Science.gov

Sample records for 77-98 special issue

  1. Preface: ISBB Special Issue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue is published for the International Society of Biocatalysis and Biotechnology (ISBB). The ISBB special issue is devoted to all areas of biocatalysis and agricultural biotechnology in which biological systems are developed and/or used for the provision of commercial goods or serv...

  2. Special issue on filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxin; Milchberg, Howard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2014-05-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on filamentation, to appear in the spring of 2015, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will attempt to give an overview of the present status of this field in order to create synergies and foster future developments. The issue is open to papers on the following issues: Theoretical advances on filamentation. Self-focusing and collapse. Filamentation in various media. Pulse self-compression and ultrafast processes in filaments. Molecular alignment and rotation. Filamentation tailoring. Interaction between filaments. Filament weather and pollution control. Filament induced condensation and precipitation. Terahertz science with filaments. Lasing in filaments. Filament induced molecular excitation and reaction. Electric discharge and plasma. Cross-disciplinary applications. Novel concepts related to these topics are particularly welcome. Please submit your article by 1 October 2014 (expected web publication: spring 2015) using our website http://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/jphysb-iop. Submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue. The issue will be edited by Ruxin Li, Howard Milchberg and André Mysyrowicz.

  3. Special Amnesty Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TESOL Adult Education and Refugee Concerns Interest Sections Newsletter, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This special issue of the newsletter of the Adult Education Interest Section (AEIS) of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), prepared in cooperation with TESOL's refugee concerns interest section, concerns the response of the English-as-a-Second-Language teaching profession to Immigration and Naturalization Service…

  4. Columbia Quincentenary. Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foard, Douglas, Ed.; Regoli, Michael, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This special theme issue of the OAH Magazine of History contains articles that present a variety of perspectives on the Columbian Quincentenary--the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's voyages of discovery. The articles include: "Exploring the Columbian Quincentenary through Historiography" (John Hebert); "Science, Religion,…

  5. Editorial Special Issue: Neuronus

    PubMed Central

    Van der Lubbe, Rob H. J.; Kuniecki, Michał

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of the 12th volume of Advances in Cognitive Psychology is devoted to the Neuronus conference that took place in Kraków in 2015. In this editorial letter, we will focus on a selection of the materials and some follow-up research that was presented during this conference. We will also briefly introduce the conference contributions that successfully passed an external reviewing process. PMID:28154611

  6. Special Issue: Resumes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Includes "Writing Effective Resumes" (Kursmark); "Writing Cover Letters with Credibility" (Davis); "Career Portfolios" (Miller); "Writing a Top-Flight Vitae" (Orlando); "Converting a Curriculum Vitae to a Resume" (Katz, Morahan); "Special Reports" (Chapman); "Every Job Searcher Needs an e-Resume" (Dixson); "Military Value" (Burns); "Key Words"…

  7. Special Issue: Rural Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The issue discusses the role of the International Labour Office in the field of workers' education for rural workers and their organizations. Articles discuss labor conditions, child labor in agriculture, gender and equality training, trade unions, fair trade, and changing patterns of food production. Appendixes include information about…

  8. Special Book Review Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Provides reviews of books dealing with all aspects of careers, including 8 books on dealing with change, 13 on career management, 4 on entrepreneurship, 3 guides and workbooks, 2 on assessment, 4 on resumes, and 1 biography. Includes 12 short reviews of books on career development issues and information such as publishers' addresses. (JOW)

  9. Special Issue of Teaching Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education (Washington D.C.), 1986

    1986-01-01

    This special issue contains teaching strategies and suggestions for health-related activities at all educational levels. A few of the topics addressed by the 21 articles are heart disease, testicular cancer, hospital stress, family life, and sexual responsibility. (MT)

  10. Special Issue: "Molecules against Alzheimer".

    PubMed

    Decker, Michael; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego

    2016-12-16

    This Special Issue, entitled "Molecules against Alzheimer", gathers a number of original articles, short communications, and review articles on recent research efforts toward the development of novel drug candidates, diagnostic agents and therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of death worldwide. This Special Issue contains many interesting examples describing the design, synthesis, and pharmacological profiling of novel compounds that hit one or several key biological targets, such as cholinesterases, β-amyloid formation or aggregation, monoamine oxidase B, oxidative stress, biometal dyshomeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction, serotonin and/or melatonin systems, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, or nuclear erythroid 2-related factor. The development of novel AD diagnostic agents based on tau protein imaging and the use of lithium or intranasal insulin for the prevention or the symptomatic treatment of AD is also covered in some articles of the Special Issue.

  11. Commentary: Indigenous Health Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonmyr, Lil; Blackstock, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    This commentary highlights indigenous public health research from a special issue of the International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction dealing with child maltreatment, mental health, substance abuse and gambling. We focus on the emerging and growing research movement in Indigenous research through three important themes: 1) worldview and…

  12. Cybernetics and Education (Special Issue)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopstein, Felix F., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This is a special issue examining the potential of cybernetics in educational technology. Articles discuss: cybernetic methods, algorithms, feedback learning theory, a structural approach to behavioral objectives and criterion-referenced testing, task specifications and diagnosis, teacher-child interaction, educational development, teaching…

  13. Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    Introduces the articles of this special issue focusing on randomized field trials in criminology. In spite of the overall lack of randomized field trials in criminology, some agencies and individuals are able to mount an impressive number of field trials, and these articles focus on their experiences. (SLD)

  14. Special Issue "Biomaterials and Bioprinting".

    PubMed

    Chua, Chee Kai; Yeong, Wai Yee; An, Jia

    2016-09-14

    The emergence of bioprinting in recent years represents a marvellous advancement in 3D printing technology. It expands the range of 3D printable materials from the world of non-living materials into the world of living materials. Biomaterials play an important role in this paradigm shift. This Special Issue focuses on biomaterials and bioprinting and contains eight articles covering a number of recent topics in this emerging area.

  15. Special issue on transient plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James; Hoarty, David; Mancini, Roberto; Yoneda, Hitoki

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is dedicated to the "spectroscopy of transient plasmas" covering plasma conditions produced by a range of pulsed laboratory sources including short and long pulse lasers, pulsed power devices, and free electron lasers (FELs). The full range of plasma spectroscopy up to high energy bremsstrahlung radiation, including line broadening analysis for application to data recorded with the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity, is covered. This issue is timely as advances in optical lasers and x-ray FELs (XFEL) are enabling transient plasma to be probed at higher energies and shorter durations than ever before. New XFEL facilities being commissioned in Europe and Asia are adding to those operating in the US and Japan and the ELI high power laser project in Europe, due to open this year, will provide short pulse lasers of unprecedented power. This special issue represents a snapshot of the theoretical and experimental research in dense plasmas, electron kinetics, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas, inertial confinement fusion and non-equilibrium atomic physics using spectroscopy to diagnose plasmas produced by optical lasers, XFELs and pulsed-power machines.

  16. Foreword: Biomonitoring Equivalents special issue.

    PubMed

    Meek, M E; Sonawane, B; Becker, R A

    2008-08-01

    The challenge of interpreting results of biomonitoring for environmental chemicals in humans is highlighted in this Foreword to the Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) special issue of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology. There is a pressing need to develop risk-based tools in order to empower scientists and health professionals to interpret and communicate the significance of human biomonitoring data. The BE approach, which integrates dosimetry and risk assessment methods, represents an important advancement on the path toward achieving this objective. The articles in this issue, developed as a result of an expert panel meeting, present guidelines for derivation of BEs, guidelines for communication using BEs and several case studies illustrating application of the BE approach for specific substances.

  17. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-10-01

    Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus), or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus), and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach) applied in the field.

  18. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus), or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus), and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach) applied in the field. PMID:26702462

  19. FOREWORD: Special issue on density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kenichi

    2004-04-01

    This special issue on density was undertaken to provide readers with an overview of the present state of the density standards for solids, liquids and gases, as well as the technologies developed for measuring density. This issue also includes topics on the refractive index of gases and on techniques used for calibrating hydrometers so that almost all areas concerned with density standards are covered in four review articles and seven original articles, most of which describe current research being conducted at national metrology institutes (NMIs). A review article was invited from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum to highlight research on the magnetic suspension densimeters. In metrology, the determinations of the volume of a weight and the density of air are of primary importance in establishing a mass standard because the effect of the buoyancy force of air acting on the weight must be known accurately to determine the mass of the weight. A density standard has therefore been developed at many NMIs with a close relation to the mass standard. Hydrostatic weighing is widely used to measure the volume of a solid. The most conventional hydrostatic weighing method uses water as a primary density standard for measuring the volume of a solid. A brief history of the determination of the density of water is therefore given in a review article, as well as a recommended value for the density of water with a specified isotopic abundance. The most modern technique for hydrostatic weighing uses a solid density standard instead of water. For this purpose, optical interferometers for measuring the diameters of silicon spheres have been developed to convert the length standard into the volume standard with a small uncertainty. A review article is therefore dedicated to describing the state-of-the-art optical interferometers developed for silicon spheres. Relative combined standard uncertainties of several parts in 108 have been achieved today for measuring the volume and density of

  20. Introduction (to Special Issue on Refugees: Issues and Directions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Examines current trends in mass international immigration and refugee resettlement and discusses related legal and humanitarian concerns. Briefly reviews the articles which follow in this special issue. (GC)

  1. Special issue on graphene nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. Yu; Maier, S. A.; Martin-Moreno, L.

    2013-11-01

    Graphene nanophotonics has recently appeared as a new research area, which combines the topics of nanophotonics (devoted to studying the behavior of electromagnetic fields on the deep subwavelength scale) and the several extraordinary material properties of graphene. Apart from being the thinnest existing material, graphene is very attractive for photonics due to its extreme flexibility, high mobility and the possibility of controlling its carrier concentration (and hence its electromagnetic response) via external gate voltages. From its very birth, graphene nanophotonics has the potential for innovative technological applications, aiming to complement (or in some cases even replace) the existing semiconductor/metallic photonic platforms. It has already shown exceptional capabilities in many directions, such as for instance in photodetection, photovoltaics, lasing, etc [1]. A special place in graphene photonics belongs to graphene plasmonics, which studies both intrinsic plasmons in graphene and the combination of graphene with plasmons supported by metallic structures [2]. Here, apart from the dynamic control via external voltages previously mentioned, the use of graphene brings with it the remarkable property that graphene plasmons have a wavelength λp that can be even one hundred times smaller than that in free space λ (for instance λp ~ 100 nm at λ ~ 10 μm). This provides both extreme confinement and extreme enhancement of the electromagnetic field at the graphene sheet which, together with its high sensitivity to the doping level, opens many interesting perspectives for new optical devices. The collection of papers presented in this special issue highlights different aspects of nanophotonics in graphene and related systems. The timely appearance of this publication was apparent during the monographic workshop 'Graphene Nanophotonics', sponsored by the European Science Foundation and held during 3-8 March 2013, in Benasque (Spain). This special issue

  2. EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2011-10-01

    testing of effective cleanup technologies to reduce environmental and health risks. Based on this work, a large amount of data are now available for publication, some of which are presented in this Special Issue of the Health Physics Journal.

  3. Japanese Special Education Today: Issues and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narita, Shigeru

    This paper presents a summary discussion of the current status of special education in Japan, its recent history, and issues and trends. Noted is establishment of the current educational system (and special education system) as part of post-war American occupation. The following issues are discussed: centralization and teacher autonomy; compulsory…

  4. Issues in Special Education & Rehabilitation, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vergason, Glenn A., Ed.; Hutzler, Yeshayahu, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This interdisciplinary scientific journal emphasizes the linkage between special education and rehabilitation services. Selected papers from the first two issues include: "The Impact of Current Issues in Teacher Education on the Preparation of Special Educators" (Patricia Edelen-Smith and others); "Training Teachers and Parents To Work…

  5. Special Issue on Creativity at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Brian; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Special issue includes "Creativity at the Workplace" (Donnelly); "Creativity Revisited" (Iandoli); interviews with 16 people who work in or teach industrial engineering, software, and graphic design; "On Creativity and Schooling" (Coppola, Iandoli); and "End Notes: What I Learned" (Iandoli). (SK)

  6. [Assessment of Young Children.] Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Booney, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This special issue of the "CEDS/Newsletter" is devoted to the theme of "preschool, early childhood, and infant assessment." It emphasizes the need for early assessment and intervention with young handicapped children. An article by Linda Pearl, "Issues in Infant Assessment," covers the purpose of infant assessment,…

  7. Students at Risk. SET Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Judith, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This special issue of the serial SET for 1996 contains seven newly commissioned articles and four reprints all related to the education of children at risk. This issue includes: (1) "Students at Risk: An Overview" (Margaret Batten, Graeme Withers, and Jean Russell); (2) "Inquiry into Children in Education at Risk through Truancy and…

  8. Introduction: Special issue on Global Lesbian Cinema.

    PubMed

    Farr, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a brief introduction to this special issue on Global Lesbian Cinema. This issue particularly highlights the importance of recognizing lesbian discourse as a separate, related piece of the discourse of queer transnational and global cinema. Subsequently, brief summaries of the eight articles of this collection are provided.

  9. Special Issue: Book Reviews 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This special issue reviews 71 books on the following topics: career management; career opportunities for people with disabilities; federal government career information; college career development/counseling; job search strategies, tools, methods; coaching; retirement issues; strategies for managers; women and careers; general career books; and…

  10. Editorial of the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Piozzi, Antonella; Francolini, Iolanda

    2013-01-01

    The special issue “Antimicrobial Polymers” includes research and review papers concerning the recent advances on preparation of antimicrobial polymers and their relevance to industrial settings and biomedical field. Antimicrobial polymers have recently emerged as promising candidates to fight microbial contamination onto surfaces thanks to their interesting properties. In this special issue, the main strategies pursued for developing antimicrobial polymers, including polymer impregnation with antimicrobial agents or synthesis of polymers bearing antimicrobial moieties, were discussed. The future application of these polymers either in industrial or healthcare settings could result in an extremely positive impact not only at the economic level but also for the improvement of quality of life. PMID:24005863

  11. Editorial to the special issue Neuronus

    PubMed Central

    Van der Lubbe, Rob H. J.; Kuniecki, Michał

    2013-01-01

    Did you visit the Neuronus conferences in the years 2012 and 2013 in Kraków? If not, then you certainly should have a close examination of this special issue including this introduction to at least have a glimpse of an idea of the highly interesting topics in the field of cognitive neuroscience that were presented at these conferences. If you were there, it is for sure a good choice to focus on this special issue as well, first to refresh your minds (we know our memories are far from perfect), but especially to see what happened with research of the presenters at these conferences. PMID:24605174

  12. Introduction to the special issue: under pressure.

    PubMed

    Howard, Yetta

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces this special issue on the theme "Under Pressure." It uses an analysis of experimental lesbian filmmaker Su Friedrich's Seeing Red (2005) to frame the issue's focus on the ways that the category "lesbian" is placed under pressure and/or the pressure "lesbian" places on twentieth- and twenty-first-century cultural production. After this overview, the introduction summarizes all seven articles in the order that they appear in the issue. These summaries also show the connections between the articles and suggest possibilities for future critical dialogues on the theme.

  13. Guest editorial, special issue on biobased adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article is a preface for a special issue that showcases significant developments on adhesives made with biorenewable materials, such as agricultural crops (soybean, corn), plant extractives (bark, tannins), and marine sources (mussels). This collection of pioneering studies and reviews on bioba...

  14. Infant Day Care: A Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Nathan; Fein, Greta G.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes the debate over the work of Jay Belsky, who claims that nonparental day care increases the likelihood of socioemotional difficulties for infants less than one year old. Previews a special journal issue that contains an article by Belsky and four responses. Focuses on attachment theory, intervention programs, and research methodology.…

  15. Video and Second Language Learning. Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Junetta B., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    The extent to which video has come of age with respect to language learning is the focus of this special issue, which provides information on sources of materials and offers practical ideas for the effective and creative use of those materials in second language instruction. Articles include: "Video and Language Learning: A Medium Comes of Age"…

  16. Sport Specialization: Developmental and Learning Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branta, Crystal F.

    2010-01-01

    When addressing issues related to sport specialization, it is important to consider how skills are developed and learned. Changes in physical development and maturation throughout the growing years affect the motor performance abilities of individuals who are not yet mature. Such variability in skill development is important to understand when…

  17. National Wildlife. Special Issue: Endangered Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohm, John, Ed.

    This is the first special issue in the 12-year history of "National Wildlife," and is devoted entirely to endangered species of animals and plants in the United States. An overview of the problem stresses the impact of man's haphazard development, suburban sprawl, and urban pollution upon a fragile environment, resulting in dozens of…

  18. Foreword for Special Issue on Environmental Biophysics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue on Environmental Biophysics is presented in honor of Dr. John Norman. Over the past four decades, Dr. Norman has dedicated himself to building bridges between disparate scientific disciplines for a better understanding and prediction of biophysical interactions. The consummate i...

  19. Special Issue: Competencies from the Individual's Viewpoint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Ten articles in this special issue deal with competencies and how their use is revolutionizing human resource management and the work of career practitioners. Topics include competency technology, models, and mapping; behavioral interviewing; talent management; emotional intelligence; succession planning; and lifelong learning. (JOW)

  20. Introduction to Special Issue on Overschooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterbeek, Hessel

    2000-01-01

    This special issue was inspired by Greg Duncan and Saul Hoffman's 1981 article on the "incidence and wage effects of overeducation." These researchers used a Mincer earnings equation to determine that a substantial number of American workers were over- or under-educated for their chosen occupations. (MLH)

  1. [Preface for special issue on bioenergy (2013)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dehua

    2013-03-01

    Bioenergy, as a renewable energy, is one of the best solutions to substitute part of fossil fuels. Based on the 6th World Bioenergy Symposium, this special issue includes latest reports and articles on the fields of bioethanol, biodiesel, microbial lipid, biofuel standard and aviation biofuels.

  2. Special Issue: Productive Employment for the Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaude, Jacques, Ed.; Miller, Steven, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This special issue contains nine articles on labor-intensive public works, social investment funds, rural infrastructure projects, grassroots socioeconomic rights, remuneration systems for self-help projects, road construction and rural transport, employment and environmental rehabilitation, and water as a source of employment. (SK)

  3. Controversial Issues Confronting Special Education: Divergent Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stainback, William; Stainback, Susan

    This book of 24 papers presents divergent views on 12 issues in special education: organizational strategies, classroom service delivery approaches, maximizing the talents and gifts of students, classification and labeling, assessment, instructional strategies, classroom management, collaboration/consultation, research practices, higher education,…

  4. [Preface for special issue on bioenergy (2015)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dehua; Li, Changzhu

    2015-10-01

    Research and industrial application of bioenergy have developed quickly with the systematic and multifocal trends in recent years. The 4th International Conference on Biomass Energy Technologies-8th World Bioenergy Symposium (ICBT-WBS 2014) and Joint Biomass Energy Symposium of Chinese Renewable Energy Society (CRES) were held in Changsha, China, 17-19 October, 2014, with American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), Biomass Energy Innovation Alliance, European Biomass Industry Association, AIChE and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). This special issue on bioenergy is based on selected excellent papers from the submissions, together with free submissions. The special issue consists of reviews and original papers, mainly involving the aspects closely related to the bioenergy and related fields, including resource analyses, pretreatment, fuel/chemicals production, byproduct disposal and strategy investigation.

  5. Special Issue: Novel Antifungal Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Poeta, Maurizio Del

    2016-01-01

    This Special Issue is designed to highlight the latest research and development on new antifungal compounds with mechanisms of action different from the ones of polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins. The papers presented here highlight new pathways and targets that could be exploited for the future development of new antifungal agents to be used alone or in combination with existing antifungals. A computational model for better predicting antifungal drug resistance is also presented. PMID:28058254

  6. Special Issue on Time Scale Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 IOP PUBLISHING METROLOGIA Metrologia 45 (2008) doi:10.1088/0026-1394/45/6/E01...special issue of Metrologia presents selected papers from the Fifth International Time Scale Algorithm Symposium (VITSAS), including some of the...Paris at the BIPM in 2002 (see Metrologia 40 (3), 2003) • 5th Symposium: in San Fernando, Spain at the ROA in 2008. The early symposia were concerned

  7. [Preface for special issue on bioenergy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dehua

    2011-03-01

    More and more attentions have been being paid to seeking alternatives for fossil fuels. Bioenergy, as a renewable energy, is one of the best solutions. Bioenergy has been developed rapidly in China, which became the third largest producer and consumer of fuel ethanol. In order to promote the research of bioenergy technology in China, this special issue includes latest reports and articles on the fields of bioethanol, biodiesel, microbial lipid and biofuel system analysis.

  8. FOREWORD: Special issue on electrical charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, George T.

    2004-10-01

    This special issue on the physics and metrology of electrical charge attempts to provide the interested reader with an overview of the ways in which this fundamental property of matter has been studied and measured, both historically and in present times. Few topics in introductory physics and electrical engineering courses receive as much attention as does the nature and behaviour of electrical charge, and experimental tests of Coulomb’s law are a staple of such curricula. The manipulation of electrical charge, even down to the level of single electrons, constitutes the currency of electrical metrology, while the effects of parasitic forces arising from spurious charges are the bane of virtually all who work in the realm of high precision experimentation. Moreover, basic questions about the equality, discreteness and possible fractional sizes of elementary charges lie at the foundation of modern physics on the one hand, while the control of charge carriers within electrical and electronic devices forms the core of essentially all of modern technology, on the other. The theme of the special issue is thus one of reviewing the scientific foundations of charge as a property of matter and as a tool for testing fundamental physical laws. The historical development of both aspects of this theme during the last two centuries has helped form the basis for modern electrical metrology. Therefore, it seemed timely to reassess the field with an eye towards future developments, especially since we find ourselves at the 250th anniversary of the period during which Benjamin Franklin carried out some of the first quantitative electrical measurements, in his colonial laboratory in Pennsylvania. To that end, the special issue contains articles on several aspects of electrical charge that have been the focus of intense study during the past several years. Coulomb’s law is of course central to any discussions in electrical science, and two of the articles provide detailed

  9. Editorial for special issue on neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Stephen; Timofeeva, Yulia

    2013-08-14

    "Neurodynamics" is an interdisciplinary area of mathematics where dynamical systems theory (deterministic and stochastic) is the primary tool for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms responsible for the behaviour of neural systems (whether biological or synthetic). A meeting on this topic was held at the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences in Edinburgh from March 5-7 in 2012. In this special issue, we have invited seven of the main contributors to this event to expand on their presentations and highlight the use of mathematics in understanding the dynamics of neural systems.

  10. [Preface for special issue on enzyme engineering].

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng

    2009-12-01

    Enzyme engineering is a combined technology of enzymology and engineering, which is becoming one of the major fields of modem biotechnology. In recent years, China has made some advances in enzyme engineering research. To promote enzyme engineering research in China, invited reviews and selected research articles were published in this special issue of "Enzyme Engineering". The reviews and research articles focus on the fields of enzymatic conversion, therapeutic enzymes, enzymes as additives to animal feedstuff, enzymes for degradation of organic pollutes, and enzymes for biofuel and biorefinery.

  11. Editorial for Special Issue on Neurodynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    “Neurodynamics” is an interdisciplinary area of mathematics where dynamical systems theory (deterministic and stochastic) is the primary tool for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms responsible for the behaviour of neural systems (whether biological or synthetic). A meeting on this topic was held at the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences in Edinburgh from March 5–7 in 2012. In this special issue, we have invited seven of the main contributors to this event to expand on their presentations and highlight the use of mathematics in understanding the dynamics of neural systems. PMID:23945204

  12. Special Issue: "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents".

    PubMed

    Sperry, Jonathan; García-Álvarez, Joaquín

    2016-11-15

    To overcome the well-established drawbacks of conventional organic solvents (toxicity, non-biodegradability, flammability, accumulation in the atmosphere) remarkable research efforts have been recently devoted to the replacement of traditional organic reaction media by the so-called Green Solvents. In this sense, the choice of a safe, non-toxic, biorenewable and cheap reaction media is a crucial goal in organic synthesis. Thus, this Special Issue on "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents" has been aimed to showcase a series of stimulating contributions from international experts within different sub-areas of organic synthesis in Green Solvents (ranging from metal- to organo-catalyzed organic reactions).

  13. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades, a strong revival of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma studies has developed in the form of microplasmas. Microplasmas have typical scales of 1 mm or less and offer a very exciting research direction in the field of plasma science and technology as the discharge physics can be considerably different due to high collisionality and the importance of plasma-surface interaction. These high-pressure small-scale plasmas have a diverse range of physical and chemical properties. This diversity coincides with various applications including light/UV sources [1], material processing [2], chemical analysis [3], material synthesis [4], electromagnetics [5], combustion [6] and even medicine [7]. At atmospheric pressure, large scale plasmas have the tendency to become unstable due to the high collision rates leading to enhanced heating and ionization compared to their low-pressure counterparts. As low-pressure plasmas typically operate in reactors with sizes of tens of centimetres, scaling up the pressure to atmospheric pressure the size of the plasma reduces to typical sizes below 1 mm. A natural approach of stabilizing atmospheric pressure plasmas is thus the use of microelectrode geometries. Traditionally microplasmas have been produced in confined geometries which allow one to stabilize dc excited discharges. This stabilization is intrinsically connected to the large surface-to-volume ratio which enhances heat transfer and losses of charged and excited species to the walls. Currently challenging boundaries are pushed by producing microcavity geometries with dimensions of the order of 1 µm [8]. The subject of this special issue, diagnostics of microplasmas, is motivated by the many challenges in microplasma diagnostics in view of the complex chemistry and strong spatial (and even temporal) gradients of species densities and plasma properties. Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a very long history dating back more than 100 years, with early work of

  14. Preface to the special issue NUMTA 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnano, Luigi; D. Sergeyev, Yaroslav; A. Zhigljavsky, Anatoly

    2015-04-01

    This special issue of the Communications in Nonlinear Science and Numerical Simulation contains a collection of research papers dealing with various problems of nonlinearity in physics, pure and applied mathematics, and computer science. It also considers numerical techniques and problems arising when natural phenomena are modelled on computers. The papers included in this special issue (see [1-19]) have been carefully selected by the guest editors among the submissions reflecting the talks presented at the international conference "Numerical computations: Theory and Algorithms (NUMTA)" held in June 17-23, 2013, Falerna (CZ), Italy. The NUMTA 2013 has been organized by the University of Calabria, Rende (CS), Italy and the N.I. Lobachevski State University of Nizhni Novgorod, Russia, in cooperation with the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, USA. The two universities have a 20 years long collaboration in the framework of the international research and educational program "Italian-Russian University" and the NUMTA 2013 was one of the major events organized jointly by the two partner institutions.

  15. FOREWORD: Special issue on radionuclide metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Bruce; Judge, Steven

    2007-08-01

    This special issue of Metrologia on radionuclide metrology is the first of a trilogy on the subject of ionizing radiation measurement, a field that is overseen by Sections I, II and III of the CIPM's Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI). The idea was first proposed at the 2003 series of CCRI Section meetings, with the general aim of showcasing the relevance and importance of metrology in ionizing radiation to a broader metrological audience. After the 2005 meeting of Section II (measurement of radionuclides), the radioactivity aspect of the project began to move forward in earnest. A working group was set up with the brief that the special issue should be of use by experienced metrologists as an overview of the 'state of the art' to compare progress and scientific content with those in other fields of metrology, as a resource for new metrologists joining the field and as a guide for users of radioactivity to explain how traceability to the international measurement system may be achieved. Since mankind first became aware of the existence of radioactivity just over a century ago (due to its discovery by Becquerel and further work by the Curies), much has been learnt and understood in the interim period. The field of radionuclide metrology that developed subsequently is broad-based and encompasses, amongst others, nuclear physics (experimental and theory), chemistry, mathematics, mathematical statistics, uncertainty analysis and advanced computing for data analysis, simulation and modelling. To determine the activity of radionuclides accurately requires elements of all of these subjects. In more recent decades the focus has been on the practical applications of radioactivity in industry and the health field in particular. In addition, low-level environmental radioactivity monitoring has taken on ever greater importance in the nuclear power era. These developments have required new detection instrumentation and techniques on an ongoing basis to ensure

  16. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharmby, D. O.

    2008-07-01

    The papers in this Special Issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics originate from the 11th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources (LS:11) held at Fudan University, Shanghai, China, during 20 24 May 2007. Abstracts of all papers were published in the conference book Light Sources 2007 (Sheffield: FAST-LS) edited by Muqing Liu and R Devonshire. Special issues were produced after LS:9 and LS:10 and have proved to be well-cited and important sources of information for this community. The Symposia occur at three-year intervals. In this one over 200 papers were presented—the majority as posters—with ample time provided for active discussion. As all submitted papers had to be refereed in the normal way for J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., I was concerned that too many submissions would overwhelm the small number of referees available in this area. To ensure a broad spread of interests and opinions, I invited 10 senior colleagues to give me their recommendations about who should be asked to submit papers for this Special Issue. The criteria were that the work should be new, complete and within the scope of the journal. As a result of their suggestions 42 authors were asked to submit papers. Not all authors were able to submit a manuscript in time and some, at my request, combined their work into a single paper. The 28 papers published here are the result of that process. The issue starts with a comprehensive review by Benilov of the remarkable progress that has been made in the past 15 years in understanding the behaviour of cathode and anode terminations in arcs. It is fair to say that we now have a fundamental understanding of the formerly baffling behaviour of spot and diffuse terminations, at least in the quasi-steady state. A number of following papers cover applications of this theory, extensions to time dependence and examination of the effects of the different gaseous atmospheres in which lighting arcs operate. Mercury has very

  17. A special issue on the RCPs

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vuuren, Detlef; Edmonds, James A.; Kainuma, M.; Riahi, Keywan; Weyant, John

    2011-11-01

    This paper provides an editors' introduction to the special issue of Climatic Change on the RCPs. Scenarios form a crucial element in climate change research. They allow researchers to explore the long-term consequences of decisions today, while taking account of the inertia in both the socio-economic and physical system. Scenarios also form an integrating element among the different research disciplines of those studying climate change, such as economists, technology experts, climate researchers, atmospheric chemists and geologists. In 2007, the IPCC requested the scientific community to develop a new set of scenarios, as the existing scenarios (published in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios, (Nakicenovic and Swart 2000), and called the 'SRES scenarios') needed to be updated and expanded in scope (see Moss et al. (2010) for a detailed discussion). Researchers from different disciplines worked together to develop a process to craft these new scenarios, as summarized by Moss, et al. (2010). The Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC), founded in response to the IPCC call, played a key role in this process.1 The scenario development process aims to develop a set of new scenarios that facilitate integrated analysis of climate change across the main scientific communities. The process comprises 3 main phases: (1) an initial phase, developing a set of pathways for emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing, (2) a parallel phase, comprising both the development of new socio-economic storylines and climate model projections, and (3) an integration phase, combining the information from the first phases into holistic mitigation, impacts and vulnerability assessments. The pathways developed in the first phase were called 'Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)'. They play an important role in providing input for prospective climate model experiments, including both the decadal and long-term projections of climate change. The RCPs also provide an

  18. Urban Issues in Special Education. A Special Study Institute Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graeb, Thelma S., Ed.; Gaughan, Joseph P., Ed.

    Presented are the proceedings of a special study institute which field tested the Special Education Administration Simulator (SEASIM) to acquaint urban school administrators with the role of the Special Education Director and with information on current trends in special education. SEASIM is said to be based on 31 critical problems and issues…

  19. EDITORIAL: Special Issue: CAMOP MOLEC XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    The advances in recent years in the field of molecular dynamics are numerous and impressive. In sophisticated experimental and theoretical studies it is nowadays possible to steer chemical reactions with quantum-number-prepared molecules, to study reaction products fully state-specifically, and to derive accurate potential energy surfaces with the goal of determining the pathways along which molecular interaction can take place. Both experimental and theoretical techniques have rapidly improved, and our understanding of the dynamical nature of chemical processes is continuously growing. In this special issue of CAMOP/Physica Scripta we have tried to present a snapshot of the state-of-the-art in the field of molecular dynamics. It contains a collection of papers submitted in association with the most recent MOLEC meeting (MOLEC XV) held in September 2004 in Nunspeet, The Netherlands. This biannual meeting started in 1976 in Trento and was subsequently organized in Brandbjerg Højskole (Denmark, 1978), Oxford (UK, 1980), Nijmegen (The Netherlands, 1982), Jerusalem (Israel, 1984), Aussois (France, 1986), Assissi (Italy, 1988), Bernkastel-Kues (Germany, 1990), Prague (Czech Republic, 1992), Salamanca (Spain, 1994), Nyborg Strand (Denmark, 1996), Bristol (UK, 1998), Jerusalem (Israel, 2000) and Istanbul (Turkey, 2002). Within the philosophy of CAMOP we have asked invited speakers to report on outstanding problems in their particular field. This comprises discussion of open questions, important applications, new theoretical and experimental approaches and also predictions of future developments. A good comment, in addition to being an authoritative contribution of an acknowledged expert, should also be readable by the non-expert and we have taken special care that the work presented here is introduced in an understandable way and has been placed within the context of accessible literature for the interested reader. The sequence of 16 papers that is presented in this

  20. EDITORIAL: Special issue on optical micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckenberg, N.; Dholakia, K.

    2007-08-01

    Few would have predicted the impact the laser has had across all of the natural sciences. Laser technology in tandem with microscopy has fuelled a revolutionary advance in biology and chemistry. Microscopic methods permit imaging of cells, nanoparticles, atoms and single molecules. Without doubt, biophotonics has emerged in many guises as a major player on the international arena, and has spawned an industry with an explosive growth rate. Notably, the influence of light is not restricted to passive imaging—it may also move, trap and manoeuvre objects from single atoms right through to the size of a large cell with no damage whatsoever. Given the well-known uses of high power lasers in surgery and industrial cutting, this sounds like science fiction, but at the size scale of these objects it is science fact: it is the area of optical micromanipulation that is the subject of this special issue. The field of optical micromanipulation has continued to impact right across the sciences in an unprecedented fashion, since its inception in the late 1960s. Excitingly the field has made an exceptional impact in single molecule biophysics and the physics of non-equilibrium systems largely due to the fact that an optical trap is an elegant and powerful force transducer. The field is also branching out into new directions: cell biology is benefiting from this advance. Trapping and microfluidics is an exciting combination within the broader remit of the field of optofluidics: methods of multiple traps using diffractive optics are permitting cell sorting, traps are aiding local viscosity measurements and novel biological studies are being performed. Combining traps with other spectroscopic methods and imaging modes is an interesting theme that poses interesting challenges but promises exciting new knowledge. All these areas are represented in this special issue, along with a number of contributions to quantitative modelling of optical fields suitable for trapping and of the

  1. EDITORIAL: Special issue: CAMOP MOLEC XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenzi, Daniela; Franceschi, Pietro; Tosi, Paolo

    2007-09-01

    In this special issue of CAMOP/Physica Scripta we would like to present a picture of the state-of-the-art in the field of the dynamics of molecular systems. It contains a collection of papers submitted in association with the most recent MOLEC meeting (MOLEC XVI), which was held in September 2006 in Levico Terme (Italy) to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the MOLEC conference series. The series of biennial European Conferences on the Dynamics of Molecular Systems (MOLEC) started in 1976, when the first meeting was held in Trento (Italy). Successive conferences were organized in Brandbjerg Højskole (Denmark, 1978), Oxford (UK, 1980), Nijmegen (The Netherlands, 1982), Jerusalem (Israel, 1984), Aussois (France, 1986), Assisi (Italy, 1988), Bernkastel-Kues (Germany, 1990), Prague (Czech Republic, 1992), Salamanca (Spain, 1994), Nyborg Strand (Denmark, 1996), Bristol (UK, 1998), Jerusalem (Israel, 2000), Istanbul (Turkey, 2002) and Nunspeet (The Netherlands, 2004). This is the second time that Physica Scripta has hosted a special issue dedicated to MOLEC. The previous issue ( Physica Scripta (2006) 73 C1-C89) was edited by Steven Stolte and Harold Linnartz following the MOLEC 2004 conference. Following the philosophy of CAMOP, we have asked invited speakers to summarize important problems in their research area, with the objective of setting forth the current thinking of leading researchers in atomic, molecular and optical physics. This comprises discussions of open questions, important new applications, new theoretical and experimental approaches and also predictions of where the field is heading. In addition to being authoritative contributions of acknowledged experts, we hope that the papers also appeal to non-specialists as each work contains a clear and broad introduction and references to the accessible literature. The present special issue comprises 17 papers, which are arranged according to the following topics: theoretical and experimental studies of

  2. Foreword [Special Issue on Superheavy Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Düllmann, Christoph E.; Herzberg, Rolf -Dietmar; Nazarewicz, Witold; Oganessian, Yuri

    2015-12-07

    Reflecting the breadth of research opportunities in the field of superheavy element research, this special issue covers the range of topics in a comprehensive way, including synthesis of superheavy isotopes, nuclear structure, atomic shell structure, and chemical properties. The contributions detail the status of the field and lay out perspectives for the future. The prospects are bright: new isotopes are awaiting discovery, completing the landscape of superheavy nuclei and bridging the currently existing gap between nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions and those from 48Ca induced fusion reactions. The possibility that the limits of nuclear structure studies can be pushed even further in mass and charge has greatly motivated a number of new facilities. Advances in experimental techniques will allow studies on isotopes produced significantly below the 1 pb level. Chemical studies progressing to elements never studied to date are already being prepared. Ultra-fast chemistry setups are under development and it will be fascinating to see them at work, elucidating the influence of relativistic effects on superheavy elements. The richness of chemical systems available for transactinides will expand further, giving access to new chemical systems, giving more information on the architecture of the periodic table.

  3. Foreword [Special Issue on Superheavy Elements

    DOE PAGES

    Düllmann, Christoph E.; Herzberg, Rolf -Dietmar; Nazarewicz, Witold; ...

    2015-12-07

    Reflecting the breadth of research opportunities in the field of superheavy element research, this special issue covers the range of topics in a comprehensive way, including synthesis of superheavy isotopes, nuclear structure, atomic shell structure, and chemical properties. The contributions detail the status of the field and lay out perspectives for the future. The prospects are bright: new isotopes are awaiting discovery, completing the landscape of superheavy nuclei and bridging the currently existing gap between nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions and those from 48Ca induced fusion reactions. The possibility that the limits of nuclear structure studies can be pushedmore » even further in mass and charge has greatly motivated a number of new facilities. Advances in experimental techniques will allow studies on isotopes produced significantly below the 1 pb level. Chemical studies progressing to elements never studied to date are already being prepared. Ultra-fast chemistry setups are under development and it will be fascinating to see them at work, elucidating the influence of relativistic effects on superheavy elements. The richness of chemical systems available for transactinides will expand further, giving access to new chemical systems, giving more information on the architecture of the periodic table.« less

  4. Special issue: practical applications of metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Turel, Iztok

    2015-04-30

    In 1913 Alfred Werner received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work that was of great importance for the development of coordination chemistry. In the years that followed numerous complexes consisting of metal ions and organic ligands were isolated, thus building a strong connection between inorganic and organic chemistry. Coordination compounds have many interesting properties which find diverse applications in numerous aspects of human life. Fourteeen contributions were received for this Special Issue covering very different aspects of metal complexes and their practical applications. The highest number of manuscripts deals with the biological activity of complexes which might potentially be used in the clinical practice. Authors have tested their cytotoxicity, antibacterial activity and enzyme inhibition. Their optical properties were studied in view of their potential use in photodynamic therapy. Moreover, optical properties could also be used for bioanalysis. It is also known that metal complexes are useful catalysts and a few such examples are also described herein. Many other interesting properties and facts about the isolated and described complexes are also reported (radioactivity, design of metal-organic frameworks, etc.).

  5. EDITORIAL: Special issue on radiation dosimetry Special issue on radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Peter

    2009-04-01

    This special issue of Metrologia on radiation dosimetry is the second in a trilogy on the subject of ionizing radiation measurements, a field that is overseen by Sections I, II and III of the CIPM's Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI). The work of Section II, on radionuclide metrology, was covered in issue 44(4), published in 2007, and that of Section III, on neutron metrology, will be covered in a special issue to be published shortly. This issue covers the work of Section I (x-rays and γ rays, and charged particles). The proposal to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the CCRI Sections was first made in 2003 and refined at the two subsequent meetings of the CCRI in 2005 and 2007. The overall aim is to present the work of the CCRI to a wider metrological audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of the field. The main focus of our special issue on dosimetry metrology is on the 'state of the art' in the various areas covered, with an indication of the current developments taking place and the problems and challenges that remain. Where appropriate, this is set in a brief historical context, although it is not the aim to give a historical review. The need for accurate measurement has been appreciated from the pioneering days of the use of ionizing radiation in the early 20th century, particularly in the fields of diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. Over the years, the range of applications for ionizing radiation has expanded both in scope and in the types and energies of radiation employed. This has led to the need to develop a wide variety of measurement techniques and standards covering fields ranging from the low doses experienced in environmental and protection applications to the extremely high doses used in industrial processing. The different types of radiation employed give rise to the need for dose measurements in radiation beams whose effective penetration through a material such as water ranges from a

  6. EDITORIAL: Special issue on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Graham; Paniccia, Mario; Wada, Kazumi; Mashanovich, Goran

    2008-06-01

    technology and the massive increase in research activity in silicon photonics since the early work in the 1980s. Only time will tell if silicon can realize its potential to satisfy the ever-increasing array of applications. However, the indications are positive, and the contributors to this cause employ increasingly impressive levels of intellectual and technological capability to realize the desired goals. It is an interesting time to be involved in slicon photonics, and it will be equally fascinating to watch the evolution of the technology in the future. Whatever happens, silicon will make the transition from being regarded as purely an electronic material to recognition as an optoelectronic material. The evidence for this is represented in the collection of papers that form this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. This special issue is, in turn, representative of the rapidly increasing body of literature that represents the field of silicon photonics. In a field of such rapid transition as silicon photonics, the hope is that this special issue takes a snapshot of the technology at the time of publication, to document the progress of the field for future reference, and in turn to stimulate further work. The Guest Editors are grateful for the tireless support of Clare Bedrock at IOP Publishing.

  7. EDITORIAL: Special issue on time scale algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakis, Demetrios; Tavella, Patrizia

    2008-12-01

    This special issue of Metrologia presents selected papers from the Fifth International Time Scale Algorithm Symposium (VITSAS), including some of the tutorials presented on the first day. The symposium was attended by 76 persons, from every continent except Antarctica, by students as well as senior scientists, and hosted by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in San Fernando, Spain, whose staff further enhanced their nation's high reputation for hospitality. Although a timescale can be simply defined as a weighted average of clocks, whose purpose is to measure time better than any individual clock, timescale theory has long been and continues to be a vibrant field of research that has both followed and helped to create advances in the art of timekeeping. There is no perfect timescale algorithm, because every one embodies a compromise involving user needs. Some users wish to generate a constant frequency, perhaps not necessarily one that is well-defined with respect to the definition of a second. Other users might want a clock which is as close to UTC or a particular reference clock as possible, or perhaps wish to minimize the maximum variation from that standard. In contrast to the steered timescales that would be required by those users, other users may need free-running timescales, which are independent of external information. While no algorithm can meet all these needs, every algorithm can benefit from some form of tuning. The optimal tuning, and even the optimal algorithm, can depend on the noise characteristics of the frequency standards, or of their comparison systems, the most precise and accurate of which are currently Two Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT) and GPS carrier phase time transfer. The interest in time scale algorithms and its associated statistical methodology began around 40 years ago when the Allan variance appeared and when the metrological institutions started realizing ensemble atomic time using more than

  8. EDITORIAL: Special issue on quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Stefano; Man'ko, Vladimir I.; Wiseman, Howard M.

    2005-10-01

    Controlling the dynamics or measurement of quantum systems via the manipulation of external parameters is a most important phenomenon that lies at the heart of several fields including atomic and optical physics, molecular chemistry and quantum information. As quantum technologies have matured, a host of practical applications of quantum control have been realized in quantum optics, cavity QED, atomic spin ensembles, ion trapping, and Bose--Einstein condensation. As a result, quantum control theory is a rapidly growing research field. The aim of this special issue is to give an idea of the present status of research in quantum control, and to stimulate further activity. The papers chosen cover a great variety of ideas in this field. To aid the reader, we have divided the papers into four broad sections: quantum filtering and feedback control; open-loop control; quantum information applications; optical and related applications. Of course there are many papers that cross the boundaries between the categories we have identified, so we encourage readers to peruse the whole issue. While some may quibble with our classification scheme, we think it will be useful, especially to those who are new to the area. In each section the papers are ordered by date of submission. The first section is on quantum filtering and feedback control. Quantum filtering means determining estimates for some (or all) observables of the system from classical measurement results obtained gradually over time from the output of the quantum system. The conditioned quantum state is one way to generate such estimates. This filtering of the measurement results is useful for feedback control (also known as closed-loop control), because those estimates can be used as the basis for varying the external control parameters. This section begins with a review article (the one exception to the ordering of papers by submission date). The second section is on open-loop control in the broad sense. This is

  9. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... aplastic anemia and are pregnant or want to get pregnant, find an aplastic anemia specialist and an obstetrician (OB) who specializes in high-risk births. Every person and every pregnancy is different. Make sure you ...

  10. What Do the Experts Say about Urban Special Education Issues?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, Ann, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The participants in a special education doctoral seminar for Urban SEALS (Special Education Academic Leaders) interacted with 4 national experts in urban education to identify and resolve several issues. The participants examined issues in four general areas: factors that impact students with disabilities in urban settings; factors related to…

  11. PREFACE: Special issue: CAMOP-MOLEC XVII Special issue: CAMOP-MOLEC XVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyutinskii, Oleg

    2009-10-01

    This special issue of CAMOP/Physica Scripta presents highlights from the scientific contributions presented at the European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems (MOLEC XVII) held on 23-29 August 2008 at St Petersburg, Russia. This meeting was the seventeenth in a series of biannual meetings that started in 1976, when the first conference was held in Trento, Italy. Subsequent meetings were held at Brandbjerg Hojskole (Denmark), Oxford (UK), Nijmegen (The Netherlands), Jerusalem (Israel), Aussois (France), Assisi (Italy), Bernkastel-Kues (Germany), Prague (Czech Republic), Salamanca (Spain), Nyborg Strand (Denmark), Bristol (UK), Jerusalem (Israel), Istanbul (Turkey), Nunspeet (The Netherlands) and Trento (Italy). In 2008, the meeting was jointly organized by scientists from the Ioffe Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St Petersburg, Herzen State University, St Petersburg, Moscow State University, St Petersburg Polytechnical University, and St Petersburg State University. About 150 scientists from 21 countries visited Pushkin, a beautiful suburb of St Petersburg near the famous palace of Empress Catherine II, and discussed the state of the art and trends in the field, as well as new methods and applications, during 24 plenary lectures, 36 hot topic talks and two evening poster sessions. A special event was the presentation of the MOLEC XVII award to Professor Grabriel Balint-Kurti for his outstanding contributions to the theory of reaction dynamics and molecular photodissociation. Further information is available from the homepage of the meeting: http://www.ioffe.ru/MOLEC17/. This special issue covers different aspects of atomic and molecular interactions, with emphasis on both experimental and theoretical studies of the dynamics of elastic, inelastic and reactive encounters between atoms, molecules, ions, clusters and surfaces. More specifically, it includes molecular collisions in different environments; plasma, atmospheric, interstellar and combustion

  12. Issues and Concerns in Special Education Microcomputing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddux, Cleborne D.

    1986-01-01

    Discussion of microcomputer use in public elementary schools focuses on the field of special education. Two main ways of using computers are described: (1) traditional uses, including administration, computer-assisted instruction, and assessment; and (2) new applications, including programming, word processing, simulations, and prosthetic aids…

  13. Introduction to Special Issue on Adolescent Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Kurt A.

    2004-01-01

    This special issue of Behavior Modification is designed to add to the literature on the behavioral assessment and treatment of CP displayed by adolescents. Contained in this issue are six empirical articles dealing with important issues on the topic. They provide examples of the richness of clinical problems classified as "conduct problems"…

  14. Issues in Children's Mental Health. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmo, Margaret L.

    This Kids Count report examines issues related to children's mental health in Virginia. The report discusses the effects of children's mental illness, presents risk and protective factors, and describes the incidence of children's mental health problems. Information specific to Virginia is presented, including the prevalence of youth suicide,…

  15. Literacy Program. National Issues Forums Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Issues Forums, Dayton, OH.

    In the spring of 1988, 33 representatives from 20 institutions or organizations sponsoring National Issues Forum (NIF) literacy programs attended a national conference in Washington, D.C. Throughout the conference, representatives from the organizations sponsoring NIF literacy programs made statements on the importance of NIF as a tool for…

  16. Introduction: Special issue on planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip; Esposito, Larry

    2016-11-01

    This issue of Icarus is devoted largely to papers presented at an open conference held at the Univ. of Colorado on 13-15 August 2014. This Planetary Rings Workshop is the fourth in a series organized by the Rings Working Group of the Cassini-Huygens mission and most of the papers presented dealt with phenomena revealed

  17. Risk, Resilience and Outcomes: Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Barbara; Shlonsky, Aron

    2011-01-01

    This commentary discusses directions for future research in child welfare. Specifically, the authors identified the need for research that tracks young people through the child welfare system, in order to best meet the needs of these vulnerable individuals. The authors also argued that the issues identified by research must be effectively…

  18. Preface of the special issue quantum foundations: information approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This special issue is based on the contributions of a group of top experts in quantum foundations and quantum information and probability. It enlightens a number of interpretational, mathematical and experimental problems of quantum theory. PMID:27091161

  19. EDITORIAL: Special issue on green photonics Special issue on green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, Allan; Brongersma, Mark; Polman, Albert

    2012-02-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells can provide virtually unlimited amounts of energy by effectively converting sunlight into clean electrical power. Over the years, significant research and development efforts have been devoted to improving the structural and charge transport properties of the materials used in PV cells. Despite these efforts, the current energy conversion efficiencies of commercial solar cells are still substantially lower than the ultimate limits set by thermodynamics. Economic arguments in addition to the scarcity of some semiconductors and materials used in transparent conductive oxides are also driving us to use less and less material in a cell. For these reasons, it is clear that new approaches need to be found. One possible solution that is more-or-less orthogonal to previous approaches is aimed at managing the photons rather than the electrons or atoms in a cell. This type of photon management is termed Green Photonics. Nano- and micro-photonic trapping techniques are currently gaining significant attention. The use of engineered plasmonic and high refractive index structures shows tremendous potential for enhancing the light absorption per unit volume in semiconductors. Unfortunately, the design space in terms of the nanostructure sizes, shapes, and array structures is too large to allow for optimization of PV cells using brute force simulations. For this reason, new intuitive models and rapid optimization techniques for advanced light trapping technologies need to be developed. At the same time we need to come up with new, inexpensive, and scalable nanostructure fabrication and optical characterization techniques in order to realize the dream of inexpensive, high power conversion efficiency cells that make economic sense. This special issue discusses some of the exciting new approaches to light trapping that leverage the most recent advances in the field of nanophotonics. It also provides some insights into why giving the green light to green

  20. Editorial: Special issue on remote sensing of light pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubé, Martin; Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2016-09-01

    This special issue contains papers related to the measurement, prediction, consequences and control of light pollution. The main underlying question of the special issue is: How remote sensing and field experiments can help us to understand and monitor light pollution? Through the papers published herein, you will find answers related to the use of remote sensing techniques as diverse as hyperspectral measurements, broadband photometry, along with DSLR color cameras image analysis.

  1. Introduction to special issue on carbon and landscape dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, Mary Ann; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    In October, 2013, at the Geological Society of America annual meeting, a theme session focused on carbon and landscape dynamics.  That event led to interest in producing a special issue in ESPL compiling papers on this subject.  The 13 papers collected for this special issue reflect the diversity of recent geomorphic research, across a range of climatic and geomorphic settings, addressing some aspect of carbon dynamics.

  2. "Special Issue": Regional Dimensions of the Triple Helix Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todeva, Emanuela; Danson, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the rationale for the special issue and its contributions, which bridge the literature on regional development and the Triple Helix model. The concept of the Triple Helix at the sub-national, and specifically regional, level is established and examined, with special regard to regional economic development founded on…

  3. Issues and Research in Special Education. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaylord-Ross, Robert, Ed.

    This compilation presents five papers on issues and research in special education. "Qualitative Research in Special Education: An Evaluative Review" (Charles A. Peck and Gail C. Furman) explicates some of the epistemological assumptions underlying qualitative research methods, reviews examples of qualitative research, evaluates the contributions…

  4. Special issue on non-Abelian gauge fields Special issue on non-Abelian gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbier, Fabrice; Goldman, Nathan; Lewenstein, Maciej; Sengstock, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    proposals for simulating Abelian LGTs, but many groups are working on extensions to the non-Abelian scenarios. The scope of this special issue of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is on all of these developments, with particular emphasis on the non-Abelian case. We invite the leading theory and experimental groups to contribute to this very special issue of the journal in order to provide a reference collection for quantum simulations of gauge fields. To summarize the key features should be Synthetic spin-orbit coupling and the physics of topological insulating phases Strongly correlated phases in non-Abelian gauge potentials Dynamical non-Abelian gauge fields and the simulation of lattice gauge theories Spin-orbit coupled BEC and vortex physics Simulators of Abelian LGTs Simulators of non-Abelian LGTs You are invited to submit your article by 15 December 2012. Expected publication: Summer 2013. Corrections were made to this article on 7 November 2012. A change was made to the affiliations.

  5. Special issues in pain control during terminal illness.

    PubMed Central

    Librach, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    Pain control is still a prime concern in managing patients with terminal illnesses, such as AIDS and cancer. I review some special issues that confront family physicians providing such care. Issues include common blocks to good pain management, understanding different types of pain, and the appropriate use of adjunct analgesic drugs and therapies. PMID:7539651

  6. Retention Issues: A Study of Alabama Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plash, Shawn; Piotrowski, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated issues that impact attrition, migration and retention of special education teachers in Alabama. The sample comprised 70 teachers designated as "highly-qualified" who responded to a job satisfaction instrument, with a focus on retention issues, developed by Levine (2001). The results indicated that the major…

  7. EDITORIAL: Special issue on High Reynolds Number Experiments Special issue on High Reynolds Number Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Yoshiyuki

    2009-04-01

    Why do we need high Reynolds number experiments? This is a question I sometimes ask myself. You may have your own answer to this question, but those people who are doing numerical simulation, theorists and experimentalists should each have their own answer. In this special issue, the leading experts present their new ideas or original experiments in response to this question. Personally, I think that high Reynolds number experiments are necessary to seek novel physics in turbulence. For instance, we do not have much information about the Lagrangian quantities. You can understand this point by reading the article 'Why we need experiments at high Reynolds numbers' by Warhaft. High Reynolds number experiments are also indispensable to reveal the universality of turbulence. One famous example is Kolmogorov's similarity hypothesis; another is the logarithmic velocity profile derived by von Kármán. They become clearly satisfied as Reynolds number increases. But there have been many arguments over these problems even in this century, thus we still have to make an effort to reveal the nature of turbulence. Kolmogorov's idea is based on small scale physics; in this sense, Mouri and Hori's paper 'Vortex tubes in turbulence velocity fields at high Reynolds numbers' is a contribution to understanding how eddy size is defined and scaled. In contrast to the universality in the small scale limit, the large scale anisotropy effect is a key factor in considering the local isotropic condition even in grid turbulence. This point is discussed by Kurian and Fransson in 'Grid generated turbulence revisited'. The mean velocity profile over a flat plate in a zero-pressure gradient boundary layer is discussed with the help of a composite profile in 'Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers' by Chauhan et al. Related important physical quantities are computed, and how they are scaled against Reynolds number is discussed, analyzing the vast experimental

  8. Special Issue: Big data and predictive computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsourelakis, P. S.; Zabaras, N.; Girolami, M.

    2016-09-01

    The motivation for this special issue stems from the symposium on ;Big Data and Predictive Computational Modeling; that took place at the Institute for Advanced Study, Technical University of Munich, during May 18-21, 2015. With a mindset firmly grounded in computational discovery, but a polychromatic set of viewpoints, several leading scientists, from physics and chemistry, biology, engineering, applied mathematics, scientific computing, neuroscience, statistics and machine learning, engaged in discussions and exchanged ideas for four days. This special issue contains a subset of the presentations. Video and slides of all the presentations are available on the TUM-IAS website http://www.tum-ias.de/bigdata2015/.

  9. Introduction to the Special Issue: Public Health Genetics and Genomics.

    PubMed

    McWalter, Kirsty; Gaviglio, Amy

    2015-06-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Genetic Counseling is dedicated to public health genetics and genomics. The seventeen papers featured in this issue span such topics as genetic counselors in public health roles, newborn screening, population screening, ethics, and health beliefs and behaviors. In this introduction to the special issue, we review some history of public health genetics and genomics, present the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "10 Essential Public Health Services" with associated genetics specific recommendations and priorities, and briefly overview how each article ties into the world of public health genetics and genomics. We hope this issue encourages genetic counselors to visualize their ever expanding and important roles in public health genetics and genomics, as well as their contributions to improving population health.

  10. EDITORIAL: Special issue on medical bionics Special issue on medical bionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Robert K.; D, Ph

    2009-12-01

    This special section of the Journal of Neural Engineering contains eight invited papers presented as part of the inaugural conference `Medical Bionics: A New Paradigm for Human Health' held in the beautiful seaside village of Lorne, Victoria, Australia from 16-19 November 2008. This meeting formed part of the Sir Mark Oliphant International Conference Series (www.oliphant.org.au) and was generously supported by the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research of the Australian Government, the Australian Academy of Science and the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering. This meeting was designed to bring experts from a variety of scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines together in a unique environment to discuss current progress in the field of medical bionics and to develop the concepts and techniques required to build the next generation of devices. The field is rapidly expanding, with new engineering solutions for neurological disorders being developed at an astonishing rate. Successful application of emerging engineering technologies into medical bionics devices requires a multidisciplinary research environment in order to deliver clinical solutions that are both safe and effective. Clinical success stories to date include spinal cord stimulators for the management of chronic neurological pain; auditory prostheses that allow the profoundly deaf to hear; and deep brain stimulation to negate movement disorders in Parkinson's disease. Other research programs currently undergoing clinical trials include devices that allow paraplegics to stand and even walk; brain-machine interfaces that provide quadriplegic patients with rudimentary control of a computer but may ultimately provide control of wheel chairs and artificial limbs; devices that detect and suppress epileptic seizures using brief trains of electrical stimulation; and retinal prostheses that will provide vision to the blind. The future for medical bionics is indeed

  11. Materials & Engineering: Propelling Innovation MRS Bulletin Special Issue Session

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Gopal

    2016-05-06

    Materials enable engineering; and, engineering in turn depends on materials to transform design concepts and equations into physical entities. This relationship continues to grow with expanding societal demand for new products and processes. MRS Bulletin, a publication of the Materials Research Society (MRS) and Cambridge University Press, planned a special issue for December 2015 on Materials and Engineering: Propelling Innovation. This special issue of MRS Bulletin captured the unique relationship between materials and engineering, which are closely intertwined. A special half day session at the 2015 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston captured this discussion through presentations by high level experts followed by a panel discussion on what it takes to translate materials discoveries into products to benefit society. The Special Session included presentations by experts who are practitioners in materials as well as engineering applications, followed by a panel discussion. Participants discussed state-of-the-art in materials applications in engineering, as well as how engineering needs have pushed materials developments, as also reflected in the 20 or so articles published in the special issue of MRS Bulletin. As expected, the discussions spanned the broad spectrum of materials and provided very strong interdisciplinary interactions and discussions by participants and presenters.

  12. Special Issue: Outcome of Anorexia Nervosa with Teenage Onset.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Regina C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The articles of this special issue report on studies of the outcomes of treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa. These studies leave no doubt about the mortality risk and debilitating nature of chronic anorexia nervosa, but they do suggest that the prognosis, given expert treatment, is favorable for the most part. (SLD)

  13. Introduction to Special Issue on Education and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiker, B. F.

    1998-01-01

    Introduces a special issue devoted to education-health linkages. The scope of coverage is quite broad. Papers treat education's connections with specific health-related behaviors, full-time employees' health insurance coverage, medical care/lifestyle choices, nurses' wage profiles, low birthweight children's capabilities, smoking decisions,…

  14. [Preface for special issue on industrial biotechnology (2014)].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dunming; Tian, Chaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology provides practical solutions to the challenges in the areas of resources, energy and environment. Based on the 7th China Summit Forum on Industrial Biotechnology Development, this special issue reports the latest advances in the fields of bioinformatics, microbial cell factories, fermentation engineering, industrial enzymes and high throughput screening methods.

  15. Special Galang Issue. Passage: A Journal of Refugee Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passage: Journal of Refugee Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    A special issue of the Journal of Refugee Education devoted to the Galang (Indonesia), site of the Overseas Refugee Training Program, contains these articles: "Origins of the Galang Program: A Historical Perspective" (Melvin E. Frarey); "'I Can't Believe I Am Flying over the South China Sea...'" (Elizabeth Tannenbaum);…

  16. Special Edition. Volume 1, Issue III, June 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Benton, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This issue of "Special Edition" contains the following articles: (1) Message from the Assistant Commissioner (Joseph Fisher); (2) Inclusion: Success in the Classroom (Benton McDonough); (3) Mid-Tennessee (Allison Davey); (4) West Tennessee (Larry Greer); (5) East Tennessee (Robert Winstead); (6) Excellence in Teaching (Paul Ayers and…

  17. Introduction to This Special Issue on Context-Aware Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Thomas P.; Dourish, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Discusses pervasive, or ubiquitous, computing; explains the notion of context; and defines context-aware computing as the key to disperse and enmesh computation into our lives. Considers context awareness in human-computer interaction and describes the broad topic areas of the essays included in this special issue. (LRW)

  18. Introduction to the special issue on joint modelling techniques.

    PubMed

    Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2014-02-01

    Joint modelling techniques have seen great advances in the recent years, with several types of joint models having been developed in literature that can handle a wide range of applications. This special issue of Statistical Methods in Medical Research presents some recent developments from this field. This introductory article contains some background material and highlights the contents of the contributions.

  19. Cognitive neuroscience of synesthesia: Introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This Special Issue of Cognitive Neuroscience showcases the latest theories and findings in research on synesthesia. The various contributions are discussed in relation to three broad themes: Models and neural mechanisms; new types of synesthesia; and cognitive profile and demographic characteristics.

  20. Anthropology and Education Quarterly. Special Issue: Anthropological Resources and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The theme of the journal of the Council on Anthropology and Education focuses on anthropological resources and teaching. Nine major articles comprise the special issue of the journal. The first article traces the development of the academic study and teaching of anthropology beginning in 1501. Although mentioned as early as the 1500s, anthropology…

  1. Special Issue: The Career Counselor, Organizational Development and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirabile, Richard J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Introduction to This Special Issue" (Mirabile); "Career Counseling for the 1990s and Beyond" (Guterman); "Career Counselor as Consultant to Organizations" (Shepard); "Managing Careers in Changing Organizations" (Schecter); "Does Your Client Need a Mentor?" (Morton, Sanzgiri); "Recognition and Treatment of Career Indecision in Adults"…

  2. Overseas Universities: Special Issue on Libraries. No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahood, Molly M., Ed.

    A special issue of Overseas Universities devoted to university libraries contains 10 articles concerning developing nations, particularly Africa. Articles cover: an architect's survey of university library problems; planning libraries in the humid tropics, with emphasis on the University of the South Pacific in Suva, Fiji; aid, funding, and…

  3. Testing Programs in Schools: What's New? A Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, L. James; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This special issue of "Catalyst", entitled Testing Programs in Schools: What's New?, was published jointly by the Nebraska Council of School Administrators and the Nebraska Association for Supervision and Curriculum. The articles emphasize desirability of designing testing programs to meet the information needs of educators and the…

  4. Introduction to special issue: moving forward in pediatric neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Daly, Brian P; Giovannetti, Tania; Zabel, T Andrew; Chute, Douglas L

    2011-08-01

    This special issue of The Clinical Neuropsychologist focuses on advances in the emerging subspecialty of pediatric neuropsychology. The national and international contributions in this issue cover a range of key clinical, research, training, and professional issues specific to pediatric neuropsychology. The genesis for this project developed out of a series of talks at the Philadelphia Pediatric Neuropsychology Symposium in 2010, hosted by the Stein Family Fellow, the Department of Psychology of the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University, and the Philadelphia Neuropsychology Society. Articles that explore clinical practice issue focus on the assessment of special medical populations with congenital and/or acquired central nervous system insults. Research articles investigate the core features of developmental conditions, the use of technology in neuropsychological research studies, and large sample size genomic, neuropsychological, and imaging studies of under-represented populations. The final series of articles examine new considerations in training, advocacy, and subspecialty board certification that have emerged in pediatric neuropsychology. This introductory article provides an overview of the articles in this special issue and concluding thoughts about the future of pediatric neuropsychology.

  5. Special issue on the spectroscopy of transient plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James; Hoarty, David; Mancini, Roberto; Yoneda, Hitoki

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical papers are invited for a special issue of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics on Spectroscopy of Transient Plasmas, covering plasma conditions produced by pulsed laboratory sources including for example, short and long pulse lasers; pulsed power devices; FELs; XFELs and ion beams. The full range of plasma spectroscopy from the optical range up to high energy bremsstrahlung radiation will be covered. The deadline for submitting to this special issue is 1 March 2015. (Expected web publication: autumn 2015). Late submissions will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue. All submitted articles will be fully refereed to the journal's usual high standards. Upon publication, the issue will be widely promoted to the atomic, molecular and optical physics community, ensuring that your work receives maximum visibility. Articles should be submitted at http://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/jphysb-iop. Should you have any questions regarding the preparation of manuscripts or the suitability of your work for this Issue, please do not hesitate to contact the J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Editorial team (jphysb@iop.org). We look forward to hearing from you and hope that we can welcome you as a contributing author.

  6. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Spin Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolen, Ton; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Sourlas, Nicolas; Wong, Michael

    2007-10-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to the subject of the conference `Viewing The World Through Spin Glasses', in honour of David Sherrington on the occasion of his 65th birthday, 31 August-1 September 2007 (http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/\\verb.~.ppzjpg/DS2007/). Invited speakers and participants at that meeting and other researchers working in the field are invited to submit a research paper to this issue. The Editorial Board has invited Ton Coolen, Hidetoshi Nishimori, Nicolas Sourlas and Michael Wong to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. Their criteria for acceptance of contributions are as follows: •The subject of the paper should relate to the subject of the conference (see the website of the conference http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/\\verb.~.ppzjpg/DS2007/). •Contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. •Conference papers may be based on already published work but should either contain significant additional new results and/or insights or give a survey of the present state of the art, a critical assessment of the present understanding of a topic, and a discussion of open problems. •Papers submitted by non-participants should be original and contain substantial new results. The guidelines for the preparation of contributions are the following: •The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 1 December 2007. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear in July 2008. •There is a nominal page limit of 16 printed pages per contribution. For papers exceeding this limit, the Guest Editors reserve the right to request a reduction in length. •Further advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical may be found at www.iop.org/Journals/jphysa. •Contributions to the special issue should, if possible, be submitted electronically by web upload at www.iop.org/Journals/jphysa or by

  7. Special issue on cluster algebras in mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Gekhtman, Michael; Kuniba, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2013-10-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to cluster algebras in mathematical physics. Over the ten years since their introduction by Fomin and Zelevinsky, the theory of cluster algebras has witnessed a spectacular growth, first and foremost due to the many links that have been discovered with a wide range of subjects in mathematics and, increasingly, theoretical and mathematical physics. The main motivation of this special issue is to gather together reviews, recent developments and open problems, mainly from a mathematical physics viewpoint, into a single comprehensive issue. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will consist of invited review articles and contributed papers containing new results on the interplays of cluster algebras with mathematical physics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Philippe Di Francesco, Michael Gekhtman, Atsuo Kuniba and Masahito Yamazaki. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: discrete integrable systems arising from cluster mutations cluster structure on Poisson varieties cluster algebras and soliton interactions cluster positivity conjecture Y-systems in the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and Zamolodchikov's periodicity conjecture T-system of transfer matrices of integrable lattice models dilogarithm identities in conformal field theory wall crossing in 4d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories 4d N = 1 quiver gauge theories described by networks scattering amplitudes of 4d N = 4 theories 3d N = 2 gauge theories described by flat connections on 3-manifolds integrability of dimer/Ising models on graphs. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers is 31 March

  8. Special issue on cluster algebras in mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Gekhtman, Michael; Kuniba, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2013-11-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to cluster algebras in mathematical physics. Over the ten years since their introduction by Fomin and Zelevinsky, the theory of cluster algebras has witnessed a spectacular growth, first and foremost due to the many links that have been discovered with a wide range of subjects in mathematics and, increasingly, theoretical and mathematical physics. The main motivation of this special issue is to gather together reviews, recent developments and open problems, mainly from a mathematical physics viewpoint, into a single comprehensive issue. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will consist of invited review articles and contributed papers containing new results on the interplays of cluster algebras with mathematical physics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Philippe Di Francesco, Michael Gekhtman, Atsuo Kuniba and Masahito Yamazaki. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: discrete integrable systems arising from cluster mutations cluster structure on Poisson varieties cluster algebras and soliton interactions cluster positivity conjecture Y-systems in the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and Zamolodchikov's periodicity conjecture T-system of transfer matrices of integrable lattice models dilogarithm identities in conformal field theory wall crossing in 4d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories 4d N = 1 quiver gauge theories described by networks scattering amplitudes of 4d N = 4 theories 3d N = 2 gauge theories described by flat connections on 3-manifolds integrability of dimer/Ising models on graphs. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers is 31 March

  9. Special issue on cluster algebras in mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Gekhtman, Michael; Kuniba, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to cluster algebras in mathematical physics. Over the ten years since their introduction by Fomin and Zelevinsky, the theory of cluster algebras has witnessed a spectacular growth, first and foremost due to the many links that have been discovered with a wide range of subjects in mathematics and, increasingly, theoretical and mathematical physics. The main motivation of this special issue is to gather together reviews, recent developments and open problems, mainly from a mathematical physics viewpoint, into a single comprehensive issue. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will consist of invited review articles and contributed papers containing new results on the interplays of cluster algebras with mathematical physics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Philippe Di Francesco, Michael Gekhtman, Atsuo Kuniba and Masahito Yamazaki. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: discrete integrable systems arising from cluster mutations cluster structure on Poisson varieties cluster algebras and soliton interactions cluster positivity conjecture Y-systems in the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and Zamolodchikov's periodicity conjecture T-system of transfer matrices of integrable lattice models dilogarithm identities in conformal field theory wall crossing in 4d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories 4d N = 1 quiver gauge theories described by networks scattering amplitudes of 4d N = 4 theories 3d N = 2 gauge theories described by flat connections on 3-manifolds integrability of dimer/Ising models on graphs. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers is 31 March

  10. Special issue on cluster algebras in mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Gekhtman, Michael; Kuniba, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2013-12-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to cluster algebras in mathematical physics. Over the ten years since their introduction by Fomin and Zelevinsky, the theory of cluster algebras has witnessed a spectacular growth, first and foremost due to the many links that have been discovered with a wide range of subjects in mathematics and, increasingly, theoretical and mathematical physics. The main motivation of this special issue is to gather together reviews, recent developments and open problems, mainly from a mathematical physics viewpoint, into a single comprehensive issue. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will consist of invited review articles and contributed papers containing new results on the interplays of cluster algebras with mathematical physics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Philippe Di Francesco, Michael Gekhtman, Atsuo Kuniba and Masahito Yamazaki. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: discrete integrable systems arising from cluster mutations cluster structure on Poisson varieties cluster algebras and soliton interactions cluster positivity conjecture Y-systems in the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and Zamolodchikov's periodicity conjecture T-system of transfer matrices of integrable lattice models dilogarithm identities in conformal field theory wall crossing in 4d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories 4d N = 1 quiver gauge theories described by networks scattering amplitudes of 4d N = 4 theories 3d N = 2 gauge theories described by flat connections on 3-manifolds integrability of dimer/Ising models on graphs. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers is 31 March

  11. Preface for the ILWS Special Issue of JASTP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Sibeck, David G.; Spann, James F.

    2011-01-01

    During the week of October 4-9,2009, about 160 participants from 19 countries met at the Itamambuca resort area of Ubatuba, Sao Paulo, Brazil to discuss the "Influence of solar variability on geophysical and heliospheric phenomena" Conference, organized by the International Living With a Star (ILWS) Program of NASA and by the National Institute of Space Research (INPE) of Brazil. This special issue collects 38 papers from that Conference, with 3 papers dealing with solar topics, 12 with interplanetary and cosmic rays,12 with magnetospheric, 9 with the low-latitude ionosphere and 2 with solar terrestrial system and climate. Furthermore six of the review papers presented at that Conference are being published in a special issue of the SpaceScience Reviews journal. The combined ensemble of papers describes the complex series of phenomena that link the Sun to the Earth.

  12. Lidar Remote Sensing for Characterizing Forest Vegetation - Special Issue. Foreword

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popescu, Sorin C.; Nelson, Ross F.

    2011-01-01

    The Silvilaser 2009 conference held in College Station, Texas, USA, was the ninth conference in the Silvilaser series, which started in 2002 with the international workshop on using lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) for analyzing forest structure, held in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Following the Canadian workshop, subsequent forestry-lidar conferences took place in Australia, Sweden, Germany, USA, Japan, Finland, and the United Kingdom (UK). By the time this Silvilaser 2009 special issue of PE&RS is published, the 10th international conference will have been held in Freiburg, Germany, and planning will be ongoing for the 11th meeting to take place in Tasmania, Australia, in October 2011. Papers presented at the 2005 conference held in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA, were assembled in a special issue of PE&RS published in December 2006. Other special issues resulting from previous conferences were published in journals such as the Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing (2003), the Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research (2004), and Japan s Journal of Forest Planning (2008). Given the conference history and the much longer record of publications on lidar applications for estimating forest biophysical parameters, which dates back to the early 1980s, we may consider lidar an established remote sensing technology for characterizing forest canopy structure and estimating forest biophysical parameters. Randy Wynne, a professor at Virginia Tech and the final keynote speaker at Silvilaser 2009, made the case that it was time to push 30 years of research into operations, along the lines of what has already been done to good effect in the Scandinavian countries. In Randy s words, it s time to "Just do it!" This special issue includes a selection of papers presented during the 2009 Silvilaser conference, which consisted of eight sections as follows: (1) biomass and carbon stock estimates, (2) tree species and forest type classification, (3) data fusion and integration, (4, 5

  13. [Preface for special issue on industrial biotechnology. Preface].

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhen; Li, Yin

    2011-07-01

    Industrial biotechnology, which employs microorganisms or enzymes to produce industrial useful products, has been considered as a promising solution for the sustainable development of society and economy. This special issue collects some recent research progresses on industrial biotechnology in China, including research articles in the field of genetic engineering, metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, physiological engineering, fermentation engineering and biochemical engineering, biocatalysis and biotransformation, as well as new biotechniques and methods.

  14. ChemDemos II Videodisc: Abstract of Special Issue 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.; Jacobsen, Jerrold J.; Houston Jetzer, Kelly; Gilbert, George; Mattes, Fred; Phillips, David; Lisensky, George; Zweerink, Gerald

    1996-09-01

    Literature Cited Moore, J. W., Jacobsen, J. J., Hunsberger, L. R., Gammon, S. D., Jetzer, K. H., Zimmerman, J. ChemDemos Videodisc, J. Chem. Educ.: Software, 1995, Special Issue 8. Jacobsen, J. J. Videodisc Browser 2.0, J. Chem. Educ.: Software, 1995, 7C, No. 2. Jacobsen, J. J. Videodisc Browser 2.0, J. Chem. Educ.: Software, 1996, 3D, No. 2. HyperCard, Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA 65014-2084. ToolBook, Asymetrics Corp., Bellevue, WA 98004.

  15. Special issue on quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators Special issue on quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Fring, Andreas; Guenther, Uwe; Jones, Hugh F.

    2012-01-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators. The main motivation behind this special issue is to gather together recent results, developments and open problems in this rapidly evolving field of research in a single comprehensive volume. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will be open to all contributions containing new results on non-Hermitian theories which are explicitly PT-symmetric and/or pseudo-Hermitian or quasi-Hermitian. The main novelties in the past years in this area have been many experimental observations, realizations, and applications of PT symmetric Hamiltonians in optics and microwave cavities. We especially invite contributions on the theoretical interpretations of these recent PT-symmetric experiments and on theoretical proposals for new experiments. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Carl Bender, Andreas Fring, Uwe Guenther and Hugh Jones. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: spectral problems novel properties of complex optical potentials PT-symmetry related threshold lasers and spectral singularities construction of metric operators scattering theory supersymmetric theories Lie algebraic and Krein-space methods random matrix models classical and semi-classical models exceptional points in model systems operator theoretic approaches microwave cavities aspects of integrability and exact solvability field theories with indefinite metric All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers will be 31 March 2012. This deadline will allow the

  16. Special issue on quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators Special issue on quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Fring, Andreas; Guenther, Uwe; Jones, Hugh F.

    2012-01-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators. The main motivation behind this special issue is to gather together recent results, developments and open problems in this rapidly evolving field of research in a single comprehensive volume. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will be open to all contributions containing new results on non-Hermitian theories which are explicitly PT-symmetric and/or pseudo-Hermitian or quasi-Hermitian. The main novelties in the past years in this area have been many experimental observations, realizations, and applications of PT symmetric Hamiltonians in optics and microwave cavities. We especially invite contributions on the theoretical interpretations of these recent PT-symmetric experiments and on theoretical proposals for new experiments. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Carl Bender, Andreas Fring, Uwe Guenther and Hugh Jones. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: spectral problems novel properties of complex optical potentials PT-symmetry related threshold lasers and spectral singularities construction of metric operators scattering theory supersymmetric theories Lie algebraic and Krein-space methods random matrix models classical and semi-classical models exceptional points in model systems operator theoretic approaches microwave cavities aspects of integrability and exact solvability field theories with indefinite metric All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers will be 31 March 2012. This deadline will allow the

  17. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Quantum Theory and Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadella, Manuel; Izquierdo, José Manuel; Kuru, Sengül; Negro, Javier; del Olmo, Mariano A.

    2007-07-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to the subject of Quantum Theory and Symmetries as featured in the conference '5th International Symposium on Quantum Theory and Symmetries', University of Valladolid, Spain, July 22-28 2007 (http://tristan.fam.cie.uva.es/~qts5/). Invited speakers at that meeting as well as other researchers working in the field are invited to submit a research paper to this issue. Please note that papers from speakers presenting contributed talks will be published separately in a volume of Journal of Physics Conference Series. Editorial policy The Editorial Board has invited Manuel Gadella, José Manuel Izquierdo, Sengül Kuru, Javier Negro and Mariano A del Olmo to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. Their criteria for the acceptance of contributions are as follows: •The subject of the paper should relate to the subject of the workshop (see list of topics in the website of the conference http://tristan.fam.cie.uva.es/~qts5/) •Contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. •Conference papers may be based on already published work but should either (a) contain significant additional new results and/or insights or (b) give a survey of the present state of the art, a critical assessment of the present understanding of a topic, and a discussion of open problems. •Papers submitted by non-participants should be original and contain substantial new results. Guidelines for preparation of contributions •The deadline for contributed papers will be 30 October 2007. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear in June 2008. •There is a nominal page limit of 16 printed pages (approximately 9600 words) per contribution. For papers exceeding this limit, the Guest Editors reserve the right to request a reduction in length. Further advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and

  18. Emerging Issues in Special Education Tort Liability: Implications for Special Educators and Teacher Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAfee, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Critical issues in tort liability that confront special educators and teacher trainers include malpractice (failure to learn), misdiagnosis, immunity, impact of a handicap on standard of care, confidentiality, access to emergency medical services, the use of aversive consequences, child abuse and corporal punishment, and school violence.…

  19. [Preface for special issue on industrial bioprocess technique front (2015)].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yingping

    2015-07-01

    Industrial bioprocess is one of the most important research fields supports the promoting of biological manufacturing industry in China, and guarantees the implementation of bioscience and biotechnology research results into the industrial applications. For improving the interconnection between academic researchers and industrial stuffs and pushing research achievement into industrial implementation, bioprocess modelling and control committee of Chinese Society for Microbiology organized two tandem conferences separately in 2012 and 2014 on the topic of "Industrial bioprocess technology", focusing mainly technique front of industrial bioprocess. A special session on industrial technique applications was hold to stimulate cooperation. The conference received many good submissions from academic and industrial sectors. This special issue is based on selected excellent papers from the submissions, together with free submissions. The special issue consists of reviews and original papers, mainly involving the aspects closely related to the bio-industrial sectors including, i) high yield strain constructing and high throughput screening; ii) optimization and modification of industrial enzymes, and iii) bioprocess modelling and high efficient scale-up method.

  20. Power and environmental assessment: Introduction to the special issue

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, Matthew; Richardson, Tim

    2013-02-15

    The significance of politics and power dynamics has long been recognised in environmental assessment (EA) research, but there has not been sustained attention to power, either theoretically or empirically. The aim of this special issue is to encourage the EA community to engage more consistently with the issue of power. The introduction represents a ground-clearing exercise intended to clarify the terms of the debate about power in the EA field, and to contribute to the development of a research agenda. Research trends in the field are outlined, and potential analytic and normative lines of inquiry are identified. The contributions to this special issue represent contrasting conceptual and methodological approaches that navigate the analytical and normative terrain of power dynamics in EA. Together, they demonstrate that power cannot be removed from EA policy or practices, and is a necessary research focus for the development of the field. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Introduces the themed section on power Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provides an overview of the papers in the themed section Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identifies research trends and directions for future research.

  1. Health psychology meets behavioral economics: introduction to special issue.

    PubMed

    Hanoch, Yaniv; Finkelstein, Eric Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Introduces the special issue of Health Psychology, entitled Health Psychology Meets Behavioral Economics. Psychologists have long been interested in understanding the processes that underlie health behaviors and, based on health behavior models that they have developed, have devised a spectrum of effective prevention and treatment programs. More recently, behavioral economists have also provided evidence of effective behavior change strategies through nonprice mechanisms in a variety of contexts, including smoking cessation, weight loss, and illicit drug use. Yet, although all are addressing similar issues, surprisingly little cross-fertilization has taken place between traditional economists, behavioral economists, and psychologists. This special issue is rooted in the assumption that collaboration between economists and psychologists can promote the development of new methodologies and encourage exploration of novel solutions to enduring health problems. The hope is that readers will be intrigued and inspired by the methodologies used in the different articles and will explore whether they might be applicable to the problems they are addressing. Collaborative efforts, although challenging and at times risky, are a promising way to produce more innovative studies, results, and interventions.

  2. Special issue on the spectroscopy of highly-charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ralchenko, Yuri; Stöhlker, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on the spectroscopy of highly-charged ions, to appear in the early summer of 2015, and invites you to submit a paper. From fusion to astrophysics to EUV lithography, highly-charged ions (HCI) are used to diagnose plasma properties, create new powerful sources of light and even verify the most fundamental theories. Since the mere creation of such multiply-stripped atoms requires extreme temperature or energies, their radiation is frequently the only physical data available to researchers. Even so, the HCI spectra provide a variety of rich and detailed information on ion properties and environment conditions. Over the last couple of decades, spectroscopy of HCI has been given a strong impetus through the development of both compact (e.g. electron beam ion traps) and large-scale (e.g. tokamaks, stellarators, storage rings) machines capable of efficiently producing atoms that are ionized fifty, sixty, or even ninety times. This, in turn, triggered the development of new experimental and theoretical techniques to measure and analyze HCI spectra and to use this radiation for plasma diagnostics. The purpose of this special issue will be to provide an extensive account of the state of the art in this thriving area of atomic physics. The covered topics, in particular, will include (but not be limited to): New experimental methods for the production and recording of HCI spectra Identification of HCI spectra Measurement of transition lifetimes Relativistic, QED and nuclear effects in HCI spectra Polarization and angular distribution of radiation Effects of external fields on HCI spectra Tests of fundamental theories Plasma spectroscopy and spectra modeling with HCI Please submit your article by 1 December 2014 using our website http://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/jphysb-iop. Submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be

  3. Personality and politics: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Lauren E; Peterson, Bill E; Zurbriggen, Eileen L

    2010-12-01

    This special issue of Journal of Personality brings together 10 original articles addressing the intersection of personality and politics. Articles build on classic traditions in political psychology by presenting both idiographic and nomothetic work on the motivational, cognitive, ideological, attitudinal, and identity correlates of many different aspects of political behavior. This work is used to understand political activism and leadership as well as everyday political behavior. We hope this collection of articles will inspire our readers to explore new investigations in personality and political psychology.

  4. Special Issue: European Conference on Surface Science 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opila, Robert L.; Ertas, Gulay

    2015-11-01

    The present Special Issue of Applied Surface Science is intended to provide a collection of peer-reviewed contributions presented at the Symposium "European Conference on Surface Science" held in Antalya (Turkey), August 31-September 5, 2014. This conference is organized annually through the joint efforts of the Surface Science Division of IUVSTA and the Surface and Interface Section of the European Physical Society (EPS). The ECOSS conference series started in 1978 in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and has been held in various cities throughout Europe during the past years. This is the first time that an ECOSS conference was held in Turkey, with the chairmanship of Prof. Sefik Suzer of Bilkent University, Ankara.

  5. Special issue on organic electronic bio-devices.

    PubMed

    Torsi, Luisa

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present editorial is to briefly summarize the current scientific and technological accomplishments in the field of organic electronic biosensors as described in the articles published in this Special Issue. By definition, a biosensor is a robust analytical device that combines a biological recognition element (e.g., antibodies, enzymes, cells) with a transducer. Organic electronic bio-devices are considered as potentially reliable substitutes of conventional and rather expensive analytical techniques employed for several applications such as medical diagnosis, food safety and environment pollution monitoring. Some insights into the selection and immobilization of recognition elements, signal amplification, fabrication techniques and analytical performance of biosensing devices will be presented.

  6. A special issue on the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Blount, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    This special issue on the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) reflects its times. At the present time, the PCMH is an aspirational model with a few pilots functioning well around the country. How long the current period of idealism, fueled by the energy of early adopters, the consensus of diverse stakeholders, and the dollars of the Affordable Care Act will continue is anybody's guess. Representing the thinking of some of the best minds in the field, the articles in this issue have an aspirational and idealistic tone as much as a descriptive and analytic one. A year ago the balance would have been tipped more toward idealism and model building and a year from now it would, in all likelihood, tip more toward model description and analysis. The authors in this volume have been personally responsible for helping to move behavioral health to a more central position in the PCMH model.

  7. Special Issue: 4th International Workshop on Space Radiation (IWSRR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    This special issue of the journal "Radiation and Environmental Biophysics" contains 20 peer-reviewed papers contributed by leading space radiation researcher's world-wide attending the 4th IWSRR. Manuscripts cover a broad range of topics ranging from radiation environments and transport in shielding and planetary surfaces to new results in understanding the biological effects of protons and high-charge and energy (HZE) nuclei on the risk of cancer, and degenerative diseases such as central nervous system effects, heart disease, and cataracts. The issue provides a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of the research in this field, demonstrating both the important results gathered in the past few years with experiments at accelerators, and the need for more research to quantify the risk and develop countermeasures.

  8. Virtual special issue: Magnetic resonance at low fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    It appears to be a common understanding that low magnetic fields need to be avoided in magnetic resonance, as sensitivity and the frequency dispersion of the chemical shift increase with increasing field strength. But there many reasons to explore magnetic resonance at low fields. The instrumentation tends to be far less expensive than high-field equipment, magnets are smaller and lighter, internal gradients in heterogeneous media are smaller, conductive media and even metals become transparent at low frequencies to electromagnetic fields, and new physics and phenomena await to be discovered. On account of an increasing attention of the scientific community to magnetic resonance at low field, we have decided to launch JMR's Virtual Special Issue Series with this compilation about Low-Field Magnetic Resonance. This topic, for which we have chosen to focus on articles reporting measurements at fields lower than 2 T, is of widespread interest to our readership. We are therefore happy to offer to this constituency a selected outlook based on papers published during the last five years (volumes 214-270) in the pages of The Journal of Magnetic Resonance. A brief survey of the topics covered in this Virtual Special Issue follows.

  9. HIV prevention research ethics: an introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Celia B

    2014-02-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics represents a sampling of projects fostered through the NIDA-funded Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Institute. The first three articles employ processes of co-learning to give voice to the experiences of individuals recovering from substance abuse and engaged in sex work who have participated in HIV prevention studies in the United States, India, and the Philippines. The fourth article describes a unique community-based approach to the development of research ethics training modules designed to increase participation of American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) tribal members as partners in research on health disparities. The last two articles focus a critical scholarly lens on two underexamined areas confronting IRB review of HIV research: The emerging and continuously changing ethical challenges of using social media sites for recruitment into HIV prevention research, and the handling of research-related complaints from participants involving perceived research harms or research experiences that do not accord with their initial expectations. Together, the articles in this special issue identify key ethical crossroads and provide suggestions for best practices that respect the values and merit the trust of research participants.

  10. Special issue: Volcanic geology of the Azores Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nunes, João Carlos; Tilling, Robert I.; Sigvaldason, Gudmundur E.

    2006-01-01

    The volcanic islands making up the Azores Archipelago rise above sea from a prominent submarine topographic high (the “Azores Plateau”), marked by the 2000-m bathymetric contour. Specifically, the Azores Islands lie at the so-called “Azores Triple Junction” (ATJ), where the Eurasian, North American, and African (or Nubian) tectonic plates meet. In general terms, the ATJ is defined by the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) separating the North American plate from the other two, and the Azores–Gibraltar fault zone separating the Eurasian and African plates. In addition, the existence of a mantle plume (“hotspot) beneath Azores Plateau has been inferred in many previous investigations. Not surprisingly, because of its distinctive plate-tectonics setting and attributes, the Azores Archipelago has been the site of intense research, serving as an ideal natural laboratory for scientific studies involving diverse disciplines, including geology, seismotectonics, climatology, ecology, and oceanography. Of course, a special field of interest and research is volcanology, with particular emphasis not only on the eruptive processes and products of the individual island volcanoes, but also of the volcanic and structural evolution of the ATJ and the “Azores Plateau” as a whole.There has been, and remains, considerable scientific debate about the dynamics of the ATJ, including the characterization of the nature and location of the involved plate boundaries, the determination of the sense and amount of plate motions, and the influence of the Azores hotspot on the involved three plates. At present, the basic nature of the ATJ is still not fully understood and the main unresolved issues are: where is the westernmost extent of Azores–Gibraltar fault zone? What is the nature of that extent? Is this fault zone a single, narrowly constricted linear boundary, or does it behave as a much larger, complex tectonic block (i.e., a “miniplate“ or “microplate”)? What is the size

  11. Special Issues of the Journal: Topics of Interest over the Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Leonore W.; Harker, H. Eugene

    1989-01-01

    Reviews special issues of the "Personnel and Guidance Journal" and its successor, the "Journal of Counseling and Development." Categorizes the topics of the special issues as evidence of trends in the history of scholarly interests in counseling and development. Lists special issues. (Author/ABL)

  12. Introduction to the special issue on molecular spectroscopy in traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, Stephan; Willitsch, Stefan; Steimle, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Trapping is a very versatile tool in many aspects of physics and chemistry. Trapping techniques are very well suited for spectroscopy studies due to the localization of the species of interest. As a result the particle density and the interaction times with photons are substantially increased with respect to other techniques. Therefore, both sensitivity and resolution benefit from this peculiar environment. Buffer gas or sympathetic cooling and mass selection are additional features applied in many trapping experiments. Thanks to these possibilities the number of spectroscopy publications based on these techniques increased substantially in the last decade. This special issue brings together some of the recent advancements in the field of molecular spectroscopy, mainly in ion traps, and demonstrates the large variety of applications, the very broad range of frequency coverage and the great potential for the field of molecular spectroscopy in general.

  13. Editorial: Special Issue (SI): International Conference on Science Education (ICSE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Zhang, BaoHui

    2014-04-01

    In the context of science education globalization, the International Conference on Science Education was held in Nanjing, China, in October 2012. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for science education researchers from China and from the rest of the world to exchange research ideas and best practices in science education. A call for papers for a special issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology was made to all conference participants, and a set of six articles was resulted from a standard peer review process. This set of six articles provides a snapshot of research in China and in some other countries, and represents a dialogue between Chinese science education researchers and science education researchers from other countries. We call for more exchange and collaboration in science education between China and the rest of the world.

  14. Introduction to Special Issue: The Retirement Career Phase across Cultures.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Megan C

    2015-06-01

    Increasingly, older workers in the United States remain in the workforce beyond retirement age, meaning the term "retirement" might include at least some form of workforce participation. Although the proportions of women and individuals from racial and ethnic minority groups working past the age of 65 has significantly increased (Wegman & McGee, 2004); few scholars have examined the retirement career phase from a multicultural perspective. This special issue will critically review vocational literature as well as provide specific recommendations for research and practice with the aim of helping scholars and practitioners conceptualize the current concerns older adults across cultures (e.g., women and racial/ethnic minorities, among others) face during retirement planning.

  15. Special Issue: Evolutionary perspectives on salmonid conservation and management

    PubMed Central

    Waples, Robin S; Hendry, Andrew P

    2008-01-01

    This special issue of Evolutionary Applications comprises 15 papers that illustrate how evolutionary principles can inform the conservation and management of salmonid fishes. Several papers address the past evolutionary history of salmonids to gain insights into their likely plastic and genetic responses to future environmental change. The remaining papers consider potential evolutionary responses to climate warming, biological invasions, artificial propagation, habitat alteration, and harvesting. All of these papers consider how such influences might alter selective regimes, which should then favour plastic or genetic responses. Some of the papers then go on to document such responses, at least some of which are genetically based and adaptive. Despite the different approaches and target species, all of the papers argue for the importance of evolutionary considerations in the conservation and management of salmonids. PMID:25567625

  16. [Preface for special issue on synthetic biology (2013)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqiang

    2013-08-01

    Synthetic biology has developed quickly worldwide. In this special issue, we reviewed its recent progresses in technologies and applications, these are: markerless knockout of chromosome genes in Streptomycetes spp. and in gene synthesis technology, in microbial genome reduction and modification, as well as genome minimization method based on metabolic network analysis and combinatorial optimization of synthetic biological systems. We also discussed photosynthetic cyanobacterial chassis, development in molecular genetic manipulation of solventogenic clostridiax. Protein budget: cost estimating criteria for synthetic biology, was also brought out for our attentions. On the application sites, some successful applications of synthetic biology were demonstrated, including design and construction of artificial biological systems for complex natural products biosynthesis, engineering the Saccharomyces cerevisiae for sclareol production, and engineering the xylose metabolic pathway for microbial production of bio-based chemicals.

  17. Special Issue featuring invited articles arising from UK Semiconductors 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Edmund; Wada, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Semiconductor research has formed the basis of many technological advances over the past 50 years, and the field is still highly active, as new material systems and device concepts are developed to address new applications or operating conditions. In addition to the development of traditional semiconductor devices, the wealth of experience with these materials also allows their use as an ideal environment for testing new physics, leading to new classes of devices exploiting quantum mechanical effects that can also benefit from the advantages of existing semiconductor technology in scalability, compactness and ease of mass production. This special issue features papers arising from the UK Semiconductors 2012 Conference, held at the University of Sheffield. The annual conference covers all aspects of semiconductor research, from crystal growth, through investigations of the physics of semiconductor structures to realization of semiconductor devices and their application in emerging technologies. The 2012 conference featured over 150 presentations, including plenary sessions on interband cascade lasers for the 3-6 µm spectral band, efficient single photon sources based on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic nanowires, nitride-based quantum dot visible lasers and single photon sources, and engineering of organic light-emitting diodes. The seven papers collected here highlight current research advances, taken from across the scope of the conference. The papers feature growth of novel nitride-antimonide material systems for mid-infrared sources and detectors, use of semiconductor nanostructures for charge-based memory and visible lasers, optimization of device structures either to reduce losses in solar cells or achieve low noise amplification in transistors, design considerations for surface-emitting lasers incorporating photonic crystals and an assessment of laser power convertors for power transfer. The editors of this special issue and the conference

  18. Special issue on ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishikawa, Akiyoshi; Martin, Fernando; Vrakking, Marc

    2013-07-01

    Your invitation to submit. Journal of Physics. B: Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics (JPhysB) is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics to appear in 2014, and invites you to submit a paper. Within the last decade, a number of novel approaches have emerged, both experimental and theoretical, that allow the investigation of (time-resolved) molecular dynamics in novel ways not anticipated before. Experimentally, the introduction of novel light sources such as high-harmonic generation and XUV/x-ray free electron lasers, and the emergence of novel detection strategies, such as time-resolved electron/x-ray diffraction and the fully coincident detection of electrons and fragment ions in reaction microscopes, has significantly expanded the arsenal of available techniques, and has taken studies of molecular dynamics into new domains of spectroscopic, spatial and temporal resolution, the latter including first explorations into the attosecond domain. Along the way, particular types of molecular dynamics, such as dynamics around conical intersections, have gained an increased prominence, sparked by an emerging realization about the essential role that this dynamics plays in relaxation pathways in important bio-molecular systems. The progress on the theoretical side has been no less impressive. Novel generations of supercomputers and a series of novel computational strategies have allowed nearly exact calculations in small molecules, as well as highly successful approximate calculations in large, polyatomic molecules. Frequent and intensive collaborations involving both theory and experiment have been essential for the progress that has been accomplished. The special issue 'Ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics' seeks to provide an overview of some of the most important developments in the field, while at the same time indicating how studies of (time-resolved) molecular dynamics are likely to evolve in the coming

  19. Big data in psychology: Introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Lisa L; Oswald, Frederick L

    2016-12-01

    The introduction to this special issue on psychological research involving big data summarizes the highlights of 10 articles that address a number of important and inspiring perspectives, issues, and applications. Four common themes that emerge in the articles with respect to psychological research conducted in the area of big data are mentioned, including: (a) The benefits of collaboration across disciplines, such as those in the social sciences, applied statistics, and computer science. Doing so assists in grounding big data research in sound theory and practice, as well as in affording effective data retrieval and analysis. (b) Availability of large data sets on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sites that provide a psychological window into the attitudes and behaviors of a broad spectrum of the population. (c) Identifying, addressing, and being sensitive to ethical considerations when analyzing large data sets gained from public or private sources. (d) The unavoidable necessity of validating predictive models in big data by applying a model developed on 1 dataset to a separate set of data or hold-out sample. Translational abstracts that summarize the articles in very clear and understandable terms are included in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms relevant to big data research discussed in the articles is presented in Appendix B. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Special cluster issue on tribocorrosion of dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Mathew T.; Stack, Margaret M.

    2013-10-01

    Tribocorrosion affects all walks of life from oil and gas conversion to biomedical materials. Wear can interact with corrosion to enhance it or impede it; conversely, corrosion can enhance or impede wear. The understanding of the interactions between physical and chemical phenomena has been greatly assisted by electrochemical and microscopic techniques. In dentistry, it is well recognized that erosion due to dissolution (a term physicists use to denote wear) of enamel can result in tooth decay; however, the effects of the oral environment, i.e. pH levels, electrochemical potential and any interactions due to the forces involved in chewing are not well understood. This special cluster issue includes investigations on the fundamentals of wear-corrosion interactions involved in simulated oral environments, including candidate dental implant and veneer materials. The issue commences with a fundamental study of titanium implants and this is followed by an analysis of the behaviour of commonly used temporomandibular devices in a synovial fluid-like environment. The analysis of tribocorrosion mechanisms of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloys in artificial saliva with different pHs is addressed and is followed by a paper on fretting wear, on hydroxyapatite-titanium composites in simulated body fluid, supplemented with protein (bovine serum albumin). The effects of acid treatments on tooth enamel, and as a surface engineering technique for dental implants, are investigated in two further contributions. An analysis of the physiological parameters of intraoral wear is addressed; this is followed by a study of candidate dental materials in common beverages such as tea and coffee with varying acidity and viscosity and the use of wear maps to identify the safety zones for prediction of material degradation in such conditions. Hence, the special cluster issue consists of a range of tribocorrosion contributions involving many aspects of dental tribocorrosion, from analysis of physiological

  1. Finally Making Good on the Promise of Qualitative Research in Special Education? A Response to the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugach, Marleen C.; Mukhopadhyay, Ananya; Gomez-Najarro, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    In this response to the special issue, we would like to offer two additional considerations to the discourse on qualitative research and special education this issue is meant to catalyze. First, we would like to further problematize the question of why qualitative research continues to be so sparsely represented in most prominent publications of…

  2. Introduction to the Special Issue: Halophytes in a changing world

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Timothy J.; Muscolo, Adele

    2015-01-01

    Climate change will bring about rising sea levels and increasing drought, both of which will contribute to increasing salinization in many regions of the world. There will be consequent effects on our crops, which cannot withstand significant salinization. This Special Issue looks at the roles that can be played by halophytes, extremophiles that do tolerate salinities toxic to most plants. In an ecological context, papers deal with the conservation of a rare species, the effects of rising concentrations of CO2 and flooding on coastal vegetation, and the consequences of tree planting in inland plains for salinization. Physiological studies deal with the different effects of chlorides and sulfates on the growth of halophytes, the ability of some parasitic plants to develop succulence when growing on halophytic hosts and the interesting finding that halophytes growing in their natural habitat do not show signs of oxidative stress. Nevertheless, spraying with ascorbic acid can enhance ascorbic acid-dependent antioxidant enzymes and growth in a species of Limonium. Enzymes preventing oxidative stress are expressed constitutively as is the case with the vacuolar H-ATPase, a key enzyme in ion compartmentation. A comparison of salt-excreting and non-excreting grasses showed the former to have higher shoot to root Na+ ratios than the latter. A particularly tolerant turf grass is described, as is the significance of its ability to secrete ions. A study of 38 species showed the importance of the interaction of a low osmotic potential and cell wall properties in maintaining growth. From an applied point of view, the importance of identifying genotypes and selecting those best suited for the product required, optimizing the conditions necessary for germination and maximizing yield are described. The consequence of selection for agronomic traits on salt tolerance is evaluated, as is the use of halophytes as green manures. Halophytes are remarkable plants: they are rare in

  3. Introduction to the Special Issue: Halophytes in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Timothy J; Muscolo, Adele

    2015-03-10

    Climate change will bring about rising sea levels and increasing drought, both of which will contribute to increasing salinization in many regions of the world. There will be consequent effects on our crops, which cannot withstand significant salinization. This Special Issue looks at the roles that can be played by halophytes, extremophiles that do tolerate salinities toxic to most plants. In an ecological context, papers deal with the conservation of a rare species, the effects of rising concentrations of CO2 and flooding on coastal vegetation, and the consequences of tree planting in inland plains for salinization. Physiological studies deal with the different effects of chlorides and sulfates on the growth of halophytes, the ability of some parasitic plants to develop succulence when growing on halophytic hosts and the interesting finding that halophytes growing in their natural habitat do not show signs of oxidative stress. Nevertheless, spraying with ascorbic acid can enhance ascorbic acid-dependent antioxidant enzymes and growth in a species of Limonium. Enzymes preventing oxidative stress are expressed constitutively as is the case with the vacuolar H-ATPase, a key enzyme in ion compartmentation. A comparison of salt-excreting and non-excreting grasses showed the former to have higher shoot to root Na(+) ratios than the latter. A particularly tolerant turf grass is described, as is the significance of its ability to secrete ions. A study of 38 species showed the importance of the interaction of a low osmotic potential and cell wall properties in maintaining growth. From an applied point of view, the importance of identifying genotypes and selecting those best suited for the product required, optimizing the conditions necessary for germination and maximizing yield are described. The consequence of selection for agronomic traits on salt tolerance is evaluated, as is the use of halophytes as green manures. Halophytes are remarkable plants: they are rare in

  4. Virtual special issue on IODP Expedition 339: The Mediterranean outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, D. A.; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Stow, Dorrik A. V.; Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    IODP Expedition 339 had two inter-related objectives to recover continuous sedimentary sequences for: (i) studying the Contourite Depositional System formed by the MOW; and (ii) reconstructing North Atlantic climate variability on orbital and suborbital time scales. This Elsevier Virtual Special Issue (VSI) ;Mediterranean Outflow; is comprised of two volumes that are roughly divided along these lines with Marine Geology devoted to (i) and Global and Planetary Change to (ii), although some papers overlap the two themes. The Marine Geology volume contains 9 contributions addressing specific aspects of IODP Expedition 339 related to contourite deposits including sedimentology, seismic interpretation, stratigraphy, physical properties, downhole logging and ichnofacies (Hernández-Molina et al., 2015; Lofi et al., 2015; Ducassou et al., 2015; Alonso et al., 2015; Takashimizu et al., 2016; Nishida, 2015; Dorador and Rodríguez-Tovar, 2015a, 2015b; Kaboth et al., 2015). The Global and Planetary Change volume consists of 18 papers described below, highlighting paleoclimatic results from sites drilled on the SW Iberian Margin and in the Gulf of Cadiz. The two volumes provide a sample of emerging results of Expedition 339 and foretell of the promising research yet to come.

  5. Editorial: Special issue dedicated to Gabor Somorjai's 80th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    This special issue of Surface Science has been prepared to honor Professor Gabor A. Somorjai on the occasion of his 80th birthday. Professor Somorjai was born on May 4, 1935 in Budapest, Hungary. In 1953 he enrolled as a chemical engineering student at the Technical University of Budapest. Gabor was an active participant in the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. When the Soviet military crushed the revolution, he had to leave the country by walking across the border with his sister and his future wife. After immigrating to the USA in 1957, he applied to begin graduate studies and was accepted at the University of California, Berkeley. Gabor received a PhD in Chemistry in 1960, only three years later. Following a short sojourn at IBM, he returned to Berkeley in 1964 to take up a faculty position in the Department of Chemistry and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which he still holds today. For the interested reader, more can be learned about Gabor's fascinating life in his autobiography, "An American Scientist: The Autobiography of Gabor A. Somorjai.

  6. Introduction to the special issue on college drinking games.

    PubMed

    Zamboanga, Byron L; Tomaso, Cara C

    2014-09-01

    Drinking games are high-risk, social drinking activities comprised of rules that promote participants' intoxication and determine when and how much alcohol should be consumed. Despite the negative consequences associated with drinking games, this high-risk activity is common among college students, with participation rates reported at nearly 50% in some studies. Empirical research examining drinking games participation in college student populations has increased (i.e. over 40 peer-reviewed articles were published in the past decade) in response to the health risks associated with gaming and its prevalence among college students. This Special Issue of The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse seeks to advance the college drinking games literature even further by addressing understudied, innovative factors associated with the study of drinking games, including the negative consequences associated with drinking games participation; contextual, cultural, and psychological factors that may influence gaming; methodological concerns in drinking games research; and recommendations for intervention strategies. This Prologue introduces readers to each article topic-by-topic and underscores the importance of the continued study of drinking games participation among college students.

  7. Primate spatial strategies and cognition: introduction to this special issue.

    PubMed

    Garber, Paul A; Dolins, Francine L

    2014-05-01

    Wild primates face significant challenges associated with locating resources that involve learning through exploration, encoding, and recalling travel routes, orienting to single landmarks or landmark arrays, monitoring food availability, and applying spatial strategies that reduce effort and increase efficiency. These foraging decisions are likely to involve tradeoffs between traveling to nearby or distant feeding sites based on expectations of resource productivity, predation risk, the availability of other nearby feeding sites, and individual requirements associated with nutrient balancing. Socioecological factors that affect primate foraging decisions include feeding competition, intergroup encounters, mate defense, and opportunities for food sharing. The nine research papers in this Special Issue, "Primate Spatial Strategies and Cognition," address a series of related questions examining how monkeys, apes, and humans encode, internally represent, and integrate spatial, temporal, and quantity information in efficiently locating and relocating productive feeding sites in both small-scale and large-scale space. The authors use a range of methods and approaches to study wild and captive primates, including computer and mathematical modeling, virtual reality, and detailed examinations of animal movement using GPS and GIS analyses to better understand primate cognitive ecology and species differences in decision-making. We conclude this Introduction by identifying a series of critical questions for future research designed to document species-specific differences in primate spatial cognition.

  8. Special issue on compact x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Simon; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Rosenzweig, James

    2014-04-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on compact x-ray sources, to appear in the winter of 2014, and invites you to submit a paper. The potential for high-brilliance x- and gamma-ray sources driven by advanced, compact accelerators has gained increasing attention in recent years. These novel sources—sometimes dubbed 'fifth generation sources'—will build on the revolutionary advance of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). New radiation sources of this type have widespread applications, including in ultra-fast imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic medicine, and studies of matter under extreme conditions. Rapid advances in compact accelerators and in FEL techniques make this an opportune moment to consider the opportunities which could be realized by bringing these two fields together. Further, the successful development of compact radiation sources driven by compact accelerators will be a significant milestone on the road to the development of high-gradient colliders able to operate at the frontiers of particle physics. Thus the time is right to publish a peer-reviewed collection of contributions concerning the state-of-the-art in: advanced and novel acceleration techniques; sophisticated physics at the frontier of FELs; and the underlying and enabling techniques of high brightness electron beam physics. Interdisciplinary research connecting two or more of these fields is also increasingly represented, as exemplified by entirely new concepts such as plasma based electron beam sources, and coherent imaging with fs-class electron beams. We hope that in producing this special edition of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (iopscience.iop.org/0953-4075/) we may help further a challenging mission and ongoing intellectual adventure: the harnessing of newly emergent, compact advanced accelerators to the creation of new, agile light sources with unprecedented capabilities

  9. Special issue on ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Fernando; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi; Vrakking, Marc

    2014-06-01

    In the last few years, the advent of novel experimental and theoretical approaches has made possible the investigation of (time-resolved) molecular dynamics in ways not anticipated before. Experimentally, the introduction of novel light sources such as high-harmonic generation (HHG) and XUV/x-ray free electron lasers, and the emergence of novel detection strategies, such as time-resolved electron/x-ray diffraction and the fully coincident detection of electrons and fragment ions in reaction microscopes, has significantly expanded the arsenal of available techniques, and has taken studies of molecular dynamics into new domains of spectroscopic, spatial and temporal resolution, the latter including first explorations into the attosecond domain, thus opening completely new avenues for imaging electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules. Along the way, particular types of molecular dynamics, e.g., dynamics around conical intersections, have gained an increased prominence, sparked by the realization of the essential role that this dynamics plays in relaxation pathways in important bio-molecular systems. In the short term, this will allow one to uncover and control the dynamics of elementary chemical processes such as, e.g., ultrafast charge migration, proton transfer, isomerization or multiple ionization, and to address new key questions about the role of attosecond coherent electron dynamics in chemical reactivity. The progress on the theoretical side has been no less impressive. Novel generations of supercomputers and a series of novel computational strategies have allowed nearly exact calculations in small molecules, as well as highly successful approximate calculations in large, polyatomic molecules, including biomolecules. Frequent and intensive collaborations involving both theory and experiment have been essential for the progress that has been accomplished. The special issue 'Ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics' seeks to provide an overview of the current

  10. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverlag, Marco; Kroesen, Gerrit; Ferguson, Ian

    2011-06-01

    The papers in this special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics (JPhysD) originate from the 12th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources and the 3rd International Conference on White LEDs and Solid State Lighting, held 11-16 July 2010 at Eindhoven University. Abstracts of all papers presented at this combined conference were published in the Conference Proceedings LS-WLED 2010 by FAST-LS, edited by M Haverlag, G M W Kroesen and T Taguchi. Special issues of the previous three LS conferences have been well-cited and have proven to be an important source of information for the lighting community. The 2010 LS-Symposium was a combined conference with the White LED Conference in order to enhance the scope of this conference series towards new light source technologies such as LEDs and OLEDs, and this co-operation will be continued in the future. Given the faster technology development in these areas it was also decided to shorten the interval between conferences from three to two years. Well over 200 invited presentations, landmark presentations and poster contributions were presented at the 2010 LS-Symposium. The organizing committee have selected from these a number of outstanding contributions with a high technological content and invited the authors to submit a full paper in JPhysD. The criteria were that the work should not be a repetition of the work already published in the Proceedings, but should be new, complete, within the scope of JPhysD, and meeting the normal quality standards of this journal. After peer review a combined set of 18 papers is published in this JPhysD special issue. In addition, a number of lighting-application-orientated papers will be published in a special issue of Journal of Light & Visual Environment later in 2011. The papers in this special issue of JPhysD show that research in the science and technology of light sources still covers a broad set of subject areas which includes both 'classical

  11. Guest Editor's introduction: Special issue on distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Rodger

    1998-09-01

    for scalability has driven different architectural designs, for example, the use of fully distributed architectures which scale well but often suffer performance costs versus centralized and hierarchical architectures in which the inverse is true. However, DVEs have also exploited the spatial nature of their domain to address scalability and have pioneered techniques that exploit the semantics of the shared space to reduce data updates and so allow greater scalability. Several of the systems reported in this special issue apply a notion of area of interest to partition the scene and so reduce the participants in any data updates. The specification of area of interest differs between systems. One approach has been to exploit a geographical notion, i.e. a regular portion of a scene, or a semantic unit, such as a room or building. Another approach has been to define the area of interest as a spatial area associated with an avatar in the scene. The five papers in this special issue have been chosen to highlight the distributed systems aspects of the DVE domain. The first paper, on the DIVE system, described by Emmanuel Frécon and Mårten Stenius explores the use of multicast and group communication in a fully peer-to-peer architecture. The developers of DIVE have focused on its use as the basis for collaborative work environments and have explored the issues associated with maintaining and updating large complicated scenes. The second paper, by Hiroaki Harada et al, describes the AGORA system, a DVE concentrating on social spaces and employing a novel communication technique that incorporates position update and vector information to support dead reckoning. The paper by Simon Powers et al explores the application of DVEs to the gaming domain. They propose a novel architecture that separates out higher-level game semantics - the conceptual model - from the lower-level scene attributes - the dynamic model, both running on servers, from the actual visual representation

  12. FOREWORD: Special issue on Statistical and Probabilistic Methods for Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bich, Walter; Cox, Maurice G.

    2006-08-01

    This special issue of Metrologia is the first that is not devoted to units, or constants, or measurement techniques in some specific field of metrology, but to the generic topic of statistical and probabilistic methods for metrology. The number of papers on this subject in measurement journals, and in Metrologia in particular, has continued to increase over the years, driven by the publication of the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) [1] and the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) of the CIPM [2]. The former stimulated metrologists to think in greater depth about the appropriate modelling of their measurements, in order to provide uncertainty evaluations associated with measurement results. The latter obliged the metrological community to investigate reliable measures for assessing the calibration and measurement capabilities declared by the national metrology institutes (NMIs). Furthermore, statistical analysis of measurement data became even more important than hitherto, with the need, on the one hand, to treat the greater quantities of data provided by sophisticated measurement systems, and, on the other, to deal appropriately with relatively small sets of data that are difficult or expensive to obtain. The importance of supporting the GUM and extending its provisions was recognized by the formation in the year 2000 of Working Group 1, Measurement uncertainty, of the Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology. The need to provide guidance on key comparison data evaluation was recognized by the formation in the year 2001 of the BIPM Director's Advisory Group on Uncertainty. A further international initiative was the revision, in the year 2004, of the remit and title of a working group of ISO/TC 69, Application of Statistical Methods, to reflect the need to concentrate more on statistical methods to support measurement uncertainty evaluation. These international activities are supplemented by national programmes such as the Software Support

  13. Preface to special issue: Granite magmatism in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; de Pinho Guimarães, Ignez; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll

    2016-07-01

    Granites are important both to the geologic evolution and to the economy of Brazil. Deposits of precious and rare metals, such as Au, Sn and many others, are directly or indirectly associated with granites, especially in the geologically under-explored Amazon region. On the opposite eastern side of the country, expanding exploitation of natural granite as dimension stone makes Brazil currently the world's second largest exporter of granite blocks. Granites are a major constituent of the Brazilian Archean-Proterozoic cratonic domains (the Amazon and São Francisco cratons) and their surrounding Neoproterozoic fold belts. The granites are thus fundamental markers of the major events of crustal generation and recycling that shaped the South American Platform. As a result, Brazilian granites have received great attention from the national and international community, and a number of influential meetings focused on the study of granites were held in the country in the last three decades. These meetings include the two International Symposia on Granites and Associated Mineralization (Salvador, January 21-31, 1987, and August 24-29, 1997), the Symposium on Rapakivi Granites and Related Rocks (Belém, August 2-5, 1995) and the Symposium on Magmatism, Crustal Evolution, and Metallogenesis of the Amazonian Craton (Belém, August 2006). Special issues dedicated to contributions presented at these meetings in the Journal of South American Earth Sciences (Sial et al., 1998), Lithos (Stephens et al., 1999), Canadian Mineralogist (Dall'Agnol and Ramo, 2006), Precambrian Research (Ramo et al., 2002) and Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências (Dall'Agnol and Bettencourt, 1997; Sial et al., 1999a) are still important references on the knowledge of Brazilian granites and granite petrology in general.

  14. Introduction to the special issue: The field tradition in geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, Carl J.; Marston, Richard A.

    2013-10-01

    In recognition of the critical role of field observations in the ongoing development of our discipline, the 43rd annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium (BGS) celebrated The Field Tradition in Geomorphology. By organizing a conference devoted to this theme, we sought to honor the contributions of pioneering, field-based geomorphologists and to encourage our community to contemplate how field work might continue to provide unique insight into a new, more technologically-driven era. For example, given recent advances in remote sensing methods such as LiDAR, what kind of added value can field work provide? Similarly, how can field-based studies contribute to societally relevant, large-scale questions related to climate change and sustainable management of the Earth system? Motivated by such questions, the 2012 BGS was convened in Jackson Hole, WY, a new, Western location that enabled participation by Rocky Mountain and west coast research groups underrepresented at previous Binghamton symposia. Also, in keeping with the field tradition theme, the 2012 BGS emphasized field trips, including a rafting excursion down the Snake River and an overview of the tectonic and glacial history of Jackson Hole. The on-site portion of the symposium consisted of invited oral and poster presentations and contributed posters, including many by graduate students. Topics ranged from an historical overview of the development of geomorphic thinking to long-term sediment tracer studies to a commentary on the synergy between LiDAR and field mapping. This special issue of Geomorphology consists of papers by invited authors from the 2012 BGS, and this overview provides some context for these contributions. Looking forward, we hope that the 43rd annual BGS will stimulate further discussion of the role of field work as the discipline of geomorphology continues to evolve, carrying on the field tradition into the future.

  15. Introduction to special issue on 'Cosmology and Time' for SHPMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosholz, Emily

    2015-11-01

    This collection of essays stems from the Workshop on Cosmology and Time held at the Pennsylvania State University on April 16-17, 2013, with support from the Department of Philosophy, the Schreyer Honors College, and the Center for Fundamental Theory/Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos. My thanks to Shannon Sullivan and Susan Welch, Arun Upneja and Christian Brady, and Abhay Ashtekar, Murat Gunaydin and Randi Neshteruk. I'd also like to acknowledge helpful counsel from Gordon Fleming (Professor of Physics Emeritus, Penn State), who has been generous with his time and expertise, and John Norton (Director, Center for History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh), who not only contributed to the workshop but also introduced me to the work of two of his graduate students. The original intention of the workshop was to pair younger scholars with older, more established scholars; during the workshop, we listened to exchanges between Bryan Roberts and Abhay Ashtekar, William Nelson and Sarah Shandera, Thomas Pashby and Gordon Fleming, David Sloan and Kurt Gibble, Elie During and myself, and Alexis de Saint-Ours and John Norton. Though some of these exchanges did not persist through the creation of this collection of essays, those that did were further developed in useful ways. I also wanted to bring philosophers and scientists together, as well as colleagues from Europe and North America. The latter intention was strengthened by the later addition of responses or essays by Jeremy Butterfield, Julian Barbour, Klaus Mainzer, and Lee Smolin, to complement the 'overview' essays by Abhay Ashtekar and John Norton that begin and end the second part. Though the thoughtful and stimulating essays and responses by William Nelson, Sarah Shandera, Kurt Gibble, Elie During and Klaus Mainzer did not survive the process of assembling this special issue, because they were too technical or did not fit in structurally or could not be revised in time, their contributions

  16. Special Education in Early Childhood. A Burning Issues Series Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego County Office of Education, CA.

    The National Preschool Coordination Project's (NPCP) Interstate Coordination Committee identified problems in finding and providing special education services for preschool migrant children. They propose training for parents and migrant staff and coordination among agencies to improve services. The NPCP Subcommittee on Special Education identified…

  17. Introduction to the 2012-2013 Tolbachik eruption special issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Benjamin R.; Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Volynets, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The Tolbachik volcanic complex in central Kamchatka holds a special place in global volcanological studies. It is one of 4 areas of extensive historic volcanic activity in the northern part of the Central Kamchatka Depression (the others being Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Shiveluch), and is part of the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group, which is one of the most active areas of volcanism on Earth. Tolbachik is especially well-known due largely to the massive 1975-1976 eruption that became known as the Great Tolbachik Fissure eruption (GTFE; Fedotov, 1983; Fedotov et al., 1984). This was one of the first eruptions in Russia to be predicted based on precursory seismic activity, based on M5 earthquakes approximately one week before the eruption started, and was intensively studied during its course by a large number of Russian scientists. A summary of those studies was published, first in Russian and then in English, and it became widely read for many reasons. One in particular is that the eruption was somewhat unusual for a subduction zone setting; although many subduction zone stratovolcanoes have associated basaltic tephra cone-lava fields, this was the first such Hawaiian-style eruption to be widely observed. After the end of the eruption in 1976, the complex showed no signs of activity until 27 November 2012, when increased seismic activity was registered by the Kamchatka Branch of the Russian Geophysical Survey and a red glow from the eruption site was first noticed through the snowstorm haze. This prompted them, and then the Kamchatka Volcanic Emergency Response Team (KVERT) to issue an alert that activity was coming from the south flank of Plosky Tolbachik volcano, the younger of two volcanic edifices (the older is Ostry Tolbachik) that together make up the bulk of the complex along with tephra cone-lava fields that lie along a NE-SW fissure zone that transects Plosky Tolbachik. The new eruption lasted for more than 250 days and, like the 1975-1976 eruption, was

  18. Research Library Issues: A Bimonthly Report from ARL, CNI, and SPARC--A Special Issue on Distinctive Collections. RLI 267

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, G. Jaia, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Research Library Issues" ("RLI") is a bimonthly report from ARL (Association of Research Libraries), CNI (Coalition of Networked Information), and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). This issue includes the following articles: (1) Special Collections at the Cusp of the Digital Age: A Credo (Clifford A. Lynch); (2)…

  19. FEMP Focus - Special Issue 2006 - EPACT 2005 and Presidential Memo

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-01

    Features information about Presidential Memorandum on Energy Conservation, Energy Policy Act 2005 Special Section, ESET FEMP Deploys Teams in Response to Natural Gas Concerns, Natural Gas Tips for Facility Managers, and more for federal agencies.

  20. The Canadian Symposium on Special Education Issues. Proceedings. (Toronto, Canada, March 4-5, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Administrators of Special Education, Inc.

    The texts of six papers presented at the Canadian Symposium on Special Education Issues are included in these proceedings. The papers' titles and authors are: "How Are We Doing? Issues and Research Related to the Integration of Students with Special Needs" (Janet Quintal); "Post-Secondary Programmes and Services for Exceptional Persons: North…

  1. 90 Minutes on a Sunday Afternoon or: The Proof of the Special MT Issue Is in...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinel, Adrian

    2002-01-01

    This article was written as a result of the author reading "MT177," a special issue dedicated to the teaching of "proof" in mathematics. He used the ideas in this special issue for planning his session "mathematical reasoning and proof," which was part of a weekend course for primary trainees. It consisted of three activities: (1) How many…

  2. Fatal Attraction: The Selling of Addiction. Special Double Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Rosalind, Ed.; Thoman, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This issue of "Media & Values" provides essays and teaching ideas for addressing the influence of the media in society and the growing incidence of addiction. Articles in this issue include: (1) "Culture of Addiction" (Rosalind Silver); (2) "Crack and the Box" (Pete Hamill); (3) "When It Comes to Drugs, Beware the Censor's Fix" (David Musto); (4)…

  3. Issues and Recommendations Concerning Vocational Assessment of Special Needs Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Michael; And Others

    Comprehensive vocational assessment needs to become an integral part of vocational programming in secondary and postsecondary schools, since it is crucial in developing appropriate individualized education plans for students with special needs. A prime focus for vocational assessment should be entrance into vocational education courses. It should…

  4. Special issue on high-resolution optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter J. S.; Davis, Ilan; Galbraith, Catherine G.; Stemmer, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The pace of development in the field of advanced microscopy is truly breath-taking, and is leading to major breakthroughs in our understanding of molecular machines and cell function. This special issue of Journal of Optics draws attention to a number of interesting approaches, ranging from fluorescence and imaging of unlabelled cells, to computational methods, all of which are describing the ever increasing detail of the dynamic behaviour of molecules in the living cell. This is a field which traditionally, and currently, demonstrates a marvellous interplay between the disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology, where apparent boundaries to resolution dissolve and living cells are viewed in ever more clarity. It is fertile ground for those interested in optics and non-conventional imaging to contribute high-impact outputs in the fields of cell biology and biomedicine. The series of articles presented here has been selected to demonstrate this interdisciplinarity and to encourage all those with a background in the physical sciences to 'dip their toes' into the exciting and dynamic discoveries surrounding cell function. Although single molecule super-resolution microscopy is commercially available, specimen preparation and interpretation of single molecule data remain a major challenge for scientists wanting to adopt the techniques. The paper by Allen and Davidson [1] provides a much needed detailed introduction to the practical aspects of stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, including sample preparation, image acquisition and image analysis, as well as a brief description of the different variants of single molecule localization microscopy. Since super-resolution microscopy is no longer restricted to three-dimensional imaging of fixed samples, the review by Fiolka [2] is a timely introduction to techniques that have been successfully applied to four-dimensional live cell super-resolution microscopy. The combination of multiple high-resolution techniques

  5. Taking Development Seriously: Critique of the 2008 "JME" Special Issue on Moral Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, John C.; Moshman, David; Berkowitz, Marvin W.; Basinger, Karen S.; Grime, Rebecca L.

    2009-01-01

    This essay comments on articles comprising a "Journal of Moral Education" Special Issue (September, 2008, 37[3]). The issue was intended to honour the 50th anniversary of Lawrence Kohlberg's doctoral dissertation and his subsequent impact on the field of moral development and education. The articles were characterised by the Issue editor (Don…

  6. The speciality fertilizer market--scope and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidlkofer, R.M.

    1993-08-01

    The specialty fertilizer market is a subset of the fertilizer market. The specialty market is characterized by high-value crops, usually with a very limited time between planting and market and subject to price variations due to quality and market timing. Additional characteristics of this market include innovations in development of new products, use of new products, and new developments and modifications in use of older products. Issues affecting this market include concerns associated with excessive nutrient runoff from irrigation. This paper focuses on the scope (including definitions) of the specialty market and issues affecting the industry.

  7. Terrestrial Carbon [Environmental Pollution: Part I, Special Issue, March 2002; Part II, Special Issue Supplement to 116/3, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Mickler, Robert; McNulty, Steven

    2002-03-01

    These issues contain a total of forty-four peer reviewed science papers on terrestrial carbon presented at the Advances in Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Inventory, Measurements, and Monitoring Conference held in Raleigh, N.C., in October 2000.

  8. Charting the Projections 1998-2008: A Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This issue on employment projections includes articles on the following: total employment in 1988, 1998, and projected for 2008; occupational groups projected to add the most jobs; industry groups projected to grow the fastest; projected changes in the major components of the gross domestic product; and projected growth and changing composition of…

  9. Youth in Northern Ireland: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a collection of articles that represent some of the research and policy analysis of key issues affecting the lives of young people currently living in Northern Ireland, which is in the midst of an unparalleled political and social transformation. The articles focus on crime, drug use, criminal justice, families, divorce, and youth…

  10. Philosophy Pursued through Empirical Research: Introduction to the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Terri S.; Santoro, Doris A.

    2015-01-01

    Many scholars have pursued philosophical inquiry through empirical research. These empirical projects have been shaped--to varying degrees and in different ways--by philosophical questions, traditions, frameworks and analytic approaches. This issue explores the methodological challenges and opportunities involved in these kinds of projects. In…

  11. SPECIAL FLES ISSUE OF "THE FLORIDA FL REPORTER."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AARONS, ALFRED C.

    HOPEFUL OF SEEKING MUCH-NEEDED SOLUTIONS TO FLES PROBLEMS, "THE FLORIDA FL REPORTER" DEVOTED ITS FALL 1965 ISSUE TO A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. HIGHLIGHTED ARE ARTICLES (1) BY FILOMENA AND GUILLERMO DEL OLMO ON A 6-PHASED APPROACH TO THE TEACHING OF STRUCTURE THAT MIGHT HELP SOLVE THE…

  12. Kaleidoscope 12. Special Issue: Arts and Humanities. Late Fall 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lydiard, Beverly W., Ed.; Norton, Natalie, Ed.

    This issue of Kaleidoscope, a magazine devoted to the exchange of ideas among schools and teachers in Massachusetts, describes 50 arts and humanities K-12 projects. These projects illustrate the premise that if the arts and humanities are to have their needed impact on a child's growth and development, they must not be treated as superimposed…

  13. Immersion Education in the Early Years: A Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Tina M.; de Mejía, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Early years' immersion education programmes can be either monolingual or bilingual, and their objectives can range from language maintenance and/or enrichment to early second language learning, depending on the context of implementation. Here we examine some of the key issues and policy concerns relating to immersion education in the early…

  14. Bilingual Resources. [American Indian Education Special Double Issue].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilingual Resources, 1981

    1981-01-01

    The double issue of the journal, "Bilingual Resources," presents nine articles pertaining to American Indian education in various perspectives, poetry by four American Indian poets, and identifies 27 publications about American Indians. Subjects of articles include: evaluation and recognition of narrative competence within peer group…

  15. Special Issue: Building Your Career Development e-Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Nine articles in this issue discuss how to develop a career development e-business, how e-business has expanded, creating a successful Web presence, doing business on the Internet, and how to take control of your career and future. (JOW)

  16. Support of Publication Costs, Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Special Issue of Deep Sea Research II Journal

    SciTech Connect

    Amy Honchar

    2012-11-12

    The contribution of funds from DOE supported publication costs of a special issue of Deep Sea Research arising from presentations at the First U.S. Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Meeting held 4-6 May, 2009 to review the US implementation plan and its coordination with other monitoring activities. The special issue includes a total of 16 papers, including publications from three DOE-supported investigators (ie Sevellec, F., and A.V. Fedorov; Hu et. al., and Wan et. al.,). The special issue addresses DOE interests in understanding and simulation/modeling of abrupt climate change.

  17. A Special Issue from the NARSTO Symposium on Tropospheric Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Watson, John G; Chow, Judith C; Edgerton, Sylvia A

    2001-11-01

    This dedicated issue of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association contains nine peer-reviewed scientific papers that were presented at the NARSTO Symposium on Tropospheric Aerosols: Science and Decisions in an International Community, held October 24-26, 2000, in Querétaro, Mexico.(1) Other peer-reviewed papers(2-9) appear in a companion issue of Science of the Total Environment to be published in February 2002. More than 130 papers were presented in platform and poster sessions at the meeting. Approximately 28% of the technical presentations dealt with topics from Mexico, and 15% related to Canada, with the remainder discussing U.S. and global topics.

  18. Introduction to the special issue on "indirect dark matter searches"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.

    2014-11-01

    The nature of cosmological dark matter finds its explanation in physics beyond the Standard Model of elementary particles. The landscape of dark matter candidates contains a wide variety of species, either elusive or hardly detectable in direct experimental searches. Even in case, when such searches are possible the interpretation of their results implies additional sources of information, which provide indirect effects of dark matter. Some nontrivial probes for the nature of the dark matter are presented in the present issue.

  19. Special issue: Cytochrome P450 structure and function: introduction.

    PubMed

    Munro, Andrew W; Leys, David

    2012-05-01

    The 17th International Conference on Cytochrome P450 Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structure was held in Manchester, UK from 26-30 June 2011. This issue of FEBS J. contains review and primary research articles reflecting the breadth of science covered at this conference, and reflecting the impact of P450-related research in fields as diverse as steroid metabolism, plant biochemistry, structural biology and biotechnology.

  20. Formation of Teachers as Leaders: Response to the Articles in This Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, William C.; Browne-Ferrigno, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    This article contains a response to three manuscripts that are part of the "JRLE" special issue entitled Developing and Empowering Teacher Leaders for Collective Leadership. Discussion of the articles, lessons learned, and implications for teacher leadership development are discussed.

  1. Handling Vagueness, Subjectivity, and Imprecision in Information Access: An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crestani, Fabio; Pasi, Gabriella

    2003-01-01

    This special issues comprises nine papers presenting a wide selection of approaches to handling subjectivity, vagueness, and imprecision in information retrieval (IR) and database management necessary for success in designing, developing and implementing effective tools for information access. (LRW)

  2. Pattern perception and computational complexity: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Fitch, W Tecumseh; Friederici, Angela D; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-07-19

    Research on pattern perception and rule learning, grounded in formal language theory (FLT) and using artificial grammar learning paradigms, has exploded in the last decade. This approach marries empirical research conducted by neuroscientists, psychologists and ethologists with the theory of computation and FLT, developed by mathematicians, linguists and computer scientists over the last century. Of particular current interest are comparative extensions of this work to non-human animals, and neuroscientific investigations using brain imaging techniques. We provide a short introduction to the history of these fields, and to some of the dominant hypotheses, to help contextualize these ongoing research programmes, and finally briefly introduce the papers in the current issue.

  3. Pattern perception and computational complexity: introduction to the special issue

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Friederici, Angela D.; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Research on pattern perception and rule learning, grounded in formal language theory (FLT) and using artificial grammar learning paradigms, has exploded in the last decade. This approach marries empirical research conducted by neuroscientists, psychologists and ethologists with the theory of computation and FLT, developed by mathematicians, linguists and computer scientists over the last century. Of particular current interest are comparative extensions of this work to non-human animals, and neuroscientific investigations using brain imaging techniques. We provide a short introduction to the history of these fields, and to some of the dominant hypotheses, to help contextualize these ongoing research programmes, and finally briefly introduce the papers in the current issue. PMID:22688630

  4. Virtual Reality and Its Potential Use in Special Education. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, John

    As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the possible contributions of virtual reality technology to educational services for students with disabilities. An example of the use of virtual reality in medical imaging introduces the paper and leads to a brief review of…

  5. Current Issues in the Neurology and Genetics of Learning-Related Traits and Disorders: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilger, Jeffrey W.

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article briefly describes each of the following eight articles in this special issue on the neurology and genetics of learning related disorders. It notes the greater appreciation of learning disability as a set of complex disorders with broad and intricate neurological bases and of the large individual differences in how these…

  6. Ethical issues in genetic counselling with special reference to haemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Vasantha

    2011-10-01

    Genetic counselling is provided in places where genetic tests are carried out. The process involves pre-test counselling as well as post-test counselling to enable the individuals to face the situation and take appropriate decisions with the right frame of mind. Major ethical principles which govern the attitudes and actions of counsellors include: respect for patient autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, or taking action to help benefit others and prevent harm, both physical and mental, and justice, which requires that services be distributed fairly to those in need. Other moral issues include veracity, the duty to disclose information or to be truthful, and respect for patient confidentiality. Nondirective counselling, a hallmark of this profession, is in accordance with the principle of individual autonomy. High prevalence of haemoglobinopathies with availability of good and sensitive carrier detection tests and prenatal diagnostic techniques makes these good candidates for population screening of carriers along with genetic counselling for primary prevention of the disease. Screening of the extended family members of the affected child, high risk communities and general population screening including antenatal women are the main target groups for planning a Haemoglobinopathy control programme. A critical mass of trained genetic counsellors who have understanding of the ethical issues and its appropriate handling with the required sensitivity is needed in India.

  7. Expanding our borders: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology's special issue on immigration.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nadine; Tummala-Narra, Pratyusha; Zárate, Michael A

    2013-07-01

    Introduces the current special issue of the journal, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. This special issue focuses on the topic of immigration and highlights the important within group differences often overlooked when immigrants are conceptualized as a homogeneous group. The articles in this journal consider a variety of microsystems, such as educational settings, ethnic and gay communities, and communities with anti-immigration laws.

  8. Special Issue of Selected Papers from Visualization and Data Analysis 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2012-01-01

    This special issue features the best papers that were selected from the 18th SPIE Conference on Visualization and Data Analysis (VDA 2011). This annual conference is a major international forum for researchers and practitioners interested in data visualization and analytics research, development, and applications. VDA 2011 received 42 high-quality submissions from around the world. Twenty-four papers were selected for full conference papers. The top five papers have been expanded and reviewed for this special issue.

  9. Inclusive Design: Building Educator Evaluation Systems That Support Students with Disabilities. Special Issues Brief. Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdheide, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    This Special Issues Brief from the Center on Great Teachers and Leaders (GTL Center) offers recommendations for the design and implementation of educator evaluation systems that support the academic and social growth of students with disabilities. Teachers of students with disabilities work closely with specialized instructional support personnel…

  10. PREFACE SPECIAL ISSUE ON MODEL EVALUATION: EVALUATION OF URBAN AND REGIONAL EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Preface to the Special Edition on Model Evaluation: Evaluation of Urban and Regional Eulerian Air Quality Models" is a brief introduction to the papers included in a special issue of Atmospheric Environment. The Preface provides a background for the papers, which have thei...

  11. Selection Pressures on Special Education Teacher Preparation: Issues Shaping Our Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Charles; Darling, Sharon M.; Doan, Kim

    2014-01-01

    In this introduction to the special issue on evolving changes in our field, we have intentionally chosen to use the power of a vastly different metaphor to promote deep reflection. Specifically, we will introduce the notion of selection pressures and its impact on an evolutionary process, illustrating how special education teacher education has…

  12. Islamic Education, Possibilities, Opportunities and Tensions: Introduction to the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waghid, Yusef; Davids, Nuraan

    2014-01-01

    If Islam continues to evoke skepticism, as it has done most intensely since 9/11, then it stands to reason that its tenets and education are viewed with equal mistrust, and as will be highlighted in this special issue, equal misunderstanding. The intention of this special edition is neither to counter the accusations Islam stands accused of, nor…

  13. Technology and Interactive Multimedia. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Ray

    As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the role of interactive multimedia, especially the digital, optical compact disc technologies, in providing instructional services to special education students. An overview identifies technological and economic trends,…

  14. Guest editorial: Special issue micro-and nanomachines.

    DOE PAGES

    Sanchez, Samuel; Paxton, Walter F.; Nitta, Takahiro

    2015-04-01

    The articles in this special section focus on the technologies and applications supported by micro- and nanomachines. The world of artificial micro- and nanomachines has greatly expanded over the last few years to include a range of disciplines from chemistry, physics, biology, to micro/nanoengineering, robotics, and theoretical physics. The dream of engineering nanomachines involves fabricating devices that mimic the mechanical action of biological motors that operate over multiple length scales: from molecular-scale enzymes and motors such as kinesins to the micro-scale biomachinery responsible for the motility of tiny organisms such as the flagella motors of E. coli. However, the designmore » and fabrication of artificial nano- and micromachines with comparable performance as their biological counterparts is not a straightforward task. It requires a detailed understanding of the basic principles of the operation of biomotors and mechanisms that couple the dissipation of energy to mechanical motion. Furthermore, micro engineering and microfabrication knowledge is required in order to design efficient, small and even smart micro- and nanomachines.« less

  15. Guest editorial: Special issue micro-and nanomachines.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Samuel; Paxton, Walter F.; Nitta, Takahiro

    2015-04-01

    The articles in this special section focus on the technologies and applications supported by micro- and nanomachines. The world of artificial micro- and nanomachines has greatly expanded over the last few years to include a range of disciplines from chemistry, physics, biology, to micro/nanoengineering, robotics, and theoretical physics. The dream of engineering nanomachines involves fabricating devices that mimic the mechanical action of biological motors that operate over multiple length scales: from molecular-scale enzymes and motors such as kinesins to the micro-scale biomachinery responsible for the motility of tiny organisms such as the flagella motors of E. coli. However, the design and fabrication of artificial nano- and micromachines with comparable performance as their biological counterparts is not a straightforward task. It requires a detailed understanding of the basic principles of the operation of biomotors and mechanisms that couple the dissipation of energy to mechanical motion. Furthermore, micro engineering and microfabrication knowledge is required in order to design efficient, small and even smart micro- and nanomachines.

  16. 17 CFR 140.74 - Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40. 140.74 Section 140.74 Commodity and Securities... COMMISSION Functions § 140.74 Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form... authority to issue special calls under Commission Rule 18.00 for series 03 reports, and under...

  17. 17 CFR 140.74 - Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40. 140.74 Section 140.74 Commodity and Securities... Functions § 140.74 Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40. (a) The... issue special calls under Commission Rule 18.00 for series 03 reports, and under Commission Rule...

  18. 17 CFR 140.74 - Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40. 140.74 Section 140.74 Commodity and Securities... Functions § 140.74 Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40. (a) The... issue special calls under Commission Rule 18.00 for series 03 reports, and under Commission Rule...

  19. 17 CFR 140.74 - Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40. 140.74 Section 140.74 Commodity and Securities... Functions § 140.74 Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40. (a) The... issue special calls under Commission Rule 18.00 for series 03 reports, and under Commission Rule...

  20. 17 CFR 140.74 - Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40. 140.74 Section 140.74 Commodity and Securities... Functions § 140.74 Delegation of authority to issue special calls for Series 03 Reports and Form 40. (a) The... issue special calls under Commission Rule 18.00 for series 03 reports, and under Commission Rule...

  1. SPECIAL ISSUE OF ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT FOR PARTICULATE MATTER SUPERSITES PROGRAM AND RELATED STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This special issue of Atmospheric Environment provides a selection of papers that were presented at the 2005 AAAR PM Supersites Program and Related Studies International Specialty Conference held in Atlanta, GA, 7-11 February 2005. Topics of papers in this issue range from the e...

  2. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #21: PUBLICATION OF SPECIAL ISSUE OF "CLIMATE RESEARCH"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 21st edition of Global Change Research News announces the publication of a Special Issue of the journal Climate Research entitled, 'Mid-Atlantic Regional Assessment of Climate Change Impacts'. This issue contains 11 papers that are products of the EPA-sponsored Mid-Atlant...

  3. Will These Trees "Ever" Bear Fruit? A Response to the Special Issue on Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Alexander C.; McClenney, Kay

    2012-01-01

    The authors articulate objections to the organization of the recent special issue on student engagement and respond in detail to three criticisms leveled in that issue. Situating their response relative to longstanding calls to make research more relevant to practice, they argue that the validity critique inappropriately focuses on criterion…

  4. Conceptual Metaphor and Embodied Cognition in Science Learning: Introduction to Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amin, Tamer G.; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Haglund, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of "International Journal of Science Education" is based on the theme "Conceptual Metaphor and Embodied Cognition in Science Learning." The idea for this issue grew out of a symposium organized on this topic at the conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA) in September 2013.…

  5. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, R.A.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.; Davis, C.

    1995-08-01

    This document is appendices D-J for the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise: Issues and Lessons Learned. Included are discussions of the US IAEA Treaty, safeguard regulations for nuclear materials, issue sheets for the PUREX process, and the LANL follow up activity for reprocessing nuclear materials.

  6. Self and Identity in Early Adolescence: Some Reflections and an Introduction to the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Seth J.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews contemporary issues in the study of self and identity and introduces the special issue. Particularly highlighted are the need to integrate the various currents in self and identity, the need to study the role of context in the development of self and identity, research on self and identity in ethnic minority and international…

  7. Special issue: Behavioral Economics and Health Annual Symposium.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    The application of behavioral economics to health and health care has captured the imagination of policymakers across the political spectrum. The idea is that many people are irrational in predictable ways, and that this both contributes to unhealthy behaviors like smoking and holds one of the keys to changing those behaviors. Because health care costs continue to increase, and a substantial portion of costs are incurred because of unhealthy behaviors, employers and insurers have great interest in using financial incentives to change behaviors. However, it is in the details that complexity and controversies emerge. Who should the targets be, and what outcomes should be rewarded? How should incentives be structured, to maximize their effectiveness and minimize unintended consequences? In what situations should we be intervening to affect decisions by people who may prefer to be obese or to smoke, and in what situations should we accept their preferences? To begin to answer these questions, the Penn-CMU Roybal P30 Center on Behavioral Economics and Health held its first annual Behavioral Economics and Health Symposium on March 24-25, 2011 with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The symposium drew more than 50 researchers, scholars, and health professionals from a variety of disciplines, including medicine, public health, economics, law, management, marketing, and psychology. They heard perspectives on behavioral economics from public and private funders, the CEO of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and the CEO of stickK.com, a start-up company that uses online, voluntary commitment contracts to help people achieve their goals. Participants formed eight working groups to review the current state-of-the-art in a variety of clinical contexts and to consider how behavioral economics could inform a research agenda to improve health. This Issue Brief summarizes the findings of these working groups and the symposium.

  8. Special issues in brain plasticity, repair and rehabilitation: 20 years of a publishing strategy.

    PubMed

    Sabel, B A; Matzke, S; Prilloff, S

    2010-01-01

    The journal Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience (RNN) is focused on the emerging field of brain plasticity, repair and rehabilitation, including original and review papers both in basic research (in vitro studies, animal experiments) and in the clinical domain, including brain imaging studies. The publication of special issues on vital topics, summarizing the work of leading experts in the field of restoration and plasticity has become a major strategy of RNN and has attracted worldwide attention. Special issues are typically organized by specialized guest-editors familiar with the respective science field. Special issues cover a particular sub-discipline and often contain laboratory review papers. The first special issue appeared in 1990, and until today RNN has published a total of 25 special issues on a variety of basic science and clinical matters. In this way, RNN promotes the dissemination of information in the field of neuroplasticity, repair and rehabilitation, providing the reader with up-to-date information prepared by leading experts in the field.

  9. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Current Trends in Integrability and Non Linear Phenomena Special issue on Current Trends in Integrability and Non Linear Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ullate, D.; Lombardo, S.; Mañas, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Nijhoff, F.; Sommacal, M.

    2009-12-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to integrability and nonlinear phenomena. The motivation behind this special issue is to summarize in a single comprehensive publication, the main aspects (past and present), latest developments, different viewpoints and the directions being followed in this multidisciplinary field. We hope that such a special issue could become a particularly valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in integrability and nonlinear phenomena. Editorial policy The Editorial Board has invited D Gómez-Ullate, S Lombardo, M Mañas, M Mazzocco, F Nijhoff and M Sommacal to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. Their criteria for the acceptance of contributions are as follows. The subject of the paper should relate to the following list of subjects: Integrable systems (including quantum and discrete) and applications Dynamical systems: Hamiltonian systems and dynamics in the complex domain Nonlinear waves, soliton equations and applications Nonlinear ODEs including Painlevé equations and isomonodromic deformations Symmetries and perturbative methods in the classification of integrable PDEs Infinite dimensional Lie algebras and integrable systems Orthogonal Polynomials, Random Matrix Theory All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The DEADLINE for contributed papers will be 28 February 2010. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear in October 2010. There is a nominal page limit of 15 printed pages per contribution (invited review papers can be longer). For papers exceeding this limit, the Guest Editors reserve the right to request a reduction in length. Further advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical

  10. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Current Trends in Integrability and Non Linear Phenomena Special issue on Current Trends in Integrability and Non Linear Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ullate, D.; Lombardo, S.; Mañas, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Nijhoff, F.; Sommacal, M.

    2009-11-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to integrability and nonlinear phenomena. The motivation behind this special issue is to summarize in a single comprehensive publication, the main aspects (past and present), latest developments, different viewpoints and the directions being followed in this multidisciplinary field. We hope that such a special issue could become a particularly valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in integrability and nonlinear phenomena. Editorial policy The Editorial Board has invited D Gómez-Ullate, S Lombardo, M Mañas, M Mazzocco, F Nijhoff and M Sommacal to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. Their criteria for the acceptance of contributions are as follows. The subject of the paper should relate to the following list of subjects: Integrable systems (including quantum and discrete) and applications Dynamical systems: Hamiltonian systems and dynamics in the complex domain Nonlinear waves, soliton equations and applications Nonlinear ODEs including Painlevé equations and isomonodromic deformations Symmetries and perturbative methods in the classification of integrable PDEs Infinite dimensional Lie algebras and integrable systems Orthogonal Polynomials, Random Matrix Theory All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The DEADLINE for contributed papers will be 28 February 2010. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear in October 2010. There is a nominal page limit of 15 printed pages per contribution (invited review papers can be longer). For papers exceeding this limit, the Guest Editors reserve the right to request a reduction in length. Further advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical

  11. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Current Trends in Integrability and Nonlinear Phenomena Special issue on Current Trends in Integrability and Nonlinear Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ullate, D.; Lombardo, S.; Mañas, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Nijhoff, F.; Sommacal, M.

    2009-12-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to integrability and nonlinear phenomena. The motivation behind this special issue is to summarize in a single comprehensive publication, the main aspects (past and present), latest developments, different viewpoints and the directions being followed in this multidisciplinary field. We hope that such a special issue could become a particularly valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in integrability and nonlinear phenomena. Editorial policy The Editorial Board has invited D Gómez-Ullate, S Lombardo, M Mañas, M Mazzocco, F Nijhoff and M Sommacal to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. Their criteria for the acceptance of contributions are as follows. The subject of the paper should relate to the following list of subjects: Integrable systems (including quantum and discrete) and applications Dynamical systems: Hamiltonian systems and dynamics in the complex domain Nonlinear waves, soliton equations and applications Nonlinear ODEs including Painlevé equations and isomonodromic deformations Symmetries and perturbative methods in the classification of integrable PDEs Infinite dimensional Lie algebras and integrable systems Orthogonal polynomials, random matrix theory All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The DEADLINE for contributed papers will be 28 February 2010. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear in October 2010. There is a nominal page limit of 15 printed pages per contribution (invited review papers can be longer). For papers exceeding this limit, the Guest Editors reserve the right to request a reduction in length. Further advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical

  12. Introduction to the special issue: drugs, wars, military personnel, and veterans.

    PubMed

    Golub, Andrew; S Bennett, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    This special issue examines major structural, sociocultural, and behavioral issues surrounding substance use and misuse among U.S. military personnel and veterans who served in recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This introduction provides a brief historical review of the US's experiences of the linkages between war and substance use, misuse, and abuse. It then describes how the various topics covered in this issue span the military-veteran life course and explains the significance of each contribution.

  13. Special Issue on "Neutrino Oscillations: Celebrating the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015" in Nuclear Physics B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsson, Tommy

    2016-07-01

    In 2015, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Takaaki Kajita from the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration and Arthur B. McDonald from the SNO Collaboration ;for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass;. Furthermore, the Daya Bay, K2K and T2K, KamLAND, SNO, and Super-Kamiokande Collaborations shared the Fundamental Physics Breakthrough Prize the same year. In order to celebrate this successful and fruitful year for neutrino oscillations, the editors and the publisher of Nuclear Physics B decided to publish a Special Issue on neutrino oscillations. We invited prominent scientists in the area of neutrino physics that relates to neutrino oscillations to write contributions for this Special Issue, which was open to both original research articles as well as review articles. The authors of this Special Issue consist of e.g. the two Nobel Laureates, International Participants of the Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden (August 19-24, 2004), selected active researchers, and members from large experimental collaborations with major results in the last ten years. In total, this Special Issue consists of 28 contributions. Please note that the cover of this Special Issue contains a figure from each of the 26 contributions that have figures included.

  14. To Cultivate the Positive...Introduction to the Special Issue on Schooling and Mental Health Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeser, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces issue of collected articles that work towards providing an integration of and across-fertilization between education- and mental health-oriented theory, research, and school-based practice. The articles seek to show how academic and social-emotional assets and problems are interrelated and how schools have a role in their development…

  15. Requisition and Issue of Supplies and Equipment: Special Authorization and Procedures for Issues, Sales, and Loans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    a passenger forecast to be submitted to AMC–AF. (2) Providing Military Traffic Management Command ( MTMC ) an information copy of the passenger...r , M T M C , A T T N : MTMC –PTO–P, Washington, DC 20315–5050. (3) Issuing each passenger a DD Form 1482–1 (AMC–AF Transportation Authorization) for...assurance of Scout group integrity. Surface transportation will normally be used for travel within an overseas area. f. The responsibilities of the MTMC

  16. Special issue dedicated to the first Q-bio conference on cellular information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek, William S; Jiang, Yi; Wall, Michael E; Nemenman, Ilya M

    2008-01-01

    The original idea of this special issue was to document a representative selection of the work presented at the conference in one place and to provide a snapshot of the q-bio field. However, we must acknowledge that this idea was only partially realized. The papers in this special issue are biased toward the theoretical and computational end of the q-bio spectrum, even though they are contributed by researchers dedicated to the q-bio ideal of complete stories and include contributions from research groups that are well known for their experimental work. Like the conference itself, this special issue was something of an experiment, as papers generally do not accompany presentations at biological meetings to the same extent as in other fields, such as computer science. Thus, the contributors of the papers collected here are truly pioneers.

  17. Introduction to This Special Issue on Geostatistics and Geospatial Techniques in Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, Peter; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The germination of this special Computers & Geosciences (C&G) issue began at the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) (RGS-IBG) annual meeting in January 1997 held at the University of Exeter, UK. The snow and cold of the English winter were tempered greatly by warm and cordial discussion of how to stimulate and enhance cooperation on geostatistical and geospatial research in remote sensing 'across the big pond' between UK and US researchers. It was decided that one way forward would be to hold parallel sessions in 1998 on geostatistical and geospatial research in remote sensing at appropriate venues in both the UK and the US. Selected papers given at these sessions would be published as special issues of C&G on the UK side and Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing (PE&RS) on the US side. These issues would highlight the commonality in research on geostatistical and geospatial research in remote sensing on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. As a consequence, a session on "Geostatistics and Geospatial Techniques for Remote Sensing of Land Surface Processes" was held at the RGS-IBG annual meeting in Guildford, Surrey, UK in January 1998, organized by the Modeling and Advanced Techniques Special Interest Group (MAT SIG) of the Remote Sensing Society (RSS). A similar session was held at the Association of American Geographers (AAG) annual meeting in Boston, Massachusetts in March 1998, sponsored by the AAG's Remote Sensing Specialty Group (RSSG). The 10 papers that make up this issue of C&G, comprise 7 papers from the UK and 3 papers from the LIS. We are both co-editors of each of the journal special issues, with the lead editor of each journal issue being from their respective side of the Atlantic. The special issue of PE&RS (vol. 65) that constitutes the other half of this co-edited journal series was published in early 1999, comprising 6 papers by US authors. We are indebted to the International Association for Mathematical

  18. Special Issue of Solid-State Electronics, dedicated to EUROSOI-ULIS 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2017-02-01

    The current special issue of Solid-State Electronics includes 29 extended papers presented at the 2016 Second Joint International EUROSOI Workshop and International Conference on Ultimate Integration on Silicon (EUROSOI-ULIS 2016) held in Wien, Austria, on January 25-27, 2016. The papers entering to the special issue have been selected by the EUROSOI-ULIS 2016 Technical Program Committee based on the excellence of abstracts submitted and presentations delivered at the conference. In order to comply with the high standards of Solid-State Electronics the manuscripts went through the standard reviewing procedure.

  19. Introduction to the Special Issue: Precarious Solidarity-Preferential Access in Canadian Health Care.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lynette

    2017-01-10

    Systems of universal health coverage may aspire to provide care based on need and not ability to pay; the complexities of this aspiration (conceptual, practical, and ethical) call for normative analysis. This special issue arises in the wake of a judicial inquiry into preferential access in the Canadian province of Alberta, the Vertes Commission. I describe this inquiry and set out a taxonomy of forms of differential and preferential access. Papers in this special issue focus on the conceptual specification of health system boundaries (the concept of medical need) and on the normative questions raised by complex models of funding and delivery of care, where patients, providers, and services cross system boundaries.

  20. Beliefs and expectancies in legal decision making: an introduction to the Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    McAuliff, Bradley D.; Bornstein, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    This introduction describes what the co-editors believe readers can expect in this Special Issue. After beliefs and expectancies are defined, examples of how these constructs influence human thought, feeling, and behavior in legal settings are considered. Brief synopses are provided for the Special Issue papers on beliefs and expectancies regarding alibis, children’s testimony behavior, eyewitness testimony, confessions, sexual assault victims, judges’ decisions in child protection cases, and attorneys’ beliefs about jurors’ perceptions of juvenile offender culpability. Areas for future research are identified, and readers are encouraged to discover new ways that beliefs and expectancies operate in the legal system. PMID:24348006

  1. Behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Alan J; Nezu, Arthur M

    2013-04-01

    This issue represents the 4th Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology special issue on behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology over the past 4 decades. Recent developments in health care policy, as well as in the maturation of the science, make a special issue in this area particularly timely. This collection includes state of the clinical science reviews, reports of clinical trials, and articles addressing theory and methods in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology. A multilevel, ecological perspective that considers multiple levels of influences (e.g., cultural influences on behavior-health linkages, individual differences) is salient throughout many of the articles. Our hope is that this sampling of this broad field, and coverage of some key issues and areas, will play a role in stimulating the next 10 years of research, practice, and policy implementation in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology.

  2. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue: One hundred years of PVI, the Fuchs Painlevé equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, P. A.; Joshi, N.; Mazzocco, M.; Nijhoff, F. W.; Noumi, M.

    2005-10-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General entitled `One hundred years of Painlevé VI, the Fuchs Painlevé equation'. The motivation behind this special issue is to celebrate the centenary of the discovery of this famous differential equation. The Editorial Board has invited P A Clarkson, N Joshi, M Mazzocco, F W Nijhoff and M Noumi to serve as Guest Editors for the issue. The nonlinear ordinary differential equation, which is nowadays known as the Painlevé VI (PVI) equation, is one of the most important differential equations in mathematical physics. It was discovered 100 years ago by Richard Fuchs (son of the famous mathematician Lazarus Fuchs) and reported for the first time in Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences Paris 141 555 8 (1905). Gambier, in his seminal paper of 1906, included this equation as the top equation in the list of what are now known as the six Painlevé transcendental equations. The Painlevé list emerged from the work on the classification of all ordinary second-order differential equations whose general solution are `uniform', in the sense that there are no movable (i.e. as a function of the initial data) singularities (meaning branch points) worse than poles. The latter is known as the Painlevé property. As the top equation in the Painlevé list of transcendental equations, the importance of PVI can be appreciated by recognizing that this is a universal differential equation, which is the most general (in terms of number of free parameters) of the known second order ODEs defining nonlinear special functions. As such, parallels can be drawn between the role played by PVI transcendents in the nonlinear case and the hypergeometric functions at the linear level. In fact, the monograph From Gauss to Painlevé by K Iwasaki, H Kimura, S Shimomura and M Yoshida (Vieweg, 1991), draws very clearly the line stretching over more than 150 years of special function theory in which PVI is

  3. The language of written language: an introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Stephen R

    2002-01-01

    This special issue includes five articles dealing with selected aspects of writing disorders, crafted by key contributors to the literature on written language. Articles addressing definitional issues and diagnostic questions, assessment strategies, selected neurodevelopmental components of written expression, the manifestation of writing problems in children and young adults, direct intervention, training for elementary teachers in the early grades in the area of literacy, and brain-behavior linkages are presented. This introduction provides an overview of these articles tied to specific issues confronting the field of written language. Some thoughts and directions for the future are articulated.

  4. SPECIAL ISSUE VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY IMMUNOPATHOLOGY: PROCEEDINGS 8TH INTERNATIONAL VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the Special Issue of Vet. Immunol. Immunopathol. that summarizes the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto, Brazil. The 8 th IVIS highlighted the importance of veterinary immunology for animal health, vaccinology, reproducti...

  5. "Children, Youth and Environments" (CYE) Announces a Special Issue on Greening Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailie, Patti; Rosenow, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The collection of papers contained in this special issue was elicited by a worldwide call for papers to explore settings that provided nature experiences for young children, with attention given to the effects that these initiatives have on the holistic development and environmental awareness of the children, as well as impacts on the teachers and…

  6. United States Special Operations Command Strategic Issues for the Long War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    for USSOCOM’s campaign plan. UNITED STATES SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND STRATEGIC ISSUES FOR THE LONG WAR World order is more fundamental and primordial ... Soup to Nuts: Understanding the Elements of the Strategy The United States is a big, lumbering, pluralistic, affluent, liberal, democratic

  7. Introduction to the special issue: GIS-based mineral potential targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Mahyar; Nykänen, Vesa

    2017-04-01

    Mineral potential targeting using geographical information system is an efficient technique to delimit a study area for further exploration of mineral deposits. This introduction presents an overview of the mineral potential modeling methods and future perspectives of research in the fields of target generation and summarizes the papers that have been incorporated into this Special Issue of the Journal of African Earth Sciences.

  8. Signifying "Students", "Teachers" and "Mathematics": A Reading of a Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tony

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines a Special Issue of "Educational Studies in Mathematics" comprising research reports centred on Peircian semiotics in mathematics education, written by some of the major authors in the area. The paper is targeted at inspecting how subjectivity is understood, or implied, in those reports. It seeks to delineate how the conceptions…

  9. New Trends and Directions in Ethnic Identity among Internationally Transracially Adopted Persons: Summary of Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosnati, Rosa; Pinderhughes, Ellen E.; Baden, Amanda L.; Grotevant, Harold D.; Lee, Richard M.; Mohanty, Jayashree

    2015-01-01

    The collective findings of the six articles in this special issue highlight the importance of ethnic-racial socialization and ethnic identity among international transracial adoptees (ITRAs). A multidimensional developmental phenomenon, ethnic identity intersects with other identities, notably adoptive identity. Family, peers, community, and host…

  10. Learning to Teach: Practice-Based Preparation in Teacher Education. Special Issues Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Amber; Holdheide, Lynn; Brownell, Mary; Foley, Abigail Marshall

    2016-01-01

    This Special Issues Brief from the Collaboration for Effective Educator Development, Accountability and Reform (CEEDAR Center) and the Center on Great Teachers and Leaders (GTL Center) outlines essential features for providing high-quality, structured, and sequenced opportunities to practice within teacher preparation programs. This brief is…

  11. Framework for Asynchronous Discussion Design Decisions: Applied Principles from Special Issue Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Barbara L.

    2011-01-01

    After a discussion of the state of both misaligned and informative online and distance education research, the authors in this special issue (hereafter called the collective) extract evidence-based principles about strategies that work. Both are addressed in this article. First, their criticisms centered on the value of comparative research. Those…

  12. The Perspectives of Policy Researchers: A Synthesis of Special Issue Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullin, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the divergent perspectives found across the 14 articles written by individuals from three types of policy research organizations--think tanks, regional collaborative organizations, and university-based institutes and centers--for this special issue of the "Community College Journal of Research and Practice." It…

  13. Contributions to the Content Analysis of Gender Roles: An Introduction to a Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Lucy; Linz, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    This special issue on gender-related content analysis is the second of two parts (see Rudy et al. 2010b). The current special issue is more diverse than was the first in the number of countries that are represented and in the variety of media genres and content types that are included. The primary aim of this paper is to outline some of the contributions of the individual papers in this second special issue. Some of these advancements and innovations include (a) examining underresearched measures, countries, time spans, sexual orientations, and individual media programs; (b) addressing both international and intranational differences in gender-role portrayals; (c) comparing multiple content formats within the same media unit; (d) updating past findings to take into consideration the current media landscape; (e) employing established measures in novel ways and novel contexts; (f) uncovering limitations in established intercultural measures and media-effects theories; (g) suggesting variables that could predict additional differences in gender-role portrayals; (h) adopting virtually identical methods and measures across distinct content categories in order to facilitate comparisons; (i) conducting multiple tests of a given hypothesis; (j) examining, from multiple perspectives, the implications of racial differences in gender portrayals; and (k) examining the implications of underrepresentation of women and the perspectives that women hold. In addition to the original content-analytical research presented in this special issue, two reviews, one methodological and the other analytical, offer recommendations of procedures and perspectives to be implemented in future research. PMID:21423330

  14. Special Issues Analysis Center Annual Report: Year One. Volumes I-V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    The Special Issues Analysis Center (SIAC) provides technical assistance to the Department of Education's Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs (OBEMLA) in its mission of serving limited-English-proficient (LEP) students. The SIAC carries out data gathering and analysis, research, and other support services to inform OBEMLA…

  15. VLSI Technology: Impact and Promise. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayoumi, Magdy

    As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the implications of very large scale integrated (VLSI) technology. The first section reviews the development of educational technology, particularly microelectronics technology, from the 1950s to the present. The implications…

  16. Introduction to the Toxin Reviews Special Issue "Aspergillus, Aflatoxin, Cyclopiazonic Acid, and Biological Control"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue of Toxin Reviews, “Aspergillus, Aflatoxin, CPA and Biological Control of Aflatoxin", is different from previous publications because it focuses on solving the problem of mycotoxin contamination through the use of biological control strains of Aspergillus, which is applicable to th...

  17. Implementation of Treatments in Research and Practice: Commentary on the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noell, George H.

    2014-01-01

    The articles presented in this special issue both advance what is currently known about treatment implementation in research and practice and illuminate what remains unknown. This article provides a commentary selectively linking current findings to prior research to make arguments regarding those facts that are well established and the gaps in…

  18. When a Student Does Not Qualify for Special Education: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Edward; Stephens, Tammy L.; Lindt, Suzanne F.

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe the issues that assessment specialists confront when a student referred for special education testing does not qualify for services. This article reviews some of the causes for students not meeting the eligibility requirements and concludes with recommendations to prevent as well as respond appropriately when a designation of…

  19. Diversity in Teacher Education and Special Education: The Issues that Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Dudley-Marling, Curt

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the enduring fissure between general and special teacher education by focusing directly on the issues that divide these two fields. In the first part of the article, the authors describe their individual and shared positionalities as scholars and practitioners. Then the article examines differences in the disciplinary…

  20. Introduction to the special issue on lesbians of African descent: contemporary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bianca D M; Johnson, Verlena L

    2011-01-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the special issue entitled, "Lesbians of African Descent: Contemporary Perspectives." We briefly discuss our framing of this collection as a contemporary contribution to the canon of Black lesbian writing and art, and identify themes that appear to transcend both earlier and current works of lesbians of African descent.

  1. Canadian and American Government Structures and Issues of Interest to Special Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cynthia M.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes the differences between American and Canadian government structures, and discusses the Constitution Act of 1982, the Meech Lake Accord, and other recent developments in Canada. Three government issues of interest to special librarians are described: the Free Trade Agreement; an amendment to the Copyright Act; and an amendment dealing…

  2. Introduction to the Special Issue: New and Interdisciplinary Approaches to Linguistic Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athanasopoulos, Panos; Bylund, Emanuel; Casasanto, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This Special Issue of "Language Learning" presents an interdisciplinary state-of-the-art overview of current approaches to linguistic relativity. It contains empirical and theoretical studies and reflections on linguistic relativity from a variety of perspectives, such as associative learning, conceptual transfer, multilingual awareness,…

  3. U.S. Special Operations Forces (SOF): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-08

    force structure and geographic boundaries for each Combatant Command (COCOM) not less than every two years and recommend changes to the Secretary of...U.S. Special Operations Forces (SOF): Background and Issues for Congress Andrew Feickert Specialist in Military Ground Forces April 8, 2016...

  4. Inclusion of Student with Special Needs within Higher Education in UAE: Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaad, Eman; Almotairi, Mishal

    2013-01-01

    This is an oral interactive presentation supported by evidences that present the current status of inclusion of students with special needs in the Higher Education sector in the UAE. It looks at the related issues and challenges in a country that is certainly heading towards inclusion of all learners in regular education following the ratification…

  5. Introduction to Special Issue: Understanding the Nature-Nurture Interactions in Language and Learning Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berninger, Virginia Wise

    2001-01-01

    The introduction to this special issue on nature-nurture interactions notes that the following articles represent five biologically oriented research approaches which each provide a tutorial on the investigator's major research tool, a summary of current research understandings regarding language and learning differences, and a discussion of…

  6. Preface to the Special Issue on High-Risk, Critical-Skills Training Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes the six articles included in this special issue, which discuss evaluation of human performance in critical skills occupations; strategic planning for safety in high-risk occupations; performance and training effectiveness decisions; performance indicators for training evaluation; evaluation of a nuclear training program; and a model for…

  7. U.S. Special Operations Forces (SOF): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-18

    cell in Yemen can incite attacks as far away as Detroit or Delhi. A flu virus in Macao can become an epidemic in Miami. Technology and globalization... Colombia , France, Turkey, Kenya, and Italy. U.S. Special Operations Forces (SOF): Background and Issues for Congress Congressional Research

  8. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence... procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources or... Intelligence is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of classified...

  9. Epilogue to Special Issue on Tobacco and Other Substance Use Disorders: Links and Implications.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Steven A

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse special issue and offers suggestions for future steps. People who use alcohol or other addictive substances are much more likely to use tobacco. Yet, clinicians and scientists have long regarded these addiction categories as separate and unrelated. The resultant benign neglect of tobacco use has had disastrous consequences on patients. This special issue is an important step toward remedying that situation. It has reviewed what is known and what more needs to be discovered regarding the co-occurrence of tobacco use disorder (TUD) and other substance use disorders (SUDs). The timing of this special issue occurs at a moment when smoking rates among both adults and youth are at a modern low. But not all segments of the population have benefited from this improvement. In particular, those with a SUD smoke two to four times the rate of the general population and thus suffer disproportionately from the myriad tobacco-induced diseases. The multi-disciplinary contributors to this special issue have reviewed various aspects of the co-occurring disorders. What emerges is a complex portrait. In some categories, the facts are stark, such as the strong association between SUDs and tobacco use and the toll they both extract. In others, such as the emerging new electronic nicotine delivery devices, there are intriguing associations that warrant further investigation. What is clear is that the historic schism between smoking and other addictions needs to be breached in order to improve the health of the public. This special issue should be viewed as a call to action for breaching that schism.

  10. Introduction to the Special Issue: Invited Papers from the 2015 APAHC Conference.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Laura A; Shahane, Amit A

    2015-12-01

    The 7th biennial National Conference of APAHC, the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers, was held in Atlanta, Georgia, February 5-7, 2015. Speakers were invited to contribute manuscripts based on their conference presentations, and many submitted manuscripts for this special edition of the Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings. Some papers will appear in the December 2015 issue of JCPMS; others will appear in the March 2016 issue. All papers have undergone a rigorous peer review process. The Conference Co-Chairs, Drs. Laura Shaffer and Amit Shahane, are Guest Editors for the special issue. In this article, they provide an overview of the conference's major themes, and also discuss some aspects of conference planning.

  11. Special observations in forensic psychiatric practice: gender issues of the watchers and the watched.

    PubMed

    Mason, T; Mason-Whitehead, E; Thomas, M

    2009-12-01

    Special observations in psychiatric practice may create tensions for both the patient under surveillance and the staff undertaking the procedure. This study reports on special observations undertaken in forensic settings focusing specifically on the gender-sensitive issues. The aim of the study was to investigate the specific gender issues relating to special observations in relation to those under the procedure and those engaged in observing. Three medium secure units in the UK formed the sampling frame, and the population studied was eight female and seven male clinical Registered nurses. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, audio-tape-recorded and transcribed for analysis. The analysis involved a Grounded Theory approach to explicate categories and formulate two overarching themes: (1) the psychosocial fusion; and (2) the private as spectacle. There are implications for practice in relation to policy formulation and the implementation of special observations following risk assessment and individual skill identification. It is concluded that gender issues are extremely important for all concerned in this intrusive practice.

  12. PREFACE: Celebrating 100 years of superconductivity: special issue on the iron-based superconductors Celebrating 100 years of superconductivity: special issue on the iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George; Greene, Laura; Johnson, Peter

    2011-12-01

    In honor of this year's 100th anniversary of the discovery of superconductivity, this special issue of Reports on Progress in Physics is a dedicated issue to the 'iron-based superconductors'—a new class of high-temperature superconductors that were discovered in 2008. This is the first time the journal has generated a 'theme issue', and we provide this to the community to provide a 'snapshot' of the present status, both for researchers working in this fast-paced field, and for the general physics community. Reports on Progress in Physics publishes three classes of articles—comprehensive full Review Articles, Key Issues Reviews and, most recently, Reports on Progress articles that recount the current status of a rapidly evolving field, befitting of the articles in this special issue. It has been an exciting year for superconductivity—there have been numerous celebrations for this centenary recounting the fascinating history of this field, from seven Nobel prizes to life-saving discoveries that brought us medically useful magnetic resonance imaging. The discovery of a completely new class of high-temperature superconductors, whose mechanism remains as elusive as the cuprates discovered in 1986, has injected a new vitality into this field, and this year those new to the field were provided with the opportunity of interacting with those who have enjoyed a long history in superconductivity. Furthermore, as high-density current carriers with little or no power loss, high-temperature superconductors offer unique solutions to fundamental grid challenges of the 21st century and hold great promise in addressing our global energy challenges. The complexity and promise of these materials has caused our community to more freely share our ideas and results than ever before, and it is gratifying to see how we have grown into an enthusiastic global network to advance the field. This invited collection is true to this agenda and we are delighted to have received contributions

  13. Introduction to this Special Issue on Geostatistics and Scaling of Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    The germination of this special PE&RS issue began at the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers)(RCS-IBC) annual meeting in January, 1997 held at the University of Exeter in Exeter, England. The cold and snow of an England winter were greatly tempered by the friendly and cordial discussions that ensued at the meeting on possible ways to foster both dialog and research across "the Big Pond" between geographers in the US and the UK on the use of geostatistics and geospatial techniques for remote sensing of land surface processes. It was decided that one way to stimulate and enhance cooperation on the application of geostatistics and geospatial methods in remote sensing was to hold parallel sessions on these topics at appropriate meeting venues in 1998 in both the US and the UK Selected papers given at these sessions would be published as a special issue of PE&RS on the US side, and as a special issue of Computers and Geosciences (C&G) on the UK side, to highlight the commonality in research on geostatistics and geospatial methods in remote sensing and spatial data analysis on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. As a consequence, a session on "Ceostatistics and Geospatial Techniques for Remote Sensing of Land Surface Processes" was held at the Association of American Geographers (AAG) annual meeting in Boston, Massachusetts in March, 1998, sponsored by the AAG's Remote Sensing Specialty Group (RSSG). A similar session was held at the RGS-IBG annual meeting in Guildford, Surrey, England in January 1998, organized by the Modeling and Advanced Techniques Special Interest Group (MAT SIG) of the Remote Sensing Society (RSS). The six papers that in part, comprise this issue of PE&RS, are the US complement to such a dual journal publication effort. Both of us are co-editors of each of the journal special issues, with the lead editor of each journal being from their respective side of the Atlantic where the journals are published. The special

  14. Association of American Geographers, Remote Sensing Specialty Group Special Issue of Geocarto International

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Thomas R. (Editor); Emerson, Charles W. (Editor); Quattrochi, Dale A. (Editor); Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This special issue continues the precedence of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), Remote Sensing Specialty Group (RSSG) for publishing selected articles in Geocarto International as a by-product from the AAG annual meeting. As editors, we issued earlier this year, a solicitation for papers to be published in a special issue of Geocarto International that were presented in RSSG-sponsored sessions at the 2001 AAG annual meeting held in New York City on February 27-March 3. Although not an absolute requisite for publication, the vast majority of the papers in this special issue were presented at this year's AAG meeting in New York. Other articles in this issue that were not part of a paper or poster session at the 2001 AAG meeting are authored by RSSG members. Under the auspices of the RSSG, this special Geocarto International issue provides even more compelling evidence of the inextricable linkage between remote sensing and geography. The papers in this special issue fall into four general themes: 1) Urban Analysis and Techniques for Urban Analysis; 2) Land Use/Land Cover Analysis; 3) Fire Modeling Assessment; and 4) Techniques. The first four papers herein are concerned with the use of remote sensing for analysis of urban areas, and with use or development of techniques to better characterize urban areas using remote sensing data. As the lead paper in this grouping, Rashed et al., examine the usage of spectral mixture analysis (SMA) for analyzing satellite imagery of urban areas as opposed to more 'standard' methods of classification. Here SMA has been applied to IRS-1C satellite multispectral imagery to extract measures that better describe the 'anatomy' of the greater Cairo, Egypt region. Following this paper, Weng and Lo describe how Landsat TM data have been used to monitor land cover types and to estimate biomass parameters within an urban environment. The research reported in this paper applies an integrated GIS (Geographic Information System

  15. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on the random search problem: trends and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Luz, Marcos G. E.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Raposo, Ernesto P.; Viswanathan, Gandhi M.

    2008-11-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to the subject of the random search problem. The motivation behind this special issue is to summarize in a single comprehensive publication, the main aspects (past and present), latest developments, different viewpoints and the directions being followed in this multidisciplinary field. We hope that such a special issue could become a particularly valuable reference for the broad scientific community working with the general random search problem. The Editorial Board has invited Marcos G E da Luz, Alexander Y Grosberg, Ernesto P Raposo and Gandhi M Viswanathan to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. The general question of how to optimize the search for specific target objects in either continuous or discrete environments when the information available is limited is of significant importance in a broad range of fields. Representative examples include ecology (animal foraging, dispersion of populations), geology (oil recovery from mature reservoirs), information theory (automated researchers of registers in high-capacity database), molecular biology (proteins searching for their sites, e.g., on DNA ), etc. One reason underlying the richness of the random search problem relates to the `ignorance' of the locations of the randomly located `targets'. A statistical approach to the search problem can deal adequately with incomplete information and so stochastic strategies become advantageous. The general problem of how to search efficiently for randomly located target sites can thus be quantitatively described using the concepts and methods of statistical physics and stochastic processes. Scope Thus far, to the best of our knowledge, no recent textbook or review article in a physics journal has appeared on this topic. This makes a special issue with review and research articles attractive to those interested in acquiring a general introduction to the

  16. Introduction to the special issue celebrating 200 years of geodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strak, Vincent; Schellart, Wouter P.

    2016-10-01

    Since the first published laboratory models from Sir James Hall in 1815, analogue and numerical geodynamic modelling have become widely used as they provide qualitative and quantitative insights into a broad range of geological processes. To celebrate the 200th anniversary of geodynamic modelling, this special issue gathers review works and recent studies on analogue and numerical modelling of tectonic and geodynamic processes, as an opportunity to present some of the milestones and recent breakthroughs in this field, to discuss potential issues and to highlight possible future developments.

  17. Empirical aesthetics, the beautiful challenge: An introduction to the special issue on Art & Perception

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, M. Dorothee; Wagemans, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The i-Perception special issue Art & Perception is based on the Art & Perception Conference 2010 in Brussels. Our vision with this conference was to bring together artists and vision scientists from different backgrounds to exchange views and state-of-the-art knowledge on art perception and aesthetics. The complexity of the experience of art and of aesthetic phenomena, in general, calls for specific research approaches, for which interdisciplinarity seems to be key. Following this logic, the special issue Art & Perception contains contributions by artists and vision scientists with different methodological approaches. The contributions span a wide range of topics, but are all centred around two questions: How can one understand art perception and aesthetics from a psychological point of view, and how is this reflected in art itself? PMID:23145296

  18. Biodiversity, ecosystem functions and services in environmental risk assessment: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ralf B

    2012-01-15

    This Special Issue focuses on the questions if and how biodiversity, ecosystem functions and resulting services could be incorporated into the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA). Therefore, three articles provide a framework for the integration of ecosystem services into ERA of soils, sediments and pesticides. Further articles demonstrate ways how stakeholders can be integrated into an ecosystem service-based ERA for soils and describe how the current monitoring could be adapted to new assessment endpoints that are directly linked to ecosystem services. Case studies show that the current ERA may not be protective for biodiversity, ecosystem functions and resulting services and that both pesticides and salinity currently adversely affect ecosystem functions in the field. Moreover, ecological models can be used for prediction of new protection goals and could finally support their implementation into the ERA. Overall, the Special Issue stresses the urgent need to enhance current procedures of ERA if biodiversity, ecosystem functions and resulting services are to be protected.

  19. The Context of Current Content Analysis of Gender Roles: An Introduction to a Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Rudy, Rena M; Popova, Lucy; Linz, Daniel G

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide context for the quantitative content analyses of gender roles that are to be included in both parts of this special issue. First, a timeline of historical uses of the content analysis methodology is presented. Second, research objectives that frequently drive content analysis of gender roles are described; these include: to support feminist claims, to compare media with real life, to predict effects on audiences, and to detect effects of media producers on content. Third, previous content analyses published in Sex Roles and other gender-focused journals are reviewed and categorized in terms of medium, genre, time span, gender, and nationality. Finally, contributions of each of the articles in this special issue are outlined.

  20. The Context of Current Content Analysis of Gender Roles: An Introduction to a Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Lucy; Linz, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide context for the quantitative content analyses of gender roles that are to be included in both parts of this special issue. First, a timeline of historical uses of the content analysis methodology is presented. Second, research objectives that frequently drive content analysis of gender roles are described; these include: to support feminist claims, to compare media with real life, to predict effects on audiences, and to detect effects of media producers on content. Third, previous content analyses published in Sex Roles and other gender-focused journals are reviewed and categorized in terms of medium, genre, time span, gender, and nationality. Finally, contributions of each of the articles in this special issue are outlined. PMID:20694031

  1. Shedding light on the dark side of identity: Introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Beyers, Wim; Çok, Figen

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this special issue is to shed light in the dark side of identity formation in adolescence and emerging adulthood, that is, to provide some understanding in what exactly can go wrong in identity development. After summarizing the recent developments in identity development literature, in this introduction the main findings of all thirteen empirical papers are summarized into three overarching themes: (1) lack of identity integration as a risk factor, (2) reconsideration of commitment as a sign of identity uncertainty, and (3) ruminative exploration as another risk factor undermining healthy identity development. Finally, given that all papers in this special issue are based on conference presentations at the 14th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Adolescence (EARA), some more information on that conference is included in this introduction.

  2. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special Issue on `Singular Interactions in Quantum Mechanics: Solvable Models'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Antonio, G.; Exner, P.; Geyler, V.

    2004-07-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General entitled `Singular Interactions in Quantum Mechanics: Solvable Models'. This issue should be a repository for high quality original work. We are interested in having the topic interpreted broadly, that is, to include contributions dealing with point-interaction models, one- and many-body, quantum graphs, including graph-like structures coupling different dimensions, interactions supported by curves, manifolds, and more complicated sets, random and nonlinear couplings, etc., as well as approximations helping us to understand the meaning of singular couplings and applications of such models on different parts of quantum mechanics. We believe that when the second printing of the `bible' of the field, the book Solvable Models in Quantum Mechanics by S Albeverio, F Gesztesy, the late R Høegh-Krohn and H Holden, appears it is the right moment to review new developments in this area, with the hope of stimulating further development of these extremely useful techniques. The Editorial Board has invited G Dell'Antonio, P Exner and V Geyler to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. Their criteria for acceptance of contributions are as follows: bullet The subject of the paper should relate to singular interactions in quantum mechanics in the sense described above. bullet Contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. bullet Papers should be original; reviews of a work published elsewhere will not be accepted. The guidelines for the preparation of contributions are as follows: bullet The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 October 2004. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear in about April 2005. bullet There is a nominal page limit of 15 printed pages (approximately 9000 words) per contribution. Papers exceeding these limits may be accepted at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Further advice on

  3. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  4. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  5. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  6. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  7. 14 CFR 21.190 - Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. 21.190 Section 21.190 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Airworthiness Certificates § 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft. (a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category...

  8. The intersection of behavioral genetics and political science: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Hatemi, Peter K

    2012-02-01

    The collection of papers in this special edition of Twin Research and Human Genetics represents a major land-mark at the intersection of behavioral genetics and political science. This issue is the fruit of 20 political scientists attending the Behavioral Genetics Association Methods Workshop in Boulder and a hands-on training practicum at the Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, and includes results from the first wave of political science twin surveys.

  9. Neuroscience and Brain Science Special Issue begins in the Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2014-01-01

    The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences and the Orient Neuron Nexus have amalgated to publish a yearly special issue based on neuro- and brain sciences. This will hopefully improve the quality of peer-reviewed manuscripts in the field of fundamental, applied, and clinical neuroscience and brain science from Asian countries. One focus of the Universiti Sains Malaysia is to strengthen neuroscience and brain science, especially in the field of neuroinformatics. PMID:25941457

  10. Special Issue on Cell Death: Murder, mystery (and a little bit of mayhem) in Manhattan.

    PubMed

    Chipuk, Jerry E; Martin, Seamus J

    2016-07-01

    This Special Issue on Cell Death comprises a series of 12 reviews that span a broad spectrum of topics within highly active research areas in the cell death field. We hope that you will find these pieces to be of interest; we certainly found them to be fresh and engaging and we are grateful to their authors for taking the time to write for The FEBS Journal.

  11. Comments on a special issue of the Journal of Allied Health.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Annual Conference of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) will be conducted in Charlotte, North Carolina, on October 20-22. The theme for this event is "Through an Interdisciplinary Looking Glass: Achieving Quality Outcomes through Research, Education, and Practice." Although the terms interdisciplinary and interprofessional differ from one another, they are close enough to justify an intent to have copies of this special issue of the Journal prepared and distributed in advance of the conference.

  12. Neuroscience and Brain Science Special Issue begins in the Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2014-12-01

    The Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences and the Orient Neuron Nexus have amalgated to publish a yearly special issue based on neuro- and brain sciences. This will hopefully improve the quality of peer-reviewed manuscripts in the field of fundamental, applied, and clinical neuroscience and brain science from Asian countries. One focus of the Universiti Sains Malaysia is to strengthen neuroscience and brain science, especially in the field of neuroinformatics.

  13. Preface paper to the Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere (SALSA) Program special issue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodrich, D.C.; Chehbouni, A.; Goff, B.; MacNish, B.; Maddock, T.; Moran, S.; Shuttleworth, W.J.; Williams, D.G.; Watts, C.; Hipps, L.H.; Cooper, D.I.; Schieldge, J.; Kerr, Y.H.; Arias, H.; Kirkland, M.; Carlos, R.; Cayrol, P.; Kepner, W.; Jones, B.; Avissar, R.; Begue, A.; Bonnefond, J.-M.; Boulet, G.; Branan, B.; Brunel, J.P.; Chen, L.C.; Clarke, T.; Davis, M.R.; DeBruin, H.; Dedieu, G.; Elguero, E.; Eichinger, W.E.; Everitt, J.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Gempko, V.L.; Gupta, H.; Harlow, C.; Hartogensis, O.; Helfert, M.; Holifield, C.; Hymer, D.; Kahle, A.; Keefer, T.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Lhomme, J.-P.; Lagouarde, J.-P.; Lo, Seen D.; Luquet, D.; Marsett, R.; Monteny, B.; Ni, W.; Nouvellon, Y.; Pinker, R.; Peters, C.; Pool, D.; Qi, J.; Rambal, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Santiago, F.; Sano, E.; Schaeffer, S.M.; Schulte, M.; Scott, R.; Shao, X.; Snyder, K.A.; Sorooshian, S.; Unkrich, C.L.; Whitaker, M.; Yucel, I.

    2000-01-01

    The Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere Program (SALSA) is a multi-agency, multi-national research effort that seeks to evaluate the consequences of natural and human-induced environmental change in semi-arid regions. The ultimate goal of SALSA is to advance scientific understanding of the semi-arid portion of the hydrosphere-biosphere interface in order to provide reliable information for environmental decision making. SALSA approaches this goal through a program of long-term, integrated observations, process research, modeling, assessment, and information management that is sustained by cooperation among scientists and information users. In this preface to the SALSA special issue, general program background information and the critical nature of semi-arid regions is presented. A brief description of the Upper San Pedro River Basin, the initial location for focused SALSA research follows. Several overarching research objectives under which much of the interdisciplinary research contained in the special issue was undertaken are discussed. Principal methods, primary research sites and data collection used by numerous investigators during 1997-1999 are then presented. Scientists from about 20 US, five European (four French and one Dutch), and three Mexican agencies and institutions have collaborated closely to make the research leading to this special issue a reality. The SALSA Program has served as a model of interagency cooperation by breaking new ground in the approach to large scale interdisciplinary science with relatively limited resources.

  14. Introduction to the special issue on molecular imaging in radiation biology.

    PubMed

    Humm, John L; Dewhirst, Mark W; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2012-04-01

    Molecular imaging is an evolving science that is concerned with the development of novel imaging probes and biomarkers that can be used to non-invasively image molecular and cellular processes. This special issue approaches molecular imaging in the context of radiation research, focusing on biomarkers and imaging methods that provide measurable signals that can assist in the quantification of radiation-induced effects of living systems at the physical, chemical and biological levels. The potential to image molecular changes in response to a radiation insult opens new and exciting opportunities for a more profound understanding of radiation biology, with the possibility of translation of these techniques to radiotherapy practice. This special issue brings together 14 reviews dedicated to the use of molecular imaging in the field of radiation research. The initial three reviews are introductory overviews of the key molecular imaging modalities: magnetic resonance, nuclear and optical. This is followed by 11 reviews each focusing on a specialist area within the field of radiation research. These include: hypoxia and perfusion, tissue metabolism, normal tissue injury, cell death and viability, receptor targeting and nanotechnology, reporter genes, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and biological dosimetry. Over the preceding decade, molecular imaging brought significant new advances to our understanding of every area of radiation biology. This special issue shows us these advances and points to the vibrant future of our field armed with these new capabilities.

  15. Introduction to the Special Issue on Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences

    PubMed Central

    Thornbush, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this introduction to the Special Issue on Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences is a focus on the participation of women in traditionally male-dominated professions, with geography as an exemplary academic subject. The Special Issue stems from the Commission of Gender and Geoethics as part of the International Association of Geoethics, and endeavors to bring together efforts at various spatial scales that examine the position of women in science and engineering in particular, as conveyed in engineering geology, disaster management sciences, and climate change adaptation studies. It has been discovered, for instance, that men are more active and personally prepared at the community level (in Atlantic Canada coastal communities), and more action is still required in developing countries especially to promote gender equality and empower women. Studies contained in this Special Issue also reveal that tutoring and mentoring by other women can promote further involvement in non-traditional professions, such as professional engineering geology, where women are preferring more traditional (less applied) approaches that may circumscribe their ability to find suitable employment after graduation. Moreover, the hiring policy needs to change in many countries, such as Canada, where there are fewer women at entry-level and senior ranks within geography, especially in physical geography as the scientific part of the discipline. The exclusion of women in traditionally male-dominated spheres needs to be addressed and rectified for the ascent of women to occur in scientific geography and in other geosciences as well as science and engineering at large. PMID:27043609

  16. Genetic Influences on Peer and Family Relationships Across Adolescent Development: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Mullineaux, Paula Y; DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher

    2015-07-01

    Nearly all aspects of human development are influenced by genetic and environmental factors, which conjointly shape development through several gene-environment interplay mechanisms. More recently, researchers have begun to examine the influence of genetic factors on peer and family relationships across the pre-adolescent and adolescent time periods. This article introduces the special issue by providing a critical overview of behavior genetic methodology and existing research demonstrating gene-environment processes operating on the link between peer and family relationships and adolescent adjustment. The overview is followed by a summary of new research studies, which use genetically informed samples to examine how peer and family environment work together with genetic factors to influence behavioral outcomes across adolescence. The studies in this special issue provide further evidence of gene-environment interplay through innovative behavior genetic methodological approaches across international samples. Results from the quantitative models indicate environmental moderation of genetic risk for coercive adolescent-parent relationships and deviant peer affiliation. The molecular genetics studies provide support for a gene-environment interaction differential susceptibility model for dopamine regulation genes across positive and negative peer and family environments. Overall, the findings from the studies in this special issue demonstrate the importance of considering how genes and environments work in concert to shape developmental outcomes during adolescence.

  17. Editorial: 2nd Special Issue on behavior change, health, and health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    This Special Issue of Preventive Medicine (PM) is the 2nd that we have organized on behavior change, health, and health disparities. This is a topic of fundamental importance to improving population health in the U.S. and other industrialized countries that are trying to more effectively manage chronic health conditions. There is broad scientific consensus that personal behavior patterns such as cigarette smoking, other substance abuse, and physical inactivity/obesity are among the most important modifiable causes of chronic disease and its adverse impacts on population health. As such behavior change needs to be a key component of improving population health. There is also broad agreement that while these problems extend across socioeconomic strata, they are overrepresented among more economically disadvantaged populations and contribute directly to the growing problem of health disparities. Hence, behavior change represents an essential step in curtailing that unsettling problem as well. In this 2nd Special Issue, we devote considerable space to the current U.S. prescription opioid addiction epidemic, a crisis that was not addressed in the prior Special Issue. We also continue to devote attention to the two largest contributors to preventable disease and premature death, cigarette smoking and physical inactivity/obesity as well as risks of co-occurrence of these unhealthy behavior patterns. Across each of these topics we included contributions from highly accomplished policymakers and scientists to acquaint readers with recent accomplishments as well as remaining knowledge gaps and challenges to effectively managing these important chronic health problems. PMID:26257372

  18. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Pseudo Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fring, Andreas; Jones, Hugh F.; Znojil, Miloslav

    2007-11-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to the subject of Pseudo Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics as featured in the conference '6th International Workshop on Pseudo Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics', City University London, UK, July 16--18 2007 (http://www.staff.city.ac.uk/~fring/PT/). Invited speakers at that meeting as well as other researchers working in the field are invited to submit a research paper to this issue. The Editorial Board has invited Andreas Fring, Hugh F Jones and Miloslav Znojil to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. Their criteria for acceptance of contributions are as follows: •The subject of the paper should relate to the subject of the workshop ((see list of topics in the website of the conference http://www.staff.city.ac.uk/~fring/PT/). •Contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. •Conference papers may be based on already published work but should either contain significant additional new results and/or insights or give a survey of the present state of the art, a critical assessment of the present understanding of a topic, and a discussion of open problems. •Papers submitted by non-participants should be original and contain substantial new results. The guidelines for the preparation of contributions are the following: •The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 16 November 2007. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear in June 2008. •There is a nominal page limit of 16 printed pages (approximately 9600 words) per contribution. For papers exceeding this limit, the Guest Editors reserve the right to request a reduction in length. Further advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical may be found at www.iop.org/Journals/jphysa. •Contributions to the special issue should, if possible, be submitted electronically by web

  19. Qualitative and mixed methods research in dissemination and implementation science: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Southam-Gerow, Michael A; Dorsey, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    This special issue provides examples of how qualitative and mixed methods research approaches can be used in dissemination and implementation science. In this introductory article, we provide a brief rationale for why and how qualitative and mixed methods approaches can be useful in moving the field forward. Specifically, we provide a brief primer on common qualitative methods, including a review of guidelines provided by the National Institutes of Health. Next, we introduce the six articles in the issue. The first of the articles by Palinkas represents a more thorough and authoritative discussion related to qualitative methods, using the other five articles in the issue (and other published works) as examples. The remaining five articles are empirical and/or descriptive articles of recently completed or ongoing qualitative or mixed methods studies related to dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices for children and adolescents.

  20. Introduction to the Special Issue on the U.S. Response to the Fukushima Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, Daniel J.

    2012-05-01

    Provides an introduction to the May 2012 issue of Health Physics, based on a special session at the 2011 Health Physics Society (HPS) annual meeting that focused on the United States' radiological response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This introduction outlines the papers in this important issue and describes the activities of the U.S. response participants, including the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Department of Defense, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other organizations. Observations are provided and the stage is set for the articles in this issue which document many of the activities undertaken during the Fukushima accident and which describe challenges faced and valuable lessons learned.

  1. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing contributions from the Fourth International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting Special issue containing contributions from the Fourth International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Theresa M.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2011-04-01

    This special issue of Journal of Neural Engineering is a result of the Fourth International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting, which was held at the Asilomar Conference Center in Monterey, California, USA from 31 May to 4 June, 2010. The meeting was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, The National Science Foundation and the Department of Defense, and was organized by the Wadsworth Center of the New York State Department of Health. It attracted over 260 participants from 17 countries—including many graduate students and postdoctoral fellows—and featured 19 workshops, platform presentations from 26 research groups, 170 posters, multiple brain-computer interface (BCI) demonstrations, and a keynote address by W Zev Rymer of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. The number of participants and the diversity of the topics covered greatly exceeded those of the previous meeting in 2005, and testified to the continuing rapid expansion and growing sophistication of this exciting and still relatively new research field. BCI research focuses primarily on using brain signals to replace or restore the motor functions that people have lost due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a brainstem stroke, or some other devastating neuromuscular disorder. In the last few years, attention has also turned towards using BCIs to improve rehabilitation after a stroke, and beyond that to enhancing or supplementing the capabilities of even those without disabilities. These diverse interests were represented in the wide range of topics covered in the workshops. While some workshops addressed broad traditional topics, such as signal acquisition, feature extraction and translation, and software development, many addressed topics that were entirely new or focused sharply on areas that have become important only recently. These included workshops on optimizing P300-based BCIs; improving the mutual adaptations of the BCI and the user; BCIs that can control neuroprostheses

  2. On Semiotics and Subjectivity: A Response to Tony Brown's "Signifying 'Students', 'Teachers', and 'Mathematics' -- A Reading of a Special Issue"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presmeg, Norma; Radford, Luis

    2008-01-01

    In this response we address some of the significant issues that Tony Brown raised in his analysis and critique of the Special Issue of "Educational Studies in Mathematics" on "Semiotic perspectives in mathematics education" (Saenz-Ludlow & Presmeg, Educational Studies in Mathematics 61(1-2), 2006). Among these issues are conceptualizations of…

  3. Preface to the HighRus-2015 special issue of JQSRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Perevalov, Valery I.; Ponomarev, Yurii N.

    2016-07-01

    This themed special issue of the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer (JQSRT) is built around the XVIIIth Symposium on High-Resolution Molecular Spectroscopy (HighRus-2015) which was held during June 30-July 4, 2015 in Tomsk, Russia. The Symposium continued the series of conferences on molecular spectroscopy organized by the V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS (IAO). The history of the meeting is given in the preface to the previous special issue devoted to the XVIth Symposium [1]. The HighRus-2015 meeting was organized together with the National Research Tomsk State University with the financial support from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR). Tomsk is one of the oldest cities (founded in 1604) of Siberia, Russia. It is situated in the Eastern part of Western Siberia on the banks of the river Tom. Tomsk is the oldest educational and scientific center in Siberia. Presently in Tomsk there are six universities, 15 research institutes, and a special economic zone of technical-innovation type.

  4. Editorial: 3rd Special Issue on behavior change, health, and health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    This Special Issue of Preventive Medicine (PM) is the 3rd that we have organized on behavior change, health, and health disparities. This is a topic of critical importance to improving U.S. population health. There is broad scientific consensus that personal behaviors such as cigarette smoking, other substance abuse, and physical inactivity/obesity are among the most important modifiable causes of chronic disease and its adverse impacts on population health. Hence, effectively promoting health-related behavior change needs to be a key component of health care research and policy. There is also broad recognition that while these problems extend throughout the population, they disproportionately impact economically disadvantaged populations and other vulnerable populations and represent a major contributor to health disparities. Thus, behavior change represents an essential step in curtailing health disparities, which receives special attention in this 3rd Special Issue. We also devote considerable space to the longstanding challenges of reducing cigarette smoking and use of other tobacco and nicotine delivery products in vulnerable populations, obesity, and for the first time food insecurity. Across each of these topics we include contributions from highly accomplished policymakers and scientists to acquaint readers with recent accomplishments as well as remaining knowledge gaps and challenges. PMID:27693562

  5. Preface to the special issue on "Integrated Microwave Photonic Signal Processing"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaña, José; Yao, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    As Guest Editors, we are pleased to introduce this special issue on ;Integrated Microwave Photonic Signal Processing; published by the Elsevier journal Optics Communications. Microwave photonics is a field of growing importance from both scientific and practical application perspectives. The field of microwave photonics is devoted to the study, development and application of optics-based techniques and technologies aimed to the generation, processing, control, characterization and/or distribution of microwave signals, including signals well into the millimeter-wave frequency range. The use of photonic technologies for these microwave applications translates into a number of key advantages, such as the possibility of dealing with high-frequency, wide bandwidth signals with minimal losses and reduced electromagnetic interferences, and the potential for enhanced reconfigurability. The central purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the state of the art of generation, processing and characterization technologies for high-frequency microwave signals. It is now widely accepted that the practical success of microwave photonics at a large scale will essentially depend on the realization of high-performance microwave-photonic signal-processing engines in compact and integrated formats, preferably on a chip. Thus, the focus of the issue is on techniques implemented using integrated photonic technologies, with the goal of providing an update of the most recent advances toward realization of this vision.

  6. Introduction to the special issue on circadian rhythms in behavioral neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms influence virtually every aspect of behavior. This special issue provides updates on the current state and future directions for the field of circadian rhythms in behavioral neuroscience. Recent data have linked circadian rhythms to behavioral and physiological phenomena and disease states in virtually every area of behavioral and biomedical science. Specifically, a growing interest in the cognitive, neuropsychiatric, and metabolic consequences of circadian rhythm disorders and dysfunction is emerging. This special issue is not intended to provide an exhaustive overview of the entire field of chronobiology or behavioral rhythms. Instead, we invited researchers from a variety of fields to critically review and integrate studies that address the roles of circadian rhythms in behavioral neuroscience. The papers included in this issue range from the molecular biology of clock genes to the behavior of free-living animals, and cover a wide variety of species ranging from insects, to rodents, to humans. As such, the reviews provide an overview of the burgeoning field of circadian rhythms within behavioral neuroscience.

  7. Introduction to the special issue from the 2014 meeting of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society.

    PubMed

    Young, Jared W; Hall, F Scott; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Kent, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    In 2013, President Obama launched what has been optimistically described as the "decade of the brain". The launch of this effort comes on the back of widespread acknowledgement that more is required to aid those suffering from mental health disorders. Specifically, a greater understanding of the neural circuitry related to behaviors specific to mental health disorders is needed. The field of research that relates the circuitry of the brain to specific aspects of behavior is referred to as behavioral neuroscience. The International Behavioral Neuroscience Society (IBNS) was founded in 1992 specifically to meet on an annual basis and present the latest research findings in this field, and to gather together the international research community to discuss issues important for the development and progress of this scientific discipline. This special issue includes reviews of topics of emerging interest and advancing knowledge in behavioral neuroscience, based on symposia presented at the 2014 IBNS meeting. Topics discussed at the annual IBNS meeting ranged from investigations of the neural mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression, traumatic brain injury, and risk-taking behavior, to behavioral consequences of obesity and immune dysfunction. Novel treatment areas are covered such as the use of deep brain stimulation, as well as investigation of the behavioral impacts of nicotine withdrawal and how this research will influence the development of nicotine cessation treatments. Hence, this special issue covers a wide-range of topics in behavioral neuroscience offering an insight into the challenges faced by researchers in this decade of the brain.

  8. Commentary on the special issue on the adolescent brain: Adolescence, trajectories, and the importance of prevention.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Susan L

    2016-11-01

    Adolescence as highlighted in this special issue is a period of tremendous growth, synaptic exuberance, and plasticity, but also a period for the emergence of mental illness and addiction. This commentary aims to stimulate research on prevention science to reduce the impact of early life events that often manifest during adolescence. By promoting a better understanding of what creates a normal and abnormal trajectory, the reviews by van Duijvenvoorde et al., Kilford et al., Lichenstein et al., and Tottenham and Galvan in this special issue comprehensively describe how the adolescent brain develops under typical conditions and how this process can go awry in humans. Preclinical reviews also within this issue describe how adolescents have prolonged extinction periods to maximize learning about their environment (Baker et al.), whereas Schulz and Sisk focus on the importance of puberty and how it interacts with stress (Romeo). Caballero and Tseng then set the stage of describing the neural circuitry that is often central to these changes and psychopathology. Factors that affect the mis-wiring of the brain for illness, including prenatal exposure to anti-mitotic agents (Gomes et al.) and early life stress and inflammation (Schwarz and Brenhouse), are included as examples of how exposure to early adversity manifests. These reviews are synthesized and show how information from the maturational stages that precede or occur during adolescence is likely to hold the key towards optimizing development to produce an adolescent and adult that is resilient and well adapted to their environment.

  9. Commentary on the special issue on the adolescent brain: Adolescence, trajectories, and the importance of prevention

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adolescence as highlighted in this special issue is a period of tremendous growth, synaptic exuberance, and plasticity, but also a period for the emergence of mental illness and addiction. This commentary aims to stimulate research on prevention science to reduce the impact of early life events that often manifest during adolescence. By promoting a better understanding of what creates a normal and abnormal trajectory, the reviews by van Duijvenvoorde et al., Kilford et al., Lichenstein et al., and Tottenham and Galvan in this special issue comprehensively describe how the adolescent brain develops under typical conditions and how this process can go awry in humans. Preclinical reviews also within this issue describe how adolescents have prolonged extinction periods to maximize learning about their environment (Baker et al.), whereas Schulz and Sisk focus on the importance of puberty and how it interacts with stress (Romeo). Caballero and Tseng then set the stage of describing the neural circuitry that is often central to these changes and psychopathology. Factors that affect the mis-wiring of the brain for illness, including prenatal exposure to anti-mitotic agents (Gomes et al.) and early life stress and inflammation (Schwarz and Brenhouse), are included as examples of how exposure to early adversity manifests. These reviews are synthesized and show how information from the maturational stages that precede or occur during adolescence is likely to hold the key towards optimizing development to produce an adolescent and adult that is resilient and well adapted to their environment. PMID:27423540

  10. Introduction to the special issue on medically unexplained symptoms: background and future directions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J

    2007-10-01

    This special issue is devoted to the topic of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by persistent physical symptoms that cannot be explained by medical illness or injury. Although psychological factors have long been regarded as central to these problems, patients with MUS have typically been managed within medical settings and referrals to mental health services have been relatively rare. In recent years, however, interest in the psychological nature and treatment of MUS has expanded, culminating in the development of tailored psychological interventions for these conditions. This, coupled with the increasing willingness of practitioners to diagnose conditions such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome, has led to an increase in the number of patients who are referred for psychological treatment. At present, however, many psychological therapists are unfamiliar with the literature on MUS. With this in mind, this special issue presents a series of papers that provide an overview of what is known about the nature, aetiology and treatment of medically unexplained illness. This introductory paper provides general information about the clinical presentation, diagnosis, classification, terminology and epidemiology of MUS in adults, and concludes with an examination of important areas for future development in the field. Subsequent papers address the psychological mechanisms [Deary, V., Chalder, T., & Sharpe, M. (2007-this issue). The cognitive behavioural model of medically unexplained symptoms: A theoretical and empirical review. Clinical Psychology Review; Iverson, A., Chalder, T., & Wessely, S. (2007-this issue). Gulf war illness: Lessons from medically unexplained illness. Clinical Psychology Review; Rief, W., & Broadbent, E. (2007-this issue). Explaining medically unexplained symptoms: Models and mechanisms. Clinical Psychology Review; Roelofs, K., & Spinhoven, P. (2007-this issue

  11. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special cluster issue on `Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, S.-I.

    2005-07-01

    Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (PPCF) invites submissions on the topic of `Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence', for consideration for a special topical cluster of articles to be published early in 2006. The topical cluster will be published in an issue of PPCF, combined with regular articles. The Guest Editor for the special cluster will be S-I Itoh, Kyushu University, Japan. There has been remarkable progress in the area of structure formation by turbulence. One of the highlights has been the physics of zonal flow and drift wave turbulence in toroidal plasmas. Extensive theoretical as well as computational studies have revealed the various mechanisms in turbulence and zonal flows. At the same time, experimental research on the zonal flow, geodesic acoustic modes and generation of global electric field by turbulence has evolved rapidly. Fast growth in reports of experimental results has stimulated further efforts to develop increased knowledge and systematic understanding. Each paper considered for the special cluster should describe the present research status and new scientific knowledge/results from the authors on experimental studies of zonal flow, geodesic acoustic modes and generation of electric field by turbulence (including studies of Reynolds-Maxwell stresses, etc). Manuscripts submitted to this special cluster in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion will be refereed according to the normal criteria and procedures of the journal. The Guest Editor guides the progress of the cluster from the initial open call, through the standard refereeing process, to publication. To be considered for inclusion in the special cluster, articles must be submitted by 2 September 2005 and must clearly state `for inclusion in the Turbulent Plasma Cluster'. Articles submitted after this deadline may not be included in the cluster issue but may be published in a later issue of the journal. Please submit your manuscript electronically via our web site at www

  12. An introduction to the special issue on Geoscience Papers of the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Cédric H.; Gil, Yolanda; Duffy, Christopher J.; Peckham, Scott D.; Venayagamoorthy, S. Karan

    2016-10-01

    Advocates of enhanced quality for published scientific results are increasingly voicing the need for further transparency of data and software for scientific reproducibility. However, such advanced digital scholarship can appear perplexing to geoscientists that are seduced by the concept of open science yet wonder about the exact mechanics and implications of the associated efforts. This special issue of Earth and Space Science entitled "Geoscience Papers of the Future" includes a review of existing best practices for digital scholarship and bundles a set of example articles that share their digital research products and reflect on the process of opening their scientific approach in a common quest for reproducible science.

  13. Introduction: Special issue on advances in topobathymetric mapping, models, and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, Dean B.; Brock, John C.; Parrish, Christopher E.; Rogers, Jeffrey N.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of near-shore topography and bathymetry is required for many geospatial data applications in the coastal environment. New data sources and processing methods are facilitating development of seamless, regional-scale topobathymetric digital elevation models. These elevation models integrate disparate multi-sensor, multi-temporal topographic and bathymetric datasets to provide a coherent base layer for coastal science applications such as wetlands mapping and monitoring, sea-level rise assessment, benthic habitat mapping, erosion monitoring, and storm impact assessment. The focus of this special issue is on recent advances in the source data, data processing and integration methods, and applications of topobathymetric datasets.

  14. Magmas and their sources: A special issue honoring Frederick A. Frey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael O.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Huang, Shichun; Hickey-Vargas, Rosemary

    2016-07-01

    This special issue is dedicated to Frederick A. Frey (Fig. 1), a pioneer in the use of trace element geochemistry (especially the rare-earth elements, REE) to interpret the origin and evolution of basalts and andesites, peridotites, granites, meteorites, tektites and even sediments. Fred's remarkable career spans more than 5 decades starting in 1964 with his seminal paper with advisor Larry Haskin entitled "rare earths in oceanic basalts" (Frey and Haskin, 1964). Given that Fred was an Associate Editor of Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (GCA) for 20 years, GCA is a highly appropriate venue for this collection of twenty-seven new scientific papers in his honor.

  15. Special issue on the "Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Research and Development Progress"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Martin, William R.

    2017-04-01

    In this special issue of the Journal of Computational Physics, the research and development completed at the time of manuscript submission by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is presented. CASL is the first of several Energy Innovation Hubs that have been created by the Department of Energy. The Hubs are modeled after the strong scientific management characteristics of the Manhattan Project and AT&T Bell Laboratories, and function as integrated research centers that combine basic and applied research with engineering to accelerate scientific discovery that addresses critical energy issues. Lifetime of a Hub is expected to be five or ten years depending upon performance, with CASL being granted a ten year lifetime.

  16. Special Issue On Estimation Of Baselines And Leakage In CarbonMitigation Forestry Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2006-06-01

    There is a growing acceptance that the environmentalbenefits of forests extend beyond traditional ecological benefits andinclude the mitigation of climate change. Interest in forestry mitigationactivities has led to the inclusion of forestry practices at the projectlevel in international agreements. Climate change activities place newdemands on participating institutions to set baselines, establishadditionality, determine leakage, ensure permanence, and monitor andverify a project's greenhouse gas benefits. These issues are common toboth forestry and other types of mitigation projects. They demandempirical evidence to establish conditions under which such projects canprovide sustained long term global benefits. This Special Issue reportson papers that experiment with a range of approaches based on empiricalevidence for the setting of baselines and estimation of leakage inprojects in developing Asia and Latin America.

  17. Facilitating reintegration for military service personnel, veterans, and their families: An introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Kilmer, Ryan P

    2017-01-01

    As service members return from active duty and, in some cases, exit the military, they face a process of reintegration (also referred to as community reintegration) as they seek to resume participation in their life roles as civilians. Facilitating this dynamic process of reintegration for service members, veterans, and their families-including outlining potential strategies for supporting this return to civilian life and its demands, roles, and responsibilities-is the focus of this Special Issue. Reintegration has been framed as a national priority (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, 2015) and has been a point of emphasis of efforts at federal, state, and local levels. As the articles in this issue suggest, multiple public, private, and voluntary systems and the communities to which service members, veterans, and their families return can help influence their health outcomes and, ultimately, their reintegration. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Introduction to the special issue on recentering science: Replication, robustness, and reproducibility in psychophysiology.

    PubMed

    Kappenman, Emily S; Keil, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the psychological and behavioral sciences have increased efforts to strengthen methodological practices and publication standards, with the ultimate goal of enhancing the value and reproducibility of published reports. These issues are especially important in the multidisciplinary field of psychophysiology, which yields rich and complex data sets with a large number of observations. In addition, the technological tools and analysis methods available in the field of psychophysiology are continually evolving, widening the array of techniques and approaches available to researchers. This special issue presents articles detailing rigorous and systematic evaluations of tasks, measures, materials, analysis approaches, and statistical practices in a variety of subdisciplines of psychophysiology. These articles highlight challenges in conducting and interpreting psychophysiological research and provide data-driven, evidence-based recommendations for overcoming those challenges to produce robust, reproducible results in the field of psychophysiology.

  19. Great nature's second course: Introduction to the special issue on the behavioral neuroscience of sleep.

    PubMed

    Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Sleep is necessary for normal psychological functioning, and psychological function in turn affects sleep integrity. Recent investigations delineate the relation of sleep to a broad array of processes ranging from learning and memory to emotional reactivity and mood, and use a variety of methodological approaches (imaging, electrophysiological, behavioral) to reveal the complex relations between sleep and the functioning of the awake brain. The articles in this issue advance our fundamental knowledge of the relation of sleep to psychological function. In addition, several of the articles discuss how sleep is affected by or affects human clinical conditions, including insomnia, epilepsy, mild cognitive impairment, bipolar disorder, and cancer. Together, the articles of this special issue highlight recent progress in understanding the behavioral neuroscience of sleep and identify promising areas for future research, including the possibility of sleep-based interventions to improve psychological health. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Resilience in Youth and Families Living With Pediatric Health and Developmental Conditions: Introduction to the Special Issue on Resilience

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Nabors, Laura; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Pediatric Psychology showcases a growing area of research with a collection of 16 contemporary studies of resilience in youth with chronic medical or developmental conditions and their families. The research reported in this special issue covers a broad range of pediatric populations, including cancer, type 1 diabetes, and chronic pain, among others, ranging in age from early childhood through early adulthood. This introduction to the special issue reviews the various ways the articles' authors conceptualize and define risk and resilience; most analyze protective processes in relation to resilient outcomes, including both achievement of explicitly positive experiences and avoidance of dysfunction or disruption. Challenges with measurement of resilience-related constructs is reviewed. Finally, the special issue editors offer a definition of resilience in the context of pediatric and health psychology. PMID:26275974

  1. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities... procedures for declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods, or of classified cryptologic information in NARA's holdings? (a) The Director of National...

  2. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... issuing special procedures for declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities... procedures for declassification of information pertaining to intelligence activities, sources and methods, or of classified cryptologic information in NARA's holdings? (a) The Director of National...

  3. Overview of the Special Issue: A Multi-Model Framework to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Climate Change Impacts and Risk Analysis (CIRA) project establishes a new multi-model framework to systematically assess the impacts, economic damages, and risks from climate change in the United States. The primary goal of this framework to estimate how climate change impacts and damages in the United States are avoided or reduced due to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation scenarios. Scenarios are designed to explore key uncertainties around the measurement of these changes. The modeling exercise presented in this Special Issue includes two integrated assessment models and 15 sectoral models encompassing six broad impacts sectors - water resources, electric power, infrastructure, human health, ecosystems, and forests. Three consistent emissions scenarios are used to analyze the benefits of global GHG mitigation targets: a reference and two policy scenarios, with total radiative forcing in 2100 of 10.0W/m2, 4.5W/m2, and 3.7W/m2. A range of climate sensitivities, climate models, natural variability measures, and structural uncertainties of sectoral models are examined to explore the implications of key uncertainties. This overview paper describes the motivations, goals, design, and academic contribution of the CIRA modeling exercise and briefly summarizes the subsequent papers in this Special Issue. A summary of results across impact sectors is provided showing that: GHG mitigation provides benefits to the United States that increase over

  4. The current state of knowledge about shatter cones: Introduction to the special issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratoux, David; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Shatter cones are a fracture phenomenon that is exclusively associated with shock metamorphism and has also been produced in the laboratory in several shock experiments. The occurrence of shatter cones is the only accepted meso- to macroscopic recognition criterion for impact structures. Shatter cones exhibit a number of geometric characteristics (orientation, apical angles, striation angles, sizes) that can be best described as varied, from case to case. Possible links between geometric properties with impact or crater parameters have remained controversial and the lack of understanding of the mechanism of formation of shatter cones does not offer a physical framework to discuss or understand them. A database of shatter cone occurrences has been produced for this introduction paper to the special issue of Meteoritics and Planetary Science on shatter cones. Distribution of shatter cones with respect to crater size and lithology suggests that shatter cones do not occur in impact craters less than a few kilometers in diameter, with a few, currently questionable exceptions. All pertinent hypotheses of formation are presented and discussed. Several may be discarded in light of the most recent observations. The branching fracture mechanism and the interference models proposed, respectively, by Sagy et al. (2002) and Baratoux and Melosh (2003) require further evaluation. New observations, experiments, or theoretical considerations presented in this special issue promise an important step forward, based on a renewed effort to resolve the enigmatic origin of these important features.

  5. Theory and Practice in Bilingual/Cross Cultural Special Education: Major Issues and Implications for Research, Practice, and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baca, Leonard M.

    Current issues involved in the identification and assessment of Limited-English-Proficient (LEP) students being considered for special services are reviewed. Focus is on the characteristics of the at-risk LEP students, who are often placed in special education programs. A theoretical framework to guide research and practice in this field is…

  6. Is French Immersion a Special Education Loophole? … And Does It Intensify Issues of Accessibility and Exclusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Cam

    2015-01-01

    What happens when children are asked to give up their right to special education in order to access a French immersion program? By examining one mother's efforts to secure gifted support in a French immersion program, this critical inquiry offers a parental perspective of the special education issues of accessibility and inclusion. The two…

  7. Special Issue "Natural Hazards' Impact on Urban Areas and Infrastructure" in Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru Dan, M.

    2009-04-01

    In 2006 and 2007, at the 3rd and 4th General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union respectivelly, the session on "Natural Hazards' Impact on Urban Areas and Infrastructure" was convened by Maria Bostenaru Dan, then at the Istituto Universitario di Studi Superiori di Pavia, ROSE School, Italy, who conducts research on earthquake management and Heidi Kreibich from the GFZ Potsdam, Germany, who conducts research on flood hazards, in 2007 being co-convened also by Agostino Goretti from the Civil Protection in Rome, Italy. The session initially started from an idea of Friedemann Wenzel from the Universität Karlsruhe (TH), Germany, the former speaker of the SFB 461 "Strong earthquakes", the university where also Maria Bostenaru graduated and worked and which runs together with the GFZ Potsdam the CEDIM, the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology. Selected papers from these two sessions as well as invited papers from other specialists were gathered for a special issue to be published in the journal "Natural Hazards" under the guest editorship of Heidi Kreibich and Maria Bostenaru Dan. Unlike the former special issue, this one contains a well balanced mixture of many hazards: climate change, floods, mountain hazards like avalanches, volcanoes, earthquakes. Aim of the issue was to enlarge the co-operation prospects between geosciences and other professions in field of natural hazards. Earthquake engineering and engineering seismology are seen more frequently co-operating, but in field of natural hazards there is a need to co-operate with urban planners, and, looking to the future, also in the field of integrated conservation, which implies co-operation between architecture and urban planning for the preservation of our environment. Integrated conservation is stipulated since the 1970s, which are the years when the participatism, and so the involvment of social sciences started.

  8. New Metrics, Measures, and Uses for Fluency Data: An Introduction to a Special Issue on the Assessment of Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biancarosa, Gina; Cummings, Kelli D.

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this special issue is to synthesize results from recent reading fluency research endeavors, and to link these findings to practical uses of reading curriculum-based measurement (R-CBM) tools. Taken together, the manuscripts presented in this issue discuss measurement work related to new metrics of indexing student reading…

  9. Helping American Soldiers in Time of War: Reply to Comments on the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2011-01-01

    Seligman responds to the comments made about the January 2011 "American Psychologist" "Special Issue on Comprehensive Soldier Fitness" (CSF). Seligman proposed an entire issue of on the topic of CSF to encourage psychologists to come to the aid of our government, and he urges psychologists not to be discouraged by this tactic.…

  10. Introduction to the Special Issue: Beyond traits: integrating behaviour into plant ecology and biology

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, James F.

    2015-01-01

    The way that plants are conceptualized in the context of ecological understanding is changing. In one direction, a reductionist school is pulling plants apart into a list of measured ‘traits’, from which ecological function and outcomes of species interactions may be inferred. This special issue offers an alternative, and more holistic, view: that the ecological functions performed by a plant will be a consequence not only of their complement of traits but also of the ways in which their component parts are used in response to environmental and social conditions. This is the realm of behavioural ecology, a field that has greatly advanced our understanding of animal biology, ecology and evolution. Included in this special issue are 10 articles focussing not on the tried and true metaphor that plant growth is similar to animal movement, but instead on how application of principles from animal behaviour can improve our ability to understand plant biology and ecology. The goals are not to draw false parallels, nor to anthropomorphize plant biology, but instead to demonstrate how existing and robust theory based on fundamental principles can provide novel understanding for plants. Key to this approach is the recognition that behaviour and intelligence are not the same. Many organisms display complex behaviours despite a lack of cognition (as it is traditionally understood) or any hint of a nervous system. The applicability of behavioural concepts to plants is further enhanced with the realization that all organisms face the same harsh forces of natural selection in the context of finding resources, mates and coping with neighbours. As these ecological realities are often highly variable in space and time, it is not surprising that all organisms—even plants—exhibit complex behaviours to handle this variability. The articles included here address diverse topics in behavioural ecology, as applied to plants: general conceptual understanding, plant nutrient foraging

  11. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing contributions from the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference Special issue containing contributions from the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2011-07-01

    Implantable neural interfaces provide substantial benefits to individuals with neurological disorders. That was the unequivocal message delivered by speaker after speaker from the podium of the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference (NIC2010) held in Long Beach, California, in June 2010. Giving benefit to patients is the most important measure for any biomedical technology, and myriad presentations at NIC2010 made clear that implantable neurostimulation technology has achieved this goal. Cochlear implants allow deaf people to communicate through speech. Deep brain stimulators give back mobility and dexterity necessary for so many daily tasks that are often taken for granted. Chronic pain can be alleviated through spinal cord stimulation. Motor prosthesis systems have been demonstrated in humans, through both reanimation of paralyzed limbs and neural control of robotic arms. Earlier this year, a retinal prosthesis was approved for sale in Europe, providing some hope for the blind. In sum, current clinical implants have been tremendously beneficial for today's patients and experimental systems that will be translated to the clinic promise to expand the number of people helped through bioelectronic therapies. Yet there are significant opportunities for improvement. For sensory prostheses, patients report an artificial sensation, clearly different from the natural sensation they remember. Neuromodulation systems, such as deep brain stimulation and pain stimulators, often have side effects that are tolerated as long as the side effects are less impactful than the disease. The papers published in the special issue from NIC2010 reflect the maturing and expanding field of neural interfaces. Our field has moved past proof-of-principle demonstrations and is now focusing on proving the longevity required for clinical implementation of new devices, extending existing approaches to new diseases and improving current devices for better outcomes. Closed-loop neuromodulation is a

  12. Report on the Special JGE issue on Strengthening Diversity in the Geosciences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. J.; Riggs, E.

    2007-12-01

    The fall meeting 2004 saw an unprecedented number of papers directed at the subject of enhancing racial diversity in the geosciences. That followed on the heels of an unprecedented number of papers at the AMS meeting that same year. NSF, AGU, and NAGT recognized that, after decades of dedicated effort in the field with only modest results, the time was ripe for a compendium of those best and not so successful practices to be published, targeted to the community of scientists concerned, as well as program managers, and heads/chairs of geoscience departments throughout the county. Thus an unlikely collaboration was spawned, and a special issue of the Journal of Geoscience Education (JGE) was initiated, jointly published by the AGU and the NAGT, sponsored by NSF. The issue is called Enhancing Diversity in Geoscience Education, and will be published late in 2007. Major findings of this Volume include the following: *The Earth and space sciences have the lowest participation rate of underrepresented minorities compared with all other physical sciences [e.g., NSF Publication 04-317, 2004]. Only 1-2% of the undergraduate student population enrolled in geoscience degree programs is African-American or Hispanic and only 1% of the PhDs produced in these disciplines in recent years have gone to minorities [R. Czujko (AIP), 2005]; *There are huge regional dichotomies in minority population, and geoscience specialization. An educational and recruitment approach that focuses on those aspects of the geosciences most relevant to audiences in their area and most appropriate to the expertise of the scientists involved, can have high efficacy; *The most successful programs take pains to account for culturally-specific learning styles, cultural issues with pedagogy, and community preferences and priorities; *Top-down efforts to increase diversity on the part of science / funding agencies and Universities, while a necessary component to any successful program, are not sufficient to

  13. Parenting Strategies in Modern and Emerging Economies : Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kermyt G; Starkweather, Kathrine E

    2017-03-09

    Independent of ecology, subsistence strategy, social complexity, or other aspects of socioecology, the altricial nature of young humans requires mothers to have help raising their offspring. What seems to be context-dependent, however, is who the helpers are, how they invest, and what the impacts of that investment are. In a series of papers that focus on parental and alloparental investment across five populations, this special issue of Human Nature uses evolutionary theory to examine how socioecological context influences modes of direct parental investment among the boat-dwelling Shodagor of Bangladesh (Starkweather), modes of indirect paternal investment in the modern United States (Anderson), and the biological outcome of paternal investment for men in Jamaica (Gray et al.), as well as direct alloparental investment among village Bangladeshis (Perry) and indirect alloparental investment in breastfeeding practices in the United States (Cisco).

  14. SPECIAL ISSUE ON 'CHALLENGES IN INTEGRATING MITIGATION ANDADAPTATION AS RESPONSES TO CLIMATE CHANGE'

    SciTech Connect

    WILBANKS, THOMAS J.; SATHAYE JAYANT; KLEIN, RICHARD J.T.

    2007-05-01

    This special issue of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategiesfor Global Change (MITI) reflects a growing recognition that the globalresponse to possible impacts of climate change will include bothmitigation and adaptation (M&A). On the one hand, impacts are alreadyemerging and mitigation efforts are not progressing as rapidly as hadonce been hoped. Further, even if greenhouse gas emissions were to stopabruptly, climate change will continue because of historically committedemissions. As a result, adaptation cannot be avoided. It will beessential, and in some cases it is essential now. On the other hand, ifclimate change is significant, impacts may exceed the capacity of manydeveloping countries, natural ecosystems, and high-impact sites to adapt,which means that mitigation is equally essential.

  15. Toward an Anthropology of Insurance and Health Reform: An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Dao, Amy; Mulligan, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    This article introduces a special issue of Medical Anthropology Quarterly on health insurance and health reform. We begin by reviewing anthropological contributions to the study of financial models for health care and then discuss the unique contributions offered by the articles of this collection. The contributors demonstrate how insurance accentuates--but does not resolve tensions between granting universal access to care and rationing limited resources, between social solidarity and individual responsibility, and between private markets and public goods. Insurance does not have a single meaning, logic, or effect but needs to be viewed in practice, in context, and from multiple vantage points. As the field of insurance studies in the social sciences grows and as health reforms across the globe continue to use insurance to restructure the organization of health care, it is incumbent on medical anthropologists to undertake a renewed and concerted study of health insurance and health systems.

  16. Integrated Imaging and Vision Techniques for Industrial Inspection: A Special Issue on Machine Vision and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng; Ukida, H.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Forsyth, D. S.

    2010-06-05

    Imaging- and vision-based techniques play an important role in industrial inspection. The sophistication of the techniques assures high- quality performance of the manufacturing process through precise positioning, online monitoring, and real-time classification. Advanced systems incorporating multiple imaging and/or vision modalities provide robust solutions to complex situations and problems in industrial applications. A diverse range of industries, including aerospace, automotive, electronics, pharmaceutical, biomedical, semiconductor, and food/beverage, etc., have benefited from recent advances in multi-modal imaging, data fusion, and computer vision technologies. Many of the open problems in this context are in the general area of image analysis methodologies (preferably in an automated fashion). This editorial article introduces a special issue of this journal highlighting recent advances and demonstrating the successful applications of integrated imaging and vision technologies in industrial inspection.

  17. Baseline studies in the Elwha River ecosystem prior to dam removal: Introduction to the special issue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Jeffrey J.; Freilich, Jerry; Schreiner, Edward G.

    2008-01-01

    The planned removal of two dams that have been in place for over 95 years on the Elwha River provides a unique opportunity to study dam removal effects. Among the largest dams ever considered for removal, this project is compelling because 83% of the watershed lies undisturbed in Olympic National Park. Eighteen million cubic meters of sediment have accumulated in and will be released from the reservoirs, and there is potential for rehabilitating depressed Pacific salmon runs. Researchers from academia, non-profit organizations, federal and state governments, and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe are currently assessing baseline ecological conditions of the Elwha River as part of dam removal studies. We introduce dam removal topics, provide a brief history of the dams, and summarize the ecology of the Elwha River basin as an introduction to a special issue devoted to research in the watershed.

  18. Special Issue on "Instanton Counting: Moduli Spaces, Representation Theory, and Integrable Systems"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzo, Ugo; Sala, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Geometry and Physics collects some papers that were presented during the workshop "Instanton Counting: Moduli Spaces, Representation Theory, and Integrable Systems" that took place at the Lorentz Center in Leiden, The Netherlands, from 16 to 20 June 2014. The workshop was supported by the Lorentz Center, the "Geometry and Quantum Theory" Cluster, Centre Européen pour les Mathématiques, la Physique et leurs Interactions (Lille, France), Laboratoire Angevin de Recherche en Mathématiques (Angers, France), SISSA (Trieste, Italy), and Foundation Compositio (Amsterdam, the Netherlands). We deeply thank all these institutions for making the workshop possible. We also thank the other organizers of the workshop, Professors Dimitri Markushevich, Vladimir Rubtsov and Sergey Shadrin, for their efforts and great collaboration.

  19. Introduction to the Special Issue on Digital Signal Processing in Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, D. C.; Kocz, J.; Bailes, M.; Greenhill, L. J.

    Advances in astronomy are intimately linked to advances in digital signal processing (DSP). This special issue is focused upon advances in DSP within radio astronomy. The trend within that community is to use off-the-shelf digital hardware where possible and leverage advances in high performance computing. In particular, graphics processing units (GPUs) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are being used in place of application-specific circuits (ASICs); high-speed Ethernet and Infiniband are being used for interconnect in place of custom backplanes. Further, to lower hurdles in digital engineering, communities have designed and released general-purpose FPGA-based DSP systems, such as the CASPER ROACH board, ASTRON Uniboard, and CSIRO Redback board. In this introductory paper, we give a brief historical overview, a summary of recent trends, and provide an outlook on future directions.

  20. The phonetics of talk in interaction--introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Richard

    2012-03-01

    This overview paper provides an introduction to work on naturally-occurring speech data, combining techniques of conversation analysis with techniques and methods from phonetics. The paper describes the development of the field, highlighting current challenges and progress in interdisciplinary work. It considers the role of quantification and its relationship to a qualitative methodology. It presents the conversation analytic notion of sequence as a version of context, and argues that sequences of talk constrain relevant phonetic design, and so provide one account for variability in naturally occurring speech. The paper also describes the manipulation of speech and language on many levels simultaneously. All of these themes occur and are explored in more detail in the papers contained in this special issue.

  1. Role of magmatism in continental lithosphere extension: an introduction to tectnophysics special issue

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wijk, Jolante W

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics and evolution of rifts and continental rifted margins have been the subject of intense study and debate for many years and still remain the focus of active investigation. The 2006 AGU Fall Meeting session 'Extensional Processes Leading to the Formation of Basins and Rifted Margins, From Volcanic to Magma-Limited' included several contributions that illustrated recent advances in our understanding of rifting processes, from the early stages of extension to breakup and incipient seafloor spreading. Following this session, we aimed to assemble a multi-disciplinary collection of papers focussing on the architecture, formation and evolution of continental rift zones and rifted margins. This Tectonophysics Special Issue 'Role of magmatism in continental lithosphere extension' comprises 14 papers that present some of the recent insights on rift and rifted margins dynamics, emphasising the role of magmatism in extensional processes. The purpose of this contribution is to introduce these papers.

  2. The Importance of the Prenatal Environment in Behavioral Genetics: Introduction to Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Knopik, Valerie S; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; de Geus, Eco; Boomsma, Dorret

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and discuss a special issue on prenatal factors in genetics research, that includes 14 papers ranging from studies on chorionicity, smoking during pregnancy, and more general prenatal risks to papers about theory, methods and measurement. There are two review papers, one focused on chorioncity and the second on pre- and perinatal ischemia-hypoxia, that help to frame the state of research in these areas with a focus on the relevance across multiple fields of study. Taken together, these papers clearly demonstrate the importance of considering prenatal environment influences on functioning in offspring across the lifespan while also underscoring the importance of using genetically informed designs as a means to clarify causality.

  3. Guest editorial: Introduction to the special issue on modern control for computer games.

    PubMed

    Argyriou, Vasileios; Kotsia, Irene; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Petrou, Maria

    2013-12-01

    A typical gaming scenario, as developed in the past 20 years, involves a player interacting with a game using a specialized input device, such as a joystic, a mouse, a keyboard, etc. Recent technological advances and new sensors (for example, low cost commodity depth cameras) have enabled the introduction of more elaborated approaches in which the player is now able to interact with the game using his body pose, facial expressions, actions, and even his physiological signals. A new era of games has already started, employing computer vision techniques, brain-computer interfaces systems, haptic and wearable devices. The future lies in games that will be intelligent enough not only to extract the player's commands provided by his speech and gestures but also his behavioral cues, as well as his/her emotional states, and adjust their game plot accordingly in order to ensure more realistic and satisfactory gameplay experience. This special issue on modern control for computer games discusses several interdisciplinary factors that influence a user's input to a game, something directly linked to the gaming experience. These include, but are not limited to, the following: behavioral affective gaming, user satisfaction and perception, motion capture and scene modeling, and complete software frameworks that address several challenges risen in such scenarios.

  4. Introduction to the Culture, Health & Sexuality Virtual Special Issue on sex, sexuality and sex work.

    PubMed

    Allman, Dan; Ditmore, Melissa Hope

    2016-05-18

    This article provides an editorial introduction to a virtual special issue on sex work and prostitution. It offers a brief history of sex work studies as published in the journal Culture, Health & Sexuality; reflects on the breadth and scope of papers the journal has published; considers the contribution of the journal's papers to the wellbeing and sexuality of people who sell sex; and envisions future areas of inquiry for sex work studies. As authors, we identify major themes within the journal's archive, including activism, agency, context, discourse, hazard, health, legalisation, love, place, power, race, relationships, stigma and vulnerabilities. In particular, we reflect on how HIV has created an environment in which issues of culture, health and sexuality have come to be disentangled from the moral agendas of earlier years. As a venue for the dissemination of a reinvigorated scholarship, Culture, Health & Sexuality provides a platform for a community of often like-minded, rigorous thinkers, to provide new and established perspectives, methods and voices and to present important developments in studies of sex, sexuality and sex work.

  5. Fire and worker health and safety: an introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard; Levenstein, Charles

    2015-02-01

    One century ago, the landmark fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City claimed the lives of 146 garment workers and helped spur the adoption of fire safety measures and laws targeting dangerous working conditions. Since that time, continuing advances have been made to address the threat of fire-in workplace fire safety practices and regulations, in training and safety requirements for firefighters and first responders, and in hazard communication laws that enhance disaster planning and response. Recent high profile events, including the West, Texas fertilizer plant explosion, derailments of fuel cargo trains, and garment factory fires in Bangladesh, have brought renewed attention to fire as a workplace health and safety issue and to the unevenness of safety standards and regulatory enforcement, in the United States as well as internationally. In this article, we provide an overview of fire as a workplace health and safety hazard and an introduction to the essays included in this special issue of New Solutions on fire and work.

  6. Introduction to the special issue: parsimony and redundancy in models of language.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Daniel; Kerz, Elma; Snider, Neal; Jaeger, T Florian

    2013-09-01

    One of the most fundamental goals in linguistic theory is to understand the nature of linguistic knowledge, that is, the representations and mechanisms that figure in a cognitively plausible model of human language-processing. The past 50 years have witnessed the development and refinement of various theories about what kind of 'stuff' human knowledge of language consists of, and technological advances now permit the development of increasingly sophisticated computational models implementing key assumptions of different theories from both rationalist and empiricist perspectives. The present special issue does not aim to present or discuss the arguments for and against the two epistemological stances or discuss evidence that supports either of them (cf. Bod, Hay, & Jannedy, 2003; Christiansen & Chater, 2008; Hauser, Chomsky, & Fitch, 2002; Oaksford & Chater, 2007; O'Donnell, Hauser, & Fitch, 2005). Rather, the research presented in this issue, which we label usage-based here, conceives of linguistic knowledge as being induced from experience. According to the strongest of such accounts, the acquisition and processing of language can be explained with reference to general cognitive mechanisms alone (rather than with reference to innate language-specific mechanisms). Defined in these terms, usage-based approaches encompass approaches referred to as experience-based, performance-based and/or emergentist approaches (Amrnon & Snider, 2010; Bannard, Lieven, & Tomasello, 2009; Bannard & Matthews, 2008; Chater & Manning, 2006; Clark & Lappin, 2010; Gerken, Wilson, & Lewis, 2005; Gomez, 2002;

  7. Introduction to the Special Issue: Advances in island plant biology since Sherwin Carlquist's Island Biology.

    PubMed

    Traveset, Anna; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Kueffer, Christoph; Bellingham, Peter J; Morden, Clifford; Drake, Donald R

    2015-12-31

    Sherwin Carlquist's seminal publications-in particular his classic Island Biology, published in 1974-formulated hypotheses specific to island biology that remain valuable today. This special issue brings together some of the most interesting contributions presented at the First Island Biology Symposium hosted in Honolulu on 7-11 July 2014. We compiled a total of 18 contributions that present data from multiple archipelagos across the world and from different disciplines within the plant sciences. In this introductory paper, we first provide a short overview of Carlquist's life and work and then summarize the main findings of the collated papers. A first group of papers deals with issues to which Carlquist notably contributed: long-distance dispersal, adaptive radiation and plant reproductive biology. The findings of such studies demonstrate the extent to which the field has advanced thanks to (i) the increasing availability and richness of island data, covering many taxonomic groups and islands; (ii) new information from the geosciences, phylogenetics and palaeoecology, which allows us a more realistic understanding of the geological and biological development of islands and their biotas; and (iii) the new theoretical and methodological advances that allow us to assess patterns of abundance, diversity and distribution of island biota over large spatial scales. Most other papers in the issue cover a range of topics related to plant conservation on islands, such as causes and consequences of mutualistic disruptions (due to pollinator or disperser losses, introduction of alien predators, etc.). Island biologists are increasingly considering reintroducing ecologically important species to suitable habitats within their historic range and to neighbouring islands with depauperate communities of vertebrate seed dispersers, and an instructive example is given here. Finally, contributions on ecological networks demonstrate the usefulness of this methodological tool to

  8. Introduction to the Special Issue: Advances in island plant biology since Sherwin Carlquist's Island Biology

    PubMed Central

    Traveset, Anna; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Kueffer, Christoph; Bellingham, Peter J.; Morden, Clifford; Drake, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Sherwin Carlquist's seminal publications—in particular his classic Island Biology, published in 1974—formulated hypotheses specific to island biology that remain valuable today. This special issue brings together some of the most interesting contributions presented at the First Island Biology Symposium hosted in Honolulu on 7–11 July 2014. We compiled a total of 18 contributions that present data from multiple archipelagos across the world and from different disciplines within the plant sciences. In this introductory paper, we first provide a short overview of Carlquist's life and work and then summarize the main findings of the collated papers. A first group of papers deals with issues to which Carlquist notably contributed: long-distance dispersal, adaptive radiation and plant reproductive biology. The findings of such studies demonstrate the extent to which the field has advanced thanks to (i) the increasing availability and richness of island data, covering many taxonomic groups and islands; (ii) new information from the geosciences, phylogenetics and palaeoecology, which allows us a more realistic understanding of the geological and biological development of islands and their biotas; and (iii) the new theoretical and methodological advances that allow us to assess patterns of abundance, diversity and distribution of island biota over large spatial scales. Most other papers in the issue cover a range of topics related to plant conservation on islands, such as causes and consequences of mutualistic disruptions (due to pollinator or disperser losses, introduction of alien predators, etc.). Island biologists are increasingly considering reintroducing ecologically important species to suitable habitats within their historic range and to neighbouring islands with depauperate communities of vertebrate seed dispersers, and an instructive example is given here. Finally, contributions on ecological networks demonstrate the usefulness of this methodological tool to

  9. Sleep Problems as Consequence, Contributor, and Comorbidity: Introduction to the Special Issue on Sleep, Published in Coordination With Special Issues in Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology and Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Dean W

    2016-07-01

    Despite long-standing public and scientific interest in the phenomenon of sleep, the current decade has shown tremendous growth in our understanding of the sleep of children who have medical or developmental conditions. To accommodate, promote, and guide that growth, Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology, and Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics have published coordinated special issues, encompassing >30 relevant articles. This article introduces the special issue in Journal of Pediatric Psychology, highlighting papers that illustrate how sleep problems are not only commonly comorbid with childhood medical and developmental conditions; they are also likely caused by and contribute to these conditions. In doing so, these coordinated special issues guide clinical care and reveal opportunities for future research.

  10. EDITORIAL: Special issue on applied neurodynamics: from neural dynamics to neural engineering Special issue on applied neurodynamics: from neural dynamics to neural engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiel, Hillel J.; Thomas, Peter J.

    2011-12-01

    , the sun, earth and moon) proved to be far more difficult. In the late nineteenth century, Poincaré made significant progress on this problem, introducing a geometric method of reasoning about solutions to differential equations (Diacu and Holmes 1996). This work had a powerful impact on mathematicians and physicists, and also began to influence biology. In his 1925 book, based on his work starting in 1907, and that of others, Lotka used nonlinear differential equations and concepts from dynamical systems theory to analyze a wide variety of biological problems, including oscillations in the numbers of predators and prey (Lotka 1925). Although little was known in detail about the function of the nervous system, Lotka concluded his book with speculations about consciousness and the implications this might have for creating a mathematical formulation of biological systems. Much experimental work in the 1930s and 1940s focused on the biophysical mechanisms of excitability in neural tissue, and Rashevsky and others continued to apply tools and concepts from nonlinear dynamical systems theory as a means of providing a more general framework for understanding these results (Rashevsky 1960, Landahl and Podolsky 1949). The publication of Hodgkin and Huxley's classic quantitative model of the action potential in 1952 created a new impetus for these studies (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952). In 1955, FitzHugh published an important paper that summarized much of the earlier literature, and used concepts from phase plane analysis such as asymptotic stability, saddle points, separatrices and the role of noise to provide a deeper theoretical and conceptual understanding of threshold phenomena (Fitzhugh 1955, Izhikevich and FitzHugh 2006). The Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations constituted an important two-dimensional simplification of the four-dimensional Hodgkin and Huxley equations, and gave rise to an extensive literature of analysis. Many of the papers in this special issue build on tools

  11. Why wasn't prevention included? Comment on the special issue on undergraduate education in psychology (2016).

    PubMed

    Clanton Harpine, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    In the February/March 2016 special issue, articles by Gurung et al. (2016) and Norcross et al. (2016) called for change in undergraduate education; however, the special issue failed to include prevention. This comment shows that undergraduate education should include a specialization in prevention, focusing on prevention groups. This could offer a new 4-year career path in psychology, expanding psychology student job opportunities. Prevention groups include health prevention, school-based prevention, violence and anger prevention, and bullying prevention. With many 4-year psychology majors looking for work, a 4-year specialization in prevention groups could help students secure psychology-related employment while meeting community needs. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Employer Policies and Practices to Manage and Prevent Disability: Foreword to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Shaw, William S; Main, Chris J; Pransky, Glenn; Nicholas, Michael K; Anema, Johannes R; Linton, Steven J

    2016-12-01

    working groups are presented in the following six articles in this special issue of the Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation. Conference attendees recommended changes in methodology, collaboration strategies, and theoretical perspectives to improve the practical and scientific impact of future research of employer practices.

  13. BIOFLUID MECHANICS OF SPECIAL ORGANS AND THE ISSUE OF SYSTEM CONTROL

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, Mair; Moore, James E.; Fujioka, Hideki; Gaver, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    independently from the physiological controls and regulations that govern these same variables. This implies that any failure of the system can be fully explained in terms of the laws of fluid mechanics, which of course is not the case. While a system failure due to a physical obstruction in a blood vessel can be readily explained in terms of the laws of fluid mechanics, a system failure due to arrhythmia cannot. In this paper we examine the clinical implications of these issues and of the special biofluid mechanics issues that arise in the lymphatic and pulmonary systems. PMID:20336840

  14. A great pioneer of clinical science remembered: introduction to the special issue in honor of Paul E. Meehl.

    PubMed

    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Waller, Niels G

    2005-10-01

    In this special issue, the seminal contributions to clinical psychology of Paul E. Meehl, who passed away in 2003, are commemorated. The nine articles comprising this special issue chronicle Meehl's remarkable intellectual biography and examine his influence on diverse domains of psychology, including the clinical versus actuarial prediction debate, the cognitive activity of the clinician, personality assessment and trait theory, the etiology of schizophrenia, the shortcomings of statistical significance testing, and the use of metascientific methods to evaluate competing models of human nature. These articles illustrate not only Meehl's legendary brilliance but also his pivotal role in forcing clinical psychologists to think more clearly and incisively about their subject matter.

  15. The virtue of culture in understanding motivation at school: Commentary on the special issue on culture and motivation.

    PubMed

    Guay, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Students' higher level of motivation is not based solely on intrapersonal factors as innate characteristics, but also on contexts in which students are supposed to develop their competencies. Thus, the cultural context is expected to shape motivation. Values and beliefs shared by a cultural group will affect students' motivation to learn and educational outcomes. This special issue on culture and motivation presents a collection of ground-breaking research ideas that advance our knowledge on how motivation is shaped by the cultural context and how motivation processes are affected by the cultural milieu. Hopefully, this special issue will stimulate new research that will advance our understanding of motivation at school.

  16. The VAST Challenge: History, Scope, and Outcomes: An introduction to the Special Issue

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Kristin A.; Grinstein, Georges; Whiting, Mark A.

    2014-10-01

    Visual analytics aims to facilitate human insight from complex data via a combination of visual representations, interaction techniques, and supporting algorithms. To create new tools and techniques that achieve this goal requires that researchers have an understanding of analytical questions to be addressed, data that illustrates the complexities and ambiguities found in realistic analytic settings, and methods for evaluating whether the plausible insights are gained through use of the new methods. However, researchers do not, generally speaking, have access to analysts who can articulate their problems or operational data that is used for analysis. To fill this gap, the Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST) Challenge has been held annually since 2006. The VAST Challenge provides an opportunity for researchers to experiment with realistic but not real problems, using realistic synthetic data with known events embedded. Since its inception, the VAST Challenge has evolved along with the visual analytics research community to pose more complex challenges, ranging from text analysis to video analysis to large scale network log analysis. The seven years of the VAST Challenge have seen advancements in research and development, education, evaluation, and in the challenge process itself. This special issue of Information Visualization highlights some of the noteworthy advancements in each of these areas. Some of these papers focus on important research questions related to the challenge itself, and other papers focus on innovative research that has been shaped by participation in the challenge. This paper describes the VAST Challenge process and benefits in detail. It also provides an introduction to and context for the remaining papers in the issue.

  17. Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-12-11

    Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in the series as well as the proceedings, and special issues resulting form the meetings. Penner and Novakov (Penner and Novakov, 1996) provide an excellent historical perspective to the early ICCPA Conferences. Thirty years later, the ninth in this conference series was held at its inception site, Berkeley, California, attended by 160 scientists from 31 countries, and featuring both new and old themes in 49 oral and 83 poster presentations. Topics covered such areas as historical trends in black carbon aerosol, ambient concentrations, analytic techniques, secondary aerosol formation, biogenic, biomass, and HULIS1 characterization, optical properties, and regional and global climate effects. The conference website, http://iccpa.lbl.gov/, holds the agenda, as well as many presentations, for the 9th ICCPA. The 10th ICCPA is tentatively scheduled for 2011 in Vienna, Austria. The papers in this issue are representative of several of the themes discussed in the conference. Ban-Weiss et al., (Ban-Weiss et al., accepted) measured the abundance of ultrafine particles in a traffic tunnel and found that heavy duty diesel trucks emit at least an order of magnitude more ultrafine particles than light duty gas-powered vehicles per unit of fuel burned. Understanding of this issue is important as ultrafine particles have been shown to

  18. Introduction to the special issue, pathways between genes, brain, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Kremen, William S; Jacobson, Kristen C

    2010-03-01

    In the past 10 years or so, with the sequencing of the human genome and rapid advances in the development of high throughput techniques, the field of behavior genetics has increasingly moved toward the detection of actual genes and environmental factors. However, the field is still in the relatively early stages of understanding some of the basic facts about the complex genetic underpinnings of brain structure and function and their relationship to behavior. The 15 articles in this special issue were selected to represent the diversity of methodologies applied to the complexity of pathways linking genes, brain, and behavior. While providing strong evidence for the role of genes in individual differences in brain structure and function, these papers also demonstrate that environmental experiences alter neurobiological pathways, and that genetic factors may further moderate the impact of environmental experience. Most importantly, the breadth of studies proves that in order to be able to trace the pathways between genes, brain, and behavior, we need experts in genetics, neuroscience, psychology, and psychiatry.

  19. Residence times in subsurface hydrological systems, introduction to the Special Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dreuzy, J.-R.; Ginn, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    Interest in the residence time distribution (RTD) as a comprehensive measure of subsurface hydrologic systems is growing. This focus is resulting from recognition that diverse vadose zone, groundwater flows, and transfer between hydrological compartments, are fundamentally related to the system RTD. Furthermore, transport of chemical or biological species and the biogeochemical activities that govern their fate, is principally reflected by the system RTD. Thus the RTD is used in geochemical interpretation of environmental tracers, in direct reactive transport approaches, and ultimately for sustainability and protection assessments in the consideration of transient boundary flows due to climate change or other causes, anthropogenic and/or natural. The RTD has been handled in the past primarily as a byproduct of models. It is now increasingly viewed as an integrative characteristic for which shape-free and generic distributions are developed, that links conceptual hydrology, characterization data, and mathematical models. Intermediary between mechanistic modeling, geochemical data and predictions, the role for residence time distribution is to represent consistently the flow, transport and reactivity processes while reaching the objective of biogeochemical interpretation and sustainability assessment. After some outline of the scientific context, we introduce the contributions of this special issue and conclude with the emerging challenges.

  20. New Trends and Directions in Ethnic Identity Among Internationally Transracially Adopted Persons: Summary of Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Rosnati, Rosa; Pinderhughes, Ellen E; Baden, Amanda L; Grotevant, Harold D; Lee, Richard M; Mohanty, Jayashree

    2015-12-01

    The collective findings of the six articles in this special issue highlight the importance of ethnic-racial socialization and ethnic identity among international transracial adoptees (ITRAs). A multidimensional developmental phenomenon, ethnic identity intersects with other identities, notably adoptive identity. Family, peers, community, and host culture are important socialization contexts that engage transracial adoptees in transactional processes that promote ethnic identity development. New directions in research were identified, including developmental processes in navigating ethnic and other identities, similarities and differences in ethnic identity between ITRAs and immigrants, the effectiveness of interventions targeting ethnic identity in ITRAs, and the impact of discrimination on ethnic identity construction and the role of social and national contexts. Implications for policies and practices were discussed, such as pre- and postadoption supports for adoptees and parents that provide developmentally appropriate support for positive ethnic identity; training for professionals working with ITRAs and their families; and intercountry practices that promote connection with cultures of origin. Lessons about ITRAs and their ethnic identity in transaction with multiple social contexts enhance understanding of how all individuals navigate multiple identities.

  1. Special issue on mercury in Canada's North: summary and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Chételat, John; Braune, Birgit; Stow, Jason; Tomlinson, Scott

    2015-03-15

    Important scientific advances have been made over the last decade in identifying the environmental fate of mercury and the processes that control its cycling in the Canadian Arctic. This special issue includes a series of six detailed reviews that summarize the main findings of a scientific assessment undertaken by the Government of Canada's Northern Contaminants Program. It was the first assessment to focus exclusively on mercury pollution in the Canadian Arctic. Key findings, as detailed in the reviews, relate to sources and long-range transport of mercury to the Canadian Arctic, its cycling within marine, freshwater, and terrestrial environments, and its bioaccumulation in, and effects on, the biota that live there. While these accomplishments are significant, the complex nature of the mercury cycle continues to provide challenges in characterizing and quantifying the relationships of mercury sources and transport processes with mercury levels in biota and biological effects of mercury exposure. Of particular concern are large uncertainties in our understanding of the processes that are contributing to increasing mercury concentrations in some Arctic fish and wildlife. Specific recommendations are provided for future research and monitoring of the environmental impacts of anthropogenic mercury emissions, influences of climate change, and the effectiveness of mitigation strategies for mercury in the Canadian Arctic.

  2. Introduction for the special issue on recent advances in drug delivery across tissue barriers.

    PubMed

    Mrsny, Randall J; Brayden, David J

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of Tissue Barriers contains a series of reviews with the common theme of how biological barriers established at epithelial tissues limit the uptake of macromolecular therapeutics. By improving our functional understanding of these barriers, the majority of the authors have highlighted potential strategies that might be applied to the non-invasive delivery of biopharmaceuticals that would otherwise require an injection format for administration. Half of the articles focus on the potential of particular technologies to assist oral delivery of peptides, proteins and other macromolecules. These include use of prodrug chemistry to improve molecule stability and permeability, and the related potential for oral delivery of poorly permeable agents by cell-penetrating peptides and dendrimers. Safety aspects of intestinal permeation enhancers are discussed, along with the more recent foray into drug-device combinations as represented by intestinal microneedles and externally-applied ultrasound. Other articles highlight the crossover between food research and oral delivery based on nanoparticle technology, while the final one provides a fascinating interpretation of the physiological problems associated with subcutaneous insulin delivery and how inefficient it is at targeting the liver.

  3. Introduction to the special issue on GOCE Earth science applications and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meijde, M.; Pail, R.; Bingham, R.

    2015-03-01

    With the launch of the Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) in 2009 the study of Earth's gravity field received another boost. After the time-dependent and long-wavelength information from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission a new sensor with high accuracy and spatial resolution was available for determination of the Earth's gravity field and geoid. Equipped with a 6-component gradiometer and flying at an altitude of 260 km and less, GOCE provides the most detailed measurements of Earth's gravity from space to date. Additionally, GOCE provides gravity gradients, i.e., the three-dimensional second derivatives of the gravitational potential. This special issue provides a review of the results presented at the 'GOCE solid Earth workshop' at the University of Twente, The Netherlands (2012). The goal of this 2-day workshop was to provide training on the usage of GOCE data as well as to present the latest scientific results. The main workshop components were: to show the latest results on GOCE data in relation to solid Earth, provide new users with tips and tricks on which models and software to use, discuss quality and reliability of gravity data and models, and how to integrate GOCE data with own (local) gravity data. The workshop specifically focussed on where GOCE data has made a unique contribution and provides insights that would not have been possible without GOCE.

  4. The Seemingly Quixotic Pursuit of a Cumulative Psychological Science: Introduction to the Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    The following manuscript is the final accepted manuscript. It has not been subjected to the final copyediting, fact-checking, and proofreading required for formal publication. It is not the definitive, publisher-authenticated version. The American Psychological Association and its Council of Editors disclaim any responsibility or liabilities for errors or omissions of this manuscript version, any version derived from this manuscript by NIH, or other third parties. The published version is available at www.apa.org/journals/met. The goal of any empirical science is to pursue the construction of a cumulative base of knowledge upon which the future of the science may be built. However, there is mixed evidence that the science of psychology can accurately be characterized by such a cumulative progression. Indeed, some argue that the development of a truly cumulative psychological science is not possible using the current paradigms of hypothesis testing in single-study designs. The author explores this controversy as a framework to introduce the six papers that make up this special issue that is focused on the integration of data and empirical findings across multiple studies. The author proposes that the methods and techniques described in this set of papers can significantly propel us forward in our ongoing quest to build a cumulative psychological science. PMID:19485622

  5. Disaster Mental Health and Positive Psychology: An Afterward to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Southwick, Steven M; Satodiya, Ritvij; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2016-12-01

    The articles in this Special Issue are devoted to integrating the fields of disaster mental health and positive psychology. Their focus on resilience building, individual and community preparation, meaning making, and posttraumatic growth represents an important new development in disaster mental health. The overarching goal of this effort is to inform strategies to help both individuals-including children, adolescent, adult disaster survivors, and relief workers-and communities prepare for, respond to, recover from, and possibly even grow stronger in the face of adversity. To achieve this goal, this body of literature suggests that it is important for disaster mental health workers to partner with community leaders, organizations, and the population at large to understand community vulnerabilities, take advantage of existing strengths, and respect cultural factors implicated in disaster recovery. It further suggests that an effective community-based approach to disaster recovery will make psychosocial support and skill-building programs available to large numbers of survivors, which is critical for responding to future national and international disasters. Continued high-quality research that is comprehensive and considers not only relevant psychological, social, cultural, and biological factors but also interrelations between individuals, organizations and communities is needed to advance this relatively new and important direction of the disaster mental health field.

  6. Introduction to the Special Issue: Across the horizon: scale effects in global change research.

    PubMed

    Gornish, Elise S; Leuzinger, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the increasing speed and magnitude in which habitats worldwide are experiencing environmental change, making accurate predictions of the effects of global change on ecosystems and the organisms that inhabit them have become an important goal for ecologists. Experimental and modelling approaches aimed at understanding the linkages between factors of global change and biotic responses have become numerous and increasingly complex in order to adequately capture the multifarious dynamics associated with these relationships. However, constrained by resources, experiments are often conducted at small spatiotemporal scales (e.g. looking at a plot of a few square metres over a few years) and at low organizational levels (looking at organisms rather than ecosystems) in spite of both theoretical and experimental work that suggests ecological dynamics across scales can be dissimilar. This phenomenon has been hypothesized to occur because the mechanisms that drive dynamics across scales differ. A good example is the effect of elevated CO2 on transpiration. While at the leaf level, transpiration can be reduced, at the stand level, transpiration can increase because leaf area per unit ground area increases. The reported net effect is then highly dependent on the spatiotemporal scale. This special issue considers the biological relevancy inherent in the patterns associated with the magnitude and type of response to changing environmental conditions, across scales. This collection of papers attempts to provide a comprehensive treatment of this phenomenon in order to help develop an understanding of the extent of, and mechanisms involved with, ecological response to global change.

  7. Sandia technology. Volume 13, number 2 Special issue : verification of arms control treaties.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Nuclear deterrence, a cornerstone of US national security policy, has helped prevent global conflict for over 40 years. The DOE and DoD share responsibility for this vital part of national security. The US will continue to rely on nuclear deterrence for the foreseeable future. In the late 1950s, Sandia developed satellite-borne nuclear burst detection systems to support the treaty banning atmospheric nuclear tests. This activity has continued to expand and diversify. When the Non-Proliferation Treaty was ratified in 1970, we began to develop technologies to protect nuclear materials from falling into unauthorized hands. This program grew and now includes systems for monitoring the movement and storage of nuclear materials, detecting tampering, and transmiting sensitive data securely. In the late 1970s, negotiations to further limit underground nuclear testing were being actively pursued. In less than 18 months, we fielded the National Seismic Station, an unattended observatory for in-country monitoring of nuclear tests. In the mid-l980s, arms-control interest shifted to facility monitoring and on-site inspection. Our Technical On-site Inspection Facility is the national test bed for perimeter and portal monitoring technology and the prototype for the inspection portal that was recently installed in the USSR under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces accord. The articles in the special issue of Sundiu Technology describe some of our current contributions to verification technology. This work supports the US policy to seek realistic arms control agreements while maintaining our national security.

  8. Issues in Educating Students with Disabilities. The LEA Series on Special Education and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, John Wills, Ed.; Kameenui, Edward J., Ed.; Chard, David, Ed.

    This book is designed to reaffirm the value of special instruction and to provide information on current research and practice which shows productive and successful outcomes. It addresses the definition of disabilities, the assessment of disabilities, instruction, special populations, special education legislation and policy, and integration.…

  9. Preparing Special Education Higher Education Faculty: The Influences of Contemporary Education Issues and Policy Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deBettencourt, Laurie U.; Hoover, John J.; Rude, Harvey A.; Taylor, Shanon S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a well-documented need for leadership personnel who are prepared at the doctoral level to fill special education faculty positions at institutions of higher education (IHEs) and train the next generation of teachers. The intersection of continued retirements of special education faculty, shortage of well-prepared special education faculty…

  10. An Issue Hiding in Plain Sight: When Are Speech-Language Pathologists Special Educators Rather than Related Services Providers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giangreco, Michael F.; Prelock, Patricia A.; Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA; as amended, 2004), speech-language pathology services may be either special education or a related service. Given the absence of guidance documents or research on this issue, the purposes of this clinical exchange are to (a) present and analyze the IDEA definitions related to…

  11. Library Instruction for the 21st Century: Introduction to a Special LOEX-of-the-West Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essinger, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Provides a historical overview of LOEX-of-the-West (Library Orientation Exchange) while introducing this special issue of RSR that includes presentations from the 1998 conference, "Library Instruction for the 21st Century." The first LOEX-of-the-West Conference was held at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon in June 1994. (AEF)

  12. Demographic and School Characteristics of Students Receiving Special Education in the Elementary Grades. Issue Brief. NCES 2007-005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, William L.; McGrath, Daniel J.; Buckley, Jacquelyn A.

    2007-01-01

    This Issue Brief provides a detailed description of the proportion of elementary school students receiving special education in kindergarten, first grade, third grade, and fifth grade; the primary disabilities of these students; and the variation in these measures across a range of demographic and school characteristics. Data for this analysis are…

  13. On Instructional Utility, Statistical Methodology, and the Added Value of ECD: Lessons Learned from the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Brian; Nugent, Rebecca; Rupp, Andre A.

    2012-01-01

    This special issue of "JEDM" was dedicated to bridging work done in the disciplines of "educational and psychological assessment" and "educational data mining" (EDM) via the assessment design and implementation framework of "evidence-centered design" (ECD). It consisted of a series of five papers: one…

  14. Opportunities and Challenges: Perspectives on NCLBA from Special Education Directors in Urban School Districts. EPRRI Issue Brief Six

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, Kate; Crawford, Jinny

    2004-01-01

    This issue brief presents the views of 13 individuals, all in special education leadership positions in selected urban school districts in the United States, concerning the opportunities and challenges their districts face in implementing key NCLBA requirements for students with disabilities. Results from a survey and two focus groups reveal that…

  15. A special issue on reviews in biomedical applications of nanomaterials, tissue engineering, stem cells, bioimaging, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2014-10-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology in a series contains another 30 state-of-the-art reviews focused on the biomedical applications of nanomaterials, biosensors, bone tissue engineering, MRI and bioimaging, single-cell detection, stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, toxicity and biosafety of nanodrugs, nanoparticle-based new therapeutic approaches for cancer, hepatic and cardiovascular disease.

  16. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources or methods, or of classified cryptologic records in NARA's holdings? 1260.26 Section 1260... procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources...

  17. 36 CFR 1260.26 - Who is responsible for issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... issuing special procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources or methods, or of classified cryptologic records in NARA's holdings? 1260.26 Section 1260... procedures for declassification of records pertaining to intelligence activities and intelligence sources...

  18. Minority Students & Special Education: The Issues of Placement and Proportion. Model Programs and Practical Approaches. Spring Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Idola J., Ed.; Goodale, Ronda, Ed.

    The second of two documents on issues concerned with limited English speaking students in Massachusetts special education programs, this report presents proceedings from a 1982 conference. Sixteen presentations are summarized and results of participants' evaluations on six-item questionnaires are included. Topics covered in the workshop sessions…

  19. Literacy: Focus on Asia and the Pacific. Special Issue To Commemorate International Literacy Year 1990. ASPBAE Courier No. 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heslop, Yvonne, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This special issue of the "Courier" has been produced to mark the beginning of International Literacy Year 1990. It brings together papers from adult educators involved in literacy work about who needs literacy and why, what literacy is, who can help in creating the right conditions for literacy to succeed, and how to evaluate literacy…

  20. Richard E. Snow's Remaking of the Concept of Aptitude and Multidimensional Test Validity: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavelson, Richard J.; Roeser, Robert W.; Kupermintz, Haggai; Lau, Shun; Ayala, Carlos; Haydel, Angela; Schultz, Susan; Gallagher, Larry; Quihuis, Gisell

    2002-01-01

    Describes some of the "big ideas" of Richard E. Snow about aptitude, person-situation transaction, and test validity. Also describes the design of a high school study undertaken to explore some of Snow's ideas further and introduces the articles of this special issue. (SLD)

  1. Virtual special issues: A new outreach effort from The Journal of Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydman, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    The Journal of Magnetic Resonance (JMR) prides itself in the quality of its publications. JMR has seen ground-breaking concepts appear in its pages, and literally whole sub-fields have sprung up from ideas published in its articles, equations and data. The search for original papers arising from you, the magnetic resonance expert, user, contributor and reader, was and remains the Journal's raison d'etre. This bottom-up approach seeks to give an outlet to contributions from all areas of magnetic resonance, while keeping the vibrancy, depth and ingenuity that have characterized our field and our Journal for nearly fifty years. While our ambition to be a forum for all matters concerning NMR, MRI, EPR and NQR -principles and applications, science and engineering, solids and liquids, physics and chemistry- lies at the core of our editorial spirit, it also raises a paradoxical situation. The variety of topics that magnetic resonance has given origin to and that JMR intends to cover, coupled with the multiplication of journals and the diversification in publication media formats, pose severe challenges to the scientist trying to keep abreast of the latest developments in our field. In order to deal with such challenge we are hereby launching, in partnership with Elsevier, a new effort: the Virtual Special Issue (VSI). Convinced that our papers contain excellent science that may go under-noticed in the short term, VSIs seek to highlight recent original JMR publications within the context of a relatively focused area of magnetic resonance. To do so the editorial team -working together with the magnetic resonance community at large- seeks to identify a thematic goal represented by JMR, and compile on its basis a homogeneous monograph relying on papers that have been recently published or accepted in the Journal. In order to bring these VSIs to our constituency we have designed a special workflow for these selected papers: while these publications will keep their original doi

  2. Preface: Special issue featuring papers from the International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, L.; Bordone, P.; Brunetti, R.

    2004-02-01

    through the Advisory and Program Committees and peer review, 162 papers were selected for publication by the Institute of Physics Publishing in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The financial support that allowed conference organization and helped researchers with budget difficulties to attend came from the following institutions which are gratefully acknowledged: Office of Naval Research (ONR), Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), Office of Naval Research International Field Office (ONRIFO), International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), Italian Ministry of Education University and Research (MIUR), National Institute for the Physics of Matter (INFM), University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’ Innovazione of the Lecce University. Finally, sincere thanks are addressed to the technical staff who provided assistance during the conference: G Angelone, M Benassi, F Grossi, M Leuzzi, A Magnani, S Montanto, L Zagni and D Zanfi. The staff of the University Press Office together with F Goggi and N Minto are acknowledged for their excellent job in printing the conference documents.

  3. Long-Term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications for Environmental Management [Special Issue

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Marshall; Brandt, Craig C; Christensen, Sigurd W; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Ham, Kenneth; Kszos, Lynn A; Loar, James M; McCracken, Kitty; Morris, Gail Wright; Peterson, Mark J; Ryon, Michael G; Smith, John G; Southworth, George R; Stewart, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

  4. EDITORIAL: Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoham, Shy; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-08-01

    a single spine, with two-photon uncaging) and in rapid, flexible spatial-temporal patterns [10-14]. Nevertheless, current technology generally requires damaging doses of UV or violet illumination and the continuous re-introduction of the caged compound, which, despite interest, makes for a difficult transition beyond in vitro preparations. Thus, the tremendous progress in the in vivo application of photo-stimulation tools over the past five years has been largely facilitated by two 'exciting' new photo-stimulation technologies: photo-biological stimulation of a rapidly increasing arsenal of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps ('optogenetic' probes[15-18]) and direct photo-thermal stimulation of neural tissue with an IR laser [19-21]. The Journal of Neural Engineering has dedicated a special section in this issue to highlight advances in optical stimulation technology, which includes original peer-reviewed contributions dealing with the design of modern optical systems for spatial-temporal control of optical excitation patterns and with the biophysics of neural-thermal interaction mediated by electromagnetic waves. The paper by Nikolenko, Peterka and Yuste [22] presents a compact design of a microscope-photo-stimulator based on a transmissive phase-modulating spatial-light modulator (SLM). Computer-generated holographic photo-stimulation using SLMs [12-14, 23] allows the efficient parallel projection of intense sparse patterns of light, and the welcome development of compact, user-friendly systems will likely reduce the barrier to its widespread adoption. The paper by Losavio et al [24] presents the design and functional characteristics of their acousto-optical deflector (AOD) systems for studying spatial-temporal dendritic integration in single neurons in vitro. Both single-photon (UV) and two-photon (femtosecond pulsed IR) AOD uncaging systems are described in detail. The paper presents an excellent overview of the current state of the art and limitations of

  5. 43 CFR 2932.26 - How will BLM decide whether to issue a Special Recreation Permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) PERMITS FOR RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS Special Recreation Permits for Commercial Use, Competitive...

  6. Special Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disability in Saudi Arabia: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnahdi, Ghaleb Hamad

    2014-01-01

    Special education services in Saudi Arabia have received much attention over the past 15 years. This increased attention has been reflected in the increasing amount of such services offered, including services aimed at students with intellectual disability. However, the enormous expansion of special education services was not followed by…

  7. Special Issue: Research Perspectives on Multi-Tiered System of Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utley, Cheryl A.; Obiakor, Festus E.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based programs and interventions targeting special education programs fall within a multi-tiered system of support (MTSS) which consists of increased instructional time, interventions, and improved educational outcomes for students in general and special education. The NASP Position Statement, "Appropriate Behavioral, Social, and…

  8. Introduction to special issue on animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders and substance use disorders: Progress and gaps.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A; Evans, Suzette M

    2017-04-01

    This is an introduction to the special issue, "Animal Models of Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Substance Use Disorders: Progress and Gaps." This issue presents 6 original research reports describing the use of mice and rats to model neurodevelopmental disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the progress of the field and the gaps and challenges that remain. They also illustrate the range of conditions that are informed by animal models and identify the clinical populations that stand to benefit from their use in preclinical research. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Introduction to the Special Issue: The role of soil microbial-driven belowground processes in mediating exotic plant invasions

    PubMed Central

    Inderjit

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities are one of the multiple factors that facilitate or resist plant invasion. Regional and biogeographic studies help to determine how soil communities and the processes mediated by soil microbes are linked to other mechanisms of invasion. Both the success of plant invasions and their impacts are profoundly influenced by a wide range of soil communities and the soil processes mediated by them. With an aim to better understand the mechanisms responsible for the soil community-driven routes, a special issue of AoB PLANTS was conceived. I hope that the range of papers included in the special issue will reveal some of the complexities in soil community-mediated plant invasion. PMID:25979967

  10. Engaging Students in Modeling as an Epistemic Practice of Science: An Introduction to the Special Issue of the "Journal of Science Education and Technology"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd; Oh, Phil Seok

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an introduction for the special issue of the "Journal of Science Education and Technology" focused on science teaching and learning with models. The article provides initial framing for questions that guided the special issue. Additionally, based on our careful review of each of these articles, some discussion of…

  11. Preface to the special issue on "Regional moment tensors and stress field in South and Central America"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, Franck; Zahradnik, Jiri; Assumpção, Marcelo

    2016-11-01

    This special issue follows from the Symposium "Regional Moment Tensor Solutions: advances and new applications" held in Bogotá, Colombia, at the I Regional Assembly of the IASPEI's Latin American and Caribbean Seismological Commission (LACSC) in 2014. Seven papers are presented dealing with determination of moment tensors, focal mechanisms and the stress field in Central and South America. The study areas of each paper are indicated in the index Map of Fig. 1.

  12. Introduction to the special issue on the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric; Gill, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    The 8 invited and 17 contributed papers in this special issue focus on the following topical areas covered at the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum, held in San Francisco, California: 1) Materials and Resonators; 2) Oscillators, Synthesizers, and Noise; 3) Microwave Frequency Standards; 4) Sensors and Transducers; 5) Timekeeping and Time and Frequency Transfer; and 6) Optical Frequency Standards.

  13. Preparing Special Educators to Infuse Real Life Issues into the K-12 Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyda-Lorie, Sandra; Kritikos, Effie; Messerer, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Research shows that educators are not prepared to address real life issues such as substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, and bullying in the classroom. Yet, students with learning disabilities remain vulnerable to each of these pressing life issues. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether the curriculum infusion (CI) model increased the…

  14. Our Place at the Table: An Introduction to the Special Issue on Women's Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kees, Nathalie L.

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes that the goal for this issue is to help move the study of women's groups beyond survival and recovery issues to the thriving that can and does occur for women through their participation in women's groups. This collection of articles helps build on a growing body of literature attempting to study women's groups as a phenomena in their…

  15. Special Issue Busing. NCRIEEO Newsletter, Volume 3, Number 2, May 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Edmund W., Ed.

    Contents of this issue of the NCRIEEO Newsletter include the following articles: (1) "Editor's commentary: background to the issue," by Edmund Gordon, which puts busing into perspective as an important educational resource--like physical facilities, instructional materials, and teachers--to be used to achieve educational and social…

  16. Kenyan government to establish special tribunal for HIV-related issues.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Kelly

    2010-06-01

    On 21 January 2010, Kenyan government officials formally announced the creation of the first-ever tribunal dedicated to hearing legal issues related to HIV/AIDS. Among other things, the Tribunal will handle issues relating to the transmission of HIV; confidentiality of medical information and records; testing; access to healthcare services; discriminatory acts and policies; and HIV-related research.

  17. Public Opinion and Children's Issues: A Special Report from the Children's Defense Fund of Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Rick

    Based on findings from public opinion polls, focus groups, and related academic research, this report explores the challenges facing child advocates in framing issues for public debate. Examining the growing public sentiment supporting governmental involvement in children's issues and general perceptions regarding the causes of current problems,…

  18. Introduction to the special issue on history development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Parks, G.; Svalgaard, L.; Kamide, Y.; Lui, T.

    2016-12-01

    Solar terrestrial (ST) sciences started centuries ago and branched into different disciplines. Starting with naked eye to highly sophisticated novel experimental techniques, observations have revealed the secrets of the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, plasmasphere, and ionosphere-atmosphere components of the ST system. Theories and theoretical models have been developed for the different components independently and together. World-wide efforts under different umbrella are being persuaded to understand the challenges of the ST system. The onset problem and role of O+ ions in sub-storm physics are two issues that are hotly debated. The onset problem is whether sub-storm is triggered by magnetic reconnection in the tail region at 15-20 Re or by a current disruption at ~12 Re. The issue on O+ role is whether O+ ions affect the dynamics of sub-storms under magnetic storm and non-storm conditions differently. This special issue of Geoscience Letters contains a collection of 15 papers on the history and development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms. Over half of the papers are based on the presentations in a session on the same topic organized at the AOGS (Asia Oceania geosciences Society) General Assembly held in Singapore during 02-07 August 2015. The rest of the papers from outside the assembly also falls within the theme of the special issue. The papers are organized in the order of history and development of ST coupling, sub-storms, and outer heliosphere.

  19. Identification of a senior superfund official for addressing special npl site-related issues. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-22

    The directive identifies a senior Superfund official responsible for reviewing and addressing specific issues at NPL (National Priorities List) sites that cannot be resolved at the Regional level and identifies criteria for NPL site referrals to this official.

  20. EDITORIAL: Special issue: overview reports from the Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) (Daejeon, South Korea, 2010) Special issue: overview reports from the Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) (Daejeon, South Korea, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-09-01

    The group of 27 papers published in this special issue of Nuclear Fusion aims to monitor the worldwide progress made in the period 2008-2010 in the field of thermonuclear fusion. Of these papers, 22 are based on overview reports presented at the 23rd Fusion Energy Conference (FEC 2010) and five are summary reports. The conference was hosted by the Republic of Korea and organized by the IAEA in cooperation with the National Fusion Research Institute and the Daejeon Metropolitan City. It took place in Daejeon on 11-16 October 2010. The overviews presented at the conference have been rewritten and extended for the purpose of this special issue and submitted to the standard double-referee peer-review of Nuclear Fusion. The articles are placed in the following sequence: Conference summaries of the sessions devoted to: Tokamak and stellarator experiments, experimental divertor physics and plasma wall interaction experiments, stability experiments and waves and fast particles; ITER activities, fusion technology, safety and economics; Magnetic confinement theory and modelling; Inertial confinement fusion; Innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement. Overview articles, presented in programme order, are as follows: Tokamaks Overview of KSTAR initial experiments; Recent progress in RF heating and long-pulse experiments on EAST; Overview of JET results; DIII-D contributions toward the scientific basis for sustained burning plasmas; Overview of JT-60U results toward the resolution of key physics and engineering issues in ITER and JT-60SA; Overview of physics results from NSTX; Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results; Overview of physics results from MAST; Contribution of Tore Supra in preparation of ITER; Overview of FTU results; Overview of experimental results on the HL-2A tokamak; Progress and scientific results in the TCV tokamak; Overview of the JT-60SA project; Recent results of the T-10 tokamak; The reconstruction and research progress of the TEXT

  1. Issues of Policy and Law in Transition Services: Implications for Special Education Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petcu, Stefania D.; Yell, Mitchell L.; Cholewicki, Judith M.; Plotner, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The successful transition into adulthood of students with disabilities should be a priority for parents, students, educators, and leaders in special education. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) amendments of 1990 first mandated transition services for individuals with disabilities. Subsequent amendments to the IDEA in 1997 and…

  2. Evolutionary perspectives on learning: conceptual and methodological issues in the study of adaptive specializations.

    PubMed

    Krause, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    Inquiry into evolutionary adaptations has flourished since the modern synthesis of evolutionary biology. Comparative methods, genetic techniques, and various experimental and modeling approaches are used to test adaptive hypotheses. In psychology, the concept of adaptation is broadly applied and is central to comparative psychology and cognition. The concept of an adaptive specialization of learning is a proposed account for exceptions to general learning processes, as seen in studies of Pavlovian conditioning of taste aversions, sexual responses, and fear. The evidence generally consists of selective associations forming between biologically relevant conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, with conditioned responses differing in magnitude, persistence, or other measures relative to non-biologically relevant stimuli. Selective associations for biologically relevant stimuli may suggest adaptive specializations of learning, but do not necessarily confirm adaptive hypotheses as conceived of in evolutionary biology. Exceptions to general learning processes do not necessarily default to an adaptive specialization explanation, even if experimental results "make biological sense". This paper examines the degree to which hypotheses of adaptive specializations of learning in sexual and fear response systems have been tested using methodologies developed in evolutionary biology (e.g., comparative methods, quantitative and molecular genetics, survival experiments). A broader aim is to offer perspectives from evolutionary biology for testing adaptive hypotheses in psychological science.

  3. Exceptional Circumstances: A Blog Series on Issues in Early Childhood Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parham, Katharine

    2016-01-01

    As recently as the 1970s, only a small number of children with disabilities were educated in public schools in the U.S. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) changed everything in 1975, mandating that states accepting public funds for education must provide special education services to children with disabilities. The 40th…

  4. Legal and Ethical Issues of Persons with Special Needs in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiwe, C. C.; Omiegbe, Odirin

    2014-01-01

    Persons with special needs have innate abilities and when properly harnessed through proper education would be able to contribute ultimately to their development as well as that of the society they reside in terms of political, social, economic and technological development. Before such group of persons can be properly educated there is the dire…

  5. Issues in Urban Vocational Education for Special Populations. TASPP Brief. Volume 2, Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, Jeanne

    1990-01-01

    Families in urban areas struggle with drug abuse, poverty, increasing housing costs, and lack of affordable child care. The challenges confronting urban schools include a higher dropout rate, higher youth unemployment, and the need to address a variety of special needs of their student population, such as programs for pregnant students, dropouts,…

  6. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned, Volume 2 of 3: Appendixes A - C

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, R.A.; Davis, C.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1995-08-01

    This document is the 2nd volume of the three volume set from the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise held at Hanford in 1994. Volume 2 contains Appendices A-C, with Appendices A and B containing a discussion of the design of the PUREX process and Appendix C containing a discussion of the safeguards measures for the PUREX facility.

  7. Strategies for Students with Behavioral Issues Prior to Referral for Special Education Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Antoinette Martinez

    2010-01-01

    By law, public schools need to exhaust all general education services prior to referral for special education services (IDEA, 1990). Unfortunately, many teachers are unaware of the pre-referral interventions they can employ to teach children displaying behavior problems. The review of literature focused on the following: (a) legislative history,…

  8. Afterschool and Students with Special Needs. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Afterschool programs can provide important benefits to all students, including those who have learning, developmental and physical disabilities. Students in afterschool programs have better grades and behavior, increased self-esteem and more positive attitudes about school. For students with special needs, afterschool programs also provide a level…

  9. Introduction to The Special Issue: Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions with Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Matthew; Lochman, John; Van Acker, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in developing models of social information processing, and cognitive-behavioral processes and related interventions. While there has been limited attention to cognitive-behavioral modification (CBM) in the special education literature, the majority of the contributions have come from the fields of school,…

  10. Preservice special education teachers' understandings, enactments, views, and plans for scientific inquiry: Issues and hopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Rajlakshmi

    This study examined the understandings, enactments, views, and plans for scientific inquiry held by preservice special education teachers enrolled in a K--8 general science methods course. Sixteen participants from four special education concentration areas---Mild to Moderate Educational Needs, Moderate to Intense Educational Needs, Mild to Moderate Educational Needs with Language Arts and Reading Emphasis, and Early Childhood Intervention---participated in this study. Qualitative data were collected from questionnaires, interviews, teaching videos, lesson plans, planning commentaries, and reflection papers. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach (Strauss & Corbin, 1990) and compared against the theoretical view of inquiry as conceptualized by the National Research Council (NRC, 2000). The participants held unique interpretations of inquiry that only partially matched with the theoretical insights provided by the NRC. The participants' previous science learning experiences and experiences in special education played an important role in shaping their conceptualizations of inquiry as learned in the science methods class. The impacts of such unique interpretations are discussed with reference to both science education and special education, and implications for teacher education are provided.

  11. Special Needs. Viewpoints. A Series of Occasional Papers on Basic Education. Issue No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit, London (England).

    This collection of papers focuses on working with adults who have special needs. In her paper entitled "Literacy and the Visually Handicapped," Janice E. Mason examines ways in which strategies for meeting the needs of visually handicapped persons can be integrated into literacy programs. "Singer and Listener: Basic Education Work…

  12. Special Education and Minority Ethnic Young People in England: Continuing Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Sally

    2016-01-01

    In countries that have developed special education (SE) provision, whether in segregated settings or "included" in mainstream, racial, ethnic and immigrant minorities continue to be disproportionately represented. Explanations for placement in SE programmes continue to centre round assumptions of deficiencies in student abilities to…

  13. Addressing Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Special Education: Issues and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Shernaz B., Ed.

    This monograph presents four chapters on cultural and linguistic diversity in special education from the perspectives of three ethnic groups--African Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Mexican Americans, respectively. The first chapter is titled "Education Reform and Service Delivery to African-American Students," by Festus E.…

  14. Lattice models and integrability: a special issue in honour of F Y Wu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, A. J.; Jacobsen, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    published in the April issue of Physical Review Letters (PRL) of the same year [4], and in September 1967, Wu moved to Northeastern University to join Lieb's group. Wu taught at Northeastern for 39 years until his retirement in 2006 as the Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Physics. Over the years, Wu has published more than 230 papers and monographs, and he continues to publish after retirement. Most of his research since 1967 is in exact and rigorous analyses of lattice models and integrable systems, which is the theme of this special issue. In 1968, after Wu's arrival at Northeastern, Lieb and Wu obtained the exact solution of the ground state of the one-dimensional Hubbard model and published the result in PRL [5], a work which has since become highly important after the advent of high-temperature superconductivity. This Lieb-Wu paper and Wu's 1982 review of the Potts model in Reviews of Modern Physics [37] are among the most cited papers in condensed matter physics. Later in 1968 Lieb departed Northeastern for MIT. As a result, the full version of the solution was not published until 34 years later [38] when Lieb and Wu collaborated to work on the manuscript on the occasion of Wu's 70th birthday. Wu spent the summer of 1968 at Stony Brook as the guest of C N Yang. Working with Yang's student, C Fan, he extended the Pfaffian solution of the Ising model to general lattices and termed such models 'free-fermion', a term now in common use [6]. In 1972, Wu visited R J Baxter, whom he had met earlier in 1968 at MIT, in Canberra, Australia, with the support of a Fulbright grant. They solved the triangular-lattice Ising model with 3-spin interactions [7], a model now known as the Baxter-Wu model. It was an ideal collaboration. While Baxter derived the solution algebraically, Wu used graphical methods to reduce the problem to an Ashkin-Teller model, which greatly simplifies the presentation. While in Canberra, Wu also studied the 8-vertex model on the honeycomb

  15. Comparing environmental issues in Cuba before and after the Special Period: balancing sustainable development and survival.

    PubMed

    Maal-Bared, Rasha

    2006-04-01

    Following the Earth Summit in 1992, Cuba designed and implemented a variety of programs, administrative structures, and public awareness activities to promote sound environmental management and sustainable development. This came shortly after the fall of the Soviet Union and the strengthening of the US blockade in 1990, which resulted in a 35% drop in Cuban GDP. This period, referred to as the Special Period, witnessed a decrease in many environmentally damaging activities both by choice and by necessity, but also resulted in many decisions to resuscitate the Cuban economy. The purpose of this work was to compare and rank the environmental risks Cuba faced before and during the Special Period (1990-2000) using two Comparative environmental risk assessments (CERAs). To do so, an ecosystem integrity risk assessment matrix was constructed with 42 risk end points. The matrix assessed the risk posed by 17 problem areas including air pollution, water contamination, solid waste sites, pesticides and ecosystem degradation. The risks were calculated using five criteria: area affected, vulnerability of affected population, severity of impact, irreversibility of effect and uncertainty. To construct this matrix, both literature reviews and expert interviews in Cuba were conducted in 2000. The results showed a general decrease in risk scores during the Special Period. Before the Special Period, high risks were posed by: terrestrial degradation and industrial wastewater and sludge, followed by freshwater degradation, surface water stressors, and pesticides. After the Special Period, industrial wastewater and sludge and pesticides were no longer high-risk areas, but municipal wastewater and marine coastal degradation ranked higher than previously. Also, the risk endpoints most stressed after 1990 were affected by activities controlled by the government, such as mining and tourism, and lack of infrastructure. Therefore, the claims that public environmental education is the main

  16. Spatial mapping of lichen specialized metabolites using LDI-MSI: chemical ecology issues for Ophioparma ventosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pogam, Pierre; Legouin, Béatrice; Geairon, Audrey; Rogniaux, Hélène; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Obermayer, Walter; Boustie, Joël; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile

    2016-11-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry techniques have become a powerful strategy to assess the spatial distribution of metabolites in biological systems. Based on auto-ionisability of lichen metabolites using LDI-MS, we herein image the distribution of major secondary metabolites (specialized metabolites) from the lichen Ophioparma ventosa by LDI-MSI (Mass Spectrometry Imaging). Such technologies offer tremendous opportunities to discuss the role of natural products through spatial mapping, their distribution patterns being consistent with previous chemical ecology reports. A special attention was dedicated to miriquidic acid, an unexpected molecule we first reported in Ophioparma ventosa. The analytical strategy presented herein offers new perspectives to access the sharp distribution of lichen metabolites from regular razor blade-sectioned slices.

  17. Spatial mapping of lichen specialized metabolites using LDI-MSI: chemical ecology issues for Ophioparma ventosa

    PubMed Central

    Le Pogam, Pierre; Legouin, Béatrice; Geairon, Audrey; Rogniaux, Hélène; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Obermayer, Walter; Boustie, Joël; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry techniques have become a powerful strategy to assess the spatial distribution of metabolites in biological systems. Based on auto-ionisability of lichen metabolites using LDI-MS, we herein image the distribution of major secondary metabolites (specialized metabolites) from the lichen Ophioparma ventosa by LDI-MSI (Mass Spectrometry Imaging). Such technologies offer tremendous opportunities to discuss the role of natural products through spatial mapping, their distribution patterns being consistent with previous chemical ecology reports. A special attention was dedicated to miriquidic acid, an unexpected molecule we first reported in Ophioparma ventosa. The analytical strategy presented herein offers new perspectives to access the sharp distribution of lichen metabolites from regular razor blade-sectioned slices. PMID:27883092

  18. A cumulative index to the 1973 issues of Aeronautical engineering: A special bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This publication is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (28) through NASA SP-7037 (39) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Special Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, and report number indexes.

  19. Russian Special Forces: Issues of Loyalty, Corruption and the Fight Against Terror

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    operations in the “ Golden Crescent,” which includes the high-volume drug-producing states of Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan. In the mid-1990s...operations in the Golden Triangle. 21 Turbiville: Russian Special Forces bolts, screws and leaving a substantial crater—was detonated with little effect...Vishnyakov and Konstantin Isakov, “When the Day of the Jackal Comes,” New Times, No. 16, 1993, p. 17; ABoksery s ekipirovkoy ubi- ytsy@ (Boxers equipped for

  20. A cumulative index to the 1972 issues of aeronautical engineering: A special bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (15) through NASA SP-7037 (26) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Special Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements has been complied through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, and report number indexes.

  1. Rural Special Education Curriculum Issues: Competency-Based Curriculum Addressing Graduation and Grading Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Norlis

    The paper introduces issues regarding graduation of handicapped students. Modifications to graduation requirements include course substitutions; curricular, method, evaluation or materials modification; and additional time allotted for completion of the degree requirements. Requirements for graduation from Show Low High School are listed under the…

  2. Skeptic, The Forum for Contemporary History; Skeptic Educator's Handbook. Special Issue No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1974

    Announced on a one time basis, this issue of Skeptic and its accompanying educator's handbook focus on crime. They are part of a series of debates-in-print in which a central question is defined and enlarged through expression of several conflicting views. The student magazine is organized into sections on the war on crime, its causes and…

  3. On Retirement Planning. A Resource Book for Teacher Retirement. Special Current Issues Publication No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipes, Lana

    This publication is intended to point teachers at resources that can help them get ready well in advance for retirement. Each section is weighted heavily toward gathering a compendium of useful references for additional reading. After a look in Section 1 at the issues provoked by the graying of America, Section 2 places the teacher in that…

  4. American Indian Policy Review Commission Special Joint Task Force Report on Alaskan Native Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S. Washington, DC. American Indian Policy Review Commission.

    Impact of the Alaskan Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) on Alaskan Natives, particularly at village levels, is the focus of a joint task force report on Alaskan Native issues. Prepared for the American Indian Policy Review Commission, the report is the work of representatives from task forces on tribal government, federal, state, and tribal…

  5. Key Themes and Future Directions in Teaching English to Young Learners: Introduction to the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copland, Fiona; Garton, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Despite being something of a "Cinderella" area of study, research into and informed discussion of teaching young learners is on the increase, perhaps mirroring the increasing numbers of children learning English globally in primary schools. This introductory article reviews key themes and issues in the teaching of English to young…

  6. Educating Healthcare Providers Regarding LGBT Patients and Health Issues: The Special Case of Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, David A.; Whitehead, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Much is written about the availability of healthcare services among elements of the U.S. population, with a large proportion of the literature focusing on access. Although physical access is an overarching issue for many, educators must remember that a key factor in providing complete and competent healthcare is to understand the patient and any…

  7. Identification of a senior Superfund official for addressing special NPL site-related issues. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-22

    The directive describes the process for identifying a senior Superfund official responsible for reviewing and addressing specific issues at National Priorities List sites that cannot be resolved at the Regional level, and for identifying criteria for NPL site referrals to this official.

  8. Preface: Special Issue on Catalytic Control of Lean-Burn Engine Exhaust Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Yezerets, Aleksey; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos; Nova, Isabella; Epling, Bill

    2012-04-30

    This issue of Catalysis Today includes original research articles based on select presentations from the Mobile Emissions Control Symposium at the 22nd North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meeting held in Detroit in June 2011, with a particular focus on catalyzed diesel emissions control. The Symposium was dedicated to the memory of Dr. Haren Gandhi, a visionary technology leader and a passionate environmental advocate.

  9. An Introduction to the Special Issue “Ecological Sites for Landscape Management"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The December 2010 Rangelands “Ecological Site Descriptions”  was one of the most widely read issues ever published. The individual papers have been used by scientists, managers, policymakers, and educators to convey the importance of ecological site information to natural resource management and to ...

  10. Introduction to the Special Section on Contemporary Issues in Human Sexuality: Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Mark D.

    1995-01-01

    Introduces a series of five articles that examine such human sexuality issues as medical interventions for male sexual disorders, the decline of traditional behavioral sex therapies, the recalcitrance of sexual desire disorders, the preventions of "unsafe" sexual behavior, and the limited understanding of female sexuality. Highlights…

  11. When [+Native] Is [-Favorable]. Lektos: Interdisciplinary Working Papers in Language Sciences, Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swacker, Marjorie

    This paper discusses the need for foreign language students to develop positive attitudes about regional and social dialect variation, while learning dialectal patterns that will best facilitate their widest acceptance into a community of target language speakers. The latter issue was tested in a study in which native speakers of American English…

  12. Return to Work Following Traumatic Brain Injury. Special Issue, Volume 5, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Patricia, Ed.

    The report examines employment service issues related to assisting persons who have suffered traumatic brain injury to re-enter the labor force and maintain their employment. An interdisciplinary team treatment approach is recommended and the roles of each of the following professionals are summarized: employment specialist, neuropsychologist,…

  13. Disaster Mental Health and Positive Psychology-Considering the Context of Natural and Technological Disasters: An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Schulenberg, Stefan E

    2016-12-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the Journal of Clinical Psychology's special issue on disaster mental health and positive psychology. The special issue comprises two sections. The first section presents a series of data-driven articles and research-informed reviews examining meaning and resilience in the context of natural and technological disasters. The second section presents key topics in the area of disaster mental health, with particular relevance for positive psychology and related frameworks. The special issue is intended to bridge the gap between these two areas of applied science, with the audience being experienced clinicians or clinicians in training.

  14. Introduction to the Special Issue on Propensity Score Methods in Behavioral Research.

    PubMed

    Pruzek, Robert M

    2011-05-31

    This issue includes six articles that present logic, methods, and models for causal analyses of observational data, in particular those based on propensity score (PS) methods. The articles include a general introduction to propensity score analysis (PSA), uses of PSA in mediation studies, issues involved in choosing covariates, challenges that often arise in PSA applications, hierarchical data issues and models, and an application in an educational testing context. In this editorial I briefly summarize each article and make a few recommendations that relate to future applications in this field: the first pertains to how propensity score (PS) work could profit by connecting it with stronger forms of randomized experiments, not just simple randomization; the second to how and why graphical methods could be used to greater advantage in PSA studies; then why it might be helpful to reconsider the meaning of the term "treatments" in observational studies and why conventional usage might be modified; and finally, to the distinction between retrospective and prospective approaches to observational study design, noting the advantages, when feasible, of the latter approach.

  15. A Special Issue: Geomathematics in practice: Case studies from earth- and environmental sciences - Proceedings of the Croatian-Hungarian Geomathematical Congress, Hungary 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatvani, István Gábor; Horváth, Janina

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims to introduce the current problems of geomathematics along with giving on overview on the papers published in the special issue covering the Croatian-Hungarian Geomathematical Congress of 2015 in Hungary.

  16. Editorial and Introduction of the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Benson, Sally M.; Karimjee, Anhar; Rubin, Edward S.

    2010-03-01

    Short one page editorial to introduce the +30 peer reviewed papers contained within the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

  17. Special symposium issue 2: proceedings of the ninth symposium on thermophysical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, H.J.M.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1986-01-01

    The topics covered in this issue include transport properties of polyatomic gases; measurements of the critical properties of sulfur hexafluoride by laser interferometry; measurements of vapor-liquid coexistence curves and critical loci for refrigerant mixtures; a crossover description of the thermodynamic properties of fluids in the critical region; thermal diffusion in ionic systems; thermal transport behavior of van der Waals solids and liquids; a heating system for the investigation of thermophysical properties of metals; high-pressure and high-temperature thermophysical measurements on rhenium, tantalum, and tungsten; and the therodynamic properties of vanadium.

  18. Issues of sample size in sensitivity and specificity analysis with special reference to oncology.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Atul; Sharma, Shashi

    2015-01-01

    Sample size is one of the basics issues, which medical researcher including oncologist faces with any research program. The current communication attempts to discuss the computation of sample size when sensitivity and specificity are being evaluated. The article intends to present the situation that the researcher could easily visualize for appropriate use of sample size techniques for sensitivity and specificity when any screening method for early detection of cancer is in question. Moreover, the researcher would be in a position to efficiently communicate with a statistician for sample size computation and most importantly applicability of the results under the conditions of the negotiated precision.

  19. Introduction to the Special Issue on Microwave Circuits on Silicon Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luy, Johann-Friedrich (Editor); Ponchak, George E. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the development of microwave circuits on silicon substrate. Silicon, even though inexpensive, did not provide the performance required for microwave circuits. Instead the development of microwave circuits used GaAs and InP substrates. With the development of commercial usages for microwave circuits, the costs of microwave circuits became an issue. The importance of cost, and the development of Si-device capabilities and fabrication techniques, such as molecular beam epitaxy, and ultra-high chemical vapor deposition. provided the circumstances where the development of microwave circuits on silicon is now possible.

  20. EDITORIAL: Special issue featuring articles arising from the 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference Special issue featuring articles arising from the 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Degrez, Gérard; Delplancke, Marie-Paule; Gleizes, Alain

    2011-05-01

    The 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP) was held in Brussels, Belgium, 27 June-2 July, 2010. HTPP started as a thermal plasma conference and gradually expanded to include low-temperature plasmas. The conference was founded by Jacques Amouroux and Pierre Fauchais, and aims to bring together different scientific communities to facilitate contacts between science, technology and industry, providing a platform for the exploration of elementary processes and applications in and by plasmas. The first HTPP was held in Odeillo, France, in 1990. Since then it has been held every other year in different European cities: Paris, Aachen, Athens, Strasbourg, Saint-Petersburg, Patras and Brussels. The 11th HTPP conference was attended by 125 participants from 19 countries. The program involved 14 invited talks, 34 contributed talks, 72 posters and a software demonstration and hands-on session for plasma modelling. The 12th HTPP conference will be held 24-28 June 2012, in Bologna, Italy. A larger part of the contributions to the 11th HTPP has been published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) volume 275, 2011. All invited speakers and other contributors, as selected by the Steering, Scientific and Organizing Committee, were invited to submit a paper based on their contributions for this special issue which is peer reviewed by the journal. Both this special issue and the JPCS volume aim to bring the 11th HTPP to a wider audience. The publications are a nice example of the broad topic range of the conference. The JPCS volume contains papers covering fundamental aspects on radiative processes of thermal plasmas, modelling of thermal arcs and non-thermal RF plasma jets, plasma diagnostics including flow and heat flux measurements of thermal plasmas, radical density measurements and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The applications-oriented contributions of the JPCS volume include plasma spraying, synthesis of (nano-sized) materials, surface

  1. Reducing Health Disparity in People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Report from Health Issues Special Interest Research Group of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheepers, M.; Kerr, M.; O'Hara, D.; Bainbridge, D.; Cooper, S.-A.; Davis, R.; Fujiura, G.; Heller, T.; Holland, A.; Krahn, G.; Lennox, N.; Meaney, J.; Wehmeyer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Disparities in the health status and care experienced by people with intellectual disabilities are increasingly being recognized. This special report presents the results of an international expert consensus workshop held under the auspices of the Health Issues Special Interest Research Group of the International Association for the Scientific…

  2. Special issue “The phreatic eruption of Mt. Ontake volcano in 2014”

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamaoka, Koshun; Geshi, Nobuo; Hashimoto, Tasheki; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Oikawa, Teruki

    2016-01-01

    Mt. Ontake volcano erupted at 11:52 on September 27, 2014, claiming the lives of at least 58 hikers. This eruption was the worst volcanic disaster in Japan since the 1926 phreatic eruption of Mt. Tokachidake claimed 144 lives (Table 1). The timing of the eruption contributed greatly to the heavy death toll: near midday, when many hikers were near the summit, and during a weekend of clear weather conditions following several rainy weekends. The importance of this timing is reflected by the fact that a somewhat larger eruption of Mt. Ontake in 1979 resulted in injuries but no deaths. In 2014, immediate precursors were detected with seismometers and tiltmeters about 10 min before the eruption, but the eruption started before a warning was issued.

  3. Thin Solid Films Topical Special Issue on ZnO related transparent conductive oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Jinn P.; Endo, Tamio; Ellmer, Klaus; Gessert, Tim; Ginley, David

    2016-04-01

    World-wide research activities on ZnO and related transparent conductive oxides (TCO) in thin film, nanostructured, and multilayered forms are driven by the vast potential of these materials for optoelectronic, microelectronic, and photovoltaic applications. Renewed interest in ZnO applications is partly stimulated by cost reduction in material processing and device development. One of the most important issues is doping and alloying with Al, Ga, In, Sn, etc. in order to tune properties. When highly doped, these materials are used as transparent-conducting contacts on solar cells, as well as in catalytic, spintronic, and surface acoustic wave devices. Film growth conditions, including substrate type and orientation, growth temperature, deposition rate, and ambient atmosphere, all play important roles in determining structural, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties.

  4. Editor's Introduction: Special Issue on the Next Big Questions in Psychology.

    PubMed

    Diener, Ed

    2009-07-01

    In this issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science, we learn what 18 leading psychologists believe are the next big research questions in their respective fields. I invited about 20 of our most outstanding scholars to tell us what they believe are the most important questions to be asked in the upcoming decade. Not unexpectedly, the contributions are wide ranging both in content and in the way the authors framed the question of what is important. The range of articles, from psychoneuroimmunology to human-android interactions, clearly indicates the enormous scope of psychology. My hope is that both freshly minted and senior scientists alike might gain from these insights into the research they should pursue in the years ahead.

  5. Special issue: Terrestrial fluids, earthquakes and volcanoes: The Hiroshi Wakita volume I

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perez, Nemesio M.; King, Chi-Yu; Gurrieri, Sergio; McGee, Kenneth A.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial Fluids, Earthquakes and Volcanoes: The Hiroshi Wakita Volume I is a special publication to honor Professor Hiroshi Wakita for his scientific contributions. This volume consists of 17 original papers dealing with various aspects of the role of terrestrial fluids in earthquake and volcanic processes, which reflect Prof. Wakita’s wide scope of research interests.Professor Wakita co-founded the Laboratory for Earthquake Chemistry in 1978 and served as its director from 1988 until his retirement from the university in 1997. He has made the laboratory a leading world center for studying earthquakes and volcanic activities by means of geochemical and hydrological methods. Together with his research team and a number of foreign guest researchers that he attracted, he has made many significant contributions in the above-mentioned scientific fields of interest. This achievement is a testimony to not only his scientific talent, but also his enthusiasm, his open mindedness, and his drive in obtaining both human and financial support.

  6. Special Populations and Pharmacogenetic Issues in Tuberculosis Drug Development and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    McIlleron, Helen; Abdel-Rahman, Susan; Dave, Joel Alex; Blockman, Marc; Owen, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Special populations, including children and pregnant women, have been neglected in tuberculosis drug development. Patients in developing countries are inadequately represented in pharmacology research, and postmarketing pharmacovigilance activities tend to be rudimentary in these settings. There is an ethical imperative to generate evidence at an early stage to support optimal treatment in these populations and in populations with common comorbid conditions, such as diabetes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article highlights the research needed to support equitable access to new antituberculosis regimens. Efficient and opportunistic pharmacokinetic study designs, typically using sparse sampling and population analysis methods, can facilitate optimal dose selection for children and pregnant women. Formulations suitable for children should be developed early and used in pharmacokinetic studies to guide dose selection. Drug–drug interactions between commonly coprescribed medications also need to be evaluated, and when these are significant, alternative approaches should be sought. A potent rifamycin-sparing regimen could revolutionize the treatment of adults and children requiring a protease inhibitor as part of antiretroviral treatment regimens for HIV infection. A sufficiently wide formulary of drugs should be developed for those with contraindications to the standard approaches. Because genetic variations may influence an individual's response to tuberculosis treatment, depending on the population being treated, it is important that samples be collected and stored for pharmacogenetic study in future clinical trials. PMID:26009615

  7. EDITORIAL: Special issue in honour of J E Allen's 75th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, R. N.

    2003-11-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics is dedicated to Professor John Allen who has spent most of his professional life in the Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, working on problems in gas discharges and plasma physics. His first degrees and doctorate were taken at Liverpool University in the 1950s where at the time there was an internationally renowned group led by Meek, Craggs and Edels. He then spent some time at Frascati in Italy on secondment from Harwell, helping to build up expertise there. He returned to England in the mid-1960s, first to Cambridge, but he soon migrated to Oxford to University College and the Department of Engineering Science to strengthen a team that already included von Engel, Motz and Woods with more recent reinforcement by Howatson and myself. Thus there was built up both a post-graduate MSc course and what amounted to a graduate school producing many scientists who have since distinguished themselves in all parts of the world. The prospects for success in the quest for fusion and the proximity of Culham Laboratory produced a heady mix. But the timescales lengthened and fashions changed. However, John moved with the times and he and his research students made notable contributions to the understanding of dusty plasmas and to radio-frequency plasmas used in the processing of microchips. The structure at Oxford was such that the recognition of a professorship came late in his career, but his international reputation was well established much earlier. Being freed of tutorial duties he has travelled much in recent years and has been Chairman of the International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases (ICPIG) 1999-2001 and directly involved in the international effort to carry out dusty plasma experiments in space under micro-gravity conditions. For my part, having known John as a colleague over the past forty years, he has been a valuable point of reference when one needed someone to comment on new ideas, a

  8. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 1: Summary of exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, R.A.; Davis, C.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1995-08-01

    In a September 1993 address to the United Nations General Assembly, President Clinton announced a new nonproliferation and export control policy that established a framework for US efforts to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The new policy proposed that the US undertake a comprehensive approach to the growing accumulation of fissile material. One of the key elements was for the US to support a special nuclear materials (SNM) multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards. This policy is often referred to as the President`s Cutoff Initiative or the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT). Because both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and foreign reprocessing facilities similar to PUREX will likely to be inspected under a FMCT, the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation, Negotiations and Analysis Division (DOE/NN-41) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to perform an information gathering exercise, the PUREX Exercise, using the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant located on the Hanford Site in Washington State. PUREX is a former production reactor fuel reprocessing plant currently undergoing a transition to a ``decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) ready`` mode. The PUREX Exercise was conducted March 29--30, 1994, to examine aspects of the imposition of several possible cutoff regimes and to study verification of non-production of SNM for nuclear weapons purposes or outside of safeguards. A follow-up activity to further examine various additional verification regimes was held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on May 10, 1994.

  9. Employer Policies and Practices to Manage and Prevent Disability: Conclusion to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Main, Chris J; Shaw, William S

    2016-12-01

    Purpose Research of employer policies and practices to manage and prevent disability spans many disciplines and perspectives, and there are many challenges related to stakeholder collaboration, data access, and interventions. The purpose of this article is to synthesize the findings from a conference and year-long collaboration among a group of invited researchers intended to spur new research innovations in this field. Methods A multidisciplinary team of 26 international researchers with published research in employer-based disability management or related fields were invited to attend a 3-day conference in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, USA. The conference goals were to review the status of current research of workplace disability management and prevention, examine its relevance for employer decision-making, compare conceptual frameworks or theoretical perspectives, and recommend future research directions. In this paper, we summarize key points from the 6 resulting papers, compare them with an earlier 2005 conference on improving return-to-work research, and conclude with recommendations for further overarching research directions. Results/Conclusion In comparison with the 2005 conference, a greater emphasis was placed on organizational and social factors, employer roles and responsibilities, methods of implementation, non-clinical approaches, and facilitating stay-at-work as well as return-to-work. A special panel of employer consultants and representatives who were featured at the 2015 conference reinforced the importance of organizational culture, leadership style, and financial decision-making strategies at the employer level. Based on the conference proceedings, we recommend that future research in this area should strive for: (a) broader inclusion of workers and workplaces; (b) attention to multilevel influences in the workplace;

  10. Introduction to the special issue on aquifer-sedimentology: problems, perspectives and modern approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggenberger, Peter; Aigner, Tom

    1999-12-01

    Progress towards a better understanding of groundwater circulation and transport processes in aquifers demands a multidisciplinary approach to a host of unresolved problems. Although much progress has been made within recent years in interpreting the dynamic character of groundwater systems, many key issues remain to be addressed. In particular, several areas demand attention: the role of sedimentological information (heterogeneity) in groundwater and transport models, the scaling-up of observations from outcrop scale to larger scales and the integration of geological and geophysical information of different quality into the description of an aquifer structure. Still nowadays many of the heterogeneities cannot be recognized directly because of the limitation of measurement techniques. This is probably one of the reasons for the limited application of aquifer-sedimentology and geophysics in practical cases. In order to consolidate, expand, and make a larger number of people aware of the contribution of modern aquifer-sedimentology, including modelling and ultra-high resolution geophysical methods, several lines of intervention were identified: (1) a better collaboration of the different disciplines on site-specific applied problems; (2) development of new modelling techniques combining data of different quality; (3) development of optimizing tools (position and number of wells, additional geophysical methods, baysian techniques); (4) development of a `common language' among sedimentologists and hydrogeologists to overcome communication problems.

  11. Special issue editorial - Plasma interactions with Solar System Objects: Anticipating Rosetta, Maven and Mars Orbiter Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Yamauchi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Within our solar system, the planets, moons, comets and asteroids all have plasma interactions. The interaction depends on the nature of the object, particularly the presence of an atmosphere and a magnetic field. Even the size of the object matters through the finite gyroradius effect and the scale height of cold ions of exospheric origin. It also depends on the upstream conditions, including position within the solar wind or the presence within a planetary magnetosphere. Soon after ESA's Rosetta reached comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, NASA's Maven and ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) reached Mars, and ESA's Venus Express mission was completed, this issue explores our understanding of plasma interactions with comets, Mars, Venus, and moons in the solar system. We explore the processes which characterise the interactions, such as ion pickup and field draping, and their effects such as plasma escape. Papers are based on data from current and recent space missions, modelling and theory, as we explore our local part of the 'plasma universe'.

  12. From Education to Practice: Addressing Opioid Misuse through Healthcare Provider Training: A Special Issue of SAj.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Adam J; Harding, John Daniel

    2017-03-22

    Opioid misuse may be ignored by providers who are unwilling or not confident in engaging the complex nature of substance use disorders among their patient populations. Addiction is a complex disease and although providers often are comfortable in identifying, assessing, and treating the complex diseases of their patients, basic knowledge and skills of identification, assessment, and treatment expertise involving opioids for pain, addressing opioid misuse, and treatment of opioid use disorder are lacking. Initiatives to improve knowledge of opioid use, misuse, and opioid use disorder among health care providers are emerging. In this issue of the Substance Abuse journal, we examine the science and evidence base of educational interventions and public initiatives addressing opioid use and addiction. These initiatives include naloxone rescue awareness and programs, community-based training initiatives, and system or public health approaches to improve student, trainee, and clinician education/training revolving around opioid misuse and opioid use disorder. We call on stakeholders to fund more research to investigate and implement the proven means to educate undergraduate students, graduate trainees, and clinicians regarding pain and addiction. We also recognize the 2016 peer reviewers of our journal who have performed meritorious, volunteer service to advance the science of addiction.

  13. Reflexive Professionalism as a Second Generation of Evidence-Based Practice: Some Considerations on the Special Issue "What Works? Modernizing the Knowledge-Base of Social Work"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Hans-Uwe; Polutta, Andreas; Ziegler, Holger

    2009-01-01

    This article refers sympathetically to the thoughtful debates and positions in the "Research on Social Work Practice" ("RSWP"; Special Issue, July, 2008 issue) on "What Works? Modernizing the Knowledge-Base of Social Work." It highlights the need for empirical efficacy and effectiveness research in social work and…

  14. Special issue: redox active natural products and their interaction with cellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Claus

    2014-11-26

    During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, "natural" cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature's treasure chest of "green gold". Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-)organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic "sensor/effector" anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s) of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for "intracellular diagnostics". In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur Species (RSS), such techniques have

  15. EDITORIAL: Fluctuations and noise in photonics and quantum optics: a special issue in memory of Hermann Haus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Derek; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2004-08-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of fluctuational phenomena in photonics and quantum optics. The topics discussed in this issue extend from fundamental physics to applications of noise and fluctuational methods from quantum to classical systems, and include: bullet Quantum measurement bullet Quantum squeezing bullet Solitons and fibres bullet Gravitational wave inferometers bullet Fluorescence phenomena bullet Cavity QED bullet Photon statistics bullet Noise in lasers and laser systems bullet Quantum computing and information bullet Quantum lithography bullet Teleportation. This Special Issue is published in connection with the SPIE International Symposium on Fluctuations and Noise, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on 1-4 June 2003. The symposium contained six parallel conferences, and the papers in this Special Issue are connected to the conference entitled `Fluctuations and Noise in Photonics and Quantum Optics'. This was the first in a series of symposia organized with the support of the SPIE that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The co-founders of the symposium series were Laszlo B Kish (Texas A&M University) and Derek Abbott (The University of Adelaide). The Chairs of the `Fluctuations and Noise in Photonics and Quantum Optics' conference were Derek Abbott, Jeffrey H Shapiro and Yoshihisa Yamamoto. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Kristi Kelso and Marilyn Gorsuch of the SPIE, USA. Sadly, less than two weeks before the conference, Hermann A Haus passed away. Hermann Haus was a founding father of the field of noise in optics and quantum optics. He submitted three papers to the conference and was very excited to attend; as can be seen in the collection of papers, he was certainly present in spirit. In honour of his creativity and pioneering work in this field, we have

  16. Reconciling evidence-based practice and cultural competence in mental health services: introduction to a special issue.

    PubMed

    Gone, Joseph P

    2015-04-01

    The calls for evidence-based practice (EBP) and cultural competence (CC) represent two increasingly influential mandates within the mental health professions. Advocates of EBP seek to standardize clinical practice by ensuring that only treatment techniques that have demonstrated therapeutic outcomes under scientifically controlled conditions would be adopted and promoted in mental health services. Advocates of CC seek to diversify clinical practice by ensuring that treatment approaches are designed and refined for a multicultural clientele that reflects a wide variety of psychological orientations and life experiences. As these two powerful mandates collide, the fundamental challenge becomes how to accommodate substantive cultural divergences in psychosocial experience using narrowly prescriptive clinical practices and approaches, without trivializing either professional knowledge or cultural difference. In this Introduction to a special issue of Transcultural Psychiatry, the virtue of an interdisciplinary conversation between and among anthropologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and social work researchers in addressing these tensions is extolled.

  17. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 12th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers Special issue containing papers presented at the 12th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.

    2010-06-01

    The 12th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers was held at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA between September 30 and October 2, 2009. This meeting was the continuation of a series of previous meetings which was initiated in 1987 and has been held bi-annually since then. Following the recent tradition at the last few meetings, the program was sub- divided into six sessions. At each session, an overview talk was presented, followed by two or three shorter oral presentations which supplemented the coverage of important issues. These talks were followed by discussion periods and poster sessions of contributed papers. The sessions were: Physics of Transition to/from Enhanced Confinement Regimes, Pedestal and Edge Localized Mode Dynamics, Plasma Rotation and Momentum Transport, Role of 3D Physics in Transport Barriers, Transport Barriers: Theory and Simulations and High Priority ITER Issues on Transport Barriers. The diversity of the 90 registered participants was remarkable, with 22 different nationalities. US participants were in the majority (36), followed by Japan (14), South Korea (7), and China (6). This special issue of Nuclear Fusion consists of a cluster of 18 accepted papers from submitted manuscripts based on overview talks and poster presentations. The paper selection procedure followed the guidelines of Nuclear Fusion which are essentially the same as for regular articles with an additional requirement on timeliness of submission, review and revision. One overview paper and five contributed papers report on the H-mode pedestal related results which reflect the importance of this issue concerning the successful operation of ITER. Four papers address the rotation and momentum transport which play a crucial role in transport barrier physics. The transport barrier transition condition is the main focus of other four papers. Finally, four additional papers are devoted to the behaviour and control of

  18. Introduction to the GEOBIA 2010 special issue: From pixels to geographic objects in remote sensing image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addink, Elisabeth A.; Van Coillie, Frieke M. B.; De Jong, Steven M.

    2012-04-01

    Traditional image analysis methods are mostly pixel-based and use the spectral differences of landscape elements at the Earth surface to classify these elements or to extract element properties from the Earth Observation image. Geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) has received considerable attention over the past 15 years for analyzing and interpreting remote sensing imagery. In contrast to traditional image analysis, GEOBIA works more like the human eye-brain combination does. The latter uses the object's color (spectral information), size, texture, shape and occurrence to other image objects to interpret and analyze what we see. GEOBIA starts by segmenting the image grouping together pixels into objects and next uses a wide range of object properties to classify the objects or to extract object's properties from the image. Significant advances and improvements in image analysis and interpretation are made thanks to GEOBIA. In June 2010 the third conference on GEOBIA took place at the Ghent University after successful previous meetings in Calgary (2008) and Salzburg (2006). This special issue presents a selection of the 2010 conference papers that are worked out as full research papers for JAG. The papers cover GEOBIA applications as well as innovative methods and techniques. The topics range from vegetation mapping, forest parameter estimation, tree crown identification, urban mapping, land cover change, feature selection methods and the effects of image compression on segmentation. From the original 94 conference papers, 26 full research manuscripts were submitted; nine papers were selected and are presented in this special issue. Selection was done on the basis of quality and topic of the studies. The next GEOBIA conference will take place in Rio de Janeiro from 7 to 9 May 2012 where we hope to welcome even more scientists working in the field of GEOBIA.

  19. Introduction to the Special Issue on Multimodality of Early Sensory Processing: Early Visual Maps Flexibly Encode Multimodal Space

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, Roberto; Binda, Paola; Cicchini, Guido Marco

    2016-01-01

    As living organisms, we have the capability to explore our environments through different senses, each making use of specialized organs and returning unique information. This is relayed to a set of cortical areas, each of which appears to be specialized for processing information from a single sense — hence the definition of ‘unisensory’ areas. Many models assume that primary unisensory cortices passively reproduce information from each sensory organ; these then project to associative areas, which actively combine multisensory signals with each other and with cognitive stances. By the same token, the textbook view holds that sensory cortices undergo plastic changes only within a limited ‘critical period’; their function and architecture should remain stable and unchangeable thereafter. This model has led to many fundamental discoveries on the architecture of the sensory systems (e.g., oriented receptive fields, binocularity, topographic maps, to name just the best known). However, a growing body of evidence calls for a review of this conceptual scheme. Based on single-cell recordings from non-human primates, fMRI in humans, psychophysics, and sensory deprivation studies, early sensory areas are losing their status of fixed readouts of receptor activity; they are turning into functional nodes in a network of brain areas that flexibly adapts to the statistics of the input and the behavioral goals. This special issue in Multisensory Research aims to cover three such lines of evidence: suggesting that (1) the flexibility of spatial representations, (2) adult plasticity and (3) multimodality, are not properties of associative areas alone, but may depend on the primary visual cortex V1. PMID:26288898

  20. General Chemistry Collection for Students (CD-ROM), Abstract of Special Issue 16, 4th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    bookstore. The cost per CD can be quite low when large numbers are ordered (as little as $3 each), making this a cost-effective method of allowing students access to the software they need whenever and wherever they desire. Other JCE Software CDs can also be adopted. Network licenses to distribute the software to your students via your local campus network can also be arranged. Contact us for details on purchasing multiple user licenses. Price and Ordering An order form is inserted in this issue that provides prices and other ordering information. If this card is not available or if you need additional information, contact: JCE Software, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1396; phone; 608/262-5153 or 800/991-5534; fax: 608/265-8094; email: jcesoft@chem.wisc.edu. Table 1. Contents of the General Chemistry Collection, 4th Edition

  1. Considerations on the aquaculture development and on the use of veterinary drugs: special issue for fluoroquinolones--a review.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Silvia Pilco; Paschoal, Jonas Augusto Rizzato; Reyes, Felix Guillermo Reyes

    2013-09-01

    Aquaculture has become an important source of fish available for human consumption. In order to achieve greater productivity, intensive fish cultivation systems are employed, which can cause greater susceptibility to diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Antimicrobial substances are compounds used in livestock production with the objectives of inhibiting the growth of microorganisms and treatment or prevention of diseases. It is well recognized that the issues of antimicrobial use in food animals are of global concern about its impact on food safety. This paper present an overview of the aquaculture production in the whole world, raising the particularities in Brazil, highlighting the importance of the use of veterinary drugs in this system of animal food production, and address the potential risks arising from their indiscriminate use and their impacts on aquaculture production as they affect human health and the environment. The manuscript also discusses the analytical methods commonly used in the determination of veterinary drug residues in fish, with special issue for fluroquinolones residues and with emphasis on employment of LC-MS/MS analytical technique.

  2. Introduction to Journal of Structural Geology special issue on "Deformation of the lithosphere. How small structures tell a big story"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintubin, Manuel; de Bresser, Hans; Drury, Martyn; Prior, David J.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-02-01

    This special issue Deformation of the Lithosphere. How small structures tell a big story is dedicated to Professor Henk Zwart (1924-2012). The theme is inspired by Henk's retirement lecture entitled Mountains must indeed be studied with a microscope (19 February 1988). Henk Zwart was a pioneer in linking microstructural research with the large-scale issues concerning lithospheric rheology and deformation. The famous Zwart's Hen House, representing the nine diagnostic relationships of porphyroblast growth with respect to the timing of deformation, is still a key element in contemporary textbooks on structural geology and microtectonics. This particular insight may not have occurred if it wasn't for a mistake made by the thin-section maker in the Leiden lab of Henk Zwart. By accident a thin section of a Pyrenean metamorphic rock was made, not perpendicular to the lineation - as was the standard procedure in those early days of structural geology - but parallel to the lineation. That mistake and Henk's recognition that the lineation parallel view gave more useful information changed structural geology and microtectonics.

  3. Chemistry Comes Alive!, Volume 4: Abstract of Special Issue 25 on CD-ROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Jerrold J.; Bain, Gordon; Bruce, Kara; Moore, John W.

    2000-06-01

    , lessons, or instructional materials that utilize Chemistry Comes Alive! The movies on this CD-ROM are QuickTime movies. In addition to viewing with a WWW browser, the video can be played directly using QuickTime MoviePlayer. Images from the CD can be easily incorporated into multimedia presentations or lessons. Use of the Bookmark function of the Web browser is a particularly convenient method of organizing material for a lecture or for a student lesson. Remember that an additional license must be purchased before you place video from any CCA! volume on your local WWW server. Images of the reactions of potassium, selected from movies on Reactions of the Elements Acknowledgments Funding for Chemistry Comes Alive! was provided by the National Science Foundation, New Traditions, grant DUE-9455928 and National Science Foundation, Instructional Materials Development grant ESI-9154099. Many individuals made significant contributions to the development of this project. These include Alton Banks, North Carolina State University; Joe March, University of Alabama at Birmingham. Price and Ordering An order form is inserted in this issue that provides prices and other ordering information. If this card is not available or if you need additional information, contact JCE Software, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1396; phone; 608/262-5153 or 800/991-5534; fax: 608/265-8094; email: jcesoft@chem.wisc.edu. Information about all our publications (including abstracts, descriptions, updates) is available from our World Wide Web site. Literature Cited

    1. Jacobsen, J. J.; Moore, J. W. Chemistry Comes Alive! Vol. 1; J. Chem. Educ. Software 1998, SP 18.
    2. Jacobsen, J. J.; Moore, J. W. Chemistry Comes Alive! Vol. 2; J. Chem. Educ. Software 1998, SP 21.
    3. Jacobsen, J. J.; Moore, J. W. Chemistry Comes Alive! Vol. 3; J. Chem. Educ. Software 2000, SP 23.
    4. Banks, A. J.; Holmes, J. L.; Jacobsen, J. J.; Kotz, J. C.; Moore, J. W

    5. Introduction to Special Issue.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Campbell, Dale F.; Kachik, Cynthia J.

      2001-01-01

      Reports on the 2001 Annual Community College Futures Assembly, which focused on the merging of education, entertainment, and information as driven by digital technology. The keynote presentation, titled "The Edutainment Age," was given by Richard W. Oliver and discussed the entertainment of education. Lists 2001 Bellwether Award winners and…

    6. Special issue on Econophysics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Richmond, P.; Ausloos, M.; Dacorogna, M.

      2002-05-01

      The area of research described as “econophysics" is renewing a kinship between physicists and economists and financial practitioners, that has been lost since the 19th century when scientists such as Pascal and Halley made groundbreaking advances in the area. Now, new meetings are revealing new research opportunities outside the established pathways traditionally explored within economics and finance. In December 2001, around 100 researchers from across the world attended the EPS meeting “Applications of Physics to Financial Analysis” (APFA3). This was held in the Museum of London Conference Centre which was chosen for its proximity to the City of London and its trading centres. The meeting was especially useful in bringing together roughly equal numbers of physicists, mathematicians and financial practitioners. Taking part in the conference we had the impression that, whilst the relation between physics and applied finance may still be at an early stage, it is evolving very quickly. As in nature, a sign of evolution is the emergence of different and specialised branches, each w ith their own specific character. Papers covered a range of topics, including: market modelling, risk management, agent-based modelling, hedging in incomplete markets, benchmarking, performance measurement, foreign exchange markets, time series analysis and prediction, efficient market hypothesis, equilibrium and non-equilibrium markets, economic a nd financial networks, the valuation of derivatives, growth and bankruptcy. The meeting was sponsored by the European Physical Society and the UK Institute of Physics. The invited speakers were J.Ph. Bouchaud, J.F. Muzy, K. Sneppen, G. Iori and S. Solomon. Articles outlining some of the more interesting advances in this fie ld have been selected by the Guest Editors, from amongst the submitted articles, and after having been refereed, they are presented here in this edition of EPJ B. APFA3 closed on a positive note. There was a feeling that links between academia and industry are healthy and that these new interactions between Physics and Finance are producing valuable scientific and economic results.

    7. Special Issue: Book Reviews.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Kohs, Perla, Ed.

      1992-01-01

      Reviews of 42 books in the following categories are provided: career counseling theory and skills, organizational development, career and life planning, adult career development, retirement, career fields, job search, job success, entrepreneurship, college and women, college and the military, life management, creativity, and reference books. (SK)

    8. Special Book Review Issue.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.; And Others

      1999-01-01

      Offers reviews of 40 new and classic books for career counselors and career centers. Includes reviews of books on the following topics: assessment, career management, distance learning, entrepreneurship, the spirit-work connection, job-search methods, lifelong career development, as well as guides and workbooks. (JOW)

    9. Foreword to Special Issue: Papers from the 52nd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 2010

      SciTech Connect

      Allen, Steve L.; Davidson, Ronald C.

      2011-05-15

      We present in this Special Issue of Physics of Plasmas the review, tutorial, and invited papers of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society's (APS) Division of Plasma Physics. This was the 52nd year of this meeting, and it was held in Chicago, Illinois on 8-12 November 2010. The meeting program was made up of over 100 review, tutorial, and invited oral presentations, and a significant fraction of these speakers prepared manuscripts which were peer-reviewed and are contained in this Special Issue.

    10. Engaging Students in Modeling as an Epistemic Practice of Science: An Introduction to the Special Issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Campbell, Todd; Oh, Phil Seok

      2015-04-01

      This article provides an introduction for the special issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology focused on science teaching and learning with models. The article provides initial framing for questions that guided the special issue. Additionally, based on our careful review of each of these articles, some discussion of how selected articles within the issue informed these questions. Specifically, when considering key facets of modeling instruction or design features of modeling curriculum, the studies in the special issue provided insight into productive ways in which teachers engaged students in modeling practices. Further, modeling pedagogies—pedagogies for transforming scientific practices of modeling into students' experience—were reified so that how these pedagogies could be coordinated into classroom instruction was revealed. When characteristic features of students' engagement in modeling were considered, research offered insight into productive model-based learning sequences for K-6 modelers and how students' development of productive epistemologies can evolve differently. Finally, the special issue considered how technology facilitated cognitive processes and/or instructional practices by examining learners' interactions with technology within modeling contexts. In this, instructional sequences using agent-based modeling (ABM) as a central technology are shared. These include the role of ABM in scaling student-modeling experiences beyond individuals to classroom experiences and how ABM can support student investigations of complex phenomenon that is not directly observable, among other affordances. Other articles also investigated some aspects of learners' interactions with technology to inform how technology-enhanced science teaching and learning with models.

    11. Clinical Audit on “Evaluation of Special Issues in Adolescents with Cancer Treated in an Adult Cancer Setting”: An Indian Experience

      PubMed Central

      Salins, Naveen S; Vallath, Nandini; Varkey, Prince; Ranganath, Kavya; Nayak, Malathi G

      2012-01-01

      Background: Adolescents with cancer form a distinct group with special care needs. These patients are often cared in an adult supportive care setting where the special needs of adolescents are not met. Aim: To identify special issues in adolescents with cancer and to determine whether special needs of adolescents are met in an adult cancer setting Materials and Methods: 10 adolescents with cancer were randomly chosen and retrospectively studied for physical, psychoscocial and emotional issues using an internally validated tool. Results: Pain was the most common physical symptom seen in all 10 patients. 3 out of 10 patients were involved in decision making, 3 out of 10 patients had identity issues and 4 out of 10 patients had peer group isolation issues. Only 3 were aware of diagnosis and none were aware of treatment outcomes and mortality. 4 out of 10 had anxiety and depression and 3 out of 10 had body image issues. Sexuality, spiritual and existential issues were not explored in any of the patients studied. Conclusion: The outcomes of the study were in an adult oncology setting there was a poor recognition of key adolescent issues such as sexuality, body image, identity and peer group isolation. The psychosocial supports to these adolescents were minimal and spiritual and existential issues were not explored. The inferences drawn from this study suggested a need for multidisciplinary team approach oriented in handling adolescent care needs and preferably to have a dedicated space that will help the peer group to interact, bond and cope better with the illness. PMID:23439995

    12. Introduction to the special issue: Substance use and the adolescent brain: Developmental impacts, interventions, and longitudinal outcomes

      PubMed Central

      Luciana, Monica; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W.

      2016-01-01

      Adolescent substance abuse is a major public health problem, particularly given the negative brain and behavioral consequences that often occur during and following acute intoxication. Negative outcomes appear to be especially pronounced when substance use is initiated in the early adolescent years, perhaps due to neural adaptations that increase risk for substance use disorders into adulthood. Recent models to explain these epidemiological trends have focused on brain-based vulnerabilities to use as well as neurodevelopmental aberrations associated with initiation of use in substance naïve samples or through the description of case-control differences between heavy users and controls. Within this research, adolescent alcohol and marijuana users have shown relative decreases in regional gray matter volumes, substance-specific alterations in white matter volumes, deviations in microstructural integrity in white matter tracts that regulate communication between subcortical areas and higher level regulatory control regions, and deficits in functional connectivity. How these brain anomalies map onto other types of youth risk behavior and later vulnerabilities represent major questions for continued research. This special issue addresses these compelling and timely questions by introducing new methodologies, empirical relationships, and perspectives from major leaders in this field. PMID:26589541

    13. Technology-based interventions for the treatment and recovery management of substance use disorders: a JSAT special issue.

      PubMed

      Marsch, Lisa A; Carroll, Kathleen M; Kiluk, Brian D

      2014-01-01

      A growing line of research has highlighted the promising role that interactive web and mobile technologies may play in improving the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and reach of efforts to assess, prevent, treat, and support the recovery management of substance use disorders and other risk behavior. Manuscripts in this special issue of the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment focus on the application of technology to the delivery of interventions for the treatment and recovery management of substance use disorders. These manuscripts are intended to highlight the diversity and current state of the science of empirically-supported innovations in this area of intervention delivery. The included manuscripts range from experimental evaluations of a variety of types of technology-based interventions (brief interventions, behavior therapy, medication adherence tools, and HIV prevention interventions) and technology platforms (mobile, Web, videoconferencing, and telephone-based interactive voice response), for an array of populations (adults, adolescents, criminal justice populations, and post-partum women), in a number of different settings (addiction specialty treatment programs, schools, emergency rooms, and criminal justice settings). They additionally reflect a variety of experimental research designs, including those focused on the design, development, and clinical evaluation of these technology-based therapeutic tools, as well as research focused on models for their successful implementation and sustained use.

    14. Introduction to the special issue: Substance use and the adolescent brain: Developmental impacts, interventions, and longitudinal outcomes.

      PubMed

      Luciana, Monica; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W

      2015-12-01

      Adolescent substance abuse is a major public health problem, particularly given the negative brain and behavioral consequences that often occur during and following acute intoxication. Negative outcomes appear to be especially pronounced when substance use is initiated in the early adolescent years, perhaps due to neural adaptations that increase risk for substance use disorders into adulthood. Recent models to explain these epidemiological trends have focused on brain-based vulnerabilities to use as well as neurodevelopmental aberrations associated with initiation of use in substance naïve samples or through the description of case-control differences between heavy users and controls. Within this research, adolescent alcohol and marijuana users have shown relative decreases in regional gray matter volumes, substance-specific alterations in white matter volumes, deviations in microstructural integrity in white matter tracts that regulate communication between subcortical areas and higher level regulatory control regions, and deficits in functional connectivity. How these brain anomalies map onto other types of youth risk behavior and later vulnerabilities represent major questions for continued research. This special issue addresses these compelling and timely questions by introducing new methodologies, empirical relationships, and perspectives from major leaders in this field.

    15. Oceanography at coastal scales: Introduction to the special issue on results from the EU FP7 FIELD_AC project

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Wolf, Judith; Monbaliu, Jaak

      2014-09-01

      The high-resolution and coupled forecasting of wind, waves and currents, in restricted coastal domains, offer a number of important challenges; these limit the quality of predictions, in the present state-of-the-art. This paper presents the main results obtained for such coastal domains, with reference to a variety of modelling suites and observing networks for: a) Liverpool Bay; b) German Bight; c) Gulf of Venice; and d) the Catalan coast. All of these areas are restricted domains, where boundary effects play a significant role in the resulting inner dynamics. This contribution addresses also the themes of the other papers in this Special Issue, ranging from observations to simulations. Emphasis is placed upon the physics controlling such restricted areas. The text deals also with the transfer to end-users and other interested parties, since the requirements on resolution, accuracy and robustness must be linked to their applications. Finally, some remarks are included on the way forward for coastal oceanography and the synergetic combination of in-situ and remote measurements, with high-resolution 3D simulations.

    16. Principles, processes, and puzzles of social cognition: an introduction for the special issue on social cognitive neuroscience.

      PubMed

      Lieberman, Matthew D

      2005-12-01

      This article introduces the special issue of NeuroImage focused on social cognitive neuroscience. Social psychology has a rich history of making sense of the often paradoxical aspects of social cognition and the social world. This article reviews the principles, processes, and puzzles of social cognition and behavior that have been examined by social psychologists for decades. Five principles of social cognition and behavior are reviewed including: (1) the power of the situation over behavior, (2) blindness for situational influences, (3) social perception and self-perception are constructive processes, (4) blindness for the constructed nature of social and self-perception, and (5) self-processes are social. Four processes of social cognition are reviewed including: (1) cognitive architecture; (2) automaticity and control; (3) motivated reasoning; and (4) accessibility, frames, and expectations. Finally, five areas of social cognition that contain enduring puzzles are described including (1) the self, (2) attitudes, (3) reflective social cognition, (4) automatic social cognition, and (5) social motives. In several of the areas of study reviewed, cognitive neuroscience is well positioned to make important contributions to these research traditions either by allowing for new tests of hypotheses or by allowing for unobtrusive measurement of social cognitive processes.

    17. Gender-specific issues in cardiac rehabilitation: do women with ischaemic heart disease need specially tailored programmes?

      PubMed

      Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Grande, Gesine; Loewel, Hannelore; Völler, Heinz; Mittag, Oskar

      2007-04-01

      Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) has changed from a disease of middle-aged men in the late 1970s to a disease of elderly women in the 2000s. Most clinical studies during the past three decades have been conducted with men. Cardiac rehabilitation programmes were also developed with special regard to improving the rate of return to work in middle-aged men. The rehabilitation needs of older patients and women in particular have been largely neglected. The aim of this review is briefly to outline our present knowledge on gender issues in cardiac rehabilitation, and to specify barriers with regard to physical activities especially in (older) women. Coping with a cardiac event, women tend to minimize or play down the impact of their health situation and avoid burdening their social contacts. After a first cardiac event, women report greater psychological distress and lower self-efficacy and self-esteem. In addition, older age, lower exercise levels and reduced functional capacity or co-morbid conditions such as osteoporosis and urinary incontinence are barriers to physical activities in women with IHD. Recent studies on psychosocial intervention revealed less favourable results in women compared with men. These findings have not yet been well explained. This emphasizes our current lack of knowledge about the processes and determinants of successful psychosocial interventions in men and women with IHD. A large (European) trial on gender-specific coping styles, needs, and preferences of older women, and the effects of psychosocial intervention is proposed.

    18. Why Go There? Evolution of Mobility and Spatial Cognition in Women and Men : An Introduction to the Special Issue.

      PubMed

      Cashdan, Elizabeth; Gaulin, Steven J C

      2016-03-01

      Males in many non-monogamous species have larger ranges than females do, a sex difference that has been well documented for decades and seems to be an aspect of male mating competition. Until recently, parallel data for humans have been mostly anecdotal and qualitative, but this is now changing as human behavioral ecologists turn their attention to matters of individual mobility. Sex differences in spatial cognition were among the first accepted psychological sex differences and, like differences in ranging behavior, are documented for a growing set of species. This special issue is dedicated to exploring the possible adaptive links between these cognitive and ranging traits. Multiple hypotheses, at various levels of analysis, are considered. At the functional (ultimate) level, a mating-competition hypothesis suggests that range expansion may augment mating opportunities, and a fertility-and-parental-care hypothesis suggests that range contraction may facilitate offspring provisioning. At a more mechanistic (proximate) level, differences in cue availability may support or inhibit particular sex-specific navigation strategies, and spatial anxiety may usefully inhibit travel that would not justify its costs. Studies in four different cultures-Twe, Tsimane, Yucatec Maya, and Faroese-as well as an experimental study using virtual reality tools are the venue for testing these hypotheses. Our hope is to stimulate more research on the evolutionary and developmental processes responsible for this suite of linked behavioral and cognitive traits.

    19. EDITORIAL: Introduction to the special issue on electromagnetic inverse problems: emerging methods and novel applications Introduction to the special issue on electromagnetic inverse problems: emerging methods and novel applications

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Dorn, O.; Lesselier, D.

      2010-07-01

      Inverse problems in electromagnetics have a long history and have stimulated exciting research over many decades. New applications and solution methods are still emerging, providing a rich source of challenging topics for further investigation. The purpose of this special issue is to combine descriptions of several such developments that are expected to have the potential to fundamentally fuel new research, and to provide an overview of novel methods and applications for electromagnetic inverse problems. There have been several special sections published in Inverse Problems over the last decade addressing fully, or partly, electromagnetic inverse problems. Examples are: Electromagnetic imaging and inversion of the Earth's subsurface (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and T Habashy) October 2000 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data (Guest Editors: K Belkebir and M Saillard) December 2001 Electromagnetic and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and J Bowler) December 2002 Electromagnetic characterization of buried obstacles (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and W C Chew) December 2004 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: inhomogeneous targets (Guest Editors: K Belkebir and M Saillard) December 2005 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: 3D targets (Guest Editors: A Litman and L Crocco) February 2009 In a certain sense, the current issue can be understood as a continuation of this series of special sections on electromagnetic inverse problems. On the other hand, its focus is intended to be more general than previous ones. Instead of trying to cover a well-defined, somewhat specialized research topic as completely as possible, this issue aims to show the broad range of techniques and applications that are relevant to electromagnetic imaging nowadays, which may serve as a source of inspiration and encouragement for all those entering this active and rapidly developing research area. Also, the

    20. ARL: A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC. Special Issue on the Role of the Library in a Digital Landscape, Number 243

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Bowen, William G.; Barrett, G. Jaia, Ed.

      2005-01-01

      This special issue of "ARL: A Bimonthly Report" contains the remarks that William G. Bowen delivered to the research library community in October 2005 at the 147th Membership Meeting of ARL. For the past 17 years Dr. Bowen has served as President of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. In these remarks, entitled "New Times Always; Old Time We Cannot…

    21. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 4th IAEA Technical Meeting on the Theory of Plasma Instabilities Special issue containing papers presented at the 4th IAEA Technical Meeting on the Theory of Plasma Instabilities

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Itoh, K.; Wilson, H. R.

      2010-05-01

      The 4th IAEA technical meeting (TM) on the Theory of Plasma Instabilities was held in Kyoto, May 18th--20th 2009, following the first (Seeon), second (Trieste) and third (York) meetings in this series. This IAEA-TM was motivated by the recent advances in theoretical methodology, the rapid progress in observations of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas and the evolution of fusion research as we approach the ITER era. The international advisory committee (IAC) and local organizing committee (LOC), the members of which are listed below, collaborated to define the scope and the content of the scientific programme. Young scientists were actively encouraged to participate in this TM to help stimulate their future research careers and raise their international profiles. Through these young scientists, the IAEA-TM planned to identify the future directions of research. About 90 researchers, from 13 countries and the IAEA, participated in this IAEA-TM, with 72 scientific presentations. The talks and posters generated enthusiastic discussions, contributing to the vibrancy of the meeting. This special issue of Nuclear Fusion consists of a cluster of papers, reporting some of the main contributions to the IAEA-TM. The articles in this cluster are representative of the scientific width of presentations at the meeting, spanning topics from micro-turbulence to large-scale MHD dynamics and from transport to detailed analysis of diagnostics. They demonstrate the quality and depth of the research presented at the conference. List of IAC (alphabetical order): B. Breizman (USA), S. Guenter (Germany), T. S. Hahm (USA), K. Itoh (Japan, Chair of 2009), Ya. I. Kolesnichenko (Ukraine), A. G. Peeters (UK), H. Wilson (UK) List of LOC (alphabetical order): A. Fukuyama, R. Horiuchi, S.-I. Itoh, N. Kasuya, Y. Kishimoto (co-chair), K. Kusano, J. Li, K. Mima, S. Murakami, H. Naitou, N. Nakajima, Y. Nakamura, H. Ohtani, S. Okamura, T. Ozeki, S. Sudo (co-chair), H. Sugama, Y. Todo, S. Tokuda, S

  1. International Perspectives on Academic and Professional Preparation of School and Educational Psychologists: Introduction to a Special Issue of the "International Journal of School & Educational Psychology"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland, Thomas; Hatzichristou, Chryse

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the "International Journal of School & Educational Psychology" is devoted to promoting an understanding of some current features of school psychology programs and to suggest ways to further strengthen preparation. Information summarized in these 12 articles is intended to assist us in determining the relevance…

  2. Response to Special Issue of "Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education" Concerning "Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the six authors in the special issue of "Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education" concerning her book "Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy." In this response, the author focuses on some general observations that came to mind whilst reading the…

  3. Asian-South Pacific Bureau of Adult Education Special Issue in Preparation for the Fourth International Conference on Adult Education Convened by Unesco, Paris, 1985. Courier No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This special issue was developed by the Asian-South Pacific Bureau for Adult Education (ASPBAE) in preparation for Unesco's fourth international conference on adult education. A section on "Literacy--A Great Challenge and Important Debate" includes "Why Literacy? (Paul Fordham); "Cooperating or Campaigning for Literacy"…

  4. PREFACE: Special issue containing the Proceedings of an ESF PESC Exploratory Workshop on Liquid Crystal Colloid Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaver, Doug; Ziherl, Primoz

    2004-05-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter collects together a series of contributions first reported at the workshop `Structural Arrest Transitions in Colloidal Systems With Short-Range Attractions' which was held in Messina (Italy) on 17-20 December 2003. The aim of the workshop was to discuss, in depth, the recent progress on both the mode coupling theory predictions and their experimental tests on various aspects of structural arrest transitions in colloidal systems with short-range attractions. Indeed, the last five years had seen an incredible progress in the understanding of the slow dynamics in colloidal suspensions and of the formation of disordered arrested states in these systems, both at low and at high packing fraction. The time was ripe for an open discussion, not only of the previous achievements, but also of foreseeable future developments. Browsing through this issue, the reader will immediately notice the presence of words and ideas indicating a flowering of the original novel idea of the structural arrest transition in densely packed systems. The dynamical arrest phenomena close to the colloidal glass transition is discussed together with several other types of dynamic arrest, in particular the ones also able to generate arrested states at extremely low packing fractions. In this issue, studies of glass and gel formation are often found together. Novel and/or deeper connections between dynamical arrest and cluster formation, both in equilibrium and out of equilibrium conditions were presented and discussed during the workshop and reported in the accompanying articles. The theoretical frontier is pushed toward systems where short-range attractions are complemented by long-range repulsions, favouring the description of supramolecular ordering in protein solutions, in the same theoretical framework developed for charged colloidal systems. Mode-coupling theory calculations, strengthened by the notable agreement between theoretical

  5. Research Library Issues: A Bimonthly Report from ARL, CNI, and SPARC--A Special Issue on Strategies for Opening up Content. RLI 269

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, G. Jaia, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Research Library Issues" ("RLI") is a bimonthly report from ARL (Association of Research Libraries), CNI (Coalition of Networked Information), and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). This issue includes the following articles: (1) Strategies for Opening Up Content: Laying the Groundwork for an Open…

  6. Introduction to the Special Issue: Electrons, water and rice fields: plant response and adaptation to flooding and submergence stress

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Michael B.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2015-01-01

    Flooding and submergence impose widespread and unpredictable environmental stresses on plants and depress the yield of most food crops. The problem is increasing, as is the need for greater food production from an expanding human population. The incompatibility of these opposing trends creates an urgent need to improve crop resilience to flooding in its multifarious forms. This Special Issue brings together research findings from diverse plant species to address the challenge of enhancing adaptation to flooding in major crops and learning from tactics of wetland plants. Here we provide an overview of the articles, with attempts to summarize how recent research results are being used to produce varieties of crop plants with greater flooding tolerance, notably in rice. The progress is considerable and based firmly on molecular and physiological research findings. The article also sets out how next-generation improvements in crop tolerance are likely to be achieved and highlights some of the new research that is guiding the development of improved varieties. The potential for non-model species from the indigenous riparian flora to uncover and explain novel adaptive mechanisms of flooding tolerance that may be introduced into crop species is also explored. The article begins by considering how, despite the essential role of water in sustaining plant life, floodwater can threaten its existence unless appropriate adaptations are present. Central to resolving the contradiction is the distinction between the essential role of cellular water as the source of electrons and protons used to build and operate the plant after combining with CO2 and O2 and the damaging role of extracellular water that, in excess, interferes with the union of these gases with photosynthetic or respiratory electrons and protons. PMID:26174144

  7. Introduction to the special issue: 50th anniversary of APA Division 28: The past, present, and future of psychopharmacology and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Stoops, William W; Sigmon, Stacey C; Evans, Suzette M

    2016-08-01

    This is an introduction to the special issue "50th Anniversary of APA Division 28: The Past, Present, and Future of Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse." Taken together, the scholarly contributions included in this special issue serve as a testament to the important work conducted by our colleagues over the past five decades. Division 28 and its members have advanced and disseminated knowledge on the behavioral effects of drugs, informed efforts to prevent and treat substance abuse, and influenced education and policy issues more generally. As past and current leaders of the division, we are excited to celebrate 50 years of Division 28 and look forward to many more successful decades for our division and its members. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.

    2010-08-01

    topics, which were also covered at previous conferences in this series and have become conventional, experimental and theoretical results on the influence of energetic ions on bulk plasma transport properties were also reported. Some materials from the meeting are available on the web page http://www.kinr.kiev.ua/TCM/index.html. 24 of the works presented at the meeting are published in this special issue. These works were reviewed to the usual high standard of Nuclear Fusion. The guest editor of this special issue is grateful to the publishers for their cooperation.

  9. A Study of Issues Related to Discipline, Grouping and Tracking, and Special Education in New Castle County, Delaware, Desegration Area. Volume I, General Issues and Introduction: Discipline Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, Charles M.; And Others

    In the former New Castle County (Delaware) School District (reorganized into four districts in 1981), minority students were numerically overrepresented from 1979 to 1982 in suspensions from school and in placement in special education and lower academic groupings. To determine if the overrepresentation was based on discriminatory practices or…

  10. Afterschool Supporting Students with Disabilities and Other Special Needs. MetLife Foundation Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 64

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Afterschool Alliance, in partnership with MetLife Foundation, is proud to present the second in their latest series of four issue briefs examining critical issues facing middle school youth and the vital role afterschool programs play in addressing these issues. This series explores afterschool and: the Common Core State Standards, students…

  11. At-Risk Children and Otitis Media with Effusion: Management Issues for the Early Childhood Special Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medley, Lynn P.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the implications of otitis media with effusion (OME) for children with disabilities who are already at risk for speech, language, and learning difficulties. The results of a survey of 189 early childhood special educators on management of young children with OME and the role of the early childhood special educator are…

  12. Summary of the Geocarto International Special Issue on "NASA Earth Science Satellite Data for Applications to Public Health" to be Published in Early 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2013-01-01

    At the 2011 Applied Science Public Health review held in Santa Fe, NM, it was announced that Dr. Dale Quattrochi from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, John Haynes, Program Manager for the Applied Sciences Public Health program at NASA Headquarters, and Sue Estes, Deputy Program Manager for the NASA Applied Sciences Public Health Program located at the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, AL, would edit a special issue of the journal Geocarto International on "NASA Earth Science Satellite Data for Applications to Public Health". This issue would be focused on compiling research papers that use NASA Earth Science satellite data for applications to public health. NASA's Public Health Program concentrates on advancing the realization of societal and economic benefits from NASA Earth Science in the areas of infectious disease, emergency preparedness and response, and environmental health (e.g., air quality). This application area as a focus of the NASA Applied Sciences program, has engaged public health institutions and officials with research scientists in exploring new applications of Earth Science satellite data as an integral part of public health decision- and policy-making at the local, state and federal levels. Of interest to this special issue are papers submitted on are topics such as epidemiologic surveillance in the areas of infectious disease, environmental health, and emergency response and preparedness, national and international activities to improve skills, share data and applications, and broaden the range of users who apply Earth Science satellite data in public health decisions, or related focus areas.. This special issue has now been completed and will be published n early 2014. This talk will present an overview of the papers that will be published in this special Geocarto International issue.

  13. Editorial for the Special Issue 100 Years of Chronogeometrodynamics: The Status of the Einstein's Theory of Gravitation in Its Centennial Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    The present Editorial introduces the Special Issue dedicated by the journal Universe to the General Theory of Relativity, the beautiful theory of gravitation of Einstein, a century after its birth. It reviews some of its key features in a historical perspective, and, in welcoming distinguished researchers from all over the world to contribute it, some of the main topics at the forefront of the current research are outlined.

  14. Children’s Exposure to Environmental Contaminants: An Editorial Reflection of Articles in the IJERPH Special Issue Entitled, “Children’s Exposure to Environmental Contaminants”

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Alesia; Solo-Gabriele, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Children are at increased vulnerability to many environmental contaminants compared to adults due to their unique behavior patterns, increased contaminant intake per body weight, and developing biological systems. Depending upon their age, young children may crawl on the floor and may practice increased hand to mouth activity that may increase their dose-intake of specific contaminants that accumulate in dust and other matrices. Children are also smaller in size than adults, resulting in a greater body burden for a given contaminant dose. Because children undergo rapid transitions through particular developmental stages they are also especially vulnerable during certain growth-related time windows. A Special Issue was organized focused on the latest findings in the field of children’s environmental exposure for these reasons. This editorial introduces articles in this Special Issue and emphasizes their main findings in advancing the field. From the many articles submitted to this Special Issue from around the world, 23 were accepted and published. They focus on a variety of research areas such as children’s activity patterns, improved risk assessment methods to estimate exposures, and exposures in various contexts and to various contaminants. The future health of a nation relies on protecting the children from adverse exposures and understanding the etiology of childhood diseases. The field of children’s environmental exposures must consider improved and comprehensive research methods aimed at introducing mitigation strategies locally, nationally, and globally. We are happy to introduce a Special Issue focused on children’s environmental exposure and children’s health and hope that it contributes towards improved health of children. PMID:27834888

  15. Children's Exposure to Environmental Contaminants: An Editorial Reflection of Articles in the IJERPH Special Issue Entitled, "Children's Exposure to Environmental Contaminants".

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alesia; Solo-Gabriele, Helena

    2016-11-09

    Children are at increased vulnerability to many environmental contaminants compared to adults due to their unique behavior patterns, increased contaminant intake per body weight, and developing biological systems. Depending upon their age, young children may crawl on the floor and may practice increased hand to mouth activity that may increase their dose-intake of specific contaminants that accumulate in dust and other matrices. Children are also smaller in size than adults, resulting in a greater body burden for a given contaminant dose. Because children undergo rapid transitions through particular developmental stages they are also especially vulnerable during certain growth-related time windows. A Special Issue was organized focused on the latest findings in the field of children's environmental exposure for these reasons. This editorial introduces articles in this Special Issue and emphasizes their main findings in advancing the field. From the many articles submitted to this Special Issue from around the world, 23 were accepted and published. They focus on a variety of research areas such as children's activity patterns, improved risk assessment methods to estimate exposures, and exposures in various contexts and to various contaminants. The future health of a nation relies on protecting the children from adverse exposures and understanding the etiology of childhood diseases. The field of children's environmental exposures must consider improved and comprehensive research methods aimed at introducing mitigation strategies locally, nationally, and globally. We are happy to introduce a Special Issue focused on children's environmental exposure and children's health and hope that it contributes towards improved health of children.

  16. Welcome to a Special Issue about the School-to-Prison Pipeline: The Pathway to Modern Institutionalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houchins, David E.; Shippen, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this issue is to provide readers with a better understanding of the inexplicable connection between school, community, and incarceration, and how better prepared professionals can make a difference in the lives of youth in the school-to-prison pipeline (STPP). This issue provides readers with an awareness of the current status of the…

  17. Special Issue "Impact of Natural Hazards on Urban Areas and Infrastructure" in the Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru Dan, M.

    2009-04-01

    This special issue includes selected papers on the topic of earthquake impact from the sessions held in 2004 in Nice, France and in 2005 in Vienna, Austria at the first and respectivelly the second European Geosciences Union General Assembly. Since its start in 1999, in the Hague, Netherlands, the hazard of earthquakes has been the most popular of the session. The respective calls in 2004 was for: Nature's forces including earthquakes, floods, landslides, high winds and volcanic eruptions can inflict losses to urban settlements and man-made structures such as infrastructure. In Europe, recent years have seen such significant losses from earthquakes in south and south-eastern Europe, floods in central Europe, and wind storms in western Europe. Meanwhile, significant progress has been made in understanding disasters. Several scientific fields contribute to a holistic approach in the evaluation of capacities, vulnerabilities and hazards, the main factors on mitigating urban disasters due to natural hazards. An important part of the session is devoted to assessment of earthquake shaking and loss scenarios, including both physical damage and human causalities. Early warning and rapid damage evaluation are of utmost importance for addressing the safety of many essential facilities, for emergency management of events and for disaster response. In case of earthquake occurrence strong motion networks, data processing and interpretation lead to preliminary estimation (scenarios) of geographical distribution of damages. Factual information on inflicted damage, like those obtained from shaking maps or aerial imagery permit a confrontation with simulation maps of damage in order to define a more accurate picture of the overall losses. Most recent developments towards quantitative and qualitative simulation of natural hazard impacts on urban areas, which provide decision-making support for urban disaster management, and success stories of and lessons learned from disaster

  18. PREFACE OF SPECIAL ISSUE OF AEROSOL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY FOR PARTICULATE MATTER SUPERSITES PROGRAM AND RELATED STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article is the preface or editors note to a dedicated issue of Aerosol Science and Technology, journal of the American Association for Aerosol Research. It includes a selection of scientific papers from the specialty conference entitled, "Particulate Matter Supersites ...

  19. The Fiscal Impact of a Tuition Assistance Grant for Virginia's Special Education Students. Parent Choice Issues in the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aud, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Parents of students with disabilities face a number of difficult choices in determining how to get the best education for their children. Too often, the special education system in public schools fails its students. Parents must become both experts and advocates for their children in order to navigate a burdensome maze of regulations to fight for…

  20. Starting School with Special Needs: Issues for Families with Complex Support Needs as Their Children Start School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob; Kearney, Emma

    2011-01-01

    The transition to school is a time of change and expectation for children, families, and communities. It is also a time when a range of factors--both within and outside the family--influence educational experiences and outcomes. This paper reports the experiences and expectations of 24 Australian families as their children with special needs…

  1. History and the Study of "Administration" (LAMPS) in Education: A Reflection on an Editorial for a Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbins, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The special edition of JEAH published in August 2006 on "Administration and Leadership in Education: A Case for History?" argued that history has been seriously undervalued in the study of administration and leadership in education. My introductory editorial explained why this mattered and outlined the framework in which the papers it…

  2. Programs and Practices for Special Education Students in Alternative Education Settings. Research to Practice Brief. Volume 6, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unruh, Deanne; Bullis, Michael; Todis, Bonnie; Waintrup, Miriam; Atkins, Trent

    2007-01-01

    This brief presents a review of alternative education programs targeting students with disabilities. Because there is no clear picture of how alternative education programs operate, specifically regarding youth with disabilities, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) funded three grants to develop a…

  3. The Intersection of Identity Development and Peer Relationship Processes in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Contributions of the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliher, Renee V.; Kerpelman, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    This analysis of the papers in the special section on the intersection of identity development and peer relationship processes calls attention to conceptual contribution this collection of papers makes to the literature on identity development. Together these ten papers build on strong theoretical foundations in identity development, which posit…

  4. An Unprecedented Shortage of Special Education Faculty Is Looming: Findings from SEFNA. The Claremont Letter. Volume 6, Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Deborah Deutsch

    2012-01-01

    The author and her colleagues have just completed a four-year long project that was funded by the federal government. The project focused on the nation's capacity to prepare a sufficient supply of general and special education professionals to provide a quality education to students with disabilities and others who struggle becoming proficient…

  5. [Nurses and research: contents and methods. Premise and guide to the use of this issue. 1. Why a special issue for research].

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    For the first time in its history, this journal assumes the unusual form of a monograph: the issue is dedicated to the problems of research methodology, as it applies to the nursing context and activities. The purpose and the contents which are developed along the eight "chapters" can be summarised as follows: 1. It is widely recognised that health care systems are undergoing a profound and rapid transformation phase, which is obviously affecting the nursing profession and roles. To minimize the very real risk of being passive observers of the changes, a propositive strategy based on diffuse and intense research activities (aiming at describing, anticipating, assessing, experimenting changes and hypotheses) appears to be a priority choice (besides the more classical and needed institutional battles and arrangements). 2. Since its very beginning (back 15 years ago), this journal had adopted among its main objectives and distinctive features, the promotion of a research oriented mentality in a profession which (mainly, but not exclusively in Italy) has been characterised more in terms of executive and basically dependent tasks. The key thesis all over the years has been that, to be relevant for the whole profession, research should not be conceived as a separate or élite area of interest but it should be as close as possible (in its scope and methods), to the routine activities of the majority of the nurses. 3. The years long experience has produced (both through the materials which have been published, and the training initiatives which the Rdl has promoted) an important body of concepts and suggestions, which appear to be possibly useful to integrate the existing standard literature dedicated to research methods and designs. 4. The structure chosen for the overall organisation of the issue tries to comply to this "experimental" background: after a first part focused on the close articulation between the conceptual and historical specificities of nursing research

  6. The risk of disease and threats to the wild population. Special Issue: Conservation and Management of the Southern Sea Otter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.J.; Cole, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The growth of the southern sea otter population has been steady, but slow in comparison to Alaskan subspecies, and range expansion in California has faltered. Slower growth is occurring in California despite birth rates comparable to those in Alaska, so biologists have reasoned that mortality is hindering the growth of the California population (Riedman and Estes 1990; see Estes et al., this issue). In order to investigate this issue, research efforts have been directed toward identifying the causes of death in southern sea otters.

  7. Special Issue: Intellectual Property in the Information Age: Knowledge as Commodity and its Legal Implications for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Jeffrey C., Ed.; Baez, Benjamin, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This monograph examines in great detail two kinds of intellectual property: copyrights and patents. Though the authors recognize the significance of trademarks and trade secrets, they focus primarily on copyrights and patents in this monograph because they represent the most significant issues in higher education in the information age.…

  8. Issues in NASA Program and Project Management. Special Report: 1997 Conference. Project Management Now and in the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Topics Considered Include: NASA's Shared Experiences Program; Core Issues for the Future of the Agency; National Space Policy Strategic Management; ISO 9000 and NASA; New Acquisition Initiatives; Full Cost Initiative; PM Career Development; PM Project Database; NASA Fast Track Studies; Fast Track Projects; Earned Value Concept; Value-Added Metrics; Saturn Corporation Lessons Learned; Project Manager Credibility.

  9. Towards a Dynamic Systems Approach to Moral Development and Moral Education: A Response to the "JME" Special Issue, September 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minkang; Sankey, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Is "development" a concept that properly belongs to mind and morality and, if it does, what account can we give of moral development now that Piagetian and Kohlbergian models are increasingly being abandoned in developmental psychology? In addressing this central issue, it is hoped that the paper will contribute to the quest for a new integrated…

  10. Alternate Assessments for Special Education Students in the Southwest Region States. Issues & Answers. REL 2008-No. 044

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Stanley; Sato, Edynn; Case, Betsy J.; Benitez, Debra; Jordan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    In 2003 the U.S. Department of Education issued regulations allowing states to develop alternate standards and assessments for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. This study reviews and summarizes alternate assessment policies and practices--and their implementation and impact--for the most significantly cognitively…

  11. SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL OF THE AIR & WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION ON THE PARTICULATE MATTER SUPERSITES PROGRAM AND RELATED STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article is the preface or editors note to the dedicated issue of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association for a selection of scientific papers from the specialty conference entitled, "Particulate Matter Supersites Program and Related Studies," that was...

  12. Lifelong Learning and Adult Education. Special Issue in Memory of CIHED Advisory Board Member J. Roby Kidd.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CIHED Newsletter, 1982

    1982-01-01

    This newsletter deals with lifelong learning and adult and continuing education. Included in the issue are the following articles: "The Learning Society," by Solveig M. Turner; "Adult Education at the Beginning of the 1980s," by J. Roby Kidd; "Lifelong Learning in an International Perspective: Selected Case Studies,"…

  13. Reflecting on imagery: a clinical perspective and overview of the special issue of memory on mental imagery and memory in psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Hackmann, Ann; Holmes, Emily A

    2004-07-01

    The authors provide an overview of the papers in the special issue of Memory on mental imagery and memory in psychopathology. The papers address emotional, intrusive mental imagery across a range of psychological disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), agoraphobia, body dysmorphic disorder, mood disorders, and psychosis. They include work on information processing issues including modelling cravings, conditioning, and aversions, as well as imagery qualities such as vividness and emotionality. The overview aims to place the articles in a broader context and draw out some exciting implications of this novel work. It provides a clinical context to the recent growth in this area from a cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) perspective. We begin with PTSD, and consider links to imagery in other disorders. The clinical implications stemming from this empirical work and from autobiographical memory theory are discussed. These include consideration of a variety of techniques for eliminating troublesome imagery, and creating healthy, realistic alternatives.

  14. Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Pamela

    2014-06-01

    Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease.

  15. The west-central Florida inner shelf and coastal system: A geologic conceptual overview and introduction to the special issue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hine, A.C.; Brooks, G.R.; Davis, R.A.; Duncan, D.S.; Locker, S.D.; Twichell, D.C.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an overview for this special publication on the geologic framework of the inner shelf and coastal zone of west-central Florida. This is a significant geologic setting in that it lies at the center of an ancient carbonate platform facing an enormous ramp that has exerted large-scale control on coastal geomorphology, the availability of sediments, and the level of wave energy. In order to understand the Holocene geologic history of this depositional system, a regional study defined by natural boundaries (north end of a barrier island to the apex of a headland) was undertaken by a group of government and university coastal geologists using a wide variety of laboratory and field techniques. It is the purpose of this introductory paper to define the character of this coastal/inner shelf system, provide a historical geologic perspective and background of environmental information, define the overall database, present the collective objectives of this regional study, and very briefly present the main aspects of each contribution. Specific conclusions are presented at the end of each paper composing this volume. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Preface to special issue: "Molecular mechanism of the adaptation of terrestrial plants to gravity environment on Earth"].

    PubMed

    Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    2003-08-01

    Organisms borne in the primitive sea about 30 million years ago had evolved in water without a large influence of gravity on earth. About 4 million years ago, the first terrestrial organisms, plants appeared on the land from the sea. The terrestrial plants have adapted to and evolved on the land environment so that they can extend their roots downward in soil and their shoots upward against 1 g gravity. At least two functions that were acquired during the process of evolution helped the terrestrial plants to adapt to gravity environment on earth. One is gravitropism. The other is the reinforcement of the cell wall, particularly the secondary cell wall. In the present feature articles, the molecular mechanism of the adaptation of terrestrial plants to gravity environment on earth will be reviewed, paying special attention to the mechanism of the genetic control of the signaling of gravity stimulus in gravitropism, automorphogenesis, genes involved in auxin transport, gravity effect on cell wall properties and gravimorphogenesis in terrestrial plants.

  17. Global climate change (GCC) issues and their impacts on the US Army Corps of Engineers. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, J.E.; Neander, J.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report is a survey of recent findings and arguments within the scientific arena on the subject of global climate change. The focus of this report looks at global, continental, and regional issues, as well as surface and upper atmospheric effects. Potential responses by the biosphere as well as the impacts on Army operations by global climate change are examined. The geologic past provides a detailed record of Earth's climate system. It also reveals changes that took place in the concentration of atmospheric gasses as Earth's climate switched from glacial to interglacial periods. The secular record of temperature shows that Earth's climate has warmed from 0.5 C to 0.7 C this past century. The world's populace is injecting tremendous amounts of greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere at a rate where the effective doubling of pre-industrial carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration could occur between the years 2035 to 2050. Clouds have been found to have a net cooling effect on the global average temperature. Anthropogenic pollutants and gasses produced from biological sources may increase the amount of clouds around the world, thus adding to the cooling effect. Aftereffects of volcanic eruption, and gasses emitted by phytoplankton that lead to cloud formation retard global warming. Weapon and support systems may require upgraded data bases to match vegetation changes due to evolving climate patterns.

  18. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip Special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessburg, Philip C.

    2011-06-01

    Once again Journal of Neural Engineering is devoting an issue to the field of visual neuro-prosthetics. These papers were presented at the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the ChipA 13 DVD set of all presentations at The Eye and the Chip 2010 is available from Carolyn Barth PhD, Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology, 15415 E Jefferson, Grosse Pointe Park MI 48230, USA, 313.824.4710, clbarth@dioeyes.org, held in Detroit in September 2010. In the last decade this field has metamorphosed from 'in all probability a foolish and impractical dream' to a device approved for implantation in Europe and pending approval in the United States, and from a handful of serious efforts to several dozen on every continent save for Antartica. A recent comprehensive volume, Visual Prosthetics [1], edited by Gislin Dagnelie of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, focuses closely on this subject and is a tremendous addition to the literature. In his preface Dr Dagnelie notes as follows. 'In the year 2000, the Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology had the inspiration to foster a new collaboration among visual prosthesis researchers, clinicians, and workers in low vision rehabilitation by creating and sponsoring a series of biennial meetings called 'The Eye and the Chip'. Successful beyond expectations, these meetings have become the premier gathering place for researchers from all parts of the world and from very different backgrounds. Invited speakers are scientists who are advancing the field, yet the scale and atmosphere allow all researchers, patients, and the media to come and be updated about progress over the past two years. More perhaps than at other scientific meetings, where investigators tend to gather within disciplines, participants at The Eye and the Chip are challenged to be open-minded, learn about and critique each other's work, and return home with fresh ideas for interdisciplinary approaches. The interdisciplinary character of this book reflects that

  19. Undertaking cancer research in international settings: report from the american society for preventive oncology special interest group on international issues in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wernli, Karen J; Kitahara, Cari M; Tamers, Sara L; Al-Temimi, Mohammed H; Braithwaite, Dejana

    2013-09-01

    The mission of the American Society for Preventive Oncology Special Interest Group in International Issues in Cancer is to serve as a worldwide cancer prevention resource. At the 2013 annual meeting, we presented three early career investigators who conducted research with international collaborators as part of postdoctoral studies. We present a synopsis of each of the scientific presentations. The investigators also highlight useful strategies to encourage a more successful international collaboration, including seeking out existing collaborations between colleagues and international researchers, maintaining awareness and sensitivity of cultural norms, establishing clear communication about investigator roles and expectations, and persevering in the face of potential challenges due to the nature of these collaborations. Incorporation of these key elements could prove useful for researchers interested in pursuing cross-country projects.

  20. The benefits of studying by production . . . And of studying production: Introduction to the special issue on the production effect in memory.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Glen E; MacLeod, Colin M

    2016-06-01

    The production effect refers to enhanced memory for materials that were produced at study (e.g., those read aloud) relative to materials that were not produced (e.g., those read silently). The effect has generated a wave of interest since being named in 2010 (MacLeod, Gopie, Hourihan, Neary, and Ozubko, 2010)-likely because of the simplicity of production tasks and of the substantial memory improvements that they can yield. This special issue of the Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology brings together 10 new studies on the production effect in memory. Our introduction provides an expanded definition of the effect along with some examples to help orient readers. The present studies contribute to our understanding of the production effect and to memory more broadly. Just as important, they also raise new questions and provide a honed set of methodological tools that will help to guide further research and theorizing about memory. (PsycINFO Database Record