilized zeolite <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Suratman, A.; Kunarti, E. S.; Aprilita, N. H.; Pamurtya, I. C.</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Immobilized zeolit in alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> for adsorption of CO2 was developed. Alginate immobilized zeolit <span class="hlt">beads</span> was generated by dropping the mixture of Na-alginate and zeolite solution into Ca2+ solution. The adsorption efficacy such as the influence of contact time, mass of zeolite, flowrate of CO2, and mass of adsorbent was evaluated. The adsorption of CO2 onto alginate immobilized zeolit <span class="hlt">beads</span> was investigated by performing both equilibrium and kinetic batch test. <span class="hlt">Bead</span> was characterized by FTIR and SEM. Alginate immobilized zeolit <span class="hlt">beads</span> demonstrated significantly higher sorption efficacy compared to plain alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> and zeolite with 0.25 mmol CO2 adsorbed /g adsorbent. Optimum condition was achieved with mass composition of alginate:zeolite (3:1), flowrate 50 mL/min for 20 minutes. The alginate immobilized zeolit <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed that adsorption of CO2 followed Freundlich isotherm and pseudo second order kinetic model. Adsorption of CO2 onto alginate immobilized zeolite <span class="hlt">beads</span> is a physisorption with adsorption energy of 6.37 kJ/mol. This results indicates that the alginate immobilized zeolit <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be used as promising adsorbents for CO2.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5235511','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5235511"><span>Tempered <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bunnell, L.R.</p> <p>1991-11-01</p> <p>This document describes a demonstration for making tempered <span class="hlt">glass</span> using minimal equipment. The demonstration is intended for a typical student of materials science, at the high school level or above. (JL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15638475','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15638475"><span>ROMPgel <span class="hlt">beads</span> in IRORI format: acylations revisited.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Roberts, Richard S</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Functionalized "designer" polymers derived from ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMPgels) are attractive for their high loading, high purity, and ease of synthesis. Their physical state may vary from liquid to gel to granular solid, making a general method of handling these polymers difficult. By incorporating a suitable norbornene-substituted linker on standard Wang <span class="hlt">beads</span>, ROMPgels can be easily grafted onto the resin, adding the convenience of a <span class="hlt">bead</span> format while still maintaining the high loading and excellent site accessibility. This advantage is demonstrated by the use of an N-hydroxysuccinimide ROMPgel (3.3 mmol g(-1), a 3-fold increase from the parent linker resin) in IRORI Kan format. Conditions for the acylation of these IRORI-formatted ROMPgels are reported, along with the scope and limitations of the choice of acylating reagents. Yields are greatly improved by the use of perfluorinated solvents as a nonparticipating cosolvent in the acylation process. A simple titration method for the quantification of the acylated ROMPgels is also reported. Spent Kans are regenerated after each use without apparent loss of activity or purity after several cycles. Due to the high loading and reduced swelling of the ROMPgel resin, up to 0.39 mmol acyl group has successfully been recovered from a single IRORI miniKan, demonstrating the high capacity of the resin and applicability to both lead discovery and optimization programs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140012598','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140012598"><span>Vesicles in Apollo 15 Green <span class="hlt">Glasses</span>: The Nature of Ancient Lunar Gases</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Berger, E. L.; Rahman, Z.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Detailed studies of Apollo 15 green <span class="hlt">glass</span> and related <span class="hlt">beads</span> have shown they were formed in gas-rich fire fountains.. As the magmatic fluid became super-saturated in volatile gas, bubbles or vesicles formed within the magma. These exsolved gases became trapped within vesicles as the <span class="hlt">glasses</span> were ejected from the fire-fountain and subsequently quenched. One of the keys to understanding formation processes on the ancient moon includes determining the composition of volatile species and elements, including metals, dissolved in magmatic gases. Here we report the nature of mineral phases spatially associated with vesicles in a green <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> from Apollo sample 15411,42. The phases reflect the composition of the cooling/degassing magmatic vapors and fluids present at the time of <span class="hlt">bead</span> formation approx, 3 Ga ago</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28188808','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28188808"><span>Characterization of a novel intrinsically radiopaque Drug-eluting <span class="hlt">Bead</span> for image-guided therapy: DC <span class="hlt">Bead</span> LUMI™.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ashrafi, Koorosh; Tang, Yiqing; Britton, Hugh; Domenge, Orianne; Blino, Delphine; Bushby, Andrew J; Shuturminska, Kseniya; den Hartog, Mark; Radaelli, Alessandro; Negussie, Ayele H; Mikhail, Andrew S; Woods, David L; Krishnasamy, Venkatesh; Levy, Elliot B; Wood, Bradford J; Willis, Sean L; Dreher, Matthew R; Lewis, Andrew L</p> <p>2017-03-28</p> <p>We have developed a straightforward and efficient method of introducing radiopacity into Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> (DC Bead™) that are currently used in the clinic to treat liver malignancies. Coupling of 2,3,5-triiodobenzaldehyde to the PVA backbone of pre-formed <span class="hlt">beads</span> yields a uniformly distributed level of iodine attached throughout the <span class="hlt">bead</span> structure (~150mg/mL) which is sufficient to be imaged under standard fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities used in treatment procedures (DC <span class="hlt">Bead</span> LUMI™). Despite the chemical modification increasing the density of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> to ~1.3g/cm(3) and the compressive modulus by two orders of magnitude, they remain easily suspended, handled and administered through standard microcatheters. As the core chemistry of DC <span class="hlt">Bead</span> LUMI™ is the same as DC Bead™, it interacts with drugs using ion-exchange between sulfonic acid groups on the polymer and the positively charged amine groups of the drugs. Both doxorubicin (Dox) and irinotecan (Iri) elution kinetics for all <span class="hlt">bead</span> sizes evaluated were within the parameters already investigated within the clinic for DC Bead™. Drug loading did not affect the radiopacity and there was a direct relationship between <span class="hlt">bead</span> attenuation and Dox concentration. The ability (Dox)-loaded DC <span class="hlt">Bead</span> LUMI™ to be visualized in vivo was demonstrated by the administration of into hepatic arteries of a VX2 tumor-bearing rabbit under fluoroscopy, followed by subsequent CT imaging.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1011358.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1011358.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span> Collage: An Arts-Based Research Method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kay, Lisa</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, "<span class="hlt">bead</span> collage," an arts-based research method that invites participants to reflect, communicate and construct their experience through the manipulation of <span class="hlt">beads</span> and found objects is explained. Emphasizing the significance of one's personal biography and experiences as a researcher, I discuss how my background as an…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19670000023','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19670000023"><span>Tests show that aluminum welds are improved by <span class="hlt">bead</span> removal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hood, D. W.</p> <p>1967-01-01</p> <p>Tests with 2218-T87 aluminum alloy plate indicate improvements in strength, ductility, fatigue properties, and burst pressure result when one or both of the top and bottom weld <span class="hlt">beads</span> are removed. There is, however, a drop in yield strength. The consistency of test data is considerably improved by weld <span class="hlt">bead</span> removal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874932','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874932"><span>Method for preparing spherical ferrite <span class="hlt">beads</span> and use thereof</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Collins, Jack L.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The invention allows the fabrication of small, dense, highly polished spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span> of hexagonal ferrites with selected compositions for use in nonreciprocal microwave and mm-wave devices as well as in microwave absorbent or reflective coatings, composites, and the like. A porous, generally spherical <span class="hlt">bead</span> of hydrous iron oxide is made by a sol-gel process to form a substantially rigid <span class="hlt">bead</span> having a generally fine crystallite size and correspondingly finely distributed internal porosity. The resulting gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> is washed and hydrothermally reacted with a soluble alkaline earth salt (typically Ba or Sr) under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure to convert the <span class="hlt">bead</span> into a mixed hydrous iron-alkaline earth oxide while retaining the generally spherical shape. This mixed oxide <span class="hlt">bead</span> is then washed, dried, and calcined to produce the desired (BaFe.sub.12 O.sub.19 or SrFe.sub.12 O.sub.19) crystal structure. The calcined <span class="hlt">bead</span> is then sintered to form a dense <span class="hlt">bead</span> of the BaFe.sub.12 O.sub.19 and SrFe.sub.12 O.sub.19 phase suitable for polishing and incorporation into various microwave devices and components.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19901555','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19901555"><span>Artificial induction of autophagy around polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> in nonphagocytic cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kobayashi, Shouhei; Kojidani, Tomoko; Osakada, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Autophagy is an intracellular event that acts as an innate cellular defense mechanism to kill invading bacteria such as group A Streptococcus in nonphagocytic epithelial-like cells. The cellular events underlying autophagosome formation upon bacterial invasion remain unclear due to the biochemical complexity associated with uncharacterized bacterial components, and the difficulty of predicting the location as well as the timing of where/when autophagosome formation will take place. To overcome these problems, we monitored autophagosome formation in living nonphagocytic cells by inducing autophagy around artificial micrometer-sized <span class="hlt">beads</span> instead of bacteria. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> conjugated with bio-reactive molecules provide a powerful tool for examining biochemical properties in vitro. However, this technique has not been applied to living cells, except for phagocytes, because the <span class="hlt">beads</span> cannot be easily incorporated into nonphagocytic cells. Here we report that micrometer-sized polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with transfection reagents containing cationic lipids can be incorporated into nonphagocytic cells, and that autophagy can be efficiently induced around the <span class="hlt">beads</span> in these cells. Monitoring the process of autophagosome formation for pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (pHrodo)-conjugated <span class="hlt">beads</span> by fluorescence live cell imaging combined with correlative light and electron microscopy, we found that autophagosomes are formed around the <span class="hlt">beads</span> after partial breakdown of the endosomal membrane. In addition, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were subsequently transferred to lysosomes within a couple of hours. Our findings demonstrate the cellular responses that lead to autophagy in response to pathogen invasion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Scavengers&pg=6&id=EJ445266','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Scavengers&pg=6&id=EJ445266"><span>Activities to Grow On: Buttons, <span class="hlt">Beads</span>, and Beans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gonzolis, Amy; And Others</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Presents new ideas for using buttons, beans, and <span class="hlt">beads</span> as teaching manipulatives for elementary school children. The ideas include a button scavenger hunt, a button count, a cup puppet bean game, a numbers guessing game with beans in jars, and a <span class="hlt">bead</span> stringing activity. (SM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27481656','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27481656"><span>Nanofibrous polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span> from aramid fibers for efficient bilirubin removal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Luo, Jiyue; Nie, Chuanxiong; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Zhao, Changsheng</p> <p>2016-08-16</p> <p>Polymer based hemoperfusion has been developed as an effective therapy to remove the extra bilirubin from patients. However, the currently applied materials suffer from either low removal efficiency or poor blood compatibility. In this study, we report the development of a new class of nanofibrous absorbent that exhibited high bilirubin removal efficiency and good blood compatibility. The Kevlar nanofiber was prepared by dissolving micron-sized Kevlar fiber in proper solvent, and the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by dropping Kevlar nanofiber solutions into ethanol. Owing to the nanofiborous structure of the Kevlar nanofiber, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> displayed porous structures and large specific areas, which would facilitate the adsorption of toxins. In the adsorption test, it was noticed that the <span class="hlt">beads</span> possessed an adsorption capacity higher than 40 mg g(-1) towards bilirubin. In plasma mimetic solutions, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> still showed high bilirubin removal efficiency. Furthermore, after incorporating with carbon nanotubes, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were found to have increased adsorption capacity for human degradation waste. Moreover, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed excellent blood compatibility in terms of a low hemolysis ratio, prolonged clotting times, suppressed coagulant activation, limited platelet activation, and inhibited blood related inflammatory activation. Additionally, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed good compatibility with endothelial cells. In general, the Kevlar nanofiber <span class="hlt">beads</span>, which integrated with high adsorption capacity, good blood compatibility and low cytotoxicity, may have great potential for hemoperfusion and some other applications in biomedical fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.4966..146L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.4966..146L"><span>Self-encoding resin <span class="hlt">beads</span> of combinatorial library screening</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lei, Du; Zhao, Yuandi; Cheng, Tongsheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming</p> <p>2003-07-01</p> <p>The latest self-encoding resin <span class="hlt">bead</span> is a novel technology for solid phase synthesis combinatorial library screening. A new encode-positional deconvolution strategy which was based on that technology been illustrated compared with positional scanning and iterative strategies. The self-encoding resin <span class="hlt">beads</span> technology provides an efficient method for improving the high-throughput screening of combinatorial library.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20978654','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20978654"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span> magnetorelaxometry with an on-chip magnetoresistive sensor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Donolato, Marco; Strømme, Maria; Strömberg, Mattias; Svedlindh, Peter; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt</p> <p>2011-01-21</p> <p>Magnetorelaxometry measurements on suspensions of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> are demonstrated using a planar Hall effect sensor chip embedded in a microfluidic system. The alternating magnetic field used for magnetizing the <span class="hlt">beads</span> is provided by the sensor bias current and the complex magnetic susceptibility spectra are recorded as the 2nd harmonic of the sensor response. The complex magnetic susceptibility signal appears when a magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> suspension is injected, it scales with the <span class="hlt">bead</span> concentration, and it follows the Cole-Cole expression for Brownian relaxation. The complex magnetic susceptibility signal resembles that from conventional magnetorelaxometry done on the same samples apart from an offset in Brownian relaxation frequency. The time dependence of the signal can be rationalized as originating from sedimented <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24854245','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24854245"><span>Incorporation of pyrene in polypyrrole/polystyrene magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Głowala, Paulina; Budniak, Adam; Krug, Pamela; Wysocka, Barbara; Berbeć, Sylwia; Dec, Robert; Dołęga, Izabela; Kacprzak, Kamil; Wojciechowski, Jarosław; Kawałko, Jakub; Kępka, Paweł; Kępińska, Daria; Kijewska, Krystyna; Mazur, Maciej</p> <p>2014-10-15</p> <p>Pyrene, a fluorescent dye, was incorporated into polystyrene particles coated with polypyrrole. The incorporation was achieved by treating the polypyrrole/polystyrene (PPy/PS) <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of the pyrene fluorophore followed by rinsing with methanol. The polystyrene cores of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> swell in THF, allowing penetration of pyrene molecules into the polystyrene structure. The addition of methanol causes contraction of the swollen polystyrene, which encapsulates the dye molecules inside the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. It is shown that the polypyrrole coating is permeable with respect to both the dye and the solvent, allowing the transport of molecules between the polystyrene cores and the contacting solution. The polypyrrole adlayer can be used as a matrix for the incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles. Embedded particles provide magnetic functionality to the PPy/PS <span class="hlt">beads</span>. It is demonstrated that the pyrene-loaded <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be manipulated with an external magnetic field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24123479','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24123479"><span>Hollow polydimethylsiloxane <span class="hlt">beads</span> with a porous structure for cell encapsulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oh, Myeong-Jin; Ryu, Tae-Kyoung; Choi, S-W</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>Based on a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion system, porous and hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing cells using a simple fluidic device with three flow channels are fabricated. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in the PDMS oil phase is served as a porogen for pore development. The feasibility of the porous PDMS <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared with different PEG concentrations (10, 20, and 30 wt%) for cell encapsulation in terms of pore size, protein diffusion, and cell proliferation inside the PDMS <span class="hlt">beads</span> is evaluated. The PDMS <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared with PEG 30 wt% are exhibited a highly porous structure and facilitated fast diffusion of protein from the core domain to the outer phase, eventually leading to enhanced cell proliferation. The results clearly indicate that hollow PDMS <span class="hlt">beads</span> with a porous structure could provide a favorable microenvironment for cell survival due to the large porous structure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983043','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983043"><span>Switchable cell trapping using superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bryan, M. T.; Smith, K. H.; Real, M. E.; Bashir, M. A.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Schrefl, T.; Allwood, D. A.; Haycock, J. W.</p> <p>2010-04-30</p> <p>Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} microwires are investigated as the basis of a switchable template for positioning magnetically-labeled neural Schwann cells. Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy and micromagnetic modeling show that magnetic domain walls can be created or removed in zigzagged structures by an applied magnetic field. Schwann cells containing superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> are trapped by the field emanating from the domain walls. The design allows Schwann cells to be organized on a surface to form a connected network and then released from the surface if required. As aligned Schwann cells can guide nerve regeneration, this technique is of value for developing glial-neuronal co-culture models in the future treatment of peripheral nerve injuries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23488896','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23488896"><span>Immobilized OBOC combinatorial <span class="hlt">bead</span> array to facilitate multiplicative screening.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xiao, Wenwu; Bononi, Fernanda C; Townsend, Jared; Li, Yuanpei; Liu, Ruiwu; Lam, Kit S</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>One-<span class="hlt">bead</span>-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library screening has been broadly utilized for the last two decades to identify small molecules, peptides or peptidomimetics targeting variable screening probes such as cell surface receptors, bacteria, protein kinases, phosphatases, proteases etc. In previous screening methods, library <span class="hlt">beads</span> were suspended in solution and screened against one single probe. Only the positive <span class="hlt">beads</span> were tracked and isolated for additional screens and finally selected for chemical decoding. During this process, the remaining negative <span class="hlt">beads</span> were not tracked and discarded. Here we report a novel <span class="hlt">bead</span> immobilization method such that a <span class="hlt">bead</span> library array can be conveniently prepared and screened in its entirety, sequentially many times with a series of distinct probes. This method not only allows us to increase the screening efficiency but also permits us to determine the binding profile of each and every library <span class="hlt">bead</span> against a large number of target receptors. As proof of concept, we serially screened a random OBOC disulfide containing cyclic heptapeptide library with three water soluble dyes as model probes: malachite green, bromocresol purple and indigo carmine. This multiplicative screening approach resulted in a rapid determination of the binding profile of each and every <span class="hlt">bead</span> respective to each of the three dyes. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> that interacted with malachite green only, bromocresol purple only, or both indigo carmine and bromocresol purple were isolated, and their peptide sequences were determined with microsequencer. Ultimately, the novel OBOC multiplicative screening approach could play a key role in the enhancement of existing on-<span class="hlt">bead</span> assays such as whole cell binding, bacteria binding, protein binding, posttranslational modifications etc. with increased efficiency, capacity, and specificity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25063138','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25063138"><span>TiO₂ <span class="hlt">beads</span> and TiO₂-chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span> for urease immobilization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ispirli Doğaç, Yasemin; Deveci, Ilyas; Teke, Mustafa; Mercimek, Bedrettin</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>The aim of the present study is to synthesize TiO2 <span class="hlt">beads</span> for urease immobilization. Two different strategies were used to immobilize the urease on TiO2 <span class="hlt">beads</span>. In the first method (A), urease enzyme was immobilized onto TiO2 <span class="hlt">beads</span> by adsorption and then crosslinking. In the second method (B), TiO2 <span class="hlt">beads</span> were coated with chitosan-urease mixture. To determine optimum conditions of immobilization, different parameters were investigated. The parameters of optimization were initial enzyme concentration (0.5; 1; 1.5; 2mg/ml), alginate concentration (1; 2; 3%), glutaraldehyde concentration (1; 2; 3% v/v) and chitosan concentration (2; 3; 4 mg/ml). The optimum enzyme concentrations were determined as 1.5mg/ml for A and 1.0mg/ml for B. The other optimum conditions were found 2.0% (w/v) for alginate concentration (both A and B); 3.0mg/ml for chitosan concentration (B) and 2.0% (v/v) for glutaraldehyde concentration (A). The optimum temperature (20-60°C), optimum pH (3.0-10.0), kinetic parameters, thermal stability (4-70°C), pH stability (4.0-9.0), operational stability (0-230 min) and reusability (20 times) were investigated for characterization. The optimum temperatures were 30°C (A), 40°C (B) and 35°C (soluble). The temperature profiles of the immobilized ureases were spread over a large area. The optimum pH values for the soluble urease and immobilized urease prepared by using methods (A) and (B) were found to be 7.5, 7.0, 7.0, respectively. The thermal stabilities of immobilized enzyme sets were studied and they maintained 50% activity at 65°C. However, at this temperature free urease protected only 15% activity.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=eyes+AND+anatomy&pg=2&id=EJ860215','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=eyes+AND+anatomy&pg=2&id=EJ860215"><span>Pinhole <span class="hlt">Glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Colicchia, Giuseppe; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Eye aberrations are commonly corrected by lenses that restore vision by altering rays before they pass through the cornea. Some modern promoters claim that pinhole <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are better than conventional lenses in correcting all kinds of refractive defects such as myopia (nearsighted), hyperopia (farsighted), astigmatisms, and presbyopia. Do pinhole…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19863487','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19863487"><span>Formulation of controlled release gellan gum macro <span class="hlt">beads</span> of amoxicillin.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Babu, R Jayachandra; Sathigari, Sateesh; Kumar, M Thilek; Pandit, J K</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Gellan gum has been reported to have wide pharmaceutical applications such as tablet binder, disintegrant, gelling agent and as a controlled release polymer. Multiparticulate delivery systems spread out more uniformly in the gastrointestinal tract and reduce the local irritation. The purpose of this study is to explore possible applicability of gellan macro <span class="hlt">beads</span> as an oral controlled release system of a sparingly soluble drug, amoxicillin. Gellan gum <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by ionotropic gelation with calcium ions. The effect of drug loading, stirring time, polymer concentration, electrolyte (CaCl2) concentration, curing time etc. influencing the preparation of the gellan gum macro <span class="hlt">beads</span> and the drug release from gellan gum <span class="hlt">beads</span> were investigated in this study. Optimal preparation conditions allowed very high incorporation efficiency for amoxicillin (91%) The release kinetics of amoxicillin from gellan <span class="hlt">beads</span> followed the diffusion model for an inert porous matrix in the order: 0.1 N HCl > phosphate buffer > distilled water. Change in curing time did not significantly affect the release rate constant, but drug concentration, polymer concentration and electrolyte concentration significantly affect the release rate of amoxicillin from the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The gellan macro <span class="hlt">beads</span> may be suitable for gastro retentive controlled delivery of amoxicillin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NIMPB.311...53S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NIMPB.311...53S"><span>Analysis of <span class="hlt">glass</span> from the post-Roman settlement Tonovcov grad (Slovenia) by PIXE-PIGE and LA-ICP-MS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Šmit, Ž.; Milavec, T.; Fajfar, H.; Rehren, Th.; Lankton, J. W.; Gratuze, B.</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>The combined PIXE-PIGE method was used for the analysis of 43 <span class="hlt">glass</span> fragments from the archaeological site Tonovcov grad in western Slovenia, with 10 of these additionally being analysed by LA-ICP-MS. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> objects were attributed to the Late Antique production of the 4th-7th c. AD, with two examples of early Roman <span class="hlt">glass</span> and three <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, one of them presumably of oriental origin. The analysis showed typical natron-type <span class="hlt">glass</span>, produced in the Levantine region around the river Belus, and a few examples of HIMT <span class="hlt">glass</span>, which could be recognized also in several other recycled objects. Only one <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span>, found in Early Medieval context, was made of the ash of halophytic plants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10148510','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10148510"><span>K Basin sludge/resin <span class="hlt">bead</span> separation test report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Squier, D.M.</p> <p>1998-08-25</p> <p>The K Basin sludge is an accumulation of fuel element corrosion products, organic and inorganic ion exchange materials, canister gasket materials, iron and aluminum corrosion products, sand, dirt and minor amounts of other organic material. The sludge will be collected and treated for storage and eventual disposal. This process will remove the large solid materials by a 1/4 inch screen. The screened material will be subjected to nitric acid in a chemical treatment process. The organic ion exchange resin <span class="hlt">beads</span> produce undesirable chemical reactions with the nitric acid. The resin <span class="hlt">beads</span> must be removed from the bulk material and treated by another process. An effective <span class="hlt">bead</span> separation method must extract 95% of the resin <span class="hlt">bead</span> mass without entraining more than 5% of the other sludge component mass. The test plan I-INF-2729, ``Organic Ion Exchange Resin Separation Methods Evaluation,`` proposed the evaluation of air lift, hydro cyclone, agitated slurry and elutriation resin <span class="hlt">bead</span> separation methods. This follows the testing strategy outlined in section 4.1 of BNF-2574, ``Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process``. Engineering study BNF-3128, ``Separation of Organic Ion Exchange Resins from Sludge,`` Rev. 0, focused the evaluation tests on a method that removed the fine sludge particles by a sieve and then extracted the <span class="hlt">beads</span> by means of a elutriation column. Ninety-nine percent of the resin <span class="hlt">beads</span> are larger than 125 microns and 98.5 percent are 300 microns and larger. Particles smaller than 125 microns make up the largest portion of sludge in the K Basins. Eliminating a large part of the sludge`s non-<span class="hlt">bead</span> component will reduce the quantity that is lifted with the resin <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the elutriation column. Resin <span class="hlt">bead</span> particle size distribution measurements are given in Appendix A The Engineering Testing Laboratory conducted measurements of a elutriation column`s ability to extract resin <span class="hlt">beads</span> from a sieved, non-radioactive sludge</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MApFl...1a7001H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MApFl...1a7001H"><span>A two-channel detection method for autofluorescence correction and efficient on-<span class="hlt">bead</span> screening of one-<span class="hlt">bead</span> one-compound combinatorial libraries using the COPAS fluorescence activated <span class="hlt">bead</span> sorting system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hintersteiner, Martin; Auer, Manfred</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>One-<span class="hlt">bead</span> one-compound combinatorial library <span class="hlt">beads</span> exhibit varying levels of autofluorescence after solid phase combinatorial synthesis. Very often this causes significant problems for automated on-<span class="hlt">bead</span> screening using TentaGel <span class="hlt">beads</span> and fluorescently labeled target proteins. Herein, we present a method to overcome this limitation when fluorescence activated <span class="hlt">bead</span> sorting is used as the screening method. We have equipped the COPAS <span class="hlt">bead</span> sorting instrument with a high-speed profiling unit and developed a spectral autofluorescence correction method. The correction method is based on a simple algebraic operation using the fluorescence data from two detection channels and is applied on-the-fly in order to reliably identify hit <span class="hlt">beads</span> by COPAS <span class="hlt">bead</span> sorting. Our method provides a practical tool for the fast and efficient isolation of hit <span class="hlt">beads</span> from one-<span class="hlt">bead</span> one-compound library screens using either fluorescently labeled target proteins or biotinylated target proteins. This method makes hit <span class="hlt">bead</span> identification easier and more reliable. It reduces false positives and eliminates the need for time-consuming pre-sorting of library <span class="hlt">beads</span> in order to remove autofluorescent <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940016285&hterms=Peridotite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DPeridotite','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940016285&hterms=Peridotite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DPeridotite"><span>Basaltic magmatism on the Moon. A perspective from volcanic picritic <span class="hlt">glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>It is widely accepted that basaltic magmas are products of partial fusion of peridotite within planetary mantles. As such they provide valuable insights into the structure and processes of planetary interiors. Those compositions which approach primary melt compositions provide both a clearer vision of planetary interiors and a starting point at which to understand basaltic evolution. Within the collection of lunar samples returned by the Apollo and Luna missions are homogeneous, picritic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> of volcanic origin. These <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> provide a unique perspective concerning the origin of mare basalts, the characteristics of the lunar interior, and processes culminating in the early differentiation of the moon. In this presentation, we report our ion microprobe derived trace element data from all picritic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> previously identified. We place this trace element data and literature isotopic and experimental data on the picritic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> with the framework of mare basaltic magmatism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4299378','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4299378"><span>Ultrasensitive proteome analysis using paramagnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hughes, Christopher S; Foehr, Sophia; Garfield, David A; Furlong, Eileen E; Steinmetz, Lars M; Krijgsveld, Jeroen</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In order to obtain a systems-level understanding of a complex biological system, detailed proteome information is essential. Despite great progress in proteomics technologies, thorough interrogation of the proteome from quantity-limited biological samples is hampered by inefficiencies during processing. To address these challenges, here we introduce a novel protocol using paramagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>, termed Single-Pot Solid-Phase-enhanced Sample Preparation (SP3). SP3 provides a rapid and unbiased means of proteomic sample preparation in a single tube that facilitates ultrasensitive analysis by outperforming existing protocols in terms of efficiency, scalability, speed, throughput, and flexibility. To illustrate these benefits, characterization of 1,000 HeLa cells and single Drosophila embryos is used to establish that SP3 provides an enhanced platform for profiling proteomes derived from sub-microgram amounts of material. These data present a first view of developmental stage-specific proteome dynamics in Drosophila at a single-embryo resolution, permitting characterization of inter-individual expression variation. Together, the findings of this work position SP3 as a superior protocol that facilitates exciting new directions in multiple areas of proteomics ranging from developmental biology to clinical applications. PMID:25358341</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4912112','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4912112"><span>The <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Assay for Biofilms: A Quick, Easy and Robust Method for Testing Disinfectants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Konrat, Katharina; Schwebke, Ingeborg; Laue, Michael; Dittmann, Christin; Levin, Katja; Andrich, Ricarda; Arvand, Mardjan; Schaudinn, Christoph</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Bacteria live primarily in microbial communities (biofilms), where they exhibit considerably higher biocide tolerance than their planktonic counterparts. Current standardized efficacy testing protocols of disinfectants, however, employ predominantly planktonic bacteria. In order to test the efficacy of biocides on biofilms in a standardized manner, a new assay was developed and optimized for easy-handling, quickness, low running costs, and above all—repeatability. In this assay, 5 mm <span class="hlt">glass</span>- or polytetrafluoroethylene <span class="hlt">beads</span> in 24 well microtiter plates served as substrate for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. After optimizing result-relevant steps, the actual performance of the assay was explored by treating P. aeruginosa biofilms with glutaraldehyde, isopropanol, or peracetic acid in predefined concentrations. The aspired 5 log10 reduction in CFU counts was achieved by glutaraldehyde at 5% (30 min), and by peracetic acid at 0.3% (10 min). In contrast, 80% isopropanol (30 min) failed to meet the reduction goal. However, the main accomplishment of this study was to unveil the potential of the array itself; most noteworthy here, a reliable repeatability of the results. The new <span class="hlt">bead</span> assay for biofilms is a robust, quick and cost-effective method for assessing the efficacy of biocides against biofilms. PMID:27315246</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA091641','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA091641"><span>Electrochromic <span class="hlt">Glasses</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1980-07-31</p> <p>Li20-B203 and Na20-B203 or Te02 . These <span class="hlt">glasses</span> exhibit for the first time, electrochromic and photochromic behaviour and have potential for use in...the complete spectral distribution of the absorption at levels of 10- cm- I for the first time. In the past, it was only possible to measure low...distribution of the absorption at levels at 10 -cm it was possible, for the first time, to identify extrinsic impurities in highly transparent solids. This</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960021852&hterms=Cutting+tools&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DCutting%2Btools','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960021852&hterms=Cutting+tools&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DCutting%2Btools"><span>More About Cutting Tool For Shaving Weld <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Oelgoetz, Peter A.; Davis, William M.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Report describes modification and testing of proposed tool discussed in "Cutting Tool For Shaving Weld <span class="hlt">Beads</span>" (MFS-30056). Modified version of commercial pneumatically driven rotary cutting tool removes such hard metals as nickel alloys, titanium, and stainless steels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ct0090.photos.025004p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ct0090.photos.025004p/"><span>8. INTERIOR <span class="hlt">BEADED</span> WALL BOARDING SHOWING TRIAL MARKS FROM DIES ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>8. INTERIOR <span class="hlt">BEADED</span> WALL BOARDING SHOWING TRIAL MARKS FROM DIES MADE IN CARPENTER'S SHOP Ph: Jack E, Boucher - March 1961 - Joseph Carpenter Silversmith Shop, 71 East Town Street, Norwichtown, New London County, CT</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyB..435...21G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyB..435...21G"><span>Guided self-assembly of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> for biomedical applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gusenbauer, Markus; Nguyen, Ha; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Fischbacher, Johann; Özelt, Harald; Kovacs, Alexander; Brandl, Martin; Schrefl, Thomas</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Micromagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> are widely used in biomedical applications for cell separation, drug delivery, and hyperthermia cancer treatment. Here we propose to use self-organized magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> structures which accumulate on fixed magnetic seeding points to isolate circulating tumor cells. The analysis of circulating tumor cells is an emerging tool for cancer biology research and clinical cancer management including the detection, diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. Microfluidic chips for isolating circulating tumor cells use either affinity, size or density capturing methods. We combine multiphysics simulation techniques to understand the microscopic behavior of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> interacting with soft magnetic accumulation points used in lab-on-chip technologies. Our proposed chip technology offers the possibility to combine affinity and size capturing with special antibody-coated <span class="hlt">bead</span> arrangements using a magnetic gradient field created by Neodymium Iron Boron permanent magnets. The multiscale simulation environment combines magnetic field computation, fluid dynamics and discrete particle dynamics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca2462.photos.316009p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca2462.photos.316009p/"><span>7. Detail, <span class="hlt">beaded</span> mortar joint, stepped wingwall coping at the ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>7. Detail, <span class="hlt">beaded</span> mortar joint, stepped wingwall coping at the east portal of Tunnel 18, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel No. 18, Milepost 410, Dorris, Siskiyou County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5102181','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5102181"><span>Couple <span class="hlt">Beads</span>: An integrated method of natural family planning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mulcaire-Jones, George; Fehring, Richard J.; Bradshaw, Megan; Brower, Karen; Lubega, Gonzaga; Lubega, Paskazia</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Various fertility indicators are used by natural family planning methods to identify the fertile and infertile phases of a woman's menstrual cycle: mucus observations, cycle-day probabilities, basal body temperature readings, and hormonal measures of LH and estrogen. Simplified NFP methods generally make use of a single fertility indicator such as cycle-day probabilities (Standard Days Method) or mucus observations (Billings Ovulation Method). The Couple <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Method integrates the two simplest fertility indicators, cycle-day probabilities and mucus observations, expanding its applicability to all women, regardless of cycle regularity and length. In determining cycle-day probabilities, the Couple <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Method relies on a new data set from ultrasound-derived determinants of gestational age that more directly define the day of conception and the fertile window. By using a visual-based system of inexpensive colored <span class="hlt">beads</span>, the Couple <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Method can be used by couples of all educational and income levels. Lay Summary: Natural family planning methods provide education in regard to the signs of a woman's body which indicate if she is possibly fertile or not. Two important signs are the day of her menstrual cycle and her observations of bleeding and cervical mucus or dryness. The Couple <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Method teaches a couple how to observe these signs and chart them with a system of colored <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The Couple <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Method can be used by women with regular or irregular cycles. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> sets are inexpensive and consist of a length of plastic cord, colored “pony beads” and safety pins. PMID:27833183</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17010044','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17010044"><span>Application of paramagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> for purifying Bacillus anthracis protective antigen.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zarzecka, A; Bartoszcze, M</p> <p>2006-10-01</p> <p>Paramagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with Protein G and Tosylactivated-280 dynabeads have been used to purify Bacillus anthracis protective antigen from a liquid culture. The obtained protein was used in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test to detect B. anthracis protective antigen antibodies in human sera collected from immunized individuals. The purification method using paramagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> is very effective. It is fast, easy and may be carried out practically in any laboratory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94b0501P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94b0501P"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span>-rod-spring models in random flows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Plan, Emmanuel Lance Christopher Medillo, VI; Ali, Aamir; Vincenzi, Dario</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Bead</span>-rod-spring models are the foundation of the kinetic theory of polymer solutions. We derive the diffusion equation for the probability density function of the configuration of a general <span class="hlt">bead</span>-rod-spring model in short-correlated Gaussian random flows. Under isotropic conditions, we solve this equation analytically for the elastic rhombus model introduced by Curtiss, Bird, and Hassager [Adv. Chem. Phys. 35, 31 (1976)].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AcSpA..83..231W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AcSpA..83..231W"><span>Raman spectroscopic study on archaeological <span class="hlt">glasses</span> in Thailand: Ancient Thai <span class="hlt">Glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Won-in, K.; Thongkam, Y.; Pongkrapan, S.; Intarasiri, S.; Thongleurm, C.; Kamwanna, T.; Leelawathanasuk, T.; Dararutana, P.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glasses</span> have been used as ornamental and decorative objects in Thailand for several hundred years as seen in archaeological artifacts, such as <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> found throughout the regions. Decorative <span class="hlt">glasses</span> can generally be seen as architectural components in Buddhist temples and old-styled palaces. They came in various colors ranging from transparent to amber, blue, green and red of different shades and tones. Fragments of archaeological <span class="hlt">glass</span> samples were characterized for the first time using Raman spectrophotometer with the aim of obtaining information that would lead to the identification of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> samples by means of laser scattering. The samples were also investigated using other techniques, such as proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy cooperated with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and synchrotron radiation to induced X-ray fluorescence. The results showed that they were mostly lead-silica based <span class="hlt">glasses</span> whose colors were induced by metal ions. The differences in chemical compositions were confirmed by Raman signature spectra.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21945350','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21945350"><span>Raman spectroscopic study on archaeological <span class="hlt">glasses</span> in Thailand: ancient Thai <span class="hlt">glass</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Won-in, K; Thongkam, Y; Pongkrapan, S; Intarasiri, S; Thongleurm, C; Kamwanna, T; Leelawathanasuk, T; Dararutana, P</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glasses</span> have been used as ornamental and decorative objects in Thailand for several hundred years as seen in archaeological artifacts, such as <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> found throughout the regions. Decorative <span class="hlt">glasses</span> can generally be seen as architectural components in Buddhist temples and old-styled palaces. They came in various colors ranging from transparent to amber, blue, green and red of different shades and tones. Fragments of archaeological <span class="hlt">glass</span> samples were characterized for the first time using Raman spectrophotometer with the aim of obtaining information that would lead to the identification of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> samples by means of laser scattering. The samples were also investigated using other techniques, such as proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy cooperated with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and synchrotron radiation to induced X-ray fluorescence. The results showed that they were mostly lead-silica based <span class="hlt">glasses</span> whose colors were induced by metal ions. The differences in chemical compositions were confirmed by Raman signature spectra.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4619777','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4619777"><span>Configurational Statistics of Magnetic <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Detection with Magnetoresistive Sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Magnetic biosensors detect magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> that, mediated by a target, have bound to a functionalized area. This area is often larger than the area of the sensor. Both the sign and magnitude of the average magnetic field experienced by the sensor from a magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> depends on the location of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> relative to the sensor. Consequently, the signal from multiple <span class="hlt">beads</span> also depends on their locations. Thus, a given coverage of the functionalized area with magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> does not result in a given detector response, except on the average, over many realizations of the same coverage. We present a systematic theoretical analysis of how this location-dependence affects the sensor response. The analysis is done for <span class="hlt">beads</span> magnetized by a homogeneous in-plane magnetic field. We determine the expected value and standard deviation of the sensor response for a given coverage, as well as the accuracy and precision with which the coverage can be determined from a single sensor measurement. We show that statistical fluctuations between samples may reduce the sensitivity and dynamic range of a sensor significantly when the functionalized area is larger than the sensor area. Hence, the statistics of sampling is essential to sensor design. For illustration, we analyze three important published cases for which statistical fluctuations are dominant, significant, and insignificant, respectively. PMID:26496495</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26496495','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26496495"><span>Configurational Statistics of Magnetic <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Detection with Magnetoresistive Sensors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Magnetic biosensors detect magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> that, mediated by a target, have bound to a functionalized area. This area is often larger than the area of the sensor. Both the sign and magnitude of the average magnetic field experienced by the sensor from a magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> depends on the location of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> relative to the sensor. Consequently, the signal from multiple <span class="hlt">beads</span> also depends on their locations. Thus, a given coverage of the functionalized area with magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> does not result in a given detector response, except on the average, over many realizations of the same coverage. We present a systematic theoretical analysis of how this location-dependence affects the sensor response. The analysis is done for <span class="hlt">beads</span> magnetized by a homogeneous in-plane magnetic field. We determine the expected value and standard deviation of the sensor response for a given coverage, as well as the accuracy and precision with which the coverage can be determined from a single sensor measurement. We show that statistical fluctuations between samples may reduce the sensitivity and dynamic range of a sensor significantly when the functionalized area is larger than the sensor area. Hence, the statistics of sampling is essential to sensor design. For illustration, we analyze three important published cases for which statistical fluctuations are dominant, significant, and insignificant, respectively.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20429683','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20429683"><span>Optimization of polyphenol oxidase immobilization in copper alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kocaturk, Selin; Yagar, Hulya</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1) was isolated from artichoke head (Cynara scolymus L.) by using 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0), concentrated by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, and immobilized in copper-alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Immobilization yield was determined to be 70%. The cresolase and catecholase activities of enzyme immobilized at optimum immobilization conditions were found to be 13.3 and 670 U g <span class="hlt">beads</span> min(-1), respectively. Effects of immobilization conditions such as alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration, amount of loading enzyme, <span class="hlt">bead</span> size, and amount of <span class="hlt">beads</span> on enzymatic activity were investigated. Optimum alginate and CuCl2 concentration were found to be 2 % and 3 % (w/v), respectively. Using <span class="hlt">bead</span> (diameter 3 mm) amount of 0.25 g maximum enzyme activities were observed for both polyphenol activities. The initial concentrations of loading free enzyme were 6.5 U mL(-1) and 5815 U mL(-1) for cresolase activity and catecholase activities, respectively. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> prepared at optimum immobilization conditions were suitable for up to 8 repeated uses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2574764','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2574764"><span>Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Defined Protein <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lund, Amanda W.; Bush, Jeff A.; Plopper, George E.; Stegemann, Jan P.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>There is a need to develop improved methods for directing and maintaining the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) for regenerative medicine. Here, we present a method for embedding cells in defined protein microenvironments for the directed osteogenic differentiation of hMSC. Composite matrices of collagen I and agarose were produced by emulsification and simultaneous polymerization in the presence of hMSC to produce 30–150 μm diameter hydrogel “<span class="hlt">beads</span>.” The proliferation, morphology, osteogenic gene expression, and calcium deposition of hMSC in <span class="hlt">bead</span> environments were compared to other two- and three-dimensional culture environments over 14–21 days in culture. Cells embedded within 40% collagen <span class="hlt">beads</span> exhibited equivalent proliferation rates to those in gel disks, but showed upregulation of bone sialoprotein and increased calcium deposition over 2D controls. Osteocalcin gene expression was not changed in 3D <span class="hlt">beads</span> and disks, while collagen type I gene expression was downregulated relative to cells in 2D culture. The hydrogel <span class="hlt">bead</span> format allows controlled cell differentiation and is a cell delivery vehicle that may also enhance vascular invasion and host incorporation. Our results indicate that the application of such <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be used to promote the osteogenic phenotype in hMSC, which is an important step toward using them in bone repair applications. PMID:18431753</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110007932','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110007932"><span>Remote Analysis of Lunar Pyroclastic <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Deposits by LRO Diviner</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Allen, Carlton C.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Telescope observations and orbital images of the Moon reveal at least 75 deposits, often tens to hundreds of km across, that mantle mare or highland surfaces. These deposits are interpreted as the products of pyroclastic eruptions and designated herein as lunar pyroclastic deposits (LPD). They are understood to be composed primarily of sub-millimeter <span class="hlt">beads</span> of basaltic composition, ranging from glassy to partially-crystallized. Delano documented 25 distinct pyroclastic <span class="hlt">bead</span> compositions in lunar soil samples, though the source deposits for most of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> have not been identified. The pyroclastic deposits are important for many reasons. Petrology experiments and modeling have demonstrated that the pyroclastic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are the deepest-sourced and most primitive basalts on the Moon. Recent analyses have documented the presence of water in these <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, demonstrating that the lunar interior is considerably more volatile-rich than previously understood. Experiments have shown that the iron-rich pyroclastic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> release the highest percentage of oxygen of any Apollo soils, making these deposits promising lunar resources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170001340','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170001340"><span>Determination of Trace and Volatile Element Abundance Systematics of Lunar Pyroclastic <span class="hlt">Glasses</span> 74220 and 15426 Using LA-ICP-MS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>McIntosh, E. Carrie; Porrachia, Magali; McCubbin, Francis M.; Day, James M. D.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Since their recognition as pyroclastic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> generated by volcanic fire fountaining on the Moon, 74220 and 15426 have garnered significant scientific interest. Early studies recognized that the <span class="hlt">glasses</span> were particularly enriched in volatile elements on their surfaces. More recently, detailed analyses of the interiors of the <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, as well as of melt inclusions within olivine grains associated with the 74220 <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>, have determined high H2O, F, Cl and S contents. Such elevated volatile contents seem at odds with evidence from moderately volatile elements (MVE), such as Zn and K, for a volatile- depleted Moon. In this study, we present initial results from an analytical campaign to study trace element abundances within the pyroclastic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>. We report trace element data determined by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for 15426 and 74220.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100005632','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100005632"><span>Volcanic Coatings on Picritic Apollo 17 <span class="hlt">Glasses</span>; Submicrometer-Deposits of Fe-CR-Metal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>McKay, David S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Ross, K.; Clementt, S. J.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The purposes of our ongoing investigations of Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange and black volcanic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are threefold: first, to increase our understanding of the volcanic origin of the <span class="hlt">glasses</span>; second, to determine the nature of the coating materials deposited on the <span class="hlt">glasses</span> during their cooling in the volcanic environment; and, third, to help determine the nature of the gases involved in the volcanic fire-fountaining that occurred at approximately 3.5 Ga on the moon. We are continuing studies of coatings on volcanic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> using analytical techniques not available when these <span class="hlt">glasses</span> were originally studied; these include high-resolution FE-TEM and X-ray mapping, along with other highly detailed methods including TEM electron diffraction analysis. Initial studies of Apollo 15 green volcanic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> using the techniques described above revealed for the first time the presence of areas containing distinct layering of volcanic surface deposits. S was associated with some of the inner layer of metallic Fe but was absent from the outer layer. Zn was associated with S in some places in the inner layer. An example of a typical spherule used for this study is shown in Fig. 1. It is a black (quench-crystallized) <span class="hlt">bead</span> from near the bottom of the 74001/2 double drive tube; black <span class="hlt">beads</span> such as this one are essentially identical in composition to the orange (uncrystallized) <span class="hlt">beads</span> of the 74001/2 core.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1306378','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1306378"><span>Fabrication of <span class="hlt">glass</span> micropipettes: a semi-automatic approach for trimming the pipette tip.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Engström, K G; Meiselman, H J</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Micropipettes as research instruments are well established in cell biology, including blood rheology. However, the experimental results are, to some extent, dependent on the quality of the pipette itself; it is usually critical to have the desired pipette internal diameter and a perpendicular tip. Pipette fabrication is a two-step procedure involving: a) the pulling of the pipette from a <span class="hlt">glass</span> capillary; b) the trimming of the pipette tip. A common method to trim and fracture the pipette tip is the use of a melted <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> on a heated tungsten wire. Previous devices using this method were often associated with problems because the heated wire varied in length with temperature. As a result, the <span class="hlt">bead</span> together with the attached pipette tip moved markedly and thus hampered the possibility to obtain a perpendicularly cut pipette tip. An improved design, based on the same principle with a melted <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span>, is thus suggested; it eliminates the problem with a moving <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> and, in addition, allows semi-automatic pipette trimming by utilizing the heat-induced elongation/retraction of the heated wire to fracture the tip without requiring manual assistance. Furthermore, a simple pipette storing technique is suggested, based on standard laboratory utensils, in order to more easily handle fragile pipettes without risk of breakage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3993991','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3993991"><span>Modeling Analyte Transport and Capture in Porous <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chou, Jie; Lennart, Alexis; Wong, Jorge; Ali, Mehnaaz F.; Floriano, Pierre N.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Camp, James; McDevitt, John T.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Porous agarose microbeads, with high surface to volume ratios and high binding densities, are attracting attention as highly sensitive, affordable sensor elements for a variety of high performance bioassays. While such polymer microspheres have been extensively studied and reported on previously and are now moving into real-world clinical practice, very little work has been completed to date to model the convection, diffusion, and binding kinetics of soluble reagents captured within such fibrous networks. Here, we report the development of a three-dimensional computational model and provide the initial evidence for its agreement with experimental outcomes derived from the capture and detection of representative protein and genetic biomolecules in 290μm porous <span class="hlt">beads</span>. We compare this model to antibody-mediated capture of C-reactive protein and bovine serum albumin, along with hybridization of oligonucleotide sequences to DNA probes. These results suggest that due to the porous interior of the agarose <span class="hlt">bead</span>, internal analyte transport is both diffusion- and convection-based, and regardless of the nature of analyte, the <span class="hlt">bead</span> interiors reveal an interesting trickle of convection-driven internal flow. Based on this model, the internal to external flow rate ratio is found to be in the range of 1:3100 to 1:170 for <span class="hlt">beads</span> with agarose concentration ranging from 0.5% to 8% for the sensor ensembles here studied. Further, both model and experimental evidence suggest that binding kinetics strongly affect analyte distribution of captured reagents within the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. These findings reveal that high association constants create a steep moving boundary in which unbound analytes are held back at the periphery of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> sensor. Low association constants create a more shallow moving boundary in which unbound analytes diffuse further into the <span class="hlt">bead</span> before binding. These models agree with experimental evidence and thus serve as a new tool set for the study of bio-agent transport processes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5836..607H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5836..607H"><span>A superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> driven fluidic device (Invited Paper)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Husband, Benjamin; Melvin, Tracy; Evans, Alan G. R.</p> <p>2005-07-01</p> <p>Injection strategies have been employed in the field of fluidic MEMS using piezo electric or thermal actuators. A very popular application for such technology is inkjet printing. Largely this technology is used to produce droplets of fluid in air; the aim of this investigation is to produce an injection device for the precise dispensing of nanolitre volumes of fluid. A novel technique for dispensing fluid using superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> has been investigated. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> used (Dynal Biotech) contain a homogeneous dispersion of Fe2O3, allowing for easy control with a magnet. This magnetic property is exploited, by a plug of approximately 60 000 <span class="hlt">beads</span> within a micro channel. This is accomplished by applying a non-uniform magnetic field from a bullet magnet within close proximity of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> plug. Once the plug is formed it can be moved along the micro channel by moving the magnet and thus, provide a plunger-like action. Previous work has demonstrated a <span class="hlt">bead</span> plug device is able to dispense fluid from a micro channel at rates up to 7.2μlmin-1. This is an investigation using silicon and Pyrex fabricated micro channels with smaller dimensions, such that the dimensions will be similar to those which will be used to produce a pipette device. Here results are presented using these fabricated micro channels, where the effects of using differently sized <span class="hlt">bead</span> plugs and varying velocities are examined. The results follow our proposed theory; further analysis is required to determine the operation of a <span class="hlt">bead</span> plug during all states of movement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9715E..05J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9715E..05J"><span>Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon <span class="hlt">beads</span> were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23218280','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23218280"><span>Controlled antiseptic release by alginate polymer films and <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liakos, Ioannis; Rizzello, Loris; Bayer, Ilker S; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia</p> <p>2013-01-30</p> <p>Biodegradable polymeric materials based on blending aqueous dispersions of natural polymer sodium alginate (NaAlg) and povidone iodine (PVPI) complex, which allow controlled antiseptic release, are presented. The developed materials are either free standing NaAlg films or Ca(2+)-cross-linked alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>, which properly combined with PVPI demonstrate antibacterial and antifungal activity, suitable for therapeutic applications, such as wound dressing. Glycerol was used as the plasticizing agent. Film morphology was studied by optical and atomic force microscopy. It was found that PVPI complex forms well dispersed circular micro-domains within the NaAlg matrix. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were fabricated by drop-wise immersion of NaAlg/PVPI/glycerol solutions into aqueous calcium chloride solutions to form calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> encapsulating PVPI solution (CaAlg/PVPI). Controlled release of PVPI was possible when the composite films and <span class="hlt">beads</span> were brought into direct contact with water or with moist media. Bactericidal and fungicidal properties of the materials were tested against Escherichia coli bacteria and Candida albicans fungi. The results indicated very efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity within 48 h. Controlled release of PVPI into open wounds is highly desired in clinical applications to avoid toxic doses of iodine absorption by the wound. A wide variety of applications are envisioned such as external and internal wound dressings with controlled antiseptic release, hygienic and protective packaging films for medical devices, and polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span> as water disinfectants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IJT....33..627I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IJT....33..627I"><span>Thermophysical and Magnetic Properties of Carbon <span class="hlt">Beads</span> Containing Cobalt Nanocrystallites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Izydorzak, M.; Skumiel, A.; Leonowicz, M.; Kaczmarek-Klinowska, M.; Pomogailo, A. D.; Dzhardimalieva, G. I.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Magnetic Co-<span class="hlt">beads</span> were fabricated in the course of a three-step procedure comprising preparation of a metal-acrylamide complex, followed by frontal polymerization and finally pyrolysis of the polymer. The composites obtained were composed of cobalt nanocrystallites stabilized in a carbon matrix built of disordered graphite. The crystallite size, material morphology, fraction of the magnetic component, and thus the magnetic properties can be tailored by a proper choice of the processing variables. The samples were subjected to an alternating magnetic field of different strengths ( H = 0 to 5 kA · m-1) at a frequency of f = 500 kHz. From the calorimetric measurements, we concluded that the relaxation processes dominate in the heat generation mechanism for the <span class="hlt">beads</span> pyrolyzed at 773 K. For the <span class="hlt">beads</span> pyrolyzed at 1073 K, significant values of magnetic properties, such as the coercive force and remanence give substantial contribution to the energy losses for hysteresis. The specific absorption coefficient ( SAR) related to the cobalt mass unit for the 1073 K pyrolyzed <span class="hlt">beads</span> {({SAR} = 1340 W \\cdot g^{-1 }_cobalt)} is in very good conformity with the results obtained by other authors. The effective density power loss, caused by eddy currents, can be neglected for heating processes applied in magnetic hyperthermia. The Co-<span class="hlt">beads</span> can potentially be applied for hyperthermia treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26381055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26381055"><span>Phase Diagram Characterization Using Magnetic <span class="hlt">Beads</span> as Liquid Carriers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blumenschein, Nicholas; Han, Daewoo; Steckl, Andrew J</p> <p>2015-09-04</p> <p>Magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> with ~1.9 µm average diameter were used to transport microliter volumes of liquids between contiguous liquid segments with a tube for the purpose of investigating phase change of those liquid segments. The magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> were externally controlled using a magnet, allowing for the <span class="hlt">beads</span> to bridge the air valve between the adjacent liquid segments. A hydrophobic coating was applied to the inner surface of the tube to enhance the separation between two liquid segments. The applied magnetic field formed an aggregate cluster of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>, capturing a certain liquid amount within the cluster that is referred to as carry-over volume. A fluorescent dye was added to one liquid segment, followed by a series of liquid transfers, which then changed the fluorescence intensity in the neighboring liquid segment. Based on the numerical analysis of the measured fluorescence intensity change, the carry-over volume per mass of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> has been found to be ~2 to 3 µl/mg. This small amount of liquid allowed for the use of comparatively small liquid segments of a couple hundred microliters, enhancing the feasibility of the device for a lab-in-tube approach. This technique of applying small compositional variation in a liquid volume was applied to analyzing the binary phase diagram between water and the surfactant C12E5 (pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether), leading to quicker analysis with smaller sample volumes than conventional methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/131641','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/131641"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span> temperature effects on FCAW heat-affected zone hardness</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kiefer, J.H.</p> <p>1995-11-01</p> <p>Hardness limits for welding procedure qualification are often imposed to lessen the chances of delayed hydrogen cracking during production fabrication. Temper <span class="hlt">bead</span> techniques have been used by fabricators during these qualifications to improve their chances of success. This practice involves using the heat of additional weld <span class="hlt">beads</span> to soften the heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness in the base metal next to the weld where the hardness is the greatest. The technique works under controlled conditions, but the consistency for field use was questionable. This report describes an investigate of the effect of welding parameters, base metal chemical composition, and weld <span class="hlt">bead</span> placement on HAZ softening. An empirical formula developed from base plate chemical composition, weld cooling time, and temper <span class="hlt">bead</span> placement can be used to estimate the amount of HAZ tempering. Combined with an appropriate hardness prediction formula, it can help find the welding procedure needed to achieve a desired maximum HAZ hardness, or predict the HAZ hardness of existing welds. Based on the results of the study, <span class="hlt">bead</span> temperature is not recommended for HAZ hardness control on large scale fabrications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18377029','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18377029"><span>Metal <span class="hlt">bead</span> crystals for easy heating by direct current.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Voigtländer, Bert; Cherepanov, Vasily; Elsaesser, Christa; Linke, Udo</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>The preparation of metal <span class="hlt">bead</span> crystals with two wires attached to the crystal is described. These crystals allow for a very easy and efficient method to heat metal single crystals by direct current heating through the connecting wires of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> crystal. This heating of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> crystal is sufficient to clean metal surfaces such as the surfaces of Pt and Au as confirmed by Auger spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). There is no need for any ion sputtering which is conventionally used to clean metal single crystal surfaces. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> crystals with two leads fabricated from a wide range metals and metal alloys such as Cu, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ta, W, Re, Ir, Pt, Au, PtPd, PtRh, AuAg, and PtIr can be used as general purpose metal substrates for surface science studies and other applications. Additionally, these <span class="hlt">bead</span> crystals can be used to reshape STM tips by indentation of the tip into the soft metal in order to recover atomic resolution imaging on hard substrates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19685235','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19685235"><span>Magnetic track array for efficient <span class="hlt">bead</span> capture in microchannels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abonnenc, Mélanie; Gassner, Anne-Laure; Morandini, Jacques; Josserand, Jacques; Girault, Hubert H</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>Magnetism-based microsystems, as those dedicated to immunoaffinity separations or (bio)chemical reactions, take benefit of the large surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the immobilized magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>, thus increasing the sensitivity of the analysis. As the sensitivity is directly linked to the efficiency of the magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> capture, this paper presents a simple method to enhance the capture in a microchannel. Considering a microchannel surrounded by two rectangular permanent magnets of different length (L (m) = 2, 5, 10 mm) placed in attraction, it is shown that the amount of trapped <span class="hlt">beads</span> is limited by the magnetic forces mainly located at the magnet edges. To overcome this limitation, a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) microchip with an integrated magnetic track array has been prototyped by laser photo-ablation. The magnetic force is therefore distributed all along the magnet length. It results in a multi-plug <span class="hlt">bead</span> capture, observed by microscope imaging, with a magnetic force value locally enhanced. The relative amount of <span class="hlt">beads</span>, and so the specific binding surface for further immunoassays, presents a significant increase of 300% for the largest magnets. The influence of the track geometry and relative permeability on the magnetic force was studied by numerical simulations, for the microchip operating with 2-mm-long magnets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231528','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231528"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span>Form</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-09-16</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glass</span>Form is a software tool for generating preliminary waste <span class="hlt">glass</span> formulas for a given waste stream. The software is useful because it reduces the number of verification melts required to develop a suitable additive composition. The software includes property models that calculate <span class="hlt">glass</span> properties of interest from the chemical composition of the waste <span class="hlt">glass</span>. The software includes property models for <span class="hlt">glass</span> viscosity, electrical conductivity, <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition temperature, and leach resistance as measured by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7045936','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7045936"><span>Strength of inorganic <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kurkjian, C.R.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>This book presents information on the following topics: a look at the history of <span class="hlt">glass</span> strength; atomistic theory of fracture; surface chemistry in relation to the strength and fracture of silicate <span class="hlt">glasses</span>; high-speed photographic investigations of the dynamic localized loading of some oxide <span class="hlt">glasses</span>; a correction for measurements of contact area using Newton's rings; envionmentally enhanced crack growth; fatigue in <span class="hlt">glass</span>; behavior of flaws in fused silica fibers; fracture toughness of chalcogenide <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and <span class="hlt">glass</span>-ceramics; fracture analysis of <span class="hlt">glass</span> surfaces; and fracture mechanics parameters for <span class="hlt">glasses</span> - a compilation and correlation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/966149','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/966149"><span>CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT <span class="hlt">GLASSES</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>KRUGER AA; HRMA PR</p> <p>2009-10-08</p> <p>In <span class="hlt">glass</span> processing situations involving <span class="hlt">glass</span> crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten <span class="hlt">glass</span> subjected to convection. Nuclear waste <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the <span class="hlt">glass</span> melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-<span class="hlt">glass</span> conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling <span class="hlt">glass</span>, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in <span class="hlt">glass</span> making are reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900052106&hterms=trace+elements&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dtrace%2Belements','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900052106&hterms=trace+elements&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dtrace%2Belements"><span>A SIMS study of lunar 'komatiitic <span class="hlt">glasses</span>' - Trace element characteristics and possible origin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Galbreath, K. C.; Wentworth, S. J.; Shimizu, N.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>In Apollo 16 regolith breccias, Wentworth and McKay (1988) identified a suite of minute (less than 120 microns) 'komatiitic <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>'. The wide major element compositional range, and ultra-Mg-prime character of the <span class="hlt">glasses</span> suggest a variety of possible origins from complex impact processes to complex volcanic processes involving rather unusual and primitive magmatism. The extent of trace element depletion or enrichment in these <span class="hlt">glasses</span> appears to be correlated to the siderophile character of the element (ionization potential or experimentally determined silicate melt/Fe metal partition coefficients. The ultra-Mg-prime <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are depleted in Co relative to a bulk Moon Mg/Co exhibited by many lunar samples (volcanic <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, basalts, regolith breccia, estimated upper mantle). The low Co and high incompatible element concentrations diminish the possibility that these <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are a product of lunar komatiitic volcanism or impact, excavation, and melting of a very high Mg-prime plutonic unit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21366843','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21366843"><span>IMPACT STRENGTH OF <span class="hlt">GLASS</span> AND <span class="hlt">GLASS</span> CERAMIC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bless, S.; Tolman, J.</p> <p>2009-12-28</p> <p>Strength of <span class="hlt">glass</span> and <span class="hlt">glass</span> ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate <span class="hlt">glass</span> had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the <span class="hlt">glass</span> ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1023735','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1023735"><span>A Pneumatic Actuated Microfluidic <span class="hlt">Beads</span>-Trapping Device</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shao, Guocheng; Cai, Ziliang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe</p> <p>2011-08-20</p> <p>The development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic microbeads trapping device is reported in this paper. Besides fluid channels, the proposed device includes a pneumatic control chamber and a <span class="hlt">beads</span>-trapping chamber with a filter array structure. The pneumatic flow control chamber and the <span class="hlt">beads</span>-trapping chamber are vertically stacked and separated by a thin membrane. By adjusting the pressure in the pneumatic control chamber, the membrane can either be pushed against the filter array to set the device in trapping mode or be released to set the device in releasing mode. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics simulation was conducted to optimize the geometry design of the filter array structure; the device fabrication was also carried out. The prototype device was tested and the preliminary experimental results showed that it can be used as a <span class="hlt">beads</span>-trapping unit for various biochemistry and analytical chemistry applications, especially for flow injection analysis systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20687745','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20687745"><span>Magnet polepiece design for uniform magnetic force on superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fallesen, Todd; Hill, David B; Steen, Matthew; Macosko, Jed C; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>Here we report construction of a simple electromagnet with novel polepieces which apply a spatially uniform force to superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> in an optical microscope. The wedge-shaped gap was designed to keep partial differential B(x)/ partial differential y constant and B large enough to saturate the <span class="hlt">bead</span>. We achieved fields of 300-600 mT and constant gradients of 67 T/m over a sample space of 0.5x4 mm(2) in the focal plane of the microscope and 0.05 mm along the microscope optic axis. Within this space the maximum force on a 2.8 microm diameter Dynabead was 12 pN with a spatial variation of approximately 10%. Use of the magnet in a biophysical experiment is illustrated by showing that gliding microtubules propelled by the molecular motor kinesin can be stopped by the force of an attached magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17659852','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17659852"><span>Ex vivo mucoadhesion of different zinc-pectinate hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hagesaether, Ellen; Bye, Ragnar; Sande, S Arne</p> <p>2008-01-22</p> <p>The objective of this study was to investigate the mucoadhesive properties of pre-swelled hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> made of six types of pectin from three manufacturers. The types of pectin differed mainly in the degree of methoxylation and degree of amidation. Zinc ions were used as cross-linking agent. The mucoadhesive properties were tested on an inverted fresh porcine small intestine attached to a rotating cylinder. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> made of pectin with a high degree of methoxylation (70%) showed superior mucoadhesive results compared to the other formulations, which could be correlated to the lower amount of zinc in this formulation, subsequently leading to a lower amount of cross-linking and higher mobility of the polymer chains of these <span class="hlt">beads</span>. This study therefore also indicated the importance of doing mucoadhesive measurements on relevant formulations, and not basing the understanding solely on investigating polymer solutions. Samples from different manufacturers produced the same results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2752363','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2752363"><span>Ion Exchange Resin <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Decoupled High-Pressure Electroosmotic Pump</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yang, Bingcheng; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Liu, Shaorong</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>We describe an electroosmotic pump (EOP) that utilizes a cation exchange resin <span class="hlt">bead</span> as the electric field decoupler. The resin <span class="hlt">bead</span> serves as a electrical grounding joint without fluid leakage, thus eliminating electrolytic gas interference from the flow channels. The arrangement is easy to practice from readily available components, displays a very low electrical resistance, and is capable of bearing high backpressure (at least 3200 psi). We use a silica xerogel column as the EOP element to pump water and demonstrate a complete capillary ion chromatograph (CIC), which uses a similar <span class="hlt">bead</span> based microelectrodialytic generator (μ-EDG) to generate a KOH eluent from the pumped water. We observed good operational stability of the complete arrangement over long periods. PMID:19449862</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999PhDT........74J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999PhDT........74J"><span>Investigation of waterborne epoxies for E-<span class="hlt">glass</span> composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jensen, Robert Eric</p> <p></p> <p>Research is presented which encompasses a study of epoxies based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) cured with 2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (EMI-24) in the presence of the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. Interest in this epoxy system is due partially to the potential application as a waterborne replacement for solvent cast epoxies in E-<span class="hlt">glass</span> laminated printed circuit boards. This research has revealed that the viscoelastic behavior of the cured epoxy is altered when serving as the matrix in a <span class="hlt">glass</span> composite. The additional constraining and coupling of the E-<span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers to the segmental motion of the epoxy matrix results in an increased level of viscoelastic cooperativity. Current research has determined that the cooperativity of an epoxy/E-<span class="hlt">glass</span> composite is also sensitive to the surface chemistry of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers. Model single-ply epoxy/E-<span class="hlt">glass</span> laminates were constructed in which the <span class="hlt">glass</span> was pretreated with either 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) or 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPS) coupling agents. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was then used to create master curves of the storage modulus (E') in the frequency domain. The frequency range of the master curves and resulting cooperativity plots clearly varied depending on the surface treatment of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers. It was determined that the surfactant has surprisingly little effect in the observed trends in cooperativity of the composites. However, the changes in cooperativity due to the surface pretreatment of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> were lessened by the aqueous phase of the waterborne resin. Moisture uptake experiments were also performed on epoxy samples that were filled with spherical <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> as well as multi-ply laminated composites. No increases in the diffusion constant could be attributed to the surfactant. However, the surfactant did enhance the final equilibrium moisture uptake levels. These equilibrium moisture uptake levels were also sensitive to the surface pretreatment of the E-<span class="hlt">glass</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25159881','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25159881"><span>Preparation and cytotoxicity of N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan/alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing gold nanoparticles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Martins, Alessandro F; Facchi, Suelen P; Monteiro, Johny P; Nocchi, Samara R; Silva, Cleiser T P; Nakamura, Celso V; Girotto, Emerson M; Rubira, Adley F; Muniz, Edvani C</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Polyelectrolyte complex <span class="hlt">beads</span> based on N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) and sodium alginate (ALG) were obtained. This biomaterial was characterised by FTIR, TGA/DTG, DSC and SEM analysis. The good properties of polyelectrolyte complex hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> were associated, for the first time, with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Through a straightforward methodology, AuNPs were encapsulated into the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The in vitro cytotoxicity assays on the Caco-2 colon cancer cells and healthy VERO cells showed that the <span class="hlt">beads</span> presented good biocompatibility on both cell lines, whereas the <span class="hlt">beads</span> loaded with gold nanoparticles (<span class="hlt">beads</span>/AuNPs) was slightly cytotoxic on the Caco-2 and VERO cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26626225','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26626225"><span>Extended release of vitamins from magnetite loaded polyanionic polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sonmez, Maria; Verisan, Cristina; Voicu, Georgeta; Ficai, Denisa; Ficai, Anton; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Vlad, Mihaela; Andronescu, Ecaterina</p> <p>2016-08-30</p> <p>Here we explore a novel approach of increasing the release duration of folic and ascorbic acid from magnetite entrapped into calcium-alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite-vitamins complexes are reported. The magnetite-vitamins complexes were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM, BET and DTA-TG. Also calcium-alginate magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by dripping a mixture of sodium alginate with magnetite-vitamins complexes into calcium chloride solution. Extended release profile of the two experimental models was evaluated and quantified by UV-vis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1009766','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1009766"><span>Development of Crystal-Tolerant High-Level Waste <span class="hlt">Glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Schaible, Micah J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Arrigoni, Alyssa L.; Tate, Rachel M.</p> <p>2010-12-17</p> <p> of the crystal-tolerant HLW <span class="hlt">glasses</span> for higher waste loading. A physical modeling effort revealed that the Stokes and Richardson-Zaki equations can be used to adequately predict the accumulation rate of spinel crystals of different sizes and concentrations in the <span class="hlt">glass</span> discharge riser of HLW melters. The determined shape factor for the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> was only 0.73% lower than the theoretical shape factor for a perfect sphere. The shape factor for the spinel crystals matched the theoretically predicted value to within 10% and was smaller than that of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, given the larger drag force caused by the larger surface area-to-volume ratio of the octahedral crystals. In the hindered settling experiments, both the <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> and spinel suspensions were found to follow the predictions of the Richardson-Zaki equation with the exponent n = 3.6 and 2.9 for <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> and spinel crystals, respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=evolution+AND+cells&pg=6&id=EJ143729','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=evolution+AND+cells&pg=6&id=EJ143729"><span>Life-Game, with <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Beads</span> and Molecules, on the Principles of the Origin of Life</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Eigen, Manfred; Haglund, Herman</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Discusses a theoretical model that uses a game as a base for studying processes of a stochastic nature, which involve chemical reactions, molecular systems, biological processes, cells, or people in a population. (MLH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120013329','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120013329"><span>Indigenous Carbonaceous Phases Embedded Within Surface Deposits on Apollo 17 Volcanic <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Ross, D. K.; Le, L.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Gonzalez, C.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The assessment of indigenous organic matter in returned lunar samples was one of the primary scientific goals of the Apollo program. Prior studies of Apollo samples have shown the total amount of organic matter to be in the range of approx 50 to 250 ppm. Low concentrations of lunar organics may be a consequence not only of its paucity but also its heterogeneous distribution. Several processes should have contributed to the lunar organic inventory including exogenous carbonaceous accretion from meteoroids and interplanetary dust particles, and endogenous synthesis driven by early planetary volcanism and cosmic and solar radiation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=glass+AND+composition&id=EJ211620','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=glass+AND+composition&id=EJ211620"><span>Chemical Principles Revisited: The Chemistry of <span class="hlt">Glass</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kolb, Doris; Kolb, Kenneth E.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>Presents a detailed discussion on the chemistry of <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Topics discussed include: natural <span class="hlt">glass</span>, early history, modern <span class="hlt">glass</span> composition, raw materials for <span class="hlt">glass</span> melting, chemically modified <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, modern <span class="hlt">glass</span> forming, <span class="hlt">glass</span> ceramics, and new developments in <span class="hlt">glass</span> research. (BT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740022878','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740022878"><span><span class="hlt">Beading</span> and spiking phenomena in the M551 metals melting experiment. [Skylab program to analyze <span class="hlt">beading</span> phenomenon under weightless conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fan, C.; Brashears, M. R.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A study was made regarding the <span class="hlt">beading</span> and spiking phenomena observed in the M551 metals melting experiment conducted during the Skylab I mission in June 1973. An analysis was made of the <span class="hlt">beading</span> phenomenon based on the Karman vortex shedding theory. The results tend to support the hypothesis that <span class="hlt">beading</span> which occurred in the stainless and tantalum samples was a Karman vortex street formation. A dynamic model of cavity oscillation is discussed to explain the spiking phenomenon which was observed in the stainless steel and tantalum samples. Calculations of spiking frequency indicate that the intensity of spiking depends primarily on the vapor pressure and surface tension properties of the material, and is only slightly affected by the level of gravitation acceleration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17046185','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17046185"><span>Xanthan-alginate composite gel <span class="hlt">beads</span>: molecular interaction and in vitro characterization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit</p> <p>2007-02-22</p> <p>Xanthan gum (XG), a trisaccharide branched polymer, was applied to reinforce calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> in this study. Composite <span class="hlt">beads</span> consisting of XG and sodium alginate (SA) were prepared using ionotropic gelation method. Diclofenac calcium-alginate (DCA) <span class="hlt">beads</span> incorporated with different amounts of XG were produced as well. Molecular interaction between SA and XG in the composite <span class="hlt">beads</span> and the XG-DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> was investigated using FTIR spectroscopy. Physical properties of the XG-DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> such as entrapment efficiency of diclofenac sodium (DS), thermal property, water uptake, swelling and DS release in various media were examined. XG could form intermolecular hydrogen bonding with SA in the composite <span class="hlt">beads</span> with or without DS. Differential scanning calorimetric study indicated that XG did not affect thermal property of the DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The DS entrapment efficiency of the DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> increased with increasing amount of XG added. The XG-DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed higher water uptake and swelling in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer and distilled water than the DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span>. A longer lag time and a higher DS release rate of the XG-DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer were found. In contrast, the 0.3%XG-DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> could retard the drug release in distilled water because interaction between XG and SA gave higher tortuosity of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> matrix. However, higher content of XG in the DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> increased the release rate of DS. This can be attributed to erosion of small aggregates of XG on the surface of the DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span>. This finding suggested that XG could modulate physicochemical properties and drug release of the DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span>, which based on the existence of molecular interaction between XG and SA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27004369','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27004369"><span>A new device for efficient preparation of standard antibiotic <span class="hlt">bead</span> chains and customized antibiotic delivery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qi, Baochang; Ju, Weina; Yu, Tiecheng; Wang, Tiejun; Zhao, Yi; Sun, Dahui</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Antibiotic-loaded polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) <span class="hlt">beads</span> are widely used in orthopedic practice for the prevention of infections after open fractures and in the management of osteomyelitis. The use of commercial <span class="hlt">beads</span> is limited by insufficient flexibility, lack of provision for selection of specific antibiotic, and short drug-release time. Further, the manual procedure for the preparation of PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span> is slow, and the products are not uniform in size. Uniformity of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> size is crucial because the placement of oversized <span class="hlt">beads</span> place at sites with limited space (e.g., narrow medullary canal) is difficult, and their retrieval from such sites is painful to the patient. To overcome the limitations of commercial <span class="hlt">beads</span> and manually prepared <span class="hlt">beads</span>, we developed a simple device for the efficient preparation of antibiotic-loaded PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span> of uniform sizes. We describe the device, <span class="hlt">bead</span> preparation, and the characteristics of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared using our device, and the preliminary clinical results. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> obtained using this device were relatively small, had excellent flexibility, and were suitable for implantation in small spaces. The device permits the selection of the antibiotic to be loaded on to the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The results of preliminary studies of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared using our device have been positive, highlighting the need for more large-scale and longitudinal investigations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17483729','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17483729"><span>Does antibiotic elution from PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span> deteriorate after 1-year shelf storage?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Balsamo, Luke H; Whiddon, David R; Simpson, R Bruce</p> <p>2007-09-01</p> <p>Antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate <span class="hlt">beads</span> are widely used as an adjunct in the treatment of orthopaedic infections. Because there is no commercially available <span class="hlt">bead</span> in the United States, surgeons must manufacture <span class="hlt">bead</span> sets at the time of implantation. This can be time consuming and wasteful. We hypothesized antibiotic-impregnated <span class="hlt">beads</span> would maintain consistent elution for up to 1 year after manufacturing and storage. Tobramycin-impregnated antibiotic <span class="hlt">beads</span> were manufactured using a <span class="hlt">bead</span> mold. The antibiotic was either hand-mixed into the polymethylmethacrylate powder (1.2 g/40 g) or came premixed from the factory (1 g/40 g). Packages of <span class="hlt">beads</span> were gas-sterilized and stored at room temperature. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> were tested at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months. Antibiotic levels in the eluent from each day of the month were measured. We were unable to detect any difference in the amount of antibiotic elution between <span class="hlt">beads</span> tested immediately after manufacture and <span class="hlt">beads</span> manufactured and stored for 6 or 12 months. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> with hand-mixed antibiotics eluted higher levels of antibiotics than the <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared with factory-mixed antibiotics. We conclude antibiotic <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be made, sterilized, and used after 1 year of storage with no deleterious effect on antibiotic elution characteristics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvE..92b1003Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvE..92b1003Q"><span>Inverted <span class="hlt">glass</span> harp</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Quinn, Daniel B.; Rosenberg, Brian J.</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>We present an analytical treatment of the acoustics of liquid-filled wine <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, or "<span class="hlt">glass</span> harps." The solution is generalized such that under certain assumptions it reduces to previous <span class="hlt">glass</span> harp models, but also leads to a proposed musical instrument, the "inverted <span class="hlt">glass</span> harp," in which an empty <span class="hlt">glass</span> is submerged in a liquid-filled basin. The versatility of the solution demonstrates that all <span class="hlt">glass</span> harps are governed by a family of solutions to Laplace's equation around a vibrating disk. Tonal analyses of recordings for a sample <span class="hlt">glass</span> are offered as confirmation of the scaling predictions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174652','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174652"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span>-silicon column</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Yu, Conrad M.</p> <p>2003-12-30</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">glass</span>-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The <span class="hlt">glass</span>-silicon column includes large area <span class="hlt">glass</span>, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate <span class="hlt">glass</span> bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on <span class="hlt">glass</span> of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/<span class="hlt">glass</span> hole structure. The <span class="hlt">glass</span>/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of <span class="hlt">glass</span>, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of <span class="hlt">glass</span>, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one <span class="hlt">glass</span>/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19650000031','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19650000031"><span>Spring loaded <span class="hlt">beaded</span> cable makes efficient wire puller</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1965-01-01</p> <p>An efficient wire puller consists of a steel probe with a hole in one end fastened to a steel cable which is strung with metal <span class="hlt">beads</span> compressed by spring loaded ferrules. This device allows cables to be pulled or forced around bends and elbows in pipes or tubes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Bang&pg=4&id=EJ930817','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Bang&pg=4&id=EJ930817"><span>Collection Development: From <span class="hlt">Beads</span> to Bangles (Jewelry Making)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hanrahan, Katie</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Jewelry making began exploding as a hobby about ten years ago, largely because the flush economy gave individuals more leisure time and disposable income. Jewelry classes, <span class="hlt">bead</span> stores, and special events have multiplied like craft shows at Christmas time. While the recent economic downturn has slowed the growth of the hobby, it is still as popular…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4627713','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4627713"><span>Magnetically-actuated, <span class="hlt">bead</span>-enhanced silicon photonic immunosensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Valera, Enrique; McClellan, Melinda S.; Bailey, Ryan C.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Magnetic actuation has been introduced to an optical immunosensor technology resulting in improvements in both rapidity and limit of detection for an assay quantitating low concentrations of a representative protein biomarker. For purposes of demonstration, an assay was designed for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), a small cytokine which regulates migration and infiltration of monocytes and macrophages, and is an emerging biomarker for several diseases. The immunosensor is based on arrays of highly multiplexed silicon photonic microring resonators. A one-step sandwich immunoassay was performed and the signal was further enhanced through a tertiary recognition event between biotinylated tracer antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>. By integrating a magnet under the sensor chip, magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> were rapidly directed towards the sensor surface resulting in improved assay performance metrics. Notably, the time required in the <span class="hlt">bead</span> binding step was reduced by a factor of 11 (4 vs 45 min), leading to an overall decrease in assay time from 73 min to 32 min. The magnetically-actuated assay also lowered the limit of detection (LOD) for MCP-1 from 124 pg mL−1 down to 57 pg mL−1. In sum, the addition of magnetic actuation into <span class="hlt">bead</span>-enhanced sandwich assays on a silicon photonic biosensor platform might facilitate improved detection of biomarkers in point-of-care diagnostics settings. PMID:26528374</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26220618','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26220618"><span>Antimicrobial N-brominated hydantoin and uracil grafted polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farah, Shady; Aviv, Oren; Laout, Natalia; Ratner, Stanislav; Domb, Abraham J</p> <p>2015-10-28</p> <p>Hydantoin-N-halamine derivatives conjugated on polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> are promising disinfectants with broad antimicrobial activity affected by the gradual release of oxidizing halogen in water. The objective of this work was to identify and test of hydantoin-like molecules possessing urea moiety, which may provide N-haloamines releasing oxidizing halogens when exposed to water at different rates and release profiles for tailored antimicrobial agents. In this work, several hydantoin (five member ring) and for the first time reported, uracil (six member ring) derivatives have been conjugated to polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> and tested for their lasting antimicrobial activity. Four molecules of each series were conjugated onto polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> from the reaction of the N-potassium hydantoin or uracil derivatives onto chloromethylated polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span>. A distinct difference in bromine loading capacity and release profiles was found for the different conjugated derivatives. All tested materials exhibit strong antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and bacteriophages MS2 of 7 and ~4 log reduction, respectively. These results highlight the antimicrobial potential of halogenated cyclic molecules containing urea groups as water disinfection agents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..MAR.M1235V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..MAR.M1235V"><span>Improving detection of avalanches on a conical <span class="hlt">bead</span> pile</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vajpeyi, Avi; Lehman, Susan; Dahmen, Karin; Leblanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan</p> <p></p> <p>A conical <span class="hlt">bead</span> pile subject to slow driving and an external magnetic field is used as a simple system to investigate the variations in the avalanche size probability distribution function. Steel <span class="hlt">beads</span> are dropped onto the pile from different heights and at different strengths of applied magnetic field. Avalanches are recorded by the change in mass as <span class="hlt">beads</span> fall off the pile. Experimentally we observe an increasing deviation from power law behavior as the field and thus cohesion between the <span class="hlt">beads</span> increases. We compare our experimental results for the probability distribution function to the results of an analytic theory from a mean-field model of slip avalanches [Dahmen, Nat Phys 7, 554 (2011)]. The model also makes predictions for avalanche duration, which is not measurable with the existing system. To more fully characterize the avalanching behavior of the pile over time, a high-speed camera has been added to the system to record the largest avalanches and allow more detailed analysis. The conical pile geometry presents a challenge for observation and particle tracking over the full pile. Our implementation scheme and preliminary results from the video analysis are presented. Research supported by NSF CBET 1336116 and 1336634.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3629372','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3629372"><span>Preparation of alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing a prodrug of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yang, Yu-Tsai; Di Pasqua, Anthony J.; He, Weiling; Tsai, Tsuimin; Sueda, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Yong; Jay, Michael</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A penta-ethyl ester prodrug of the radionuclide decorporation agent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), which exists as an oily liquid, was encapsulated in alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> by the ionotropic gelation method. An optimal formulation was found by varying initial concentrations of DTPA pentaethyl ester, alginate polymer, Tween 80 surfactant and calcium chloride. All prepared alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> were ~1.6 mm in diameter, and the optimal formulation had loading and encapsulation efficiencies of 91.0 ± 1.1 and 72.6 ± 2.2%, respectively, and only 3.2 ± 0.8% water absorption after storage at room temperature in ~80% relative humidity. Moreover, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that DTPA penta-ethyl ester did not react with excipients during formation of the DTPA penta-ethyl ester-containing alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Release of prodrug from alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> was via anomalous transport, and its stability enhanced by encapsulation. Collectively, these data suggest that this solid dosage form may be suitable for oral administration after radionuclide contamination. PMID:23399237</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MPLB...2741028L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MPLB...2741028L"><span>Purification of Lysozyme by Intrinsically Shielded Hydrogel <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Cong; Zhang, R.; Wang, L.; Bowyer, A.; Eisenthal, R.; Shen, Yehua; Hubble, J.</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Macro-sized intrinsically shielded hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> have been prepared from BSA and CM-dextran grafted with CB using a technique based on freeze-thawing gelation method. The size of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> lies in around 500 μm. Isothemal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed that the relative binding affinities of the lysozyme for CB, compared with BSA, at pH 3.0 was stronger than that at pH 7.4. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme using chromatography column. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme at pH 3.0 is higher than that at pH 9. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed very high selectivity toward lysozyme. Lysozyme of very high purity (> 93%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and 85% from egg white solution. The results indicate that the macro-sized <span class="hlt">bead</span> can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme in a chromatograph column.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/az0575.photos.217920p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/az0575.photos.217920p/"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span> Roller, at right, used for preparing flume sheeting (still ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Bead</span> Roller, at right, used for preparing flume sheeting (still in use, 2004); on left is a pipe cutter. Facing southeast - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Childs Powerhouse, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25308755','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25308755"><span>Quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal <span class="hlt">beads</span> for multiplex detection of tumor markers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Juan; Wang, Huan; Dong, Shujun; Zhu, Peizhi; Diao, Guowang; Yang, Zhanjun</p> <p>2014-12-04</p> <p>Novel quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal <span class="hlt">beads</span> were fabricated for multiplex detection of tumor markers via self-assembly of quantum dot-embedded polystyrene nanospheres into photonic crystal <span class="hlt">beads</span> through a microfluidic device.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1895088','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1895088"><span>Potential use of scrap expanded polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> for the control of Aedes triseriatus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Beehler, J W; DeFoliart, G R</p> <p>1991-06-01</p> <p>The potential use of expanded polystyrene (EPS) <span class="hlt">beads</span> for control of Aedes triseriatus was tested in the laboratory and the field. Laboratory studies showed that <span class="hlt">beads</span> present in amounts which persisted throughout a season significantly reduced the emergence of Ae. triseriatus adults by preventing normal eclosion from the pupae. In the field, tree holes containing EPS <span class="hlt">beads</span> had significantly fewer larvae present than untreated controls. These field data suggest that EPS <span class="hlt">beads</span> may mechanically prevent oviposition by mosquitoes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/597095','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/597095"><span>Apparatus for the production of gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing a biocatalyst</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Scott, C.D.; Scott, T.C.; Davison, B.H.</p> <p>1998-03-19</p> <p>An apparatus is described for the large-scale and continuous production of gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or <span class="hlt">beads</span> that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> from the bottom of the column. 1 fig.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871409','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871409"><span>Apparatus for the production of gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing a biocatalyst</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Scott, Charles D.; Scott, Timothy C.; Davison, Brian H.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>An apparatus for the large-scale and continuous production of gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing a biocatalyst. The apparatus is a columnar system based on the chemical cross-linking of hydrocolloidal gels that contain and immobilize a biocatalyst, the biocatalyst being a microorganism or an enzyme. Hydrocolloidal gels, such as alginate, carrageenan, and a mixture of bone gelatin and modified alginate, provide immobilization matrices that can be used to entrap and retain the biocatalyst while allowing effective contact with substrates and release of products. Such immobilized biocatalysts are generally formulated into small spheres or <span class="hlt">beads</span> that have high concentrations of the biocatalyst within the gel matrix. The columnar system includes a gel dispersion nozzle submerged in a heated non-interacting liquid, typically an organic liquid, that is immiscible with water to allow efficient formation of spherical gel droplets, the non-interacting liquid having a specific gravity that is less than water so that the gel droplets will fall through the liquid by the force of gravity. The heated non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with a chilled upflowing non-interacting liquid that will provide sufficient residence time for the gel droplets as they fall through the liquid so that they will be cooled below the gelling temperature and form solid spheres. The upflowing non-interacting liquid is in direct contact with an upflowing temperature-controlled aqueous solution containing the necessary chemicals for cross-linking or fixing of the gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> to add the necessary stability. The flow rates of the two liquid streams can be varied to control the proper residence time in each liquid section to accommodate the production of gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> of differing settling velocities. A valve is provided for continuous removal of the stabilized gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> from the bottom of the column.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf"><span>49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span> (or granules), expandable, evolving flammable vapor and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2014-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2014-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf"><span>49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span> (or granules), expandable evolving flammable vapor and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2012-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2012-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf"><span>49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span> (or granules), expandable, evolving flammable vapor and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf"><span>49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span> (or granules), expandable evolving flammable vapor and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title49-vol2-sec173-221.pdf"><span>49 CFR 173.221 - Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.221 Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span>, expandable and Plastic molding compound. (a) Non-bulk shipments of Polymeric <span class="hlt">beads</span> (or granules), expandable, evolving flammable vapor and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27987845','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27987845"><span>Alginate/bacterial cellulose nanocomposite <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared using Gluconacetobacter xylinus and their application in lipase immobilization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Saerom; Kim, Hyungsup; Kim, Hyung Joo; Yang, Yung-Hun; Kim, Yong Hwan; Jung, Sang-Kyu; Kan, Eunsung; Lee, Sang Hyun</p> <p>2017-02-10</p> <p>Alginate/bacterial cellulose nanocomposite <span class="hlt">beads</span>, with well-controlled size and regular spherical shapes, were prepared in a simple manner by entrapping Gluconacetobacter xylinus in barium alginate hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span>, followed by cultivation of the entrapped cells in culture media with a low sodium ion concentration. The entire surface of the alginate hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing the cells was covered with cellulose fibers (∼30nm) after 36h of cultivation. The cellulose crystallinity index of the alginate/bacterial cellulose <span class="hlt">beads</span> was 0.7, which was slightly lower than that of bacterial cellulose prepared by cultivating dispersed cells. The water vapor sorption capacity of the alginate/bacterial cellulose <span class="hlt">beads</span> increased significantly from 0.07 to 38.00 (g/g dry <span class="hlt">bead</span>) as cultivation time increased. These results clearly indicate that alginate/bacterial cellulose <span class="hlt">beads</span> have a much higher surface area, crystallinity, and water-holding capacity than alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The immobilization of lipase on the surface of the nanocomposite <span class="hlt">beads</span> was also investigated as a potential application of this system. The activity and specific activity of lipase immobilized on alginate/bacterial cellulose <span class="hlt">beads</span> were 2.6- and 3.8-fold higher, respectively, than that of lipase immobilized on cellulose <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The alginate/bacterial cellulose nanocomposite <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared in this study have several potential applications in the biocatalytic, biomedical, and pharmaceutical fields because of their biocompatibility, biodegradability, high crystallinity, and large surface area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070018890','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070018890"><span>Picture Wall (<span class="hlt">Glass</span> Structures)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Photo shows a subway station in Toronto, Ontario, which is entirely <span class="hlt">glass</span>-enclosed. The all-<span class="hlt">glass</span> structure was made possible by a unique glazing concept developed by PPG Industries, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of flat <span class="hlt">glass</span>. In the TVS glazing system, transparent <span class="hlt">glass</span> "fins" replace conventional vertical support members used to provide support for wind load resistance. For stiffening, silicone sealant bonds the fins to adjacent <span class="hlt">glass</span> panels. At its <span class="hlt">glass</span> research center near Pittsburgh, PPG Industries uses the NASTRAN computer program to analyze the stability of enclosures made entirely of <span class="hlt">glass</span>. The company also uses NASTRAN to simulate stresses on large containers of molten <span class="hlt">glass</span> and to analyze stress effects of solar heating on flat <span class="hlt">glass</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22257895','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22257895"><span>Properties of crystalline phase in waste <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Usami, T.; Uruga, K.; Tsukada, T.; Miura, Y.; Komamine, S.; Ochi, E.</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Depending on the operating conditions of the vitrification process of high-level liquid waste, some crystalline phases can be present. The crystalline phase exists as molten salt at <span class="hlt">glass</span> melting temperature. In this study, the chemical and physical properties of the crystalline phase were determined. Two samples rich in Mo and a sample rich in Re were examined. One of the samples rich in Mo was obtained from simulated waste solution and <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a middle scale melter, while two other samples were made from mixed reagents. The chemical forms of the constituents were determined by XRD and SEM-EDX. When Mo is dominant, the crystal is mainly composed of molybdates of Na, Li, Ba and Ca, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and CsReO{sub 4}. When Re is dominant, (Na{sub x}Cs{sub 1-x})ReO{sub 4} and NaLiMoO{sub 4} are added. The characteristic temperature and the heat of transition were determined by differential scanning calorimetry. The density of the molten salt at high temperature was measured from buoyancy. The density of the molten salt is larger than that of molten <span class="hlt">glass</span>, and increases with Re content. (authors)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10146444','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10146444"><span>Bioactive <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and <span class="hlt">glass</span>-ceramics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rawlings, R D</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Bioactive materials are designed to induce a specific biological activity; in most cases the desired biological activity is one that will give strong bonding to bone. A range of materials has been assessed as being capable of bonding to bone, but this paper is solely concerned with bioactive <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and <span class="hlt">glass</span>-ceramics. Firstly, the structure and processing of <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and <span class="hlt">glass</span>-ceramics are described, as a basic knowledge is essential for the understanding of the development and properties of the bioactive materials. The effect of composition and structure on the bioactivity is then discussed, and it will be shown that bioactivity is associated with the formation of an apatite layer on the surface of the implant. A survey of mechanical performance demonstrates that the structure and mechanical properties of <span class="hlt">glass</span>-ceramics depend upon whether the processing involves casting or sintering and that the strength and toughness of <span class="hlt">glass</span>-ceramics are superior to those of <span class="hlt">glasses</span>. Attempts to further improve the mechanical performance by the use of non-monolithic components, i.e. bioactive coatings on metal substrates and <span class="hlt">glass</span> and <span class="hlt">glass</span>-ceramic matrix composites, are also reviewed and are shown to have varying degrees of success. Finally, some miscellaneous applications, namely bioactive bone cements and bone fillers, are briefly covered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780024317','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780024317"><span>Reaction cured <span class="hlt">glass</span> and <span class="hlt">glass</span> coatings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B.; Katvala, V. W. (Inventor)</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>The invention relates to reaction cured <span class="hlt">glass</span> and <span class="hlt">glass</span> coatings prepared by reacting a compound selected from the group consisting of silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, other boron silicides, boron and mixtures with a reactive <span class="hlt">glass</span> frit composed of a porous high silica borosilicate <span class="hlt">glass</span> and boron oxide. The glassy composites of the present invention are useful as coatings on low density fibrous porous silica insulations used as heat shields and for articles such as reaction vessels that are subjected to high temperatures with rapid heating and cooling and that require resistance to temperature and repeated thermal shock at temperatures up to about 1482C (2700PF).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780057824&hterms=Gabbro&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DGabbro','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780057824&hterms=Gabbro&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DGabbro"><span>The Apollo 17 drill core - Modal petrology and <span class="hlt">glass</span> chemistry /sections 70007, 70008, 70009/</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>On the basis of modal petrography the upper, mare basalt-rich portion of the Apollo 17 drill core (sections 70007, 70008, 70009) can be subdivided into three major stratigraphic units. The lower unit (a) falls within 70007, is relatively mature, and contains evidence of an increase in highland component and decrease of mare component within the lower approximately 8 cm. The middle unit (b) is coarse-grained and relatively immature; this unit has the highest concentration of mare basalt lithic and mineral fragments and mare orange/black <span class="hlt">glasses</span>. The top unit (c) falls within 70009 and is relatively mature. Within these three sections of the drill core, there are compositional clusters of <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> that correspond to high Ti subfloor basalt (orange/black <span class="hlt">glass</span>), anorthositic gabbro (clear <span class="hlt">glass</span>), and a new very low Ti (VLT) mare basalt (yellow/green <span class="hlt">glass</span>).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ne0072.photos.198156p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ne0072.photos.198156p/"><span>6. Looking <span class="hlt">glass</span> aircraft in the project looking <span class="hlt">glass</span> historic ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>6. Looking <span class="hlt">glass</span> aircraft in the project looking <span class="hlt">glass</span> historic district. View to north. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Airborne Command Post, Looking <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Avenue between Comstat Drive & Nightwatch Avenue, Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920013463','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920013463"><span>Oxynitride <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many <span class="hlt">glass</span> properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the <span class="hlt">glass</span> structure. Oxynitride <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and fibers of <span class="hlt">glass</span> compositions similar to commercial oxide <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made <span class="hlt">glasses</span> with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten <span class="hlt">glass</span> in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving <span class="hlt">glass</span> quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride <span class="hlt">glasses</span> indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19710000510','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19710000510"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> tube splitting tool</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Klein, J. A.; Murray, C. D.; Stein, J. A.</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>Tool accurately splits <span class="hlt">glass</span> tubing so cuts are aligned 180 deg apart and reassembled tube forms low pressure, gastight enclosure. Device should interest industries using cylindrical closed <span class="hlt">glass</span> containers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720000363','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720000363"><span>Failure in <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Keeton, S. C.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>Review of state of the art concerning <span class="hlt">glass</span> failure mechanisms and fatigue theories discusses brittle fracture in <span class="hlt">glass</span>, fatigue mechanisms, fatigue behavior, environmental effects on failure rate, and aging.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20653409','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20653409"><span>Bile salt-reinforced alginate-chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Takka, Sevgi; Cali, Aybige Gürel</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A polymeric delayed release protein delivery system was investigated with albumin as the model drug. The polysaccharide chitosan was reacted with sodium alginate in the presence of calcium chloride to form <span class="hlt">beads</span> with a polyelectrolyte. In this study, attempts were made to extend albumin release in the phosphate buffer at pH 6.8 from the alginate-chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span> by reinforcing the matrix with bile salts. Sodium taurocholate was able to prevent albumin release at pH 1.2, protecting the protein from the acidic environment and extending the total albumin release at pH 6.8. This effect was explained by an interaction between the permanent negatively charged sulfonic acid of sodium taurocholate with the amino groups of chitosan. Mild formulation conditions, high bovine serum albumin (BSA) entrapment efficiency, and resistance to gastrointestinal release seem to be synergic and promising factors toward the development of an oral protein delivery form.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21413496','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21413496"><span>Frictionless Demonstration Using Fine Plastic <span class="hlt">Beads</span> For Teaching Mechanics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ishii, K.; Kagawa, K.; Khumaeni, A.; Kurniawan, K. H.</p> <p>2010-07-28</p> <p>New equipment for demonstrating laws of mechanics have successfully been constructed utilizing fine sphere plastic <span class="hlt">beads</span> (0.3 mm in diameter). Fine plastic <span class="hlt">beads</span> function as ball bearings to reduce the friction between the object and the plate surface. By this method, a quantitative measurement of energy conservation law has successfully been carried out with a small error of less 3%. The strong advantage of this frictionless method is that we can always use the same objects like Petri dishes for demonstrating many kinds of mechanics laws, such as the first, second, and the third laws of motion, momentum conservation law, and energy conservation law. This demonstration method surely has a beneficial effect for students, who can then understand mechanics laws systematically with a unified concept and no confusion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995JPhy2...5...53G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995JPhy2...5...53G"><span>Plasticity of an Amorphous Assembly of Elastic Gel <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Grosshans, D.; Knaebel, A.; Lequeux, F.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>We have studied the rheological properties of an assembly of swollen gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a lack of solvent. The system is an amorphous assembly of packed soft spheres in a given volume. We have studied the plastic behavior of the system, and interpreted it in terms of <span class="hlt">bead</span> rearrangements within the assembly. Nous avons étudié les propriétés rhéologiques d'un assemblage de billes de gel gonflées en défaut de solvant. Le système est donc une assemblée amorphe de sphères molles écrasées à volume total constant. Nous avons étudié divers aspects du comportement plastique et nous l'avons interprété en termes de réorganisations de billes dans l'assemblage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18246487','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18246487"><span>Shape optimization and characterization of polysaccharide <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared by ionotropic gelation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Smrdel, Polona; Bogataj, Marija; Zega, Anamarija; Planinsek, Odon; Mrhar, Ales</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>The shape of drug loaded polysaccharide <span class="hlt">beads</span> produced by ionotropic gelation has been optimized, with the aim of producing spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span> suitable for further technological operations, such as coating. The optimization was performed on a model system sodium alginate/theophylline by inclusion of various fillers. Incorporation of excipients markedly influenced the morphological characteristics of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The undesired irregular shape of <span class="hlt">beads</span> caused by incorporation of the drug could only be improved by incorporating a combination of polycarbophil (PK) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The spherical shape of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> was stabilized mechanically by numerous air bubbles trapped inside the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, which prevented the collapse of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> during drying. The optimized method was shown to be applicable to a target system of pectin and an anti-inflammatory drug, LK-423.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19962883','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19962883"><span>Adsorption of congo red by chitosan hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> impregnated with carbon nanotubes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chatterjee, Sudipta; Lee, Min W; Woo, Seung H</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>The adsorption performance of chitosan (CS) hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> was investigated after multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) impregnation for the removal of congo red (CR) as an anionic dye. The study of the adsorption capacity of CS/CNT <span class="hlt">beads</span> as a function of the CNT concentration indicated that 0.01% CNT impregnation was the most useful for enhancing the adsorption capacity. The sulfur (%) in the CS/CNT <span class="hlt">beads</span> measured by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) was 2.5 times higher than that of normal CS <span class="hlt">beads</span> after CR adsorption. Equilibrium adsorption isotherm data of the CS/CNT <span class="hlt">beads</span> exhibited better fit to the Langmuir isotherm model than to the Freundlich isotherm model, and the heterogeneity factor (n) value of the CS/CNT <span class="hlt">beads</span> calculated from the Sips isotherm model was close to unity (0.98). The maximum adsorption capacity of CS/CNT <span class="hlt">beads</span> obtained from the Langmuir model was 450.4 mg g(-1).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12593965','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12593965"><span>Residual gentamicin-release from antibiotic-loaded polymethylmethacrylate <span class="hlt">beads</span> after 5 years of implantation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Neut, Daniëlle; van de Belt, Hilbrand; van Horn, Jim R; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J</p> <p>2003-05-01</p> <p>In infected joint arthroplasty, high local levels of antibiotics are achieved through temporary implantation of non-biodegradable gentamicin-loaded polymethylmethacrylate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Despite their antibiotic release, these <span class="hlt">beads</span> act as a biomaterial surface to which bacteria preferentially adhere, grow and potentially develop antibiotic resistance. In routine clinical practice, these <span class="hlt">beads</span> are removed after 14 days, but for a variety of reasons, we were confronted with a patient in which these <span class="hlt">beads</span> were left in situ for 5 years. Retrieval of gentamicin-loaded <span class="hlt">beads</span> from this patient constituted an exceptional case to study the effects of long-term implantation on potentially colonizing microflora and gentamicin release. Gentamicin-release test revealed residual antibiotic release after being 5 years in situ and extensive microbiological sampling resulted in recovery of a gentamicin-resistant staphylococcal strain from the <span class="hlt">bead</span> surface. This case emphasizes the importance of developing biodegradable antibiotic-loaded <span class="hlt">beads</span> as an antibiotic delivery system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26386220','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26386220"><span>Effect of Cellulose Acetate <span class="hlt">Beads</span> on the Release of Transforming Growth Factor-β.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yagi, Makoto; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Rika; Mizumoto, Naoko; Kanno, Nana; Ueno, Yoshiyuki</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is released by activated platelets and induces the differentiation of T-helper 17 from naïve T cells. Contact between blood and cellulose acetate (CA) <span class="hlt">beads</span> induces cytokine release, although their inflammatory effects on TGF-β release are unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> on the release of TGF-β in vitro. We incubated peripheral blood with and without CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> and measured platelets and TGF-β. Compared with blood samples incubated without <span class="hlt">beads</span>, the platelet count and amount of TGF-β significantly decreased in blood samples incubated with CA <span class="hlt">beads</span>. In conclusion, CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> inhibited the release of TGF-β from adsorbed platelets. The biological effects of this reduction of TGF-β release during platelet adsorption to CA <span class="hlt">beads</span> need further clarification.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930021684','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930021684"><span>Structural response of <span class="hlt">bead</span>-stiffened thermoplastic shear webs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rouse, Marshall</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The results of an experimental and analytical study of the structural response and failure characteristics of selected <span class="hlt">bead</span>-stiffened thermoplastic shear-webs are presented. Results are given for specimens with one stiffeneer, with two stiffeners, and different stiffener geometries. Selected analytical results that were obtained with the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed computer code are presented. Analytical results that describe normal and transverse shear stress are also presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://cancergenome.nih.gov/abouttcga/aboutdata/platformdesign/illuminamethylation450','NCI'); return false;" href="https://cancergenome.nih.gov/abouttcga/aboutdata/platformdesign/illuminamethylation450"><span>Infinium HumanMethylation450 <span class="hlt">Bead</span>Chip</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The HumanMethylation450 <span class="hlt">Bead</span>Chip offers a unique combination of comprehensive, expert-selected coverage and high throughput at a low price, making it ideal for screening large sample populations such as those used in genome-wide association study cohorts. By providing quantitative methylation measurement at the single-CpG–site level for normal and FFPE samples, this assay offers powerful resolution for understanding epigenetic changes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20656897','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20656897"><span>Antibiotic-loaded cement <span class="hlt">beads</span> for Charcot ankle osteomyelitis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>The concomitant presence of osteomyelitis and diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle places those patients affected at increased risk for limb loss. Antibiotic-loaded cement has been reported to be useful in the treatment of deep soft tissue and joint infections. The authors present an overview of this adjunctive treatment modality and present a case report using antibiotic-loaded cement <span class="hlt">beads</span> in staged reconstruction for Charcot ankle osteomyelitis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9443E..1JW','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9443E..1JW"><span>Weakly supervised <span class="hlt">glasses</span> removal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Yisu; Wen, Lijie</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glasses</span> removal is an important task on face recognition, in this paper, we provide a weakly supervised method to remove eyeglasses from an input face image automatically. We choose sparse coding as face reconstruction method, and optical flow to find exact shape of <span class="hlt">glasses</span>. We combine the two processes iteratively to remove <span class="hlt">glasses</span> more accurately. The experimental results reveal that our method works much better than these algorithms alone, and it can remove various <span class="hlt">glasses</span> to obtain natural looking glassless facial images.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94a2907S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94a2907S"><span>Liquid morphologies and capillary forces between three spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Semprebon, Ciro; Scheel, Mario; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Equilibrium shapes of coalesced pendular bridges in a static assembly of spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span> are computed by numerical minimization of the interfacial energy. Our present study focuses on generic <span class="hlt">bead</span> configurations involving three <span class="hlt">beads</span>, one of which is in contact to the two others while there is a gap of variable size between the latter. In agreement with previous experimental studies, we find interfacial "trimer" morphologies consisting of three coalesced pendular bridges, and "dimers" of two coalesced bridges. In a certain range of the gap opening we observe a bistability between the dimer and trimer morphology during changes of the liquid volume. The magnitude of the corresponding capillary forces in presence of a trimer or dimer depends, besides the gap opening, only on the volume or Laplace pressure of the liquid. For a given Laplace pressure, and for the same gap opening, the capillary forces induced by a trimer are only slightly larger than the corresponding forces in the presence of three pendular bridges. This observation is consistent with a plateau of capillary cohesion in terms of the saturation of a wetting liquid in the funicular regime, as reported in the experimental work [Scheel et al., Nat. Mater. 7, 189 (2008), 10.1038/nmat2117].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20886906','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20886906"><span>Random glycopeptide <span class="hlt">bead</span> libraries for seromic biomarker discovery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kracun, Stjepan K; Cló, Emiliano; Clausen, Henrik; Levery, Steven B; Jensen, Knud J; Blixt, Ola</p> <p>2010-12-03</p> <p>Identification of disease-specific biomarkers is important to address early diagnosis and management of disease. Aberrant post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins such as O-glycosylations (O-PTMs) are emerging as triggers of autoantibodies that can serve as sensitive biomarkers. Here we have developed a random glycopeptide <span class="hlt">bead</span> library screening platform for detection of autoantibodies and other binding proteins. Libraries were build on biocompatible PEGA <span class="hlt">beads</span> including a safety-catch C-terminal amide linker (SCAL) that allowed mild cleavage conditions (I(2)/NaBH(4) and TFA) for release of glycopeptides and sequence determination by ESI-Orbitrap-MS(n). As proof-of-principle, tumor -specific glycopeptide reporter epitopes were built-in into the libraries and were detected by tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies and autoantibodies from cancer patients. Sequenced and identified glycopeptides were resynthesized at the preparative scale by automated parallel peptide synthesis and printed on microarrays for validation and broader analysis with larger sets of sera. We further showed that chemical synthesis of the monosaccharide O-glycopeptide library (Tn-glycoform) could be diversified to other tumor glycoforms by on-<span class="hlt">bead</span> enzymatic glycosylation reactions with recombinant glycosyltransferases. Hence, we have developed a high-throughput flexible platform for rapid discovery of O-glycopeptide biomarkers and the method has applicability in other types of assays such as lectin/antibody/enzyme specificity studies as well as investigation of other PTMs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26709997','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26709997"><span>Microbubble Fabrication of Concave-porosity PDMS <span class="hlt">Beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bertram, John R; Nee, Matthew J</p> <p>2015-12-15</p> <p>Microbubble fabrication (by use of a fine emulsion) provides a means of increasing the surface-area-to-volume (SAV) ratio of polymer materials, which is particularly useful for separations applications. Porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be produced by heat-curing such an emulsion, allowing the interface between the aqueous and aliphatic phases to mold the morphology of the polymer. In the procedures described here, both polymer and crosslinker (triethoxysilane) are sonicated together in a cold-bath sonicator. Following a period of cross-linking, emulsions are added dropwise to a hot surfactant solution, allowing the aqueous phase of the emulsion to separate, and forming porous polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span>. We demonstrate that this method can be tuned, and the SAV ratio optimized, by adjusting the electrolyte content of the aqueous phase in the emulsion. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> produced in this way are imaged with scanning electron microscopy, and representative SAV ratios are determined using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. Considerable variability with the electrolyte identity is observed, but the general trend is consistent: there is a maximum in SAV obtained at a specific concentration, after which porosity decreases markedly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993CmpSt..25..469L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993CmpSt..25..469L"><span>Buckling of open-section <span class="hlt">bead</span>-stiffened composite panels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Laananen, D. H.; Renze, S. P.</p> <p></p> <p>Stiffened panels are structures that can be designed to efficiently support inplane compression, bending, and shear loads. Although the stiffeners are usually discrete elements which are fastened or bonded to a flat or continuously curved plate, manufacturing methods such as thermoforming allow integral formation of the stiffeners in a panel. Such a configuration offers potential advantages in terms of a reduced number of parts and manufacturing operations. For thermoplastic composite panels stiffened by integrally formed open-section <span class="hlt">beads</span>, the effects of <span class="hlt">bead</span> spacing and bend cross-section geometry on the initiation of buckling under uniaxial compression and uniform shear loading were investigated. Finite elements results for a range of stiffened panel sizes and <span class="hlt">bead</span> geometries are presented and compared with approximate closed-form solutions based on an effective flat plate size. Experimental verification of analytical predictions for one of the shear panels and one of the compression panels is described. Compensation of the forming tool to reduce the degree of initial curvature of the panels was found to be necessary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810000209&hterms=Machining+processes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DMachining%2Bprocesses','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810000209&hterms=Machining+processes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DMachining%2Bprocesses"><span>Technique for Machining <span class="hlt">Glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rice, S. H.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Process for machining <span class="hlt">glass</span> with conventional carbide tools requires a small quantity of a lubricant for aluminum applied to area of <span class="hlt">glass</span> to be machined. A carbide tool is then placed against workpiece with light pressure. Tool is raised periodically to clear work of <span class="hlt">glass</span> dust and particles. Additional lubricant is applied as it is displaced.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Atomic+AND+structure&pg=7&id=EJ723748','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Atomic+AND+structure&pg=7&id=EJ723748"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> in Class</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Greaves, Neville</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glass</span> is reviewed from fabrication to application, laying emphasis on the wide-ranging physics involved. This begins with liquids and solids and the way in which <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are defined and can be demonstrated in the classroom. At the atomic level the regular structure of crystals and their irregular counterparts in <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are explained through…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20365559','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20365559"><span>Anisotropic nonlinear elasticity in a spherical-<span class="hlt">bead</span> pack: influence of the fabric anisotropy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Khidas, Yacine; Jia, Xiaoping</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Stress-strain measurements and ultrasound propagation experiments in <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> packs have been simultaneously conducted to characterize the stress-induced anisotropy under uniaxial loading. These measurements realized, respectively, with finite and incremental deformations of the granular assembly, are analyzed within the framework of the effective-medium theory based on the Hertz-Mindlin contact theory. Our work shows that both compressional and shear wave velocities and consequently the incremental elastic moduli agree fairly well with an effective-medium model developed by Johnson [J. Appl. Mech. 65, 380 (1998)] for the oedometric test, but the anisotropic stress ratio resulting from finite deformation does not at all. As indicated by numerical simulations, the discrepancy may arise from the fact that the model does not properly allow the grains to relax from the affine motion approximation. Here we find that the interaction nature at the grain contact could also play a crucial role for the relevant prediction by the model; indeed, such discrepancy can be significantly reduced if the frictional resistance between grains is removed. Another main experimental finding is the influence of the inherent anisotropy of granular packs, realized by different protocols of the sample preparation. Our results reveal that compressional waves are more sensitive to the stress-induced anisotropy, whereas the shear waves are more sensitive to the fabric anisotropy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7247401','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7247401"><span>Radiation coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.</p> <p>1986-11-04</p> <p>A radiation coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span> is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of <span class="hlt">glass</span>. The coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span> includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span> is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span> does not lose transparency. 3 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866043','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866043"><span>Radiation coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A radiation coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span> is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of <span class="hlt">glass</span>. The coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span> includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span> is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant <span class="hlt">glass</span> does not lose transparency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867767','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867767"><span>Oxynitride <span class="hlt">glass</span> production procedure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Weidner, Jerry R.; Schuetz, Stanley T.; O'Brien, Michael H.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The invention is a process for the preparation of high quality oxynitride <span class="hlt">glasses</span> without resorting to high pressures. Nitrogen-containing compounds such as Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 are first encapsulated in a low melting temperature <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Particles of the encapsulated nitrogen-containing compound are mixed with other oxide <span class="hlt">glass</span>-formers and melted in an atmosphere of flowing nitrogen and in the presence of buffering gas to form the oxynitride <span class="hlt">glass</span>. <span class="hlt">Glasses</span> containing up to 15 at % nitrogen have been prepared by this method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4462...75D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4462...75D"><span>Developing photorefractive <span class="hlt">glass</span> composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Duignan, Jason P.; Taylor, Lesley L.; Cook, Gary</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The production of a transparent photorefractive <span class="hlt">glass</span> composite would offer a useful alternative to bulk crystal materials. We aim to produce such a material by incorporating single domain photorefractive Fe:LiNbO3 particles into a refractive index matched <span class="hlt">glass</span> host. This <span class="hlt">glass</span> host is also required to be chemically compatible with the photorefractive material. This compatibility will ensure that the Fe:LiNbO3 particles added to the host <span class="hlt">glass</span> will remain in the intended crystalline phase and not simply dissolve in the <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Due to the high refractive index of the Fe:LiNbO3 (no equals 2.35 532 nm), producing a chemically compatible and refractive index matched <span class="hlt">glass</span> host is technically challenging. By examining common Tellurite, Bismuthate, and Gallate <span class="hlt">glasses</span> as a starting point and then developing new and hybrid <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, we have succeeded in producing a chemically compatible <span class="hlt">glass</span> host and also a refractive index matched <span class="hlt">glass</span> host. We have produced preliminary <span class="hlt">glass</span> composite samples which contain a large amount of Fe:LiNbO3. We are currently able to retain nearly 90% of the incorporated Fe:LiNbO3 in the correct crystalline phase, a substantial improvement over previous work conducted in this area in recent years. In this paper we present our progress and findings in this area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ASAJ..115.2566R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ASAJ..115.2566R"><span>Acoustics of <span class="hlt">glass</span> harmonicas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rossing, Thomas D.</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glass</span> musical instruments are probably as old as glassmaking. At least as early as the 17th century it was discovered that wine <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, when rubbed with a wet finger, produced a musical tone. A collection of <span class="hlt">glasses</span> played in this manner is called a <span class="hlt">glass</span> harp. Another type of <span class="hlt">glass</span> harmonica, called the armonica by its inventor Benjamin Franklin, employs <span class="hlt">glass</span> bowls or cups turned by a horizontal axle, so the performer need only touch the rim of the bowls as they rotate to set them into vibration. We discuss the modes of vibration of both types of <span class="hlt">glass</span> harmonica, and describe the different sounds that are emitted by rubbing, tapping, or bowing them. Rubbing with a wet finger tends to excite only the (2,0) mode and its harmonics through a ``stick-slip'' process, while tapping excites the other modes as well.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17284012','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17284012"><span>Acceleration of microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion reactions by magnetite <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie</p> <p>2007-03-15</p> <p>In this study, we demonstrated that microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion could be greatly accelerated by multifunctional magnetite <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The acceleration of microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion by the presence of the magnetite <span class="hlt">beads</span> was attributable to several features of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Their capacity to absorb microwave radiation leads to rapid heating of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Furthermore, their negatively charged functionalities cause adsorption of proteins with opposite charges onto their surfaces by electrostatic interactions, leading to a concentration on the surfaces of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> of proteins present in trace amounts in the solution. The adsorbed proteins are denatured and hence rendered vulnerable to enzymatic digestion and are digested on the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. For microwave heating, 30 s was sufficient for carrying out the tryptic digestion of cytochrome c, in the presence of magnetite <span class="hlt">beads</span>, while 1 min was adequate for tryptic digestion of myoglobin. The digestion products were characterized by MALDI-MS. This rapid enzymatic digestion allowed the entire time for identification of proteins to be greatly reduced. Furthermore, specific proteins present in trace quantities were enriched from the sample on the magnetite <span class="hlt">beads</span> and could be rapidly isolated from the sample by employing an external magnetic field. These multiple roles of magnetite <span class="hlt">beads</span>, as the absorber for microwave irradiation, the concentrating probe, and the agent for unfolding proteins, contributed to their capability of accelerating microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion. We also demonstrated that trypsin immobilized magnetite <span class="hlt">beads</span> were suitable for use in microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1300639','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1300639"><span>Theoretical formalism for kinesin motility I. <span class="hlt">Bead</span> movement powered by single one-headed kinesins.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chen, Y d</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The directional movement on a microtubule of a plastic <span class="hlt">bead</span> connected elastically to a single one-headed kinesin motor is studied theoretically. The kinesin motor can bind and unbind to periodic binding sites on the microtubule and undergo conformational changes while catalyzing the hydrolysis of ATP. An analytic formalism relating the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> and the ATP hydrolysis cycle of the motor is derived so that the calculation of the average velocity of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> can be easily carried out. The formalism was applied to a simple three-state biochemical model to investigate how the velocity of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> movement is affected by the external load, the diffusion coefficient of the <span class="hlt">bead</span>, and the stiffness of the elastic element connecting the <span class="hlt">bead</span> and the motor. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> velocity was found to be critically dependent on the diffusion coefficient of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> and the stiffness of the elastic element. A linear force-velocity relation was found for the model no matter whether the <span class="hlt">bead</span> velocity was modulated by the diffusion coefficient of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> or by the externally applied load. The formalism should be useful in modeling the mechanisms of chemimechanical coupling in kinesin motors based on in vitro motility data. PMID:10620295</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPB..2940033Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPB..2940033Y"><span>Modeling of weld <span class="hlt">bead</span> geometry for rapid manufacturing by robotic GMAW</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yang, Tao; Xiong, Jun; Chen, Hui; Chen, Yong</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Weld-based rapid prototyping (RP) has shown great promises for fabricating 3D complex parts. During the layered deposition of forming metallic parts with robotic gas metal arc welding, the geometry of a single weld <span class="hlt">bead</span> has an important influence on surface finish quality, layer thickness and dimensional accuracy of the deposited layer. In order to obtain accurate, predictable and controllable <span class="hlt">bead</span> geometry, it is essential to understand the relationships between the process variables with the <span class="hlt">bead</span> geometry (<span class="hlt">bead</span> width, <span class="hlt">bead</span> height and ratio of <span class="hlt">bead</span> width to <span class="hlt">bead</span> height). This paper highlights an experimental study carried out to develop mathematical models to predict deposited <span class="hlt">bead</span> geometry through the quadratic general rotary unitized design. The adequacy and significance of the models were verified via the analysis of variance. Complicated cause-effect relationships between the process parameters and the <span class="hlt">bead</span> geometry were revealed. Results show that the developed models can be applied to predict the desired <span class="hlt">bead</span> geometry with great accuracy in layered deposition with accordance to the slicing process of RP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24705415','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24705415"><span>Echicetin coated polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span>: a novel tool to investigate GPIb-specific platelet activation and aggregation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Navdaev, Alexey; Subramanian, Hariharan; Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span>, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin <span class="hlt">beads</span> to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin <span class="hlt">beads</span> was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin <span class="hlt">beads</span> induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin <span class="hlt">beads</span> induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin <span class="hlt">bead</span> triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin <span class="hlt">bead</span>-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated <span class="hlt">beads</span> are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27318817','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27318817"><span>Entrapment of cross-linked cellulase colloids in alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> for hydrolysis of cellulose.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nguyen, Le Truc; Lau, Yun Song; Yang, Kun-Lin</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Entrapment of enzymes in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> is a popular enzyme immobilization method. However, leaching of immobilized enzymes from the alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> is a common problem because enzyme molecules are much smaller than the pore size of alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> (∼200nm). To address this issue, we employ a millifluidic reactor to prepare cross-linked cellulase aggregate (XCA) colloids with a uniform size (∼300nm). Subsequently, these colloids are immobilized in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> as biocatalysts to hydrolyze cellulose substrates. By using fluorescent microscopy, we conclude that the immobilized XCA colloids distribute uniformly inside the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and do not leach out from the <span class="hlt">beads</span> after long-term incubation. Meanwhile, the pore size of the alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> is big enough for the cellulose substrates and fibers to diffuse into the <span class="hlt">beads</span> for hydrolysis. For example, palm oil fiber and microcrystalline cellulose can be hydrolyzed within 48h and release reducing sugar concentrations up to 2.48±0.08g/l and 4.99±0.09g/l, respectively. Moreover, after 10 cycles of hydrolysis, 96.4% of the XCA colloids remain inside the alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> and retain 67% of the original activity. In contrast, free cellulase immobilized in the alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> loses its activity completely after 10 cycles. The strategy can also be used to prepare other types of cross-linked enzyme aggregates with high uniformity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25817550','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25817550"><span>Dose-response curve of a microfluidic magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based surface coverage sandwich assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cornaglia, Matteo; Trouillon, Raphaël; Tekin, H Cumhur; Lehnert, Thomas; Gijs, Martin A M</p> <p>2015-09-25</p> <p>Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles ('magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>') have been used to advantage in many microfluidic devices for sensitive antigen (Ag) detection. Today, assays that use as read-out of the signal the number count of immobilized <span class="hlt">beads</span> on a surface for quantification of a sample's analyte concentration have been among the most sensitive and have allowed protein detection lower than the fgmL(-1) concentration range. Recently, we have proposed in this category a magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> surface coverage assay (Tekin et al., 2013 [1]), in which 'large' (2.8μm) antibody (Ab)-functionalized magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> captured their Ag from a serum and these Ag-carrying <span class="hlt">beads</span> were subsequently exposed to a surface pattern of fixed 'small' (1.0μm) Ab-coated magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>. When the system was exposed to a magnetic induction field, the magnet dipole attractive interactions between the two <span class="hlt">bead</span> types were used as a handle to approach both <span class="hlt">bead</span> surfaces and assist with Ag-Ab immunocomplex formation, while unspecific binding (in absence of an Ag) of a large <span class="hlt">bead</span> was reduced by exploiting viscous drag flow. The dose-response curve of this type of assay had two remarkable features: (i) its ability to detect an output signal (i.e. <span class="hlt">bead</span> number count) for very low Ag concentrations, and (ii) an output signal of the assay that was non-linear with respect to Ag concentration. We explain here the observed dose-response curves and show that the type of interactions and the concept of our assay are in favour of detecting the lowest analyte concentrations (where typically either zero or one Ag is carried per large <span class="hlt">bead</span>), while higher concentrations are less efficiently detected. We propose a random walk process for the Ag-carrying <span class="hlt">bead</span> over the magnetic landscape of small <span class="hlt">beads</span> and this model description explains the enhanced overall capture probability of this assay and its particular non-linear dose response curves.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15778044','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15778044"><span>Molecular interaction in alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> reinforced with sodium starch glycolate or magnesium aluminum silicate, and their physical characteristics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Priprem, Aroonsri</p> <p>2005-04-11</p> <p>Diclofenac calcium-alginate (DCA) <span class="hlt">beads</span> were reinforced with different amounts of sodium starch glycolate (SSG) or magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) and were prepared using ionotropic gelation method. Complex formation of sodium alginate (SA) and SSG or MAS in calcium-alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> was revealed using FTIR spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetric study indicated that diclofenac sodium (DS) in amorphous form was dispersed in the matrix of DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The thermal behavior of SSG-DCA and MAS-DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> was similar to the control <span class="hlt">bead</span>. Both additives can improve the entrapment efficiency of DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The swelling and water uptake of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> depended on the properties of incorporated additives. The SSG-DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed a higher water uptake and swelling than MAS-DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Moreover, the swelling of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed a good correlation with the square root of time. The release kinetic of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer was swelling controlled mechanism, while that in distilled water followed Higuchi's model. The slower release rate and the longer lag time in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer was obtained from the SSG-DCA and MAS-DCA <span class="hlt">beads</span> because of complex formation between SA and SSG or MAS. However, SSG in the <span class="hlt">beads</span> could increase the release of DS from the <span class="hlt">beads</span> in distilled water because it acted as a channeling agent. In contrast, MAS retarded the release of DS from the <span class="hlt">beads</span> in distilled water due to the stronger matrix formation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25702912','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25702912"><span>The peculiar behavior of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition temperature of amorphous drug-polymer films coated on inert sugar spheres.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dereymaker, Aswin; Van Den Mooter, Guy</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Fluid bed coating has been proposed in the past as an alternative technology for manufacturing of drug-polymer amorphous solid dispersions, or so-called <span class="hlt">glass</span> solutions. It has the advantage of being a one-step process, and thus omitting separate drying steps, addition of excipients, or manipulation of the dosage form. In search of an adequate sample preparation method for modulated differential scanning calorimetry analysis of <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with <span class="hlt">glass</span> solutions, <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition broadening and decrease of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition temperature (Tg ) were observed with increasing particle size of crushed coated <span class="hlt">beads</span> and crushed isolated films of indomethacin (INDO) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Substituting INDO with naproxen gave comparable results. When ketoconazole was probed or the solvent in INDO-PVP films was switched to dichloromethane (DCM) or a methanol-DCM mixture, two distinct Tg regions were observed. Small particle sizes had a <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition in the high Tg region, and large particle sizes had a <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition in the low Tg region. This particle size-dependent <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition was ascribed to different residual solvent amounts in the bulk and at the surface of the particles. A correlation was observed between the deviation of the Tg from that calculated from the Gordon-Taylor equation and the amount of residual solvent at the Tg of particles with different sizes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110022971','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110022971"><span>Analysis of Lunar Pyroclastic <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Deposit FeO Abundances by LRO Diviner</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Allen, Carlton C.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; DonaldsonHanna, Kerri L.; Paige, David A.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Telescopic observations and orbital images of the Moon reveal at least 75 deposits, often tens to hundreds of km across, that mantle mare or highland surfaces [1]. These deposits are interpreted as the products of pyroclastic eruptions and designated herein as lunar pyroclastic deposits (LPD). They are understood to be composed primarily of sub-millimeter <span class="hlt">beads</span> of basaltic composition, ranging from glassy to partially-crystallized [2]. Delano [3] documented 25 distinct pyroclastic <span class="hlt">bead</span> compositions in lunar soil samples, though the source deposits for most of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> have not been identified. The pyroclastic deposits are important for many reasons. Petrology experiments and modeling have demonstrated that the pyroclastic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are the deepest-sourced and most primitive basalts on the Moon [4]. Recent analyses have documented the presence of water in these <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, demonstrating that the lunar interior is considerably more volatile-rich than previously understood [5]. Experiments have shown that the iron-rich pyroclastic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> release the highest percentage of oxygen of any Apollo soils, making these deposits promising lunar resources [6].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19619992','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19619992"><span>Characteristics and antioxidant activity of catechin-loaded calcium pectinate gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared by internal gelation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Ji-Soo; Kim, Eek-Joo; Chung, Donghwa; Lee, Hyeon Gyu</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>Catechin-loaded calcium pectinate gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared by internal gelation were characterized for their catechin entrapment efficiency and release behavior. The entrapment efficiency was higher when the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared with a lower catechin-to-pectin ratio, shorter gelling time, higher pectin concentration, and lower acetic acid concentration. The entrapment efficiency was much higher under all tested conditions, when the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by internal gelation instead of external gelation. The catechin release was slower for the <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared with lower catechin-to-pectin ratio, longer gelling time, and higher concentrations of pectin and acetic acid in both simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. Antioxidant power of catechin was effectively maintained in alkaline simulated intestinal fluid when catechin was entrapped within the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, compared to cases where it was not entrapped, indicating that the <span class="hlt">beads</span> can protect catechin molecules from the alkaline environment and release them in a sustained fashion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23036278','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23036278"><span>Silver nanoparticle-alginate composite <span class="hlt">beads</span> for point-of-use drinking water disinfection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lin, Shihong; Huang, Rixiang; Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Jie; Lau, Boris L T; Wiesner, Mark R</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)-alginate composite <span class="hlt">beads</span> were synthesized using three different approaches as filler materials of packed columns for simultaneous filtration-disinfection as an alternative portable water treatment process. The prepared composite <span class="hlt">beads</span> were packed into a column through which Escherichia coli containing water was filtered to evaluate the disinfection efficacy. Excellent disinfection performance (no detectable viable colony) was achieved with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) as short as 1 min (the shortest tested) with the SGR (Simultaneous-Gelation-Reduction) and AR (Adsorption-Reduction) <span class="hlt">beads</span> that were prepared using in situ reduction of Ag(+). Comparatively, the SGR <span class="hlt">beads</span> released significantly less Ag(+)/AgNPs than the AR <span class="hlt">beads</span> did within the same HRT. From the results of this study it was identified that SGR may be the best choice among all three different synthesis approaches in that the SGR <span class="hlt">beads</span> can achieve satisfactory bactericidal performance with a relatively low material consumption rate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27455729','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27455729"><span>A Microfluidic Microbeads Fluorescence Assay with Quantum Dots-<span class="hlt">Bead</span>-DNA Probe.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ankireddy, S R; Kim, Jongsung</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>A microfluidic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based nucleic acid sensor for the detection of tumor causing N-Ras genes using quantum dots has been developed. Presently, quantum dots-<span class="hlt">bead</span>-DNA probe based hybridization detection methods are often called as '<span class="hlt">bead</span> based assays' and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capability of the microfluidic technology. This study reports the detection of N-Ras cancer gene by fluorescence quenching of quantum dots immobilized on the surface of polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span>. A microfluidic chip was constructed in which the quantum dots-<span class="hlt">bead</span>-DNA probes were packed in the channel. The target DNA flowed across the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and hybridized with immobilized probe sequences. The target DNA can be detected by the fluorescence quenching of the quantum dots due to their transfer of emission energy to intercalation dye after DNA hybridization. The mutated gene also induces fluorescence quenching but with less degree than the perfectly complementary target DNA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/321193','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/321193"><span>Structurally stable gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> containing entrapped enzyme and method for manufacture thereof</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Woodward, J.</p> <p>1998-12-08</p> <p>This research provides a structurally stable gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> containing an entrapped enzyme and a method for its manufacture. The enzyme is covalently cross-linked to gelatin in the presence of glutaraldehyde prior to the formation of the gel <span class="hlt">bead</span>, to prevent leakage of the enzyme. Propylene glycol alginate is then added to the mixture. Once the gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> are formed, they are then soaked in glutaraldehyde, which imparts structural stability to the gel <span class="hlt">beads</span>. This method can be used with many types of enzymes, such as proteases, carbohydrases, proteases, ligases, isomerases, oxidoreductases, and specialty enzymes. These and other enzymes can be immobilized in the gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> and utilized in a number of enzymatic processes. Exogenously added ions are not required to maintain the structural stability of these gel <span class="hlt">beads</span>. 7 figs.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/872026','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/872026"><span>Structurally stable gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> containing entrapped enzyme and method for manufacture thereof</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Woodward, Jonathan</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>A structurally stable gel <span class="hlt">bead</span> containing an entrapped enzyme and a method for its manufacture. The enzyme is covalently cross-linked to gelatin in the presence of glutaraldehyde prior to the formation of the gel <span class="hlt">bead</span>, to prevent leakage of the enzyme. Propylene glycol alginate is then added to the mixture. Once the gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> are formed, they are then soaked in glutaraldehyde, which imparts structural stability to the gel <span class="hlt">beads</span>. This method can be used with many types of enzymes, such as proteases, carbohydrases, proteases, ligases, isomerases, oxidoreductases, and specialty enzymes. These and other enzymes can be immobilized in the gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> and utilized in a number of enzymatic processes. Exogenously added ions are not required to maintain the structural stability of these gel <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1013411','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1013411"><span>Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA</p> <p>2011-01-11</p> <p>A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608624','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608624"><span>Spontaneous Liver Rupture After Treatment With Drug-Eluting <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ritter, C. O.; Wartenberg, M.; Mottok, A.; Steger, U.; Goltz, J. P.; Hahn, D.; Kickuth, R.</p> <p>2012-02-15</p> <p>Spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a rare and life-threatening complication. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not yet fully known; it is suggested that rupture is preceded by reactive tissue edema and intratumerous bleeding, leading to a rapid expansion of tumour mass with risk of extrahepatic bleeding in the case of subcapsular localisation. This case report discusses a sudden, unexpected lethal complication in a 74 year-old male patient treated with TACE using DC <span class="hlt">Bead</span> loaded with doxorubicin (DEBDOX) in a progressive multifocal HCC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16018254','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16018254"><span>[Enrichment of giant panda microsatellite markers using dynal magnet <span class="hlt">beads</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shen, Fu-Jun; Watts, Phill; Zhang, Zhi-He; Zhang, An-Ju; Sanderson, Stephanie; Kemp, Steve J; Yue, Bi-Song</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>The 400 -600 bp DNA fractions of giant panda containing STR sequences were captured by hybridization with the oligonucleotide probes attached to streptavadin coated magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> (Dynal). The enriched DNA were ligated into pGEM-T and then transformed into E. coil JM109 competent cells. In total 260 positive clones were identified from 2 880 transformants in the libraries which were screened by gamma-32 P radiolabelled probes. Finally, we got 54 sequences and successfully designed 37 pairs of STR primers for giant panda. The results showed that this method is very efficient to isolate microsatellite markers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3574225','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3574225"><span>Hot embossed polyethylene through-hole chips for <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based microfluidic devices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chou, Jie; Du, Nan; Ou, Tina; Floriano, Pierre N.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; McDevitt, John T.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Over the past decade, there has been a growth of interest in the translation of microfluidic systems into real-world clinical practice, especially for use in point-of-care or near patient settings. While initial fabrication advances in microfluidics involved mainly the etching of silicon and <span class="hlt">glass</span>, the economics of scaling of these materials is not amendable for point-of-care usage where single-test applications forces cost considerations to be kept low and throughput high. As such, a materials base more consistent with point-of-care needs is required. In this manuscript, the fabrication of a hot embossed, through-hole low-density polyethylene ensembles derived from an anisotropically etched silicon wafer is discussed. This semi-opaque polymer that can be easily sterilized and recycled provides low background noise for fluorescence measurements and yields more affordable cost than other thermoplastics commonly used for microfluidic applications such as cyclic olefin copolymer (COC). To fabrication through-hole microchips from this alternative material for microfluidics, a fabrication technique that uses a high-temperature, high-pressure resistant mold is described. This aluminum-based epoxy mold, serving as the positive master mold for embossing, is casted over etched arrays of pyramidal pits in a silicon wafer. Methods of surface treatment of the wafer prior to casting and PDMS casting of the epoxy are discussed to preserve the silicon wafer for future use. Changes in the thickness of polyethylene are observed for varying embossing temperatures. The methodology described herein can quickly fabricate 20 disposable, single use chips in less than 30 minutes with the ability to scale up 4x by using multiple molds simultaneously. When coupled as a platform supporting porous <span class="hlt">bead</span> sensors, as in the recently developed Programmable Bio-Nano-Chip, this <span class="hlt">bead</span> chip system can achieve limits of detection, for the cardiac biomarker C-reactive protein, of 0.3 ng/mL, thereby</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23183187','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23183187"><span>Hot embossed polyethylene through-hole chips for <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based microfluidic devices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chou, Jie; Du, Nan; Ou, Tina; Floriano, Pierre N; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; McDevitt, John T</p> <p>2013-04-15</p> <p>Over the past decade, there has been a growth of interest in the translation of microfluidic systems into real-world clinical practice, especially for use in point-of-care or near patient settings. While initial fabrication advances in microfluidics involved mainly the etching of silicon and <span class="hlt">glass</span>, the economics of scaling of these materials is not amendable for point-of-care usage where single-test applications force cost considerations to be kept low and throughput high. As such, materials base more consistent with point-of-care needs is required. In this manuscript, the fabrication of a hot embossed, through-hole low-density polyethylene ensembles derived from an anisotropically etched silicon wafer is discussed. This semi-opaque polymer that can be easily sterilized and recycled provides low background noise for fluorescence measurements and yields more affordable cost than other thermoplastics commonly used for microfluidic applications such as cyclic olefin copolymer (COC). To fabrication through-hole microchips from this alternative material for microfluidics, a fabrication technique that uses a high-temperature, high-pressure resistant mold is described. This aluminum-based epoxy mold, serving as the positive master mold for embossing, is casted over etched arrays of pyramidal pits in a silicon wafer. Methods of surface treatment of the wafer prior to casting and PDMS casting of the epoxy are discussed to preserve the silicon wafer for future use. Changes in the thickness of polyethylene are observed for varying embossing temperatures. The methodology described herein can quickly fabricate 20 disposable, single use chips in less than 30 min with the ability to scale up 4 times by using multiple molds simultaneously. When coupled as a platform supporting porous <span class="hlt">bead</span> sensors, as in the recently developed Programmable Bio-Nano-Chip, this <span class="hlt">bead</span> chip system can achieve limits of detection, for the cardiac biomarker C-reactive protein, of 0.3 ng/mL, thereby</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880007792','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880007792"><span>Nutrient requirements and other factors involved in the culture of human kidney cells on microcarrier <span class="hlt">beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The culture of human kidney cells on microcarrier <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the Bioprocessing Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center is described. These were the first series of studies performed before and during 1983 to determine optimum conditions, including medium type, <span class="hlt">bead</span> type and density. The composition of several medium types and the molecular weights of some common culture medium supplements and cellular proteins are included. The microgravity cell-to-<span class="hlt">bead</span> attachment experiment performed on Space Transportation System Flight 8 is described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27805450','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27805450"><span>Elution of platinum from carboplatin-impregnated calcium sulfate hemihydrate <span class="hlt">beads</span> in vitro.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tulipan, Rachel J; Phillips, Heidi; Garrett, Laura D; Dirikolu, Levent; Mitchell, Mark A</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVE To characterize the elution of platinum from carboplatin-impregnated calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) <span class="hlt">beads</span> in vitro. SAMPLE 60 carboplatin-impregnated CSH <span class="hlt">beads</span> and 9 CSH <span class="hlt">beads</span> without added carboplatin (controls). PROCEDURES Carboplatin-impregnated CSH <span class="hlt">beads</span> (each containing 4.6 mg of carboplatin [2.4 mg of platinum]) were placed into separate 10-mL plastic tubes containing 5 mL of PBSS in groups of 1, 3, 6, or 10; 3 control <span class="hlt">beads</span> were placed into a single tube of PBSS at the same volume. Experiments were conducted in triplicate at 37°C and a pH of 7.4 with constant agitation. Eluent samples were collected at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 72 hours. Samples were analyzed for platinum content by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. RESULTS The mean concentration of platinum released per carboplatin-impregnated <span class="hlt">bead</span> over 72 hours was 445.3 mg/L. Cumulative concentrations of platinum eluted increased as the number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> per tube increased. There was a significant difference in platinum concentrations over time, with values increasing over the first 12 hours and then declining for all tubes. There was also a significant difference in percentage of total incorporated platinum released into tubes with different numbers of <span class="hlt">beads</span>: the percentage of eluted platinum was higher in tubes containing 1 or 3 <span class="hlt">beads</span> than in those containing 6 or 10 <span class="hlt">beads</span>. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Carboplatin-impregnated CSH <span class="hlt">beads</span> eluted platinum over 72 hours. Further studies are needed to determine whether implantation of carboplatin-impregnated CSH <span class="hlt">beads</span> results in detectable levels of platinum systemically and whether the platinum concentrations eluted locally are toxic to tumor cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21655331','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21655331"><span>Dynamic micro-Hall detection of superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a microfluidic channel.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aledealat, K; Mihajlović, G; Chen, K; Field, M; Sullivan, G J; Xiong, P; Chase, P B; von Molnár, S</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>We report integration of an InAs quantum well micro-Hall magnetic sensor with microfluidics and real-time detection of moving superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> moving within and around the Hall cross area result in positive and negative Hall voltage signals respectively. Relative magnitudes and polarities of the signals measured for a random distribution of immobilized <span class="hlt">beads</span> over the sensor are in good agreement with calculated values and explain consistently the shape of the dynamic signal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850000071&hterms=hexane&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dhexane','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850000071&hterms=hexane&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dhexane"><span>Reversing <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Wettability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Frazier, D. O.; Smith, J. E., Jr.; Kaukler, W. F.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Treatment reverses wettability of glassware: Liquids that normally wet <span class="hlt">glass</span> no longer do, and those that do not wet <span class="hlt">glass</span> are made to do so. Useful in research on container effects in nucleation and growth of secondary phase from solution. Treatment consists of spreading 3 percent (by weight) solution of silicone oil in hexane isomers over <span class="hlt">glass</span>, drying in air, and curing at 300 degrees C in vacuum for one hour.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/476639','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/476639"><span>Diamond turning of <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.</p> <p>1988-12-01</p> <p>A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic <span class="hlt">glass</span>) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and amorphous materials</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25312603','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25312603"><span>Okra (Hibiscus esculentus) gum-alginate blend mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> for controlled glibenclamide release.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sinha, Priyanka; Ubaidulla, U; Nayak, Amit Kumar</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The utility of isolated okra (Hibiscus esculentus) gum (OG) was evaluated as a potential sustained drug release polymer-blends with sodium alginate in the development of controlled glibenclamide release ionically-gelled <span class="hlt">beads</span> for oral use. OG was isolated from okra fruits and its solubility, pH, viscosity and moisture content were studied. Glibenclamide-loaded OG-alginate blend <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared using CaCl2 as cross-linking agent through ionic-gelation technique. These ionically gelled <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed drug entrapment efficiency of 64.19 ± 2.02 to 91.86 ± 3.24%. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> sizes were within 1.12 ± 0.11 to 1.28 ± 0.15 mm. These glibenclamide-loaded OG-alginate blend <span class="hlt">beads</span> exhibited sustained in vitro drug release over a prolonged period of 8 h. The in vitro drug release from these OG-alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> were followed controlled-release (zero-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were also characterized by SEM and FTIR. The swelling and degradation of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> was influenced by the pH of the test medium. These <span class="hlt">beads</span> also exhibited good mucoadhesivity with goat intestinal mucosa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11077403','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11077403"><span>Preparation and characterization of chitin <span class="hlt">beads</span> as a wound dressing precursor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yusof, N L; Lim, L Y; Khor, E</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Chitin was dissolved in N, N-dimethylacetamide/5% lithium chloride (DMAc/5%LiCl) to form a 0.5% chitin solution. Chitin <span class="hlt">beads</span> were formed by dropping the 0.5% chitin solution into a nonsolvent coagulant, ethanol. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were left in ethanol for 24 h to permit hardening, consolidation, and removal of residual DMAc/5%LiCl solvent in order to give spherical chitin <span class="hlt">beads</span> uniform size distribution. The ethanol-gelled chitin <span class="hlt">beads</span> had an average diameter of 535 microm. The chitin <span class="hlt">beads</span> were subsequently activated in 50% (w/v) NaOH solution and reacted with 1.9 M monochloroacetic acid/2-propanol solution to introduce a carboxymethylated surface layer to the chitin <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The bilayer character of the surface-carboxymethylated chitin (SCM-chitin) <span class="hlt">beads</span> was verified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and confocal microscopy. The bilayered SCM-chitin <span class="hlt">beads</span> were found to absorb up to 95 times their dry weight of water. These SCM-chitin <span class="hlt">beads</span> have potential as a component of wound dressings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21216192','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21216192"><span>Comparison of alginate and pectin based <span class="hlt">beads</span> for production of poultry probiotic cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Voo, Wan-Ping; Ravindra, Pogaku; Tey, Beng-Ti; Chan, Eng-Seng</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>A comparative study on the stability and potential of alginate and pectin based <span class="hlt">beads</span> for production of poultry probiotic cells using MRS medium in repeated batch fermentation was conducted. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> cores, made of three types of materials, i.e., ca-alginate, ca-pectinate and ca-alginate/pectinate, were compared. The effect of single and double layer coatings using chitosan and core material, respectively, on the <span class="hlt">bead</span> stability and cell production were also studied. The pectin based <span class="hlt">beads</span> were found to be more stable than that of the alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> and their stability was further improved by coating with chitosan. The cell concentration in pectin based <span class="hlt">beads</span> was comparable to that in the alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. On the other hand, pectin based <span class="hlt">beads</span> gave significantly lower cell concentration in the growth medium for the initial fermentation cycles when compared to the alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. In conclusion, pectin was found to be potential encapsulation material for probiotic cell production owing to its stability and favourable microenvironment for cell growth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20152396','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20152396"><span>A new and facile method for measurement of apparent density of monodisperse polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Qi; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Li, Yuanpeng; Jing, Ying; Xing, Chengguo; Chang, Jin; Wang, Jian-Ping</p> <p>2010-03-15</p> <p>The apparent density, an intrinsic physical property of polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span>, plays an important role in the application of <span class="hlt">beads</span> in micro-total analysis systems and separation. Here we have developed a new, facile and milligram-scale method to describe the motion of <span class="hlt">beads</span> in aqueous solution and further detect the apparent density of <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The motion of <span class="hlt">beads</span> in solutions is determined by the viscosity of solutions and the density difference between <span class="hlt">beads</span> and solutions. In this study, using various glycerol aqueous solutions with certain viscosities and densities, the motion time (i.e. floating or sedimentation time) of hybrid polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span> was experimentally measured and theoretically deduced, and consequently, the apparent density of monodisperse <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be quickly and easily calculated. The results indicated that the present method provided a more precise way to predict the movement of hybrid <span class="hlt">beads</span> in aqueous solution compared with the approach for commercial use. This new method can be potentially employed in flow cytometry, suspension stability, and particle analysis systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1040092','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1040092"><span>Magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> counter using a micro-Hall sensor for biological applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lee, W.; Kim, K.; Joo, S.; Kim, S.U.; Rhie, K.; Hong, J.; Shin, K-H.; and Kim, K.H.</p> <p>2009-04-13</p> <p>Micro-Hall sensors have been fabricated, and various numbers of micron-size magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> have been placed within the sensor area. The Hall resistances measured at room temperature are found to be proportional to the number of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, and are in good agreement with the numerically simulated results presented in this study. Our sensors are designed to measure the number of <span class="hlt">beads</span> between zero and full-scale signals for a given number range of interest. The effects of miniaturizing the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and sensors to nanoscale are also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCM...27j3101C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCM...27j3101C"><span>Are polymers standard <span class="hlt">glass</span>-forming systems? The role of intramolecular barriers on the <span class="hlt">glass</span>-transition phenomena of <span class="hlt">glass</span>-forming polymers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Colmenero, J.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p> mixtures with dynamic asymmetry. Moreover, recent MD-simulations of a ‘<span class="hlt">bead</span>-spring’ polymer model, but including intra-macromolecular potential of different strengths, confirm that the high λ-values found in polymers are due to the effect of intra-macromolecular barriers. Although there are still open questions, these results allow to conclude that there is a fundamental difference between the nature of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition in polymers and in simple (standard) <span class="hlt">glass</span>-formers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhTea..44..142E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhTea..44..142E"><span>Drugstore Reading <span class="hlt">Glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Erlichson, Herman</p> <p>2006-03-01</p> <p>The occasion for this paper was my reading of a paper in the February 2005 issue of TPT. As one gets older the near point of the eye begins to recede.2 This is called presbyopia.3 An alternative to purchasing <span class="hlt">glasses</span> from an optometrist is to purchase an inexpensive pair of reading <span class="hlt">glasses</span> in a pharmacy. The pharmacy has these <span class="hlt">glasses</span> ordered by diopters corresponding to the strength of the lens needed for a particular presbyopic eye. The <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are, of course, not available for myopic eyes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21165022','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21165022"><span>Chalcogenide <span class="hlt">glass</span> microsphere laser.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Elliott, Gregor R; Murugan, G Senthil; Wilkinson, James S; Zervas, Michalis N; Hewak, Daniel W</p> <p>2010-12-06</p> <p>Laser action has been demonstrated in chalcogenide <span class="hlt">glass</span> microsphere. A sub millimeter neodymium-doped gallium lanthanum sulphide <span class="hlt">glass</span> sphere was pumped at 808 nm with a laser diode and single and multimode laser action demonstrated at wavelengths between 1075 and 1086 nm. The gallium lanthanum sulphide family of <span class="hlt">glass</span> offer higher thermal stability compared to other chalcogenide <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, and this, along with an optimized Q-factor for the microcavity allowed laser action to be achieved. When varying the pump power, changes in the output spectrum suggest nonlinear and/or thermal effects have a strong effect on laser action.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24891064','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24891064"><span>Photoprotection: clothing and <span class="hlt">glass</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Almutawa, Fahad; Buabbas, Hanan</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Ultraviolet (UV) radiation (UVR) has well-known adverse effects on the skin and eyes. Little attention is given to physical means of photoprotection, namely <span class="hlt">glass</span>, window films, sunglasses, and clothing. In general, all types of <span class="hlt">glass</span> block UV-B. For UV-A, the degree of transmission depends on the type, thickness, and color of the <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Adding window films to <span class="hlt">glass</span> can greatly decrease the transmission of UV-A. Factors that can affect the transmission of UVR through cloth include tightness of weave, thickness, weight, type of fabrics, laundering, hydration, stretch, fabric processing, UV absorbers, color, and fabric-to-skin distance.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730053372&hterms=Emeralds&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DEmeralds','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730053372&hterms=Emeralds&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DEmeralds"><span>Apollo 15 green <span class="hlt">glasses</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ridley, W. I.; Reid, A. M.; Warner, J. L.; Brown, R. W.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The samples analyzed include 28 spheres, portions of spheres, and angular fragments from soil 15101. Emerald green <span class="hlt">glasses</span> from other soils are identical to those from 15101. The composition of the green <span class="hlt">glass</span> is unlike that of any other major lunar <span class="hlt">glass</span> group. The Fe content is comparable to that in mare basalts, but Ti is much lower. The Mg content is much higher than in most lunar materials analyzed to date, and the Cr content is also high. The low Al content is comparable to that of mare basalt <span class="hlt">glasses</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25149001','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25149001"><span>Improving the controlled delivery formulations of caffeine in alginate hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> combined with pectin, carrageenan, chitosan and psyllium.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Komes, Draženka; Karlović, Sven; Djaković, Senka; Spoljarić, Igor; Mršić, Gordan; Ježek, Damir</p> <p>2015-01-15</p> <p>Alginate-based blends consisting of carrageenan, pectin, chitosan or psyllium husk powder were prepared for assessment of the best formulation aimed at encapsulation of caffeine. Alginate-pectin blend exhibited the lowest viscosity and provided the smallest <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Alginate-psyllium husk blend was characterised with higher viscosity, yielding the largest <span class="hlt">bead</span> size and the highest caffeine encapsulation efficiency (83.6%). The release kinetics of caffeine indicated that the porosity of alginate hydrogel was not reduced sufficiently to retard the diffusion of caffeine from the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Chitosan coated alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> provided the most retarded release of caffeine in water. Morphological characteristics of <span class="hlt">beads</span> encapsulating caffeine were adversely affected by freeze drying. Bitterness intensity of caffeine-containing <span class="hlt">beads</span> in water was the lowest for alginate-psyllium <span class="hlt">beads</span> and chitosan coated alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Higher sodium alginate concentration (3%) for production of hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> in combination with psyllium or chitosan coating would present the most favourable carrier systems for immobilization of caffeine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26033737','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26033737"><span>Label-free <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based metallothionein electrochemical immunosensor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nejdl, Lukas; Nguyen, Hoai Viet; Richtera, Lukas; Krizkova, Sona; Guran, Roman; Masarik, Michal; Hynek, David; Heger, Zbynek; Lundberg, Karin; Erikson, Kristofer; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>A novel microfluidic label-free <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based metallothionein immunosensors was designed. To the surface of superparamagnetic agarose <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with protein A, polyclonal chicken IgY specifically recognizing metallothionein (MT) were immobilized via rabbit IgG. The Brdicka reaction was used for metallothionein detection in a microfluidic printed 3D chip. The assembled chip consisted of a single copper wire coated with a thin layer of amalgam as working electrode. Optimization of MT detection using designed microfluidic chip was performed in stationary system as well as in the flow arrangement at various flow rates (0-1800 μL/min). In stationary arrangement it is possible to detect MT concentrations up to 30 ng/mL level, flow arrangement allows reliable detection of even lower concentration (12.5 ng/mL). The assembled miniature flow chip was subsequently tested for the detection of MT elevated levels (at approx. level 100 μg/mL) in samples of patients with cancer. The stability of constructed device for metallothionein detection in flow arrangement was found to be several days without any maintenance needed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EJPh...38a5005R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EJPh...38a5005R"><span>The <span class="hlt">bead</span> on a rotating hoop revisited: an unexpected resonance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Raviola, Lisandro A.; Véliz, Maximiliano E.; Salomone, Horacio D.; Olivieri, Néstor A.; Rodríguez, Eduardo E.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">bead</span> on a rotating hoop is a typical problem in mechanics, frequently posed to junior science and engineering students in basic physics courses. Although this system has a rich dynamics, it is usually not analysed beyond the point particle approximation in undergraduate textbooks, nor empirically investigated. Advanced textbooks show the existence of bifurcations owing to the system's nonlinear nature, and some papers demonstrate, from a theoretical standpoint, its points of contact with phase transition phenomena. However, scarce experimental research has been conducted to better understand its behaviour. We show in this paper that a minor modification to the problem leads to appealing consequences that can be studied both theoretically and empirically with the basic conceptual tools and experimental skills available to junior students. In particular, we go beyond the point particle approximation by treating the <span class="hlt">bead</span> as a rigid spherical body, and explore the effect of a slightly non-vertical hoop's rotation axis that gives rise to a resonant behaviour not considered in previous works. This study can be accomplished by means of digital video and open source software. The experience can motivate an engaging laboratory project by integrating standard curriculum topics, data analysis and experimental exploration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3354777','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3354777"><span>Robust Optimization of Alginate-Carbopol 940 <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Formulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>López-Cacho, J. M.; González-R, Pedro L.; Talero, B.; Rabasco, A. M.; González-Rodríguez, M. L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Formulation process is a very complex activity which sometimes implicates taking decisions about parameters or variables to obtain the best results in a high variability or uncertainty context. Therefore, robust optimization tools can be very useful for obtaining high quality formulations. This paper proposes the optimization of different responses through the robust Taguchi method. Each response was evaluated like a noise variable, allowing the application of Taguchi techniques to obtain a response under the point of view of the signal to noise ratio. A L18 Taguchi orthogonal array design was employed to investigate the effect of eight independent variables involved in the formulation of alginate-Carbopol <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Responses evaluated were related to drug release profile from <span class="hlt">beads</span> (t50% and AUC), swelling performance, encapsulation efficiency, shape and size parameters. Confirmation tests to verify the prediction model were carried out and the obtained results were very similar to those predicted in every profile. Results reveal that the robust optimization is a very useful approach that allows greater precision and accuracy to the desired value. PMID:22645438</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhD...49ULT02K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhD...49ULT02K"><span>Triboelectric generator based on a moving charged <span class="hlt">bead</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Jihoon; Chae, Soo Sang; Han, Sun Woong; Lee, Keun Ho; Ki, Tae Hoon; Oh, Jin Young; Lee, Ji Hoon; Kim, Won Shik; Jang, Woo Soon; Baik, Hong Koo</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>An energy harvesting system using a triboelectric generator (TEG), which converts a small amount of mechanical energy to available electrical energy, has recently been developed by combining a simple one-directional mechanical force (contact and separation or sliding back and forth) with a 2D device materials. However, with regard to using the TEG in real world applications, there is no TEG design suitable for utilizing a variety of mechanical forces and for generating triboelectric charge in various environmental conditions, especially under high relative humidity. In this work, we introduce a design for a humidity-independent triboelectric generator (HITEG) that can generate triboelectric charges with a granular system by simple rotating or shaking under high relative humidity conditions. The HITEG can generate an open-circuit voltage of 81.63 V and a short-circuit current of 213.9 nA using 80 polytetrafluoroethylene <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: More detailed information for analytic calculation via COMSOL about available charge distance between the PTFE <span class="hlt">bead</span> and Cu electrode, illustration of the speed-dependence contact area, and time dependent long-term stability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23198137','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23198137"><span>Simulation of enzyme catalysis in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Mayah, Ameel M R</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A general mathematical model for a fixed bed immobilized enzyme reactor was developed to simulate the process of diffusion and reaction inside the biocatalyst particle. The modeling and simulation of starch hydrolysis using immobilized α-amylase were used as a model for this study. Corn starch hydrolysis was carried out at a constant pH of 5.5 and temperature of 50°C. The substrate flow rate was ranging from 0.2 to 5.0 mL/min, substrate initial concentrations 1 to 100 g/L. α-amylase was immobilized on to calcium alginate hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> of 2 mm average diameter. In this work Michaelis-Menten kinetics have been considered. The effect of substrate flow rate (i.e., residence time) and initial concentration on intraparticle diffusion have been taken into consideration. The performance of the system is found to be affected by the substrate flow rate and initial concentrations. The reaction is controlled by the reaction rate. The model equation was a nonlinear second order differential equation simulated based on the experimental data for steady state condition. The simulation was achieved numerically using FINITE ELEMENTS in MATLAB software package. The simulated results give satisfactory results for substrate and product concentration profiles within the biocatalyst <span class="hlt">bead</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9884E..2PI','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9884E..2PI"><span>Autocorrelation and relaxation time measurements on metal oxide core: dielectric shell <span class="hlt">beads</span> in an optical trap</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Iyengar, Shruthi S.; Parthasarathi, Praveen; Selvan, Rekha; Bhattacharya, Sarbari; Ananthamurthy, Sharath</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Optical Tweezers are capable of trapping individual particles of sizes that range from micrometers to sub micrometers. One can compute the trap strength experienced by a particle by analyzing the fluctuations in the position of the trapped particle with time. It is reported that the trap strength of a dielectric <span class="hlt">bead</span> increases linearly with increase in the power of the trapping laser. The situation with metallic particles, however, is strongly dependent on the particle size. Available literature shows that metallic Rayleigh particles experience enhanced trap strengths when compared to dielectric particles of similar sizes due to a larger polarizability. On the contrary, micrometer sized metallic particles are poor candidates for trapping due to high reflectivity. We report here that commercially available micrometer sized metal oxide core - dielectric shell (core - shell) <span class="hlt">beads</span> are trapped in a single beam optical tweezer in a manner similar to dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span>. However as the laser power is increased these core - shell <span class="hlt">beads</span> are trapped with a reduced corner frequency, which represents a lowered trap strength, in contrast to the situation with ordinary dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span>. We attribute this anomaly to an increase in the temperature of the medium in the vicinity of the core - shell <span class="hlt">bead</span> due to an enhanced dissipation of the laser power as heat. We have computed autocorrelation functions for both types of <span class="hlt">beads</span> at various trapping laser powers and observe that the variation in the relaxation times with laser power for core - shell <span class="hlt">beads</span> is opposite in trend to that of ordinary dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span>. This supports our claim of an enhanced medium temperature about the trapped core - shell <span class="hlt">bead</span>. Since an increase in temperature should lead to a change in the local viscosity of the medium, we have estimated the ratio of viscosity to temperature for core - shell and dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span> of the same size. We observe that while for ordinary dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span> this ratio remains a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4481928','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4481928"><span>Highly Sensitive Bacteria Quantification Using Immunomagnetic Separation and Electrochemical Detection of Guanine-Labeled Secondary <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jayamohan, Harikrishnan; Gale, Bruce K.; Minson, Bj; Lambert, Christopher J.; Gordon, Neil; Sant, Himanshu J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, we report the ultra-sensitive indirect electrochemical detection of E. coli O157:H7 using antibody functionalized primary (magnetic) <span class="hlt">beads</span> for capture and polyguanine (polyG) oligonucleotide functionalized secondary (polystyrene) <span class="hlt">beads</span> as an electrochemical tag. Vacuum filtration in combination with E. coli O157:H7 specific antibody modified magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> were used for extraction of E. coli O157:H7 from 100 mL samples. The magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> conjugated E. coli O157:H7 cells were then attached to polyG functionalized secondary <span class="hlt">beads</span> to form a sandwich complex (magnetic <span class="hlt">bead/E</span>. coli/ secondary <span class="hlt">bead</span>). While the use of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> for immuno-based capture is well characterized, the use of oligonucleotide functionalized secondary <span class="hlt">beads</span> helps combine amplification and potential multiplexing into the system. The antibody functionalized secondary <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be easily modified with a different antibody to detect other pathogens from the same sample and enable potential multiplexing. The polyGs on the secondary <span class="hlt">beads</span> enable signal amplification up to 108 guanine tags per secondary <span class="hlt">bead</span> (7.5 × 106 biotin-FITC per secondary <span class="hlt">bead</span>, 20 guanines per oligonucleotide) bound to the target (E. coli). A single-stranded DNA probe functionalized reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode was used to bind the polyGs on the secondary <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Fluorescent imaging was performed to confirm the hybridization of the complex to the electrode surface. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to quantify the amount of polyG involved in the hybridization event with tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) ( Ru(bpy)32+) as the mediator. The amount of polyG signal can be correlated to the amount of E. coli O157:H7 in the sample. The method was able to detect concentrations of E. coli O157:H7 down to 3 CFU/100 mL, which is 67 times lower than the most sensitive technique reported in literature. The signal to noise ratio for this work was 3. We also demonstrate the use of the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4679352','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4679352"><span>A Novel Inherently Radiopaque <span class="hlt">Bead</span> for Transarterial Embolization to Treat Liver Cancer - A Pre-clinical Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Duran, Rafael; Sharma, Karun; Dreher, Matthew R.; Ashrafi, Koorosh; Mirpour, Sahar; Lin, MingDe; Schernthaner, Ruediger E.; Schlachter, Todd R.; Tacher, Vania; Lewis, Andrew L.; Willis, Sean; den Hartog, Mark; Radaelli, Alessandro; Negussie, Ayele H.; Wood, Bradford J.; Geschwind, Jean-François H.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: Embolotherapy using microshperes is currently performed with soluble contrast to aid in visualization. However, administered payload visibility dimishes soon after delivery due to soluble contrast washout, leaving the radiolucent <span class="hlt">bead</span>'s location unknown. The objective of our study was to characterize inherently radiopaque <span class="hlt">beads</span> (RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span>) in terms of physicomechanical properties, deliverability and imaging visibility in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. Materials and Methods: RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span>, which are based on LC <span class="hlt">Bead</span>® platform, were compared to LC <span class="hlt">Bead</span>. <span class="hlt">Bead</span> size (light microscopy), equilibrium water content (EWC), density, X-ray attenuation and iodine distribution (micro-CT), suspension (settling times), deliverability and in vitro penetration were investigated. Fifteen rabbits were embolized with either LC <span class="hlt">Bead</span> or RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span> + soluble contrast (iodixanol-320), or RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span>+dextrose. Appearance was evaluated with fluoroscopy, X-ray single shot, cone-beam CT (CBCT). Results: Both <span class="hlt">bead</span> types had a similar size distribution. RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span> had lower EWC (60-72%) and higher density (1.21-1.36 g/cc) with a homogeneous iodine distribution within the <span class="hlt">bead</span>'s interior. RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span> suspension time was shorter than LC <span class="hlt">Bead</span>, with durable suspension (>5 min) in 100% iodixanol. RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span> ≤300 µm were deliverable through a 2.3-Fr microcatheter. Both <span class="hlt">bead</span> types showed similar penetration. Soluble contrast could identify target and non-target embolization on fluoroscopy during administration. However, the imaging appearance vanished quickly for LC <span class="hlt">Bead</span> as contrast washed-out. RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span>+contrast significantly increased visibility on X-ray single shot compared to LC <span class="hlt">Bead</span>+contrast in target and non-target arteries (P=0.0043). Similarly, RO <span class="hlt">beads</span> demonstrated better visibility on CBCT in target arteries (P=0.0238) with a trend in non-target arteries (P=0.0519). RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span>+dextrose were not sufficiently visible to monitor embolization using fluoroscopy. Conclusion: RO <span class="hlt">Beads</span> provide better</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8943000','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8943000"><span>Melanotropic peptide-conjugated <span class="hlt">beads</span> for microscopic visualization and characterization of melanoma melanotropin receptors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sharma, S D; Jiang, J; Hadley, M E; Bentley, D L; Hruby, V J</p> <p>1996-11-26</p> <p>We developed two solid-phase reagent systems for microscopic visualization and characterization of melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) receptors of melanoma cells. Multiple copies of [Nle-4,D-Phe-7]-alpha-MSH, a potent analog of alpha-MSH, were conjugated to microspheres (latex <span class="hlt">beads</span>) or macrospheres (polyamide <span class="hlt">beads</span>) through a thioether or disulfide bond. Binding between the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and mouse and human melanoma cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy and by light microscopy. Each mouse and human melanoma cell (of all cell lines) evinced binding to the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Binding of the melanotropin conjugates was not restricted to any one phase of the cell cycle. Specificity of binding was demonstrated by several studies. Negative controls included cell types of nonmelanocyte origin (e.g., mammary cancer cells) and <span class="hlt">beads</span> that lacked the melanotropic ligand or had other attached ligands. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> with a disulfide-linked melanotropin analog served as a direct control. Treatment of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> with DTT during or before incubation of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> with melanoma cells (resulting in release of the MSH analog from the <span class="hlt">beads</span>) eliminated binding of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> to melanoma cells. Binding interactions between melanoma cells and melanotropin-bound <span class="hlt">beads</span> also could be abolished by prior incubation with unconjugated MSH analog. During these experiments, certain membrane receptor-hormone associated phenomena, such as capping (aggregation) of the receptor-ligand complex, also were observed. These results provide visual evidence that MSH receptors are a property common to melanoma cells. Normal human epidermal melanocytes and keratinocytes were also shown to express melanotropin receptors by the same criteria established for melanoma cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=19401','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=19401"><span>Melanotropic peptide-conjugated <span class="hlt">beads</span> for microscopic visualization and characterization of melanoma melanotropin receptors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sharma, Shubh D.; Jiang, Jinwen; Hadley, Mac E.; Bentley, David L.; Hruby, Victor J.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>We developed two solid-phase reagent systems for microscopic visualization and characterization of melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) receptors of melanoma cells. Multiple copies of [Nle-4,d-Phe-7]-α-MSH, a potent analog of α-MSH, were conjugated to microspheres (latex <span class="hlt">beads</span>) or macrospheres (polyamide <span class="hlt">beads</span>) through a thioether or disulfide bond. Binding between the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and mouse and human melanoma cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy and by light microscopy. Each mouse and human melanoma cell (of all cell lines) evinced binding to the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Binding of the melanotropin conjugates was not restricted to any one phase of the cell cycle. Specificity of binding was demonstrated by several studies. Negative controls included cell types of nonmelanocyte origin (e.g., mammary cancer cells) and <span class="hlt">beads</span> that lacked the melanotropic ligand or had other attached ligands. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> with a disulfide-linked melanotropin analog served as a direct control. Treatment of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> with DTT during or before incubation of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> with melanoma cells (resulting in release of the MSH analog from the <span class="hlt">beads</span>) eliminated binding of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> to melanoma cells. Binding interactions between melanoma cells and melanotropin-bound <span class="hlt">beads</span> also could be abolished by prior incubation with unconjugated MSH analog. During these experiments, certain membrane receptor-hormone associated phenomena, such as capping (aggregation) of the receptor-ligand complex, also were observed. These results provide visual evidence that MSH receptors are a property common to melanoma cells. Normal human epidermal melanocytes and keratinocytes were also shown to express melanotropin receptors by the same criteria established for melanoma cells. PMID:8943000</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23334057','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23334057"><span>Development of electrospun <span class="hlt">beaded</span> fibers from Thai silk fibroin and gelatin for controlled release application.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Somvipart, Siraporn; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Rangkupan, Rattapol; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Thai silk fibroin and gelatin are attractive biomaterials for tissue engineering and controlled release applications due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bioactive properties. The development of electrospun fiber mats from silk fibroin and gelatin were reported previously. However, burst drug release from such fiber mats remained the problem. In this study, the formation of <span class="hlt">beads</span> on the fibers aiming to be used for the sustained release of drug was of our interest. The <span class="hlt">beaded</span> fiber mats were fabricated using electrospinning technique by controlling the solution concentration, weight blending ratio of Thai silk fibroin/gelatin blend, and applied voltage. It was found that the optimal conditions including the solution concentration and the weight blending ratio of Thai silk fibroin/gelatin at 8-10% (w/v) and 70/30, respectively, with the applied voltage at 18 kV provided the fibers with homogeneous formation of <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Then, the <span class="hlt">beaded</span> fiber mats obtained were crosslinked by the reaction of carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Methylene blue as a model active compound was loaded on the fiber mats. The release test of methylene blue from the <span class="hlt">beaded</span> fiber mats was carried out in comparison to that of the smooth fiber mats without <span class="hlt">beads</span>. It was found that the <span class="hlt">beaded</span> fiber mats could prolong the release of methylene blue, comparing to the smooth fiber mats without <span class="hlt">beads</span>. This was possibly due to the <span class="hlt">beaded</span> fiber mats that would absorb and retain higher amount of methylene blue than the fiber mats without <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Thai silk fibroin/gelatin <span class="hlt">beaded</span> fiber mats were established as an effective carrier for the controlled release applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/975365','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/975365"><span>Rare Earth Phosphate <span class="hlt">Glass</span> and <span class="hlt">Glass</span>-Ceramic Proton Conductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ray, Hannah L.; Wang, Ruigang</p> <p>2008-12-03</p> <p>The structure and conductivity of cerium and lanthanum phosphate <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and <span class="hlt">glass</span>-ceramics were investigated. The effects of varying the metal to phosphate ratio in the <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, doping LaP3O9 <span class="hlt">glasses</span> with Ce, and recrystallization of CeP3O9 <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, on the <span class="hlt">glasses</span>' microstructure and total conductivity were investigated using XRD, SEM, and AC impedance techniques. Strong increases in conductivity occurred when the <span class="hlt">glasses</span> were recrystallized: the conductivity of a cerium metaphosphate <span class="hlt">glass</span> increased conductivity after recrystallization from 10-7.5 S/cm to 10-6 S/cm at 400oC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhSRv...2...65M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhSRv...2...65M"><span>Lanthanoides in <span class="hlt">Glass</span> and <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Ceramics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Meinhardt, Jürgen; Kilo, Martin; Somorowsky, Ferdinand; Hopp, Werner</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Many types of <span class="hlt">glass</span> contain lanthanoides; among them, special <span class="hlt">glass</span> for optical applications is the one with the highest content of lanthanoides. The precise determination of the lanthanoides' concentration is performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). However, up to now, there are no established standard processes guaranteeing a uniform approach to the lanthanoide analysis. The knowledge of the lanthanoides' concentrations is necessary on the microscale in some cases, especially if a suitable separation and recycling procedure is to be applied. Here, the analysis is performed by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) or wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) analytics in the scanning electron microscope.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Metamorphosis&pg=2&id=EJ765600','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Metamorphosis&pg=2&id=EJ765600"><span>Getting Started with <span class="hlt">Glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>White, Heather</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The metamorphosis of <span class="hlt">glass</span> when heated is a magical process to students, yet teachers are often reluctant to try it in class. The biggest challenge in working with <span class="hlt">glass</span> in the classroom is to simplify procedures just enough to ensure student success while maintaining strict safety practices so no students are injured. Project concepts and safety…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://kidshealth.org/en/kids/glasses.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://kidshealth.org/en/kids/glasses.html"><span><span class="hlt">Glasses</span> and Contact Lenses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... about special eyewear you can wear on the field. With <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, you'll also want to find out how to clean them properly. And it helps if you have a <span class="hlt">glasses</span> case and put them in it when you're not wearing them. The last thing you want is to sit on your ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/glasses.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/glasses.html"><span><span class="hlt">Glasses</span> and Contact Lenses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray <span class="hlt">Glasses</span> and Contact Lenses KidsHealth > For Kids > <span class="hlt">Glasses</span> and Contact Lenses Print A A A What's in this ... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Tin&pg=5&id=EJ310539','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Tin&pg=5&id=EJ310539"><span>Surface Conductive <span class="hlt">Glass</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tanaka, John; Suib, Steven L.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the properties of surface-conducting <span class="hlt">glass</span> and the chemical nature of surface-conducting stannic (tin) oxide. Also provides the procedures necessary for the preparation of surface-conducting stannic oxide films on <span class="hlt">glass</span> substrates. The experiment is suitable for the advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gothic&pg=2&id=EJ670492','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gothic&pg=2&id=EJ670492"><span>Dramatic Stained <span class="hlt">Glass</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Prater, Michael</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Describes an art project that is appropriate for students in fifth through twelfth grade in which they create Gothic-style stained-<span class="hlt">glass</span> windows. Discusses how college students majoring in elementary education created stained-<span class="hlt">glass</span> windows. Addresses how to adapt this lesson for younger students. (CMK)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8275E..0DS','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8275E..0DS"><span>Indium fluoride <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Saad, Mohammed</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Fluoride <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride <span class="hlt">glasses</span> have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApPhA.113..999G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApPhA.113..999G"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span>-metal objects from archaeological excavation: corrosion study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Greiner-Wronowa, Elżbieta; Zabiegaj, Dominika; Piccardo, Paolo</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>This paper contributes to the investigations on history, technology, and degradation of middle age objects (metallic rings with mounted <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span>) recently excavated under the Main Square in Krakow (Poland). Moreover, they were discovered in soil layers differing by chemical composition and microclimate parameters. Historical material is indeed very limited in terms of quantity and sample size, and the following nondestructive analyses were applied: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). The <span class="hlt">glass</span> and the metal were separately tested. Metallography on cross-sections (by both optical and scanning electron microscopy) was applied only on microfragments sampled from metallic rings. The achieved results pointed out how the local microclimate affected the degradation of the analyzed rings developing locally different corrosion processes. Each tested <span class="hlt">glass</span> of "ring eye" shows a specific chemical composition. All <span class="hlt">glass</span> pieces were covered by silica gel, and locally more advanced corrosion has been found.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23453460','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23453460"><span>Rapid freezing cryo-polymerization and microchannel liquid-flow focusing for cryogel <span class="hlt">beads</span>: adsorbent preparation and characterization of supermacroporous <span class="hlt">bead</span>-packed bed.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yun, Junxian; Dafoe, Julian T; Peterson, Eric; Xu, Linhong; Yao, Shan-Jing; Daugulis, Andrew J</p> <p>2013-04-05</p> <p>Cryogel <span class="hlt">beads</span>, fabricated by the microchannel liquid-flow focusing and cryo-polymerization method, have micron-scale supermacropores allowing the passage of crude feedstocks, and could be of interest as chromatographic adsorbents in bioseparation applications. In this work, we provide a rapid freezing and continuous formation method for cryogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> by cryo-polymerization using dry ice particles as the freezing source and microchannel liquid-flow focusing using peristaltic pumps for the fluid supply. Polyacrylamide (pAAm)-based supermacroporous cryogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared and grafted with N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), which provided the anion-exchange cryogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> with tertiary amine functional groups suitable for binding proteins. Properties of the supermacroporous cryogel-<span class="hlt">bead</span> packed bed, i.e., permeability, bed voidage, protein breakthrough as well as protein adsorption performance by using bovine γ-globulin as model protein, were experimentally investigated. A capillary-based model was employed to characterize the supermacroporous bed performance, and gave a reasonable description of the microstructure and thus an insight into the flow, dispersion and mass transfer behaviors within the cryogel <span class="hlt">bead</span>-packed bed. The results also showed that by using dry ice as the freezing source, it is easy to reduce the temperature below -55 to -61°C in the bulk solution, causing the rapid formation of ice crystals within the monomer drops, and finally effective cryo-polymerization to form supermacropores within the cryogel <span class="hlt">beads</span>. By using peristaltic pumps, continuous preparation was achieved and the obtained cryogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> had favorable properties similar to those prepared using syringe pumps in the microchannel liquid-flow focusing process. This method is thus expected to be interesting in the liter- or even larger-scale preparation of cryogel adsorbents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16635665','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16635665"><span>Photoprotection by window <span class="hlt">glass</span>, automobile <span class="hlt">glass</span>, and sunglasses.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tuchinda, Chanisada; Srivannaboon, Sabong; Lim, Henry W</p> <p>2006-05-01</p> <p>In daily activity, much time is spent indoors and in vehicles. Although the adverse effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation is now well recognized and active public education programs on photoprotection have been undertaken, the role of window <span class="hlt">glass</span> in photoprotection has been rarely addressed. It has been known for some time that window <span class="hlt">glass</span> filters out UVB and transmits UVA and visible light. Recent developments in the <span class="hlt">glass</span> industry have resulted in <span class="hlt">glass</span> that provides broad UV protection without the historically associated loss of visible light transmission. Factors affecting UV-protective properties of <span class="hlt">glass</span> are <span class="hlt">glass</span> type, <span class="hlt">glass</span> color, interleave between <span class="hlt">glass</span>, and <span class="hlt">glass</span> coating. In this article, photoprotection by window <span class="hlt">glass</span>, automobile <span class="hlt">glass</span>, and sunglasses is reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/839531','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/839531"><span>Defense HLW <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Degradation Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>D. Strachan</p> <p>2004-10-20</p> <p>The purpose of this report is to document the development of a model for calculating the release rate for radionuclides and other key elements from high-level radioactive waste (HLW) <span class="hlt">glasses</span> under exposure conditions relevant to the performance of the repository. Several <span class="hlt">glass</span> compositions are planned for the repository, some of which have yet to be identified (i.e., <span class="hlt">glasses</span> from Hanford and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). The mechanism for <span class="hlt">glass</span> dissolution is the same for these <span class="hlt">glasses</span> and the <span class="hlt">glasses</span> yet to be developed for the disposal of DOE wastes. All of these <span class="hlt">glasses</span> will be of a quality consistent with the <span class="hlt">glasses</span> used to develop this report.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18261846','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18261846"><span>Covalent attachment of actin filaments to Tween 80 coated polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> for cargo transportation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kaur, Harsimran; Das, Tapan; Kumar, Rajesh; Ajore, Ram; Bharadwaj, Lalit M</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>In this manuscript, a new strategy has been reported for circumscribed covalent attachment of barbed and pointed ends of actin filaments to polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span>. A comparative study of attachment of actin filaments to polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> was performed by blocking functionally active sites on polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> with nonionic detergents such as Tween 20, Tween 80 and polyethylene glycol (PEG). Effective blocking of active sites was obtained with Tween 80 at 0.1% concentration. Attachment of single bundle of actin filament to <span class="hlt">bead</span> was assessed by rotational motion of <span class="hlt">bead</span> tailed actin in front and lateral view. Velocity of actin filaments attached to different size of <span class="hlt">beads</span> in in-vitro motility assay was calculated to ascertain their attachments. Velocity of actin attached to 1.0 and 3.0 microm polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> was reduced to 3.0-4.0 and 0.0-1.0 microm/s, respectively as compared to free actin velocity of 4.0-6.0 microm/s. Single point attachment of actin filaments to different size of <span class="hlt">beads</span> was assessed by decrease in sliding velocity. Present study provides insight into the actin-myosin based molecular motor systems for drug delivery and biosensors applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23983180','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23983180"><span>Development of bioactive porous α-TCP/HAp <span class="hlt">beads</span> for bone tissue engineering.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Asaoka, Teruo; Ohtake, Shoji; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Tamura, Akito; Ushida, Takashi</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>Porous <span class="hlt">beads</span> of bioactive ceramics such as hydroxyapatite (HAp) and tribasic calcium phosphate (TCP) are considered a promising scaffold for cultivating bone cells. To realize this, α-TCP/HAp functionally graded porous <span class="hlt">beads</span> are fabricated with two main purposes: to maintain the function of the scaffold with sufficient strength up to the growth of new bone, and is absorbed completely after the growth. HAp is a bioactive material that has both high strength and strong tissue-adhesive properties, but is not readily absorbed by the human body. On the contrary, α-TCP is highly bioabsorbable, resulting in a scaffold that is absorbed before it is completely replaced by bone. In this study, we produced porous, <span class="hlt">bead</span>-shaped carriers as scaffolds for osteoblast culture. To control the solubility in vivo, the fabricated <span class="hlt">beads</span> contained α-TCP at the center and HAp at the surface. Cell adaptability of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> for bone tissue engineering was confirmed in vitro. It was found that α-TCP/HAp <span class="hlt">bead</span> carriers exhibit low toxicity in the initial stages of cell seeding and cell adhesion. The presence of HAp in the composite <span class="hlt">bead</span> form effectively increased ALP activity. In conclusion, it is suggested that these newly developed α-TCP/HAp <span class="hlt">beads</span> are a promising tool for bone tissue engineering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19235554','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19235554"><span>Adipic acid dihydrazide treated partially oxidized alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> for sustained oral delivery of flurbiprofen.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maiti, Sabyasachi; Singha, Kamalika; Ray, Somasree; Dey, Paramita; Sa, Biswanath</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>In this study, periodate oxidation of sodium alginate was controlled such that the oxidized alginate could form isolatable <span class="hlt">beads</span> with Ca(+2) ions. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> of oxidized alginate having a degree of oxidation 1 mol%, entrapped 89% flurbiprofen and released almost all of its content within 1.5 h in pH 7.2 phosphate buffer solution. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were covalently crosslinked with adipic dihydrazide (ADH) in addition to ionic crosslinks and were characterized. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were spherical having smooth surfaces. The drug entrapment efficiency decreased (90-86%) with increasing concentration of ADH (2-6% w/v) in the gelation medium. However, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> prolonged the drug release in alkaline dissolution medium up to 8 h depending upon the concentration of ADH. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared with 2% ADH swelled more rapidly and led to faster drug release in either pH 1.2 HCl solution or pH 7.2 phosphate buffer solution. The swelling tendencies were reduced and the drug release became slower with higher concentrations in either fluid. The drug diffusion from the <span class="hlt">beads</span> followed super case II transport mechanism. FTIR spectroscopy indicated stable nature of flurbiprofen in the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and therefore had potential as sustained oral delivery system for the drug.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11714527','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11714527"><span>Use of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> for Gram staining of bacteria in aqueous suspension.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yazdankhah, S P; Sørum, H; Larsen, H J; Gogstad, G</p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>A Gram staining technique was developed using monodisperse magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> in concentrating bacteria in suspension for downstream application. The technique does not require heat fixation of organisms, electrical power, or a microscope. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were identified macroscopically based on the colour of the suspension. The bacteria concentrated on magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> may also be identified microscopically.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2014-title49-vol2-sec176-907.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2014-title49-vol2-sec176-907.pdf"><span>49 CFR 176.907 - Polymeric <span class="hlt">Beads</span> and Plastic Molding Compounds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Polymeric <span class="hlt">Beads</span> and Plastic Molding Compounds. 176.907 Section 176.907 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS..., and Plastic Molding Compounds § 176.907 Polymeric <span class="hlt">Beads</span> and Plastic Molding Compounds. (a)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title49-vol2-sec176-907.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title49-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title49-vol2-sec176-907.pdf"><span>49 CFR 176.907 - Polymeric <span class="hlt">Beads</span> and Plastic Molding Compounds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Polymeric <span class="hlt">Beads</span> and Plastic Molding Compounds. 176.907 Section 176.907 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS..., and Plastic Molding Compounds § 176.907 Polymeric <span class="hlt">Beads</span> and Plastic Molding Compounds. (a)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhD...45N5301B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhD...45N5301B"><span>Tunable <span class="hlt">bead</span>-on-string microstructures fabricated by mechano-electrospinning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bu, Ningbin; Huang, YongAn; Deng, Huixu; Yin, Zhouping</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>In this paper, <span class="hlt">bead</span>-on-string microstructures are fabricated by the mechano-electrospinning (MES) process in a continuously tunable manner. The thin jet is pulled onto the substrate by the stable electric field force and tunable mechanical drawing force, and then the <span class="hlt">bead</span>-on-string structures are generated by means of the force exerted on the jet, which changes from capillary force and resisting viscosity force to friction force at the contact point in the horizontal direction. In a stable <span class="hlt">bead</span>-on-string formation process, one cycle can be divided into three stages from the point of view of the jet behaviour: being anchored, being stretched, and skipping. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> size and the <span class="hlt">bead</span> gap are continuously tunable through the MES process. The fabrication mechanisms of the <span class="hlt">bead</span>-on-string microstructure are uncovered through theoretical analysis and experimental characterization. When a critical velocity is achieved, the jet directly falls on the substrate without accumulation since the mechanical drawing force in the horizontal direction overtakes the capillary force, which leads the <span class="hlt">bead</span>-on-string microstructures to a continuous fibre line. It is a flexible and highly controllable method to fabricate <span class="hlt">bead</span>-on-string microstructures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..84b1907L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..84b1907L"><span>Effectiveness of <span class="hlt">beads</span> for tracking small-scale molecular motor dynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lade, Steven J.; Craig, Erin M.; Linke, Heiner</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>Investigations into molecular motor dynamics are increasingly focused on small-scale features of the motor’s motion. We define performance measures of a common type of single-molecule motility assay, the <span class="hlt">bead</span> assay, for its ability to detect such features. Using numerical models, we explore the dependence of assay performance on a number of experimentally controllable parameters, including <span class="hlt">bead</span> size, optical force, and the method of attaching the <span class="hlt">bead</span> to the motor. We find that the best parameter choice depends on the objective of the experiments, and give a guide to parameter selection. Comparison of the models against experimental data from a recent <span class="hlt">bead</span> assay of myosin V exemplifies how our methods can also be used to extract additional information from <span class="hlt">bead</span> assays, particularly that related to small-scale features. By analyzing the experimental data we find evidence for previously undetected multiple waiting states of the <span class="hlt">bead</span>-motor complex. Furthermore, from numerical simulations we find that equilibrium <span class="hlt">bead</span> dynamics display features previously attributed to aborted motor steps, and that <span class="hlt">bead</span> dynamics alone can produce multiple subphases during a step.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25933528','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25933528"><span>Preparation of fucoidan-shelled and genipin-crosslinked chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span> for antibacterial application.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yu, Shu-Huei; Wu, Shao-Jung; Wu, Jui-Yu; Wen, De-Yu; Mi, Fwu-Long</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>In this study, a fucoidan-shelled chitosan <span class="hlt">bead</span> was developed with the purpose of oral delivery of berberine to inhibit the growth of bacteria. The cross-linking level and swelling property of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were affected by the pH value and the composition of the genipin/fucoidan combined gelling agent. The drug release of the berberine-loaded <span class="hlt">beads</span> was faster in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) than those in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.4). Furthermore, a nanoparticles/<span class="hlt">beads</span> complex system was developed by incorporation of berberine-loaded chitosan/fucoidan nanoparticles in the fucoidan-shelled chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The nanoparticles/<span class="hlt">beads</span> complex served as a drug carrier to delay the berberine release in simulated gastric fluid, with an estimated lag time of 2 h. Our results showed that the berberine-loaded <span class="hlt">beads</span> and nanoparticles/<span class="hlt">beads</span> complex could effectively inhibit the growth inhibition of common clinical pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and have the advantage of continually releasing berberine to inhibit the growth of the bacteria over 24 h.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20522987','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20522987"><span>Floating-mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> of clarithromycin for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gattani, Surendra Ganeshlal; Savaliya, Pankaj Jayantilal; Belgamwar, Veena Shailendra</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>An objective of the present study was to develop alginate/hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) based floating-mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> of clarithromycin to provide prolonged contact time of antibiotic to treat stomach ulcer. Floating-mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared and characterized for in vitro performance followed by investigation of ex vivo study in albino-wistar rats. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> were prepared by ionic gelation technique where calcium chloride used as gelating agent and incorporated liquid paraffin for floating of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Prepared <span class="hlt">beads</span> were evaluated extensively for particle size, drug entrapment; swelling and surface morphology by using scanning electron microscopy. X-ray radioimaging study in rabbits, in vitro mucoadhesion using rat stomach mucosal membrane and in vitro drug release studies were carried out. Ex vivo performance of alginate-HPMC <span class="hlt">beads</span> were studied using albino rats in comparison to simple alginate-calcium <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Alginate-HPMC <span class="hlt">beads</span> may be suitable floating-muco-adhesive drug delivery system for delivering clarithromycin to treat stomach ulcers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22837988','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22837988"><span>The elution of colistimethate sodium from polymethylmethacrylate and calcium phosphate cement <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Waterman, Paige; Barber, Melissa; Weintrob, Amy C; VanBrakle, Regina; Howard, Robin; Kozar, Michael P; Andersen, Romney; Wortmann, Glenn</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>Gram-negative bacilli resistance to all antibiotics, except for colistimethate sodium (CMS), is an emerging healthcare concern. Incorporating CMS into orthopedic cement to treat bone and soft-tissue infections due to these bacteria is attractive, but the data regarding the elution of CMS from cement are conflicting. The in vitro analysis of the elution of CMS from polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and calcium phosphate (CP) cement <span class="hlt">beads</span> is reported. PMMA and CP <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing CMS were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline and the eluate sampled at sequential time points. The inhibition of the growth of a strain of Acinetobacter baumannii complex by the eluate was measured by disk diffusion and microbroth dilution assays, and the presence of CMS in the eluate was measured by mass spectroscopy. Bacterial growth was inhibited by the eluate from both PMMA and CP <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Mass spectroscopy demonstrated greater elution of CMS from CP <span class="hlt">beads</span> than PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The dose of CMS in PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span> was limited by failure of <span class="hlt">bead</span> integrity. CMS elutes from both CP and PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span> in amounts sufficient to inhibit bacterial growth in vitro. The clinical implications of these findings require further study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24155136','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24155136"><span>Size and composition of synthetic calcium sulfate <span class="hlt">beads</span> influence dissolution and elution rates in vitro.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Roberts, Randy; McConoughey, Stephen J; Calhoun, Jason H</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Treatments of osteomyelitis lag behind bacterial resistance to antibiotics. We tested different-sized calcium sulfate <span class="hlt">beads</span> and their ability to elute multiple antibiotics in vitro as a possible method to improve the therapeutic delivery in patients. Two sizes of calcium sulfate <span class="hlt">beads</span> (4.8 and 3.0 mm diameter) that contained vancomycin, tobramycin, or both were dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline, and the rate of dissolution by weight and antibiotic elution by the disc diffusion assay and high-pressure liquid chromatography were measured. The 4.8 mm <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed significantly higher dissolution rates relative to the 3.0 mm <span class="hlt">beads</span> (2.3 mg/day vs. 1.3 mg/day). While the vancomycin-loaded 4.8 mm <span class="hlt">beads</span> eluted for a longer time relative to the 3.0 mm <span class="hlt">beads</span> (20 days vs. 10 days), the smaller <span class="hlt">beads</span> had threefold higher elution for the first 2 days, before dropping to near zero elution by day 4. The presence of tobramycin extended the elution of the vancomycin to day 40, which closely matches the recommended 6 weeks to treat orthopedic staphylococcus infections. These data suggest that size and content of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> are variables that could affect their clinical success, and both could be exploited to tailor treatments of specific infections and injuries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JAP...105e4701K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JAP...105e4701K"><span>Three-dimensional pattern formation of magnetically labeled microgel <span class="hlt">beads</span> for biological tissue engineering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kawamoto, H.; Inoue, H.; Nakamura, M.</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>We commenced basic research on the three-dimensional (3D) pattern formation of microgel <span class="hlt">beads</span> for applications in biological tissue engineering. In this new technique, microgel <span class="hlt">beads</span> are premagnetized by doping them with magnetic nanoparticles. Living cells will be included in the <span class="hlt">beads</span> for actual use. If a nonuniform magnetic field is applied to a solution containing these magnetized <span class="hlt">beads</span>, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> will align, contact, and form a 3D structure. The structure is controlled by the seed pattern of the magnetic particles plugged in a substrate and the profile of the magnetic field distribution. We constructed tubes, which imitate blood vessels, for demonstration using gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> whose diameters are of the order of several tens of micrometers. The diameter of the demonstrated tube was less than 0.5 mm and its length was 6.6 mm, although living cells were not included in the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Numerical calculations by using the discrete element method were conducted to confirm the formation of the tube and to predict the effect of centrifugal force, which will be applied to fill cells in the space between magnetically patterned <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Although this unique technology is in the nascent stage, this 3D pattern formation technique by the control of the magnetic field has potential to be one of the effective engineering technologies for manufacturing 3D patterned biological tissues in the future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9724569','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9724569"><span>Preparation and in vitro characterization of gentamycin-impregnated biodegradable <span class="hlt">beads</span> suitable for treatment of osteomyelitis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Meyer, J D; Falk, R F; Kelly, R M; Shively, J E; Withrow, S J; Dernell, W S; Kroll, D J; Randolph, T W; Manning, M C</p> <p>1998-09-01</p> <p>A new method for preparing poly(L-lactide) (PLA) biodegradable <span class="hlt">beads</span> impregnated with an ionic aminoglycoside, gentamycin, is described. The process employs hydrophobic ion pairing to solubilize gentamycin in a solvent compatible with PLA, followed by precipitation with a compressed antisolvent (supercritical carbon dioxide). The resulting precipitate is a homogeneous dispersion of the ion-paired drug in PLA microspheres. The microspheres are approximately 1 microm in diameter and can be compressed into <span class="hlt">beads</span> (3-6 mm in diameter) strung on surgical sutures for implantation. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> strings exhibit no significant change in release kinetics upon sterilization with a hydrogen peroxide plasma (Ster-Rad). The kinetics of gentamycin release from the PLA <span class="hlt">beads</span> are consistent with a matrix-controlled diffusion mechanism. While nonbiodegradable poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) <span class="hlt">beads</span> initially release gentamycin in a similar manner, the drug release from PMMA ceases after 8 or 9 weeks, while the PLA <span class="hlt">beads</span> continue to release drug for over 4 months. Moreover, only 10% of the gentamycin is released from the PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span>, while PLA <span class="hlt">beads</span> release more than 60% of their load, if serum is present in the release medium. The PLA system displays improved release kinetics relative to PMMA, is biodegradable, is unaltered by gas sterilization, can be used for a range of antibiotics, and can be manipulated without disintegration. These are all desirable properties for an implantable drug delivery system for the prevention or treatment of osteomyelitis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26036661','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26036661"><span>Self-Assembly-Driven Electrospinning: The Transition from Fibers to Intact <span class="hlt">Beaded</span> Morphologies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Linge; Topham, Paul D; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Yu, Hao; Ryan, Anthony J; Fairclough, J Patrick A; Bras, Wim</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span> have attracted considerable interest for use in catalysis, drug delivery, and photonics due to their particular shape and surface morphology. Electrospinning, typically used for producing nanofibers, can also be used to fabricate polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span> if the solution has a sufficiently low concentration. In this work, a novel approach for producing more uniform, intact <span class="hlt">beads</span> is presented by electrospinning self-assembled block copolymer (BCP) solutions. This approach allows a relatively high polymer concentration to be used, yet with a low degree of entanglement between polymer chains due to microphase separation of the BCP in a selective solvent system. Herein, to demonstrate the technology, a well-studied polystyrene-poly(ethylene butylene)-polystyrene triblock copolymer is dissolved in a co-solvent system. The effect of solvent composition on the characteristics of the fibers and <span class="hlt">beads</span> is intensively studied, and the mechanism of this fiber-to-<span class="hlt">bead</span> is found to be dependent on microphase separation of the BCP.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18770821','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18770821"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span>Cons: detection of nucleic acid sequences by flow cytometry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Horejsh, Douglas; Martini, Federico; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria</p> <p>2005-11-01</p> <p>Molecular beacons are single-stranded nucleic acid structures with a terminal fluorophore and a distal, terminal quencher. These molecules are typically used in real-time PCR assays, but have also been conjugated with solid matrices. This unit describes protocols related to molecular beacon-conjugated <span class="hlt">beads</span> (<span class="hlt">Bead</span>Cons), whose specific hybridization with complementary target sequences can be resolved by cytometry. Assay sensitivity is achieved through the concentration of fluorescence signal on discrete particles. By using molecular beacons with different fluorophores and microspheres of different sizes, it is possible to construct a fluid array system with each <span class="hlt">bead</span> corresponding to a specific target nucleic acid. Methods are presented for the design, construction, and use of <span class="hlt">Bead</span>Cons for the specific, multiplexed detection of unlabeled nucleic acids in solution. The use of <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based detection methods will likely lead to the design of new multiplex molecular diagnostic tools.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3193323','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3193323"><span>Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Drug-Eluting <span class="hlt">Beads</span> Complicated by Interstitial Pneumonitis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Aladdin, Mohammed; Ilyas, Mohammed</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Transarterial chemoembolization has proven benefit in the treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Commonly reported symptoms following chemoembolization with or without drug-eluting <span class="hlt">beads</span> include abdominal pain, nausea, and low-grade fever, which typically limited resolve within a few days. A recent study comparing traditional chemoembolization versus chemoembolization with drug-eluting <span class="hlt">beads</span> demonstrated similar survival between the two techniques, but improved tolerability when the drug-eluting <span class="hlt">beads</span> were used. This case report describes a patient with unresectable HCC undergoing chemoembolization with drug-eluting <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The postprocedure course was complicated by interstitial pneumonitis secondary to shunting of the drug-eluting <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing doxorubicin to both lungs via tumor vasculature. This case highlights the relationship between the number and size of the tumors to be treated, arteriovenous shunting within the liver/tumors, and the size of the embolization particles. PMID:22654266</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2966028','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2966028"><span>Observation and Kinematic Description of Long Actin Tracks Induced by Spherical <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kang, Hyeran; Perlmutter, David S.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Tang, Jay X.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>We report an in vitro study comparing the growth of long actin tails induced by spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with the verprolin central acidic domain of the polymerization enzyme N-WASP to that induced by Listeria monocytogenes in similar cellular extracts. The tracks behind the <span class="hlt">beads</span> show characteristic differences in shape and curvature from those left by the bacteria, which have an elongated shape and a similar polymerization-inducing enzyme distributed only on the rear surface of the cell. The experimental tracks are simulated using a generalized kinematic model, which incorporates three modes of <span class="hlt">bead</span> rotation with respect to the tail. The results show that the trajectories of spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span> are mechanically deterministic rather than random, as suggested by stochastic models. Assessment of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> rotation and its mechanistic basis offers insights into the biological function of actin-based motility. PMID:21044576</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12552840','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12552840"><span>[<span class="hlt">Beaded</span> molecule imprinted polymer for stereo isomer separation].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Meng, Z; Wang, J; Zhou, L; Wang, Q; Zhu, D</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaded</span> molecule imprinted polymer (MIP) was made by suspension polymerization. Particles with the size of 50-70 microns in diameter were collected and evaluated in HPLC mode to separate stereo isomers. Stereo isomers cinchonine and cinchonidine were successfully discriminated with selectivity factor of 2.89 and resolution factor of 0.76. Stereo selectivity of the MIP was found to come from both the interaction between the analyte and carboxyl group on the MIP and the similarity between the stereo structure of imprinted molecule and the MIP. The thermal analysis results showed that the MIP had high thermal stability with initial thermal decomposition temperature of 320 degrees C. The pore volume of the MIP was 0.1849 mL/g, the specific surface area was 126.84 sqm/g and the average pore diameter was 5.8 nanometer. Scanning electron microscopy showed that MIP had perfect spherical morphology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988JChPh..89.6972S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988JChPh..89.6972S"><span>The effects of <span class="hlt">bead</span> inertia on the Rouse model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schieber, J. D.; Öttinger, Hans Christian</p> <p>1988-12-01</p> <p>The Rouse model for dilute polymer solutions undergoing homogeneous flows has been generalized to include the inertia of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the equations of motion. To obtain the correct ``diffusion equation'' for the probability density distribution function in phase space, we generalize the diffusion equation derived by Murphy and Aguirre [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 2098 (1972)] from Hamilton's equations of motion for an arbitrary number of interacting Brownian particles at equilibrium. Material functions are found, and the noninertial case is seen to be obtained as the zero mass limit in all steps of the development. In particular, the steady-state shear results are unaffected by the inclusion of inertia. It is also shown how two assumptions, ``equilibration in momentum space,'' and the neglect of acceleration, made independently by Curtiss, Bird, and Hassager in their phase-space kinetic theory, are actually the result of assuming zero mass.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23718690','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23718690"><span>Photonic crystal <span class="hlt">beads</span> from gravity-driven microfluidics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gu, Hongcheng; Rong, Fei; Tang, Baocheng; Zhao, Yuanjin; Fu, Degang; Gu, Zhongze</p> <p>2013-06-25</p> <p>This Letter reports a simple method for the mass production of 3D colloidal photonic crystal <span class="hlt">beads</span> (PCBs) by using a gravity-driven microfluidic device and online droplet drying method. Compared to traditional methods, the droplet templates of the PCBs are generated by using the ultrastable gravity as the driving force for the microfluidics, thus the PCBs are formed with minimal polydispersity. Moreover, drying of the droplet templates is integrated into the production process, and the nanoparticles in the droplets self-assemble online. Overall, this process results in PCBs with good morphology, low polydispersity, brilliant structural colors, and narrow stop bands. PCBs could be bulk generated by this process for many practical applications, such as multiplex-encoded assays and the construction of novel optical materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JMiMi..21e4019S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JMiMi..21e4019S"><span>A dynamic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based microarray for parallel DNA detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sochol, R. D.; Casavant, B. P.; Dueck, M. E.; Lee, L. P.; Lin, L.</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>A microfluidic system has been designed and constructed by means of micromachining processes to integrate both microfluidic mixing of mobile microbeads and hydrodynamic microbead arraying capabilities on a single chip to simultaneously detect multiple bio-molecules. The prototype system has four parallel reaction chambers, which include microchannels of 18 × 50 µm2 cross-sectional area and a microfluidic mixing section of 22 cm length. Parallel detection of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences was achieved via molecular beacon probes immobilized on polystyrene microbeads of 16 µm diameter. Experimental results show quantitative detection of three distinct DNA oligonucleotide sequences from the Hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome with single base-pair mismatch specificity. Our dynamic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based microarray offers an effective microfluidic platform to increase parallelization of reactions and improve microbead handling for various biological applications, including bio-molecule detection, medical diagnostics and drug screening.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15108034','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15108034"><span>Obtaining transgenic plants using the bio-active <span class="hlt">beads</span> method.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Haibo; Kawabe, Akira; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Murakawa, Tomoko; Mizukami, Atsushi; Yanagisawa, Masanobu; Nagamori, Eiji; Harashima, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Akio; Fukui, Kiichi</p> <p>2004-04-01</p> <p>Several methods of transformation are currently available for delivering exogenous DNA into animal and plant cells. In this study, a novel and efficient transformation system for DNA delivery/expression with a capacity to transport DNA of high molecular weight was developed. This system can overcome the shortcomings of traditional transformation methods such as Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, particle bombardment, and the electroporation method. The method developed in this study uses calcium alginate micro <span class="hlt">beads</span> to immobilize DNA molecules in combination with polyethylene glycol treatment. In addition, it is simple and low-cost, and requires limited equipment. Using this method, we have successfully transformed tobacco plants, screening by kanamycin resistance. The transformed genes in the transformants were confirmed by PCR and Southern hybridization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26134902','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26134902"><span>Lectin-Magnetic <span class="hlt">Beads</span> for Plasma Membrane Isolation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Yu-Chen; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Chuang, Carol; Lin, Sue-Hwa</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Plasma membrane proteins mainly function to transmit external signals into the cell. Many plasma membrane receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g., HER2 and EGFR) are known to mediate oncogenic progression, making them prime targets for cancer therapy. Recently, it has become important to identify plasma membrane proteins that are differentially expressed in normal versus cancer cells, in drug-sensitive versus drug-resistant cells, or among tumor cells that metastasize to different organ sites because these differentially expressed membrane proteins may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. In addition, there is an increased interest in identifying cell-surface proteins that could serve as markers for stem cells, progenitor cells, or cells of different lineages. Traditionally, membrane isolation requires multiple centrifugation steps to isolate different organelles based on their density. With the advent of affinity matrix technology, it is possible to separate organelles based on their molecular differences. A defining characteristic of the plasma membrane is that plasma membrane proteins are more extensively glycosylated than are intracellular membrane proteins. As a result, affinity chromatography employing lectin, a carbohydrate-binding protein, is commonly used to isolate plasma membrane proteins. We have extended this concept for plasma membrane isolation by using concanavalin A (ConA), a lectin with mannose specificity. Here we describe a protocol that uses immobilized ConA bound to magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> to isolate plasma membranes from homogenized cell lysates. The captured plasma membrane proteins are then solubilized from the ConA-magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> by detergents in the presence of a competing sugar, methyl α-mannopyranoside.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319813','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319813"><span>In situ single cell detection via microfluidic magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> assay</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>KC, Pawan; Zhang, Ge; Zhe, Jiang</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We present a single cell detection device based on magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> assay and micro Coulter counters. This device consists of two successive micro Coulter counters, coupled with a high gradient magnetic field generated by an external magnet. The device can identify single cells in terms of the transit time difference of the cell through the two micro Coulter counters. Target cells are conjugated with magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> via specific antibody and antigen binding. A target cell traveling through the two Coulter counters interacts with the magnetic field, and have a longer transit time at the 1st counter than that at the 2nd counter. In comparison, a non-target cell has no interaction with the magnetic field, and hence has nearly the same transit times through the two counters. Each cell passing through the two counters generates two consecutive voltage pulses one after the other; the pulse widths and magnitudes indicating the cell’s transit times through the counters and the cell’s size respectively. Thus, by measuring the pulse widths (transit times) of each cell through the two counters, each single target cell can be differentiated from non-target cells even if they have similar sizes. We experimentally proved that the target human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and non-target rat adipose-derived stem cells (rASCs) have significant different transit time distribution, from which we can determine the recognition regions for both cell groups quantitatively. We further demonstrated that within a mixed cell population of rASCs and HUVECs, HUVECs can be detected in situ and the measured HUVECs ratios agree well with the pre-set ratios. With the simple device structure and easy sample preparation, this method is expected to enable single cell detection in a continuous flow and can be applied to facilitate general cell detection applications such as stem cell identification and enumeration. PMID:28222140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26560232','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26560232"><span>Enhanced Ionic Conductivity and Power Generation Using Ion-Exchange Resin <span class="hlt">Beads</span> in a Reverse-Electrodialysis Stack.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Bopeng; Gao, Haiping; Chen, Yongsheng</p> <p>2015-12-15</p> <p>Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is a promising technique for harvesting energy by mixing seawater with river water. The energy production is usually limited by ionic conductivity in dilute compartments of a RED system. Novel tests were conducted in this research, which used ion-exchange resin <span class="hlt">beads</span> (IERB) to replace nonconductive spacer fabrics in RED compartments with dilute NaCl solution in a modified stack containing Fumasep FKS and Fumasep FAS membranes. We compared the conductivity of an IERB packed bed with that of an inert <span class="hlt">glass-beads</span>-packed bed as a control to confirm IERB's effectiveness. When applied in a RED system, IERB decreased the stack resistance by up to 40%. The maximum gross power density improved by 83% in the RED stack compared to that in a regular RED stack at 1.3 cm/s average linear flow velocity. IERB-filled stack resistance was modeled. The model results fit well with experimental data, thereby confirming the effectiveness of the new approach presented here. The net power density is also estimated based on the measured pressure drop and pumping energy model. Both gross and net power density was improved by over 75% at higher flow rate. A net power density of 0.44 W/m(2) was achieved at a cell thickness of 500 μm. To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first to study the impact of IERB on power generation and establishes a new approach to improving the power performance of a RED system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/61720','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/61720"><span>Effect of different <span class="hlt">glasses</span> in <span class="hlt">glass</span> bonded zeolite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.</p> <p>1995-05-01</p> <p>A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a <span class="hlt">glass</span> matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable <span class="hlt">glass</span> bonded zeolite. Further development of <span class="hlt">glass</span> bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the <span class="hlt">glass</span> and the zeolite. Properties of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> that enhance binding and durability of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of <span class="hlt">glass</span>, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each <span class="hlt">glass</span> was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica <span class="hlt">glasses</span> did not give a durable <span class="hlt">glass</span> bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate <span class="hlt">glasses</span> rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable <span class="hlt">glass</span> bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate <span class="hlt">glasses</span> wetted the zeolite powders better than the other <span class="hlt">glasses</span>. Development of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865616','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865616"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> electrolyte composition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Kucera, Gene H.; Roche, Michael F.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>An ionically conductive <span class="hlt">glass</span> is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> includes the constituents Na.sub.2 O, ZrO.sub.2, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and SiO.sub.2 in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2.times.10.sup.-3 (ohm-cm).sup.-1 at 300.degree. C. and a <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition temperature in excess of 500.degree. C.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5238182','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5238182"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> electrolyte composition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.</p> <p>1985-01-08</p> <p>An ionically conductive <span class="hlt">glass</span> is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApSS..253.3077S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApSS..253.3077S"><span>The preparation of nitrogen-doped TiO 2- xN x photocatalyst coated on hollow <span class="hlt">glass</span> microbeads</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shifu, Chen; Xuqiang, Liu; Yunzhang, Liu; Gengyu, Cao</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, the effective method for nitrogen-doped TiO 2- xN x photocatalyst coated on hollow <span class="hlt">glass</span> microbeads is described, which uses titanium tetraisopropoxide [Ti( iso-OC 3H 7) 4] as the raw materials and gaseous ammonia as a heat treatment atmosphere. The effects of heat treatment temperature and time on the photocatalytic activity of TiO 2- xN x/<span class="hlt">beads</span> are studied. The photocatalyst is characterized by the UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that when the TiO 2- xN x/<span class="hlt">beads</span> is heated at 650 °C for 5 h, the photocatalytic activity of the TiO 2- xN x/<span class="hlt">beads</span> is the best. Compared with TiO 2, the photoabsorption wavelength range of nitrogen-doped TiO 2- xN x red shifts of about 60 nm, and the photoabsorption intensity increases as well. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO 2- xN x/<span class="hlt">beads</span> is higher than that of the TiO 2/<span class="hlt">beads</span> under visible light irradiation. The presence of nitrogen neither influences on the transformation of anatase to rutile, nor creates new crystal phases. When the TiO 2- xN x/<span class="hlt">beads</span> is heated at 650 °C for 5 h, the amount of nitrogen-doped is 0.53 wt.% in the TiO 2- xN x. As the density of TiO 2- xN x/<span class="hlt">beads</span> prepared is lower than 1.0 g/cm 3, it may float on water surface and use broader sunlight spectrum directly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26422447','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26422447"><span>Development and evaluation of alginate-chitosan gastric floating <span class="hlt">beads</span> loading with oxymatrine solid dispersion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Yanhua; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Chengming; Yang, Jianhong; Hou, Yanhui; Wang, Wenping</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Oxymatrine (OM) can be metabolized to matrine in gastrointestinal ileocecal valve after oral administration, which affects pharmacological activity and reduce bioavailability of OM. A type of multiple-unit alginate-chitosan (Alg-Cs) floating <span class="hlt">beads</span> was prepared by the ionotropic gelation method for gastroretention delivery of OM. A solid dispersion technique was applied and incorporated into <span class="hlt">beads</span> to enhance the OM encapsulation efficiency (EE) and sustain the drug release. The surface morphology and internal hollow structure of <span class="hlt">beads</span> were evaluated using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The developed Alg-Cs <span class="hlt">beads</span> were spherical in shape with hollow internal structure and had particle size of 3.49 ± 0.09 mm and 1.33 ± 0.09 mm for wet and dried <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Over 84% of the optimized OM solid dispersion-loaded Alg-Cs <span class="hlt">beads</span> were able to continuously float over the simulated gastric fluid for 12 h in vitro. The OM solid dispersion-loaded Alg-Cs <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed drug EE of 67.07%, which was much higher than that of <span class="hlt">beads</span> loading with pure OM. Compared with the immediate release of OM capsules and pure OM-loaded <span class="hlt">beads</span>, the release of OM from solid dispersion-loaded Alg-Cs <span class="hlt">beads</span> was in a sustained-release manner for 12 h. Prolonged gastric retention time of over 8.5 h was achieved for OM solid dispersion-loaded Alg-Cs floating <span class="hlt">beads</span> in healthy rabbit in in vivo floating ability evaluated by X-ray imaging. The developed Alg-Cs <span class="hlt">beads</span> loading with OM solid dispersion displayed excellent performance features characterized by excellent gastric floating ability, high drug EE and sustained-release pattern. The study illustrated the potential use of Alg-Cs floating <span class="hlt">beads</span> combined with the solid dispersion technique for prolonging gastric retention and sustaining release of OM, which could provide a promising drug delivery system for gastric-specific delivery of OM for bioavailability enhancement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21428987','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21428987"><span>Prospective Randomized Comparison of Chemoembolization with Doxorubicin-Eluting <span class="hlt">Beads</span> and Bland Embolization with <span class="hlt">Bead</span>Block for Hepatocellular Carcinoma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Malagari, Katerina; Pomoni, Mary; Kelekis, Alexis; Pomoni, Anastasia; Dourakis, Spyros; Spyridopoulos, Themis; Moschouris, Hippokratis; Emmanouil, Emmanouil; Rizos, Spyros; Kelekis, Dimitrios</p> <p>2010-06-15</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to evaluate the added role of a chemotherapeutic in transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The issue is of major importance since, as suggested by recent evidence, hypoxia or incomplete devascularization of the tumor is a potent stimulator of angiogenesis, and there are not many papers supplying level one evidence confirming the value of a chemotherapeutic. The hypothesis was that since drug-eluting <span class="hlt">bead</span> (DEB)-TACE is standardized and reproducible, a comparison with bland TACE can readily reveal the potential value of the chemotherapeutic. Two groups were randomized in this prospective study: group A (n = 41) was treated with doxorubicin DEB-TACE, and group B (n = 43) with bland embolization. Patients were randomized for tumor diameter. Patients were embolized at set time intervals (2 months), with a maximum of three embolizations. Tumor response was evaluated using the EASL criteria and {alpha}-fetoprotein levels. At 6 months a complete response was seen in 11 patients (26.8%) in the DEB-TACE group and in 6 patients (14%) in the bland embolization group; a partial response was achieved in 19 patients (46.3%) and 18 (41.9%) patients in the DEB-TACE and bland embolization groups, respectively. Recurrences at 9 and 12 months were higher for bland embolization (78.3% vs. 45.7%) at 12 months. Time to progression (TTP) was longer for the DEB-TACE group (42.4 {+-} 9.5 and 36.2 {+-} 9.0 weeks), at a statistically significant level (p = 0.008). In conclusion, DEB-TACE presents a better local response, fewer recurrences, and a longer TTP than bland embolization with <span class="hlt">Bead</span>Block. However, survival benefit and bland embolization with smaller particles must be addressed in future papers to better assess the clinical value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5317310','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5317310"><span>Super ionic conductive <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.</p> <p></p> <p>Described is an ionically conducting <span class="hlt">glass</span> for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting <span class="hlt">glass</span> having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the <span class="hlt">glass</span> and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the <span class="hlt">glass</span> and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865131','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865131"><span>Super ionic conductive <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Susman, Sherman; Volin, Kenneth J.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>An ionically conducting <span class="hlt">glass</span> for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting <span class="hlt">glass</span> having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the <span class="hlt">glass</span> and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the <span class="hlt">glass</span> and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=contractor&pg=4&id=EJ664565','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=contractor&pg=4&id=EJ664565"><span>Seeing <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Contractors Clearly.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Deliberato, Jerry</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Offers seven tips for finding and working with an effective <span class="hlt">glass</span> contractor. For example, schools should consider the company's reputation and longevity of service, and whether it has in-house engineering capabilities. (EV)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880041349&hterms=laser+glass&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dlaser%2Bglass','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880041349&hterms=laser+glass&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dlaser%2Bglass"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> formation in microgravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>An account is given of containerless <span class="hlt">glass</span>-forming experiments conducted aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985, using a single-axis acoustic levitator furnace apparatus. An attempt was made to obtain quantitative evidence for the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation/crystallization in containerless melts under microgravity conditions, as well as to study melt homogenization in the absence of gravity-driven convection and assess the feasibility of laser fusion target <span class="hlt">glass</span> microsphere preparation with a microgravity apparatus of the present type. A ternary calcia-gallia-silica <span class="hlt">glass</span> thus obtained indicated a 2-3-fold increase in <span class="hlt">glass</span>-formation tendency for this material composition in microgravity, by comparison with 1g.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/accomplishments/documents/fullText/ACC0393.pdf','DOE-RDACC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/accomplishments/documents/fullText/ACC0393.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> Stronger than Steel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/accomplishments/fieldedsearch.html">DOE R&D Accomplishments Database</a></p> <p>Yarris, Lynn</p> <p>2011-03-28</p> <p>A new type of damage-tolerant metallic <span class="hlt">glass</span>, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JaJAP..55cCA01H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JaJAP..55cCA01H"><span>Display innovations through <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hamilton, Lori L.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Prevailing trends in thin, lightweight, high-resolution, and added functionality, such as touch sensing, continue to drive innovation in the display market. While display volumes grow, so do consumers’ need for portability, enhanced optical performance, and mechanical reliability. Technical advancements in <span class="hlt">glass</span> design and process have enabled display innovations in these areas while supporting industry growth. Opportunities for further innovation remain open for <span class="hlt">glass</span> manufacturers to drive new applications, enhanced functionality, and increased demand.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865804','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865804"><span>Metallic <span class="hlt">glass</span> composition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Kroeger, Donald M.; Koch, Carl C.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A metallic <span class="hlt">glass</span> alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic <span class="hlt">glass</span> upon annealing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730010148','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730010148"><span>Frangible <span class="hlt">glass</span> canisters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Seifert, R.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>The need for a canister that can release its contents without disturbing the contents dynamically is discussed. The solution of this problem by the use of a frangible <span class="hlt">glass</span> canister is considered. The basic theory applicable to frangible <span class="hlt">glass</span> and the method of initiating a command flaw are discussed. A brief description of the test program and the results of a flight test are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/863429','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/863429"><span>Method for making <span class="hlt">glass</span> nonfogging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Lord, David E.; Carter, Gary W.; Petrini, Richard R.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>A method for rendering <span class="hlt">glass</span> nonfogging (to condensation fog) by sandwiching the <span class="hlt">glass</span> between two electrodes such that the <span class="hlt">glass</span> functions as the dielectric of a capacitor, a large alternating current (AC) voltage is applied across the electrodes for a selected time period causing the <span class="hlt">glass</span> to absorb a charge, and the electrodes are removed. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> absorbs a charge from the electrodes rendering it nonfogging. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> surface is undamaged by application of the AC voltage, and normal optical properties are unaffected. This method can be applied to optical surfaces such as lenses, auto windshields, mirrors, etc., wherever condensation fog on <span class="hlt">glass</span> is a problem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1086749','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1086749"><span>Baseline LAW <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Formulation Testing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard</p> <p>2013-06-13</p> <p>The major objective of the baseline <span class="hlt">glass</span> formulation work was to develop and select <span class="hlt">glass</span> formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of <span class="hlt">glasses</span> with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of <span class="hlt">glass</span> melts with melter materials of construction, development of <span class="hlt">glass</span> formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of <span class="hlt">glass</span> formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25720832','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25720832"><span>Alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> of Captopril using galactomannan containing Senna tora gum, guar gum and locust bean gum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pawar, Harshal A; Lalitha, K G; Ruckmani, K</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Gastro-retentive Captopril loaded alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by an ionotropic gelation method using sodium alginate in combination with natural gums containing galactomannans (Senna tora seed gum, guar gum and locust bean gum) in the presence of calcium chloride. The process variables such as concentration of sodium alginate/natural polymer, concentration of calcium chloride, curing time, stirring speed and drying condition were optimized. Prepared <span class="hlt">beads</span> were evaluated for various parameters such as flow property, drug content and entrapment efficiency, size and shape, and swelling index. Surface morphology of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> was studied using scanning electron microscopy. In vitro mucoadhesion and in vitro drug release studies were carried out on the prepared <span class="hlt">beads</span>. From the entrapment efficiency and dissolution study, it was concluded that galactomannans in combination with sodium alginate show sustained release property. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> formulation F4 prepared using combination of sodium alginate and guar gums in the ratio 2:1 showed satisfactory sustained release for 12h. The release of Captopril from the prepared <span class="hlt">beads</span> was found to be controlled by the swelling of the polymer followed by drug diffusion through the swelled polymer and slow erosion of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27598142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27598142"><span>Preparation of Silk Sericin/Lignin Blend <span class="hlt">Beads</span> for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium Ions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kwak, Hyo Won; Shin, Munju; Yun, Haesung; Lee, Ki Hoon</p> <p>2016-09-02</p> <p>In the present study, novel adsorbents having high adsorption capability and reusability were prepared using agricultural by-products: silk sericin and lignin. Silk sericin and lignin blend <span class="hlt">beads</span> were successfully prepared using simple coagulation methods for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution. A 1 M lithium chloride (LiCl)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system successfully dissolved both sericin and lignin and had sufficient viscosity for <span class="hlt">bead</span> preparation. Compared to the conventional sericin <span class="hlt">bead</span> adsorbent, sericin/lignin blend <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed higher Cr(VI) adsorption capacity. The amount of lignin added to the adsorbent greatly affected the adsorption capacity of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, and a 50:50 sericin/lignin blend ratio was optimal. Adsorption behavior followed the Freundlich isotherm, which means the adsorption of Cr(VI) occurred on the heterogeneous surface. Cr(VI) adsorption capability increased with temperature because of thermodynamic-kinetic effects. In addition, over 90% of Cr(VI) ions were recovered from the Cr(VI) adsorbed sericin/lignin <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a 1 M NaOH solution. The adsorption-desorption recycling process was stable for more than seven cycles, and the recycling efficiency was 82%. It is expected that the sericin/lignin <span class="hlt">beads</span> could be successfully applied in wastewater remediation especially for hazardous Cr(VI) ions in industrial wastewater.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5037744','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5037744"><span>Preparation of Silk Sericin/Lignin Blend <span class="hlt">Beads</span> for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium Ions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kwak, Hyo Won; Shin, Munju; Yun, Haesung; Lee, Ki Hoon</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In the present study, novel adsorbents having high adsorption capability and reusability were prepared using agricultural by-products: silk sericin and lignin. Silk sericin and lignin blend <span class="hlt">beads</span> were successfully prepared using simple coagulation methods for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution. A 1 M lithium chloride (LiCl)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system successfully dissolved both sericin and lignin and had sufficient viscosity for <span class="hlt">bead</span> preparation. Compared to the conventional sericin <span class="hlt">bead</span> adsorbent, sericin/lignin blend <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed higher Cr(VI) adsorption capacity. The amount of lignin added to the adsorbent greatly affected the adsorption capacity of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, and a 50:50 sericin/lignin blend ratio was optimal. Adsorption behavior followed the Freundlich isotherm, which means the adsorption of Cr(VI) occurred on the heterogeneous surface. Cr(VI) adsorption capability increased with temperature because of thermodynamic-kinetic effects. In addition, over 90% of Cr(VI) ions were recovered from the Cr(VI) adsorbed sericin/lignin <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a 1 M NaOH solution. The adsorption-desorption recycling process was stable for more than seven cycles, and the recycling efficiency was 82%. It is expected that the sericin/lignin <span class="hlt">beads</span> could be successfully applied in wastewater remediation especially for hazardous Cr(VI) ions in industrial wastewater. PMID:27598142</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21809830','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21809830"><span>Formulation and drying of alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> for controlled release and stabilization of invertase.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Santagapita, Patricio R; Mazzobre, M Florencia; Buera, M Pilar</p> <p>2011-09-12</p> <p>Several alternatives to the conventional alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> formulation were studied for encapsulation of invertase. Pectin was added to the alginate/enzyme solution while trehalose and β-cyclodextrin were added to the calcium gelation media. The effect of composition changes, freezing, drying methods (freeze, vacuum, or air drying), and thermal treatment were evaluated on invertase stability and its release kinetics from <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The enzyme release mechanism from wet <span class="hlt">beads</span> depended on pH. The addition of trehalose, pectin, and β-cyclodextrin modified the <span class="hlt">bead</span> structure, leading in some cases to a release mechanism that included the relaxation of the polymer chains, besides Fickian diffusion. Enzyme release from vacuum-dried <span class="hlt">beads</span> was much faster than from freeze-dried <span class="hlt">beads</span>, probably due to their higher pore size. The inclusion of β-cyclodextrin and especially of pectin prevented enzyme activity losses during <span class="hlt">bead</span> generation, and trehalose addition was fundamental for achieving adequate invertase protection during freezing, drying, and thermal treatment. Present results showed that several alternatives such as drying method, composition, as well as pH of the relese medium can be managed to control enzyme release.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24685529','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24685529"><span>Simultaneous removal of phenol, Cu and Cd from water with corn cob silica-alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shim, Jaehong; Lim, Jeong-Muk; Shea, Patrick J; Oh, Byung-Taek</p> <p>2014-05-15</p> <p>Phenol and heavy metals in petroleum waste are environmental and human health concerns, but physicochemical removal is often cost-prohibitive and can produce toxic secondary products and treatment residues. An environmentally benign alternative combines corn cob silica with alginate and immobilized bacteria into <span class="hlt">beads</span> for treating contaminated water. The concentration of phenol was decreased >92% by Pseudomonas putida YNS1 on aliginate-silica <span class="hlt">beads</span> (2%, w/v) after equilibrating for 96h with water containing 214mg phenol/L. GC-MS analysis indicated formation of benzoquinone and other polar products. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> containing corn cob silica decreased Cu concentrations by 84-88% and Cd by 83-87% within 24h. In a mixture of 114mg phenol, 43mg Cu and 51mg Cd/L, phenol removal (93% within 96h) only occurred with <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing the silica and bacterial strain. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> containing corn cob silica removed >97% of the Cu and >99% of the Cd, critical for reducing toxicity to the bacteria. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> with the immobilized strain removed phenol when zeolite was used instead of corn cob silica, but <span class="hlt">beads</span> with silica were more effective for Cu and Cd removal. Results show the potential of corn cob silica combined with alginate and immobilized bacteria for removing phenol and heavy metals from contaminated water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18459055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18459055"><span>Wax-incorporated emulsion gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> of calcium pectinate for intragastric floating drug delivery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Asavapichayont, Panida; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Luangtana-Anan, Manee; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Piriyaprasarth, Suchada</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to prepare wax-incorporated pectin-based emulsion gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> using a modified emulsion-gelation method. The waxes in pectin-olive oil mixtures containing a model drug, metronidazole, were hot-melted, homogenized and then extruded into calcium chloride solution. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> formed were separated, washed with distilled water and dried for 12 h. The influence of various types and amounts of wax on floating and drug release behavior of emulsion gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> of calcium pectinate was investigated. The drug-loaded gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> were found to float on simulated gastric fluid if the sufficient amount of oil was used. Incorporation of wax into the emulsion gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> affected the drug release. Water-soluble wax (i.e. polyethylene glycol) increased the drug release while other water-insoluble waxes (i.e. glyceryl monostearate, stearyl alcohol, carnauba wax, spermaceti wax and white wax) significantly retarded the drug release. Different waxes had a slight effect on the drug release. However, the increased amount of incorporated wax in the formulations significantly sustained the drug release while the <span class="hlt">beads</span> remained floating. The results suggest that wax-incorporated emulsion gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> could be used as a carrier for intragastric floating drug delivery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22528076','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22528076"><span>Calcium alginate/dextran methacrylate IPN <span class="hlt">beads</span> as protecting carriers for protein delivery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>D'Arrigo, Giorgia; Di Meo, Chiara; Pescosolido, Laura; Coviello, Tommasina; Alhaique, Franco; Matricardi, Pietro</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>In the present study, mechanical and protein delivery properties of a system based on the interpenetration of calcium-alginate (Ca-Alg) and dextran-methacrylate (Dex-MA) networks are shown. Interpenetrated hydrogels <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by means of the alginate chains crosslinking with calcium ions, followed by the exposure to UV light that allows the Dex-MA network formation. Optical microscope analysis showed an average diameter of the IPN <span class="hlt">beads</span> (Ca-Alg/Dex-MA) of 2 mm. This dimension was smaller than that of Ca-Alg <span class="hlt">beads</span> because of the Dex-MA presence. Moreover, the strength of the IPN <span class="hlt">beads</span>, and of their corresponding hydrogels, was influenced by the Dex-MA concentration and the crosslinking time. Model proteins (BSA and HRP) were successfully entrapped into the <span class="hlt">beads</span> and released at a controlled rate, modulated by changing the Dex-MA concentration. The enzymatic activity of HRP released from the <span class="hlt">beads</span> was maintained. These novel IPN <span class="hlt">beads</span> have great potential as protein delivery system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhDT.......131N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhDT.......131N"><span>Expanded PLA <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Foaming: Analysis of Crystallization Kinetics and Development of a Novel Technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nofar, Mohammadreza</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Bead</span> foam technology with a double crystal-melting peak structure has been well established for polyolefins. The double crystal melting peak structure, which is required in the molding stage of the <span class="hlt">bead</span> foams, generates a strong sintering among the foamed <span class="hlt">beads</span> and maintains the overall foam structure. In this research, despite the PLA's poor foaming behavior and its slow crystallization kinetics, we successfully developed expanded PLA (EPLA) <span class="hlt">bead</span> foams with double crystal melting peak structure and the inter-<span class="hlt">bead</span> sintering behavior was verified through steam chest molding. For this purpose, the generation and evolution of double crystal melting peak structure in different PLA materials is simulated in a high-pressure differential scanning calorimeter (HP-DSC). The simulation results shows that the formation of double crystal melting peak with different peak ratios can be controlled by varying the processing parameters (i.e., saturation pressure, temperature, and time) during the saturation. The PLA <span class="hlt">bead</span> foams characterization showed that the high melting temperature crystals generated during the saturation and the low melting temperature crystals formed during the cooling and foaming can significantly affect the foaming behavior of PLA <span class="hlt">bead</span> foams. Moreover, the crystallization kinetics of different PLA materials are systematically investigated in presence of dissolved gas. It is shown that the different crystallization kinetics (i.e., crystal nucleation and growth rate) that can be induced at various gas pressures can significantly influence the PLA's foaming behavior (i.e., cell nucleation and expansion behavior).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24607645','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24607645"><span>Enrichment of cancer stem cell-like cells by culture in alginate gel <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xu, Xiao-xi; Liu, Chang; Liu, Yang; Yang, Li; Li, Nan; Guo, Xin; Sun, Guang-wei; Ma, Xiao-jun</p> <p>2014-05-10</p> <p>Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are most likely the reason of cancer reoccurrence and metastasis. For further elucidation of the mechanism underlying the characteristics of CSCs, it is necessary to develop efficient culture systems to culture and expand CSCs. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) culture system based on alginate gel (ALG) <span class="hlt">beads</span> was reported to enrich CSCs. Two cell lines derived from different histologic origins were encapsulated in ALG <span class="hlt">beads</span> respectively and the expansion of CSCs was investigated. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) culture, the proportion of cells with CSC-like phenotypes was significantly increased in ALG <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Expression levels of CSC-related genes were greater in ALG <span class="hlt">beads</span> than in 2D culture. The increase of CSC proportion after being cultured within ALG <span class="hlt">beads</span> was further confirmed by enhanced tumorigenicity in vivo. Moreover, increased metastasis ability and higher anti-cancer drug resistance were also observed in 3D-cultured cells. Furthermore, we found that it was hypoxia, through the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) that occurred in ALG <span class="hlt">beads</span> to induce the increasing of CSC proportion. Therefore, ALG <span class="hlt">bead</span> was an efficient culture system for CSC enrichment, which might provide a useful platform for CSC research and promote the development of new anti-cancer therapies targeting CSCs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20660718','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20660718"><span>Neurite <span class="hlt">beading</span> is sufficient to decrease the apparent diffusion coefficient after ischemic stroke.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Budde, Matthew D; Frank, Joseph A</p> <p>2010-08-10</p> <p>Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is a sensitive and reliable marker of cerebral ischemia. Within minutes of an ischemic event in the brain, the microscopic motion of water molecules measured with DWI, termed the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), decreases within the infarcted region. However, although the change is related to cell swelling, the precise pathological mechanism remains elusive. We show that focal enlargement and constriction, or <span class="hlt">beading</span>, in axons and dendrites are sufficient to substantially decrease ADC. We first derived a biophysical model of neurite <span class="hlt">beading</span>, and we show that the <span class="hlt">beaded</span> morphology allows a larger volume to be encompassed within an equivalent surface area and is, therefore, a consequence of osmotic imbalance after ischemia. The DWI experiment simulated within the model revealed that intracellular ADC decreased by 79% in <span class="hlt">beaded</span> neurites compared with the unbeaded form. To validate the model experimentally, excised rat sciatic nerves were subjected to stretching, which induced <span class="hlt">beading</span> but did not cause a bulk shift of water into the axon (i.e., swelling). <span class="hlt">Beading</span>-induced changes in cell-membrane morphology were sufficient to significantly hinder water mobility and thereby decrease ADC, and the experimental measurements were in excellent agreement with the simulated values. This is a demonstration that neurite <span class="hlt">beading</span> accurately captures the diffusion changes measured in vivo. The results significantly advance the specificity of DWI in ischemia and other acute neurological injuries and will greatly aid the development of treatment strategies to monitor and repair damaged brain in both clinical and experimental settings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16736086','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16736086"><span>Superparamagnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) <span class="hlt">beads</span> for nattokinase purification from fermentation broth.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yang, Chengli; Xing, Jianmin; Guan, Yueping; Liu, Huizhou</p> <p>2006-09-01</p> <p>An effective method for purification of nattokinase from fermentation broth using magnetic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) <span class="hlt">beads</span> immobilized with p-aminobenzamidine was proposed in this study. Firstly, magnetic PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span> with a narrow size distribution were prepared by spraying suspension polymerization. Then, they were highly functionalized via transesterification reaction with polyethylene glycol. The surface hydroxyl-modified magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> obtained were further modified with chloroethylamine to transfer the surface amino-modified magnetic functional <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The morphology and surface functionality of the magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> were examined by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared. An affinity ligand, p-aminobenzamidine was covalently immobilized to the amino-modified magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> by the glutaraldehyde method for nattokinase purification directly from the fermentation broth. The purification factor and the recovery of the enzyme activity were found to be 8.7 and 85%, respectively. The purification of nattokinase from fermentation broth by magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> only took 40 min, which shows a very fast purification of nattokinase compared to traditional purification methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14627286','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14627286"><span>Protection of bifidobacteria encapsulated in polysaccharide-protein gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> against gastric juice and bile.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guérin, Daniel; Vuillemard, Jean-Christophe; Subirade, Muriel</p> <p>2003-11-01</p> <p>Bifidobacterium cells were encapsulated in a mixed gel composed of alginate, pectin, and whey proteins. Two kinds of capsules were obtained: gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> without membranes and gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> with two membranes formed by the transacylation reaction. In vitro studies were carried out to determine the effects of simulated gastric pH and bile salts on the survival of free and encapsulated Bifidobacterium bifidum. The protective effects of gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> without membranes and gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> coated with two membranes formed by the transacylation reaction were evaluated. After 1 h in an acidic solution (pH 2.5), the free-cell counts decreased by 4.75 log units, compared with a <1-log decrease for entrapped cells. The free cells did not survive after 2 h of incubation at pH 2.5, while immobilized-cell counts decreased by about 2 log units. After incubation (1 or 3 h) in 2 and 4% bile salt solutions, the bifidobacterium mortality level for membrane-free gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> (4 to 7 log units) was higher than that for free cells (2 to 3 log units). However, counts of bifidobacteria immobilized in membrane-coated gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> decreased by <2 log units. Cell encapsulation in membrane-coated protein-polysaccharide gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> could be used to increase the survival of healthy probiotic bacteria during their transit through the gastrointestinal tract.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SMaS...25h4008P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SMaS...25h4008P"><span>A bacteria-based <span class="hlt">bead</span> for possible self-healing marine concrete applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Palin, D.; Wiktor, V.; Jonkers, H. M.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>This work presents a bacteria-based <span class="hlt">bead</span> for potential self-healing concrete applications in low-temperature marine environments. The <span class="hlt">bead</span> consisting of calcium alginate encapsulated bacterial spores and mineral precursor compounds was assessed for: oxygen consumption, swelling, and its ability to form a biocomposite in a simulative marine concrete crack solution (SMCCS) at 8 °C. After six days immersion in the SMCCS the bacteria-based <span class="hlt">beads</span> formed a calcite crust on their surface and calcite inclusions in their network, resulting in a calcite-alginate biocomposite. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> swelled by 300% to a maximum diameter of 3 mm, while theoretical calculations estimate that 0.112 g of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were able to produce ˜1 mm3 of calcite after 14 days immersion; providing the <span class="hlt">bead</span> with considerable crack healing potential. The bacteria-based <span class="hlt">bead</span> shows great potential for the development of self-healing concrete in low-temperature marine environments, while the formation of a biocomposite healing material represents an exciting avenue for self-healing concrete research.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19111313','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19111313"><span>Surface-modified polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> as photografting imprinted polymer matrix for chromatographic separation of proteins.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qin, Lei; He, Xi-Wen; Zhang, Wei; Li, Wen-You; Zhang, Yu-Kui</p> <p>2009-01-30</p> <p>A new and facile fabricating method for lysozyme molecularly imprinted polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span> (lysozyme-MIP <span class="hlt">beads</span>) in aqueous media was presented. Mesoporous chloromethylated polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> (MCP <span class="hlt">beads</span>) containing dithiocarbamate iniferter (initiator transfer agent terminator) were used as supports for the grafting of lysozyme imprinted copolymers with acrylamide and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide through surface initiated living-radical polymerization (SIP). After the polymerization, a layer of lysozyme-MIP was formed on the MCP <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The SIP allowed an efficient control of the grafting process and suppressed solution propagation. Therefore, the obtained lysozyme-MIP <span class="hlt">beads</span> had a large quantity of well-distributed pores on the surface without any visible gel formation in solution and were more advantageous comparing with traditional MIPs which were prepared by traditionally initiated radical polymerization. The obtained composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Chromatographic behaviors of the column packed with lysozyme-MIP <span class="hlt">beads</span> exhibited ability in separating lysozyme from competitive protein (bovine hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin or cytochrome c) in aqueous mobile phase.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910012027','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910012027"><span>Containerless synthesis of interesting <span class="hlt">glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Weinberg, Michael C.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>One aspect of containerless <span class="hlt">glass</span> experimentation was thoroughly examined: <span class="hlt">glass</span> forming ability. It is argued that although containerless processing will abet <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation, other ground-based methods can do the job better. However, these methods have limitations, such as sample dimensions and concomitant ability to make property measurements. Most importantly, perhaps, is the observation that <span class="hlt">glass</span> properties are a function of preparation procedure. Thus, it seems as though there still is an argument for use of containerless processing for <span class="hlt">glass</span> forming.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3479550','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3479550"><span>On the strength of <span class="hlt">glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wisitsorasak, Apiwat; Wolynes, Peter G.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The remarkable strength of <span class="hlt">glasses</span> is examined using the random first order transition theory of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition. The theory predicts that strength depends on elastic modulus but also on the configurational energy frozen in when the <span class="hlt">glass</span> is prepared. The stress catalysis of cooperative rearrangements of the type responsible for the supercooled liquid’s high viscosity account quantitatively for the measured strength of a range of metallic <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, silica, and a polymer <span class="hlt">glass</span>. PMID:22988070</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10940862','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10940862"><span>Characterization of an encapsulation device for the production of monodisperse alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> for cell immobilization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Serp, D; Cantana, E; Heinzen, C; Von Stockar, U; Marison, I W</p> <p>2000-10-05</p> <p>An encapsulation device, designed on the basis of the laminar jet break-up technique, is characterized for cell immobilization with different types of alginate. The principle of operation of the completely sterilizable encapsulator, together with techniques for the continuous production of <span class="hlt">beads</span> from 250 microm to 1 mm in diameter, with a size distribution below 5%, at a flow rate of 1-15 mL/min, is described. A modification of the device, to incorporate an electrostatic potential between the alginate droplets and an internal electrode, results in enhanced monodispersity with no adverse effects on cell viability. The maximum cell loading capacity of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> strongly depends on the nozzle diameter as well as the cells used. For the yeast Phaffia rhodozyma, it is possible to generate 700 microm alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> with an initial cell concentration of 1 x 10(8) cells/mL of alginate whereas only 1 x 10(6) cells/ml could be entrapped within 400 microm <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> have been characterized with respect to mechanical resistance and size distribution immediately after production and as a function of storage conditions. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> remain stable in the presence of acetic acid, hydrochloric acid, water, basic water, and sodium ions. The latter stability applies when the ratio of sodium: calcium ions is less than 1/5. Complexing agents such as sodium citrate result in the rapid solubilization of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> due to calcium removal. The presence of cells does not affect the mechanical resistance of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Finally, the mechanical resistance of alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be doubled by treatment with 5-10 kDa chitosan, resulting in reduced leaching of cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24354669','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24354669"><span>Oil-cyclodextrin based <span class="hlt">beads</span> for oral delivery of poorly-soluble drugs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hamoudi, M C; Bochot, A</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The main interest of cyclodextrins results from their ability to form inclusion complexes with hydrophobic molecules. This property is employed in pharmaceutical industry to facilitate the formulation of poorly-soluble and/or fragile drugs. Cyclodextrins are also used to form or stabilise dispersed systems. An original multiparticulate system named "<span class="hlt">beads</span>" is obtained thanks to the interactions occurring between the molecules of α cyclodextrin and the triglycerides of vegetable oils. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> are prepared by a simple process involving the external shaking of a mixture of an aqueous solution of α cyclodextrin with soybean oil. This is done without any organic solvent or surface-active agent. Once freezedried, <span class="hlt">beads</span> have a diameter of 1.6 mm and a high lipid content. They consist in a partially crystalline matrix of cyclodextrin surrounding microdomains of oil. The coating of <span class="hlt">beads</span> with a layer of α cyclodextrin improves their resistance in gastro- intestinal fluids and prolongs the release of drugs. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> can also be manufactured from mineral oils with α cyclodextrin and from silicone oils with γ cyclodextrin. Poorly-soluble drugs which do not form inclusion complexes with α cyclodextrin are encapsulated in <span class="hlt">beads</span> with high efficiency and drug loading. In rats, the oral bioavailability of isotretinoin is twofold enhanced with uncoated <span class="hlt">beads</span> as compared to the lipid content of a soft capsule. The relative oral bioavailability of indomethacin is improved with both coated and uncoated <span class="hlt">beads</span> versus a commercial hard capsule. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> demonstrate an important potential for the encapsulation of poorly-soluble and/or fragile compounds and their delivery by oral route.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23609603','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23609603"><span>Digital microfluidics-enabled single-molecule detection by printing and sealing single magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> in femtoliter droplets.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Witters, Daan; Knez, Karel; Ceyssens, Frederik; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen</p> <p>2013-06-07</p> <p>Digital microfluidics is introduced as a novel platform with unique advantages for performing single-molecule detection. We demonstrate how superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>, used for capturing single protein molecules, can be printed with unprecedentedly high loading efficiency and single <span class="hlt">bead</span> resolution on an electrowetting-on-dielectric-based digital microfluidic chip by micropatterning the Teflon-AF surface of the device. By transporting droplets containing suspended superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> over a hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic micropatterned Teflon-AF surface, single <span class="hlt">beads</span> are trapped inside the hydrophilic microwells due to their selective wettability and tailored dimensions. Digital microfluidics presents the following advantages for printing and sealing magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> for single-molecule detection: (i) droplets containing suspended <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be transported back and forth over the array of hydrophilic microwells to obtain high loading efficiencies of microwells with single <span class="hlt">beads</span>, (ii) the use of hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic patterns permits the use of a magnet to speed up the <span class="hlt">bead</span> transfer process to the wells, while the receding droplet meniscus removes excess <span class="hlt">beads</span> off the chip surface and thereby shortens the <span class="hlt">bead</span> patterning time, and (iii) reagents can be transported over the printed <span class="hlt">beads</span> multiple times, while capillary forces and a magnet hold the printed <span class="hlt">beads</span> in place. High loading efficiencies (98% with a CV of 0.9%) of single <span class="hlt">beads</span> in microwells were obtained by transporting droplets of suspended <span class="hlt">beads</span> over the array 10 times in less than 1 min, which is much higher than previously reported methods (40-60%), while the total surface area needed for performing single-molecule detection can be decreased. The performance of the device was demonstrated by fluorescent detection of the presence of the biotinylated enzyme β-galactosidase on streptavidin-coated <span class="hlt">beads</span> with a linear dynamic range of 4 orders of magnitude ranging from 10 aM to 90 fM.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24245280','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24245280"><span>Formation of a macro-porous SiO2 layer as an anti-reflective coating on <span class="hlt">glass</span> substrates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, No-Kuk; Kim, Yong Sul; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Tae Jin; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Seung Hun</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>A macro-porous silica layer, consisting of a silica layer with macro-sized pores, was formed as an antireflective material on <span class="hlt">glass</span> substrates. The silica layer and macro-pores were formed by the oxidative thermal decomposition of tetra-ethylorthorsilicate (TEOS) used as the precursor and polystyrene (PS) spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span> used as the polymer template for the macro-pores at high temperatures. The size of pores was determined by the size of PS <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the antireflective agent solution. The size of the PS spherical <span class="hlt">beads</span> can be controlled by changing the concentration of styrene monomer, and the porosity of the macro pore in the silica layer could be controlled by the TEOS/PS ratio. The optimal thermal treating temperature for the formation of a macro-porous silica layer was found to be 650 degrees C. The size of the spherical type macro pores formed in the silica layer on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> substrate was 100-150 nm. UV-Vis spectrophotometry confirmed the improved antireflective properties of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> substrate with the macro-porous silica layer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28244513','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28244513"><span>Two-<span class="hlt">bead</span> polarizable water models combined with a two-<span class="hlt">bead</span> multipole force field (TMFF) for coarse-grained simulation of proteins.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Min; Zhang, John Z H</p> <p>2017-03-08</p> <p>The development of polarizable water models at coarse-grained (CG) levels is of much importance to CG molecular dynamics simulations of large biomolecular systems. In this work, we combined the newly developed two-<span class="hlt">bead</span> multipole force field (TMFF) for proteins with the two-<span class="hlt">bead</span> polarizable water models to carry out CG molecular dynamics simulations for benchmark proteins. In our simulations, two different two-<span class="hlt">bead</span> polarizable water models are employed, the RTPW model representing five water molecules by Riniker et al. and the LTPW model representing four water molecules. The LTPW model is developed in this study based on the Martini three-<span class="hlt">bead</span> polarizable water model. Our simulation results showed that the combination of TMFF with the LTPW model significantly stabilizes the protein's native structure in CG simulations, while the use of the RTPW model gives better agreement with all-atom simulations in predicting the residue-level fluctuation dynamics. Overall, the TMFF coupled with the two-<span class="hlt">bead</span> polarizable water models enables one to perform an efficient and reliable CG dynamics study of the structural and functional properties of large biomolecules.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950007095','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950007095"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> microsphere lubrication</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or <span class="hlt">glasses</span>), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or <span class="hlt">glass</span> was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, <span class="hlt">glass</span> has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid <span class="hlt">glass</span> lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the <span class="hlt">glass</span> in. Solid <span class="hlt">glass</span> spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of <span class="hlt">glass</span> microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25981262','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25981262"><span>Multiplex detection of plant pathogens through the Luminex MagPlex <span class="hlt">bead</span> system.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van der Vlugt, René A A; van Raaij, Henry; de Weerdt, Marjanne; Bergervoet, Jan H W</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Here we describe a versatile multiplex method for both the serological and molecular detection of plant pathogens. The Luminex MagPlex <span class="hlt">bead</span> system uses small paramagnetic microspheres ("<span class="hlt">beads</span>"), either coated with specific antibodies or oligonucleotides, which capture respectively viruses and/or bacteria or PCR products obtained from their genetic material. The Luminex MagPlex <span class="hlt">bead</span> system allows true multiplex detection of up to 500 targets in a single sample on a routine basis. The liquid suspension nature of the method significantly improves (1) assay speed, (2) detection limits and (3) dynamic range. It can also considerably reduce labor and consumables costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21076246','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21076246"><span>Spherical vesicles distorted by a grafted latex <span class="hlt">bead</span>: An exact solution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Benoit, Jerome; Saxena, Avadh</p> <p>2007-10-15</p> <p>We present an exact solution to the problem of the global shape description of a spherical vesicle distorted by a grafted latex <span class="hlt">bead</span>. This solution is derived by treating the nonlinearity in bending elasticity through the (topological) Bogomol'nyi decomposition technique and elastic compatibility. We recover the 'hat-model' approximation in the limit of a small latex <span class="hlt">bead</span> and find that the region antipodal to the grafted latex <span class="hlt">bead</span> flattens. We also derive the appropriate shape equation using the variational principle and relevant constraints.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16494892','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16494892"><span>Surfactant-induced detachment of monodispersed hematite particles adhered on <span class="hlt">glass</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zelenev, Andrei; Matijević, Egon</p> <p>2006-07-01</p> <p>The effects of an anionic (sodium 4-octylbenzenesulfonate, NaOBS) and a cationic (1-dodecylpyridinium chloride, DPC) surfactant on the detachment of colloidal hematite particles adhered to <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> was studied using the packed column technique. Both additives induced particle removal at concentrations above those necessary for the reversal of charge either on particles or on <span class="hlt">beads</span>, in order to induce a repulsion between interacting surfaces. The amount of detached hematite was substantially increased as the surfactant concentrations exceeded the corresponding critical micellization concentrations (CMC). Particle removal was shown to follow first order kinetics with two distinctively different rate constants. The value of the constant for rapid removal, k(r), was substantially higher than that established in earlier studies for detachment of the same particles with NaOH solutions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139p5104K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139p5104K"><span>Exploring chemical reaction mechanisms through harmonic Fourier <span class="hlt">beads</span> path optimization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Khavrutskii, Ilja V.; Smith, Jason B.; Wallqvist, Anders</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Here, we apply the harmonic Fourier <span class="hlt">beads</span> (HFB) path optimization method to study chemical reactions involving covalent bond breaking and forming on quantum mechanical (QM) and hybrid QM/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potential energy surfaces. To improve efficiency of the path optimization on such computationally demanding potentials, we combined HFB with conjugate gradient (CG) optimization. The combined CG-HFB method was used to study two biologically relevant reactions, namely, L- to D-alanine amino acid inversion and alcohol acylation by amides. The optimized paths revealed several unexpected reaction steps in the gas phase. For example, on the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) potential, we found that alanine inversion proceeded via previously unknown intermediates, 2-iminopropane-1,1-diol and 3-amino-3-methyloxiran-2-ol. The CG-HFB method accurately located transition states, aiding in the interpretation of complex reaction mechanisms. Thus, on the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) potential, the gas phase activation barriers for the inversion and acylation reactions were 50.5 and 39.9 kcal/mol, respectively. These barriers determine the spontaneous loss of amino acid chirality and cleavage of peptide bonds in proteins. We conclude that the combined CG-HFB method further advances QM and QM/MM studies of reaction mechanisms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24182085','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24182085"><span>Exploring chemical reaction mechanisms through harmonic Fourier <span class="hlt">beads</span> path optimization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Khavrutskii, Ilja V; Smith, Jason B; Wallqvist, Anders</p> <p>2013-10-28</p> <p>Here, we apply the harmonic Fourier <span class="hlt">beads</span> (HFB) path optimization method to study chemical reactions involving covalent bond breaking and forming on quantum mechanical (QM) and hybrid QM∕molecular mechanical (QM∕MM) potential energy surfaces. To improve efficiency of the path optimization on such computationally demanding potentials, we combined HFB with conjugate gradient (CG) optimization. The combined CG-HFB method was used to study two biologically relevant reactions, namely, L- to D-alanine amino acid inversion and alcohol acylation by amides. The optimized paths revealed several unexpected reaction steps in the gas phase. For example, on the B3LYP∕6-31G(d,p) potential, we found that alanine inversion proceeded via previously unknown intermediates, 2-iminopropane-1,1-diol and 3-amino-3-methyloxiran-2-ol. The CG-HFB method accurately located transition states, aiding in the interpretation of complex reaction mechanisms. Thus, on the B3LYP∕6-31G(d,p) potential, the gas phase activation barriers for the inversion and acylation reactions were 50.5 and 39.9 kcal∕mol, respectively. These barriers determine the spontaneous loss of amino acid chirality and cleavage of peptide bonds in proteins. We conclude that the combined CG-HFB method further advances QM and QM∕MM studies of reaction mechanisms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1440892','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1440892"><span>Mechanochemical analysis of DNA gyrase using rotor <span class="hlt">bead</span> tracking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nöllmann, Marcelo; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.; Bustamante, Carlos</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>DNA gyrase is a molecular machine that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to introduce essential negative supercoils into DNA1-3. The directionality of supercoiling is ensured by chiral wrapping of the DNA4,5 around a specialized domain6-9 of the enzyme prior to strand passage. Here we observe the activity of gyrase in real time by tracking the rotation of a sub-micron <span class="hlt">bead</span> attached to the side of a stretched DNA molecule10. In the presence of gyrase and ATP, we observe bursts of rotation corresponding to the processive, stepwise introduction of negative supercoils in strict multiples of two11. Changes in DNA tension have no detectable effect on supercoiling velocity, but the enzyme becomes markedly less processive as tension is increased over a range of only a few tenths of piconewtons. This behavior is quantitatively explained by a simple mechanochemical model in which processivity depends on a kinetic competition between dissociation and rapid, tension-sensitive DNA wrapping. In a high-resolution variant of our assay, we directly detect rotational pauses corresponding to two kinetic substeps: an ATP-independent step at the end of the reaction cycle and an ATP-binding step in the middle of the cycle, subsequent to DNA wrapping. PMID:16397501</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..172a2068Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..172a2068Z"><span>Bacillus thuringiensis HCB6 Amylase Immobilization by Chitosan <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zusfahair; Ningsih, D. R.; Kartika, D.; Fatoni, A.; Zuliana, A. L.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to optimize the amylase immobilization using a chitosan <span class="hlt">bead</span> and to characterize immobilized amylase of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteria HCB6. This study was started of amylase production, continued by immobilization optimization including ratio of chitosan:enzymes, enzyme-matrix contact time, substrate concentration, pH effect, incubation temperature effect, reaction time, and stability of immobilized enzyme. Amylase activity assay was dinitro salicylic (DNS) method. The results showed the optimum chitosan:enzyme ratio was 2.5: 1 (v/v), immobilization contact time of 18 hours and immobilization efficiency of 87.93%. Furthermore, immobilized amylase of B. thuringiensis HCB6 showed optimum substrate concentration of 1.5%, optimum pH of 6, optimum incubation temperature of 37 ° C, and the reaction time of 30 minutes. The Michaelis-Menten constant KM value for free and immobilized amylase were 5.30% and 1.33% respectively. Immobilized amylase can be used up to five times with the remaining activity of 43.3%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20955484','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20955484"><span>Insights into the <span class="hlt">beaded</span> filament of the eye lens</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Perng, M.-D. . E-mail: m.d.perng@durham.ac.uk; Zhang Qingjiong; Quinlan, Roy A.</p> <p>2007-06-10</p> <p>Filensin (BFSP1) and CP49 (BFSP2) represent two members of the IF protein superfamily that are thus far exclusively expressed in the eye lens. Mutations in both proteins cause lens cataract and careful consideration of the detail of these cataract phenotypes alerts us to several interesting features concerning the function of filensin (BFSP1) and CP49 (BFSP2) in the lens. With the first filensin (BFSP1) mutation now having been reported to cause a recessive cataract phenotype, there is the suggestion that the mutation could predispose heterozygote carriers to the early onset of age-related nuclear cataract. In the case of CP49 (BFSP2), there are now three unrelated families who have been identified with a common E233{delta} mutation. Very interestingly this is linked to myopia in one family. Despite the apparent phenotypic differences of the filensin (BFSP1) and CP49 (BFSP2) mutations, the data are still consistent with the <span class="hlt">beaded</span> filament proteins being essential for lens function and specifically contributing to the optical properties of the lens. The fact that none of the mutations thus far reported affect either the conserved LNDR or TYRKLLEGE motifs that flank the central rod domain supports the view that this pair of IF proteins have unusual structural features and a distinctive assembly mechanism. The multiple sequence divergences suggest these proteins have been adapted to the specific functional requirements of lens fibre cells, a function that can be traced from squid to man.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011IJT....32.1973S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011IJT....32.1973S"><span>Thermophysical and Magnetic Properties of Carbon <span class="hlt">Beads</span> Containing Nickel Nanocrystallites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Skumiel, A.; Izydorzak, M.; Leonowicz, M.; Pomogailo, A. D.; Dzhardimalieva, G. I.</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>Ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic nickel nanocrystallites, stabilized in a carbon matrix, were prepared by a three-step procedure including formation of a Ni acrylamide complex, followed by frontal polymerization and pyrolysis of the polymer at various temperatures. It was found that the procedure applied enables fabrication of magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metallic nanocrystallites embedded in a carbon matrix. The size of the crystallites, their morphology, volume fraction, and magnetic properties can be tailored by the pyrolysis temperature. The size of the crystallites affects their behavior in an external magnetic field, i.e., a heating process is the most effective for a sample pyrolyzed at 873 K. The revealed H n-type dependence of the temperature increase rate, (d T/d t) t=0, on the amplitude of the magnetic field indicates the presence of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic particles in all the samples studied since n > 2. For the superparamagnetic particles, the heating mechanism is associated with Néel relaxation. For the lower values of the magnetic field amplitude, H < H 0, the relaxation losses dominate whereas for the opposite case, H > H 0, the magnetic hysteresis is the main source of thermal energy losses. The composites containing magnetic Ni nanocrystallites entrapped in a carbon matrix can be potentially applied for hyperthermia treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1048208','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1048208"><span>HOM identification by <span class="hlt">bead</span> pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hahn H.; Calaga, R.; Jain, P.; Johnson, E.C.; Xu, W.</p> <p>2012-06-25</p> <p>Several past measurements of the Brookhaven ERL at superconducting temperature produced a long list of higher order modes (HOMs). The Niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to tolerable levels. However, a number of undamped resonances with Q {ge} 10{sup 6} were found at 4 K and their mode identification remained as a goal for this paper. The approach taken here consists in taking different S{sub 21} measurements on a copper cavity replica of the ERL which can be compared with the actual data and also with Microwave Studio computer simulations. Several different S{sub 21} transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, between probes in a single cell, and between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes. Mode identification is supported by <span class="hlt">bead</span> pulling with a metallic needle or a dielectric sphere that are calibrated in the fundamental mode. This paper presents results for HOMs in the first two dipole bands with the prototypical 958 MHz trapped mode, the lowest beam tube resonances, and high-Q modes in the first quadrupole band and beyond.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4784722','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4784722"><span>Metallurgical investigation of wire breakage of tyre <span class="hlt">bead</span> grade</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Palit, Piyas; Das, Souvik; Mathur, Jitendra</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Tyre <span class="hlt">bead</span> grade wire is used for tyre making application. The wire is used as reinforcement inside the polymer of tyre. The wire is available in different size/section such as 1.6–0.80 mm thin Cu coated wire. During tyre making operation at tyre manufacturer company, wire failed frequently. In this present study, different broken/defective wire samples were collected from wire mill for detailed investigation of the defect. The natures of the defects were localized and similar in nature. The fracture surface was of finger nail type. Crow feet like defects including button like surface abnormalities were also observed on the broken wire samples. The defect was studied at different directions under microscope. Different advanced metallographic techniques have been used for detail investigation. The analysis revealed that, white layer of surface martensite was formed and it caused the final breakage of wire. In this present study we have also discussed about the possible reason for the formation of such kind of surface martensite (hard-phase). PMID:26973808</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4749332','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4749332"><span>Rapid <span class="hlt">Bead</span>-Based Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing by Optical Diffusometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chung, Chih-Yao; Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Chuang, Han-Sheng</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study combined optical diffusometry and <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based immunoassays to develop a novel technique for quantifying the growth of specific microorganisms and achieving rapid AST. Diffusivity rises when live bacteria attach to particles, resulting in additional energy from motile microorganisms. However, when UV-sterilized (dead) bacteria attach to particles, diffusivity declines. The experimental data are consistent with the theoretical model predicted according to the equivalent volume diameter. Using this diffusometric platform, the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the antibiotic gentamicin was tested. The result suggests that the proliferation of bacteria is effectively controlled by gentamicin. This study demonstrated a sensitive (one bacterium on single particles) and time-saving (within 2 h) platform with a small sample volume (~0.5 μL) and a low initial bacteria count (50 CFU per droplet ~ 105 CFU/mL) for quantifying the growth of microorganisms depending on Brownian motion. The technique can be applied further to other bacterial strains and increase the success of treatments against infectious diseases in the near future. PMID:26863001</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/323716','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/323716"><span>Molybdate sorption by cross-linked chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span>: Dynamic studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Guibal, E.; Milot, C.; Roussy, J.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Recent trends in environmental monitoring have induced increasing development of new wastewater treatment techniques. Membrane processes, electrochemical techniques, or ion-exchange systems are widely used, but biosorption has been recognized in the last 30 years as a promising way to reduce the contamination of surface water issued from industrial effluent. Chitosan, a biopolymer extracted from crustacean shells, exhibits high sorption capacities for metal ion recovery. Sorption efficiency and removal rates are controlled by several diffusion mechanisms. Chitosan gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> have been prepared and have shown enhanced sorption performance in batch systems. This study shows that, in continuous systems, sorption capacities can reach 700 mg/g, a level close to that obtained in batch studies. The effects of metal concentration, flow velocity, and column size are investigated and demonstrate that, because of diffusion mechanisms, the optimum concentration range is approximately 50 to 100 mg/L. In column systems, the Biot number, though greater than 1, is lower than the Biot number obtained in batch systems, indicating that external mass transfer influences mass transfer at the low superficial velocity investigated in this work.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22410149','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22410149"><span>Magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> detection using domain wall-based nanosensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.</p> <p>2015-05-07</p> <p>We investigate the effect of a single magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads{sup ®} MyOne{sup ™}) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔB{sub dep} = 4.5–27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/909675','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/909675"><span>Magnetic <span class="hlt">Beads</span>-based Bioelectrochemical Immunoassay of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lin, Ying-Ying; Liu, Guodong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe</p> <p>2007-07-01</p> <p>A simple, rapid, and sensitive bioelectrochemical immunoassay method based on magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> (MBs) has been developed to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The principle of this bioassay is based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using PAH-antibody-coated MBs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled PAH (HRP-PAH). A magnetic process platform was used to mix and shake the samples during the immunoreactions and to separate free and unbound reagents after the liquid-phase competitive immunoreaction among PAH-antibody-coated MBs, PAH analyte, and HRP-PAH. After a complete immunoassay, the HRP tracers attached to MBs were transferred to a substrate solution containing 3, 3´, 5, 5´- tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for electrochemical detection. The voltammetric characteristics of the substrate were investigated, and the reduction peak current of TMB was used to quantify the concentration of PAH. The different parameters, including the amount of HRP-PAH conjugates, the enzyme catalytic reaction time, and the pH of the supporting electrolyte that governs the analytical performance of the immunoassay have been studied in detail and optimized. The detection limit of 50 pg mL-1 was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The performance of this bioelectrochemical magnetic immunoassay was successfully evaluated with tap water spiked with PAHs, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for decentralized environmental applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26830562','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26830562"><span>Encapsulation of lactase (β-galactosidase) into κ-carrageenan-based hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span>: Impact of environmental conditions on enzyme activity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Zipei; Zhang, Ruojie; Chen, Long; McClements, David Julian</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Encapsulation of enzymes in hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> may improve their utilization and activity in foods. In this study, the potential of carrageenan hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> for encapsulating β-galactosidase was investigated. Hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> were fabricated by injecting an aqueous solution, containing β-galactosidase (26 U) and carrageenan (1 wt%), into a hardening solution (5% potassium chloride). Around 63% of the β-galactosidase was initially encapsulated in the hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Encapsulated β-galactosidase had a higher activity than that of the free enzyme over a range of pH and thermal conditions, which was attributed to the stabilization of the enzyme structure by K(+) ions within the carrageenan <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Release of the enzyme from the <span class="hlt">beads</span> was observed during storage in aqueous solutions, which was attributed to the relatively large pore size of the hydrogel matrix. Our results suggest that carrageenan hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> may be useful encapsulation systems, but further work is needed to inhibit enzyme leakage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10653768','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10653768"><span>Survival of Bifidobacterium longum immobilized in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> in simulated gastric juices and bile salt solution.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, K Y; Heo, T R</p> <p>2000-02-01</p> <p>Bifidobacterium longum KCTC 3128 and HLC 3742 were independently immobilized (entrapped) in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing 2, 3, and 4% sodium alginate. When the bifidobacteria entrapped in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> were exposed to simulated gastric juices and a bile salt solution, the death rate of the cells in the <span class="hlt">beads</span> decreased proportionally with an increase in both the alginate gel concentration and <span class="hlt">bead</span> size. The initial cell numbers in the <span class="hlt">beads</span> affected the numbers of survivors after exposure to these solutions; however, the death rates of the viable cells were not affected. Accordingly, a mathematical model was formulated which expressed the influences of several parameters (gel concentration, <span class="hlt">bead</span> size, and initial cell numbers) on the survival of entrapped bifidobacteria after sequential exposure to simulated gastric juices followed by a bile salt solution. The model proposed in this paper may be useful for estimating the survival of bifidobacteria in <span class="hlt">beads</span> and establishing optimal entrapment conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867965','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867965"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> matrix armor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Calkins, Noel C.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>An armor system which utilizes <span class="hlt">glass</span>. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of <span class="hlt">glass</span> and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a <span class="hlt">glass</span> matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in <span class="hlt">glass</span> or dispersed in said polymer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000686&hterms=sol+gel&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsol%2Bgel','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000686&hterms=sol+gel&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsol%2Bgel"><span>Sol-Gel <span class="hlt">Glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mukherjee, S. P.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are promising batch materials for the containerless <span class="hlt">glass</span> melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> forming ability of marginally <span class="hlt">glass</span> forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived <span class="hlt">glasses</span> in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3683359','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3683359"><span><span class="hlt">Bead</span> Assembly Magnetorotation as a Signal Transduction Method for Protein Detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hecht, Ariel; Commiskey, Patrick; Shah, Nicholas; Kopelman, Raoul</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This paper demonstrates a proof-of-principle for a new signal transduction method for protein detection called <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Assembly Magnetorotation (BAM). In this paper, we chose to focus on the protein thrombin, a popular choice for proof-of-principle work in this field. BAM is based on using the protein target to mediate the formation of aptamer-coated 1 μm magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> into a <span class="hlt">bead</span> assembly, formed at the bottom of a 1 μL hanging droplet. The size, shape and fractal dimension of this <span class="hlt">bead</span> assembly all depend on the protein concentration. The protein concentration can be measured in two ways: by magnetorotation, in which the rotational period of the assembly correlates with the protein concentration, or by fractal analysis. Additionally, a microscope-free magnetorotation detection method is introduced, based on a simple laser apparatus built from standard laboratory components. PMID:23639345</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23316810','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23316810"><span>Immobilization of catalase on chitosan and amino acid- modified chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Başak, Esra; Aydemir, Tülin</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Bovine liver catalase was covalently immobilized onto amino acid-modified chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were characterized with SEM, FTIR, TGA and the effects of immobilization on optimum pH and temperature, thermostability, reusability were evaluated. Immobilized catalase showed the maximal enzyme activity at pH 7.0 at 30°C. The kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax, for immobilized catalase on alanine-chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span> and lysine-chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span> were estimated to be 25.67 mM, 27 mM and 201.39 μmol H2O2/min, 197.50 μmol H2O2/min, respectively. The activity of the immobilized catalase on Ala-CB and Lys-CB retained 40% of its high initial activity after 100 times of reuse.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMMM..380..215R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMMM..380..215R"><span>On-chip magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of <span class="hlt">beads</span> bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> to the sensor surface. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23659866','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23659866"><span>An innovative bioremediation strategy using a bacterial consortium entrapped in chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Angelim, Alysson Lira; Costa, Samantha Pinheiro; Farias, Bárbara Cibelle Soares; Aquino, Lyanderson Freitas; Melo, Vânia Maria Maciel</p> <p>2013-09-30</p> <p>This aim of this work was to develop a bioremediation strategy for oil-contaminated mangrove sediments using chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing an immobilised hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial consortium. The consortium composed of 17 isolates was obtained from an enrichment culture. The isolates were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing, which revealed 12 different genera. Thirteen isolates showed resistance to chitosan and were thus able to be trapped in chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span> for microcosm evaluation. The data revealed that entrapped consortium grew in the microcosms until day 15, which is when the <span class="hlt">beads</span> disintegrated and released their biomass into the sediments. Bacterial bioaugmentation within the sediments was confirmed by cell counts; additionally, the dynamics of the bacterial populations were analysed through denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The chitosan showed a prebiotic effect on the autochthonous bacterial communities. Therefore, chitosan <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing selected immobilised bacteria attain two bioremediation purposes, bioaugmentation and biostimulation, and thus represent an emergent approach.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981Sci...213..233L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981Sci...213..233L"><span>Serum Albumin <span class="hlt">Beads</span>: An Injectable, Biodegradable System for the Sustained Release of Drugs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Timothy K.; Sokoloski, Theodore D.; Royer, Garfield P.</p> <p>1981-07-01</p> <p>Biologically active compounds were entrapped in cross-linked serum albumin microbeads. Injection of these drug-impregnated <span class="hlt">beads</span> into rabbits produced no adverse immunological reactions. Sustained release (20 days) of progesterone was demonstrated in vivo.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25406530','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25406530"><span>Effect of pH on the formation of lysosome-alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> for antimicrobial activity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, Hyun Jung; Min, Jiho; Ahn, Joo-Myung; Cho, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Yang-Hoon</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>In this study, we developed lysosome-alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> for application as an oral drug delivery system (ODDS). The <span class="hlt">beads</span> harboring lysosomes, which have antimicrobial activity, and various concentrations of alginate were characterized and optimized. For application as an ODDS, pH-dependent lysosome-alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> were generated, and the level of lysosome release was investigated by using antimicrobial tests. At low pH, lysosomes were not released from the lysosome-alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>; however, at neutral pH, similar to the pH in the intestine, lysosome release was confirmed, as determined by a high antimicrobial activity. This study shows the potential of such an ODDS for the in vivo treatment of infection with pathogens.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23999018','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23999018"><span>Optimization of aceclofenac-loaded pectinate-poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) <span class="hlt">beads</span> by response surface methodology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nayak, Amit Kumar; Kalia, Samir; Hasnain, M Saquib</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>The paper describes development of aceclofenac-loaded pectinate-poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) [PVP] <span class="hlt">beads</span> through ionotropic-gelation. Effects of amount of pectin and PVP on drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE), and cumulative drug release at 6h (R6h) were optimized by using response surface methodology. The optimized <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed DEE of 96.58 ± 4.15% and R6h of 41.62 ± 2.18% with controlled drug release pattern. FTIR spectroscopy analysis revealed possible intermolecular hydrogen bonding, which could be formed between C=O groups of PVP and -OH groups of pectin in these <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The swelling of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> were influenced by pH of the medium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApSS..259..840L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApSS..259..840L"><span>Air plasma processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) micro-<span class="hlt">beads</span>: Surface characterisations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Chaozong; Cui, Nai-Yi; Osbeck, Susan; Liang, He</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>This paper reports the surface processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) micro-<span class="hlt">beads</span> by using a rotary air plasma reactor, and its effects on surface properties. The surface properties, including surface wettability, surface chemistry and textures of the PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span>, were characterised. It was observed that the air plasma processing can improve the surface wettability of the PMMA microbeads significantly. A 15 min plasma processing can reduce the surface water contact angle of PMMA <span class="hlt">beads</span> to about 50° from its original value of 80.3°. This was accompanied by about 8% increase in surface oxygen concentration as confirmed by XPS analysis. The optical profilometry examination revealed the air plasma processing resulted in a rougher surface that has a “delicate” surface texture. It is concluded that the surface chemistry and texture, induced by air plasma processing, co-contributed to the surface wettability improvement of PMMA micro-<span class="hlt">beads</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27691962','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27691962"><span>CUTANEOUS SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA IN A PANTHER CHAMELEON (FURCIFER PARDALIS) AND TREATMENT WITH CARBOPLATIN IMPLANTABLE <span class="hlt">BEADS</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Johnson, James G; Naples, Lisa M; Chu, Caroline; Kinsel, Michael J; Flower, Jennifer E; Van Bonn, William G</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>A 3-yr-old male panther chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) presented with bilateral raised crusted skin lesions along the lateral body wall that were found to be carcinoma in situ and squamous cell carcinoma. Similar lesions later developed on the caudal body wall and tail. A subcutaneous implantable carboplatin <span class="hlt">bead</span> was placed in the first squamous cell carcinoma lesion identified. Additional new lesions sampled were also found to be squamous cell carcinomas, and viral polymerase chain reaction was negative for papillomaviruses and herpesviruses. Significant skin loss would have resulted from excision of all the lesions, so treatment with only carboplatin <span class="hlt">beads</span> was used. No adverse effects were observed. Lesions not excised that were treated with <span class="hlt">beads</span> decreased in size. This is the first description of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and treatment with carboplatin implantable <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a panther chameleon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhL.109v1110Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhL.109v1110Z"><span>Use of optoelectronic tweezers in manufacturing—accurate solder <span class="hlt">bead</span> positioning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Shuailong; Liu, Yongpeng; Juvert, Joan; Tian, Pengfei; Navarro, Jean-Claude; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Neale, Steven L.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>In this work, we analyze the use of optoelectronic tweezers (OETs) to manipulate 45 μm diameter Sn62Pb36Ag2 solder <span class="hlt">beads</span> with light-induced dielectrophoresis force and we demonstrate high positioning accuracy. It was found that the positional deviation of the solder <span class="hlt">beads</span> increases with the increase of the trap size. To clarify the underlying mechanism, simulations based on the integration of the Maxwell stress tensor were used to study the force profiles of OET traps with different sizes. It was found that the solder <span class="hlt">beads</span> felt a 0.1 nN static friction or stiction force due to electrical forces pulling them towards the surface and that this force is not dependent on the size of the trap. The stiction limits the positioning accuracy; however, we show that by choosing a trap that is just larger than the solder <span class="hlt">bead</span> sub-micron positional accuracy can be achieved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1133938','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1133938"><span>Two-phase mixed media dielectric with macro dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span> for enhancing resistivity and breakdown strength</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Falabella, Steven; Meyer, Glenn A; Tang, Vincent; Guethlein, Gary</p> <p>2014-06-10</p> <p>A two-phase mixed media insulator having a dielectric fluid filling the interstices between macro-sized dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span> packed into a confined volume, so that the packed dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span> inhibit electro-hydrodynamically driven current flows of the dielectric liquid and thereby increase the resistivity and breakdown strength of the two-phase insulator over the dielectric liquid alone. In addition, an electrical apparatus incorporates the two-phase mixed media insulator to insulate between electrical components of different electrical potentials. And a method of electrically insulating between electrical components of different electrical potentials fills a confined volume between the electrical components with the two-phase dielectric composite, so that the macro dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span> are packed in the confined volume and interstices formed between the macro dielectric <span class="hlt">beads</span> are filled with the dielectric liquid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1168728','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1168728"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> strengthening and patterning methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E</p> <p>2015-01-27</p> <p>High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate <span class="hlt">glass</span>, <span class="hlt">glass</span> ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the <span class="hlt">glass</span>. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> surface--the pattern being raised above the <span class="hlt">glass</span> surface and integral with the <span class="hlt">glass</span> (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830040972&hterms=contemporary&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dcontemporary','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830040972&hterms=contemporary&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dcontemporary"><span><span class="hlt">Glass</span> formation - A contemporary view</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Uhlmann, D. R.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>The process of <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation is discussed from several perspectives. Particular attention is directed to kinetic treatments of <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation and to the question of how fast a given liquid must be cooled in order to form a <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Specific consideration is paid to the calculation of critical cooling rates for <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation, to the effects of nucleating heterogeneities and transients in nucleation on the critical cooling rates, to crystallization on reheating a <span class="hlt">glass</span>, to the experimental determination of nucleation rates and barriers to crystal nucleation, and to the characteristics of materials which are most conducive to <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA558015','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA558015"><span>Understanding the Impact of <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Type on Paint and Thermoplastic Pavement Markings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>20 Figure 7: <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Performance Over Time for Polyurea (Needham, 2011) ......................... 23 Figure 8...specifically. Research conducted at the Air Force Institute of Technology reveals that <span class="hlt">bead</span> type does impact the degradation rate of polyurea ...Preformed tape - profiled < 1.0 8 Methyl methacrylate < 1.0 9 Thermoplastics profiled < 1.0 10 Polyurea < 1.0 11 Cold applied plastics < 1.0 12</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JAP...107e4702F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JAP...107e4702F"><span>On-chip magnetic separation of superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> for integrated molecular analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Florescu, Octavian; Wang, Kevan; Au, Patrick; Tang, Jimmy; Harris, Eva; Beatty, P. Robert; Boser, Bernhard E.</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>We have demonstrated a postprocessed complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit (IC) capable of on-chip magnetic separation, i.e., removing via magnetic forces the nonspecifically bound magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> from the detection area on the surface of the chip. Initially, 4.5 μm wide superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> sedimenting out of solution due to gravity were attracted to the detection area by a magnetic concentration force generated by flowing current through a conductor embedded in the IC. After sedimentation, the magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> that did not bind strongly to the functionalized surface of the IC through a specific biochemical complex were removed by a magnetic separation force generated by flowing current through another conductor placed laterally to the detection area. As the spherical <span class="hlt">bead</span> pivoted on the surface of the chip, the lateral magnetic force was further amplified by mechanical leveraging, and 50 mA of current flowing through the separation conductor placed 18 μm away from the <span class="hlt">bead</span> resulted in 7.5 pN of tensile force on the biomolecular tether immobilizing the <span class="hlt">bead</span>. This force proved high enough to break nonspecific interactions while leaving specific antibody-antigen bonds intact. A sandwich capture immunoassay on purified human immunoglobulin G showed strong correlation with a control enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and a detection limit of 10 ng/ml or 70 pM. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> bound to the detection area after on-chip magnetic separation were detected optically. To implement a fully integrated molecular diagnostics platform, the on-chip magnetic separation functionality presented in this work can be readily combine with state-of-the art CMOS-based magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> detection technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IJTSM.130..584Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IJTSM.130..584Y"><span>Development of a Magnetic <span class="hlt">Beads</span> Quantitative Detection System for Fast Diagnosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yamamoto, Yujiro; Morishita, Tomohiro; Matsuyama, Kenji; Takasa, Kenji; Shibasaki, Ichiro</p> <p></p> <p>This paper reports the development and performance of a detection system for magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The system consists of a semiconductor based magneto-resistance sensor for <span class="hlt">beads</span> detection and a lateral flow kit. Detection of anti-gen of H.Influenza at concentration of 0.1ng/ml was performed with satisfactory sensitivity, showing the system to be a promising for immunoassay.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26818806','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26818806"><span>Arsenate removal by layered double hydroxides embedded into spherical polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span>: Batch and column studies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nhat Ha, Ho Nguyen; Kim Phuong, Nguyen Thi; Boi An, Tran; Mai Tho, Nguyen Thi; Ngoc Thang, Tran; Quang Minh, Bui; Van Du, Cao</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this study, the performance of poly(layered double hydroxides) [poly(LDHs)] <span class="hlt">beads</span> as an adsorbent for arsenate removal from aqueous solution was investigated. The poly(LDHs) <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by immobilizing LDHs into spherical alginate/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-glutaraldehyde <span class="hlt">beads</span> (spherical polymer <span class="hlt">beads</span>). Batch adsorption studies were conducted to assess the effect of contact time, solution pH, initial arsenate concentrations and co-existing anions on arsenate removal performance. The potential reuse of these poly(LDHs) <span class="hlt">beads</span> was also investigated. Approximately 79.1 to 91.2% of arsenic was removed from an arsenate solution (50 mg As L(-1)) by poly(LDHs). The adsorption data were well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics model and the Langmuir isotherm model, and the adsorption capacities of these poly(LDHs) <span class="hlt">beads</span> at pH 8 were from 1.64 to 1.73 mg As g(-1), as calculated from the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption ability of the poly(LDHs) <span class="hlt">beads</span> decreased by approximately 5-6% after 5 adsorption-desorption cycles. Phosphates markedly decreased arsenate removal. The effect of co-existing anions on the adsorption capacity declined in the following order: HPO4 (2-) > HCO3 (-) > SO4 (2-) > Cl(-). A fixed-bed column study was conducted with real-life arsenic-containing water. The breakthrough time was found to be from 7 to 10 h. Under optimized conditions, the poly(LDHs) removed more than 82% of total arsenic. The results obtained in this study will be useful for further extending the adsorbents to the field scale or for designing pilot plants in future studies. From the viewpoint of environmental friendliness, the poly(LDHs) <span class="hlt">beads</span> are a potential cost-effective adsorbent for arsenate removal in water treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22364994','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22364994"><span>Antibiotic-impregnated <span class="hlt">beads</span> for the treatment of aortic graft infection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Healy, Aaron H; Reid, Bruce B; Allred, Bryce D; Doty, John R</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Infection of a prosthetic graft after replacement of the ascending aorta is an uncommon but life-threatening complication of surgery. We report the use of antibiotic-impregnated calcium sulfate <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a patient with ascending aortic graft infection to provide localized, high-dose therapy to the infected region. Perigraft placement of antibiotic <span class="hlt">beads</span> provides an alternative method for the treatment of aortic graft infection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AmJPh..80..506B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AmJPh..80..506B"><span>Jacobi elliptic functions and the complete solution to the <span class="hlt">bead</span> on the hoop problem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baker, Thomas E.; Bill, Andreas</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>Jacobi elliptic functions are flexible functions that appear in a variety of problems in physics and engineering. We introduce and describe important features of these functions and present a physical example from classical mechanics where they appear: a <span class="hlt">bead</span> on a spinning hoop. We determine the complete analytical solution for the motion of a <span class="hlt">bead</span> on the driven hoop for arbitrary initial conditions and parameter values.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6548801','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6548801"><span>Waste <span class="hlt">glass</span> melting stages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.</p> <p>1993-04-01</p> <p>Three different simulated nuclear waste <span class="hlt">glass</span> feeds, consisting of dried waste and <span class="hlt">glass</span> frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600[degrees]C--1000[degrees]C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10157210','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10157210"><span>Waste <span class="hlt">glass</span> melting stages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.</p> <p>1993-04-01</p> <p>Three different simulated nuclear waste <span class="hlt">glass</span> feeds, consisting of dried waste and <span class="hlt">glass</span> frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600{degrees}C--1000{degrees}C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6036..252K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6036..252K"><span>Silicon-on-<span class="hlt">glass</span> based microchip for protein sensing and analysis by using confocal microscopy and MALDI-TOF</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, M. S.; Cho, S. H.; Kim, B. G.; Kim, Y. K.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>We propose a prototype of silicon-on-<span class="hlt">glass</span> microchip for protein detection by <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based affinity chromatography. The microchip has five channels integrated by composing one <span class="hlt">beads</span> reactor per one channel. Especially, an effective protein analysis mechanism is presented where the three protein-pretreatment processes are simultaneously performed on a single <span class="hlt">beads</span> reactor: selective detection (purification / sensing), pre-concentration and protein digestion. Since the five channels are closely spaced in parallel on the microchip, it is possible to inspect the five different detection results on real-time in a single microscope image. The microchip is fabricated on silicon-on-<span class="hlt">glass</span> (SiOG) to make a mechanically strong and vertically transparent structure for efficient fluid interconnection and fluorescence detection, respectively. Within the microchip, the grid-type filter is formed on channel output to physically trap 38 ~ 50 μm diameter microbeads. The dimension of one grid is 30 × 30 μm2. The volume flow rate was investigated experimentally on the case of <span class="hlt">bead</span>-packed chamber, and the resulted value was compared to that of the case of hollow chamber. In this research, we used self-cleavage free aptazymes as detection ligands immobilized on polystyrene microbeads. The target proteins are firstly on-chip concentrated and fluorescence-detected (confocal microscopy), and secondly checked off-chip by using MALDI-TOF. If the two analyses are used cooperatively, it is expected that the accuracy in diagnostic analysis will be enhanced in biosensing system. Especially by using this free aptazymes system, we don't need to consider the requirement of fluorescence tagging and the difficulty of eluting antibody-bound proteins from microbeads without bad effects of harsh elution conditions in protease treatment. We analyzed the on-<span class="hlt">bead</span> detection of HCV replicase and HCV helicase respectively by measuring fluorescence intensities at different concentrations, and also performed a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4662676','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4662676"><span>Dynamic trajectory analysis of superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> driven by on-chip micromagnets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Lim, Byeonghwa; Yang, Ye; Howdyshell, Marci; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham; Yellen, Benjamin B.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We investigate the non-linear dynamics of superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> moving around the periphery of patterned magnetic disks in the presence of an in-plane rotating magnetic field. Three different dynamical regimes are observed in experiments, including (1) phase-locked motion at low driving frequencies, (2) phase-slipping motion above the first critical frequency fc1, and (3) phase-insulated motion above the second critical frequency fc2. Experiments with Janus particles were used to confirm that the <span class="hlt">beads</span> move by sliding rather than rolling. The rest of the experiments were conducted on spherical, isotropic magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span>, in which automated particle position tracking algorithms were used to analyze the <span class="hlt">bead</span> dynamics. Experimental results in the phase-locked and phase-slipping regimes correlate well with numerical simulations. Additional assumptions are required to predict the onset of the phase-insulated regime, in which the <span class="hlt">beads</span> are trapped in closed orbits; however, the origin of the phase-insulated state appears to result from local magnetization defects. These results indicate that these three dynamical states are universal properties of <span class="hlt">bead</span> motion in non-uniform oscillators. PMID:26648596</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4753426','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4753426"><span>“Nanofiltration” Enabled by Super-Absorbent Polymer <span class="hlt">Beads</span> for Concentrating Microorganisms in Water Samples</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xie, Xing; Bahnemann, Janina; Wang, Siwen; Yang, Yang; Hoffmann, Michael R.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Detection and quantification of pathogens in water is critical for the protection of human health and for drinking water safety and security. When the pathogen concentrations are low, large sample volumes (several liters) are needed to achieve reliable quantitative results. However, most microbial identification methods utilize relatively small sample volumes. As a consequence, a concentration step is often required to detect pathogens in natural waters. Herein, we introduce a novel water sample concentration method based on superabsorbent polymer (SAP) <span class="hlt">beads</span>. When SAP <span class="hlt">beads</span> swell with water, small molecules can be sorbed within the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, but larger particles are excluded and, thus, concentrated in the residual non-sorbed water. To illustrate this approach, millimeter-sized poly(acrylamide-co-itaconic acid) (P(AM-co-IA)) <span class="hlt">beads</span> are synthesized and successfully applied to concentrate water samples containing two model microorganisms: Escherichia coli and bacteriophage MS2. Experimental results indicate that the size of the water channel within water swollen P(AM-co-IA) hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> is on the order of several nanometers. The millimeter size coupled with a negative surface charge of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> are shown to be critical in order to achieve high levels of concentration. This new concentration procedure is very fast, effective, scalable, and low-cost with no need for complex instrumentation. PMID:26876979</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22244298','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22244298"><span>Novel polymer-layered silicate intercalated composite <span class="hlt">beads</span> for drug delivery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xu, Ruifen; Feng, Xuyang; Li, Wei; Xin, Shangjing; Wang, Xiaoying; Deng, Hongbing; Xu, Lixian</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Core-shell structured <span class="hlt">beads</span> were fabricated from chitosan (CS)/organic rectorite (OREC) composites and alginate (ALG) in Ca(2+) aqueous solutions with different mixing ratios by a cross-linking process. The mechanical properties, surface and internal morphology, intercalation structure between CS and OREC, porosity and pore size distribution, bovine serum albumin (BSA) encapsulation efficiency and its controllable release ability were investigated. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the core-shell structure was generated in the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The Fourier transform infrared spectra results implied the presence of electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interaction between CS and OREC. The energy-dispersive X-ray and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results verified the existence of OREC in the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Small-angle X-ray diffraction results confirmed that the interlayer of OREC was intercalated by CS chains successfully, and the interlayer distance increased from 2.42 to 2.60 nm. The BSA encapsulation and release test indicated that the <span class="hlt">beads</span> released the drug continuously. OREC could not only avoid the burst release phenomenon in the first period but also improve the utilization efficacy of the drug. When the ratio of CS/OREC was 6:1 and CS-OREC/ALG was 2:1, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were better for drug released in stomach, and when CS/OREC was 12:1 and CS-OREC/ALG was 2:1, the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were better for drug released in stomach than in intestine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21786420','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21786420"><span>Multiplatform comparison of multiplexed <span class="hlt">bead</span> arrays using HPV genotyping as a test case.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Corrie, Simon R; Feng, Qinghua; Blair, Tiffany; Hawes, Stephen E; Kiviat, Nancy B; Trau, Matt</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>While previous studies have investigated the utility of Luminex technology in comparison to other standard techniques, there have been few studies directly comparing different <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based assays. A key barrier to establishing Luminex technology in research or clinical laboratories is the apparent need to purchase not only encoded <span class="hlt">bead</span> sets but also the Luminex instrument. However, as flow cytometry instrumentation continues to improve in sensitivity and in the number and diversity of detection parameters, a diverse range of <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based assays is likely to emerge. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping requires multiplexed analysis of 10-100 individual genotypes per sample, which is well suited to <span class="hlt">bead</span>-based assays whilst technically challenging and costly for related technologies (e.g., qPCR). Here we performed an unbiased technical comparison between Luminex technology and our in-house 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane ("MPS") <span class="hlt">bead</span> platform, which has been designed for integration with generic cytometry instruments. In genotyping 200 clinical samples, we compared the two <span class="hlt">bead</span> assays against the goldstandard Roche Line Blot (RLB) assay, and both performed well in receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. We also show instrument-based differences are a significant factor in comparing the methods, which needs to be considered in future comparative studies. These multi-platform analyses are important in establishing the validity of new methods, as well as highlighting specific advantages and disadvantages of the assays for specific applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23584225','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23584225"><span>Conditions for efficient on-chip magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> detection via magnetoresistive sensors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Albisetti, E; Petti, D; Cantoni, M; Damin, F; Torti, A; Chiari, M; Bertacco, R</p> <p>2013-09-15</p> <p>A commonly used figure of merit of magnetoresistive sensors employed to detect magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> labeling biomolecules in lab-on-chip applications is the sensor sensitivity (S0) to external magnetic fields in the linear region of the sensor. In this paper we show that, in case of lock-in detection and <span class="hlt">bead</span> excitation by a small AC magnetic field, S0 is not the good figure of merit to optimize. Indeed, the highest sensitivity to the magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> is achieved biasing the sensor in the region of its characteristics where the product between the DC bias field and the second derivative of the resistance with respect to the magnetic field is maximum. The validity of this criterion, derived from a phenomenological model of <span class="hlt">bead</span> detection, is proved in case of magnetic tunneling junction sensors detecting magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> with 250nm diameter. This work paves the way to the development of a new generation of sensors properly designed to maximize the <span class="hlt">bead</span> sensitivity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MMTB...45.2000O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MMTB...45.2000O"><span>Processing and Characterization of MMC <span class="hlt">Beads</span> Based on Zirconia and TRIP Steel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oppelt, Marie; Wenzel, Claudia; Aneziris, Christos G.; Berek, Harry</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>A novel process for metal-matrix composite fabrication with the special focus on single <span class="hlt">beads</span> and sintered <span class="hlt">bead</span> structures is explored. The used gel-casting process by sodium alginate gelation is introduced, and various analyses with significant results are presented. The suspensions contained 16-7-3 steel and zirconia particles as well as sodium alginate and were subsequently added dropwise into water which contained solidifying agent for forming rubbery, substantially round <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Sintered <span class="hlt">beads</span> with adequate strength (~400 MPa) and perfect surface, homogeneous microstructure, and high energy absorption capability have been produced by this casting process. At lower strains (up to 15 pct), all zirconia reinforced steel <span class="hlt">beads</span> obtain higher specific energy absorption (SEA) in comparison to pure steel <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Especially the composition of 90 vol pct TRIP steel and 10 vol pct zirconia shows a significant improved energy absorption capability with 27.7 MJ/m3 at a strain of 15 pct. Pure steel only exhibits a SEA of 13.1 MJ/m3.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26876979','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26876979"><span>"Nanofiltration" Enabled by Super-Absorbent Polymer <span class="hlt">Beads</span> for Concentrating Microorganisms in Water Samples.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xie, Xing; Bahnemann, Janina; Wang, Siwen; Yang, Yang; Hoffmann, Michael R</p> <p>2016-02-15</p> <p>Detection and quantification of pathogens in water is critical for the protection of human health and for drinking water safety and security. When the pathogen concentrations are low, large sample volumes (several liters) are needed to achieve reliable quantitative results. However, most microbial identification methods utilize relatively small sample volumes. As a consequence, a concentration step is often required to detect pathogens in natural waters. Herein, we introduce a novel water sample concentration method based on superabsorbent polymer (SAP) <span class="hlt">beads</span>. When SAP <span class="hlt">beads</span> swell with water, small molecules can be sorbed within the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, but larger particles are excluded and, thus, concentrated in the residual non-sorbed water. To illustrate this approach, millimeter-sized poly(acrylamide-co-itaconic acid) (P(AM-co-IA)) <span class="hlt">beads</span> are synthesized and successfully applied to concentrate water samples containing two model microorganisms: Escherichia coli and bacteriophage MS2. Experimental results indicate that the size of the water channel within water swollen P(AM-co-IA) hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> is on the order of several nanometers. The millimeter size coupled with a negative surface charge of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> are shown to be critical in order to achieve high levels of concentration. This new concentration procedure is very fast, effective, scalable, and low-cost with no need for complex instrumentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MAR.P1061T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MAR.P1061T"><span>New Analysis Techniques for Avalanches in a Conical <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Pile with Cohesion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tieman, Catherine; Lehman, Susan</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Avalanche statistics and pile geometry for 3 mm steel spheres dropped on a conical <span class="hlt">bead</span> pile were studied at different drop heights and different cohesion strengths. The pile is initially built on a circular base and is subsequently slowly driven by adding one <span class="hlt">bead</span> at a time to the apex of the pile. We investigate the dynamic response of the pile by recording avalanches off the pile over the course of tens of thousands of <span class="hlt">bead</span> drops. The level of cohesion is tuned through use of an applied uniform magnetic field. Changes in the pile mass and geometry were investigated to determine the effect of cohesion and drop height on the angle of repose. The angle of repose increased with cohesion strength, and decreased somewhat for higher drop heights. The packing density of <span class="hlt">beads</span> is expected to decrease as magnetic cohesion increases, but for our 20 000-<span class="hlt">bead</span> pile, this effect has not been observed. The proportion of <span class="hlt">beads</span> removed from the pile by different avalanche sizes was also calculated. Although larger avalanches are much rarer occurrences, they carry away a larger fraction of the total avalanched mass than small avalanches. As the pile cohesion increases, the number of small and medium avalanches decreases so that this mass loss distribution shifts more strongly to large sizes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24447799','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24447799"><span>Artocarpus heterophyllus L. seed starch-blended gellan gum mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> of metformin HCl.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam., family: Moraceae) seed starch (JFSS)-gellan gum (GG) mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metformin HCl were developed through ionotropic gelation technique. The effect of GG to JFSS ratio and CaCl2 concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %) and cumulative drug release at 10h (R10h, %) was optimized and analyzed using response surface methodology based on 3(2) factorial design. The optimized JFSS-GG <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metformin HCl showed DEE of 92.67±4.46%, R10h of 61.30±2.37%, and mean diameter of 1.67±0.27 mm. The optimized <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed pH-dependent swelling and mucoadhesivity with the goat intestinal mucosa. The in vitro drug release from all these JFSS-GG <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metformin HCl was followed zero-order pattern (R(2)=0.9907-0.9975) with super case-II transport mechanism over a period of 10 h. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were also characterized by SEM and FTIR. The optimized JFSS-GG <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metformin HCl exhibited significant hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3886839','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3886839"><span>PHOS-Select Iron Affinity <span class="hlt">beads</span> enrich peptides for detection of organophosphorus adducts on albumin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jiang, Wei; Dubrovskii, Yaroslav A; Podolskaya, Ekaterina P; Murashko, Ekaterina A; Babakov, Vladimir; Nachon, Florian; Masson, Patrick; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Albumin is covalently modified by organophosphorus toxicants (OP) on tyrosine 411, but less than 1% of albumin is modified in humans by lethal OP doses that inhibit 95% of plasma butyrylcholinesterase. A method that enriches OP-modified albumin peptides could aid analysis of low dose exposures. Soman or chlorpyrifos oxon treated human plasma was digested with pepsin. Albumin peptides were enriched by binding to Fe3+ <span class="hlt">beads</span> at pH 11 and eluted with pH 2.6 buffer. Similarly, mouse and guinea pig albumin modified by chlorpyrifos oxon were digested with pepsin and enriched by binding to Fe3+ <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Peptides were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. PHOS-select Iron Affinity <span class="hlt">beads</span> specifically enriched albumin peptides VRY411TKKVPQVST and LVRY411TKKVPQVST in a pepsin digest of human plasma. The unmodified as well as OP-modified peptides bound to the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The binding capacity of 500 μl <span class="hlt">beads</span> was the pepsin digest of 2.1 μL human plasma. The limit of detection was 0.2% of OP-modified albumin peptide in 0.43 μL plasma. Enrichment of OP-modified albumin peptides by binding to Fe3+ <span class="hlt">beads</span> is a method with potential application to diagnosis of OP pesticide and nerve agent exposure in humans, mice, and guinea pigs. PMID:24187955</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27177460','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27177460"><span>Floating mucoadhesive alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> of amoxicillin trihydrate: A facile approach for H. pylori eradication.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dey, Sanjoy Kumar; De, Pintu Kumar; De, Arnab; Ojha, Souvik; De, Ronita; Mukhopadhyay, Asish Kumar; Samanta, Amalesh</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>This study investigates the design of sunflower oil entrapped floating and mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> of amoxicillin trihydrate using sodium alginate and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as matrix polymers and chitosan as coating polymer to localize the antibiotic at the stomach site against Helicobacter pylori. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> prepared by ionotropic gellation technique were evaluated for different physicochemical, in-vitro and in-vivo properties. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> of all batches were floated for >24h with a maximum lag time of 46.3±3.2s. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the <span class="hlt">beads</span> were spherical in shape with few oil filled channels distributed throughout the surfaces and small pocket structures inside the matrix confirming oil entrapment. Prepared <span class="hlt">beads</span> showed good mucoadhesiveness of 75.7±3.0% to 85.0±5.5%. The drug release profile was best fitted to Higuchi model with non fickian driven mechanism. The optimized batch showed 100% Helicobacter pylori growth inhibition in 15h in in-vitro culture. Furthermore, X-ray study in rabbit stomach confirmed the gastric retention of optimized formulation. The results exhibited that formulated <span class="hlt">beads</span> may be preferred to localize the antibiotic in the gastric region to allow more availability of antibiotic at gastric mucus layer acting on Helicobacter pylori, thereby improving the therapeutic efficacy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...620516X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...620516X"><span>“Nanofiltration” Enabled by Super-Absorbent Polymer <span class="hlt">Beads</span> for Concentrating Microorganisms in Water Samples</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xie, Xing; Bahnemann, Janina; Wang, Siwen; Yang, Yang; Hoffmann, Michael R.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Detection and quantification of pathogens in water is critical for the protection of human health and for drinking water safety and security. When the pathogen concentrations are low, large sample volumes (several liters) are needed to achieve reliable quantitative results. However, most microbial identification methods utilize relatively small sample volumes. As a consequence, a concentration step is often required to detect pathogens in natural waters. Herein, we introduce a novel water sample concentration method based on superabsorbent polymer (SAP) <span class="hlt">beads</span>. When SAP <span class="hlt">beads</span> swell with water, small molecules can be sorbed within the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, but larger particles are excluded and, thus, concentrated in the residual non-sorbed water. To illustrate this approach, millimeter-sized poly(acrylamide-co-itaconic acid) (P(AM-co-IA)) <span class="hlt">beads</span> are synthesized and successfully applied to concentrate water samples containing two model microorganisms: Escherichia coli and bacteriophage MS2. Experimental results indicate that the size of the water channel within water swollen P(AM-co-IA) hydrogel <span class="hlt">beads</span> is on the order of several nanometers. The millimeter size coupled with a negative surface charge of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> are shown to be critical in order to achieve high levels of concentration. This new concentration procedure is very fast, effective, scalable, and low-cost with no need for complex instrumentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16394319','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16394319"><span>Utility of expanded polystyrene (EPS) <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the control of vector-borne diseases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sivagnaname, N; Amalraj, D Dominic; Mariappan, T</p> <p>2005-10-01</p> <p>The use of chemicals or bio-larvicides for the control of Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles stephensi breeding in pit latrines and overhead tanks (OHT) respectively is discouraged owing to many undesirable impacts in the environment. Due to faecal contamination and poor survival, use of predatory fish in OHTs is not feasible. The use of expanded polystyrene (EPS) <span class="hlt">beads</span> is a potential alternative in these habitats. EPS <span class="hlt">beads</span> not only prevent oviposition but also kill the immature by forming a thick blanket on the water surface. A thick layer of 2 cm with <span class="hlt">beads</span> of 2 mm is sufficient to suppress and prevent mosquito breeding. These are cheap, environmentally safe and do not need frequent application since they remain on the surface for quiet a long time. Successful trials against C. quinquefasciatus breeding in pit latrines, soakage pits, septic tanks, etc., have been carried out in Kenya, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Certain trials with EPS indicated reduction in microfilaria (mf) rate besides decline in biting density. In India, EPS <span class="hlt">beads</span> have also been used on small scale for the control of A. stephensi and A. culicifacies breeding in OHTs and unused wells respectively. The polystyrene <span class="hlt">beads</span> have also been reported to be effective in the control of mosquito breeding in biogas plants and other industrial situations. The practical utility of EPS <span class="hlt">beads</span> in the control of vector-borne diseases has been discussed in the present review.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26592698','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26592698"><span>Tapioca starch blended alginate mucoadhesive-floating <span class="hlt">beads</span> for intragastric delivery of Metoprolol Tartrate.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Biswas, Nikhil; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The objective of the study was to develop tapioca starch blended alginate mucoadhesive-floating <span class="hlt">beads</span> for the intragastric delivery of Metoprolol Tartrate (MT). The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared by ionotropic gelation method using calcium chloride as crosslinker and gas forming calcium carbonate (CaCO3) as floating inducer. The alginate gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> having 51-58% entrapped MT showed 90% release within 45 min in gastric medium (pH 1.2). Tapioca starch blending markedly improved the entrapment efficiency (88%) and sustained the release for 3-4 h. A 12% w/w HPMC coating on these <span class="hlt">beads</span> extended the release upto 9-11 h. In vitro wash off and buoyancy test in gastric media revealed that the <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing CaCO3 has gastric residence of more than 12 h. In vitro optimized multi-unit formulation consisting of immediate and sustained release mucoadhesive-floating <span class="hlt">beads</span> (40:60) showed good initial release of 42% MT within 1h followed by a sustained release of over 90% for 11 h. Pharmacokinetic study performed in rabbit model showed that the relative oral bioavailability of MT after administration of oral solution, sustain release and optimized formulation was 51%, 67% and 87%, respectively. Optimized formulation showed a higher percent inhibition of isoprenaline induced heart rate in rabbits for almost 12 h.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21664462','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21664462"><span>Encapsulation of Cwp84 into pectin <span class="hlt">beads</span> for oral vaccination against Clostridium difficile.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sandolo, Chiara; Péchiné, Séverine; Le Monnier, Alban; Hoys, Sandra; Janoir, Claire; Coviello, Tommasina; Alhaique, Franco; Collignon, Anne; Fattal, Elias; Tsapis, Nicolas</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>We have designed an oral vaccine against Clostridium difficile infection. The virulent factor Cwp84, that is a cystein protease highly immunogenic in patients with C. difficile-associated disease, was entrapped within pectin <span class="hlt">beads</span>. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> encapsulating Cwp84 were shown to be stable in the simulated intestinal medium and to release the cystein protease once in the simulated colonic medium. Three groups of hamsters were immunized, the first receiving pectin <span class="hlt">beads</span> encapsulating Cwp84, the second unloaded <span class="hlt">beads</span> and the third one free Cwp84. After three immunizations by the intragastric route, all groups received clindamycine. Post-challenge survival with a strain of C. difficile showed that 2 days after infection, all hamsters treated with unloaded <span class="hlt">beads</span> and all hamsters treated with free Cwp84 have deceased after 7 days, whereas about 40% of hamsters administered with Cwp84-loaded <span class="hlt">beads</span> survived 10 days after challenge, proving that oral vaccination provides partial protection. These first data obtained with an oral vaccine against C. difficile appear promising for preventing this infection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23628586','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23628586"><span>Formulation optimization and evaluation of jackfruit seed starch-alginate mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> of metformin HCl.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>The present study deals with the formulation optimization of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam., family: Moraceae) seed starch (JFSS)-alginate mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metformin HCl through ionotropic gelation using 3(2) factorial design. The effect of sodium alginate to JFSS ratio and CaCl2 concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %), and cumulative drug release at 10h (R10h, %) was optimized. The optimized <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metformin HCl showed DEE of 97.48±3.92%, R10h of 65.70±2.22%, and mean diameter of 1.16±0.11mm. The in vitro drug release from these <span class="hlt">beads</span> was followed controlled-release (zero-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were also characterized by SEM and FTIR. The swelling and degradation of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> were influenced by pH of the test medium. The optimized <span class="hlt">beads</span> also exhibited good mucoadhesivity and significant hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23994792','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23994792"><span>Blends of jackfruit seed starch-pectin in the development of mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metformin HCl.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>In this work, calcium pectinate-jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) seed starch (JFSS) mucoadhesive <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metformin HCl were developed through ionotropic-gelation. Effects of pectin and JFSS amounts on drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE), and cumulative drug release after 10 h (R10 h) were optimized using 3(2) factorial design. The optimized calcium pectinate-JFSS <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing metformin HCl showed DEE of 94.11 ± 3.92%, R10 h of 48.88 ± 2.02%, and mean diameter of 2.06 ± 0.20 mm. The in vitro drug release from these <span class="hlt">beads</span> was followed controlled-release (zero-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> were also characterized by SEM and FTIR. The pH of test mediums was found critical for swelling and mucoadhesion of these <span class="hlt">beads</span>. The optimized calcium pectinate-JFSS <span class="hlt">beads</span> also exhibited good mucoadhesivity and significant hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26221913','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26221913"><span>Optimization of the Magnetic Recovery of Hits from One-<span class="hlt">Bead</span>-One-Compound Library Screens.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mendes, Kimberly; Ndungu, J M; Clark, Lorraine F; Kodadek, Thomas</p> <p>2015-09-14</p> <p>On-<span class="hlt">bead</span> screening of one-<span class="hlt">bead</span>-one-compound (OBOC) libraries is a useful procedure for the identification of protein ligands. An important aspect of this experiment is the method by which <span class="hlt">beads</span> that bind the target protein are separated from those that do not. Ideally, such a method would be rapid and convenient and result in the isolation of 100% of the "hits" with no false positives (<span class="hlt">beads</span> that display compounds that are not good ligands for the target). We introduced a technique in which <span class="hlt">beads</span> that have bound a labeled target protein can be magnetized, thus allowing their convenient isolation ( Astle et al. Chem. Biol. 2010 , 17 , 38 - 45 ). However, recent work in our laboratory and others has shown that magnetic hit recovery can result in the isolation of large numbers of false positives and has also suggested that many true hit <span class="hlt">beads</span> are missed. In this study, we employ a well-defined model system to examine the efficiency of various magnetic hit isolation protocols. We show that the choice of reagents and the particular operations employed are critical for optimal results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25913056','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25913056"><span>OBT analysis method using polyethylene <span class="hlt">beads</span> for limited quantities of animal tissue.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, S B; Stuart, M</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>This study presents a polyethylene <span class="hlt">beads</span> method for OBT determination in animal tissues and animal products for cases where the amount of water recovered by combustion is limited by sample size or quantity. In the method, the amount of water recovered after combustion is enhanced by adding tritium-free polyethylene <span class="hlt">beads</span> to the sample prior to combustion in an oxygen bomb. The method reduces process time by allowing the combustion water to be easily collected with a pipette. Sufficient water recovery was achieved using the polyethylene <span class="hlt">beads</span> method when 2 g of dry animal tissue or animal product were combusted with 2 g of polyethylene <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Correction factors, which account for the dilution due to the combustion water of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>, are provided for beef, chicken, pork, fish and clams, as well as egg, milk and cheese. The method was tested by comparing its OBT results with those of the conventional method using animal samples collected on the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site. The results determined that the polyethylene <span class="hlt">beads</span> method added no more than 25% uncertainty when appropriate correction factors are used.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5481445','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5481445"><span>Chondroitin sulfate-derivatized agarose <span class="hlt">beads</span>: a new system for studying cation binding to glycosaminoglycans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hunter, G.K.</p> <p>1987-09-01</p> <p>Chondroitin sulfate (CS) has been covalently attached to aminoethyl-agarose <span class="hlt">beads</span> in a carbodiimide-catalyzed reaction. In this process, an amide bond is formed between carboxylate groups on the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and the primary amine groups of the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Under optimal conditions, up to 160 micrograms of CS is attached per milligram of <span class="hlt">beads</span>. CS-agarose <span class="hlt">beads</span> have been used to study Ca binding to GAGs. The <span class="hlt">beads</span> are mixed with a solution containing CaCl/sub 2/ and /sup 45/Ca and allowed to sediment under unit gravity. An aliquot of supernatant is then removed and /sup 45/Ca activity is determined to quantitate remaining (free) Ca. Using this system, it was shown that CS binds approximately 0.7 Ca/disaccharide unit at saturation. Under the conditions used, the apparent association constant (KA) is approximately 14 mM. In principle, this derivatization protocol may be used to attach any proteoglycan or GAG (except keratan sulfate) to an insoluble support. CS-agarose <span class="hlt">beads</span> provide a rapid, simple, and relatively artifact-free system for studying cation-GAG interactions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870066377&hterms=glass+powder&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dglass%2Bpowder','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870066377&hterms=glass+powder&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dglass%2Bpowder"><span>Crystallization of fluorozirconate <span class="hlt">glasses</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bansal, Narottam P.; Doremus, Robert H.; Bruce, A. J.; Moynihan, C. T.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The crystallization of a number of <span class="hlt">glasses</span> of the fluorozirconate family has been studied (using powder X-ray diffraction and DSC) as a function of time and temperature of heating. The main crystalline phases were beta BaZrF6 and beta BaZr2F10. Stable and metastble transformations to the low-temperature alpha phases were also investigated. The size of crystallites in fully devitrified <span class="hlt">glasses</span> was calculated (from line broadening of the X-ray diffraction peaks) to be about 60 nm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.138lA520A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.138lA520A"><span>Local elastic response measured near the colloidal <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anderson, D.; Schaar, D.; Hentschel, H. G. E.; Hay, J.; Habdas, Piotr; Weeks, Eric R.</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>We examine the response of a dense colloidal suspension to a local force applied by a small magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span>. For small forces, we find a linear relationship between the force and the displacement, suggesting the medium is elastic, even though our colloidal samples macroscopically behave as fluids. We interpret this as a measure of the strength of colloidal caging, reflecting the proximity of the samples' volume fractions to the colloidal <span class="hlt">glass</span> transition. The strain field of the colloidal particles surrounding the magnetic probe appears similar to that of an isotropic homogeneous elastic medium. When the applied force is removed, the strain relaxes as a stretched exponential in time. We introduce a model that suggests this behavior is due to the diffusive relaxation of strain in the colloidal sample.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830016424','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830016424"><span>Solid spherical <span class="hlt">glass</span> particle impingement studies of plastic materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Erosion experiments on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polycarbonate, and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were conducted with spherical <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">beads</span> impacting at normal incidence. Optical and scanning electron microscopic studies and surface profile measurements were made on specimens at predetermined test intervals. During the initial stage of damage to PMMA and polycarbonate, material expands or builds up above the original surface. However, this buildup disappears as testing progresses. Little or no buildup was observed on PTFE. PTFE is observed to be the most resistant material to erosion and PMMA the least. At low impact pressures, material removal mechanisms are believed to be similar to those for metallic materials. However, at higher pressures, surface melting is indicated at the center of impact. Deformation and fatigue appear to play major roles in the material removal process with possible melting or softening.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARQ43010N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARQ43010N"><span>Relation of dynamics and local structure to <span class="hlt">glass</span>-formability in a crystallizable <span class="hlt">bead</span>-spring polymer model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nguyen, Hong; Smith, Tyler; Hoy, Robert; Karayiannis, Nikos</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We relate the dynamics and local structure of equilibrium and supercooled polymer melts using a model wherein a single parameter (bending stiffness) controls the morphology of the equilibrium, low-temperature crystal. The dynamical slowing down in strongly glassforming systems correlates directly to the increasing presence of microstructural features that are incompatible both with each other and with crystalline order. Systems which more readily crystallize also exhibit rich behavior since their solid-state morphology can be varied from nearly amorphous to highly crystalline by varying their thermal preparation protocol. We tie the ``critical'' cooling rates, across which this behavior varies, to the lifetimes of structural features such as small crystalline nuclei and stable liquid-like clusters. The role such structures play is analogous to that recently demonstrated for colloidal systems [S. R. Williams, arXiv:0705.0203, 2007], but is considerably enriched both by the dynamical constraints imposed by covalent connectivity and by the presence of a second characteristic length scale (the polymer Kuhn length) controlled by chain bending stiffness.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA605822','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA605822"><span>An Analysis of the Nonlinear Spectral Mixing of Didymium and Soda-Lime <span class="hlt">Glass</span> <span class="hlt">Beads</span> Using Hyperspectral Imagery (HSI) Microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>soils. A linear spectral unmixing inversion applied to a nonlinear mixture will yield subpixel abundance estimates that do not equal the true values of...abundance estimates regardless of the constraints applied in the inversion . The ’K-hype’ kernel-based method also produced poor fraction estimates. The...linear spectral unmixing to imaging spectrometer data. However, a linear spectral unmixing inversion applied to an intimate mixture exhibiting</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/946259','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/946259"><span>Magnetic <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Based Immunoassay for Autonomous Detection of Toxins</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kwon, Y; Hara, C A; Knize, M G; Hwang, M H; Venkatesteswaran, K S; Wheeler, E K; Bell, P M; Renzi, R F; Fruetel, J A; Bailey, C G</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p>As a step towards toward the development of a rapid, reliable analyzer for bioagents in the environment, we are developing an automated system for the simultaneous detection of a group of select agents and toxins. To detect toxins, we modified and automated an antibody-based approach previously developed for manual medical diagnostics that uses fluorescent eTag{trademark} reporter molecules and is suitable for highly multiplexed assays. Detection is based on two antibodies binding simultaneously to a single antigen, one of which is labeled with biotin while the other is conjugated to a fluorescent eTag{trademark} through a cleavable linkage. Aqueous samples are incubated with the mixture of antibodies along with streptavidin-coated magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> coupled to a photo-activatable porphyrin complex. In the presence of antigen, a molecular complex is formed where the cleavable linkage is held in proximity to the photoactivable group. Upon excitation at 680 nm, free radicals are generated, which diffuse and cleave the linkage, releasing the eTags{trademark}. Released eTags{trademark} are analyzed using capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Limits of detection for ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid individually were 4 ng/mL (or 80 pg) and 16 ng/mL (or 320 pg), respectively, using the manual assay. In addition, we demonstrated the use of pairs of antibodies from different sources in a single assay to decrease the rate of false positives. Automation of the assay was demonstrated on a flow-through format with higher LODs of 125 ng/mL (or 2.5 ng) each of a mixture of ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid. This versatile assay can be easily modified with the appropriate antibodies to detect a wide range of toxins and other proteins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18847280','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18847280"><span>Magnetic <span class="hlt">bead</span> based immunoassay for autonomous detection of toxins.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kwon, Youngeun; Hara, Christine A; Knize, Mark G; Hwang, Mona H; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S; Wheeler, Elizabeth K; Bell, Perry M; Renzi, Ronald F; Fruetel, Julie A; Bailey, Christopher G</p> <p>2008-11-15</p> <p>We are developing an automated system for the simultaneous, rapid detection of a group of select agents and toxins in the environment. To detect toxins, we modified and automated an antibody-based approach previously developed for manual medical diagnostics that uses fluorescent eTag reporter molecules and is suitable for highly multiplexed assays. Detection is based on two antibodies binding simultaneously to a single antigen, one of which is labeled with biotin while the other is conjugated to a fluorescent eTag through a cleavable linkage. Aqueous samples are incubated with the mixture of antibodies along with streptavidin-coated magnetic <span class="hlt">beads</span> and a photoactive porphyrin complex. In the presence of antigen, a molecular complex is formed where the cleavable linkage is held in proximity to the photoactive group. Upon excitation at 680 nm, free radicals are generated, which diffuse and cleave the linkage, releasing the eTags. Released eTags are analyzed using capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Limits of detection for ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid individually were 4 (or 80 pg) and 16 ng/mL (or 320 pg), respectively, using the manual assay. In addition, we demonstrated the use of pairs of antibodies from different sources in a single assay to decrease the rate of false positives. Automation of the assay was demonstrated in a flow-through format with higher LODs of 32 ng/mL (or 640 ng) each of a mixture of ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid. This versatile assay can be easily modified with the appropriate antibodies to detect a wide range of toxins and other proteins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRA..121.8661N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRA..121.8661N"><span>Statistical properties of substorm auroral onset <span class="hlt">beads</span>/rays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nishimura, Y.; Yang, J.; Pritchett, P. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Donovan, E. F.; Lyons, L. R.; Wolf, R. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mende, S. B.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Auroral substorms are often associated with optical ray or <span class="hlt">bead</span> structures during initial brightening (substorm auroral onset waves). Occurrence probabilities and properties of substorm onset waves have been characterized using 112 substorm events identified in Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) all-sky imager data and compared to Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) and kinetic instability properties. All substorm onsets were found to be associated with optical waves, and thus, optical waves are a common feature of substorm onset. Eastward propagating wave events are more frequent than westward propagating wave events and tend to occur during lower-latitude substorms (stronger solar wind driving). The wave propagation directions are organized by orientation of initial brightening arcs. We also identified notable differences in wave propagation speed, wavelength (wave number), period, and duration between westward and eastward propagating waves. In contrast, the wave growth rate does not depend on the propagation direction or substorm strength but is inversely proportional to the wave duration. This suggests that the waves evolve to poleward expansion at a certain intensity threshold and that the wave properties do not directly relate to substorm strengths. However, waves are still important for mediating the transition between the substorm growth phase and poleward expansion. The relation to arc orientation can be explained by magnetotail structures in the RCM-E, indicating that substorm onset location relative to the pressure peak determines the wave propagation direction. The measured wave properties agree well with kinetic ballooning interchange instability, while cross-field current instability and electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability give much larger propagation speed and smaller wave period.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17669648','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17669648"><span>Biofiltration of ketone compounds by a composite <span class="hlt">bead</span> biofilter.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chan, Wu-Chung; Peng, Kang-Hong</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p>In this study, the biochemical kinetic behaviors of ketone compounds in a composite <span class="hlt">bead</span> biofilter were investigated. Both microbial growth rate kg and biochemical reaction rate kd would be inhibited at higher average inlet concentration. For the microbial growth process, the inhibitive effect was the least pronounced for acetone and the order of kg value was MEK>MIPK>acetone in the average inlet concentration range of 100-150 ppm. The degree of inhibitive effect was almost the same for three ketone compounds and the order of kg value was acetone>MEK>MIPK in the average inlet concentration range of 200-300 ppm. The values of half-saturation constant Ks for acetone, MEK and MIPK were 26.80, 21.56 and 22.96 ppm, respectively. The values of maximum reaction rate Vm for acetone, MEK and MIPK were 8.55, 9.06 and 7.55 g-C/h-kg packed material, respectively. The zero-order kinetic with the diffusion rate limitation could be regarded as the most adequate biochemical reaction model. For the biochemical reaction process, the inhibitive effect was the most pronounced for MEK and the order of kd value was MEK>acetone>MIPK in the average inlet concentration range of 100-150 ppm. The degree of inhibitive effect was MIPK>MEK>acetone and the order of kd value was acetone>MEK>MIPK in the average inlet concentration range of 200-300 ppm. The maximum elimination capacity of acetone, MEK and MIPK were 0.157, 0.127 and 0.101 g-C/h-kg packed material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910054345&hterms=fluoride&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dfluoride','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910054345&hterms=fluoride&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dfluoride"><span>Containerless processing of fluoride <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Doremus, Robert H.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Ground-based experiments on <span class="hlt">glass</span> formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride <span class="hlt">glass</span> are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-<span class="hlt">glass</span> interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL <span class="hlt">glass</span> sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the <span class="hlt">glass</span>. <span class="hlt">Glass</span> formation should be easier for a containerless <span class="hlt">glass</span> than in a container.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790000101&hterms=ceramic+frits&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dceramic%2Bfrits','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790000101&hterms=ceramic+frits&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dceramic%2Bfrits"><span>Characterizing <span class="hlt">glass</span> frits for slurries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Nakano, H. N.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glass</span> frit can be mixed with consistently reproducible properties even from different batches of <span class="hlt">glass</span> frit using technique to measure one quantity that determines integrated properties of frit for combination with given liquid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980STIN...8118522L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980STIN...8118522L"><span>Barstow heliostat mirror <span class="hlt">glass</span> characterization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lind, M. A.; Buckwalter, C. Q.</p> <p>1980-09-01</p> <p>The technical analysis performed on the special run of low iron float <span class="hlt">glass</span> for a ten megawatt solar thermal/electric pilot power plant is discussed. The topics that are addressed include the optical properties and the relative durability of the <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Two optical parameters, solar transmittance and optical flatness, were measured as referenced in the specification and found to be better than the stated tolerances. The average solar transmittance exceeded 0.890 transmittance units. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> also exhibited optical angular flatness deviations less than + or - 1.0 mrad as required. Both qualitative and quantitative accelerated weathering tests were performed on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> in order to compare its durability to other soda lime float <span class="hlt">glass</span> and alternate composition <span class="hlt">glasses</span> of interest to the solar community. In both the quantitative leaching experiments and the more qualitative room temperature and elevated temperature water vapor exposure experiments the heliostat <span class="hlt">glass</span> exhibited the same characteristics as the other soda lime silicate float <span class="hlt">glasses</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......141S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......141S"><span>High temperature behavior of polypropylene and polypropylene / <span class="hlt">glass</span> composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shipley, Katherine Mary Herber</p> <p></p> <p>Solid state die drawing of polymer matrix composite materials offers an opportunity to make products that cannot be produced by any other method. This is done by heating a composite billet to a temperature just below the melting point and drawing it through a heated converging die by pulling from the downstream side. Since this is done at high temperatures, it is imperative to understand the behavior of the polymer and the composites at high temperature. Therefore, in this work, the stress-strain behavior of neat polypropylene and polypropylene composites with <span class="hlt">glass</span> flake and <span class="hlt">glass</span> <span class="hlt">bead</span> fillers was studied at 23°C, 130°C, and 145°C. The onset of debonding was found to occur at a lower stress and strain for the composites tested at higher temperature, while the loss of reinforcement was slower at the elevated temperatures. The interfacial interaction between the filler and matrix was also determined to be greater at elevated temperatures. The presence of filler particles also changed the character of the stress-strain curves at higher temperatures. Specifically, the filler induced a sharper neck region in the composites at elevated temperature. Annealing for one hour at temperatures between 130°C and 145°C produced a secondary, lower melting temperature peak in the DSC curves, which increased in prominence with increasing temperature. This increase in prominence was greater for the composites than for the neat polymer. Finally, the onset of debonding was studied using transverse strain vs. stress curves for the two composites. The debonding stress decreased with increasing temperature for both materials, and it was determined that stress amplification at the interface is greater for the flake composite than for the <span class="hlt">bead</span> composite.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23736787','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23736787"><span>The development, physicochemical characterisation and in vitro drug release studies of pectinate gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing Thai mango seed kernel extract.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nithitanakool, Saruth; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Bourgeois, Sandrine; Fessi, Hatem; Bavovada, Rapepol</p> <p>2013-06-03</p> <p>Pectinate gel <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing Thai mango seed kernel extract (MSKE, cultivar 'Fahlun') were developed and characterised for the purpose of colon-targeted delivery. The MSKE-loaded pectinate <span class="hlt">beads</span> were prepared using ionotropic gelation with varying pectin-to-MSKE ratios, MSKE concentrations, and concentrations of two cross-linkers (calcium chloride and zinc acetate). The formulated <span class="hlt">beads</span> were spherical in shape and ranged in size between 1.13 mm and 1.88 mm. Zinc-pectinate (ZPG) <span class="hlt">beads</span> containing high amounts of MSKE showed complete entrapment efficiency (EE) of MSKE (100%), while calcium-pectinate (CPG) <span class="hlt">beads</span> demonstrated 70% EE. The in vitro release tests indicated that MSKE-loaded CPG <span class="hlt">beads</span> were unstable in both simulated gastric medium (SGM) and simulated intestinal medium (SIM), while MSKE-loaded ZPG <span class="hlt">beads</span> were stable in SIM but unable to prevent the release of MSKE in SGM. The protection of ZPG <span class="hlt">beads</span> with gastro-resistant capsules (Eudragit® L 100-55) resulted in stability in both SGM and SIM; they disintegrated immediately in simulated colonic medium containing pectinolytic enzymes. MSKE-loaded ZPG <span class="hlt">beads</span> were stable at 4, 25 and 45 °C during the study period of four months. The present study revealed that ZPG <span class="hlt">beads</span> in enteric-coated capsules might be a promising carrier for delivering MSKE to the colon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28380391','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28380391"><span>A microhydrodynamic rationale for selection of <span class="hlt">bead</span> size in preparation of drug nanosuspensions via wet stirred media milling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Meng; Alvarez, Paulina; Bilgili, Ecevit</p> <p>2017-04-02</p> <p>Although wet stirred media milling has proven to be a robust process for producing nanoparticle suspensions of poorly water-soluble drugs and thereby enhancing their bioavailability, selection of <span class="hlt">bead</span> size has been largely empirical, lacking fundamental rationale. This study aims to establish such rationale by investigating the impact of <span class="hlt">bead</span> size at various stirrer speeds on the drug breakage kinetics via a microhydrodynamic model. To this end, stable suspensions of griseofulvin, a model BCS Class II drug, were prepared using hydroxypropyl cellulose and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The suspensions were milled at four different stirrer speeds (1000-4000rpm) using various sizes (50-1500μm) of zirconia <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Laser diffraction, SEM, and XRPD were used for characterization. Our results suggest that there is an optimal <span class="hlt">bead</span> size that achieves fastest breakage at each stirrer speed and that it shifts to a smaller size at higher speed. Calculated microhydrodynamic parameters reveal two counteracting effects of <span class="hlt">bead</span> size: more <span class="hlt">bead-bead</span> collisions with less energy/force upon a decrease in <span class="hlt">bead</span> size. The optimal <span class="hlt">bead</span> size exhibits a negative power-law correlation with either specific energy consumption or the microhydrodynamic parameters. Overall, this study rationalizes the use of smaller <span class="hlt">beads</span> for more energetic wet media milling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18608801','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18608801"><span>Effect of drying processes and curing time of chitosan-lysine semi-IPN <span class="hlt">beads</span> on chlorpheniramine maleate delivery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kumari, K; Kundu, P P</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beads</span> of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) have been synthesized from chitosan and lysine with varying amounts of glutaraldehyde solution used as a cross-linker. The cross-linked <span class="hlt">beads</span> are dried by different drying processes such as air-drying, oven-drying and freeze-drying. These semi-IPNs are characterized under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Swelling studies of these <span class="hlt">beads</span> are carried out in different pH (2.0 and 7.4) solutions. The effect of concentration of cross-linking agent and curing period on the swelling as well as on the drug release is analysed. The results indicate that the size of matrix depend on the curing time of <span class="hlt">beads</span>, concentration of glutaraldehyde and technique of drying. The freeze-dried <span class="hlt">beads</span> exhibit a relatively higher percentage of swelling in the range of 66-89% as compared to oven-dried <span class="hlt">beads</span> (53-74%) and air-dried <span class="hlt">beads</span> (39-61%). The drug loaded <span class="hlt">beads</span> which are cured for different time intervals followed by drying are tested for in-vitro release of chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) drug. The rate of drug release from freeze-dried <span class="hlt">beads</span> is much faster than that from the oven-dried and air-dried <span class="hlt">beads</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5071796','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5071796"><span>Evaluation of the Effect of Psyllium on the Viability of Lactobacillus Acidophilus in Alginate-Polyl Lysine <span class="hlt">Beads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Esmaeilzadeh, Jaleh; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Maghsoodi, Maryam; Lotfipour, Farzaneh</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: Psylliumseeds are used in traditional herbal medicine to treat various disorders. Moreover, as a soluble fiber, psyllium has potential to stimulate bacterial growth in digestive system. We aimed to substitute alkali-extractable polysaccharides of psyllium for alginate in <span class="hlt">beads</span> with second coat of poly-l-lysine to coat Lactobacillus acidophilus. Methods: <span class="hlt">Beads</span> were prepared using extrusion technique. Poly-l-lysine as second coat was incorporated on optimum alginate/psyllium <span class="hlt">beads</span> using immersion technique. <span class="hlt">Beads</span> were characterized in terms of size, encapsulation efficiency, integrity and bacterial survival in harsh conditions. Results: <span class="hlt">Beads</span> with narrow size distribution ranging from 1.85 ± 0.05 to 2.40 ± 0.18 mm with encapsulation efficiency higher than 96% were achieved. Psyllium concentrations in <span class="hlt">beads</span> did not produce constant trend in <span class="hlt">bead</span> sizes. Surface topography by SEM showed that substitution of psyllium enhanced integrity of obtained <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Psyllium successfully protected the bacteria against acidic condition and lyophilization equal to alginate in the <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Better survivability with <span class="hlt">beads</span> of alginate/psyllium-poly-l-lysine was achieved with around 2 log rise in bacterial count in acid condition compared to the corresponding single coat <span class="hlt">beads</span>. Conclusion: Alginate/psyllium (1:2) <span class="hlt">beads</span> with narrow size distribution and high encapsulation efficiency of the bacteria have been achieved. Presence of psyllium produced a much smoother and integrated surface texture for the <span class="hlt">beads</span> with sufficient protection of the bacteria against acidic condition as much as alginate. Considering the health benefits of psyllium and its prebiotic activity, psyllium can be beneficially replaced in part for alginate in probiotic coating. PMID:27766217</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000471&hterms=pure&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dpure','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000471&hterms=pure&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dpure"><span>Making Highly Pure <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Rods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Naumann, R. J.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Proposed quasi-containerless method for making <span class="hlt">glass</span> rods or fibers minimizes contact between processing equipment and product. Method allows greater range of product sizes and shapes than achieved in experiments on containerless processing. Molten zone established in polycrystalline rod. Furnace sections separated, and <span class="hlt">glass</span> rod solidifies between them. Clamp supports solid <span class="hlt">glass</span> as it grows in length. Pulling clamp rapidly away from melt draws <span class="hlt">glass</span> fiber. Fiber diameter controlled by adjustment of pulling rate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4714659','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4714659"><span>CADMIUM PHOSPHATE <span class="hlt">GLASS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Carpenter, H.W.; Johnson, P.D.</p> <p>1963-04-01</p> <p>A method of preparing a cadmium phosphate <span class="hlt">glass</span> that comprises providing a mixture of solid inorganic compounds of cadmuim and phosphate having vaporizable components and heating the resulting composition to a temperature of at least 850 un. Concent 85% C is presented. (AEC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=glass&pg=6&id=EJ789072','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=glass&pg=6&id=EJ789072"><span>"Stained <span class="hlt">Glass</span>" Landscape Windows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Vannata, Janine</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-<span class="hlt">glass</span> windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=translucent&pg=2&id=EJ598139','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=translucent&pg=2&id=EJ598139"><span>Shimmering Stained <span class="hlt">Glass</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Simon, Gail Murray</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Presents an art lesson for fifth- and sixth-graders where they create a translucent design of colored cellophane on black paper inspired by the stained-<span class="hlt">glass</span> windows of the Middle Ages and the artwork of Lewis Comfort Tiffany. Enables the students to become crafts people rather than just observers of the past. (CMK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=LAYOUT+AND+DESIGN&id=EJ849923','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=LAYOUT+AND+DESIGN&id=EJ849923"><span>Stained-<span class="hlt">Glass</span> Pastels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Laird, Shirley</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The author has always liked the look of stained-<span class="hlt">glass</span> windows. Usually the designs are simplified and the shapes are easier for younger students to draw. This technique seemed to be the perfect place for her fifth-graders to try their hand at color mixing. The smaller spaces and simple shapes were just what she needed for this group. Her students…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hair&pg=2&id=EJ891774','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hair&pg=2&id=EJ891774"><span>Yesterday's Trash Makes Tomorrow's "<span class="hlt">Glass</span>"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wayne, Dale</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>In this article, the author describes a <span class="hlt">glass</span> art project inspired by Dale Chihuly. This project uses two-liter plastic soda bottles which are cut apart and trimmed. Applying heat using a hair dryer, the plastic curls and takes an uneven blown-<span class="hlt">glass</span> quality. The "<span class="hlt">glass</span>" is then painted using acrylic paint. (Contains 2 resources and 1 online…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6870823','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6870823"><span>Barstow heliostat mirror <span class="hlt">glass</span> characterization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lind, M.A.; Buckwalter, C.Q.</p> <p>1980-09-01</p> <p>The technical analysis performed on the special run of low iron float <span class="hlt">glass</span> procured from the Ford <span class="hlt">Glass</span> Division for the ten megawatt solar thermal/electric pilot power plant to be constructed at Barstow, California is discussed. The topics that are addressed include the optical properties and the relative durability of the <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Two optical parameters, solar transmittance and optical flatness, were measured as referenced in the specification and found to be better than the stated tolerances. The average solar transmittance exceeded 0.890 transmittance units. The <span class="hlt">glass</span> also exhibited optical angular flatness deviations less than +-1.0 mrad as required. Both qualitative and quantitative accelerated weathering tests were performed on the <span class="hlt">glass</span> in order to compare its durability to other soda lime float <span class="hlt">glass</span> and alternate composition <span class="hlt">glasses</span> of interest to the solar community. In both the quantitative leaching experiments and the more qualitative room temperature and elevated temperature water vapor exposure experiments the heliostat <span class="hlt">glass</span> exhibited the same characteristics as the other soda-lime silicate float <span class="hlt">glasses</span>. As a final test for mirroring compatability, selected samples of the production run of the <span class="hlt">glass</span> were sent to four different commercial manufacturers for mirror coating. None of the manufacturers reported any difficulty silvering the <span class="hlt">glass</span>. Based on the tests performed, the <span class="hlt">glass</span> meets or exceeds all optical specifications for the Barstow heliostat field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......188S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......188S"><span>Optimization and characterization of bioactive <span class="hlt">glass</span> nanofibers and nanocomposites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Scarber, Reginna E.</p> <p></p> <p>Disease affects different areas of the bone and can impact individuals of all pathologies and ethnicities. These bone diseases can result in weakening which leads to trauma during ordinary function, the need for reconstructive surgery, and eventual bone replacement. Tissue engineering can provide a less traumatic and more fundamental solution to the current therapies. Bioactive <span class="hlt">glasses</span> are promising materials in tissue engineering applications because of their ability to form hydroxycarbonate apatite in the presence of simulated body fluid, support cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation, induce bone formation, and concentrate bone morphogenic proteins in vivo. The research in this dissertation will attempt to improve the quality, yield, and toughness of bioactive <span class="hlt">glass</span> nanofibrous scaffolds. The three specific aims of this research include, (1) Optimization and Characterization of Surfactant Modified Bioactive <span class="hlt">Glass</span> (2) Optimization of Direct Synthesis Bioactive <span class="hlt">glass</span> Nanofibers from Sols (3) Mechanical Properties and In-vitro Biomineralization of Bioglass-loaded Polyglyconate Nanocomposites Created Using the Particulate Leaching Method. The purpose of the first specific aim was to optimize the processing of bioactive <span class="hlt">glass</span> nanofibers, resulting in greater fiber uniformity with a reduction in <span class="hlt">beading</span>. The increase in viscosity coupled with the ability of the surfactant to limit polymeric secondary bonding led to improved fiber quality. The focal point of the second specific aim is the production of sol-gel derived <span class="hlt">glass</span> fibers with high bioactivity prepared by electrospinning without the use of any polymer carrier system. Advantages of this method include decreased processing time, increased production of fibers, and a decrease in the loss of material due to the calcining process. The solvent cast/ particulate leaching method was used to create a nanocomposite of bioglass and the co-polymer polyglyconate (MaxonRTM) for bone tissue scaffolds The biocompatibility</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/47903','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/47903"><span>Volcanic <span class="hlt">glass</span> as a natural analog for borosilicate waste <span class="hlt">glass</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Morgenstein, M.E.; Shettel, D.L.</p> <p>1994-12-31</p> <p>Obsidian and basaltic <span class="hlt">glass</span> are opposite end-members of natural volcanic <span class="hlt">glass</span> compositions. Syngenetic and diagenetic tensile failure in basaltic <span class="hlt">glass</span> (low silica <span class="hlt">glass</span>) is pervasive and provides abundant alteration fronts deep into the <span class="hlt">glass</span> structure. Perlitic fracturing in obsidian (high silica <span class="hlt">glass</span>) limits the alteration zones to an {open_quotes}onion skin{close_quotes} geometry. Borosilicate waste <span class="hlt">glass</span> behaves similarly to the natural analog of basaltic <span class="hlt">glass</span> (sideromelane). During geologic time, established and tensile fracture networks form <span class="hlt">glass</span> cells (a three-dimensional reticulated pattern) where the production of new fracture surfaces increases through time by geometric progression. This suggests that borosilicate <span class="hlt">glass</span> monoliths will eventually become rubble. Rates of reaction appear to double for every 12C{degrees} of temperature increase. Published leach rates suggest that the entire inventory of certain radionuclides may be released during the 10,000 year regulatory time period. Steam alteration prior to liquid attack combined with pervasive deep tensile failure behavior may suggest that the <span class="hlt">glass</span> waste form is not license defensible without a metallic- and/or ceramic-type composite barrier as an overpack.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1266813-regular-oscillations-random-motion-glass-microspheres-levitated-single-optical-beam-air','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1266813-regular-oscillations-random-motion-glass-microspheres-levitated-single-optical-beam-air"><span>Regular oscillations and random motion of <span class="hlt">glass</span> microspheres levitated by a single optical beam in air</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Moore, Jeremy; Martin, Leopoldo L.; Maayani, Shai; ...</p> <p>2016-02-03</p> <p>We experimentally reporton optical binding of many <span class="hlt">glass</span> particles in air that levitate in a single optical beam. A diversity of particle sizes and shapes interact at long range in a single Gaussian beam. Our system dynamics span from oscillatory to random and dimensionality ranges from 1 to 3D. In conclusion, the low loss for the center of mass motion of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> could allow this system to serve as a standard many body testbed, similar to what is done today with atoms, but at the mesoscopic scale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850002712','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850002712"><span>Potential utilization of <span class="hlt">glass</span> experiments in space</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kreidl, N. J.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Materials processing in space utilizing the microgravity environment is discussed; <span class="hlt">glass</span> processing in particular is considered. Attention is given to the processing of <span class="hlt">glass</span> shells, critical cooling rate and novel <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, gel synthesis of <span class="hlt">glasses</span>, immiscibility, surface tension, and <span class="hlt">glass</span> composites. Soviet <span class="hlt">glass</span> experiments in space are also enumerated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.......327H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.......327H"><span>Development of Expanded Thermoplastic Polyurethane <span class="hlt">Bead</span> Foams and Their Sintering Mechanism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hossieny, Nemat</p> <p></p> <p>Polymer <span class="hlt">bead</span> foaming technology represents a breakthrough in the production of low density plastic foamed components that have a complex geometrical structure and has helped to expand the market for plastic foams by broadening their applications. In this research, the unique microstructure of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) consisting of phase-separated hard segment (HS) domains dispersed in the soft segment (SS) matrix has been utilized to develop expanded TPU (E-TPU) <span class="hlt">bead</span> foam with microcellular morphologies and also to create inter-<span class="hlt">bead</span> sintering into three dimensional products using steam-chest molding machine. The phase-separation and crystallization behavior of the HS chains in the TPU microstructure was systematically studied in the presence of dissolved gases and also by changing the microstructure of TPU by melt-processing and addition of nano-/micro-sized additives. It was observed that the presence of gas improved the phase separation (i.e. crystallization) of HSs and increased the overall crystallinity of the TPU. It was also shown that by utilizing the HS crystalline domains, the overall foaming behavior of TPU (i.e. cell nucleation and expansion ratio) can be significantly improved. Moreover, the HS crystalline domains can be effective for both sintering of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> as well strengthening the individual <span class="hlt">beads</span> to improve the property of the moulded part. It was also observed that unlike other polymer <span class="hlt">bead</span> foaming technologies, the E-TPU <span class="hlt">bead</span> foaming sintering does not require formation of double melting-peak. The original broad melting peak existing in the TPU microstructure due to the wide size distribution of HS crystallites can be effectively utilized for the purpose of sintering as well as maintenance of the overall dimensional stability of the moulded part.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3695878','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3695878"><span>Effect of immobilized cells in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> in alcoholic fermentation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized in calcium alginate and chitosan-covered calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> and studied in the fermentation of glucose and sucrose for ethanol production. The batch fermentations were carried out in an orbital shaker and assessed by monitoring the concentration of substrate and product with HPLC. Cell immobilization in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> and chitosan-covered calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span> allowed reuse of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> in eight sequential fermentation cycles of 10 h each. The final concentration of ethanol using free cells was 40 g L-1 and the yields using glucose and sucrose as carbon sources were 78% and 74.3%, respectively. For immobilized cells in calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>, the final ethanol concentration from glucose was 32.9 ± 1.7 g L-1 with a 64.5 ± 3.4% yield, while the final ethanol concentration from sucrose was 33.5 ± 4.6 g L-1 with a 64.5 ± 8.6% yield. For immobilized cells in chitosan-covered calcium alginate <span class="hlt">beads</span>, the ethanol concentration from glucose was 30.7 ± 1.4 g L-1 with a 61.1 ± 2.8% yield, while the final ethanol concentration from sucrose was 31.8 ± 6.9 g L-1 with a 62.1 ± 12.8% yield. The immobilized cells allowed eight 10 h sequential reuse cycles to be carried out with stable final ethanol concentrations. In addition, there was no need to use antibiotics and no contamination was observed. After the eighth cycle, there was a significant rupture of the <span class="hlt">beads</span> making them inappropriate for reuse. 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