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Sample records for 77th atlanta georgia

  1. Atlanta, Georgia as seen from STS-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport is visible to the south of Atlanta, situated near the center of the photograph. Dobbins Air Force Base and the city of Marietta can also be seen to the north of Atlanta in this south-looking low-oblique view. The complex system of transportation routes and interstate highways surrounding and traversing Atlanta can also be seen in the photograph. The white dot near the center of the photograph is the Georgia Dome, a major sports and entertainment complex in downtown Atlanta. The Stone Mountain Memorial, with its enormous relief carvings of Confederate figures, is located east of Atlanta and is visible on the photograph.

  2. OZONE PRODUCTION AND TRANSPORT IN THE ATLANTA, GEORGIA REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results from air quality monitoring program conducted in the Atlanta, Georgia region during July 1981. The study included data collected at several ground sites as well as airborne measurements using an instrumented aircraft. Study participants included Wa...

  3. Student Financial Aid Issues Hearing Report (Atlanta, Georgia,

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, Washington, DC.

    This paper summarizes results of a hearing by the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance in Atlanta, Georgia, on the delivery and disposition of higher education student financial assistance funds. Seventeen individuals offered testimony. They included representatives of guarantee agencies, the lending community, the financial aid…

  4. Georgia State University Spending Patterns and the Atlanta Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Charles D.

    The single but substantial economic dimension of Georgia State University's contribution to the Atlanta metropolitan area is examined in this research report. The purpose of the study was to identify successful estimating techniques developed by previous studies of the local spending impact of postsecondary educational institutions. Three direct…

  5. Climate change adaptation through urban heat management in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Stone, Brian; Vargo, Jason; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yongtao; Russell, Armistead

    2013-07-16

    This study explores the potential effectiveness of metropolitan land cover change as a climate change adaptation strategy for managing rising temperatures in a large and rapidly warming metropolitan region of the United States. Through the integration of a mesoscale meteorological model with estimated land cover data for the Atlanta, Georgia region in 2010, this study quantifies the influence of extensive land cover change at the periphery of a large metropolitan region on temperature within the city center. The first study to directly model a metropolitan scale heat transfer mechanism, we find both enhanced tree canopy and impervious cover in the suburban zones of the Atlanta region to produce statistically significant cooling and warming effects in the urban core. Based on these findings, we conclude that urban heat island management both within and beyond the central developed core of large cities may provide an effective climate change adaptation strategy for large metropolitan regions. PMID:23734623

  6. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Lodge, Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia is described. This system provides for 81 percent of the total hot water demand. There are two separate systems, each serving one building of the lodge (total of 65 suites). The entire system contains only potable city water. The 1024 square feet of Grumman Sunstream Model 332 liquid flat plate collectors and the outside piping drain whenever the collector plates approach freezing or when power is interrupted. Solar heated water from the two above ground cement lined steel tanks (1000 gallon tank) is drawn into the electric Domestic Hot Water (DHW) tanks as hot water is drawn. Electric resistance units in the DHW tanks top off the solar heated water, if needed, to reach thermostat setting.

  7. STS-56 ESC Earth observation of Atlanta, Georgia at night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 electronic still camera (ESC) Earth observation image shows metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia at night as recorded on the 64th orbit of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. The image was recorded using an image intensifier on the Hand-held, Earth-oriented, Real-time, Cooperative, User-friendly, Location-targeting and Environmental System (HERCULES). HERCULES is a device that makes it simple for shuttle crewmembers to take pictures of Earth as they merely point a modified 35mm camera and shoot any interesting feature, whose latitude and longitude are automatically determined in real-time. Center coordinates on this image are 33.738 degrees north latitude and 84.414 degrees west longitude. Digital file name is ESC04030.IMG.

  8. Flood-flow characteristics of Nancy Creek at Georgia Highway 400 extension near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, McGlone; Hess, Glen W.

    1987-01-01

    The Highway Division, Georgia Department of Transportation, plans the extension of Georgia Highway 400 from Interstate 285 southward to Interstate 85. As part of this extension, the Highway Division plans construction of a bridge crossing Nancy Creek near Atlanta, Georgia. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Highway Division, determined the flood flow characteristics of Nancy Creek near the bridge crossing. The flood frequency, elevation discharge relation, flood profiles, floodway, and flood flow effects were determined. The maximum backwater effect for the proposed bridge and relocated channel was 0.2 ft for the 100-yr flood. The relocated channel will drastically shorten flow length near the proposed State Highway 400 extension and reduce the 100-yr flood elevation between one and two ft from existing conditions between the proposed site and Windsor Parkway. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Outcomes among Asylum Seekers in Atlanta, Georgia, 2003--2012.

    PubMed

    Evans, Dabney P; Donato, Caitlin E; Malewezi, Bridget A; Li, Anyie J; Corea, Mario J; Mitchell, Andrew B

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Asylum seekers face a wide array of challenges, including the need for a fair and just adjudication process. In the state of Georgia, the Atlanta Asylum Network addresses the needs of such individuals by providing them physical, psychological and gynecological assessments, the results of which are presented to the courts in the asylum appeal process. OBJECTIVE As a component of the Network's program evaluation, assess outcomes among asylum seekers using its services, as well as relation of outcomes to type of service provided, the individual's geographic origin and English language proficiency. METHODS A retrospective examination was conducted of program data gathered by the Network between 2003 and 2012. Subjects included asylum seekers who received assessments by the Network during this period. The primary variable of interest was the final case outcome, defined as determination of asylum status: granted, withholding of removal, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion, denied or voluntary departure. Outcomes were subsequently collapsed into a single positive or negative outcome variable. Positive outcomes included asylum granted, removal withheld, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion. Negative outcomes included asylum denied and voluntary departure. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses, relating final case outcomes to Network services, geographic origin and English language proficiency, among the key variables. RESULTS A total of 69 of 120 asylum seekers in the study had a known final case outcome, and of those, 63.8% (44) had a positive outcome; or 37% of the total number of asylum seekers (n = 120). Among the 20 who received 2 of the 3 types of assessment (physical, psychological, gynecological), 16 (80%) received a positive case outcome. Most persons with a known final outcome came from Africa (41), where 78% (32) of cases resulted positive. Asylum seekers not proficient in English were 2.4 times more likely

  10. Urbanization effects on the hydrology of the Atlanta, Georgia (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Rose, S.

    2001-01-01

    For the period from 1958 to 1996, streamflow and rainfall characteristics of a highly urbanized watershed were compared with less-urbanized and non-urbanized watersheds in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia (USA). Water levels in several wells completed in surficial and crystalline-rock aquifers also were evaluated. Annual runoff coefficients (runoff as a fractional percentage of precipitation) ranged from 0.31 to 0.34 and were not significantly different for the urban stream (Peachtree Creek). Peak flows for the largest 25 stormflows at Peachtree Creek were 30% to 80% greater than peak flows for the other streams. A 2-day storm recession constant for Peachtree Creek was much larger, that is streamflow decreased more rapidly than for the other streams. Average low flow of Peachtree Creek was 25 to 35% less than the other streams, possibly the result of decreased infiltration caused by the more efficient routing of storm water and the paving of groundwater recharge areas. The timing of groundwater level variations was similar annually in each well, reflecting the seasonal recharge. Although water level monitoring only began during the late 1970s and early 1980s for the two urban wells, water levels in these wells have been declining compared to non-urban wells since then. The water level decline is attributed to decreased groundwater recharge in the urban watersheds due to increased imperviousness and related rapid storm runoff. Likewise, the increased urbanization from the 1960s to the 1990s of the Peachtree Creek watershed produced more runoff than urbanization in the less urbanized Big Creek and Sweetwater Creek watersheds.

  11. 78 FR 65877 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Georgia's ROP plan for the 1-hour ozone NAAQS for the Atlanta Area on April 26, 1999. See 64 FR 20196. \\3..., Paulding, and Rockdale. See 56 FR 56694, November 6, 1991. \\4\\ Seven additional ``ring'' counties were.... These additional counties are: Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, Hall, Newton, Spalding, and Walton. See 69...

  12. Energy in Agriculture: Proceedings of a Conference-Workshop, Atlanta, Georgia, October 1-3, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This publication is the proceedings of a conference-workshop held in Atlanta, Georgia in October 1975. At this conference 13 papers were presented on various aspects of energy use in agriculture. Also included are the final reports of the extension, the teaching, and the research workshop groups. Title of papers include Energy in Agriculture and…

  13. Three Georgias in Atlanta: Lessons from Business Schools about Finding Your Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Mimi

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to look into how universities identify themselves and the audiences they choose to serve, taking into account three specific universities in Atlanta, Georgia. Design/methodology/approach: The paper gives brief overviews of the literature on differentiation and sustainability and the study, followed by…

  14. 75 FR 15415 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Atlanta, Georgia, Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... given in the Federal Register (73 FR 60676-60677, 10/14/08; correction, 73 FR 63675, 10/27/ 08) and the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Atlanta, Georgia, Area Pursuant to...

  15. Newcastle disease B1 vaccine strain in wild rock pigeons in Atlanta, Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From June to October of 2012, samples were collected from wild Rock Pigeons (Columba livia) in urban neighborhoods of Atlanta, Georgia to ascertain the prevalence of pigeon paramyxovirus serotype-1 (PPMV-1). PPMV-1 strains are a subset of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) commonly isolated fro...

  16. 77 FR 75972 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26 - Atlanta, Georgia Notification of Proposed Production Activity Suzuki Mfg...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26 -- Atlanta, Georgia Notification of Proposed Production Activity Suzuki Mfg. of America Corp. (All-Terrain Vehicles) Rome, Jonesboro and Cartersville, Georgia Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of...

  17. Radar signatures of the urban effect on precipitation distribution: A case study for Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Thomas L.; Lacke, Matthew C.; Shepherd, J. Marshall

    2007-10-01

    Ground-based weather radar from Peachtree City, GA, is used to examine the distribution of summer precipitation in northern Georgia, including metropolitan Atlanta, during June-August of 2002-2006. The study included 194 ``synoptically benign'' days with a maritime tropical air mass type. Areas in eastern metropolitan Atlanta are shown to have 30% more rainfall during these days than areas west of the city. Both precipitation amount and frequency were enhanced up to 80 km to the east of the urban core of Atlanta. A precipitation maxima northeast of Atlanta occurs near a precipitation anomaly and lightning flash density anomaly identified in previous studies. An hourly analysis of precipitation data demonstrates that the enhanced precipitation on the periphery of the urban core is most evident from 00-05 UTC (19-00 LST). This study is the first to use ground-based radar precipitation estimates in an attempt to quantify the impact of urbanization on precipitation.

  18. Limited spillover to humans from West Nile Virus viremic birds in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Levine, Rebecca S; Mead, Daniel G; Kitron, Uriel D

    2013-11-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that impacts the health of its passerine bird hosts as well as incidentally infected humans in the United States. Intensive enzootic activity among the hosts and vectors does not always lead to human outbreaks, as is the situation throughout much of the southeastern United States. In Georgia, substantial yearly evidence of WNV in the mosquito vectors and avian hosts since 2001 has only led to 324 human cases. Although virus has been consistently isolated from mosquitoes trapped in Atlanta, GA, little is known about viral activity among the passerine hosts. A possible reason for the suppression of WNV spillover to humans is that viremic birds are absent from high human-use areas of the city. To test this hypothesis, multiseason, multihabitat, longitudinal WNV surveillance for active WNV viremia was conducted within the avian host community of urban Atlanta by collection of blood samples from wild passerine birds in five urban microhabitats. WNV was isolated from the serum of six blood samples collected from 630 (0.95%) wild passerine birds in Atlanta during 2010-2012, a proportion similar to that found in the Chicago, IL, area in 2005, when over 200 human cases were reported. Most of the viremic birds were Northern Cardinals, suggesting they may be of particular importance to the WNV transmission cycle in Georgia. Results indicated active WNV transmission in all microhabitats of urban Atlanta, except in the old-growth forest patches. The number of viremic birds was highest in Zoo Atlanta, where 3.5% of samples were viremic. Although not significant, these observations may suggest a possible transmission reduction effect of urban old-growth forests and a potential role in WNV amplification for Zoo Atlanta. Overall, spillover to humans remains a rare occurrence in urban Atlanta settings despite active WNV transmission in the avian population. PMID:24107200

  19. Limited Spillover to Humans from West Nile Virus Viremic Birds in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Daniel G.; Kitron, Uriel D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that impacts the health of its passerine bird hosts as well as incidentally infected humans in the United States. Intensive enzootic activity among the hosts and vectors does not always lead to human outbreaks, as is the situation throughout much of the southeastern United States. In Georgia, substantial yearly evidence of WNV in the mosquito vectors and avian hosts since 2001 has only led to 324 human cases. Although virus has been consistently isolated from mosquitoes trapped in Atlanta, GA, little is known about viral activity among the passerine hosts. A possible reason for the suppression of WNV spillover to humans is that viremic birds are absent from high human-use areas of the city. To test this hypothesis, multiseason, multihabitat, longitudinal WNV surveillance for active WNV viremia was conducted within the avian host community of urban Atlanta by collection of blood samples from wild passerine birds in five urban microhabitats. WNV was isolated from the serum of six blood samples collected from 630 (0.95%) wild passerine birds in Atlanta during 2010–2012, a proportion similar to that found in the Chicago, IL, area in 2005, when over 200 human cases were reported. Most of the viremic birds were Northern Cardinals, suggesting they may be of particular importance to the WNV transmission cycle in Georgia. Results indicated active WNV transmission in all microhabitats of urban Atlanta, except in the old-growth forest patches. The number of viremic birds was highest in Zoo Atlanta, where 3.5% of samples were viremic. Although not significant, these observations may suggest a possible transmission reduction effect of urban old-growth forests and a potential role in WNV amplification for Zoo Atlanta. Overall, spillover to humans remains a rare occurrence in urban Atlanta settings despite active WNV transmission in the avian population. PMID:24107200

  20. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    This summary report outlines needs and issues for increasing energy efficiency of new and existing U.S homes, as identified at the U.S Department of Energy Building America program Spring 2011 stakeholder meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-045-1681, 101 Marietta Tower Building, Atlanta, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, S.; Roper, P.

    1986-04-01

    A reevaluation of the air quality in the Marietta Tower Building, Atlanta, Georgia was requested by the DHHS Region IV Employee Health and Safety Committee because of worker complaints about sinus problems, eye irritation, and headaches. Air cooling and circulation units were inspected on six floors. Outside air supply to these floors was measured and the buildup of carbon dioxide determined as an indicator of indoor pollution.

  2. Ozone trends in Atlanta, Georgia - Have emission controls been effective?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Richardson, Jennifer L.; Chameldes, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Nine years of summertime ozone data from the Atlanta metropolitan area are analyzed and compared to local emissions of volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides. Trends from 1979 to 1987 were studied for the number of days per year ozone exceeded the NAAQS standard, the second-highest ozone level observed per year, and the first quartile summertime average ozone observed, as well as the mean difference between the ozone level observed downwind and upwind of the city. Because this last parameter is sensitive to chemical factors but relatively insensitive to the number of days each year with meteorological conditions conducive to ozone formation, its trend may be best suited for determining how effective emission controls have been in reducing O3 in the Atlanta area. In spite of the fact that sizeable reductions have been claimed for volatile organic carbon emissions over the past several years, the data give no indication that ozone levels have decreased and in fact, imply that summertime ozone production may have increased. The results imply that either emissions have not decreased as much as has been claimed or that ozone is not sensitive to anthropogenic volatile organic carbon emissions.

  3. Design, implementation, and initial results from a water-quality monitoring network for Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Smith, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    In cooperation with the City of Atlanta, Georgia, the US Geological Survey has designed and implemented a water-quantity and quality monitoring network that measures a variety of biological and chemical constituents in water and suspended sediment. The network consists of 20 long-term monitoring sites and is intended to assess water-quality trends in response to planned infrastructural improvements. Initial results from the network indicate that nonpoint-source contributions may be more significant than point-source contributions for selected sediment associated trace elements and nutrients. There also are indications of short-term discontinuous point-source contributions of these same constituents during baseflow.

  4. History of the Georgia Baptist/Atlanta Medical Center surgical residency.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, George M; Humphries, Timothy

    2010-07-01

    The Georgia Baptist Hospital established itself as a premier healthcare facility during the first 50 years of the 20th century. The surgical residency started in the 1940s, became accredited in 1958, and has grown into one of the most respected independent programs in the country. The development and growth of the program was a result of the commitment and dedication of the Program Directors in Surgery over the past 50 years. These key leaders included A. Hamblin Letton, John P. Wilson, Paul Stanton, and George Lucas. The hospital's name has changed to Atlanta Medical Center with the sale of the hospital to Tenet in 1997. The same old school approach to surgical training that characterized the residency when it was known as Georgia Baptist persists and provides outstanding training for future surgeons interested in a broadly based surgical education and experience. PMID:20698368

  5. A Remote Sensing Approach for Urban Environmental Decision-Making: An Atlanta, Georgia Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Howell, Burgess F.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Unquestionably, urbanization causes tremendous changes in land cover and land use, as well as impacting a host of environmental characteristics. For example, unlike natural surfaces, urban surfaces have very different thermal energy properties whereby they store solar energy throughout the day and continue to release it as heat well after sunset. This effect, known as the 'Urban Heat Island', serves as a catalyst for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrial activities leading to the deterioration in air quality, especially exacerbating the production of ground level ozone. 'Cool Community' strategies that utilize remote sensing data, are now being implemented as a way to reduce the impacts of the urban heat island and its subsequent environmental impacts. This presentation focuses on how remote sensing data have been used to provide descriptive and quantitative data for characterizing the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area - particularly for measuring surface energy fluxes, such as the thermal or "heat" energy that emanates from different land cover types across the Atlanta urban landscape. In turn, this information is useful for developing a better understanding of how the thermal characteristics of the city surface affect the urban heat island phenomena and, ultimately, air quality and other environmental parameters over the Atlanta metropolitan region. Additionally, this paper also provides insight on how remote sensing, with its synoptic approach, can be used to provide urban planners, local, state, and federal government officials, and other decision-makers, as well as the general public, with information to better manage urban areas as sustainable environments.

  6. Educational Continuity of the Migrant Child. Annual Eastern Stream Conference (5th, Atlanta, Georgia, March 5-8, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    The Fifth Annual Eastern Stream Conference on Migrant Education met in Atlanta, Georgia, March 5-8, 1974. Conference objectives were to provide information on: teaching techniques; the Migrant Student Record Transfer System (MSRTS); program designs, plans, and communication techniques; the form, scope, nature and purpose of migrant programs;…

  7. BACKGROUND MATERIALS FOR WATERSHED CENTRAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP HELD JANUARY 8-10, 2007, IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA (CD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A development workshop for Watershed Central was held in Atlanta, Georgia, January 8-10, 2007. Participants in the workshop included representatives of EPA’s Office of Water, Office of Environmental Information, Office of Research and Development, and several Regional Offices. ...

  8. Georgia State University Spending Patterns and the Atlanta Economy, 1983. Institutional Research Report No. 84-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey, Ellen I.

    The economic impact of Georgia State University on Atlanta was assessed. The survey methodology of Salley (1976) was employed, and the differential expenditure multiplier was recomputed using local value added data. Attention was directed to: university enrollment, payroll, and spending; estimated student and staff spending; calculation of the…

  9. Flood-frequency relations for urban streams in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Inman, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    A knowledge of the magnitude and frequency of floods is needed for the design of highway drainage structures, for establishing flood insurance rates, and for many other uses by urban planners and engineers. This report presents a method for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods on small streams in the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area. The Distributed Routing Rainfall-Runoff Model Version II and the US Geological Survey rainfall-runoff model were calibrated for 19 drainage basins in the Atlanta area ranging in size from 0.21 to 19.1 square miles and in impervious area from 19 to 42%. The models were used to synthesize long-term flood records for these basins. The 2- to 100-year floods were developed for each basin from these long-term flood peak records using the log-Pearson Type III distribution. Multiple-regression analysis was then used to define relations between the flood-frequency station data and certain physical basin characteristics, of which drainage area, channel slope, and measured total impervious area were found to be significant. By using these relations, with these basin characteristics, the magnitude and frequency of floods at ungaged basins can be estimated. 27 refs., 6 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Effects of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Strategies on Current and Future Meteorology of Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, W. L.; Lapenta, W. M.; Griggs, L.; Kenna, G.; Johnson, H.; Dembek, S.

    2004-05-01

    The characterization of land use/land cover is an integral component of an ongoing air quality modeling project focused on evaluating strategies for reducing the Urban Heat Island (UHI) and improving air quality in Atlanta, Georgia. The `UHI mitigation strategies' applied in this project involve `Cool Communities' principles of high albedo pavement and roofing as well as increased urban tree canopy. These strategies have been developed based on input from local stakeholders and represent conditions that are attainable assuming broad-based support from local government and the community. In order to evaluate the impact of these strategies on urban meteorology (principally near-surface air temperature) and ultimately on air quality, mesoscale model simulations have been performed for the Atlanta region based on land use for 1999 and projected to 2030 using the Spatial Growth Model assuming `Business as Usual' development. Significant land use change associated with continuing urban sprawl is expected from now until 2030. Model simulations based on identical synoptic forcing were performed to evaluate the effects of local land use change on local and regional meteorology. For the 2030 case, results from `Business as Usual' and `UHI mitigation strategies' simulations will be compared. The impacts of higher urban albedo and increased tree cover will be examined separately and in combination.

  11. Effects of urbanization on stream water quality in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    A long-term stream water quality monitoring network was established in the city of Atlanta, Georgia during 2003 to assess baseline water quality conditions and the effects of urbanization on stream water quality. Routine hydrologically based manual stream sampling, including several concurrent manual point and equal width increment sampling, was conducted ???12 times annually at 21 stations, with drainage areas ranging from 3.7 to 232 km2. Eleven of the stations are real-time (RT) stations having continuous measures of stream stage/ discharge, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature and turbidity, and automatic samplers for stormwater collection. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, and a broad suite of water quality and sediment-related constituents. Field parameters and concentrations of major ions, metals, nutrient species and coliform bacteria among stations were evaluated and with respect to watershed characteristics and plausible sources from 2003 through September 2007. Most constituent concentrations are much higher than nearby reference streams. Concentrations are statistically different among stations for several constituents, despite high variability both within and among stations. Routine manual sampling, automatic sampling during stormflows and RT water quality monitoring provided sufficient information about urban stream water quality variability to evaluate causes of water quality differences among streams. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations of most samples exceeded Georgia's water quality standard for any water-usage class. High chloride concentrations occur at three stations and are hypothesized to be associated with discharges of chlorinated combined sewer overflows, drainage of swimming pool(s) and dissolution and transport during rainstorms of CaCl2, a deicing salt applied to roads during winter storms. One stream was affected by dissolution and transport of ammonium alum [NH4Al(SO4)2] from an alum

  12. Future desire for children among women living with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Lisa B; Machen, Leah Kathleen; Cordes, Sarah; Huylebroeck, Brian; Delaney, Augustina; Ofotokun, Igho; Nguyen, Minh Ly; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-04-01

    Little is known regarding family planning desires among women living with HIV in the United States. This study aimed to identify factors influencing desire for children in the future among HIV-infected women in Atlanta, Georgia. HIV-infected women ages 18-45 completed an ACASI (audio computer-assisted self-interview) questionnaire. Chi-square, t-tests, and multivariate logistic regression evaluated factors associated with desire for future children. Of 181 participants, 62 (34.3%) expressed desire for children in the future, with increased desire among younger women (age <26) and those with seronegative partners. Concerns for horizontal and vertical HIV transmission were deterrents to future childbearing. Condom use and overall knowledge of transmission risk was low. Over a third of women desiring a child never discussed their desire with a physician. Misinformation regarding HIV transmission risks persists and is a notable concern influencing desire for children. Providers should reassess family planning desires regularly through integrated HIV care. PMID:26702869

  13. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 92-226-2269, Empire Distributors, Inc. , Atlanta, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, M.

    1992-11-01

    In response to a request from the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, worker exposure to diesel exhaust at the Empire Distributors, Inc. (SIC-4215) warehouse in Atlanta, Georgia was investigated. Empire Distributors was a wholesale beverage distributor, employing about 40 warehouse workers and 33 truck drivers. All 32 delivery trucks were being replaced with newer models which emitted much less visible emissions than did the older models. The employees were experiencing transient eye and throat irritation. Environmental sampling was conducted to determine employee exposure to elemental carbon as an index of diesel emission concentrations. The highest elemental carbon concentrations detected were for the drivers of trucks and from the check out operator. Carbon-monoxide levels were well below established exposure criteria. Particle concentrations during the morning truck start up activities were five times higher than concentrations during the night shift. The author concludes that there was a potential for elevated levels of nitrogen-dioxide during the morning start up activities, especially during winter months. The author recommends that efforts be made to reduce exposure to diesel emissions.

  14. Multilevel factors influencing hepatitis B screening and vaccination among Vietnamese Americans in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Frew, Paula M; Alhanti, Brooke; Vo-Green, Linda; Zhang, Siyu; Liu, Chang; Nguyen, Tranh; Schamel, Jay; Saint-Victor, Diane S; Nguyen, Minh Ly

    2014-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may lead to liver cirrhosis, chronic liver disease, and liver cancer. Immunization rates are suboptimal among Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders (AAPIs), who remain disproportionately affected by these illnesses. We investigated socioecological factors affecting HBV prevention among 316 Vietnamese Americans in Atlanta, Georgia. Social and community support of HBV vaccination was associated with screening (OR=1.69, 95% CI [1.21,2.38]), vaccination (OR=1.89, [1.27,2.81]), and intent to vaccinate (OR=1.77, [1.13,2.78]). Misconceptions decreased screening likelihood (OR=0.67, [0.46,0.99]) and vaccination (OR=0.55, [0.35,0.86]). Those able to pay for medical treatment (OR=1.23, [1.01,1.50]) were also more likely immunized, and greater transportation access (OR=1.42, [1.07,1.87]) was associated with greater intention to vaccinate. Multi-level factors facilitated HBV vaccination in this population. Tailored, culturally appropriate communication strategies will positively influence immunization uptake. PMID:25506280

  15. Multilevel Factors Influencing Hepatitis B Screening and Vaccination among Vietnamese Americans in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Frew, Paula M.; Alhanti, Brooke; Vo-Green, Linda; Zhang, Siyu; Liu, Chang; Nguyen, Tranh; Schamel, Jay; Saint-Victor, Diane S.; Nguyen, Minh Ly

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may lead to liver cirrhosis, chronic liver disease, and liver cancer. Immunization rates are suboptimal among Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders (AAPIs), who remain disproportionately affected by these illnesses. We investigated socioecological factors affecting HBV prevention among 316 Vietnamese Americans in Atlanta, Georgia. Social and community support of HBV vaccination was associated with screening (OR=1.69, 95% CI [1.21,2.38]), vaccination (OR=1.89, [1.27,2.81]), and intent to vaccinate (OR=1.77, [1.13,2.78]). Misconceptions decreased screening likelihood (OR=0.67, [0.46,0.99]) and vaccination (OR=0.55, [0.35,0.86]). Those able to pay for medical treatment (OR=1.23, [1.01,1.50]) were also more likely immunized, and greater transportation access (OR=1.42, [1.07,1.87]) was associated with greater intention to vaccinate. Multi-level factors facilitated HBV vaccination in this population. Tailored, culturally appropriate communication strategies will positively influence immunization uptake. PMID:25506280

  16. PAHs and PM2.5 emissions and female breast cancer incidence in metro Atlanta and rural Georgia.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Puja Vijay; Wei, Yudan

    2016-08-01

    Environmental chemical exposure could be an important etiologic factor for geographic differences in breast cancer incidence. In this study, we examined emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PM2.5 in relation to breast cancer incidence in metro Atlanta and rural Georgia by analyzing data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program and the Environmental Protection Agency. The results showed that metro Atlanta had a significantly higher age-adjusted annual incidence rate of female breast cancer than rural Georgia (132.6 vs. 113.7 per 100,000) for 1992-2011. Emissions of both PAHs [adjusted β = 0.568 (95 % CI: 0.209, 0.927); p = 0.004] and PM2.5 [adjusted β = 2.964 (95 % CI: 0.468, 5.459); p = 0.023] were significantly associated with breast cancer incidence in metro Atlanta area. This study suggests that ambient air pollution, especially PAHs and PM2.5, could have a significant impact on the increased incidence of female breast cancer in urban areas. PMID:26983363

  17. Effects of urbanization on streamflow in the Atlanta area (Georgia, USA): a comparative hydrological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Seth; Peters, Norman E.

    2001-06-01

    For the period from 1958 to 1996, streamflow characteristics of a highly urbanized watershed were compared with less-urbanized and non-urbanized watersheds within a 20 000 km2 region in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia: in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces of the southeastern USA. Water levels in several wells completed in surficial and crystalline-rock aquifers were also evaluated. Data were analysed for seven US Geological Survey (USGS) stream gauges, 17 National Weather Service rain gauges, and five USGS monitoring wells. Annual runoff coefficients (RCs; runoff as a fractional percentage of precipitation) for the urban stream (Peachtree Creek) were not significantly greater than for the less-urbanized watersheds. The RCs for some streams were similar to others and the similar streams were grouped according to location. The RCs decreased from the higher elevation and higher relief watersheds to the lower elevation and lower relief watersheds: values were 0·54 for the two Blue Ridge streams, 0·37 for the four middle Piedmont streams (near Atlanta), and 0·28 for a southern Piedmont stream. For the 25 largest stormflows, the peak flows for Peachtree Creek were 30% to 100% greater than peak flows for the other streams. The storm recession period for the urban stream was 1-2 days less than that for the other streams and the recession was characterized by a 2-day storm recession constant that was, on average, 40 to 100% greater, i.e. streamflow decreased more rapidly than for the other streams. Baseflow recession constants ranged from 35 to 40% lower for Peachtree Creek than for the other streams; this is attributed to lower evapotranspiration losses, which result in a smaller change in groundwater storage than in the less-urbanized watersheds. Low flow of Peachtree Creek ranged from 25 to 35% less than the other streams, possibly the result of decreased infiltration caused by the more efficient routing of stormwater and the paving of groundwater

  18. Effects of urbanization on streamflow in the Atlanta area (Georgia, USA): A comparative hydrological approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, S.; Peters, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    For the period from 1958 to 1996, streamflow characteristics of a highly urbanized watershed were compared with less-urbanized and non-urbanized watersheds within a 20 000 km2 region in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia: In the Piedmont and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces of the southeastern USA. Water levels in several wells completed in surficial and crystalline-rock aquifers were also evaluated. Data were analysed for seven US Geological Survey (USGS) stream gauges, 17 National Weather Service rain gauges, and five USGS monitoring wells. Annual runoff coefficients (RCs; runoff as a fractional percentage of precipitation) for the urban stream (Peachtree Creek) were not significantly greater than for the less-urbanized watersheds. The RCs for some streams were similar to others and the similar streams were grouped according to location. The RCs decreased from the higher elevation and higher relief watersheds to the lower elevation and lower relief watersheds: Values were 0.54 for the two Blue Ridge streams. 0.37 for the four middle Piedmont streams (near Atlanta), and 0.28 for a southern Piedmont stream. For the 25 largest stormflows, the peak flows for Peachtree Creek were 30% to 100% greater then peak flows for the other stream. The storm recession period for the urban stream was 1-2 days less than that for the other streams and the recession was characterized by a 2-day storm recession constant that was, on average, 40 to 100% greater, i.e. streamflow decreased more rapidly than for the other streams. Baseflow recession constants ranged from 35 to 40% lower for Peachtree Creek than for the other streams; this is attributed to lower evapotranspiration losses, which result in a smaller change in groundwater storage than in the less-urbanized watersheds. Low flow of Peachtree Creek ranged from 25 to 35% less than the other streams, possibly the result of decreased infiltration caused by the more efficient routing of stormwater and the paving of groundwater

  19. 78 FR 20091 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Board (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 75406..., Perkins Shibaura Engines, LLC (Diesel Engines), Griffin, Georgia On November 29, 2012, Georgia...

  20. Effects of Urbanization on Stream Water Quality in the City of Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, N. E.

    2009-05-01

    A long-term stream water-quality monitoring network was established in the City of Atlanta (COA) during 2003 to assess baseline water-quality conditions and the effects of urbanization on stream water quality. Routine hydrologically-based manual stream sampling, including several concurrent manual point and equal width increment sampling, was conducted approximately 12 times per year at 21 stations, with drainage areas ranging from 3.7 to 232 km2. Eleven of the stations are real-time (RT) water-quality stations having continuous measures of stream stage/discharge, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, and turbidity, and automatic samplers for stormwater collection. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, and a broad suite of water-quality and sediment-related constituents. This paper summarizes an evaluation of field parameters and concentrations of major ions, minor and trace metals, nutrient species (nitrogen and phosphorus), and coliform bacteria among stations and with respect to watershed characteristics and plausible sources from 2003 through September 2007. The concentrations of most constituents in the COA streams are statistically higher than those of two nearby reference streams. Concentrations are statistically different among stations for several constituents, despite high variability both within and among stations. The combination of routine manual sampling, automatic sampling during stormflows, and real-time water-quality monitoring provided sufficient information about the variability of urban stream water quality to develop hypotheses for causes of water-quality differences among COA streams. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations of most individual samples at each station exceeded Georgia's water-quality standard for any water-usage class. High chloride concentrations occur at three stations and are hypothesized to be associated with discharges of chlorinated combined sewer overflows, drainage of swimming pool(s), and

  1. 77 FR 24440 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002 Base Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... 73 FR 16436. The current action, however, is being taken to address requirements under the 1997 8... (NAAQS). The Atlanta Area is comprised of Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta,...

  2. AN ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA ON THE SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RESIDENTS OF "VINE CITY"--A NEGRO SLUM GHETTO WITHIN THE CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HALVORSEN, MARCIA L.

    IN THIS REPORT DATA DESCRIBING THE SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RESIDENTS OF "VINE CITY," A NEGRO SLUM IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA, ARE STATISTICALLY SUMMARIZED AND ANALYZED. ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SIX PERSONS, MOSTLY WOMEN, REPRESENTING 11 PERCENT OF "VINE CITY'S" FAMILY POPULATION, WERE INTERVIEWED BY STUDENTS AT A NEARBY COLLEGE. THE INTERVIEW TOPICS,…

  3. Modeling the spatial differentiation in cloud-to-ground lightning: A case study in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strikas, Ona

    Urban cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning enhancement has been well documented for Atlanta, Georgia. This study builds on those investigations using modeling techniques. Numerous styles of analyses and regressions were conducted to establish patterns of CG lightning over the North Georgia region. CG lightning demonstrated clustering for all years of data: 1995--2008. However, the first strike of each day with lightning was randomly distributed according to a Poisson distribution, demonstrating the clustering is not due to permanent features. Attempts were unsuccessful to model CG lightning clusters as either a Matern or Thomas Poisson point process. Regressions of CG lightning with built environment covariates---FAA aviation obstacle locations and heights, population density, road length density, distance to the center of Atlanta, PM10 emissions data, distance to highways, and coal plant locations---as well as natural variables such as projected coordinate easting, northing, and NWS severe thunderstorm status were executed at resolutions of 1km, 2km, 4km, and 8km. Analyses demonstrated significantly higher flash frequency near FAA aviation obstacles. With an R2 value of 0.22, taller obstacles are struck more frequently than shorter obstacles. Regressions with road length density revealed little explanatory power (maximum R2=0.19), but demonstrated a positive correlation independent of scale. A multi-level visualization technique demonstrates the road length density correlation loses accuracy within dense urban corridors. Distance from Atlanta shows a negative correlation, but only at larger scales. Subsetting both regressions by direction reveals a significant difference on the Eastern and Western sides of Atlanta. Subsetting both regressions only to Gwinnett County, Georgia illustrates road length density has no correlation with flash frequency, and distance to Atlanta is still a scale dependent process. PM10 emissions analysis suggests that CG amplification is most

  4. Status and trends in atmospheric deposition and emissions near Atlanta, Georgia, 1986-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Meyers, T.P.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2002-01-01

    Wet and dry atmospheric deposition were investigated from weekly data, 1986-99 (1986-97 for dry deposition) at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed (PMRW), a forested research site 25 km, southeast of Atlanta, Georgia. Furthermore, the wet deposition was compared to that at three adjacent National Atmospheric Deposition Program's National Trends Network (NTN) sites (GA41, 50 km south of PMRW; AL99, 175 km northwest; NC25, 175 km north-northeast) and dry deposition was compared to that at adjacent Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET) sites, co-located at the NTN sites. The pH of precipitation is acidic and the dominant acid anion is SO4; the pH (derived from the volume-weighted mean H concentration) averages 4.44 for 1986-99, and varies seasonally with average lowest values in summer (4.19) and highest in winter (4.63). From 1986-99, the annual wet deposition of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) averaged 400 and 300 eq ha-1 (6.4 and 4.2 kg ha-1), respectively. Inferential model estimates of annual dry S and N deposition from 1986-97 averaged 130 and 150 eq ha-1 (2.1 and 2.1 kg ha-1), respectively. From 1993-99, net S deposition (dry deposition plus canopy interactions) for coniferous and deciduous throughfall (throughfall minus wet-only deposition) averaged 400 and 150 eq ha-1 (6.4 and 2.1 kg ha-1), respectively. The annual wet deposition of S and N species at PMRW was comparable to that at NTN sites, with the exception of higher N species deposition at AL99 and relatively lower H, SO4 and NO3 deposition at GA41. Dry S deposition at PMRW differed markedly from the CASTNET sites despite similarity in S concentrations for all but NC25; the differences are attributed to differences in model parameters associated with the landscape and vegetation characteristics at the sites. At PMRW, atmospheric deposition trends were not detected for the entire sampling period, but were detected for shorter periods (4-5yr). Annual S and N deposition increased from 1986 to 1991

  5. The Risk of West Nile Virus Infection Is Associated with Combined Sewer Overflow Streams in Urban Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Vanden Eng, Jodi L.; Kelly, Rosmarie; Mead, Daniel G.; Kolhe, Priti; Howgate, James; Kitron, Uriel; Burkot, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, the factors favoring transmission and amplification of West Nile Virus (WNV) within urban environments are poorly understood. In urban Atlanta, Georgia, the highly polluted waters of streams affected by combined sewer overflow (CSO) represent significant habitats for the WNV mosquito vector Culex quinquefasciatus. However, their contribution to the risk of WNV infection in humans and birds remains unclear. Objectives Our goals were to describe and quantify the spatial distribution of WNV infection in mosquitoes, humans, and corvids, such as blue jays and American crows that are particularly susceptible to WNV infection, and to assess the relationship between WNV infection and proximity to CSO-affected streams in the city of Atlanta, Georgia. Materials and methods We applied spatial statistics to human, corvid, and mosquito WNV surveillance data from 2001 through 2007. Multimodel analysis was used to estimate associations of WNV infection in Cx. quinquefasciatus, humans, and dead corvids with selected risk factors including distance to CSO streams and catch basins, land cover, median household income, and housing characteristics. Results We found that WNV infection in mosquitoes, corvids, and humans was spatially clustered and statistically associated with CSO-affected streams. WNV infection in Cx. quinquefasciatus was significantly higher in CSO compared with non-CSO streams, and WNV infection rates among humans and corvids were significantly associated with proximity to CSO-affected streams, the extent of tree cover, and median household income. Conclusions Our study strongly suggests that CSO-affected streams are significant sources of Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes that may facilitate WNV transmission to humans within urban environments. Our findings may have direct implications for the surveillance and control of WNV in other urban centers that continue to use CSO systems as a waste management practice. PMID:20529765

  6. 78 FR 32135 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... the 1-hour ozone NAAQS for the Atlanta Area on April 26, 1999. See 64 FR 20196. \\3\\ The 13-County.... See 56 FR 56694, November 6, 1991. \\4\\ Seven additional ``ring'' counties were added to the original 1... counties include: Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, Hall, Newton, Spalding, and Walton. See 69 FR 23857, April...

  7. 77 FR 24399 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002 Base Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... FR 23857, April 30, 2004).\\1\\ Ambient air quality monitoring data for the 3-year period must meet a..., 2004) using 2001-2003 ambient air quality data (69 FR 23857, April 30, 2004). At the time of... nonattainment designations. Therefore, the Atlanta Area's original attainment date was June 15, 2007. See 69...

  8. Mixed Messages in Media Coverage of Bilingual Education: The Case of Atlanta, Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasawa, Beth

    2008-01-01

    As the increasing number of Latino and Asian immigrants to the Atlanta area has escalated tensions over occupational, residential, and educational resources, research has begun to examine opposition to bilingual education as an extension of anti-immigrant prejudice and as a measure of perceived threat. This study uses content analysis to compare…

  9. Negro Residential Patterns in Atlanta, Georgia, 1860-1983, and Their Impact on Public School Mixing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Annie S.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the role of Black real estate brokers and financiers in shaping Black residential patterns in the Atlanta area. Argues that Black expansion into formerly White neighborhoods has not contributed significantly to racial school mixing and that the development of an integrated busing system is needed. (KH)

  10. IMPACT OF URBAN STORM RUNOFF ON STREAM QUALITY NEAR ATLANTA, GEORGIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of stormwater runoff from point and nonpoint sources on the water quality of receiving streams in the Atlanta area. Emphasis was placed on the collection of water-quality data in the summer and autumn to determine the impact on...

  11. 77 FR 12487 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Fine Particulate Matter 2002...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Order Reviews I. Background On July 18, 1997 (62 FR 36852), EPA established an annual PM 2.5 NAAQS at 15... concentrations. On January 5, 2005 (70 FR 944), EPA published its air quality designations and classifications... December 8, 2011 (76 FR 76620), EPA determined that the Atlanta Area attained the 1997 annual average PM...

  12. Applications of centrographic techniques to the study of urban phenomena: Atlanta, Georgia 1940-1975.

    PubMed

    Jones, B G

    1980-01-01

    "A limited number of centrographic techniques are applied to data for total population, black population, households by income quartiles, and housing characteristics for the five-county metropolitan region of Atlanta over the period from 1940 to 1975. Results of the analysis are compared to expectations from urban economic theory, and descrepancies are noted." PMID:12263198

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part IV: International Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The International Media section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 15 papers: "Testing the Interaction of the Third-Person Effect and Spiral of Silence in a Political Pressure Cooker: The Case of Hong Kong" (Lars Willnat); "The Use of Small State Variables in Research on Coverage of Foreign Policy: New Zealand…

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part I: Media History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Media History section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 21 papers: "Social Class Advocacy Journalism: Prelude to Party Politics, 1892" (David J. Vergobbi); "Pilfering the News: A Quality Comparison of the World and Journal's Spanish-American War Coverage" (Randall S. Sumpter); "The Early Black Press in…

  15. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part X: Miscellaneous Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous Studies section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 22 papers: "Men and Women Journalists in the Movies: Exploration of Some Sexism and Gender Issues in Their Portrayals in Eleven Films" (Albert D. Talbott); "Female Archetypes in Late '80s Films" (Fakhri Haghani); "Chain Ownership, Organizational…

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part IX: Magazines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Magazines section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 15 papers: "'National Geographic Magazine' and the Vietnam War: Did We Just Get Pretty Pictures?" (John W. Williams); "Free Speech at All Costs: A Short History of 'The Masses'" (Chris Lamb); "Newspapers Locally Edited Magazines Seek Ways to Maintain Place…

  17. Magnitudes, nature, and effects of point and nonpoint discharges in the Chattahoochee River Basin, Atlanta to West Point Dam, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Cherry, Rodney N.; Faye, R.E.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    During the period April 1975 to June 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a river-quality assessment of the Upper Chattahoochee River basin in Georgia. One objective of the study was to assess the magnitudes, nature, and effects of point and non-point discharges in the Chattahoochee River basin from Atlanta to the West Point Dam. On an average annual basis and during the storm period of March 1215, 1976, non-point-source loads for most constituents analyzed were larger than point-source loads at the Whitesburg station, located on the Chattahoochee River about 40 river miles downstream of Atlanta. Most of the non-point-source constituent loads in the Atlanta-to-Whitesburg reach were from urban areas. Average annual point-source discharges accounted for about 50 percent of the dissolved nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loads, and about 70 percent of the dissolved phosphorus loads at Whitesburg. During weekends, power generation at the upstream Buford Dam hydroelectric facility is minimal. Streamflow at the Atlanta station during dry-weather weekends is estimated to be about 1,200 ft3/s (cubic feet per second). Average daily dissolved-oxygen concentrations of less than 5.0 mg/L (milligrams per liter) occurred often in the river, about 20 river miles downstream from Atlanta during these periods from May to November. During a low-flow period, June 1-2, 1977, five municipal point sources contributed 63 percent of the ultimate biochemical oxygen demand, 97 percent of the ammonium nitrogen, 78 percent of the total nitrogen, and 90 percent of the total phosphorus loads at the Franklin station, at the upstream end of West Point Lake. Average daily concentrations of 13 mg/L of ultimate biochemical oxygen demand and 1.8 mg/L of ammonium nitrogen were observed about 2 river miles downstream from two of the municipal point sources. Carbonaceous and nitrogenous oxygen demands caused dissolved-oxygen concentrations between 4.1 and 5.0 mg/L to occur in a 22-mile

  18. Preliminary flood-frequency relations for urban streams, Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golden, Harold G.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods for urban streams in metropolitan Atlanta. The method is based on adjustments to the natural stream flood-frequency and rainfall-frequency characteristics of the local area as defined by urban flood studies in other areas. The effects of urbanization on flood-peak runoff are estimated from the percentage of drainage basin that is impervious and the percentage of drainage area served by storm sewers. Equation are presented for estimating the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year flood peak discharges for basin sizes from 0.5 to 100 square miles in the Atlanta metro area. Data from 12 urban streams in the Atlanta area were used to obtain a qualitative verification of the 2- and 100-year estimating equations. Hydrologic data are presently being collected for a study that will provide a data base for use in hydrologic models to develop more reliable urban flood-frequency relations. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. The Global Thinking Project: Linking Schools in Environmental Understanding. Symposium Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, November 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golley, Priscilla, Ed.; Hassard, Jack, Ed.

    The Global Thinking Project at Georgia State University and the Department of Middle Secondary Education and Instructional Technology sponsored a Symposium on Global Thinking Research, in November, 1993. The following 11 papers were presented at the symposium: (1) "Teaching Students to Think Globally" (Jack Hassard); (2) "Introducing Global…

  20. Investigation Into the Use of Satellite Data in Aiding Characterization of Particulate Air Quality in the Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Erica J.; Sokolik, Irina, N.; Doddridge, Bruce G.

    2011-01-01

    Poor air quality episodes occur often in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. The primary focus of this research is to assess the capability of satellites as a tool in characterizing air quality in Atlanta. Results indicate that intra-city PM2.5 concentrations show similar patterns as other U.S. urban areas, with the highest concentrations occurring within the city. Both PM2.5 and MODIS AOD show more increases in the summer than spring, yet MODIS AOD doubles in the summer unlike PM2.5. A majority of OMI AI is below 0.5. Using this value as an ambient measure of carbonaceous aerosols in the urban area, aerosol transport events can be identified. Our results indicate that MODIS AOD is well correlated with PM2.5 on a yearly and seasonal basis with correlation coefficients as high as 0.8 for Terra and 0.7 for Aqua. A possible alternative view of the PM2.5 and AOD relationship is seen through the use of AOD thresholds. These probabilistic thresholds provide a means to describe the AQI through the use of past AOD for a specific area. We use the NAAQS to classify the AOD into different AQI codes, and probabilistically determine thresholds of AOD that represent the majority of a specific AQI category. For example, the majority 80% of moderate AQI days have AOD values between 0.5 - 0.6. The development of thresholds could be a tool used to evaluate air quality from the use of satellites in regions where there are sparse ground-based measurements of PM2.5.

  1. 78 FR 25253 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 26-Atlanta, Georgia; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; PBR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Production Activity; PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles); Athens, Georgia Georgia... the FTZ Board on behalf of PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (SKAPS), located in Athens, Georgia....

  2. Effect of the restricted use of phosphate detergent and upgraded wastewater-treatment facilities of water quality in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wangsness, D.J.; Frick, E.A.; Buell, G.R.; DeVivo, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Data compiled for the six largest waste-water treatment facilities in Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, indicate about an 83-percent reduction in the phosphorus load discharged to the Chattahoochee River from 1988 to 1993 because of restricted use of phosphate detergents and upgraded treatment of municipal wastewater. This reduction resulted in about a 54-percent decrease in the phosphorus load in the Chattahoochee River downstream of Atlanta during this time period. Phosphorus loads in animal manure and fertilizers applied to the land (nonpoint sources) are greater than loads discharged to the Chattahoochee River from wastewater-treatment facilities (point sources). However, only a fraction of the phosphorus applied to the land enters the surface waters and is bioavailable. Even though nonpoint sources of land applied phosphorus potentially are important sources to surface waters, point-source inputs from wastewater effluent are far greater. Phosphorus concentrations in wastewater effluent from three cities of Atlanta waste-water treatment facilities need to be reduced by about an additional 31 percent by 1996 to comply with Georgia Department of Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division regulations.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability in nutrient concentrations in surface waters of the Chattahoochee River basin near Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Buell, G.R.; Frick, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Nutrient concentrations from the early 1970s through 1995 were evaluated at several sites along the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries near Atlanta, to determine general patterns and processes controlling nutrient concentrations in the river. A spatial analysis was conducted on data collected in 1994 and 1995 from an intensive nutrient study of the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division. The 1994-1995 data show step increases in ammonium (NH4-N), nitrite plus nitrate (NO2 + NO3-N), and total-phosphorus (Tot-P) concentrations in the river. The step increases occur downstream of two wastewater treatment facilities (WWTFs) and Peachtree Creek, a small tributary inflow with degraded water quality draining a predominantly urban and industrial area. Median NO2 + NO3-N and Tot-P concentrations in the mainstem increase downstream of these inputs from 0.5 to 1 mg 1-1 and from 0.04 to 0.13 mg 1-1, respectively. NH4-N concentrations were typically low with 95% of the 2575 observations less than 0.2 mg 1-1 throughout the river system, except some high values (>1 mg 1-1) in some tributaries, particularly near the central part of Atlanta. High NH4-N concentrations are attributed to sewage discharge as they also are associated with high biological oxygen demand and faecal coliform bacteria concentrations. Nutrient concentrations vary temporally. An assessment of four sites, two mainstem and two tributaries, from 1970 to 1995 indicates a progressive increase and variability in NO2 + NO3-N concentrations during the period. The progressive increase in NO2 + NO3-N concentrations and their variability is similar to that reported for surface waters throughout the world and for which increased fertilizer usage has been attributed. Tot-P concentrations increase at mainstem sites through the middle to late 1980s and decrease markedly thereafter, due to improvements to WWTFs and a 1990 phosphate

  4. Simulating unsteady transport of nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Chattahoochee River downstream from Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1985-01-01

    As part of an intensive water-quality assessment of the Chattahoochee River, repetitive water-quality measurements were made at 12 sites along a 69-kilometer reach of the river downstream of Atlanta, Georgia. Concentrations of seven constituents (temperature, dissolved oxygen, ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), organic nitrogen, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate) were obtained during two periods of 36 hours, one starting on August 30, 1976, and the other starting on May 31, 1977. The study reach contains one large and several small sewage outfalls and receives the cooling water from two large powerplants. An unsteady water-quality model of the Lagrangian type was calibrated using the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The model provided a good means of interpreting these data even though both the flow and the pollution loading rates were highly unsteady. A kinetic model of the cascade type accurately described the physical and biochemical processes occurring in the river. All rate coefficients, except reaeration coefficients and those describing the resuspension of BOD, were fitted to the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The study showed that, at steady low flow, about 38 percent of the BOD settled without exerting an oxygen demand. At high flow, this settled BOD was resuspended and exerted an immediate oxygen demand. About 70 percent of the ammonia extracted from the water column was converted to nitrite, but the fate of the remaining 30 percent is unknown. Photosynthetic production was not an important factor in the oxygen balance during either run.

  5. “Because He Misses His Normal Life Back Home”: Masculinity and Sexual Behavior Among Mexican Migrants in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jennifer S.; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Nyhus, Christina M.; Yount, Kathryn M.; Bauermeister, José A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Labor migration presents an important HIV risk context. Effective health promotion begins with understanding cultural and structural influences on sexual risk. Methods This paper presents the quantitative results from a mixed-methods study carried out in 1999 among Mexican migrant men (N=187) in Atlanta, Georgia. The instrument included questions on several domains: Demographic and sexual history, migration motivations, substance use, social support, leisure time practices, and ideas about masculinity, sexuality, and marriage. We created six multivariate regressions to test the association between each of these domains and men's number of partners. Results Greater number of partners was associated with being younger, having fewer years of formal education, and owning a home in Mexico (Model 1); taking more trips to Mexico (Model 2); feeling sex wasn't tied to emotional intimacy and power (Model 3); having a larger social network and fewer frequency of contact with network members (Model 4); having a sex worker as a partner (Model 5); and going out dancing and stripclubs on weekends (Model 6). Conclusion Emergent visions of marriage that include shared sexual intimacy and emotional intimacy and power imply a reorganization of marital sexuality; yet, only those men who emphasize emotional companionship and equity have fewer extramarital sexual partners. An individual-level intervention may be insufficient to transform men's ideas about manhood; programs must acknowledge and target migrant men's social networks and the spaces in which sexual risk may occur. Multilevel strategies, such as the development of more health-enhancing community spaces, active discussions regarding masculinity, and the promotion of safer sexual practices should form part of comprehensive efforts to reduce sexual risk among migrant men. PMID:19291125

  6. Chemical Properties of Air Pollutants and Cause-Specific Hospital Admissions among the Elderly in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel; Coull, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Health risks differ by fine particle (aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) component, although with substantial variability. Traditional methods to assess component-specific risks are limited, suggesting the need for alternative methods. Objectives: We examined whether the odds of daily hospital admissions differ by pollutant chemical properties. Methods: We categorized pollutants by chemical properties and examined their impacts on the odds of daily hospital admissions among Medicare recipients > 64 years of age in counties in Atlanta, Georgia, for 1998–2006. We analyzed data in two stages. In the first stage we applied a case-crossover analysis to simultaneously estimate effects of 65 pollutants measured in the Aerosol Research and Inhalation Epidemiology Study on cause-specific hospital admissions, controlling for temperature and ozone. In the second stage, we regressed pollutant-specific slopes from the first stage on pollutant properties. We calculated uncertainty estimates using a bootstrap procedure. We repeated the two-stage analyses using coefficients from first-stage models that included single pollutants plus ozone and meteorological variables only. We based our primary analyses on exposures on day of admission. Results: We found that 24-hr transition metals and alkanes were associated with increased odds [0.26%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.02–0.48; and 0.37%; 95% CI, 0.04–0.72, respectively] of hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Transition metals were significantly associated with increased hospital admissions for ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Increased respiratory-related hospital admissions were significantly associated with alkanes. Aromatics and microcrystalline oxides were significantly associated with decreased CVD- and respiratory-related hospital admissions. Conclusions: The two-stage approach showed transition metals to be consistently associated with increased

  7. Evaluation of stream water quality in Atlanta, Georgia, and the surrounding region (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Kandell, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    A water-quality index (WQI) was developed from historical data (1986-1995) for streams in the Atlanta Region and augmented with 'new' and generally more comprehensive biweekly data on four small urban streams, representing an industrial area, a developed medium-density residential area and developing and developed low-density residential areas. Parameter WQIs were derived from percentile ranks of individual water-quality parameter values for each site by normalizing the constituent ranks for values from all sites in the area for a base period, i.e. 1990-1995. WQIs were developed primarily for nutrient-related parameters due to data availability. Site WQIs, which were computed by averaging the parameter WQIs, range from 0.2 (good quality) to 0.8 (poor quality), and increased downstream of known nutrient sources. Also, annual site WQI decreases from 1986 to 1995 at most long-term monitoring sites. Annual site WQI for individual parameters correlated with annual hydrological characteristics, particularly runoff, precipitation quantity, and water yield, reflecting the effect of dilution on parameter values. The WQIs of the four small urban streams were evaluated for the core-nutrient-related parameters, parameters for specific dissolved trace metal concentrations and sediment characteristics, and a species diversity index for the macro-invertebrate taxa. The site WQI for the core-nutrient-related parameters used in the retrospective analysis was, as expected, the worst for the industrial area and the best for the low-density residential areas. However, macro-invertebrate data indicate that although the species at the medium-density residential site were diverse, the taxa at the site were for species tolerant of degraded water quality. Furthermore, although a species-diversity index indicates no substantial difference between the two low-density residential areas, the number for macro-invertebrates for the developing area was much less than that for the developed area

  8. Development and evaluation of alternative approaches for exposure assessment of multiple air pollutants in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Kathie L; Isakov, Vlad; Baxter, Lisa K; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Burke, Janet; Rosenbaum, Arlene; Graham, Stephen E; Cook, Rich; Mulholland, James; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2013-01-01

    Measurements from central site (CS) monitors are often used as estimates of exposure in air pollution epidemiological studies. As these measurements are typically limited in their spatiotemporal resolution, true exposure variability within a population is often obscured, leading to potential measurement errors. To fully examine this limitation, we developed a set of alternative daily exposure metrics for each of the 169 ZIP codes in the Atlanta, GA, metropolitan area, from 1999 to 2002, for PM(2.5) and its components (elemental carbon (EC), SO(4)), O(3), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Metrics were applied in a study investigating the respiratory health effects of these pollutants. The metrics included: (i) CS measurements (one CS per pollutant); (ii) air quality model results for regional background pollution; (iii) local-scale AERMOD air quality model results; (iv) hybrid air quality model estimates (a combination of (ii) and (iii)); and (iv) population exposure model predictions (SHEDS and APEX). Differences in estimated spatial and temporal variability were compared by exposure metric and pollutant. Comparisons showed that: (i) both hybrid and exposure model estimates exhibited high spatial variability for traffic-related pollutants (CO, NO(x), and EC), but little spatial variability among ZIP code centroids for regional pollutants (PM(2.5), SO(4), and O(3)); (ii) for all pollutants except NO(x), temporal variability was consistent across metrics; (iii) daily hybrid-to-exposure model correlations were strong (r>0.82) for all pollutants, suggesting that when temporal variability of pollutant concentrations is of main interest in an epidemiological application, the use of estimates from either model may yield similar results; (iv) exposure models incorporating infiltration parameters, time-location-activity budgets, and other exposure factors affect the magnitude and spatiotemporal distribution of exposure, especially for local pollutants. The

  9. Flood-inundation maps for Peachtree Creek from the Norfolk Southern Railway bridge to the Moores Mill Road NW bridge, Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.5-mile reach of the Peachtree Creek from the Norfolk Southern Railway bridge to the Moores Mill Road NW bridge, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Atlanta, Georgia. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Peachtree Creek at Atlanta, Georgia (02336300) and the USGS streamgage at Chattahoochee River at Georgia 280, near Atlanta, Georgia (02336490). Current water level (stage) at these USGS streamgages may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ and can be used in conjunction with these maps to estimate near real-time areas of inundation. The National Weather Service (NWS) is incorporating results from this study into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that commonly are collocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information for the USGS streamgage at Peachtree Creek, which is available through the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. A one-dimensional step-backwater model was developed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC–RAS software for a 6.5-mile reach of Peachtree Creek and was used to compute flood profiles for a 5.5-mile reach of the creek. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Peachtree Creek at Atlanta, Georgia, streamgage (02336300), and the Chattahoochee River at Georgia 280, near Atlanta, Georgia, streamgage (02336490) as well as high water marks collected during the 2010 annual peak flow event. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 50 water

  10. Ground-water resources of the south metropolitan Atlanta region, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Peck, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    Ground-water resources of the nine county south metropolitan Atlanta region were evaluated in response to an increased demand for water supplies and concern that existing surface water supplies may not be able to meet future supply demands. Previous investigations have suggested that crystalline rock in the study area has low permeability and can not sustain well yields suitable for public supply. However, the reported yield for 406 wells drilled into crystalIine rock units in this area ranged from less than 1 to about 700 gallons per minute, and averaged 43 gallons per minute. The reported flow from 13 springs ranged from 0.5 to 679 gallons per minute. The yield of 43 wells and flow from five springs was reported to exceed 100 gallons per minute. Most of the high-yielding wells and springs were near contact zones between rocks of contrasting lithologic and weathering properties. The high-yielding wells and springs are located in a variety of topographic settings: hillsides, upland draws, and hilltops were most prevalent. The study area, which includes Henry, Fayette, Coweta, Spalding, Lamar, Pike, Meriwether, Upson and Talbot Counties, is within the Piedmont physiographic province except for the southernmost part of Talbot County, which is in the Coastal Plain physiographic province. In the Piedmont, ground-water storage occurs in joints, fractures and other secondary openings in the bedrock, and in pore spaces in the regolith. The most favorable geologic settings for siting highyielding wells are along contact zones between rocks of contrasting lithology and permeability, major zones of fracturing such as the Towaliga and Auchumpkee fault zones, and other numerous shear and microbreccia zones. Although most wells in the study area are from 101 to 300 feet deep, the highest average yields were obtained from wells 51 to 100 feet deep, and 301 to 500 feet deep. Of the wells inventoried, the average diameter of well casing was largest for wells located on hills and

  11. Trends in on-road vehicle emissions and ambient air quality in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, from the late 1990s through 2009

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; DenBleyker, Allison; Ma, Lan; Lindhjem, Chris; Yarwood, Greg

    2014-01-01

    On-road vehicle emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during 1995–2009 in the Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area were estimated using the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model and data from the National Emissions Inventories and the State of Georgia. Statistically significant downward trends (computed using the nonparametric Theil-Sen method) in annual on-road CO, NOx, and VOC emissions of 6.1%, 3.3%, and 6.0% per year, respectively, are noted during the 1995–2009 period despite an increase in total vehicle distance traveled. The CO and NOx emission trends are correlated with statistically significant downward trends in ambient air concentrations of CO and NOx in Atlanta ranging from 8.0% to 11.8% per year and from 5.8% to 8.7% per year, respectively, during similar time periods. Weather-adjusted summertime ozone concentrations in Atlanta exhibited a statistically significant declining trend of 2.3% per year during 2001– 2009. Although this trend coexists with the declining trends in on-road NOx, VOC, and CO emissions, identifying the cause of the downward trend in ozone is complicated by reductions in multiple precursors from different source sectors. Implications: Large reductions in on-road vehicle emissions of CO and NOx in Atlanta from the late 1990s to 2009, despite an increase in total vehicle distance traveled, contributed to a significant improvement in air quality through decreases in ambient air concentrations of CO and NOx during this time period. Emissions reductions in motor vehicles and other source sectors resulted in these improvements and the observed declining trend in ozone concentrations over the past decade. Although these historical trends cannot be extrapolated to the future because pollutant concentration contributions due to on-road vehicle emissions will likely become an increasingly smaller fraction of the atmospheric total, they provide an indication of the

  12. Public Hearing: Report of the Proceedings of a Public Hearing of the Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology (Atlanta, Georgia, March 2, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC.

    The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston…

  13. Long-term trends and weekday-to-weekend differences in ozone, its precursors, and other secondary pollutants in Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Holloway, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Roberts, J. M.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    In an environment rich in biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), decreasing concentrations of ozone (-1.3 % yr-1) and other secondary pollutants (-8.2 % yr-1 for nitric acid, HNO3; and -7.9 % yr-1 for peroxyacetyl nitrate, PAN) in Atlanta, Georgia over the past fifteen years are primarily attributed to decreases in local emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2). Large reductions in abundances of NOx in the Southeast U.S. over the years (-8.0 % yr-1 for total reactive nitrogen, NOy) are the direct result of control strategies implemented to reduced emissions from electric-power generation plants and on-road motor vehicles. Here, we compile an extensive historical data set of trace gas measurements spanning fifteen years between 1998 and 2013 from a surface monitoring network site in downtown Atlanta (i.e. the SEARCH network Jefferson Street site) and research aircraft (e.g. the 2013 Southeast Atmosphere Study and 1999 Southern Oxidants Study aboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft). With this data set we confirm and extend long-term trends and weekday-to-weekend differences in ozone, its precursors, and other secondary pollutants during summertime in Atlanta. Long-term changes in abundances and enhancement ratios of secondary oxidation products indicate changes in pollutant formation chemistry in Atlanta resulting from the significant decrease in NOx precursor emissions over the past fifteen years. The most noteworthy changes include: 1) an increase in enhancement ratios of odd oxygen (Ox=O3+NO2) to (PAN+HNO3) of +5.5 % yr-1 indicating an increase in ozone production efficiency by a factor of 2 over the fifteen year period, 2) no significant change in the fraction of oxidized NOx out of NOy over time indicating little change in the extent of photochemical processing of the NOx emissions, and 3) a flip in observed ozone concentrations from higher average ozone on weekends to higher average ozone on weekdays after 2004. The observations for Atlanta will also be contrasted

  14. Fecal-coliform bacteria concentrations in streams of the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, May-October 1994 and 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregory, M. Brian; Frick, Elizabeth A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: The Metropolitan Atlanta area has been undergoing a period of rapid growth and development. The population in the 10-county metropolitan area almost doubled from about 1.5 million people in 1970 to 2.9 million people in 1995 (Atlanta Regional Commission, written commun., 2000). Residential, commercial, and other urban land uses more than tripled during the same period (Frick and others, 1998). The Chattahoochee River is the most utilized water resource in Georgia. The rapid growth of Metropolitan Atlanta and its location downstream of the headwaters of the drainage basin make the Chattahoochee River a vital resource for drinking-water supplies, recreational opportunities, and wastewater assimilation. In 1978, the U.S. Congress declared the natural, scenic, recreation, and other values of 48 miles of the Chattahoochee River from Buford Dam to Peachtree Creek to be of special national significance. To preserve this reach of the Chattahoochee River, the U.S. Congress created the Chattahoochee River National Recreational Area (CRNRA), which includes the Chattahoochee River downstream from Buford Dam to the mouth of Peachtree Creek and a series of park areas adjacent to the river in northern Metropolitan Atlanta Even with this protection, waters of the Chattahoochee River and many of its tributaries in Metropolitan Atlanta did not meet water-quality standards set for designated uses during 1994 and 1995 (fig. 1 and table 1). Much of the degradation of water quality has been associated with areas undergoing rapid urban growth and sprawling suburban development. The resulting conversion of mostly forested land to urban land has multiple adverse effects on water quality. Degradation of water quality may be caused by a number of factors including an increase in nutrient concentrations, sediment and sedimentbound contaminant concentrations (e.g., metals and pesticides) (Frick and others, 1998), and fecal-coliform bacteria concentrations (Center for Watershed

  15. Monitoring urban impacts on suspended sediment, trace element, and nutrient fluxes within the City of Atlanta, Georgia, USA: Program design, methodological considerations, and initial results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Smith, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Atlanta, Georgia (City of Atlanta, COA), is one of the most rapidly growing urban areas in the US. Beginning in 2003, the US Geological Survey established a long-term water-quantity/quality monitoring network for the COA. The results obtained during the first 2 years have provided insights into the requirements needed to determine the extent of urban impacts on water quality, especially in terms of estimating the annual fluxes of suspended sediment, trace/major elements, and nutrients. During 2004/2005, suspended sediment fluxes from the City of Atlanta (COA) amounted to about 150 000 t year-1; ??? 94% of the transport occurred in conjunction with storm-flow, which also accounted for ??? 65% of the annual discharge. Typically, storm-flow averaged ??? 20% of theyear. Normally, annual suspended sediment fluxes are determined by summing daily loads based on a single calculation step using mean-daily discharge and a single rating curve-derived suspended sediment concentration. Due to the small and 'flashy' nature of the COAs streams, this approach could produce underestimates ranging from 25% to 64%. Accurate estimates (?? 15%) require calculation time-steps as short as every 2-3 h. Based on annual median base-flow/storm-flow chemical concentrations, the annual fluxes of ??? 75% of trace elements (e.g. Cu, Pb, Zn), major elements (e.g. Fe, Al), and total P occur in association with suspended sediment; in turn, ??? 90% of the transport of these constituents occur in conjunction with storm-flow. As such, base-flow sediment-associated and dissolved contributions represent relatively insignificant portions of the total annual load. An exception is total N, whose sediment-associated fluxes range from 50% to 60%; even so, storm-related transport typically exceeds 80%. Hence, in urban environments, non-point-source appear to be the dominant contributors to the fluxes of these constituents.

  16. NMOC, ozone, and organic aerosol in the southeastern United States, 1999-2007: 1. Spatial and temporal variations of NMOC concentrations and composition in Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, C. L.; Hidy, G. M.; Tanenbaum, S.; Rasmussen, R.; Watkins, R.; Edgerton, E.

    2010-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted from anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources into the atmosphere. Characterizing their ambient mixing ratios or concentrations is a challenge because VOCs comprise hundreds of species, and accurate measurements are difficult. Long-term hourly and daily-resolution data have been collected in the metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, a major city dominated by motor vehicle emissions. A series of observations of daily, speciated C 2-C 10 non-methane organic compounds (NMOC) and oxygenated hydrocarbons (OVOC) in mid-town Atlanta (Jefferson Street, JST) are compared with data from three urban-suburban sites and a nearby non-urban site. Annual-average mixing ratios of NMOC and OVOC at JST declined from 1999 through 2007. Downward trends in NMOC, CO, and NO y corroborate expected emission changes as reflected in emission inventories for Atlanta's Fulton County. Comparison of the JST NMOC composition with data from roadside and tunnel sampling reveals similarities to motor vehicle dominated samples. The JST annual average VOC-OH reactivities from 1999 to 2007 were relatively constant compared with the decline in annual-average NMOC mixing ratios. Mean reactivity at JST, in terms of concentration*k OH, was approximately 40% alkenes, 22% aromatics, 16% isoprene and 6% other biogenics, 13% C 7-C 10 alkanes and 3% C 2-C 6 alkanes, indicating that biogenic NMOCs are important but not dominant contributors to the urban reactive NMOC mix. In contrast, isoprene constituted ˜50% of the VOC-OH reactivities at two non-urban sites. Ratios of 24-hour average CO/benzene, CO/isopentane, and CO/acetylene concentrations indicate that such species are relatively conserved, consistent with their low reactivity. Ratios of more-reactive to less-reactive species show diurnal variability largely consistent with expected emission patterns, transport and mixing of air, and chemical processing.

  17. NMOC, ozone, and organic aerosol in the southeastern United States, 1999-2007: 3. Origins of organic aerosol in Atlanta, Georgia, and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, C. L.; Hidy, G. M.; Tanenbaum, S.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2011-02-01

    Carbonaceous compounds constitute a major fraction of the fine particle mass at locations throughout North America; much of the condensed-phase organic carbon (OC) is produced in the atmosphere from NMOC reactions as "secondary" OC (SOC). Ten years of particulate carbon and speciated non-methane organic compound (NMOC) data combined with other measurements from Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) and other sites provide insight into the association between elemental carbon (EC), OC and NMOCs. Data are analyzed to characterize the OC and SOC contrasts between urban Atlanta, Georgia, and nearby non-urban conditions in the Southeast. Analysis of the monitoring record indicates that the mean Atlanta urban excess of total carbon (TC) is 2.1-2.8 μg m -3. The OC/EC ratio of the Atlanta urban excess is in the range 1.3 to 1.8, consistent with OC/EC ratios observed in motor vehicle emissions and a fossil carbon source of urban excess TC. Carbon isotope analysis of a subset of particle samples demonstrates that the urban excess is mainly fossil in origin, even though the majority of the TC is modern at both urban and non-urban sites. Temperature-dependent partitioning of OC between gas and condensed phases cannot explain the observed diurnal and seasonal variations of OC/CO, EC/CO, and OC/EC ratios. Alternatively, a hypothesis involving vertical mixing of OC-enriched air from aloft is supported by the seasonal and diurnal OC, isopentane, aromatic and isoprene observations at the ground. A statistical model is applied to indicate the relative significance of aerometric factors affecting OC and EC concentrations, including meteorological and pollutant associations. The model results demonstrate strong linkages between fine particle carbon and pollutant indicators of source emissions compared with meteorological factors; the model results show weaker dependence of OC on meteorological factors than is the case for ozone (O 3) concentrations.

  18. Observing Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia: Using an Urban Field Study to Enhance Student Experiences and Instructor Knowledge in Urban Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Deborah G.

    2003-01-01

    In urban geography courses, knowledge of a local area is especially useful for demonstrating geographic principles. These classroom examples are further enhanced when students conduct their own field observations, with direction from the instructor. This paper describes a field study of the metropolitan Atlanta area that is used in an intermediate…

  19. Magnitudes, nature, and effects of point and nonpoint discharges in the Chattahoochee River basin, Atlanta to West Point Dam, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Cherry, R.N.; Faye, R.E.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    On an average annual basis and during the storm period of March 12-15, 1976, nonpoint-source loads for most constituents were larger than point-source loads at the Whitesburg station, located on the Chattahoochee River about 40 miles downstream from Atlanta, GA. Most of the nonpoint-source constituent loads in the Atlanta to Whitesburg reach were from urban areas. Average annual point-source discharges accounted for about 50 percent of the dissolved nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loads and about 70 percent of the dissolved phosphorus loads at Whitesburg. During a low-flow period, June 1-2, 1977, five municipal point-sources contributed 63 percent of the ultimate biochemical oxygen demand, and 97 percent of the ammonium nitrogen loads at the Franklin station, at the upstream end of West Point Lake. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations of 4.1 to 5.0 milligrams per liter occurred in a 22-mile reach of the river downstream from Atlanta due about equally to nitrogenous and carbonaceous oxygen demands. The heat load from two thermoelectric powerplants caused a decrease in dissolved-oxygen concentration of about 0.2 milligrams per liter. Phytoplankton concentrations in West Point Lake, about 70 miles downstream from Atlanta, could exceed three million cells per millimeter during extended low-flow periods in the summer with present point-source phosphorus loads. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (10TH) HELD AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA ON NOVEMBER 17-21, 1986. VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the Tenth Symposium on Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), held in Atlanta, GA, November 17-21, 1986. The symposium, jointly sponsored by EPA and EPRI, had as its objective the exchange of technical information on FGD systems and processes applicable to utili...

  1. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (10TH) HELD AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA ON NOVEMBER 17-21, 1986. VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the Tenth Symposium on Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), held in Atlanta, GA, November 17-21, 1986. The symposium, jointly sponsored by EPA and EPRI, had as its objective the exchange of technical information on FGD systems and processes applicable to utili...

  2. Trends in on-road vehicle emissions and ambient air quality in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, from the late 1990s through 2009.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; DenBleyker, Allison; Ma, Lan; Lindhjem, Chris; Yarwood, Greg

    2014-07-01

    On-road vehicle emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during 1995-2009 in the Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area were estimated using the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model and data from the National Emissions Inventories and the State of Georgia. Statistically significant downward trends (computed using the nonparametric Theil-Sen method) in annual on-road CO, NO(x), and VOC emissions of 6.1%, 3.3%, and 6.0% per year, respectively, are noted during the 1995-2009 period despite an increase in total vehicle distance traveled. The CO and NO(x) emission trends are correlated with statistically significant downward trends in ambient air concentrations of CO and NO(x) in Atlanta ranging from 8.0% to 11.8% per year and from 5.8% to 8.7% per year, respectively, during similar time periods. Weather-adjusted summertime ozone concentrations in Atlanta exhibited a statistically significant declining trend of 2.3% per year during 2001-2009. Although this trend coexists with the declining trends in on-road NO(x), VOC, and CO emissions, identifying the cause of the downward trend in ozone is complicated by reductions in multiple precursors from different source sectors. Implications: Large reductions in on-road vehicle emissions of CO and NO(x) in Atlanta from the late 1990s to 2009, despite an increase in total vehicle distance traveled, contributed to a significant improvement in air quality through decreases in ambient air concentrations of CO and NO(x) during this time period. Emissions reductions in motor vehicles and other source sectors resulted in these improvements and the observed declining trend in ozone concentrations over the past decade. Although these historical trends cannot be extrapolated to the future because pollutant concentration contributions due to on-road vehicle emissions will likely become an increasingly smaller fraction of the atmospheric total, they provide an indication of

  3. The Effect of Commuting Patterns on HIV Care Attendance Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Michael R; Rosenberg, Eli S; Sanchez, Travis H; Reed, Landon; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    Background Travel-related barriers to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care, such as commute time and mode of transportation, have been reported in the United States. Objective The objective of the study was to investigate the association between public transportation use and HIV care attendance among a convenience sample of Atlanta-based, HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), evaluate differences across regions of residence, and estimate the relationship between travel distance and time by mode of transportation taken to attend appointments. Methods We used Poisson regression to estimate the association between use of public transportation to attend HIV-related medical visits and frequency of care attendance over the previous 12 months. The relationship between travel distance and commute time was estimated using linear regression. Kriging was used to interpolate commute time to visually examine geographic differences in commuting patterns in relation to access to public transportation and population-based estimates of household vehicle ownership. Results Using public transportation was associated with lower rates of HIV care attendance compared to using private transportation, but only in south Atlanta (south: aRR: 0.75, 95% CI 0.56, 1.0, north: aRR: 0.90, 95% CI 0.71, 1.1). Participants living in south Atlanta were more likely to have longer commute times associated with attending HIV visits, have greater access to public transportation, and may live in areas with low vehicle ownership. A majority of attended HIV providers were located in north and central Atlanta, despite there being participants living all across the city. Estimated commute times per mile traveled were three times as high among public transit users compared to private transportation users. Conclusions Improving local public transit and implementing use of mobile clinics could help address travel-related barriers to HIV care. PMID:27227128

  4. Feasibility study of social media to reduce intimate partner violence among gay men in metro atlanta, georgia.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Sheryl M; Smith, Megan; Pendrick-Denney, Danielle; Boos-Beddington, Sarah; Chen, Ken; McCarty, Frances

    2012-08-01

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major public health issue occurring in the United States and globally. While little is known in general about IPV, understanding about the prevalence of physical IPV among gay men is even more obscure. There is a clear disparity in violence research attention focused on this vulnerable segment of society. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted to examine the feasibility of enrolling 100 gay men from Atlanta into an IPV survey study. The survey was administered via Facebook. Ninety-nine usable surveys were collected. Chi-square tests reveal that minority ethnic status, illicit drug use, and non-disclosed orientation status were all significantly associated with positive IPV reports--in terms of both victimization as well as perpetration. Overall, the majority of the study sample indicated that they believe IPV is a health problem in the Atlanta gay community. These findings bear importance for the Atlanta gay community and public health professionals who must address this nearly invisible yet increasing public health issue. PMID:22928060

  5. Feasibility Study of Social Media to Reduce Intimate Partner Violence Among Gay Men in Metro Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Sheryl M; Smith, Megan; Pendrick-Denney, Danielle; Boos-Beddington, Sarah; Chen, Ken; McCarty, Frances

    2012-01-01

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major public health issue occurring in the United States and globally. While little is known in general about IPV, understanding about the prevalence of physical IPV among gay men is even more obscure. There is a clear disparity in violence research attention focused on this vulnerable segment of society. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted to examine the feasibility of enrolling 100 gay men from Atlanta into an IPV survey study. The survey was administered via Facebook. Ninety-nine usable surveys were collected. Chi-square tests reveal that minority ethnic status, illicit drug use, and non-disclosed orientation status were all significantly associated with positive IPV reports--in terms of both victimization as well as perpetration. Overall, the majority of the study sample indicated that they believe IPV is a health problem in the Atlanta gay community. These findings bear importance for the Atlanta gay community and public health professionals who must address this nearly invisible yet increasing public health issue. PMID:22928060

  6. The National Conference on Professional and Personal Renewal for Faculty (2nd, Atlanta, Georgia, April 13-15, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Office of Instructional Development.

    This document reports on the second of a projected series of conferences, for University of Georgia faculty, having the theme of "faculty renewal" (rather than the older "faculty development") as the major focus. Following a brief introduction, the proceedings open with the keynote speech, "Meeting the Challenge of Personal and Professional…

  7. 75 FR 25839 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26 Atlanta, Georgia, Application for Subzone, Yates Bleachery Company (Textile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ..., Yates Bleachery Company (Textile Fabric Finishing), Flintstone, Georgia An application has been... 26, requesting special-purpose subzone status for the textile fabric finishing facility of Yates... facility is used to finish up to 200 million square yards of foreign-origin, greige fabric annually on...

  8. 78 FR 54234 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity PBR, Inc. d/b/a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Board (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 25253... PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles), Athens, Georgia On April 8, 2013... activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries...

  9. Spatial Growth Modeling and High Resolution Remote Sensing Data Coupled with Air Quality Modeling to Assess the Impact of Atlanta, Georgia on the Local and Regional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William; Johnson, Hoyt; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 60 percent of the world s population will live in cities. Urban expansion has profound impacts on a host of biophysical, environmental, and atmospheric processes within an urban ecosystems perspective. A reduction in air quality over cities is a major result of these impacts. Because of its complexity, the urban landscape is not adequately captured in air quality models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model that is used to assess whether urban areas are in attainment of EPA air quality standards, primarily for ground level ozone. This inadequacy of the CMAQ model to sufficiently respond to the heterogeneous nature of the urban landscape can impact how well the model predicts ozone levels over metropolitan areas and ultimately, whether cities exceed EPA ozone air quality standards. We are exploring the utility of high-resolution remote sensing data and urban spatial growth modeling (SGM) projections as improved inputs to a meteorological/air quality modeling system focusing on the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area as a case study. These growth projections include business as usual and smart growth scenarios out to 2030. The growth projections illustrate the effects of employing urban heat island mitigation strategies, such as increasing tree canopy and albedo across the Atlanta metro area, which in turn, are used to model how air temperature can potentially be moderated as impacts on elevating ground-level ozone, as opposed to not utilizing heat island mitigation strategies. The National Land Cover Dataset at 30m resolution is being used as the land use/land cover input and aggregated to the 4km scale for the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model and the CMAQ modeling schemes. Use of these data has been found to better characterize low density/suburban development as compared

  10. Remote Sensing and Spatial Growth Modeling Coupled With Air Quality Modeling to Assess the Impact of Atlanta, Georgia on the Local and Regional Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrochi, D. A.; Estes, M. G.; Crosson, W. L.; Johnson, H.; Khan, M.

    2006-05-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 60 percent of the world's population will live in cities. Urban expansion has profound impacts on a host of biophysical, environmental, and atmospheric processes within an urban ecosystems perspective. A reduction in air quality over cities is a major result of these impacts. Because of its complexity, the urban landscape is not adequately captured in air quality models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model that is used to assess whether urban areas are in attainment of EPA air quality standards, primarily for ground level ozone. This inadequacy of the CMAQ model to sufficiently respond to the heterogeneous nature of the urban landscape can impact how well the model predicts ozone levels over metropolitan areas and ultimately, whether cities exceed EPA ozone air quality standards. We are exploring the utility of high-resolution remote sensing data and urban spatial growth modeling (SGM) projections as improved inputs to a meteorological/air quality modeling system focusing on the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area as a case study. These growth projections include "business as usual" and "smart growth" scenarios out to 2030. The growth projections illustrate the effects of employing urban heat island mitigation strategies, such as increasing tree canopy and albedo across the Atlanta metro area, which in turn, are used to model how air temperature can potentially be moderated as impacts on elevating ground-level ozone, as opposed to not utilizing heat island mitigation strategies. The National Land Cover Dataset at 30m resolution is being used as the land use/land cover input and aggregated to the 4km scale for the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model and the CMAQ modeling schemes. Use of these data has been found to better characterize low density/suburban development as

  11. Technical report. Graduate Student Focus on Diversity Workshop, 1999 SIAM Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia, May 12, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-12

    The Third SIAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held May 12 at the Sheraton Atlanta Hotel on the first day of the 1999 SIAM Annual Meeting. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities: eight technical talks by under-represented minority graduate students, a lively panel discussion concerning the benefits of undergraduate summer research programs, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum with candid discussions of graduate school experiences from a minority graduate student perspective. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants.

  12. No evidence for acid-catalyzed secondary organic aerosol formation in power plant plumes over metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, R. E.; Sullivan, A. P.; Weber, R. J.; Wollny, A. G.; Holloway, J. S.; Brock, C. A.; de Gouw, J. A.; Atlas, E. L.

    2007-03-01

    Aircraft-based measurements of the water-soluble fraction of fine PM organic carbon (WSOC) and inorganic salt composition in the Atlanta, GA region were conducted in the summer of 2004. Five notable plumes of SO2, apparently from coal-fired power plants, were intercepted, and had NH4 +/SO4 2- molar ratios ranging from approximately 0.8 to 1.4 compared to molar ratios near 2 outside of the plumes. Sulfate aerosol concentrations increased from a regional background of 5-8 μg m-3 to as high as 19.5 μg m-3 within these plumes. No increase in WSOC concentrations was observed in plumes compared to out-of-plumes within a WSOC measurement uncertainty of 8%. These measurements suggest that secondary organic aerosol formation via heterogeneous acid-catalyzed reactions within power plant plumes are not likely a significant contributor to the ambient aerosol mass loading in Atlanta and the surrounding region. Because this region is rich in both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic carbon (VOC), the results may be widely applicable.

  13. Changes in Density of On-Premises Alcohol Outlets and Impact on Violent Crime, Atlanta, Georgia, 1997–2007

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Bonnie; Clarkson, Lydia; Holt, James; Bagchi, Suparna; Kanny, Dafna; Brewer, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Regulating alcohol outlet density is an evidence-based strategy for reducing excessive drinking. However, the effect of this strategy on violent crime has not been well characterized. A reduction in alcohol outlet density in the Buckhead neighborhood of Atlanta from 2003 through 2007 provided an opportunity to evaluate this effect. Methods We conducted a community-based longitudinal study to evaluate the impact of changes in alcohol outlet density on violent crime in Buckhead compared with 2 other cluster areas in Atlanta (Midtown and Downtown) with high densities of alcohol outlets, from 1997 through 2002 (preintervention) to 2003 through 2007 (postintervention). The relationship between exposures to on-premises retail alcohol outlets and violent crime were assessed by using annual spatially defined indices at the census block level. Multilevel regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between changes in exposure to on-premises alcohol outlets and violent crime while controlling for potential census block-level confounders. Results A 3% relative reduction in alcohol outlet density in Buckhead from 1997–2002 to 2003–2007 was associated with a 2-fold greater reduction in exposure to violent crime than occurred in Midtown or Downtown, where exposure to on-premises retail alcohol outlets increased. The magnitude of the association between exposure to alcohol outlets and violent crime was 2 to 5 times greater in Buckhead than in either Midtown or Downtown during the postintervention period. Conclusions A modest reduction in alcohol outlet density can substantially reduce exposure to violent crime in neighborhoods with high density of alcohol outlets. Routine monitoring of community exposure to alcohol outlets could also inform the regulation of alcohol outlet density, consistent with Guide to Community Preventive Services recommendations. PMID:26020548

  14. HIV Risk Behaviors, Perceptions, and Testing and Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Awareness/Use in Grindr-Using Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Goedel, William C; Halkitis, Perry N; Greene, Richard E; Hickson, DeMarc A; Duncan, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    Geosocial-networking smartphone applications such as Grindr can help men who have sex with men (MSM) meet sexual partners. Given the high incidence of HIV in the Deep South, the purpose of our study was to assess HIV risk and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) awareness and use in a sample of HIV-uninfected, Grindr-using MSM residing in Atlanta, Georgia (n = 84). Most (n = 71; 84.6%) reported being somewhat or very concerned about becoming HIV infected. Most (n = 74; 88.1%) had been tested for HIV in their lifetimes. About three fourths (n = 65; 77.4%) were aware of PrEP, but only 11.9% currently used the medication. HIV continues to disproportionately impact MSM and represents a significant source of concern. As the number of new infections continues to rise, it is important to decrease risks associated with acquisition and transmission of HIV by increasing rates of HIV testing and the use of biobehavioral interventions such as PrEP. PMID:26708834

  15. Remote Sensing and Spatial Growth Modeling Coupled with Air Quality Modeling to Assess the Impact of Atlanta, Georgia on the Local and Regional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 80 percent of the world s population will live in cities. Directly aligned with the expansion of cities is urban sprawl. Urban expansion has profound impacts on a host of biophysical, environmental, and atmospheric processes. A reduction in air quality over cities is a major result of these impacts. Strategies that can be directly or indirectly implemented to help remediate air quality problems in cities and that can be accepted by political decision makers and the general public are now being explored to help bring down air pollutants and improve air quality. The urban landscape is inherently complex and this complexity is not adequately captured in air quality models, particularly the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model that is used to assess whether urban areas are in attainment of EPA air quality standards, primarily for ground level ozone. This inadequacy of the CMAQ model to sufficiently respond to the heterogeneous nature of the urban landscape can impact how well the model predicts ozone pollutant levels over metropolitan areas and ultimately, whether cities exceed EPA ozone air quality standards. We are exploring the utility of high-resolution remote sensing data and urban spatial growth modeling (SGM) projections as improved inputs to the meteorology component of the CMAQ model focusing on the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area as a case study. These growth projections include "business as usual" and "smart growth" scenarios out to 2030. The growth projections illustrate the effects of employing urban heat island mitigation strategies, such as increasing tree canopy and albedo across the Atlanta metro area, which in turn, are used to model how ozone and air temperature can potentially be moderated as impacts on elevating ground-level ozone, as opposed to not utilizing heat

  16. Refined assessment of associations between drinking water residence time and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Metro Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Levy, Karen; Klein, Mitchel; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Panwhar, Samina; Huttinger, Alexandra; Tolbert, Paige; Moe, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Recent outbreak investigations suggest that a substantial proportion of waterborne disease outbreaks are attributable to water distribution system issues. In this analysis, we examine the relationship between modeled water residence time (WRT), a proxy for probability of microorganism intrusion into the distribution system, and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illness for two water utilities in Metro Atlanta, USA during 1993-2004. We also examine the association between proximity to the nearest distribution system node, based on patients' residential address, and GI illness using logistic regression models. Comparing long (≥90th percentile) with intermediate WRTs (11th to 89th percentile), we observed a modestly increased risk for GI illness for Utility 1 (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.02-1.13), which had substantially higher average WRT than Utility 2, for which we found no increased risk (OR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.94-1.02). Examining finer, 12-hour increments of WRT, we found that exposures >48 h were associated with increased risk of GI illness, and exposures of >96 h had the strongest associations, although none of these associations was statistically significant. Our results suggest that utilities might consider reducing WRTs to <2-3 days or adding booster disinfection in areas with longer WRT, to minimize risk of GI illness from water consumption. PMID:27441862

  17. Green roof adoption in atlanta, georgia: the effects of building characteristics and subsidies on net private, public, and social benefits.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Jeffrey D; Lamsal, Madhur; Colson, Greg

    2013-10-01

    This research draws on and expands previous studies that have quantified the costs and benefits associated with conventional roofs versus green roofs. Using parameters from those studies to define alternative scenarios, we estimate from a private, public, and social perspective the costs and benefits of installing and maintaining an extensive green roof in Atlanta, GA. Results indicate net private benefits are a decreasing function of roof size and vary considerably across scenarios. In contrast, net public benefits are highly stable across scenarios, ranging from $32.49 to $32.90 m(-2). In addition, we evaluate two alternative subsidy regimes: (i) a general subsidy provided to every building that adopts a green roof and (ii) a targeted subsidy provided only to buildings for which net private benefits are negative but net public benefits are positive. In 6 of the 12 general subsidy scenarios the optimal public policy is not to offer a subsidy; in 5 scenarios the optimal subsidy rate is between $20 and $27 m(-2); and in 1 scenario the optimal rate is $5 m(-2). The optimal rate with a targeted subsidy is between $20 and $27 m(-2) in 11 scenarios and no subsidy is optimal in the twelfth. In most scenarios, a significant portion of net public benefits are generated by buildings for which net private benefits are positive. This suggests a policy focused on information dissemination and technical assistance may be more cost-effective than direct subsidy payments. PMID:23991671

  18. New Horizons at Pluto: An Overview of Educational Activities / Outreach at Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward F.; Harris, R. Scott

    2015-11-01

    We report on educational activities and associated outreach at Fernbank Science Center (Atlanta, GA) in conjunction with the July 2015 New Horizons spacecraft encounter at Pluto. On encounter day, a public lecture about the dwarf planet was presented by Georgia’s NASA Solar System ambassador to kick off the arrival of the space probe at Pluto. In the months following the flyby, we presented a program called “Exploring New Horizons” in the Science Center’s Zeiss planetarium. This program is a digital full-dome presentation about the discovery of Pluto and its subsequent exploration - including an overview of the New Horizons mission. Since NASA continues to receive data from the probe, a brief update (tribute) is included at the end of each planetarium program that features the latest imagery and data from the dwarf planet. We anticipate running the planetarium program throughout the fall semester of 2015. With Pluto visible in the early evening autumn sky, observations are possible with Center’s 0.9 m telescope, which is open for public viewing on clear Thursday and Friday nights following the planetarium program. Although Pluto is somewhat faint through the telescope's eyepiece, it is visible and clearly identified within the surrounding starfield. Intermittent post-encounter lectures ("Messages from the Outer Solar System") have been given on Friday evenings as well. Finally, due to the continued interest in Pluto, we have developed a new outreach program about dwarf planets in general, geared towards 4th - 6th students.

  19. Organic compounds assessed in Chattahoochee River water used for public supply near Atlanta, Georgia, 2004-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, W. Brian; Younker, Cristal L.

    2011-01-01

    An investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program characterized the occurrence of 266 organic compounds in source water and finished water from the Chattahoochee River, which is the main water-supply source for the Atlanta metropolitan area. Source water is stream water collected at a surface-water intake prior to water treatment, and finished water is water that has passed through treatment processes prior to distribution. Samples were collected approximately monthly during 2004-05 and included 15 paired source-water and finished-water samples. Samples were collected during winter-spring high flow and summer-fall low flow, but storm events were not targeted during this Source Water-Quality Assessment (SWQA) study. Samples were analyzed for pesticides and degradates, gasoline hydrocarbons, solvents, disinfection by-products, personal care and domestic-use products, and other organic compounds. Community water systems are required to monitor regulated organic compounds under the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1996 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1998); however, most compounds included in this study are not regulated by Federal drinking-water standards (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007a). The Chattahoochee River study is part of an ongoing NAWQA investigation of community water systems across the United States. Additional details about the national study are given in Carter and others (2007).

  20. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of the Atlanta, Georgia, Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Impacts on the Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    the impact of increased urban heating on air quality. The urban landscape impacts surface thermal energy exchanges that determine development of the UHI. This paper will illustrate how we are using high spatial remote sensing data collected over the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area in conjunction with other geographic information, to perform a detailed urban land cover classification and to determine the contribution of these land covers to the urban heat island effect. Also, the spatial arrangement of the land covers and the impact on urban heating from these selected patterns of development are evaluated. Additionally, this paper will show how these data are being used as inputs to improve air quality modeling for Atlanta, including potential benefits from UHI mitigation.

  1. A comparison of traditional food and health strategies among Taiwanese and Chinese immigrants in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical studies on the use of plants amongst migrant populations are of great relevance to public health. Traditional health strategies, which incorporate plants as medicines, foods, or both – can play an important role in individual well-being. However, at the same time, migrant populations’ traditional knowledge of such practices may be under a state of greater threat of decline due to factors such as limited access to the plant materials and physical isolation from the homeland, which serves as the primary living reservoir for this knowledge. Methods In this study, we conducted a medical ethnobotanical survey focusing on a comparison of local medicinal food and health strategies with members of two Asian immigrant populations in metro-Atlanta: Chinese and Taiwanese. Snowball sampling techniques were employed to recruit 83 study participants, 57 of which were included in the final analysis. Semi-structured interview techniques were used to question participants about their beliefs and usage of the yin yang system, usage of Chinese herbs and medicinal foods, preference and usage of Eastern and Western medicines, and gardening for medicinal foods. Results and conclusion Comparison of the two groups demonstrated a remarkable difference in health strategies concerning medicinal plant use, including statistically significant differences in beliefs concerning yin and yang, uses of Eastern versus Western medicine, and gardening for medicinal foods. Domestic health strategies in the form of medicinal foods play an important role in local health practices, especially among the Taiwanese participants. The collective desire for the use of both Eastern and Western medicine by both groups highlights the important role that cultural competency training will play in preparing allopathic health practitioners to serve increasingly diverse patient populations in the US. PMID:23981857

  2. Adaptation of a Cervical Cancer Education Program for African Americans in the Faith-Based Community, Atlanta, Georgia, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Escoffery, Cam; Wilkerson, Corinthia; Bell, Rashida; Flowers, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background From 1999 through 2009, African American women in the United States had the second highest incidence rates of cervical cancer and were more likely to die from cervical cancer than women of other races. Con Amor Aprendemos (CAA) is an intervention created to educate the Latino community to reduce their risk for cervical cancer and diseases related to human papilloma virus (HPV). CAA was adapted to With Love We Learn (WLWL) to prevent cervical cancer and HPV in African American communities. Community Context Health ministries of 2 churches in the Atlanta area partnered with the Spirit Foundation Inc to adapt CAA to WLWL by tailoring the curriculum to the African American faith-based community. Methods The National Cancer Institute’s Research to Reality (R2R) mentorship program pair collaborated with program staff on an adaptation summary form, a tool to document and assist with adapting the program curriculum with fidelity. Trainers, faith leaders, and participants adapted the program in 4 phases: 1) review of the CAA curriculum, 2) a focus group discussion to determine changes for the WLWL curriculum, 3) train-the-trainer sessions on program delivery, and 4) a pilot intervention and follow-up focus group to evaluate the new curriculum. Outcomes The CAA/WLWL curriculum was adapted and piloted in a faith-based setting. Adaptations to the CAA program included pictures, games, statistics on cervical cancer, dialogues, and delivery of curriculum. Interpretation Community engagement in the adaptation of WLWL through various methods was critical to tailoring an evidence-based program to a new population and setting. PMID:24762531

  3. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. Intercomparison of two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21) indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the filter-adjusted continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Correlations of the ACSM NR-PM1 (non-refractory particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 1 μm) plus elemental carbon (EC) with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM2.5 and Federal Reference Method (FRM) PM1 mass are strong with r2 > 0.7 and r2 > 0.8, respectively. Discrepancies might be attributed to evaporative losses of semi-volatile species from the filter measurements used to adjust the collocated continuous measurements. This suggests that adjusting the ambient aerosol continuous measurements with results from filter analysis introduced additional bias to the measurements. We also recommend to calibrate the ambient aerosol monitoring instruments using aerosol standards rather than gas-phase standards. The fitting approach for ACSM relative ionization for sulfate was shown to improve the comparisons between ACSM and collocated measurements in the absence of calibrated values, suggesting the importance of adding sulfate calibration into the ACSM calibration routine.

  4. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part VII: Media and Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Media and Politics section of this collection of conference proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "Characteristics of Readers of Religious Publications for Political Information" (Judith M. Buddenbaum); "Is 'Nightline' Biased?: A Content Analysis of the Issue of Gays in the Military" (Chuck Hoy and Terry Scott); "Newspaper Coverage of…

  5. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part II: Media and Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Media and Law section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 11 papers: "Independent State Constitutional Analysis of Public Concern and Opinion Issues in Defamation Litigation, 1977-1993" (James Parramore); "The President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992: Will Sun Finally Shine over…

  6. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part VI: Mass Media Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Mass Media Effects section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 13 papers: "The Nature of the Public's Objections to Television Programs: An Examination of Third-Person Effects" (Guy E. Lometti and others); "An Examination of the Relationship of Structural Pluralism, News Role and Source Use with Framing in the…

  7. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part V: Media and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Media and Technology section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 10 papers: "Carpooling on the Information Superhighway" (Lorna Veraldi); "New Media Departure in 'The Principle of Relative Constancy': VCRs" (Ghee-Young Noh); "Why the Western Design Approach Does Not Work for Asian Language Computers" (Virginia…

  8. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part VIII: Advertising and Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Advertising and Public Relations section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 17 papers: "Using the FCB Grid and the 'Lost Quadrants' to Write Advertising Strategy" (Johan C. Yssel); "Antitrust and the Marketplace of Ideas: The Continuing Problem of Issue Advertising Access to Broadcast Television Networks"…

  9. METROPOLITAN ATLANTA CONGENITAL DEFECTS PROGRAM (MACDP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP) was established in 1967 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with Emory University and the Georgia Mental Health Institute as the nation's first population-based active ascertainment birth defects surveillan...

  10. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in Downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was recently developed to provide long-term real-time continuous measurements of ambient non-refractory (i.e., organic, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and chloride) submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1). Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the ACSM against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. The collocated measurements included a second ACSM, continuous and integrated sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium measurements, as well as a semi-continuous Sunset organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC) analyzer, continuous tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), 24 h integrated Federal Reference Method (FRM) filters, and continuous scanning electrical mobility system-mixing condensation particle counter (SEMS-MCPC). Intercomparison of the two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21); mass concentration for all chemical species agreed within ±27%, indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. Chemical constituents measured by the ACSM are also compared with those obtained from the continuous measurements from JST. Since the continuous measurement concentrations are adjusted to match the integrated filter measurements, these comparisons reflect the combined uncertainties of the ACSM, continuous, and filter measurements. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Differences between ACSM mass concentrations and the filter-adjusted JST continuous data are 5-27%, 4

  11. 2. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Aerial view of Clark Howell Homes, center, Techwood Homes, left, Georgia Institute of Technology, bottom. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  12. 1. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Aerial view, Clark Howell Homes, left, Techwood Homes, right, Georgia Institute of Technology, top, right. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  13. Risk factors for AIDS-defining illnesses among a population of poorly adherent people living with HIV/AIDS in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jeremy Y; Alsan, Marcella; Armstrong, Wendy; del Rio, Carlos; Marconi, Vincent C

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve the programmatic goals established in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, virologic suppression remains the most important outcome within the HIV care continuum for individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therefore, clinicians have dedicated substantial resources to improve adherence and clinic retention for individuals on ART; however, these efforts should be focused first on those most at risk of morbidity and mortality related to AIDS. Our study aimed to characterize the factors that are associated with AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs) amongst people living with HIV (PLHIV) who are poorly adherent or retained in care in order to identify those at highest risk of poor clinical outcomes. We recruited 99 adult PLHIV with a history of poor adherence to ART, poor clinic attendance, or unsuppressed viral load (VL) from the Infectious Disease Program (IDP) of the Grady Health System in Atlanta, Georgia between January and May 2011 to participate in a survey investigating the acceptability of a financial incentive for improving adherence. Clinical outcomes including the number of ADI episodes in the last five years, VLs, and CD4 counts were abstracted from medical records. Associations between survey items and number of ADIs were performed using chi-square analysis. In our study, 36.4% of participants had ≥1 ADI in the last five years. The most common ADIs were Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, recurrent bacterial pneumonia, and esophageal candidiasis. Age <42.5 years (OR 2.52, 95% CI = 1.08-5.86), male gender (OR 3.51, 95% CI = 1.08-11.34), CD4 nadir <200 cells/µL (OR 11.92, 95% CI = 1.51-94.15), unemployment (OR 3.54, 95% CI = 1.20-10.40), and travel time to clinic <30 minutes (OR 2.80, 95% CI = 1.20-6.52) were all significantly associated with a history of ≥1 ADI in the last five years. Awareness of factors associated with ADIs may help clinicians identify which poorly adherent PLHIV are at highest risk of HIV-related morbidity. PMID

  14. Seasonal characterization of submicron aerosol chemical composition and organic aerosol sources in the southeastern United States: Atlanta, Georgia,and Look Rock, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S.; Bairai, Solomon T.; Mueller, Stephen; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    A year-long near-real-time characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was conducted at an urban (Atlanta, Georgia, in 2012) and rural (Look Rock, Tennessee, in 2013) site in the southeastern US using the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) collocated with established air-monitoring network measurements. Seasonal variations in organic aerosol (OA) and inorganic aerosol species are attributed to meteorological conditions as well as anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in this region. The highest concentrations of NR-PM1 were observed during winter and fall seasons at the urban site and during spring and summer at the rural site. Across all seasons and at both sites, NR-PM1 was composed largely of OA (up to 76 %) and sulfate (up to 31 %). Six distinct OA sources were resolved by positive matrix factorization applied to the ACSM organic mass spectral data collected from the two sites over the 1 year of near-continuous measurements at each site: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), isoprene-derived epoxydiols (IEPOX) OA (IEPOX-OA) and 91Fac (a factor dominated by a distinct ion at m/z 91 fragment ion previously observed in biogenic influenced areas). LV-OOA was observed throughout the year at both sites and contributed up to 66 % of total OA mass. HOA was observed during the entire year only at the urban site (on average 21 % of OA mass). BBOA (15-33 % of OA mass) was observed during winter and fall, likely dominated by local residential wood burning emission. Although SV-OOA contributes quite significantly ( ˜ 27 %), it was observed only at the urban site during colder seasons. IEPOX-OA was a major component (27-41 %) of OA at both sites, particularly in spring and summer. An ion fragment at m/z 75 is well correlated with the m/z 82 ion associated with the aerosol mass spectrum of IEPOX-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The

  15. Air quality impacts and health-benefit valuation of a low-emission technology for rail yard locomotives in Atlanta Georgia.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Boris; Bergin, Michael; Boylan, James; Huang, Yan; Bergin, Michelle; Russell, Armistead G

    2015-11-15

    One of the largest rail yard facilities in the Southeastern US, the Inman and Tilford yards, is located in the northwestern section of Atlanta, Georgia alongside other industries, schools, businesses, and dwellings. It is a significant source of fine particulate (PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) (Galvis, Bergin, & Russell, 2013). We calculate 2011 PM2.5 and BC emissions from the rail yards and primary industrial and on-road mobile sources in the area and determine their impact on local air quality using Gaussian dispersion modeling. We determine the change in PM2.5 and BC concentrations that could be accomplished by upgrading traditional switcher locomotives used in these rail yards to a lower emitting technology and evaluate the health benefits for comparison with upgrade costs. Emissions from the rail yards were estimated using reported fuel consumption data (GAEPD, 2012b) and emission factors previously measured in the rail yards (Galvis et al., 2013). Model evaluation against 2011 monitoring data found agreement between measured and simulated concentrations. Model outputs indicate that the line-haul and switcher activities are responsible for increments in annual average concentrations of approximately 0.5±0.03 μg/m(3) (39%) and 0.7±0.04 μg/m(3) (56%) of BC, and for 1.0±0.1 μg/m(3) (7%) and 1.6±0.2 μg/m(3) (14%) of PM2.5 at two monitoring sites located north and south of the rail yards respectively. Upgrading the switcher locomotives at the yards with a lower emitting technology in this case "mother slug" units could decrease PM2.5 and BC emissions by about 9 and 3 t/year respectively. This will lower annual average PM2.5 concentrations between 0.3±0.1 μg/m(3) and 0.6±0.1 μg/m(3) and BC concentrations between 0.1±0.02 μg/m(3) and 0.2±0.03 μg/m(3) at monitoring sites north and south of the rail yards respectively, and would facilitate PM2.5 NAAQS attainment in the area. We estimate that health benefits of approximately 20 million dollars per year

  16. Photocopy of photograph (Original photograph from the Vanishing Georgia collection, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (Original photograph from the Vanishing Georgia collection, Georgia State Archives, Atlanta Georgia, Photo Number SUM-125A) Unknown Photographer, Circa 1920s. EAST PORCH, LOOKING WEST. - Wise Sanatorium No. 2, Hospital Street, Plains, Sumter County, GA

  17. Seasonal characterization of submicron aerosol chemical composition and organic aerosol sources in the southeastern United States: Atlanta, Georgia and Look Rock, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Bairai, S. T.; Mueller, S.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    A yearlong near-real-time characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was conducted at an urban (Atlanta, Georgia) and rural (Look Rock, Tennessee) site in the southeastern US using the Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) collocated with established air-monitoring network measurements. Seasonal variations in organic aerosol (OA) and inorganic aerosol species are attributed to meteorological conditions as well as anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in this region. The highest concentrations of NR-PM1 were observed during winter and fall seasons at the urban site and during spring and summer at the rural site. Across all seasons and at both sites, NR-PM1 was composed largely of OA (50-76 %) and inorganic sulfate (12-31 %). Six distinct OA sources were resolved by positive matrix factorization applied to the ACSM organic mass spectral data collected from the two sites over the one year of near-continuous measurements at each site: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (OOA), isoprene-derived epoxydiol (IEPOX) OA (IEPOX-OA), and 91Fac OA (a factor dominated by a distinct ion at m/z 91 fragment ion previously observed in biogenic influenced areas). LV-OOA was observed throughout the year at both sites and contributed 30-66 % of total OA mass. HOA was also observed during the entire year only at the urban site (15-24 % of OA mass). BBOA (15-33 % of OA mass) was observed during winter and fall, likely dominated by local residential wood burning emission. Although SV-OOA contributes quite significantly (∼ 27 %), it was observed only at the urban site during colder seasons. IEPOX-OA was a major component (27-41 %) of OA at both sites, particularly in spring and summer. An ion fragment at m/z 75 is proposed as an additional marker for IEPOX-OA, as it is shown to correlate well with the m/z 82 ion shown to be associated with the aerosol mass spectrum of

  18. Influence of septic systems on stream base flow in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin near Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2014-01-01

    Septic systems were identified at 241,733 locations in a 2,539-square-mile (mi2) study area that includes all or parts of 12 counties in the Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, area. Septic system percolation may locally be an important component of streamflow in small drainage basins where it augments natural groundwater recharge, especially during extreme low-flow conditions. The amount of groundwater reaching streams depends on how much is intercepted by plants or infiltrates to deeper parts of the groundwater system that flows beyond a basin divide and does not discharge into streams within a basin. The potential maximum percolation from septic systems in the study area is 62 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), of which 52 ft3/s is in the Chattahoochee River Basin and 10 ft3/s is in the Flint River Basin. These maximum percolation rates represent 0.4 to 5.7 percent of daily mean streamflow during the 2011–12 period at the farthest downstream gaging site (station 02338000) on the Chattahoochee River, and 0.5 to 179 percent of daily mean streamflow at the farthest downstream gaging site on the Flint River (02344350). To determine the difference in base flow between basins having different septic system densities, hydrograph separation analysis was completed using daily mean streamflow data at streamgaging stations at Level Creek (site 02334578), with a drainage basin having relatively high septic system density of 101 systems per square mile, and Woodall Creek (site 02336313), with a drainage basin having relatively low septic system density of 18 systems per square mile. Results indicated that base-flow yield during 2011–12 was higher at the Level Creek site, with a median of 0.47 cubic feet per second per square mile ([ft3/s]/mi2), compared to a median of 0.16 (ft3/s)/mi2, at the Woodall Creek site. At the less urbanized Level Creek site, there are 515 septic systems with a daily maximum percolation rate of 0.14 ft3/s, accounting for 11 percent of the base flow in

  19. The Atlanta Public School's Dropout Initiative: A Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Edward D., Jr.; Amuleru-Marshall, Nancy

    This project proposes the development and implementation of a model system for collecting, documenting, and reporting to the Atlanta (Georgia) Board of Education information that will indicate the number, ages, and grades of students dropping out of the Atlanta Public School System (APS). Furthermore, this project will demonstrate an effective…

  20. Projecting Future Urbanization with Prescott College's Spatial Growth Model to Promote Environmental Sustainability and Smart Growth, A Case Study in Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William; Limaye, Ashutosh; Johnson, Hoyt; Quattrochi, Dale; Lapenta, William; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    Planning is an integral element of good management and necessary to anticipate events not merely respond to them. Projecting the quantity and spatial distribution of urban growth is essential to effectively plan for the delivery of city services and to evaluate potential environmental impacts. The major drivers of growth in large urban areas are increasing population, employment opportunities, and quality of life attractors such as a favorable climate and recreation opportunities. The spatial distribution of urban growth is dictated by the amount and location of developable land, topography, energy and water resources, transportation network, climate change, and the existing land use configuration. The Atlanta region is growing very rapidly both in population and the consumption of forestland or low-density residential development. Air pollution and water availability are significant ongoing environmental issues. The Prescott Spatial Growth Model (SGM) was used to make growth projections for the metropolitan Atlanta region to 2010,2020 and 2030 and results used for environmental assessment in both business as usual and smart growth scenarios. The Prescott SGM is a tool that uses an ESRI ArcView extension and can be applied at the parcel level or more coarse spatial scales and can accommodate a wide range of user inputs to develop any number of growth rules each of which can be weighted depending on growth assumptions. These projections were used in conjunction with meteorological and air quality models to evaluate future environmental impacts. This presentation will focus on the application of the SGM to the 13-County Atlanta Regional Commission planning jurisdiction as a case study. The SGM will be described, including how rule sets are developed and the decision process for allocation of future development to available land use categories. Data inputs required to effectively run the model will be discussed. Spatial growth projections for ten, twenty, and thirty

  1. Effects of instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of the temporal variation of ambient air pollution in Atlanta, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Katherine S. Wade; James A. Mulholland; Amit Marmur; Armistead G. Russell; Ben Hartsell; Eric Edgerton; Mitch Klein; Lance Waller; Jennifer L. Peel; Paige E. Tolbert

    2006-06-15

    Data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality System, the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization database, and the Assessment of Spatial Aerosol Composition in Atlanta database for 1999 through 2002 have been used to characterize error associated with instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of the temporal variation of ambient air pollution in Atlanta, GA. These data are being used in time series epidemiologic studies in which associations of acute respiratory and cardiovascular health outcomes and daily ambient air pollutant levels are assessed. Modified semivariograms are used to quantify the effects of instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of daily metrics of ambient gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2}, CO, NOx, and O{sub 3}) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) (PM2.5 mass, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC)). Variation because of instrument imprecision represented 7-40% of the temporal variation in the daily pollutant measures and was largest for the PM2.5 EC and OC. Spatial variability was greatest for primary pollutants (SO{sub 2}, CO, NOx, and EC). Population-weighted variation in daily ambient air pollutant levels because of both instrument imprecision and spatial variability ranged from 20% of the temporal variation for O{sub 3} to 70% of the temporal variation for SO{sub 2} and EC. Wind rose plots, corrected for diurnal and seasonal pattern effects, are used to demonstrate the impacts of local sources on monitoring station data. The results presented are being used to quantify the impacts of instrument precision and spatial variability on the assessment of health effects of ambient air pollution in Atlanta and are relevant to the interpretation of results from time series health studies that use data from fixed monitors. 38 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. No evidence for acid-catalyzed secondary organic aerosol formation in power plant plumes over metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia - article no. L06801

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.E.; Sullivan, A.P.; Weber, R.J.; Wollny, A.G.; Holloway, J.S.; Brock, C.A.; de Gouw, J.A.; Atlas, E.L.

    2007-03-15

    Aircraft-based measurements of the water-soluble fraction of fine PM organic carbon (WSOC) and inorganic salt composition in the Atlanta, GA region were conducted in the summer of 2004. Five notable plumes of SO{sub 2}, apparently from coal-fired power plants, were intercepted, and had NH{sub 4}{sup +}/SO4{sup 2-} molar ratios ranging from approximately 0.8 to 1.4 compared to molar ratios near 2 outside of the plumes. Sulfate aerosol concentrations increased from a regional background of 5 - 8 {mu} g m{sup -3} to as high as 19.5 {mu} g m{sup -3} within these plumes. No increase in WSOC concentrations was observed in plumes compared to out-of-plumes within a WSOC measurement uncertainty of 8%. These measurements suggest that secondary organic aerosol formation via heterogeneous acid-catalyzed reactions within power plant plumes are not likely a significant contributor to the ambient aerosol mass loading in Atlanta and the surrounding region. Because this region is rich in both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic carbon (VOC), the results may be widely applicable.

  3. OVERVIEW OF THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an overview of the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Project coordinated through the Southern Oxidants Study and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and funded by the US EPA along with other sponsors who provided in-kind support primarily through existing studies. ...

  4. Preparing Students for Technology: The Atlanta Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crim, Alonzo A.; Odom, Boyd D.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a program involving four technology-oriented magnet high schools in Atlanta, Georgia, called Technology Quadrangle. Supported by private businesses and area universities, the program is based on the research consortium concept. Business involvement in curriculum design, internship opportunities, and the program's educational advantages…

  5. SUMMER 1990 ATLANTA OZONE PRECURSOR STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the summer of 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a major monitoring study in Atlanta, Georgia, addressing the measurement of ozone and its precursors. The study was undertaken to obtain an information base to support the development and implemen...

  6. Overview of the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Paul A.; Chameides, William; Weber, Rodney; Middlebrook, Ann; Kiang, C. S.; Russell, Armistead G.; Butler, Andre; Turpin, Barbara; Mikel, Dennis; Scheffe, Richard; Cowling, Ellis; Edgerton, Eric; St. John, James; Jansen, John; McMurry, Peter; Hering, Susanne; Bahadori, Tina

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Project coordinated through the Southern Oxidants Study and Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) along with other sponsors who provided in-kind support primarily through existing studies. The Atlanta Supersite Project was located at the existing Southeastern Aerosol Research Characterization Study (SEARCH)/Aerosol Research Inhalation Epidemiology Study (ARIES) site on Jefferson Street in NW Atlanta, Georgia. The primary objective of the Atlanta Supersite Project was to evaluate and compare advanced measurement methods for particulate matter mass and its components. Methods included filter- and denuder-based time-integrated or discrete samplers, a variety of semicontinuous methods measuring mass, its major components (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon, elemental carbon, trace elements) and gas-phase precursors, and for the first time ever, a comparison among particle mass spectrometers; four in total. These data were complemented by meteorological data as well as gas-phase criteria pollutant measurements and other supplemental data such as particle physical properties, volatile organic compounds (VOC), oxygenated VOC, and NOy. The primary and supplemental data also were used to better understand the formation and accumulation of particulate matter in Atlanta and to better understand source-receptor relationships. This paper overviews the study, summarizing objectives, the site and measurements, and the relative reference data used for comparisons, and it overviews the meteorological and chemical characteristics of pollution in Atlanta during the study, puts the study in context of Atlanta and the southeast United States, and finally summarizes the key findings from the over 30 publications published, submitted, or in preparation. This paper also provides as complete a list as is currently available of those publications. Others

  7. Impact of flow regulation and power plant effluents on the flow and temperature regimes of the Chattahoochee River; Atlanta to Whitesburg, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.; Jobson, Harvey E.; Land, Larry F.

    1978-01-01

    A calibrated and verified transient-flow temperature model was used to evaluate the effects of flow regulation and powerplant loadings on the natural temperature regime of the Chattahoochee River in northeast Georgia. Estimates were made of both instantaneous and average natural temperatures in the river during an 8-day period in August 1976. Differences between the computed average natural temperature and an independent estimateof natural temperature based on observed equilibrium temperatures were less than 0.5C. The combined thermal effects of flow regulation and powerplant effluents resulted in mean daily river temperatures downstreams of the powerplants about equal to or less than computed mean natural temperatures. The range and rates of change of computed natural diurnal temperature fluctuations were considerably less than those presently observed (1976) in the river. Except during periods of peak water-supply demand, differences between computed year 2000 river temperatures and observed present-day temperatures were less than 2C. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. The Atlanta tornado of 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greneker, E. F.; Wilson, C. S.; Metcalf, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Joint observations by radar and high-frequency sferics detectors at Georgia Institute of Technology provided unique data on the Atlanta tornado of Mar. 24, 1975. The classic hook echo was detected by radar at a range of about 26 km, 15 min before the tornado touched down. While the tornado was on the ground the sferics burst rate was very low, despite very high values recorded immediately before and after this interval. This observation, together with visual reports of a strong cloud-to-ground discharge at the time of tornado touchdown, suggests an interaction of the tornado with the electric field of the storm.

  9. Impact of flow regulation and powerplant effluents on the flow and temperature regimes of the Chattahoochee River; Atlanta to Whitesburg, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.; Jobson, Harvey E.; Land, Larry F.

    1979-01-01

    A calibrated and verified transient flow-temperature model was used to evaluate the effects of flow regulation and powerplant loadings on the natural temperature regime of the Chattahoochee River in northeast Georgia. Estimates were made of both instantaneous and average natural temperatures in the river during an 8-day period in August 1976. Differences between the computed average natural temperature and an independent estimate of natural temperature based on observed equilibrium temperatures were less than 0.5?C. Downstream of the powerplants, the combined thermal effects of flow regulation and powerplant effluents resulted in mean daily river temperatures about equal to or less than computed mean natural temperatures. Thus the thermal impact of heated effluents was offset by the cooling effects of structural regulation. An independent analysis of historical river- and air-temperature data, although considerably less accurate than model computations, provided substantially the same result. The range and rates of change of computed natural diurnal temperature fluctuations were considerably less than those in the river at the time of this study in 1976. The models also were used to simulate summer river temperatures using estimated year 2000 flow conditions and meteorologic data collected during 1976. Except during periods of peak water-supply demand, differences between computed year 2000 river temperatures and observed 1976 temperatures were less than 2?C.

  10. Three-dimensional urban GIS for Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Dharmajyoti; Faust, Nickolas L.; Estrada, Diana; Linares, Jairo

    1997-07-01

    Georgia Tech has developed a prototype system for the demonstration of the concepts of a virtual 3D geographic information system (GIS) in an urban environment. The virtual GIS integrates the technologies of GIS, remote sensing, and visualization to provide an interactive tool for the exploration of spatial data. A high density urban environment with terrain elevation, imagery, GIS layers, and three dimensional natural and manmade features is a stressing test for the integration potential of such a virtual 3D GIS. In preparation for the 1996 Olympic Games, Georgia Tech developed two highly detailed 3D databases over parts of Atlanta. A 2.5 meter database was used to depict the downtown Atlanta area with much higher resolution imagery being used for photo- texture of individual Atlanta buildings. Less than 1 meter imagery data was used to show a very accurate map of Georgia Tech, the 1996 Olympic Village. Georgia Tech developed visualization software was integrated via message passing with a traditional GIS package so that all commonly used GIS query and analysis functions could be applied within the 3D environment. This project demonstrates the versatility and productivity that can be accomplished by operating GIS functions within a virtual GIS and multi-media framework.

  11. Destination Station Atlanta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Destination Station was recently in Atlanta from April 15 through April 21. During the week, NASA visited schools, hospitals, museums, and the city’s well known Atlanta Science Tavern Meet Up gro...

  12. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  13. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  14. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  15. The Social Studies Curriculum in Atlanta Public Schools during the Desegregation Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohan, Chara Haeussler; Randolph, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This historical investigation explores how teachers, students, and education officials viewed the social studies curriculum in the local context of Atlanta, and the broader state of Georgia, during the post-Civil Rights era, when integration was a court-ordered reality in the public schools. During the desegregation era, Atlanta schools were led…

  16. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.45 Section 81.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  17. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.45 Section 81.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  18. Georgia History Plan Stirs Civil War Fuss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2004-01-01

    Nearly 140 years have not erased Georgia's memory of the trail of destruction by General William T. Sherman and Union troops as they burned their way from Atlanta to Savannah during a critical campaign of the Civil War. Those weeks in late 1864 have left a lasting influence on the state's history and culture. This article deals with Georgia's…

  19. Dante and Oedipus Go to Atlanta, Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calisch, Richard

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the three main lines of symbolic development in "The Artificial Nigger" by Flannery O'Conner that make this short story an eminently teachable tale in world literature and humanities classes where Dante, Sophocles, and the Bible have been read. (RL)

  20. George A. Towns Elementary School. Atlanta, Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Ralph H.

    1976-01-01

    A project testing solar heating and cooling in an existing building, the George A. Towns Elementary School, is intended to provide information on system design and performance, allow the identification and correction of problems encountered in installing large units, and gauge community/user reaction to solar equipment. (Author/MLF)

  1. Niskey Lake Middle School. Atlanta, Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Preston, Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The proposed Niskey Lake Middle School is designed to have solar heating in half of the building, solar water heating for the entire facility, and solar cooling for the administration area. (Author/MLF)

  2. COMPARISON OF HYDROCARBON CONCENTRATIONS FOR 1981 AND 1990 IN ATLANTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted during the July - August period of 1981 and 1990 in Atlanta, Georgia. araffinic, olefinic, and aromatic hydrocarbons in the C2 to C,range were determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and cryogenic preconcentration. n 1981 samp...

  3. Environmental Public Health Surveillance for Exposure to Respiratory Health Hazards: A Joint NASA/CDC Project to Use Remote Sensing Data for Estimating Airborne Particulate Matter Over the Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Estes, Maurice; Crosson, William

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELiX-Atlanta). The goal of developing the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is to improve the health of communities. Currently, few systems exist at the state or national level to concurrently track many of the exposures and health effects that might be associated with environmental hazards. An additional challenge is estimating exposure to environmental hazards such as particulate matter whose aerodynamic diameter is less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) is collaborating with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of PM2.5 concentrations that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma. While use of the Air Quality System (AQS) PM2.5 data alone could meet HELIX-Atlanta specifications, there are only five AQS sites in the Atlanta area, thus the spatial coverage is not ideal. We are using NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data for estimating daily ground level PM2.5 at 10 km resolution over the metropolitan Atlanta area supplementing the AQS ground observations and filling their spatial and temporal gaps.

  4. 78 FR 32530 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in Georgia the Northwest I-75/I-575...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Northwest I-75/I-575 Corridor, Cobb and Cherokee Counties, Georgia (Atlanta Metropolitan Area) AGENCY... I-75 to Sixes Road on I-575) located in Cobb and Cherokee Counties, Georgia. The approximate...

  5. 8. VIEW FROM TECHWOOD DRIVE LOOKING NORTH TOWARD GEORGIA TECH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW FROM TECHWOOD DRIVE LOOKING NORTH TOWARD GEORGIA TECH DORMITORY, 581-587 TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  6. ATLANTA COMMUTE VEHICLE SOAK AND START DISTRIBUTIONS AND ENGINE STARTS PER DAY: IMPACT ON MOBILE SOURCE EMISSION RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Georgia Institute of Technology School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers analyzed the 2004 vehicle activity data obtained from vehicles in the Atlanta Commuter Choice Value Pricing Initiative. The onboard monitoring equipment installed in each participating vehi...

  7. The Effect of High Rates of Bacterial Sexually Transmitted Infections on HIV Incidence in a Cohort of Black and White Men Who Have Sex with Men in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Adam S.; Luisi, Nicole; Sanchez, Travis H.; Salazar, Laura F.; Frew, Paula M.; Cooper, Hannah L.F.; Diclemente, Ralph; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S.; Rosenberg, Eli S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Data reporting sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence rates among HIV-negative U.S. men who have sex with men (MSM) are lacking. In addition, it is difficult to analyze the effect of STI on HIV acquisition given that sexual risk behaviors confound the relationship between bacterial STIs and incident HIV. The InvolveMENt study was a longitudinal cohort of black and white HIV-negative, sexually active MSM in Atlanta who underwent routine screening for STI and HIV and completed behavioral questionnaires. Age-adjusted incidence rates were calculated for urethral and rectal Chlamydia (CT), gonorrhea (GC), and syphilis, stratified by race. Propensity-score-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the effect of STI on HIV incidence and calculate the population attributable fraction (PAF) for STI. We included 562 HIV-negative MSM with 843 person-years of follow-up in this analysis. High incidence rates were documented for all STIs, particularly among black MSM. Having a rectal STI was significantly associated with subsequent HIV incidence in adjusted analyses (aHR 2.7; 95% CI 1.2, 6.4) that controlled for behavioral risk factors associated with STI and HIV using propensity score weights. The PAF for rectal STI was 14.6 (95% CI 6.8, 31.4). The high incidence of STIs among Atlanta MSM and the association of rectal STI with HIV acquisition after controlling for behavioral risk underscore the importance of routine screening and treatment for STIs among sexually active MSM. Our data support targeting intensive HIV prevention interventions, such as preexposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP), for Atlanta MSM diagnosed with rectal STIs. PMID:25719950

  8. Environmental Public Health Survelliance for Exposure to Respiratory Health Hazards: A Joint NASA/CDC Project to Use Remote Sensing Data for Estimating Airborne Particulate Matter Over the Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Douglas; Mohammad, Al-Hamdan; Crosson, William; Estes, Maurice, Jr.; Limaye, Ashutosh; Qualters, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Describes the public health surveillance efforts of NASA, in a joint effort with the Center for Disease Control (CDC). NASA/MSFC and the CDC are partners in linking nvironmental and health data to enhance public health surveillance. The use of NASA technology creates value - added geospatial products from existing environmental data sources to facilitate public health linkages. The venture sought to provide remote sensing data for the 5-country Metro-Atlanta area and to integrate this environmental data with public health data into a local network, in an effort to prevent and control environmentally related health effects. Remote sensing data used environmental data (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Air Quality System [AQS] ground measurements and MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth [AOD]) to estimate airborne particulate matter over Atlanta, and linked this data with health data related to asthma. The study proved the feasibility of linking environmental data (MODIS particular matter estimates and AQS) with health data (asthma). Algorithms were developed for QC, bias removal, merging MODIS and AQS particulate matter data, as well as for other applications. Additionally, a Business Associate Agreement was negotiated for a health care provider to enable sharing of Protected Health Information.

  9. The 77th National Conference on Weights and Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickenkamp, Carroll S.; Turner, Ann H.

    1992-10-01

    The 77th Annual Meeting of the National Conference on Weights and Measures (NCWM) was held July 19 through 23, 1992, at the Stouffer Nashville Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee. The theme of the meeting was 'Partnerships for Progress'. Reports by the standing and annual committees of the conference comprise the major portion of the publication, along with the addresses delivered by conference officials and other authorities from government and industry. Special meetings included those of the metrologists, the Associate Membership Committee, the Retired Officials Committee, the Scale Manufacturers' Association, the American Petroleum Institute, the Industry Committee on Packaging and Labeling, the regional weights and measure associations, and the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture Weights and Measures Division, and the National Council on State Metrication.

  10. THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase 11 is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersites Program is par...

  11. UV - ATLANTA GA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brewer 108 is located in Atlanta GA, measuring ultraviolet solar radiation. Irradiance and column ozone are derived from this data. Ultraviolet solar radiation is measured with a Brewer Mark IV, single-monochrometer, spectrophotometer manufactured by SCI-TEC Instruments, Inc. of ...

  12. Loss of Accreditation Rocks Georgia District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In the end, six months of management reforms and the hiring of an experienced urban superintendent failed to keep the Clayton County, Georgia, school district from becoming the nation's first district in nearly four decades to have its accreditation stripped. Last week's decision by the Atlanta-based Southern Association of Colleges and Schools…

  13. Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: Temperature and Air quality): A Study of how the Urban Landscape Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G.; Lo, C. P.; Kidder, Stanley Q.; Hafner, Jan; Taha, Haider; Bornstein, Robert D.; Gillies, Robert R.; Gallo, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    It is our intent through this investigation to help facilitate measures that can be Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: applied to mitigate climatological or air quality Temperature and Air-quality) is a NASA Earth degradation, or to design alternate measures to sustain Observing System (EOS) Interdisciplinary Science or improve the overall urban environment in the future. investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta. The primary objectives for this research effort are: 1) To In the last half of the 20th century, Atlanta, investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta Georgia has risen as the premier commercial, urban growth, land cover change, and the development industrial, and transportation urban area of the of the urban heat island phenomenon through time at southeastern United States. The rapid growth of the nested spatial scales from local to regional; 2) To Atlanta area, particularly within the last 25 years, has investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta made Atlanta one of the fastest growing metropolitan urban growth and land cover change on air quality areas in the United States. The population of the through time at nested spatial scales from local to Atlanta metropolitan area increased 27% between 1970 regional; and 3) To model the overall effects of urban and 1980, and 33% between 1980-1990 (Research development on surface energy budget characteristics Atlanta, Inc., 1993). Concomitant with this high rate of across the Atlanta urban landscape through time at population growth, has been an explosive growth in nested spatial scales from local to regional. Our key retail, industrial, commercial, and transportation goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how services within the Atlanta region. This has resulted in land cover changes associated with urbanization in the tremendous land cover change dynamics within the Atlanta area, principally in transforming

  14. 78 FR 2878 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia: New Source Review-Prevention of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ...--Prevention of Significant Deterioration AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule.... Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street SW., Atlanta, Georgia 30303-8960. Ms. Bradley's... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL...

  15. Escherichia coli bacteria density in relation to turbidity, streamflow characteristics, and season in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia, October 2000 through September 2008—Description, statistical analysis, and predictive modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Regression analyses show that E. coli density in samples was strongly related to turbidity, streamflow characteristics, and season at both sites. The regression equation chosen for the Norcross data showed that 78 percent of the variability in E. coli density (in log base 10 units) was explained by the variability in turbidity values (in log base 10 units), streamflow event (dry-weather flow or stormflow), season (cool or warm), and an interaction term that is the cross product of streamflow event and turbidity. The regression equation chosen for the Atlanta data showed that 76 percent of the variability in E. coli density (in log base 10 units) was explained by the variability in turbidity values (in log base 10 units), water temperature, streamflow event, and an interaction term that is the cross product of streamflow event and turbidity. Residual analysis and model confirmation using new data indicated the regression equations selected at both sites predicted E. coli density within the 90 percent prediction intervals of the equations and could be used to predict E. coli density in real time at both sites.

  16. Changing Land Use: Peachtree Street, Atlanta. A Case Study in Sequent Occupance [And] Student Work Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laws, Kevin

    A social studies unit and student workbook explore the historical geography of the area of Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia. The unit deals with sequent occupance, a type of historical geography in which students study the same area, the changes in culture, and the changing land use in the area during certain time periods. For each period,…

  17. Solar Heating and Cooling Experiment for a School in Atlanta. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    This report documents the performance and conclusions of a 13-month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The objectives of the project were to (1) make a significant contribution to solar design, technology, and acceptability;…

  18. CLASS, PARTY, AND RACE IN FOUR TYPES OF ELECTIONS--THE CASE OF ATLANTA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JENNINGS, M. KENT; ZEIGLER, HARMON

    THE VOTING RESULTS OF 13 DEMOCRATIC PRIMARIES, PARTISAN, NONPARTISAN, AND REFERENDUMS ELECTIONS HELD BETWEEN 1954 AND 1964 IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA, WERE STUDIED TO ASSESS THE EFFECTS OF PARTY AFFILIATION, CLASS COMPOSITION, AND RACE. THIS STUDY WAS A REPLICATION OF THE MAIN PORTIONS OF A DES MOINES STUDY (SEPTEMBER, 1963) AND RELATED THE RESULTS OF…

  19. Fine Art at the Cotton States and International Exposition, Atlanta, 1895. Learning Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kate; Peckham, Kathleen

    With the end of the Civil War just 30 years past, the organizers of the Atlanta (Georgia) 1895 Cotton States and International Exposition sought to demonstrate the South's national patriotism and progressivism. While the exhibits at the exposition widely varied, among the most ambitious undertakings were the displays of fine arts found in the Fine…

  20. Atlanta Metropolitan College, Exploring America's Communities: In Quest of Common Ground. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Community Coll., GA.

    In 1996, Atlanta Metropolitan College (Georgia) participated in the American Association of Community Colleges' Exploring America's Communities project, which works to strengthen the teaching and learning of American history, literature, and culture at U.S. community colleges. In an attempt to enhance the college's curriculum with American…

  1. Epic Flooding in Georgia, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; McCallum, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    Metropolitan Atlanta-September 2009 Floods * The epic floods experienced in the Atlanta area in September 2009 were extremely rare. Eighteen streamgages in the Metropolitan Atlanta area had flood magnitudes much greater than the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) annual exceedance probability. * The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reported that 23 counties in Georgia were declared disaster areas due to this flood and that 16,981 homes and 3,482 businesses were affected by floodwaters. Ten lives were lost in the flood. The total estimated damages exceed $193 million (H.E. Longenecker, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., November 2009). * On Sweetwater Creek near Austell, Ga., just north of Interstate 20, the peak stage was more than 6 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. Flood magnitudes in Cobb County on Sweetwater, Butler, and Powder Springs Creeks greatly exceeded the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) floods for these streams. * In Douglas County, the Dog River at Ga. Highway 5 near Fairplay had a peak stage nearly 20 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. * On the Chattahoochee River, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage at Vinings reached the highest level recorded in the past 81 years. Gwinnett, De Kalb, Fulton, and Rockdale Counties also had record flooding. South Georgia March and April 2009 Floods * The March and April 2009 floods in South Georgia were smaller in magnitude than the September floods but still caused significant damage. * No lives were lost in this flood. Approximately $60 million in public infrastructure damage occurred to roads, culverts, bridges and a water treatment facility (Joseph T. McKinney, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., July 2009). * Flow at the Satilla River near Waycross, exceeded the 0.5-percent (200-year) flood. Flows at seven other stations in South Georgia exceeded the 1-percent (100-year) flood.

  2. Atlanta's Own "Hall" of Famer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesil A.

    2008-01-01

    This article features Beverly L. Hall, poised to become one of the longest-serving superintendents of the Atlanta schools. When she came to Atlanta in 1999, student achievement was sliding downward, teacher morale was dismal, and enrollment was falling as parents pulled their children out of the school system. Under the superintendent's driving…

  3. Project ATLANTA (Atlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air Quality): Use of Remote Sensing and Modeling to Analyze How Urban Land Use Change Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use ANalysis: Temperature and Air-quality) which is an investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area since the early 1970's has impacted the region's climate and air quality. The primary objectives for this research effort are: (1) To investigate and model the relationships between land cover change in the Atlanta metropolitan, and the development of the urban heat island phenomenon through time; (2) To investigate and model the temporal relationships between Atlanta urban growth and land cover change on air quality; and (3) To model the overall effects of urban development on surface energy budget characteristics across the Atlanta urban landscape through time. Our key goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how land cover changes associated with urbanization in the Atlanta area, principally in transforming forest lands to urban land covers through time, has, and will, effect local and regional climate, surface energy flux, and air quality characteristics. Allied with this goal is the prospect that the results from this research can be applied by urban planners, environmental managers and other decision-makers, for determining how urbanization has impacted the climate and overall environment of the Atlanta area. Multiscaled remote sensing data, particularly high resolution thermal infrared data, are integral to this study for the analysis of thermal energy fluxes across the Atlanta urban landscape.

  4. Advancing Residential Retrofits in Atlanta

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Roderick K; Kim, Eyu-Jin; Roberts, Sydney; Stephenson, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This report will summarize the home energy improvements performed in the Atlanta, GA area. In total, nine homes were retrofitted with eight of the homes having predicted source energy savings of approximately 30% or greater based on simulated energy consumption.

  5. Assessing the Impacts of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on Particulate Matter and Ozone in Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Alper; Odman, M. Talat; Russell, Armistead G.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine, through modeling, the impact of aircraft emissions on regional air quality, especially in regard to fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) as well as ozone and other pollutants. For this, we focused on Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport which is the busiest airport in the world based on passenger traffic (AIC, 2003). Hartsfield-Jackson serves the metropolitan Atlanta area where air quality does not meet national standards. Emissions from mobile and industrial sources (including several large electric power generating utilities) are the major contributors to the area's air pollution. In this study, we assessed the impact of Hartsfield-Jackson Airport on air quality around Atlanta, Georgia, and compared it to the impacts of other emission sources in the area. The assessment was built upon other, related air quality studies involving both field and modeling components. To achieve the objectives, first a detailed inventory was developed for aircraft and other emissions at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Then, air quality simulations were performed to relate these emissions to regional air quality around Atlanta. The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) was used as the modeling platform. The period of August 11-20 2000 was selected as the episode to be modeled in this study. Prior modeling of this episode during the Fall Line Air Quality Study (FAQS) and availability of additional PM(2.5) measurements for evaluation played a major role in this selection. Meteorological data for this episode as well as emission data for sources other than aircrafts were already available from FAQS.

  6. 77 FR 55817 - Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... published in the Federal Register March 7, 2012 (77 FR 13594). The notice advised interested parties of a..., 2012, in Atlanta, Georgia. By notice published June 8, 2012, (77 FR 34037) the comment period was..., SOCO-2-E, SOCO-3-E, SOCO-4-E, ALA-1-N, MISS-1-N, Duke-1-E, Duke-2-E, Duke-3-E, Duke-4-E,...

  7. Haymon-Morris Middle School: Keeping the Peace in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article features Haymon-Morris Middle School in Winder, Georgia. This highly successful Title I middle school is tucked behind the high school in a rural area 50 miles northeast of Atlanta. The staff is dedicated to creating a culture where it is believed that a calm, serene school setting results in less stress for both students and staff…

  8. 76 FR 45771 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA; Application for Manufacturing Authority; Makita Corporation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, GA; Application for Manufacturing Authority... Manufacturing); Buford, GA An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26, requesting manufacturing authority on behalf...

  9. Teacher Morale in the Atlanta Public Schools: Spring 1990. Report No. 4, Volume 25, 11/91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Lowrie A.

    A study was done of Atlanta (Georgia) public school teacher morale in May of 1990. About 40 percent of the teaching staff (1,520 teachers) voluntarily completed a 91-item questionnaire that contained subsets of questions from the Maslach Burnout Inventory and three subscales of emotional exhaustion, departmentalization, and personal…

  10. Operation Heli-STAR - Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE). Volume 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Operation Heli-STAR (Helicopter Short-Haul Transportation and Aviation Research) was established and operated in Atlanta, Georgia, during the period of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Heli-STAR had three major thrusts: (1) the establishment and operation of a helicopter-based cargo transportation system, (2) the management of low-altitude air traffic in the airspace of an urban area, and (3) the collection and analysis of research and development data associated with items 1 and 2. Heli-STAR was a cooperative industry/government program that included parcel package shippers and couriers in the Atlanta area, the helicopter industry, aviation electronics manufacturers, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and support contractors. Several detailed reports have been produced as a result of Operation Heli-STAR. These include four reports on acoustic measurements and associated analyses, and reports on the Heli-STAR tracking data including the data processing and retrieval system, the Heli-STAR cargo simulation, and the community response system. In addition, NASA's Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) program has produced a report describing the Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE) which produced the avionics and ground equipment using automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) technology. This latter report is restricted to organizations belonging to NASA's AGATE industry consortium. A complete list of these reports is shown on the following page.

  11. New American Home(R): Atlanta, Georgia--2002

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-01-01

    The New American Home is an annual showcase project designed by committee and co-sponsored by the National Association of Home Builders' (NAHB) National Council of the Housing Industry (NCHI). This year's project is built by John Wieland Homes and Neighborhoods and supported by IBACOS.

  12. Substantial Overlap Between Incarceration and Tuberculosis in Atlanta, Georgia, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Maryam B.; Foote, Mary K.; Ray, Susan M.; Maggio, David M.; Sales, Rose-Marie F.; Kim, Min Jung; Kempker, Russell R.; Spaulding, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Standard tuberculosis case reporting captures incarceration at diagnosis only. This retrospective analysis of 106 US-born adults with prevalent tuberculosis in 2011 found that 46.2% had documented histories of being in jail or prison, including 16.0% during the year before diagnosis. PMID:25734108

  13. Theoretical investigation of electron-positive ion/atom interactions. [Clark Atlanta Univ. , Atlanta, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Msezane, A.Z.

    1992-01-01

    Very brief summaries are given on three research topics. Electron impact elastic, excitation, and total cross sections for K were investigated by using elaborate Cl target wave functions in the close-coupling approximation. Photoionization cross sections from ground-state Na were calculated near the 2s[sup 2]2p[sup 5]3s and 2s2p[sup 6]3s inner-shell thresholds; also, the photoionization cross sections of excited 3p [sup 2]P[sup o] and 3d [sup 2]D states were calculated with the R-matrix methodology near the 2s2p[sup 6]3s thresholds. A numerical approach was developed to calculate the charge transfer matrix elements for ion-atom(ion) collisions; this was used for the proton-hydrogen collision problem as an illustration.

  14. Atlanta Public Schools Latin Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    This teacher's guide outlines the basic objectives and the content of the Atlanta Public Schools Latin program and suggests resources and methods to achieve the stated goals. The philosophy and general objectives of the program are presented. Course outlines include: (1) Beginning Latin, (2) Intermediate Latin, (3) Vergil's "Aeneid," (4) Ovid:…

  15. Metro Atlanta responds to West Nile virus: a coordinated public health response.

    PubMed

    Willis, Juanette

    2005-01-01

    Three and a half million people live in metropolitan Atlanta, in multiple counties with varying population bases, resources, issues and separate boards of health. Historically, public health issues have been managed within each county, with very little sharing of information among counties. The 1999 West Nile virus (WNV) outbreak in the Northeast caused public health officials in Atlanta to recognize the potential for the disease to spread to Georgia and the need to develop a coordinated, multi-jurisdictional response plan. This plan would need to address a new disease with little scientific data to predict how it might behave in a new environment and would also require closely coordinated communication among the local/state public health entities and elected officials. In early 2000, staff from the five health districts in the metro Atlanta area and the state health department voluntarily convened the Metro Atlanta Surveillance Task Force (MASTF) to create the Metro Atlanta West Nile Virus Response Plan. This plan utilizes a coordinated effort encompassing public education, surveillance, and mosquito control. With this plan in place, when the first human case of WNV was detected in Atlanta, the public heard consistent health messages about preventive measures to lower their risk of illness and the metro counties were able to carry out a successful uniform approach to mosquito control. This plan has received recognition by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) as a 2004 Model Practice, demonstrating exemplary and replicable qualities in response to a local public health need. Since the early days of the emergence of WNV in the metro Atlanta area, MASTF has continued to be a viable, evolving entity, managing and anticipating health issues. The MASTF plan is a successful effort to develop consistent policies and procedures for disease surveillance in a heavily populated area with multiple local health departments. PMID:15822839

  16. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF APARTMENT INTERIOR. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. Historically Black Colleges and Universities of Higher Education. Hearing before the Committee on the Budget. United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, First Session (Atlanta, GA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Budget.

    This document contains the testimonies of witnesses at a November 13, 1989 hearing on the status of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), as well as additional statements and a report by the Congressional Research Service. Witnesses included: the presidents of Spelman College (Georgia), Clark Atlanta University, Virginia State…

  18. A Reply to Diem et al.'s Commentary on a Recent Literature Contribution Focused on Urban-Induced Rainfall in Atlanta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    2004-01-01

    A response is provided to Diem and colleagues discussion on the whether urbanization-enhanced precipitation should be maximized in the South-Southeast of Atlanta, Georgia as documented in Shepherd et al. (2003). Diem and colleagues have offered a critical response to Shepherd et al. (2002). The response herein offers both general and specific responses to issues raised by Diem and colleagues.

  19. A Dynamic Optimization Technique for Siting the NASA-Clark Atlanta Urban Rain Gauge Network (NCURN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Taylor, Layi

    2003-01-01

    NASA satellites and ground instruments have indicated that cities like Atlanta, Georgia may create or alter rainfall. Scientists speculate that the urban heat island caused by man-made surfaces in cities impact the heat and wind patterns that form clouds and rainfall. However, more conclusive evidence is required to substantiate findings from satellites. NASA, along with scientists at Clark Atlanta University, are implementing a dense, urban rain gauge network in the metropolitan Atlanta area to support a satellite validation program called Studies of PRecipitation Anomalies from Widespread Urban Landuse (SPRAWL). SPRAWL will be conducted during the summer of 2003 to further identify and understand the impact of urban Atlanta on precipitation variability. The paper provides an. overview of SPRAWL, which represents one of the more comprehensive efforts in recent years to focus exclusively on urban-impacted rainfall. The paper also introduces a novel technique for deploying rain gauges for SPRAWL. The deployment of the dense Atlanta network is unique because it utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Decision Support Systems (DSS) to optimize deployment of the rain gauges. These computer aided systems consider access to roads, drainage systems, tree cover, and other factors in guiding the deployment of the gauge network. GIS and DSS also provide decision-makers with additional resources and flexibility to make informed decisions while considering numerous factors. Also, the new Atlanta network and SPRAWL provide a unique opportunity to merge the high-resolution, urban rain gauge network with satellite-derived rainfall products to understand how cities are changing rainfall patterns, and possibly climate.

  20. 33. 193195 AUBURN AVENUE (Callaway BuildingGeorgia Insurance Brokerage Inc.) (Consolidated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. 193-195 AUBURN AVENUE (Callaway Building--Georgia Insurance Brokerage Inc.) (Consolidated Mortgage Building--Three Sisters Beauty Shop; Alston & Co. Realty and Property Management) NORTH ELEVATION - 126-255 Auburn Avenue (Commercial Buildings), Auburn Avenue, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  1. 75 FR 74673 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia: Stage II Vapor Recovery

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to... Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4... Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street, SW., Atlanta, Georgia...

  2. Libraries in Georgia: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atlanta @Scottish Rite Fran Golding Medical Library 1001 Johnson Ferry Road NE Atlanta, GA 30342-1605 404- ... Hospital Northside Hospital-Atlanta Health Resource Center 1000 Johnson Ferry Road, NE Atlanta, GA 30342-1611 404- ...

  3. Winds from the Atlanta /34 deg N, 84 deg W/ radio meteor wind facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    A brief description of the Georgia Tech radio meteor wind facility is followed by a tabular presentation and discussion of winds measured over Atlanta (34 deg N, 84 deg W) for the first three intervals of the URSI/IAGA Cooperative Tidal Observations Program (CTOP). The pervailing zonal wind measured during August 1974, being easterly, is significantly different from that measured during October 1975 and January 1976, and is not typical of winds measured in August 1975 and August 1976, when westerlies predominated. The complicated tidal picture is detailed, but is not easily summarized.

  4. The Distribution of Segregation in Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    A prediction from ecological theory relating the distribution of residential segregation between inner and outer zones of a metropolitan area to conditions of population growth, expansion, etc. was tested using 1960 data on the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. (JM)

  5. The International Year of Astronomy in Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pree, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    The greater Atlanta metropolitan area has been able to participate in the International Year of Astronomy in a number of ways, through local and national funding. The Hartsfield-Atlanta International airport has hosted a 7 month exhibition of over 50 images in From Earth to the Universe (FETTU), and the Atlanta Center for the Visually Impaired (CVI) has hosted a two month exhibition of tactile astronomical images at their downtown education and outreach facility. Connected to the FETTU exhibit, 9 locations in Atlanta are home to scaled images of the planets and the Sun in a project entitled the Metro Atlanta Solar System (MASS). Centered at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, GA, the goal of MASS is help make the sizes and distances between planets more understandable. In addition, Agnes Scott College as a whole has connected to the IYA celebration in declaring Project Galileo: Revealing Hidden Worlds as its curricular focus the 2009-2010 academic year. I will describe the various Atlanta projects and the ways in which the IYA has enriched the curricular life of the college.

  6. Obstetric Provider Maldistribution: Georgia, USA, 2011.

    PubMed

    Spelke, Bridget; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In 2010, Georgia had the nation's highest maternal mortality rate, sixteenth highest infant mortality rate, and a waning obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce. Statewide ob/gyn workforce data, however, masked obstetric-specific care shortages and regional variation in obstetric services. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group thereby assessed each Georgia region's obstetric provider workforce to identify service-deficient areas. Methods We identified 63 birthing facilities in the 82 Primary Care Service Areas (PCSAs) outside metropolitan Atlanta and interviewed nurse managers and others to assess the age, sex, and expected departure year of each delivering professional. Using accepted annual delivery rates of 155 per obstetrician (OB), 100 per certified nurse midwife (CNM), and 70 per family medicine physician (FP) we converted obstetric providers into "OB equivalents" to standardize obstetric services available in any given area. Using facility births and computed OB equivalents (contemporary and 2020 estimates), we calculated current and projected average annual births per provider (AABP) for each PCSA, categorizing its obstetric provider workforce as "adequate" (AABP < 144), "at risk" (144 ≤ AABP ≤ 166), or "deficient" (AABP > 166). We mapped results using ArcGIS. Results Of 82 surveyed PCSAs, 52 % (43) were deficient in obstetric care; 16 % (13) had a shortage and 37 % (30) lacked obstetric providers entirely. There were no delivering FPs in 89 % (73) of PCSAs and no CNMs in 70 % (56). If Georgia fails to recruit delivering providers, 72 % (58/77) of PCSAs will have deficient or no obstetric care by 2020. Conclusions Obstetric provider shortages in Georgia hinder access to prenatal and delivery services. Care-deficient areas will expand if recruitment and retention of delivering professionals does not improve. PMID:27084367

  7. From "Fear-Based" Choice to "Freedom-Based" Choice: Georgia's Tuition Grants Act, 1960-1997

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearne, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Georgia's General Assembly passed the 1961 "Tuition Grants Act" as a method for avoiding school desegregation. In 1993, an Atlanta attorney attempted to use the Act to provide private school vouchers. This study compares and contrasts arguments for and against the Act, and public support for the Act, in 1961 and 1993, using Robinson's (2004)…

  8. 77 FR 20097 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Georgia Multi-Modal Passenger Terminal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ...-Modal Passenger Terminal AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), United States Department of... Impact Statement (EIS) for a proposed transit terminal project in Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia. The... Terminal is to establish a multimodal hub to enhance regional mobility and connectivity among existing...

  9. Increasing spatiotemporal resolution of several major pollutant species in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosius, A. L.; Luong, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The American Lung Association cited Atlanta, Georgia, as one of the top 20 most polluted U.S. cities in 2014. Heavy air and ground transportation traffic contribute to the production of carbon dioxide (CO2), particulate matter (PM), and tropospheric ozone (O3) for the Atlanta Metropolitan Area (AMA). Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport contributes significantly to the emission of these pollutants and their precursors. This study focuses on enhancing spatiotemporal resolution of CO2, PM, and O3in near-surface (ground to 50m) air columns by using Arduino-based sensors. The city of Decatur, due to its proximity to the airport, is the study site for the investigation of target pollutant concentrations. The results of this study, combined with other metropolitan air quality data sets, can be used to verify projected trends and append seasonal data. An understanding of the pollutant concentration distributions throughout the near-surface air column is vital to providing insight into the fluctuation of urban area pollutants.

  10. 3. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1945. Typical streetscape view, Clark Howell Homes. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF PLAYGROUND BEHIND BUILDING X, FROM WEST FACING EAST. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  12. 5. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa July, 1940. Public opening, Clark Howell Homes. 411 Luckie Street, left. From east facing west. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  13. 12. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1945. View across park and playground between Techwood Homes and Clark Howell Homes, facing west with Clark Howell Homes in background. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF BUILDING 16, FROM NORTHEAST FACING SOUTHWEST ACROSS TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  15. 10. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. View of east end and north side of Building E-1, from east side of Venable Street facing west. Luckie Street visible in background. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, 1981. AERIAL VIEW IN CONTEXT, TECHWOOD HOMES, FROM SOUTHEAST FACING NORTHWEST. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, June, 1940. VIEW OF BUILDING 19, FROM EAST FACING WEST, ACROSS TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  18. 4. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Clark Howell Homes, 219 Mills Street, left, 199 Mills Street, center, 404 Lovejoy Street, right, under construction. From west facing east. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  19. 8. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. Contextual view of Building E-7 (left), Building E-5 (center), and Building E-6 right), from west side of Luckie Street facing northeast. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  20. 11. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1945. View of rear entrances and yards of Building A-5, from northwest facing southeast. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. VIEW OF WADING POOL, BUILDING 12 IN BACKGROUND (LEFT), FROM SOUTHEAST FACING NORTHWEST. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, June, 1940. VIEW OF STORE AND ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (RIGHT), BUILDING 4 (CENTER) AND BUILDING 5 RIGHT, FROM NORTH FACING SOUTH ALONG TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  3. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. View of apartment interior, kitchen, living room, and bedrooms. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  4. Preventing the repetition: Or, what Los Angeles' experience in water management can teach Atlanta about urban water disputes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, David L.

    2009-04-01

    Southern California's water history is an epic story with larger-than-life characters and ambitions and abundant hubris. Students of water policy might reasonably ask: Does this story, while unique to greater Los Angeles, hold lessons for other metropolises experiencing water conflict caused by explosive growth? We examine this question by considering similarities between the challenges facing Atlanta, Georgia, one of the nation's fastest growing cities in the 21st century, with those of Los Angeles. We focus on junctures where important decisions regarding water were made and how these decisions continue to challenge both cities' futures. Atlanta's financial, cultural, and environmental imprint on its surrounding region share remarkable similarities with Los Angeles' influence trajectory: it is the largest city in the southeast, a principal transportation and business hub, and it is embroiled in water conflict with nearby communities and adjoining states.

  5. Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange in Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta): A Pilot Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Shire, J.; Qualters, J.; Mitchell, K.; Pollard, S.; Rao, R.; Kajumba, N.; Quattrochi, D.; Estes, M., Jr.; Meyer, P.; Crosson, W.; Limaye, A.; Al-Hamdan, M.; Khan, M.; Bayakly, R.; Staley, F.; Hallisey, E.; Young, J.; Ward, K.; Tolbert, P.; Tolsma, D.; Sinclair, A.; Strickland, M.; Adeniyi, K.; Rainisch, G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To provide an overview of four environmental public health surveillance projects developed by CDC and its partners for the Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange, Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta) and to illustrate common issues and challenges encountered in developing an environmental public health tracking system. Methods. HELIX-Atlanta, initiated in October 2003 to develop data linkage and analysis methods that can be used by the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network), conducted four projects. We highlight the projects' work, assess attainment of the HELIX-Atlanta goals and discuss three surveillance attributes. Results. Among the major challenges was the complexity of analytic issues which required multidiscipline teams with technical expertise. This expertise and the data resided across multiple organizations. Conclusions:Establishing formal procedures for sharing data, defining data analysis standards and automating analyses, and committing staff with appropriate expertise is needed to support wide implementation of environmental public health tracking.

  6. Bright Meteor Lights Up Atlanta Skies

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a very bright meteor that streaked over the skies of Atlanta, Ga., on the night of Aug. 28, 2011. The view is from an all sky camera in Cartersville, Ga., operated by NASA’s Mars...

  7. Information Around the Clock: Atlanta's Channel 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chepesiuk, Ron

    1985-01-01

    Describes development of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library's Channel 16, the country's only library television station to produce programming 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Use of cable television, program administration and budgeting, programming, interactive information and reference services, measuring viewer response, and publicity are…

  8. Design and performance of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center photovoltaic system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, A.; Begovic, M.; Long, R.; Ropp, M.; Pregelj, A.

    1996-12-31

    A building-integrated DC PV array has been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. The array is mounted on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center (GTAC), site of the aquatic events during the 1996 Paralympic and Olympic Games in Atlanta. At the time of its construction, it was the world`s largest roof-mounted photovoltaic array, comprised of 2,856 modules and rates at 342 kW. This section describes the electrical and physical layout of the PV system, and the associated data acquisition system (DAS) which monitors the performance of the system and collects measurements of several important meteorological parameters.

  9. METROPOLITAN ATLANTA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM (MADDSP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the problem of developmental disabilities among children, CDC, the former Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, which was funded by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the Georgia Department of Human Resources, initiate...

  10. The Effects of Departmentalized and Self-Contained Classrooms on Fifth-Grade Students' Achievement in Science on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Lisa S.

    2013-01-01

    Elementary instruction of fifth grade classrooms was found to be primarily in two organizational models in a school district northwest of Atlanta, Georgia. The self-contained classroom provided a generalist teacher responsible for the instruction of all academic subjects to one group of students throughout the day, while departmentalized…

  11. Georgia Mediagraphy. Second Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Instructional Services.

    This document is a guide to print and nonprint materials about Georgia and Georgians. Entries are arranged under the subject headings used in "Essential Skills for Georgia Schools." Criteria for inclusion were appropriateness for K-12 students and commercial availability of the item. Six books containing pictorial and photographic studies of…

  12. Biological and microbiological assessment of the upper Chattahoochee River basin, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lium, Bruce W.; Stamer, J.K.; Ehlke, T.A.; Faye, R.E.; Cherry, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    Biological and microbiological studies were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey as a part of the Intensive River-Quality Assessment studies of the upper Chattahoochee River basin, Georgia. Phytoplankton concentrations in cells per milliliter (cells/mL) were generally higher downstream from Atlanta than upstream. The highest concentrations, mostly blue-green algae, occurred in West Point Lake with an average of 90,000 cells/mL for the sampling period. The lowest concentrations, 1,000 cells/mL, occurred upstream of Lake Sidney Lanier. Dissolved orthophosphate and nitrite plus nitrate concentrations were highest in the river reaches and upper reaches of the two lakes and were lowest at the dam pools of both lakes. The high nitrite plus nitrate concentrations downstream from Atlanta were primarily a result of nitrification by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter bacteria. Algal growth potential was highest downstream from Atlanta, 25 milligrams per liter (mg/L) at Whitesburg, and was the lowest in the headwaters and at the dam pools of Lake Sidney Lanier and West Point Lake. The rate of nitrification in the Atlanta to Franklin reach of the river was comparatively low, 0.02 mg/L per hour. Nitrification was an important cause of dissolved-oxygen consumption in a 45-mi reach of the river downstream from the Atlanta wastewater treatment facilities. Dissolved-oxygen consumption as a result of nitrification may be greatest during low flow. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Obstetric Provider Trainees in Georgia: Characteristics and Attitudes About Practice in Obstetric Provider Shortage Areas.

    PubMed

    Smulian, Elizabeth A; Zahedi, Leilah; Hurvitz, Julie; Talbot, Abigail; Williams, Audra; Julian, Zoë; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In Georgia, 52 % of the primary care service areas outside metropolitan Atlanta have a deficit of obstetric providers. This study was designed to identify factors associated with the likelihood of Georgia's obstetric trainees (obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and certified nurse midwifery (CNM) students) to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services, i.e. rural Georgia. Methods Pilot-tested electronic and paper surveys were distributed to all of Georgia's OB/GYN residents (N = 95) and CNM students (N = 28). Mixed-methods survey questions assessed characteristics, attitudes, and incentives that might be associated with trainee desire to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services. Surveys also gathered information about concerns that may prevent trainees from practicing in shortage areas. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed, and qualitative themes were abstracted from open-ended questions. Results The survey response rate was 87.8 % (108/123). Overall, 24.4 % (19/78) of residents and 53.6 % (15/28) of CNM students expressed interest in practicing in rural Georgia, and both residents and CNM students were more likely to desire to practice in rural Georgia with the offer of any of six financial incentives (P < 0.001). Qualitative themes highlighted trainees' strong concerns about Georgia's political environment as it relates to reproductive healthcare. Conclusions Increasing state-level, rurally-focused financial incentive programs and emphasizing the role of CNMs may alleviate obstetric provider shortages in Georgia. PMID:27072048

  14. 7. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1939. Typical dwellings demolished for construction of Clark Howell Homes. View of west side of McAfee Street, from intersection with Gresham Street (now Clark Howell Place) facing northwest. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  15. 9. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph in possession of Atlanta Housing Authority, Atlanta, GA). Photographer unknown, circa 1940. View of Hunnicutt Street under construction, from Venable Street facing east. Buildings A-2, D-4, C-5, and A-5 at left, Building J-12 at right. W.W. Orr Medical Building visible in background at center. - Clark Howell Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Lovejoy Street, Mills Street & Luckie Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  16. Changes in Incidence and Antifungal Drug Resistance in Candidemia: Results From Population-Based Laboratory Surveillance in Atlanta and Baltimore, 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Angela Ahlquist; Farley, Monica M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Stein, Betsy; Hollick, Rosemary; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Magill, Shelley S.; Derado, Gordana; Park, Benjamin J.; Chiller, Tom M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Candidemia is common and associated with high morbidity and mortality; changes in population-based incidence rates have not been reported. Methods We conducted active, population-based surveillance in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, and Baltimore City/County, Maryland (combined population 5.2 million), during 2008–2011. We calculated candidemia incidence and antifungal drug resistance compared with prior surveillance (Atlanta, 1992–1993; Baltimore, 1998–2000). Results We identified 2675 cases of candidemia with 2329 isolates during 3 years of surveillance. Mean annual crude incidence per 100 000 person-years was 13.3 in Atlanta and 26.2 in Baltimore. Rates were highest among adults aged ≥65 years (Atlanta, 59.1; Baltimore, 72.4) and infants (aged <1 year; Atlanta, 34.3; Baltimore, 46.2). In both locations compared with prior surveillance, adjusted incidence significantly declined for infants of both black and white race (Atlanta: black risk ratio [RR], 0.26 [95% confidence interval {CI}, .17–.38]; white RR: 0.19 [95% CI, .12–.29]; Baltimore: black RR, 0.38 [95% CI, .22–.64]; white RR: 0.51 [95% CI: .29–.90]). Prevalence of fluconazole resistance (7%) was unchanged compared with prior surveillance; 32 (1%) isolates were echinocandin-resistant, and 9 (8 Candida glabrata) were multidrug resistant to both fluconazole and an echinocandin. Conclusions We describe marked shifts in candidemia epidemiology over the past 2 decades. Adults aged ≥65 years replaced infants as the highest incidence group; adjusted incidence has declined significantly in infants. Use of antifungal prophylaxis, improvements in infection control, or changes in catheter insertion practices may be contributing to these declines. Further surveillance for antifungal resistance and efforts to determine effective prevention strategies are needed. PMID:22893576

  17. Baylisascaris procyonis in the metropolitan Atlanta area.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Mark L; Nace, Eva K; Won, Kimberly Y; Punkosdy, George A; Bishop, Henry S; Johnston, Stephanie P

    2003-12-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis, the raccoon roundworm responsible for fatal larva migrans in humans, has long been thought to be absent from many regions in the southeastern United States. During spring 2002, 11 (22%) of 50 raccoons trapped in DeKalb County, Georgia, had B. procyonis infection. The increasing number of cases highlight this emerging zoonotic infection. PMID:14720412

  18. An Examination of Green School Practices in Atlanta Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to examine green environmental practices exercised in maintaining healthy schools in Atlanta. A forty-item researcher-developed instrument was used to survey 30 randomly sampled schools in the Atlanta area. Five schools particularly strong in green environment implementation were visited to observe their green…

  19. Georgia Institute of Technology chilled water system evaluation and master plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-15

    As the host of the Olympic Village for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, Georgia Tech has experienced a surge in construction activities over the last three years. Over 1.3 million square feet of new buildings have been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. This growth has placed a strain on the Georgia Tech community and challenged the facilities support staff charged with planning and organizing utility services. In concert with Olympic construction, utility planners have worked to ensure long term benefits for Georgia Tech facilities while meeting the short term requirements of the Olympic Games. The concentration of building construction in the northwest quadrant of the campus allowed planners to construct a satellite chilled water plant to serve the needs of this area and provide the opportunity to integrate this section of the campus with the main campus chilled water system. This assessment and master plan, funded in part by the US Department of Energy, has evaluated the chilled water infrastructure at Georgia Tech, identified ongoing problems and made recommendations for long term chilled water infrastructure development and efficiency improvements. The Georgia Tech office of Facilities and RDA Engineering, Inc. have worked together to assemble relevant information and prepare the recommendations contained in this document.

  20. An Overview of Article III and Article XII, Senate Bill 1, 77th Legislature: General Appropriations Act--Agencies of Public Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin. Div. of Research, Campus Planning and Finance.

    Almost all the funds appropriated to state agencies and institutions of higher education in Texas for the 2002-2003 biennium are provided through Senate Bill 1, General Appropriations Act, 77th Legislature. This report summarizes the higher education portion of that act. The all funds appropriation for higher education for the biennium is $14.6…

  1. Comparison of Methods for Estimating Mixing Height Used during the 1992 Atlanta Field Intensive.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsik, Frank J.; Fischer, Kenneth W.; McDonald, Tracey D.; Samson, Perry J.

    1995-08-01

    During the summer of 1992, measurements of the boundary layer mixing height were conducted at five locations around the city of Atlanta, Georgia, as part of the 1992 Atlanta Field Intensive of the Southern Oxidants Research Program on Ozone Non-Attainment. These measurements were made during a series of `high-ozone-event days' for the purpose of acquiring information about the temporal evolution of the convective mixed layer. The information acquired from these systems was included in a database of meteorological variables for use in the photochemical modeling efforts associated with the study. The following measurement systems were selected for use in this study by organizers of the 1992 Atlanta Field Intensive: one rawinsonde system, four radar wind profiler RASS (radar acoustic sounding system) systems, and two lidar systems.A comparison of the mixing-height estimates from each of the measurement systems used during the 1992 Atlanta Field Intensive was performed in an effort to evaluate the consistency of the estimates between the different systems and, further, to evaluate the relative performance of each system during the study period. Statistical analyses were performed on the dataset, with in-depth statistical analyses presented for two specific days: 30 July and 4 August 1992. Results indicate that there is often disagreement in the mixing-height estimates between the various systems, particularly during the early morning and late afternoon. It is believed that the differences between estimates are the result of 1) the physical limitations of the different instrument system 2) the assumptions used with each system as to which tracer most accurately defines the structure of the convective boundary layer, and 3) the spatial inhomogeneity of convective boundary layer structure across the region studied.In general, the rawinsonde system appeared to give the most accurate mixing-height estimates under the meteorological conditions studied. The lidar estimates

  2. Characterization of aerosol composition and sources in the greater Atlanta area by aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Weber, R. J. J.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    An important and uncertain aspect of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is that it is often associated with anthropogenic pollution tracers. Prior studies in Atlanta suggested that 70-80% of the carbon in water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is modern, yet it is well-correlated with the anthropogenic CO. In this study, we deployed a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at multiple sites in different seasons (May 2012-February 2013) to characterize the sources and chemical composition of aerosols in the greater Atlanta area. This area in the SE US is ideal to investigate anthropogenic-biogenic interactions due to high natural and anthropogenic emissions. These extensive field studies are part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology study (SCAPE). The HR-ToF-AMS is deployed at four sites (~ 3 weeks each) in rotation: Jefferson Street (urban), Yorkville (rural), roadside site (near Highway 75/85), and Georgia Tech site (campus), with the urban and rural sites being part of the SEARCH network. We obtained seven HR-ToF-AMS datasets in total. During the entire measurement period, the ACSM is stationary at the GIT site and samples continuously. We perform positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis on the HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data to deconvolve the OA into different components. While the diurnal cycle of the total OA is flat as what have been previously observed, the OA factors resolved by PMF analysis show distinctively different diurnal trends. We find that the "more-oxidized oxygenated OA" (MO-OOA) constitutes a major fraction of OA at all sites. In summer, OA is dominated by SOA, e.g., isoprene-OA and OOA with different degrees of oxidation. In contrary, biomass burning OA is more prominent in winter data. By comparing HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data during the same sampling periods, we find that the aerosol time series are highly correlated, indicating the

  3. Energy integrated dairy farm system in Georgia: Technical manual, Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm, Social Circle, Georgia. [Cogeneration using biogas; heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.L. Jr.; Ross, C.C.; Lamade, R.M.

    1986-09-01

    This manual describes a project sponsored to optimize energy generation and utilization in the agricultural or food processing industry. The particular project involves the Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm located in Social Circle, Georgia (about 60 miles east of Atlanta). The farm is designed for a 550 milking cow herd and produces certified raw milk for sale to a processing plant located in Atlanta. The project converted the Mathis/P and and M Dairy into an energy integrated dairy farm system (EIDFS) in which the interaction of the subsystems and components are modified such that the energy resources of the farm are optimized. This manual is a description of the system, subsystems and components composing the Mathis EIDFS and is primarily intended for farmers, extension agents, and equipment manufacturers who might be involved in future EIDFS projects. Cogeneration using biogas from manures and heat recovery from the refrigeration machinery were among the options chosen.

  4. 76 FR 28971 - Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on May 9, 2011, as supplemented on May 11, 2011, Atlanta Gas Light Company (Atlanta Gas Light... for transportation service. Atlanta Gas Light states the rate election consists of the maximum...

  5. The State of Youth at Risk and the Juvenile Justice System: Prevention and Intervention. Hearing on Support for State Law Enforcement Efforts and for State Juvenile Justice Systems To Help Address the Wave of Violent Crimes among Youthful Offenders before the Subcommittee on Juvenile Justice of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session (Atlanta, GA, October 21, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    This document presents witness testimonies and prepared statements from a Senate hearing held in Atlanta, Georgia to examine the problem of crime among youth and to discuss the reauthorization of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974. In his opening statement, Senator Fowler notes that the reauthorization puts greater…

  6. Radon and geology in the Atlanta area

    SciTech Connect

    Ranger, L.S.

    1995-12-31

    For the Atlanta area, 2,791 indoor radon screening tests are plotted on 40 geologic formations where there are five or more measurements. Each is presented with average, range, and house construction type. 29 formations have houses with measurements > = 4.0 pCi/l. For the region, 6.6% of homes measure > = 4.0 pCi/l. The percent of houses > = 4.0 pCi/l varies from 0 to 50% by geologic formation. The range is 0.0 to 57.3 pCi/l. Marked differences in radon levels are observed when plotted by geologic formation. Areas of higher radon potential can be determined for the purpose of planning radon surveys or testing programs in areas of highest potential. The higher potential areas do not necessarily coincide with the EPA radon potential map.

  7. Modeling highly transient flow, mass, and heat transport in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Keefer, Thomas N.

    1979-01-01

    A coupled flow-temperature model has been developed and verified for a 27.9-km reach of the Chattahoochee River between Buford Dam and Norcross, Ga. Flow in this reach of the Chattahoochee is continuous but highly regulated by Buford Dam, a flood-control and hydroelectric facility located near Buford, Ga. Calibration and verification utilized two sets of data collected under highly unsteady discharge conditions. Existing solution techniques, with certain minor improvements, were applied to verify the existing technology of flow and transport modeling. A linear, implicit finite-difference flow model was coupled with implicit, finite-difference transport and temperature models. Both the conservative and nonconservative forms of the transport equation were solved, and the difference in the predicted concentrations of dye were found to be insignificant. The temperature model, therefore, was based on the simpler nonconservative form of the transport equation. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Modeling highly transient flow, mass, and heat transport in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Keefer, Thomas N.

    1979-01-01

    A coupled flow-temperature model has been developed and verified for a 27.9-km reach of the Chattahoochee River between Buford Dam and Norcross, Ga. Flow in this reach of the Chattahoochee is continuous but highly regulated by Buford Dam, a flood-control and hydroelectric facility located near Buford, Ga. Calibration and verification utilized two sets of data collected under highly unsteady discharge conditions. Existing solution techniques, with certain minor improvements, were applied to verify the existing technology of flow and transport modeling. The linear, implicit finite-difference flow model was calibrated by use of a depth profile obtained at steady low flow and unsteady flow data obtained in March 1976. During the calibration period, the model was generally able to reproduce observed stages to within 0.15 m and discharges at less than 100 m 3 /s, to within 5 percent. Peak discharges of about 200 m 3 /s were under-estimated by about 20 percent. During the verification period, October 1975, the flow model reproduced observed stage changes to within about 0.15 m, and its timing and over-all performance was considered to be very good. Dye was added to the upstream end of the river reach at a constant rate while the river flow was highly unsteady. The numerical solution of either the conservative or nonconservative form of the mass-transport equation did an excellent job of simulating the observed concentrations of dye in the river. The temperature model was capable of predicting temperature changes through this reach of as large as 5.8?C with a RMS (root-mean-square) error of 0.32?C in October 1975 and 0.20?C in March 1976. Hydropulsation has a significant effect on the water temperature below Buford Dam. These effects are very complicated because they are quite dependent on the timing of the release with respect to both the time of day and past releases.

  9. Conference of the Society for Literature and Science. Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, October 10-13, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkowitz, Sidney, Ed.

    The papers contained in these proceedings from the 1996 Society for Literature and Science Conference are organized into sections based on theme. Some of these themes are: (1) Secularizing Enlightenment; (2) Eugenics and the Politics of Knowledge; (3) Reading the Discourses of Psychology; (4) Women and Medicine; (5) The Rhetoric of Public Health;…

  10. 75 FR 9781 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Atlanta, Georgia, 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... standard, was approved by EPA on March 6, 2008 (73 FR 12013). However, EPA inadvertently excluded Hall... this action. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews Under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4... Use'' (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001). This action merely corrects an inadvertent error of omission in...

  11. Public housing relocations in Atlanta, Georgia, and declines in spatial access to safety net primary care

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Hannah LF; Wodarski, Stephanie; Cummings, Janet; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Karnes, Conny; Ross, Zev; Druss, Ben; Bonney, Loida E

    2012-01-01

    This analysis investigates changes in spatial access to safety-net primary care in a sample of US public housing residents relocating via the HOPE VI initiative from public housing complexes to voucher-subsidized rental units; substance misusers were oversampled. We used gravity-based models to measure spatial access to care, and used mixed models to assess pre-/post-relocation changes in access. Half the sample experienced declines in spatial access of ≥79.83%; declines did not vary by substance misuse status. Results suggest that future public housing relocation initiatives should partner with relocaters, particularly those in poor health, to help them find housing near safety-net clinics. PMID:23060002

  12. 78 FR 32222 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... 73 FR 16436. The current action, however, is being taken to address requirements under the earlier... Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, Dekalb, Douglas, Fayette, Forsyth,...

  13. 75 FR 41884 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Georgia Department of Transportation, Atlanta, GA; University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... South Carolina); Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal... Tribe, Oklahoma; Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee...

  14. 75 FR 17126 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Application for Expansion and Reorganization under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... (74 FR 1170, 01/12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/09). The ASF is an option for grantees for the... entry. FTZ 26 was approved by the Board on January 17, 1977 (Board Order 115, 42 FR 4186, 01/24/77); reorganized on April 18, 1988 (Board Order 381, 53 FR 15254, 04/28/88); and, expanded on April 29, 1996...

  15. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia intestinalis in swimming pools, Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joan M; Gleim, Elizabeth R; Beach, Michael J

    2008-06-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia intestinalis have been found in swimming pool filter backwash during outbreaks. To determine baseline prevalence, we sampled pools not associated with outbreaks and found that of 160 sampled pools, 13 (8.1%) were positive for 1 or both parasites; 10 (6.2%) for Giardia sp., 2 (1.2%) for Cryptosporidium spp., and 1 (0.6%) for both. PMID:18507911

  16. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia intestinalis in Swimming Pools, Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Gleim, Elizabeth R.; Beach, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia intestinalis have been found in swimming pool filter backwash during outbreaks. To determine baseline prevalence, we sampled pools not associated with outbreaks and found that of 160 sampled pools, 13 (8.1%) were positive for 1 or both parasites; 10 (6.2%) for Giardia sp., 2 (1.2%) for Cryptosporidium spp., and 1 (0.6%) for both. PMID:18507911

  17. Energy Technology Training Conference Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, October 27-29, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Conference goals included identifying projected technical manpower needs and skill mix requirements, potential obstacles to developing an adequate technical education base, and stimulating education, industry, and labor cooperation in technical program development and federal interagency coordination and cooperation. Findings of the conference…

  18. Development and evaluation of alternative approaches for exposure assessment of multiple air pollutants in Atlanta, Georgia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements from central site (CS) monitors are often used as estimates of exposure in air pollution epidemiological studies. As these measurements are typically limited in their spatiotemporal resolution, true exposure variability within a population is often obscured, leading ...

  19. Non Invasive Biomedical Analysis - Breath Networking Session at PittCon 2011, Atlanta, Georgia

    EPA Science Inventory

    This was the second year that our breath colleagues organized a networking session at the Pittsburgh Conference and Exposition or ''PittCon'' (http://www.pincon.org/).This time it was called "Non-invasive Biomedical Analysis" to broaden the scope a bit, but the primary focus rema...

  20. Inventory of forest and rangeland resources, including forest stress. [Black Hills, Manitou, Colorado, and Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, R. C.; Weber, F. P.; Driscoll, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Road systems being developed within the Manitou, Colorado area for human habitation are readily discernible on the S192 normal-color photographs. These are dirt roads, some of which are about 20 feet wide. These data should provide the District Ranger of the Pike National Forest required information on the size and extent of these developing areas, information which he does not now have but is required for total management of the District.

  1. Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) Conference Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, March 6-9, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torraco, Richard J., Ed.

    These proceedings begin with the schedule, conference committee membership lists, and detailed agenda of the 1997 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development, which explored the future of human resource development (HRD). Presented next are papers on HRD from scholars affiliated with organizations from 12 countries. The papers are…

  2. The structure of lightning flashes HF-UHF: 12 September 1975, Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Jenkins, H. H.; Wilson, B. J.; Wilson, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of sferics at 3, 30, 139, and 295 MHz were made during thunderstorms. Wideband electronics and an analogue tape recorder continuously recorded the radiation from lightning with about 300 kHz of bandwidth. The data were obtained during the passage of a cold front. Flashing rate, burst rate and the structure of individual flashes were recorded. The record of a typical flash begins with a sudden burst of closely spaced pulses whose temporal structure is typical of the stepped leader, and ends in a large pulse suggestive of a first return stroke. The remainder of the flash consists of a sequence of pulses of varying amplitude separated by quiet periods of the order of milliseconds. The shape of these pulses and the temporal structure suggest that the first few large pulses are return strokes. Other discharges begin with widely spaced discrete pulses and resemble the preceding discharge less the leader and return stroke phase. The radiation exhibits a similar structure, at each of the frequencies monitored.

  3. Civil Engineering Technology Consultants' Workshop (Atlanta, Georgia, May 17-20, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrovolny, Jerry S.

    A consultants' workshop was conducted by the Occupational Education Project of the American Association of Junior Colleges to orient the consultants to recent developments in civil engineering technology and their responsibilities in program development. This document, a summary of workshop presentations and discussions, is intended as a guide to…

  4. Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, Abstracts (11th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 5-9, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.; Pulliam, E. J.

    This publication includes more than 470 abstracts of papers scheduled to be presented at a chemical education conference. Topics of the papers include: (1) human impact on the environment; (2) technology; (3) forensic science; (4) paper chemistry; (5) computer interfacing, software, videodisc and graphics; (6) faculty enhancement programs; (7)…

  5. Public housing relocations in Atlanta, Georgia, and declines in spatial access to safety net primary care.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Hannah L F; Wodarski, Stephanie; Cummings, Janet; Hunter-Jones, Josalin; Karnes, Conny; Ross, Zev; Druss, Ben; Bonney, Loida E

    2012-11-01

    This analysis investigates changes in spatial access to safety-net primary care in a sample of US public housing residents relocating via the HOPE VI initiative from public housing complexes to voucher-subsidized rental units; substance misusers were oversampled. We used gravity-based models to measure spatial access to care, and used mixed models to assess pre-/post-relocation changes in access. Half the sample experienced declines in spatial access of ≥ 79.83%; declines did not vary by substance misuse status. Results suggest that future public housing relocation initiatives should partner with relocaters, particularly those in poor health, to help them find housing near safety-net clinics. PMID:23060002

  6. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (12th, Atlanta, Georgia, December 6, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Arlington, VA. Agricultural Education Div.

    These proceedings include the following papers: "An Assessment of the National FFA Public Service Announcement Program" (Sutphin, Dillon, and Rush); "Educational Objectives and Administrative Criteria for the National FFA Contest Program" (Smith and Kahler); "A National Profile of Agricultural Teacher Educators and State Supervisors of Vocational…

  7. Convention Proceedings Digest: American Vocational Association (Atlanta, Georgia, November 30-December 5, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The document is the fifth volume in an annual series of American Vocational Association (AVA) proceedings digests. It contains the reports of professional meetings, workshops, educational tours, speeches, and discussions, as well as the resolutions, elections, and other activities undertaken at the various meetings. The proceedings of meetings of…

  8. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, January 17-19, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    The Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference was devoted to over 30 workshops and demonstrations of games and sports that may be used by teachers to improve physical fitness and cardiovascular strength in young children. There were also seminars and workshops focusing on disruptive behavior, curriculum development,…

  9. 77 FR 12526 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Fine Particulate Matter 2002...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Particulate Matter 2002 Base Year Emissions Inventory AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION..., Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street... Planning Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S. Environmental Protection......

  10. Georgia's Unusual "Electoral College"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a unique partnership between Kennesaw State University and the Georgia state government involving the participation of computer experts in the deployment or electronic voting machines. The effort has received attention in Washington as scientists and government officials search for ways to reform election procedures across the…

  11. Georgia and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Georgia and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the nation in…

  12. Georgia's Teacher Performance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Anne Marie; Wetherington, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Like most states, Georgia until recently depended on an assessment of content knowledge to award teaching licenses, along with a licensure recommendation from candidates' educator preparation programs. While the content assessment reflected candidates' grasp of subject matter, licensure decisions did not hinge on direct, statewide assessment of…

  13. Bright Fireball Over Georgia

    NASA Video Gallery

    A camera in Cartersville, Ga., captured this view of a bright fireball over Georgia on the night of Mar. 7, 2012, at approx. 10:19:11 EST. The meteor was first recorded at an altitude of 51.5 miles...

  14. South Georgia Autograph Parties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womack, Geneva H.

    1978-01-01

    The manager of the South Georgia College Bookstore describes several autograph parties used as a sales promotion technique. The planning process, including initial contacts with the guest authors, are discussed, and the schedules and events of the authors' visits are reviewed. (JMD)

  15. Outdoor Education in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Providing an overview of the Outdoor Education Workshop provided by the Georgia Migrant Education Program to give migrant students and staff an opportunity to learn new skills which they can then share with other migrant children upon their return to the regular school setting, the paper briefly discusses the administrative steps necessary when…

  16. The Georgia Centenarian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Leonard W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents theoretical rationale, hypotheses, models, and methods and procedures of Georgia Centenarian Study, interdisciplinary study of oldest-old which began in 1988 to investigate adaptational characteristics of long-lived individuals. Introduces other articles in journal issue: first four reports of study, summarizing data collected in first…

  17. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (plus or minus 5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  18. Remote Sensing of Atlanta's Urban Sprawl and the Distribution of Land Cover and Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1992, an average of 20 ha of forest was lost each day to urban expansion of Atlanta, Georgia. Urban surfaces have very different thermal properties than natural surfaces-storing solar energy throughout the day and continuing to release it as sensible heat well after sunset. The resulting heat island effect serves as catalysts for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrialization leading to a deterioration in air quality. In this study, high spatial resolution multispectral remote sensing data has been used to characterize the type, thermal properties, and distribution of land surface materials throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area. Ten-meter data were acquired with the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) on May 11 and 12, 1997. ATLAS is a 15-channel multispectral scanner that incorporates the Landsat TM bands with additional bands in the middle reflective infrared and thermal infrared range. The high spatial resolution permitted discrimination of discrete surface types (e.g., concrete, asphalt), individual structures (e.g., buildings, houses) and their associated thermal characteristics. There is a strong temperature contrast between vegetation and anthropomorphic features. Vegetation has a modal temperature at about 20 C, whereas asphalt shingles, pavement, and buildings have a modal temperature of about 39 C. Broad-leaf vegetation classes are indistinguishable on a thermal basis alone. There is slightly more variability (+/-5 C) among the urban surfaces. Grasses, mixed vegetation and mixed urban surfaces are intermediate in temperature and are characterized by broader temperature distributions with modes of about 29 C. Thermal maps serve as a basis for understanding the distribution of "hotspots", i.e., how landscape features and urban fabric contribute the most heat to the lower atmosphere.

  19. Evaluation of a Pilot Surveillance System: Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange in Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P.; Shire, J.; Qualters, Judy; Daley, Randolph; Fiero, Leslie Todorov; Autry, Andy; Avchen, Rachel; Stock, Allison; Correa, Adolofo; Siffel, Csaba; Devine, Owen; Gotway, Carol; Crawford; Mitchell, Ken; Pollard, Solomon; Rao, Ravi; Kajumba, Ntale; Rickman, Doug; Quattrochi, Dale; Estes, Maury; Meyer, Paul; Crosson, Bill; Limaye, Ashutosh; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Khan, Maudood

    2007-01-01

    CDC and its partners established the Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange, Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta) demonstration project, to develop linking and analysis methods that could be used by the National Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Network. Initiated in October 2003, the Metropolitan Atlanta-based collaborative conducted four projects: asthma and particulate air pollution, birth defects and ozone and particulate air pollution, childhood leukemia and traffic emissions, and children's blood lead testing and neighborhood risk factors for lead poisoning. This report provides an overview of the HELIX-Atlanta projects' goals, methods and outcomes. We discuss priority attributes and common issues and challenges and offer recommendations for implementation of the nascent national environmental public health tracking network.

  20. Georgia's Workforce Development Pipeline: One District's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melissa H.; Hufstetler, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Launched in 2006, the Georgia Work Ready initiative seeks to improve the job training and marketability of Georgia's workforce and drive the state's economic growth. Georgia Work Ready is a partnership between the state and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce. Comprised of three components, Georgia's initiative focuses on job profiling, skills…

  1. Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

  2. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  3. 1995 Area 1 bird survey/Zone 1, Operable Unit 2, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.C.

    1995-08-01

    Robins Air Force Base is located in Warner Robins, Georgia, approximately 90 miles southeast of Atlanta, Georgia. As part of the Baseline Investigation (CDM Federal 1994) a two day bird survey was conducted by M. C. Wade (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and B.A. Beatty (CDM Federal Programs) in May 1995. The subject area of investigation includes the sludge lagoon, Landfill No. 4, and the wetland area east of the landfill and west of Hannah Road (including two ponds). This is known as Area 1. The Area 1 wetlands include bottomland hardwood forest, stream, and pond habitats. The objectives of this survey were to document bird species using the Area I wetlands and to see if the change in hydrology (due to the installation of the Sewage Treatment Plant effluent diversion and stormwater runon control systems) has resulted in changes at Area 1 since the previous survey of May 1992 (CDM Federal 1994).

  4. Atlanta NAVIGATOR case study. Final report, May 1996--Jun 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Amodei, R.; Bard, E.; Brong, B.; Cahoon, F.; Jasper, K.

    1998-11-01

    The Atlanta metropolitan region was the location of one of the most ambitious Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) deployments in the United States. This deployment included several individual projects--a Central Transportation Management Center (TMC), six Traffic Control Centers (TCC), one Transit Information Center (TIC), the Travel Information Showcase (TIS), and the extension of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) rail network and the new high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-85 and I-75. The Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games created a focus for these projects. All of these systems were to be brought on line in time for the Olympic Games. This report presents the findings of the NAVIGATOR Case Study and documents the lessons learned from the Atlanta ITS deployment experience in order to improve other ITS deployments in the future. The Case Study focuses on the institutional, programmatic, and technical issues and opportunities from planning and implementing the ITS deployment in Atlanta. The Case Study collected data and information from interviews, observations, focus groups, and documentation reviews. It presents a series of lessons learned and recommendations for enabling successful ITS deployments nationwide.

  5. “Everyone called me grandma”: Public housing demolition and relocation among older adults in Atlanta

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Danya E; Ruel, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades public and political dissatisfaction with public housing projects and an increasing emphasis on poverty deconcentration has led to the demolition of public housing in cities across the country. A significant body of literature has examined experiences of relocation from public housing and their implications for the well-being of individuals and communities. While much of this literature has focused on young or middle-aged adults and children, older adults have also been affected by demolition and relocation. The displacement of older adults raises a new set of age and life-course specific concerns for the well-being of this population. In this paper, we analyze the relocation narratives of 25 former public housing residents in Atlanta, Georgia. Our analysis focuses on the loss of geographically rooted communities of kinship, support and belonging that many participants, particularly those who have aged in place, attribute to their former developments. Participants describe many material and psychosocial benefits associated with living in communities that were “like families” and where they often held important roles as respected elders. While some were satisfied with their moves, others describe the dispersal of these “families” as a deeply felt loss. While some were able to draw on support from children and grandchildren in their new homes, others describe experiences of profound isolation after relocation. PMID:24187415

  6. Road dust lead (Pb) in two neighborhoods of urban Atlanta, (GA, USA).

    PubMed

    Deocampo, Daniel M; Reed, Jack; Kalenuik, Alexander P

    2012-06-01

    Road dust continues to be a major potential reservoir of Pb in the urban environment, and an important potential component of child Pb exposure. This study presents ICP-AES analyses of metals in 72 samples of road dust (<250 µm) collected in the urban core of Atlanta, Georgia. In the Downtown area, median Pb concentrations are ~63 mg/kg Pb, with high values of 278 mg/kg. For comparison, median Pb values in a nearby residential neighborhood (also in the urban core) were ~93 mg/kg, with a high of 972 mg/kg. Geospatial variability is high, with significant variation observed over tens to hundreds of meters. Spearman Rank Correlation tests suggest that Pb and other metals (Cu, Ni, V, Zn) are associated with iron and manganese oxide phases in the residential area, as reported in other cities. However, Pb in the Downtown area is not correlated with the others, suggesting a difference in source or transport history. Given these complexities and the expected differences between road dust and soil Pb, future efforts to assess exposure risk should therefore be based on spatially distributed sampling at very high spatial resolution. PMID:22829787

  7. Road Dust Lead (Pb) in Two Neighborhoods of Urban Atlanta, (GA, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Deocampo, Daniel M.; Reed, Jack; Kalenuik, Alexander P.

    2012-01-01

    Road dust continues to be a major potential reservoir of Pb in the urban environment, and an important potential component of child Pb exposure. This study presents ICP-AES analyses of metals in 72 samples of road dust (<250 µm) collected in the urban core of Atlanta, Georgia. In the Downtown area, median Pb concentrations are ~63 mg/kg Pb, with high values of 278 mg/kg. For comparison, median Pb values in a nearby residential neighborhood (also in the urban core) were ~93 mg/kg, with a high of 972 mg/kg. Geospatial variability is high, with significant variation observed over tens to hundreds of meters. Spearman Rank Correlation tests suggest that Pb and other metals (Cu, Ni, V, Zn) are associated with iron and manganese oxide phases in the residential area, as reported in other cities. However, Pb in the Downtown area is not correlated with the others, suggesting a difference in source or transport history. Given these complexities and the expected differences between road dust and soil Pb, future efforts to assess exposure risk should therefore be based on spatially distributed sampling at very high spatial resolution. PMID:22829787

  8. "Everyone called me grandma": Public housing demolition and relocation among older adults in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Keene, Danya E; Ruel, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades public and political dissatisfaction with public housing projects and an increasing emphasis on poverty deconcentration has led to the demolition of public housing in cities across the country. A significant body of literature has examined experiences of relocation from public housing and their implications for the well-being of individuals and communities. While much of this literature has focused on young or middle-aged adults and children, older adults have also been affected by demolition and relocation. The displacement of older adults raises a new set of age and life-course specific concerns for the well-being of this population. In this paper, we analyze the relocation narratives of 25 former public housing residents in Atlanta, Georgia. Our analysis focuses on the loss of geographically rooted communities of kinship, support and belonging that many participants, particularly those who have aged in place, attribute to their former developments. Participants describe many material and psychosocial benefits associated with living in communities that were "like families" and where they often held important roles as respected elders. While some were satisfied with their moves, others describe the dispersal of these "families" as a deeply felt loss. While some were able to draw on support from children and grandchildren in their new homes, others describe experiences of profound isolation after relocation. PMID:24187415

  9. 86th Annual Georgia Public Health Association Meeting & Conference Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Selina A.; Abbott, Regina; Sims, Christy

    2015-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The 86th annual meeting of the Georgia Public Health Association (GPHA) and joint conference with the Southern Health Association was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 13–14, 2015, with pre-conference (April 12th) and post-conference (April 14th) Executive Board meetings. As Georgia’s leading forum for public health researchers, practitioners, and students, the annual meeting of the GPHA brings together participants from across the state to explore recent developments in the field and to exchange techniques, tools, and experiences. Historically, the GPHA conference has been held in Savannah (n=24); Jekyll Island (n=20); Atlanta (n=16); Augusta (n=4); and Gainesville (n=1). There was no annual meeting during the early years (1929–1936); during World War II (1941–1943 and 1945); and for four years during the 1980s. Between 2006 and 2010, GPHA held one-day annual meetings and business sessions with educational workshops. Several new initiatives were highlighted as part of this year’s conference. These included a “move and groove” physical activity lounge, registration scholarships for students with a dedicated meet-and-greet reception, an expanded exhibit hall, presentation and approval of three resolutions (related to healthy foods at official activities and events; weapons at official activities and events; and memorials), and approval of the 2015 legislative policy positions and amended association bylaws. The theme for the conference was Advocacy in Action for Public Health. Specifically, the program addressed ensuring access to care; protecting funding for core programs, services, and infrastructure; eliminating health disparities; and addressing key public health issues important to the state of Georgia. One hundred and nine (109) abstracts were submitted for peer review; 36 were accepted for poster and 40 for workshop presentations. Four plenary sessions with keynote speakers covered the intersection between advocacy and policy

  10. 78 FR 68777 - Proposed Establishment of Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes; Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ...This action proposes to establish nine low-altitude RNAV routes (T-routes) in the Atlanta, GA area. The new routes would support the Atlanta Optimization of Airspace and Procedures in a Metroplex (OAPM) project. The proposed routes would have connectivity to the current airway structure and would provide routing through, around and over the busy Atlanta Metroplex...

  11. Landslide Hazard in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaprindashvili, George; Tsereteli, Emil; Gaprindashvili, Merab

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades of the XX century, protect the population from geological hazards, to maintain land and safe operation of the engineering facilities has become the most important social - economic, demographic, political and environmental problems for the whole world. Georgia, with its scales of origination of the natural-catastrophic processes (landslide, mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.), their re-occurrence and with the negative results inflicted by these processes to the population, agricultural lands and engineering objects, is one of the most complex mountainous region. The extremely sensitive conditions were conditioned by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Activation of the negative meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic changes and their abnormally frequent occurrence (mostly increased atmospheric precipitations, temperature and humidity); 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. Following the problem urgency, a number of departmental and research institutions have made their operations more intense in the given direction within the limits of their competence. First of all, the activity of the Department of Geology of Georgia (which is at present included in the National Environmental Agency of the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Protection), which mapped, identified and cataloged the hazardous processes on the territory of the country and identified the spatial limits and developmental regularities of these processes for tens of years. The increased risk of Geological catastrophes in Georgia first of all is caused by insufficient information between society and responsible persons toward this event. The existed situation needs the base assessment of natural disasters level, the identification of events, to determine their caused reasons, to develop special maps in GIS system, and continuous functioning of geo monitoring researches for develop safety early

  12. Landslide Hazard in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaprindashvili, G.; Tsereteli, E.; Gaprindashvili, M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last decades of the XX century, protect the population from geological hazards, to maintain land and safe operation of the engineering facilities has become the most important social - economic, demographic, political and environmental problems for the whole world. Georgia, with its scales of origination of the natural-catastrophic processes (landslide, mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.), their re-occurrence and with the negative results inflicted by these processes to the population, agricultural lands and engineering objects, is one of the most complex mountainous region. The extremely sensitive conditions were conditioned by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Activation of the negative meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic changes and their abnormally frequent occurrence (mostly increased atmospheric precipitations, temperature and humidity); 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. Following the problem urgency, a number of departmental and research institutions have made their operations more intense in the given direction within the limits of their competence. First of all, the activity of the Department of Geology of Georgia (which is at present included in the National Environmental Agency of the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Protection), which mapped, identified and cataloged the hazardous processes on the territory of the country and identified the spatial limits and developmental regularities of these processes for tens of years. The increased risk of Geological catastrophes in Georgia first of all is caused by insufficient information between society and responsible persons toward this event. The existed situation needs the base assessment of natural disasters level, the identification of events, to determine their caused reasons, to develop special maps in GIS system, and continuous functioning of geo monitoring researches for develop safety early

  13. CHATTAHOOCHEE ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Welsh, Robert A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Chattahoochee Roadless Area, Georgia, offers little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources even though gold, mica, sillimanite, soapstone, dunite, chromite, and nickel have been mined nearby, and source rocks for these commodities are present in the roadless area. Granite gneiss, gneiss, schist, and metasandstone in the roadless area are suitable for stone, crushed rock, or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available outside the roadless area, closer to present markets. The potential for the occurrence of hydrocarbons (probably gas) beneath the thick regional thrust sheets in this area cannot be adequately evaluated from available data.

  14. Droughts in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, Nancy L.; Stamey, Timothy C.

    2000-01-01

    Droughts do not have the immediate effects of floods, but sustained droughts can cause economic stress throughout the State. The word 'drought' has various meanings, depending on a person's perspective. To a farmer, a drought is a period of moisture deficiency that affects the crops under cultivation - even two weeks without rainfall can stress many crops during certain periods of the growing cycle. To a meteorologist, a drought is a prolonged period when precipitation is less than normal. To a water manager, a drought is a deficiency in water supply that affects water availability and water quality. To a hydrologist, a drought is an extended period of decreased precipitation and streamflow. Droughts in Georgia have severely affected municipal and industrial water supplies, agriculture, stream water quality, recreation at major reservoirs, hydropower generation, navigation, and forest resources. In Georgia, droughts have been documented at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow gaging stations since the 1890's. From 1910 to 1940, about 20 streamflow gaging stations were in operation. Since the early 1950's through the late 1980's, about 100 streamflow gaging stations were in operation. Currently (2000), the USGS streamflow gaging network consists of more than 135 continuous-recording gages. Ground-water levels are currently monitored at 165 wells equipped with continuous recorders.

  15. Blackjack Complex Fire, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For the past week, fires have raged across southeast Georgia, consuming nearly 40,000 acres of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. This true-color image of the largest fire near Blackjack Island, Georgia, was acquired on May 3, 2002 (top), by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiomter (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The fire was ignited by lightning strikes and has spread quickly over a large area of scrub brush in the swamp. Due to the unseasonably dry conditions and the difficult swamp terrain, firefighters have been struggling to keep the fire from spreading any further across the 400,000-acre refuge. Although the fire is now endangering some buildings in nearby Stephen Foster State Park, no one has been injured or killed. By May 8th (lower) the area covered by the fire itself-denoted by red pixels-had shrunk, but smoke continued to billow from the site. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  16. A Time for Silence: Booker T. Washington in Atlanta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the rhetoric of silence as an alternative to participation in a discussion of social issues, particularly when participation confirms the efforts of those who seek social control. Concludes that Booker T. Washington should have employed the strategy of silence when invited to address an exposition in Atlanta in 1895. (JMF)

  17. Changing the Odds: The Race for Results in Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Janelle; Torian, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Casey has invested in several southwest Atlanta communities for more than 10 years. This report explores how race and community of residence continue to create barriers that keep the city's kids, particularly those of color, from reaching their full potential. The report highlights three key areas that support or thwart children's healthy…

  18. Spatial analysis of ozone in Atlanta: Regulatory and epidemiologic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, A.J.; Mulholland, J.A.; Wilkinson, J.G.; Russell, A.G.; Tolbert, P.E.

    1998-12-31

    Relationships between ambient levels of selected air pollutants and pediatric asthma exacerbation in Atlanta were studied retrospectively. As a part of this study, spatial distributions of ambient ozone concentrations in the twenty-county Atlanta metropolitan area during the summers of 1993, 1994 and 1995 were estimated and assessed. A universal kriging procedure was used for spatial interpolation of aerometric monitoring station data. In this paper, the spatial distributions of ozone are described, and regulatory and epidemiologic implications are discussed. For the study period, the Atlanta ozone nonattainment area based on the one-hour, exceedance-based standard of 0.12 ppm is estimated to expand from 56 percent of the Atlanta MSA by area and 71 percent by population to 88 percent by area and 96 percent by population under the new eight-hour, concentration-based standard of 0.08 ppm. Regarding asthma exacerbation, a 4 percent increase in pediatric asthma emergency room presentation rate per 20 ppb increase in ambient ozone concentration was observed (p-value = 0.001). Ambient ozone level represents a general indicator of air quality due to its correlation with other pollutants. The use of spatially-resolved ozone estimates in the epidemiologic analysis demonstrates the need to control confounding by demographic covariates.

  19. What Can We Learn from the Atlanta Cheating Scandal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saultz, Andrew; Murphy, Kristin M.; Aronson, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    In April 2015, 11 educators were convicted for their roles in the cheating scandal in the Atlanta Public Schools. The authors examine the lessons that teachers, administrators, and policy makers can learn from the cheating scandal: Teachers and school leaders were not adequately prepared to navigate the school district's environment; there were…

  20. OBJECTIVES, DESIGN, AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase II is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersite Program is part o...

  1. Heat stress in atlanta: preparing for the olympic worst.

    PubMed

    Roos, R

    1996-06-01

    The weather might provide the toughest competition for endurance athletes at the Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta next month. The heat stress is likely to be higher than in any of the last several summer games. Here's a report on the expected conditions and how medical officials for the games are preparing. PMID:20086999

  2. Atlanta's Public Schools: Moving Forward on a Positive Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crim, Alonzo A.

    1983-01-01

    The Atlanta school superintendent describes the city's concerns and strengths in conjunction with policies devoted to improving students' academic achievement and career preparation and placement. Strategies implemented include winning principals' cooperation, inservice teacher training in reading and mathematics, partnership with businesses, and…

  3. Environmental Public Health Tracking: Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange-Atlanta (HEXIX-Atlanta: A cooperative Program Between CDC and NASA for Development of an Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Niskar, Amanda Sue

    2005-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is coordinating HELIX- Atlanta to provide information regarding the five-county Metropolitan Atlanta Area (Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinett) via a network of integrated environmental monitoring and public health data systems so that all sectors can take action to prevent and control environmentally related health effects. The HELIX-Atlanta Network is a tool to access interoperable information systems with optional information technology linkage functionality driven by scientific rationale. HELIX-Atlanta is a collaborative effort with local, state, federal, and academic partners, including the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified the following HELIX-Atlanta initial focus areas: childhood lead poisoning, short-latency cancers, developmental disabilities, birth defects, vital records, respiratory health, age of housing, remote sensing data, and environmental monitoring, HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified and evaluated information systems containing information on the above focus areas. The information system evaluations resulted in recommendations for what resources would be needed to interoperate selected information systems in compliance with the CDC Public Health Information Network (PHIN). This presentation will discuss the collaborative process of building a network that links health and environment data for information exchange, including NASA remote sensing data, for use in HELIX-Atlanta.

  4. Andosols of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushadze, T. F.; Blum, W. E. H.; Sanadze, E. V.; Kvrivishvili, T. O.

    2011-09-01

    Andosols formed on andesite-basalts, andesite, diabase, and dolerite in the central part of the Adzhar-Trialet Ridge are studied. Their morphological features and some chemical properties are characterized. The soils are diagnosed according to the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB). The soil bulk density, the contents of oxalate-soluble R2O3, adsorbed phosphates, and organic carbon are determined. It is shown that vitric and andic diagnostic features predominate in the investigated soils. According to the adopted classification, these soils are classified as mountain meadow soils. Their morphological features and chemical characteristics correspond to those of Andosols, one of the soil groups in the WRB. It can be expected that these soils are developed in some other regions of volcanic activity in Georgia.

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF SYMPOSIUM ON PROCESS MEASUREMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (2ND), HELD AT THE SHERATON-ATLANTA HOTEL IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA ON FEBRUARY 25-27, 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents 22 presentations comprising 12 poster sessions at the symposium. The symposium focused on the state-of-the-art of sampling and analysis techniques that are appropriate for process measurements in the context of an environmental assessment program. Methods are...

  6. Atlanta Papers: Caucus on Social Theory and Art Education. Proceedings of the Inaugural Session of the Annual Meeting of the National Art Education Association (Atlanta, Georgia, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caucus on Social Theory and Art Education.

    Papers included in this collection which were originally presented at the inaugural meeting of the Caucus on Social Theory and Art Education are: "Introduction: Toward a Socially Progressive Conception of Art Education" (R. Bersson); "Established Ways of Thinking" (J. Hobbs); "Needed: A New View of Art and Emotions" (A. Sherman); "Statement for…

  7. Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group (GMIHRG): Mobilizing Allied Health Students and Community Partners to Put Data into Action.

    PubMed

    Zertuche, Adrienne D; Spelke, Bridget; Julian, Zoë; Pinto, Meredith; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Despite having an obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce comparable to the national average, Georgia is ranked 50th in maternal mortality and 40th in infant mortality. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group (GMIHRG) was founded in 2010 to evaluate and address this paradox. Description In the several years since GMIHRG's inception, its graduate allied health student researchers and advisors have collaborated with community partners to complete several requisite research initiatives. Their initial work demonstrated that over half the Georgia areas outside metropolitan Atlanta lack adequate access to obstetric services, and their subsequent research evaluated the reasons for and the consequences of this maldistribution of obstetric providers. Assessment In order to translate their workforce and outcomes data for use in policymaking and programming, GMIHRG created reader-friendly reports for distribution to a wide variety of stakeholders and prepared concise, compelling presentations with targeted recommendations for change. This commitment to advocacy ultimately enabled them to: (a) inspire the Georgia Study Committees on Medicaid Reform and Medical Education, (b) influence Georgia General Assembly abortion bills, medical scholarship/loan legislation, and appropriations, and (c) motivate programming initiatives to improve midwifery education and perinatal regionalization in Georgia. Conclusion GMIHRG members have employed inventive research methods and maximized collaborative partnerships to enable their data on Georgia's maternal and infant outcomes and obstetric workforce to effectively inform state organizations and policymakers. With this unique approach, GMIHRG serves as a cost-efficient and valuable model for student engagement in the translation of research into advocacy efforts, policy change, and innovative programming. PMID:27072049

  8. Imaging lexicon for acute pancreatitis: 2012 Atlanta Classification revisited.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Arora, Ankur

    2016-02-01

    The original 1992 Atlanta Classification System for acute pancreatitis was revised in 2012 by the Atlanta Working Group, assisted by various national and international societies, through web-based consensus. This revised classification identifies two phases of acute pancreatitis: early and late. Acute pancreatitis can be either oedematous interstitial pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis. Severity of the disease is categorized into three levels: mild, moderately severe and severe, depending upon organ failure and local/systemic complications. According to the type of pancreatitis, collections are further divided into acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, acute necrotic collection, and walled-off necrosis. Insight into the revised terminology is essential for accurate communication of imaging findings. In this review article, we will summarize the updated nomenclature and illustrate corresponding imaging findings using examples. PMID:26224684

  9. Fuel-based fine particulate and black carbon emission factors from a railyard area in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Boris; Bergin, Mike; Russell, Armistead

    2013-06-01

    Railyards have the potential to influence localfine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm; PM2.5) concentrations through emissions from diesel locomotives and supporting activities. This is of concern in urban regions where railyards are in proximity to residential areas. Northwest of Atlanta, Georgia, Inman and Tilford railyards are located beside residential neighborhoods, industries, and schools. The PM2.5 concentrations near the railyards is the highest measured amongst the state-run monitoring sites (Georgia Environmental Protection Division, 2012; http://www.georgiaair.org/amp/report.php). The authors estimated fuel-based black carbon (BC) and PM2.5 emission factors for these railyards in order to help determine the impact of railyard activities on PM2.5 concentrations, and for assessing the potential benefits of replacing current locomotive engines with cleaner technologies. High-time-resolution measurements of BC, PM2.5, CO2, and wind speed and direction were made at two locations, north and south of the railyards. Emissions factors (i.e., the mass of BC or PM2.5 per gallon of fuel burned) were estimated by using the downwind/upwind difference in concentrations, wavelet analysis, and an event-based approach. By the authors' estimates, diesel-electric engines used in the railyards have average emission factors of 2.8 +/- 0.2 g of BC and 6.0 +/- 0.5 g of PM2.5 per gallon of diesel fuel burned. A broader mix of railyard supporting activities appear to lead to average emission factors of 0.7 +/- 0.03 g of BC and 1.5 +/- 0.1 g of PM2.5 per gallon of diesel fuel burned. Railyard emissions appear to lead to average enhancements of approximately 1.7 +/- 0.1 microg/m3 of PM2.5 and approximately 0.8 +/- 0.01 microg/m3 of BC in neighboring areas on an annual average basis. Uncertainty not quantified in these results could arise mainly from variability in downwind/upwind differences, differences in emissions of the diverse zones within the

  10. Racial disparities in travel time to radiotherapy facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Flanagan, Barry

    2013-07-01

    Low-income women with breast cancer who rely on public transportation may have difficulty in completing recommended radiation therapy due to inadequate access to radiation facilities. Using a geographic information system (GIS) and network analysis we quantified spatial accessibility to radiation treatment facilities in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. We built a transportation network model that included all bus and rail routes and stops, system transfers and walk and wait times experienced by public transportation system travelers. We also built a private transportation network to model travel times by automobile. We calculated travel times to radiation therapy facilities via public and private transportation from a population-weighted center of each census tract located within the study area. We broadly grouped the tracts by low, medium and high household access to a private vehicle and by race. Facility service areas were created using the network model to map the extent of areal coverage at specified travel times (30, 45 and 60 min) for both public and private modes of transportation. The median public transportation travel time to the nearest radiotherapy facility was 56 min vs. approximately 8 min by private vehicle. We found that majority black census tracts had longer public transportation travel times than white tracts across all categories of vehicle access and that 39% of women in the study area had longer than 1 h of public transportation travel time to the nearest facility. In addition, service area analyses identified locations where the travel time barriers are the greatest. Spatial inaccessibility, especially for women who must use public transportation, is one of the barriers they face in receiving optimal treatment. PMID:23726213

  11. Drinking water turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in Atlanta, 1993-2004.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Sarah C; Moe, Christine L; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, W Dana; Uber, Jim; Amirtharajah, Appiah; Singer, Philip; Tolbert, Paige E

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which drinking water turbidity measurements indicate the risk of gastrointestinal illness is not well understood. Despite major advances in drinking water treatment and delivery, infectious disease can still be transmitted through drinking water in the United States, and it is important to have reliable indicators of microbial water quality to inform public health decisions. The objective of our study was to assess the relationship between gastrointestinal illness, quantified through emergency department visits, and drinking water quality, quantified as raw water and filtered water turbidity measured at the treatment plant. We examined the relationship between turbidity levels of raw and filtered surface water measured at eight major drinking water treatment plants in the metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, and over 240,000 emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness during 1993-2004 among the population served by these plants. We fit Poisson time-series statistical regression models that included turbidity in a 21-day distributed lag and that controlled for meteorological factors and long-term time trends. For filtered water turbidity, the results were consistent with no association with emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. We observed a modest association between raw water turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. Our results suggest that source water quality may contribute modestly to endemic gastrointestinal illness in the study area. The association between turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness was only observed when raw water turbidity was considered; filtered water turbidity may not serve as a reliable indicator of modest pathogen risk at all treatment plants. PMID:18941478

  12. DRINKING WATER TURBIDITY AND EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT VISITS FOR GASTROINTESTINAL ILLNESS IN ATLANTA, 1993 – 2004

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, Sarah C.; Moe, Christine L.; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, W. Dana; Uber, Jim; Amirtharajah, Appiah; Singer, Philip; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The extent to which drinking water turbidity measurements indicate the risk of gastrointestinal illness is not well-understood. Despite major advances in drinking water treatment and delivery, infectious disease can still be transmitted through drinking water in the U.S., and it is important to have reliable indicators of microbial water quality to inform public health decisions. The objective of our study was to assess the relationship between gastrointestinal illness, quantified through emergency department visits, and drinking water quality, quantified as raw water and filtered water turbidity measured at the treatment plant. Methods We examined the relationship between turbidity levels of raw and filtered surface water measured at eight major drinking water treatment plants in the metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, and over 240 000 emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness during 1993–2004 among the population served by these plants. We fit Poisson time-series statistical regression models that included turbidity in a 21-day distributed lag and that controlled for meteorological factors and long-term time trends. Results For filtered water turbidity, the results were consistent with no association with emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. We observed a modest association between raw water turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness. This association was not observed for all treatment plants in plant-specific analyses. Conclusions Our results suggest that source water quality may contribute modestly to endemic gastrointestinal illness in the study area. The association between turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness was only observed when raw water turbidity was considered; filtered water turbidity may not serve as a reliable indicator of modest pathogen risk at all treatment plants. PMID:18941478

  13. GA State Profile. Georgia: Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) and Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) and Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT). The purpose of the exams is to: (1) Ensure that students qualifying for a diploma have mastered essential core academic content and skills. All students seeking a Georgia high school diploma must pass the GHSGT in four…

  14. 77 FR 51099 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00046

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Georgia dated 08/14... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Tift. Contiguous Counties: Georgia: Berrien,...

  15. 77 FR 37727 - Georgia Disaster # GA-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of GEORGIA dated 06/14... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties Thomas. Contiguous Counties Georgia: Brooks,...

  16. Fires in Southern Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Several large fires were burning in southern Georgia on April 29, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured this image. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. The Roundabout Fire sprang up on April 27, according to the U.S. Southern Area Coordination Center, and was about 3,500 acres as of April 30. That fire was threatening homes in the community of Kirkland. Meanwhile, south of Waycross, two large blazes were burning next to each other in the northern part of Okefenokee Swamp. The Sweat Farm Road Fire threatened the town of Waycross in previous weeks, but at the end of April, activity had moved to the southeastern perimeter. The fire had affected more than 50,000 acres of timber (including pine tree plantations) and swamps. Scores of residences scattered throughout the rural area are threatened. The Big Turnaround Complex is burning to the east. The 26,000-acre fire was extremely active over the weekend, with flame lengths more than 60 feet (just over 18 meters) in places. The two blazes appeared to overlap in fire perimeter maps available from the U.S. Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Team. According to the Southern Area Coordination Center morning report on April 30, the Sweat Farm Road Fire 'will be a long term fire. Containment and control will depend on significant rainfall, due to the inaccessible swamp terrain.' No expected containment date was available for the Big Turnaround Complex Fire, either. Describing that fire, the report stated, 'Heavy fuel loading, high fire danger, and difficulty of access continue to hamper suppression efforts.' The large image provided above has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response Team provides twice-daily images of the region in additional resolutions. They also provide a version of the image that shows smoke plumes stretching out across the Atlantic Ocean.

  17. Energy conserving site design case study: Shenandoah, Georgia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The case study examines the means by which energy conservation can be achieved at an aggregate community level by using proper planning and analytical techniques for a new town, Shenandoah, Georgia, located twenty-five miles southwest of Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport. A potentially implementable energy conservation community plan is achieved by a study team examining the land use options, siting characteristics of each building type, alternate infrastructure plans, possible decentralized energy options, and central utility schemes to determine how community energy conservation can be achieved by use of pre-construction planning. The concept for the development of mixed land uses as a passively sited, energy conserving community is based on a plan (Level 1 Plan) that uses the natural site characteristics, maximizes on passive energy siting requirement, and allows flexibility for the changing needs of the developers. The Level 2 Plan is identical with Level 1 plan plus a series of decentraized systems that have been added to the residential units: the single-family detached, the apartments, and the townhouses. Level 3 Plan is similar to the Level 1 Plan except that higher density dwellings have been moved to areas adjacent to central site. The total energy savings for each plan relative to the conventional plan are indicated. (MCW)

  18. Revised Atlanta Classification for Acute Pancreatitis: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Foster, Bryan R; Jensen, Kyle K; Bakis, Gene; Shaaban, Akram M; Coakley, Fergus V

    2016-01-01

    The 2012 revised Atlanta classification is an update of the original 1992 Atlanta classification, a standardized clinical and radiologic nomenclature for acute pancreatitis and associated complications based on research advances made over the past 2 decades. Acute pancreatitis is now divided into two distinct subtypes, necrotizing pancreatitis and interstitial edematous pancreatitis (IEP), based on the presence or absence of necrosis, respectively. The revised classification system also updates confusing and sometimes inaccurate terminology that was previously used to describe pancreatic and peripancreatic collections. As such, use of the terms acute pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess is now discouraged. Instead, four distinct collection subtypes are identified on the basis of the presence of pancreatic necrosis and time elapsed since the onset of pancreatitis. Acute peripancreatic fluid collections (APFCs) and pseudocysts occur in IEP and contain fluid only. Acute necrotic collections (ANCs) and walled-off necrosis (WON) occur only in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and contain variable amounts of fluid and necrotic debris. APFCs and ANCs occur within 4 weeks of disease onset. After this time, APFCs or ANCs may either resolve or persist, developing a mature wall to become a pseudocyst or a WON, respectively. Any collection subtype may become infected and manifest as internal gas, though this occurs most commonly in necrotic collections. In this review, the authors present a practical image-rich guide to the revised Atlanta classification system, with the goal of fostering implementation of the revised system into radiology practice, thereby facilitating accurate communication among clinicians and reinforcing the radiologist's role as a key member of a multidisciplinary team in treating patients with acute pancreatitis. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163588

  19. Fighting Corruption in Georgia's Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janashia, Natia

    2004-01-01

    In the Republic of Georgia, about 240 institutions of higher education serve a population of 5 million. On the surface, these numbers suggest a prosperous, highly educated society. Behind this facade, however, lies a reality of degraded standards, crumbling infrastructure, rampant academic fraud, and deteriorating educational quality. At the…

  20. Advocacy Strategies--Georgia-Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambill, Matthew; Wilson, Lynne; Carter, Amy

    2012-01-01

    This November, CTE professionals from all over the country will assemble in the beautiful state of Georgia for CareerTech VISION 2012. With the total redesign of this event, this opportunity will no doubt prove to be one of the greatest professional development opportunities ever offered by the Association for Career and Technical Education…

  1. Georgiaites: Tektites in Central Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Information is provided about the origin, the features, and the availability of tektites which are odd and very rare types of transparent glass theorized to be from a common, yet unknown, origin. The basis for this article is the Howard collection of tektites found in a small region of central Georgia. (seven references) (JJK)

  2. 75 FR 2582 - Proposed Modification of the Atlanta, GA, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Friday, December 4, 2009, concerning a proposal to revise Class B airspace at Atlanta, GA, (74 FR 63818... a proposal to revise Class B airspace at Atlanta, GA, (74 FR 63818). The address and phone number..., in Covington, GA, as published in the Federal Register on Friday, December 4, 2009 (74 FR 63818),...

  3. Why, Where, and How to Infuse the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory into the Sociology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Earl, II

    2012-01-01

    The Atlanta Sociological Laboratory is the moniker bestowed on scholars engaged in sociological research at Atlanta University between 1895 and 1924. Under the leadership of W. E. B. Du Bois, 1897-1914, this school made substantive yet marginalized contributions to the discipline. Its accomplishments include, but are not limited to, its…

  4. 76 FR 66713 - Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atlanta Gas Light Company; Notice of Compliance Filing Take notice that on October 19, 2011, Atlanta Gas Light Company filed a revised Statement of Operating Conditions...

  5. SEMI-CONTINUOUS AEROSOL CARBON MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF ATLANTA SUPERSITE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive field campaign of the Atlanta Supersite Experiment was carried out at a ground-based measurement site on Jefferson Street in midtown Atlanta, GA, from 3 August to 1 September, 1999. This paper examines the semi-continuous particulate organic and elemental measureme...

  6. Falsification, Annual Targets, and Errant Leadership: Media Portrayal of the Atlanta Test-Cheating Scandal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Atlanta test-cheating scandal differs markedly from the version reported in the press. Using discourse analysis, I examined over 50 articles published in the "Atlanta Journal-Constitution" ("AJC"), the hometown newspaper at the center of the investigation. Because newspapers are a primary source of…

  7. A New Definition in Atlanta: Q&A with Beverly Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Beverly Hall has been superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools since 1999. Before coming to Atlanta, Hall was state district superintendent of Newark Public Schools, deputy chancellor for instruction of New York City Public Schools, superintendent of Community School District 27 in New York City, and a principal in Brooklyn. Hall chairs Harvard…

  8. AN OVERVIEW OF THE OBJECTIVES AND DESIGN OF THE '99 ATLANTA SUPERSITE EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Summer of 1999, a 4-week intensive field campaign was conducted at a site on Jefferson Street in Midtown Atlanta. The campaign, the 1999 Atlanta Supersites Experiment, was carried out under the direction of the Southern Oxidants Study and represented the first of U....

  9. Healthy beginnings: a system of care for children in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ryan; Bertonaschi, Susan; Gazmararian, Julie

    2014-12-01

    For more than a decade the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Atlanta Civic Site has invested in a comprehensive community change strategy in five neighborhoods near downtown Atlanta. The foundation pursues a three-prong strategy focused on improving educational outcomes for children, encouraging family economic success for adults, and positively transforming the community's physical environment. The foundation recently integrated a focus on health into its community and family strengthening strategies. In this article we review the foundation's Healthy Beginnings System of Care. Healthy Beginnings seeks to prevent or reduce health disparities through a community-based, coordinated care approach based in a high-quality early learning center. An initial evaluation found that in 2013 the program exceeded all of its performance requirements for the 279 enrolled children. Ninety-seven percent of the children had health insurance, 92 percent were up to date with immunizations, and 98 percent were current with developmental screenings. By building upon the partnerships formed through the foundation's community change effort, Healthy Beginnings has dramatically increased neighborhood children's access to health care and forms the basis for a cost-effective approach that can be replicated in other communities. PMID:25489045

  10. Redistributive impact of the Atlanta mass transit system: a comment

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, W.K.; French, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Dajani, Egan, and McElroy (DEM) in this joural (pp 49-60, July 1975) attempted to determine the redistributive impact (i.e., the net incidence of benefits and costs) of the new Atlanta transit system to be operated by the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA). Based upon a sample of eight origin zones, DEM conclude that there appears to be no relationship between net benefits from MARTA and income per family but a relationship between net benefits and proximity to the transit station. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the DEM made several methodological errors in measuring benefits and costs of MARTA and hence their conclusions are questionable. Furthermore, the DEM benefit-cost model will be presented in a graphical framework. Because of the many factors that enter into the determination of benefits and costs or urban transit, the possibility of not considering or being inconsistent in considering a relevant factor becomes highly probable. The graphical model presented in this paper was found to be extremely useful in understanding the DEM benefit-cost model and in discovering its errors. A similar model may also be found useful by future researchers in avoiding methodological errors in the measurement of benefits and costs of urban transit.

  11. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference (Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, January 15-17, 1981). Proceedings, Saturday, Activity and Position Paper Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    At the final session of the January conference on Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education, 40 discussions and workshops centered on physical fitness, health, safety, and adapting athletics for the disabled child. Other topics covered were creative dance, water activities, lifetime sports, and teacher resource materials and…

  12. Daily mortality and air pollution in Atlanta: two years of data from ARIES.

    PubMed

    Klemm, R J; Lipfert, F W; Wyzga, R E; Gust, C

    2004-01-01

    Associations between daily mortality and air pollution were investigated in Fulton and DeKalb Counties, Georgia, for the 2-yr period beginning in August 1998, as part of the Aerosol Research and Inhalation Epidemiological Study (ARIES). Mortality data were obtained directly from county offices of vital records. Air quality data were obtained from a dedicated research site in central Atlanta; 15 separate air quality indicators (AQIs) were selected from the 70 particulate and gaseous air quality parameters archived in the ARIES ambient air quality database. Daily meteorological parameters, comprising 24-h average temperatures and dewpoints, were obtained from Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport. Effects were estimated using Poisson regression with daily deaths as the response variable and time, meteorology, AQI, and days of the week as predictor variables. AQI variables entered the model in a linear fashion, while all other continuous predictor variables were smoothed via natural cubic splines using the generalized linear model (GLM) framework in S-PLUS. Knots were spaced either quarterly, monthly, or biweekly for temporal smoothing. A default model using monthly knots and AQIs averaged for lags 0 and 1 was postulated, with other models considered in sensitivity analyses. Lags up to 5 days were considered, and multipollutant models were evaluated, taking care to avoid overlapping (and thus collinear) AQIs. For this reason, PM(2.5) was partitioned into its three major constituents: SO(2-)(4), carbon (EC + 1.4 OC), and the remainder; sulfate was assumed to be (NH(4))(2)SO(4) for this purpose. Initial AQI screening was based on all-cause (ICD-9 codes <800) mortality for those aged 65 and over. For the (apparently) most important pollutants--PM(2.5) and its 3 major constituents, coarse PM mass [CM], 1-h maximum CO, 8-h maximum O(3)--we investigated 15 mortality categories in detail. (The 15 categories result from three age groups [all ages, <65, 65+] and five

  13. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference (9th, Atlanta, Georgia, January 22-24, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    The conference reported in these proceedings focused on the sharing of recent innovations, successful programming and teaching concepts, and research in children's physical education. Materials are presented in three sections, one for each day of the conference. The first day's agenda included presentations by nationally known physical educators…

  14. National Conference on Professional and Personal Renewal for Faculty. Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, April 10-12, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, William K., Ed.; Chandler, Judith B., Ed.

    Strategies for promoting faculty renewal are discussed in proceedings of the 1986 National Conference on Professional and Personal Renewal for Faculty. Included is an introduction by Ronald D. Simpson, a keynote speech by John W. Gardner and an address on academic culture by Peter Seldin. Summaries of 47 papers are provided, including the…

  15. National Forum on Issues in Vocational Assessment (Atlanta, Georgia, September 20-22, 1984). The Issues Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher, Ed.; Fry, Ronald, Ed.

    The current state of the art in vocational assessment is explored in 46 papers: "Vocational Evaluation: An Experimental Trend in Vocational Assessment" (Nadolsky); "Certification for Teachers and Vocational Evaluation Specialists" (Meers); "Marketing Vocational Education" (Williamson); "Norms, Reliability, and Validity in Commercial Vocational…

  16. Speeches Presented at National Conference on Accreditation of Public Postsecondary Occupational Education (Atlanta, Georgia, June 10-12, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Lane C.; And Others

    Accreditation of public postsecondary occupational education is discussed critically and in depth. Alternatives are offered for the diversity which characterizes accreditation at this level of education. Manuscripts are included for the following presentations: (1) "The American Vocational Association and the Development of Standards for…

  17. APL/IV: Fourth International APL Users' Conference. June 15-16, 1972, Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta. School of Information and Computer Science.

    APL is a computer language (A Programing Language). Papers at this conference of APL users deal with the following topics: an APL approach to interactive display terminals; graphics in APL; an interactive APL graphics system; modeling a satellite experiment on APL; representing negative integers in bit vectors; APL as a teaching tool--two…

  18. Improving Linkages--the Challenge for the Southeast. Early Childhood Regional Symposium Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, November 21-22, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Greensboro. School of Education.

    This report outlines the proceedings of a symposium held to discuss ways of strengthening linkages and transitions between pre-kindergarten programs and early elementary school. The 63 symposium participants included Head Start representatives, elementary school teachers and principals, state and federal department of education employees,…

  19. Inventory of forest and rangeland and detection of forest stress. [Black Hills, Manitou, Colorado, and Atlanta, Georgia test sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, R. C.; Aldrich, R. C.; Driscoll, R. S.; Weber, F. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Controlled visual interpretation of one ERTS-1 scene taken at the peak of the growing season has indicated that classification to the ECOCLASS Series level is not entirely satisfactory. For five forest classes, aspen, Douglas-fir, lodgepole pine, ponderosa pine, and Spruce/fir, correct identification ranged from 60 to 70 percent. With the exception of shortgrass and wet shrubby meadow classes in the nonforest categories (81 and 100 percent correct, respectively), correct identification of the nonforest classes is so far unacceptable. The low accuracies are believed due to: (1) edge effects due to ecotones between plant community classes with apparent similar image characteristics; (2) confounding effects of amount of plant crown cover and ground surface material in the scene; and (3) variable land slope degree and aspect as it affects the image signature.

  20. Inventory of forest and rangeland resources, including forest stress. [Atlanta, Georgia, Black Hills, and Manitou, Colorado test sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, R. C.; Aldrich, R. C.; Weber, F. P.; Driscoll, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Some current beetle-killed ponderosa pine can be detected on S190-B photography imaged over the Bear Lodge mountains in the Black Hills National Forest. Detections were made on SL-3 imagery (September 13, 1973) using a zoom lens microscope to view the photography. At this time correlations have not been made to all of the known infestation spots in the Bear Lodge mountains; rather, known infestations have been located on the SL-3 imagery. It was determined that the beetle-killed trees were current kills by stereo viewing of SL-3 imagery on one side and SL-2 on the other. A successful technique was developed for mapping current beetle-killed pine using MSS imagery from mission 247 flown by the C-130 over the Black Hills test site in September 1973. Color enhancement processing on the NASA/JSC, DAS system using three MSS channels produced an excellent quality detection map for current kill pine. More importantly it provides a way to inventory the dead trees by relating PCM counts to actual numbers of dead trees.

  1. Occurrence of organic wastewater-indicator compounds in urban streams of the Atlanta area, Georgia, 2003-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Stephen J.; LaFontaine, Jacob H.

    2010-01-01

    The similarity in the pattern and distribution of OWICs in samples at sites upstream and downstream from known CSO outfalls indicates that CSOs were not the dominant source of OWICs during the study period. Other sources may include non-sewage discharges-both permitted, permitted but out of compliance, and non-permitted, contaminated groundwater from leaking sewer lines or septic systems, sanitary-sewer overflows, or dry-weather runoff from outdoor water use. These OWICs may be better suited for identifying sewage-contaminated groundwater than sewage-contaminated surface water because groundwater is not typically affected by the OWICs that are more common in urban runoff.

  2. Understanding the Comorbidity of Dyslexia: Acceptance of the Samuel Torrey Orton Award November 15, 2002, Atlanta, Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Bruce F.

    2003-01-01

    This speech by a researcher into the genetic bases of dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and their etiological overlap, first honors four pioneers in the field (Samuel Orton, Bertil Hallgren, Isabelle Liberman, and Norman Geschwind); then updates knowledge about the genetics of dyslexia and comorbidity with ADHD and certain…

  3. Proceedings of the International Academy for Information Management Annual Conference (12th, Atlanta, Georgia, December 12-14, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Camille, Ed.

    This proceedings includes 62 papers presented at the 12th annual International Academy for Information Management (IAIM) conference. Topics of papers include: electronic undergraduate courses; software for teaching change management; cooperative projects; experiential learning; World Wide Web applications; internationalization of the information…

  4. Inventory of forest and rangeland and detection of forest stress. [Manitou, Colorado, Atlanta, Georgia, and Black Hills test sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, R. C.; Aldrich, R. C.; Weber, F. P.; Driscoll, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Eucalyptus tree stands killed by low temperatures in December 1972 were outlined by image enhancement of two separate dates of ERTS-1 images (January 22, 1973-I.D. 1183-18175 and April 22, 1973-I.D. 1273-18183). Three stands larger than 500 meters in size were detected very accurately. In Colorado, range and grassland communities were analyzed by visual interpretation of color composite scene I.D. 1028-17135. It was found that mixtures of plant litter, amount and kind of bare soil, and plant foliage cover made classification of grasslands very difficult. Changes in forest land use were detected on areas as small as 5 acres when ERTS-1 color composite scene 1264-15445 (April 13, 1973) was compared with 1966 ASCS index mosaics (scale 1:60,000). Verification of the changes were made from RB-57 underflight CIR transparencies (scale 1:120,000).

  5. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia, March 16-18, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-05-01

    This meeting brought together more than 200 professionals representing organizations with vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings. Participants identified or reinforced a wide variety of needs and issues associated with delivering high-performance homes in both new and existing home scenarios,

  6. Labor-Management Cooperation: 1990 State-of-the-Art Symposium (Atlanta, Georgia, October 24-26, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor-Management Relations and Cooperative Programs (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This booklet synthesizes symposium discussions exploring how to transform organizations to compete in the rapidly changing world economy. First, the new cooperative organization is defined. Next, practical advice on making partnership organizations a reality is summarized. Suggestions include appealing to people's self-interest; coming up with…

  7. THE ATLANTA AREA WORKSHOP ON PREPARING TEACHERS TO WORK WITH DISADVANTAGED YOUTH (PINE MOUNTAIN, GEORGIA, MARCH 5-8, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CODY, WILMER S.; SHUFELT, LYNN F.

    THIS IS A REPORT OF A WORKSHOP FOR 114 SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL LEADERS WHICH AIMED AT (1) INVESTIGATING THE PROBLEMS FACED BY TEACHERS OF DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN, (2) GENERATING IDEAS FOR MODEL PRE-SERVICE AND IN-SERVICE PROGRAMS FOR SUCH TEACHERS, AND (3) HAVING WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS DESIGN SUCH PROGRAMS. THERE WAS GENERAL AGREEMENT THAT THE BASIC…

  8. 3. VIEW OF SOUTHWESTERN APPROACH TO GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF SOUTHWESTERN APPROACH TO GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 111-00060P-00020N - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 111-00060P-00020N, Georgia State Route 60 spur spanning Hempton Creek, Mineral Bluff, Fannin County, GA

  9. 7. DETAIL OF VIEW OF BALUSTRADE OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF VIEW OF BALUSTRADE OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 111-00060P-00020N - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 111-00060P-00020N, Georgia State Route 60 spur spanning Hempton Creek, Mineral Bluff, Fannin County, GA

  10. 5. VIEW OF TIMBER PILES SUPPORTING GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF TIMBER PILES SUPPORTING GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 111-00060P-00020N - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 111-00060P-00020N, Georgia State Route 60 spur spanning Hempton Creek, Mineral Bluff, Fannin County, GA

  11. 4. VIEW OF NORTHEASTERN APPROACH TO GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF NORTHEASTERN APPROACH TO GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 111-00060P-00020N - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 111-00060P-00020N, Georgia State Route 60 spur spanning Hempton Creek, Mineral Bluff, Fannin County, GA

  12. Lessons from the Georgia floods.

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, J J; Hagebak, B R; Sirmons, J G; Brennan, J A

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, tropical storm Alberto brought heavy rains to parts of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. In South Georgia, rivers rose 44 feet above flood stage, muddy water covered 10,000 square miles, and 31 lives were lost. In implementing the Health and Medical Services portion of the FEMA Federal Response Plan, the Public Health Service learned lessons from this experience that can be applied to planning for other natural disasters. Continuous reassessment to assure the best utilization of resources in rapidly changing conditions, cross-training in the content of emergency plans at all levels, and on-going face-to-face liaison among response managers will improve response efforts. Populations with special medical needs must become part of any response design. The effects that any response activity may have on the community as a whole should be carefully considered before action is taken. Images p685-a p687-a PMID:8570818

  13. Georgia Tech sonic boom simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Krish K.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the building and human response to sonic boom in the range 3 Hz to 30 Hz, Georgia Institute of Technology is building a special acoustic driver system to simulate sonic boom. To support the NASA LaRC program on building and human response, this simulator's capability has been extended to an upper frequency of 4 KHz. A residential test house was made available by Georgia Tech for these tests. At the time of preparation of this document, most of the acoustic drivers and the associated electronics have been built and assembled. The system has, however, not been fully tested. The following pages provide an overview of the progress to date. The acoustic driver systems, and the principle of their operation together with the test house are described. Future plans are also summarized.

  14. Cedar Creek at Cedartown, Georgia, floodflow characteristics from West Girard Avenue to the Georgia Avenue Relocation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, McGlone

    1981-01-01

    In cooperation with the Highway Division, Georgia Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey determined the backwater effects of existing bridges and dikes on Cedar Creek at Cedartown, Georgia, for the reach from West Girard Avenue to the Georgia Avenue relocation. The maximum backwater effect for the bridges was 1.7 feet in the upstream approach at the Seaboard Coastline Railroad bridge as a combined result of the Georgia Highway 278 bridge and the Seaboard Coastline Railroad bridge. The maximum effect from the existing dikes was 0.7 foot at the approach section of Georgia Highway 278.

  15. Flood-tracking chart for the Withlacoochee and Little River Basins in south-central Georgia and northern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; McCallum, Brian E.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with other Federal, State, and local agencies, operates a flood-monitoring system in the Withlacoochee and Little River Basins. This system is a network of automated river stage stations (ten are shown on page 2 of this publication) that transmit stage data through satellite telemetry to the USGS in Atlanta, Georgia and the National Weather Service (NWS) in Peachtree City, Georgia. During floods, the public and emergency response agencies use this information to make decisions about road closures, evacuations, and other public safety issues. This Withlacoochee and Little River Basins flood-tracking chart can be used by local citizens and emergency response personnel to record the latest river stage and predicted flood-crest information along the Withlacoochee River, Little River, and Okapilco Creek in south-central Georgia and northern Florida. By comparing the current stage (water-surface level above a datum) and predicted flood crest to the recorded peak stages of previous floods, emergency response personnel and residents can make informed decisions concerning the threat to life and property.

  16. Association between severity and the determinant-based classification, Atlanta 2012 and Atlanta 1992, in acute pancreatitis: a clinical retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhui; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2015-04-01

    Recently, the determinant-based classification (DBC) and the Atlanta 2012 have been proposed to provide a basis for study and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP). The present study aimed to evaluate the association between severity and the DBC, the Atlanta 2012 and the Atlanta 1992, in AP. Patients admitted to our center with AP from January 2007 to July 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were assigned to severity categories for all the 3 classification systems. The primary outcomes include long-term clinical prognosis (mortality and length-of-hospital stay), major complications (intraabdominal hemorrhage, multiple-organ dysfunction, single organ failure [OF], and sepsis) and clinical interventions (surgical drainage, continuous renal replace therapy [CRRT] lasting time, and mechanical ventilation [MV] lasting time). The classification systems were validated and compared in terms of these abovementioned primary outcomes. A total of 395 patients were enrolled in this retrospective study with an overall 8.86% in-hospital mortality. Intraabdominal hemorrhage was present in 27 (6.84%) of the patients, multiple-organ dysfunction in 73(18.48%), single OF in 67 (16.96%), and sepsis in 73(18.48%). For each classification system, different categories regarding severity were associated with statistically different clinical mortality, major complications, and clinical interventions (P < 0.05). However, the Atlanta 2012 and the DBC performed better than the Atlanta 1992, and they were comparable in predicting mortality (area under curve [AUC] 0.899 and 0.955 vs 0.585, P < 0.05); intraabdominal hemorrhage (AUC 0.930 and 0.961 vs 0.583, P < 0.05), multiple-organ dysfunction (AUC 0.858 and 0.881 vs 0.595, P < 0.05), sepsis (AUC 0.826 and 0.879 vs 0.590, P < 0.05), and surgical drainage (AUC 0.900 and 0.847 vs 0.606, P < 0.05). For continuous variables, the Atlanta 2012 and the DBC were also better than the Atlanta 1992, and they were similar in

  17. The University System of Georgia's GALILEO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penson, Merryll

    1998-01-01

    The University System of Georgia and the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) built the innovative electronic library GALILEO (GeorgiA LIbrary LEarning Online system). This article describes the cooperation, leadership, and technology that made GALILEO possible; the proposal; planning and implementation; governance; current status; and future…

  18. Economic Yearbook from Georgia Trend Magazine, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John

    Based on information from "Georgia Trend" magazine examining economic conditions across Georgia, Gainesville College (GC) is expected to experience an expanding base of students over the next 5 years. With respect to Hall County and the nine contiguous counties that make up GC's service area, data indicate a population growth in the region, growth…

  19. 40 CFR 81.408 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Georgia. 81.408 Section 81.408 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.408 Georgia. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  20. 50 CFR 32.29 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Georgia. 32.29 Section 32.29 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.29 Georgia. The following refuge units...

  1. 50 CFR 32.29 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Georgia. 32.29 Section 32.29 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.29 Georgia. The following refuge units...

  2. 76 FR 27138 - Georgia Disaster # GA-00033

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00033 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Georgia (FEMA-- 1973--DR), dated 04/29/2011. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes,...

  3. The Georgia Centenarian Study: Comments from Friends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Ilene C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses five issues related to the Georgia Centenarian Study: recruitment of centenarians, birth cohort effects, the changing age structure of the population, religion, and cognition and survival. Concludes that Georgia Centenarian Study provides critically needed baseline data so characteristics of centenarians of the twenty-first century can…

  4. 77 FR 8255 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum Superfund...

  5. Ecological investigation of a hazardous waste site, Warner Robins, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.; Billig, P.

    1993-05-01

    Landfill No. 4 and the sludge lagoon at Robins Air Force Base, Warner Robins, Georgia, were added to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List in 1987 because of highpotential for contaminant migration. Warner Robins is located approximately 90 miles southeast of Atlanta. In 1990 CH2M HILL conducted a Remedial Investigation at the base that recommended that further ecological assessment investigations be conducted (CH2M HILL 1990). The subject paper is the result of this recommendation. The ecological study was carried out by the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP)Division of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., working jointly with its subcontractor CDM (CDM 1992a). The primary area of investigation (Zone 1) included the sludge lagoon, Landfill No. 4, the wetland area east of the landfill and west of Hannah Road (including two sewage treatment ponds), and the area between Hannah Road and Horse Creek (Fig. 1). The bottomland forest wetlands of Zone 1 extend from the landfill east to Horse Creek. Surface water and groundwater flow across Zone 1 is generally in an easterly direction toward Horse Creek. Horse Creek is a south-flowing tributary of the Ocmulgee River Floodplain. The objective of the study was to perform a quantitative analysis of ecological risk associated with the ecosystems present in Zone 1. This investigation was unique because the assessment was to be based upon many measurement endpoints resulting in both location-specific data and data that would assess the condition of the overall ecosystem. The study was segregated into five distinct field investigations: hydrology, surface water and sediment, aquatic biology, wetlands ecology, and wildlife biology.

  6. BLOOD MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeppen, Robert P.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Blood Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia, indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral and energy resources. Natural gas may be present at great depth, perhaps 5 mi down and below the overthrust sheets of the Blue Ridge Mountains, but presently available information is not adequate to evaluate the resource potential of this commodity. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

  7. Water Resources Data, Georgia, 2001, Volume 2: Continuous ground-water level data, and periodic surface-water- and ground-water-quality data, Calendar Year 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffin, Robert; Grams, Susan C.; Cressler, Alan M.; Leeth, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Georgia consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; and the stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs published in two volumes in a digital format on a CD-ROM. Volume one of this report contains water resources data for Georgia collected during water year 2001, including: discharge records of 133 gaging stations; stage for 144 gaging stations; precipitation for 58 gaging stations; information for 19 lakes and reservoirs; continuous water-quality records for 17 stations; the annual peak stage and annual peak discharge for 76 crest-stage partial-record stations; and miscellaneous streamflow measurements at 27 stations, and miscellaneous water-quality data recorded by the NAWQA program in Georgia. Volume two of this report contains water resources data for Georgia collected during calendar year 2001, including continuous water-level records of 159 ground-water wells and periodic records at 138 water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Georgia. Note: Historically, this report was published as a paper report. For the 1999 and subsequent water-year reports, the Water Resources Data for Georgia changed to a new, more informative and functional format on CD-ROM. The format is based on a geographic information system (GIS) user interface that allows the user to view map locations of the hydrologic monitoring stations and networks within respective river basins. To obtain a copy of the CD version of this report, you may call the U.S. Geological Survey office in Atlanta at (770) 903-9100, or send e-mail to request the publication. Please include your name and mailing address in your e-mail.

  8. 77 FR 67639 - Liberty Energy (Georgia) Corp.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Liberty Energy (Georgia) Corp.; Notice of Application Take notice that on October 25, Liberty Energy (Georgia) Corp. (Liberty Georgia), 2845 Bristol Circle, Oakville, Ontario... Gas Act (NGA) requesting the determination of a service area within which Liberty Georgia may,...

  9. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) of the Act, they shall not be construed to be inconsistent with the Act: (1) Georgia Code Ann. section 56-412 pertaining to limitation of risks for insurance companies. (2) Georgia Code Ann. section..., preempted and superseded: (1) The Georgia Surface Mining Act of 1968, Georgia Code Ann. Section 43-1401...

  10. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) of the Act, they shall not be construed to be inconsistent with the Act: (1) Georgia Code Ann. section 56-412 pertaining to limitation of risks for insurance companies. (2) Georgia Code Ann. section..., preempted and superseded: (1) The Georgia Surface Mining Act of 1968, Georgia Code Ann. Section 43-1401...

  11. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) of the Act, they shall not be construed to be inconsistent with the Act: (1) Georgia Code Ann. section 56-412 pertaining to limitation of risks for insurance companies. (2) Georgia Code Ann. section..., preempted and superseded: (1) The Georgia Surface Mining Act of 1968, Georgia Code Ann. Section 43-1401...

  12. Soil erosion in river basins of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogichaishvili, G. P.

    2016-06-01

    The area of cultivated lands in western and eastern Georgia comprises 28-40 and 29-33% of the total catchment areas, respectively. Eroded arable soils in Georgia occupy 205700 ha, i.e. 30.5% of the total plowland area, including 110500 ha (16.4%) of slightly eroded soils, 74400 ha (11%) of moderately eroded soils, and 20800 ha (3.1%) of strongly eroded soils. The maximum denudation rate in catchments of western Georgia reaches 1.0 mm/yr. The minimum denudation (0.01 mm/yr.) is typical of river catchments in southern Georgia. The mean annual soil loss from plowed fields in western Georgia reaches 17.4 t/ha and exceeds the soil loss tolerance by nearly four times. In eastern Georgia, it is equal to 10.46 t/ha and exceeds the soil loss tolerance by 2.5 times. In southern Georgia, the mean annual soil loss from plowed fields is as low as 3.08 t per ha, i.e., much lower than the soil loss tolerance.

  13. Sense of place among Atlanta public housing residents.

    PubMed

    Tester, Griff; Ruel, Erin; Anderson, Angela; Reitzes, Donald C; Oakley, Deirdre

    2011-06-01

    For almost two decades now, cities around the country have been demolishing traditional public housing and relocating residents to subsidized private market rental housing. In this paper, we examine sense of place, consisting of both community and place attachment, among a sample of Atlanta public housing residents prior to relocation (N = 290). We find that 41% of the residents express place attachment, and a large percentage express some level of community attachment, though residents of senior public housing are far more attached than residents of family public housing. Positive neighborhood characteristics, such as collective efficacy and social support, are associated with community attachment, and social support is also associated with place attachment. Negative neighborhood characteristics, such as social disorder and fear of crime, are not consistently associated with sense of place. We argue that embodied in current public housing relocation initiatives is a real sense of loss among the residents. Policy makers may also want to consider the possibilities of drawing upon residents' sense of place as a resource for renovating and revitalizing public housing communities rather than continuing to demolish them and relocating residents to other neighborhoods. PMID:21567265

  14. Telepsychiatry: addressing mental health needs in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Vought, R G; Grigsby, R K; Adams, L N; Shevitz, S A

    2000-10-01

    Creation of a comprehensive mental health telecommunications system to serve isolated persons in Georgia, resulting in a more equitable distribution of mental health resources, is the goal of the telepsychiatry program at the Medical College of Georgia. Although telepsychiatric consultation is not a new idea, the "distribution" of telepsychiatry through additional integrated telecommunications channels such as the World Wide Web is a distinctive approach. This report describes the history of the development of the MCG Telepsychiatry Program. Through the use of a multichanneled telecommunications system, a more equitable distribution of mental health resources is underway in Georgia. PMID:10994685

  15. Virtual health care center in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

    2008-01-01

    Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology – Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center". PMID:18673518

  16. Virtual health care center in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

    2008-01-01

    Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology--Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center". PMID:18673518

  17. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The High School/High Tech initiative of the President's Committee on Employment of Disabilities, Georgia's application of the collaborative "Georgia Model" and NASA's commitment of funding have shown that opportunities for High School/High Tech students are unlimited. In Georgia, the partnership approach to meeting the needs of this program has opened doors previously closed. As the program grows and develops, reflecting the needs of our students and the marketplace, more opportunities will be available. Our collaboratives are there to provide these opportunities and meet the challenge of matching our students with appropriate education and career goals. Summing up the activities and outcomes of Project Georgia High School/High Tech is not difficult. Significant outcomes have already occurred in the Savannah area as a result of NASA's grant. The support of NASA has enabled Georgia Committee to "grow" High School/High Tech throughout the region-and, by example, the state. The success of the Columbus pilot project has fostered the proliferation of projects, resulting in more than 30 Georgia High School High Tech programs-with eight in the Savannah area.

  18. Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 6, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The four States-Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina-that comprise Segment 6 of this Atlas are located adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico, or both. These States are drained by numerous rivers and streams, the largest being the Tombigbee, Alabama, Chattahoochee, Suwannee, St. Johns, Altamaha, and Savannah Rivers. These large rivers and their tributaries supply water to cities such as Columbia, S.C., Atlanta, Ga., and Birmingham, Ala. However, the majority of the population, particularly in the Coastal Plain which comprises more than one-half of the four-State area, depends on ground water as a source of water supply. The aquifers that contain the water are mostly composed of consolidated to unconsolidated sedimentary rocks, but also include hard, crystalline rocks in parts of three of the States. This chapter describes the geology and hydrology of each of the principal aquifers throughout the four-State area. Precipitation is the source of all the water in the four States of Segment 6. Average annual precipitation (1951-80) ranges from about 48 inches per year over a large part of central South Carolina and Georgia to about 80 inches per year in mountainous areas of northeastern Georgia and western South Carolina. (fig. 1) In general, precipitation is greatest in the mountains (because of their orographic effect) and near the coast, where water vapor, which has been evaporated primarily from the ocean and the gulf, is picked up by prevailing winds and subsequently condenses and falls as precipitation when reaching the shoreline. Much of the precipitation either flows directly into rivers and stream as overland runoff or indirectly as baseflow discharging from aquifers where the water has been stored for a short time. Accordingly, the areal distribution of average annual runoff from 1951 to 1980 (fig. 2) directly reflects that of average annual precipitation during the same period: runoff is greater in mountainous areas and near the coast

  19. Highlights from the 42nd annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Atlanta, GA, USA, 2-6 June 2006.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Fabio; Andreetta, Claudia; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2006-11-01

    The results of approximately 3700 preclinical and clinical studies were presented at the 42nd annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) held 2-6 June 2006, in Atlanta, Georgia. The annual ASCO meeting is the largest forum in which oncology professionals from around the world report the latest advances in cancer research, encompassing a wide spectrum of subjects on molecular biology, prevention, diagnosis and therapy of tumours. The present report summarises some of the more important results of the studies presented at the meeting. In particular, the authors focused on findings from randomised Phase III trials that, in their opinion, are most likely to have an immediate effect on clinical practice. The top advances were grouped into four major themes (breast cancer, colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and selected presentations from the plenary session). In addition, selected Phase I and II studies on promising novel therapeutic agents were briefly described. Finally, a 'question and answer' format was adopted to report results of interesting studies on some hot topics. PMID:17059386

  20. INTERCOMPARISION OF SEMI-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF NITRATE AND SULFATE AT THE EPA ATLANTA SUPERSITE, AUGUST 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersite was one of the first Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Supersites dedicated to the study of fine particles (PM2.5). The study involved intensive measurements during the month of August 1999, at a site situated near the center of Atlanta. One of the s...

  1. SHORT-TERM TEMPORAL VARIATION IN PM2.5 MASS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION DURING THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE EXPERIMENT, 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements in urban Atlanta of transient aerosol events in which PM2.5 mass concentrations rapidly rise and fall over a period of 3-6 hr are reported. The data are based on new measurement techniques demonstrated at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Atlanta Supe...

  2. Atmospheric characteristics conducive to high-ozone days in the Atlanta metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, Jeremy E.

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the atmospheric conditions associated with elevated ground-level ozone concentrations during June-August of 2000-2007 at 11 ozone-monitoring stations in the Atlanta, GA, USA metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Analyses were confined to high-ozone days (HODs), which had a daily maximum 8-h average ozone concentration in the 95th percentile of all June-August values. Therefore, each station had 36 HODs. The southeastern and far northern portions of the MSA had HODs with the highest and lowest ozone concentrations, respectively. HODs at nearly all Atlanta MSA ozone-monitoring stations were enabled by migratory anticyclones. HODs for most stations were hot, dry, and calm with low morning mixing heights and high afternoon mixing heights. All sets of HODs had daily mean relative humidities and afternoon mixing heights that, respectively, were significantly less than and significantly greater than mean values for the remaining days. Urbanized Atlanta typically was upwind of an ozone-monitoring station on its HODs; therefore, wind direction on HODs varied considerably among the stations. HODs may have been caused partially by NO x emissions from electric-utility power plants: HODs in the southern portion of the MSA were linked to air-parcel trajectories intersecting a power plant slightly northwest of Atlanta and plants in the Ohio River Valley, while HODs in the northern portion of the MSA were linked to air-parcel trajectories intersecting two large power plants slightly southeast of the Atlanta MSA. Results from this study suggest that future research in the Atlanta MSA should focus on power-plant contributions to ground-level ozone concentrations as well as the identification of non-monitored locations with potentially high ozone concentrations.

  3. Working Towards Safe Motherhood: Delays and Barriers to Prenatal Care for Women in Rural and Peri-Urban Areas of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Erika; Hennink, Monique; Rochat, Roger; Julian, Zoë; Pinto, Meredith; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Spelke, Bridget; Dott, Andrew; Cota, Pat

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Georgia has the highest rate of maternal mortality in the United States, and ranks 40th for infant mortality. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group was formed to investigate and address the shortage of obstetric care providers outside the Atlanta area. Because access to prenatal care (PNC) can improve maternal and infant health outcomes, we used qualitative methods to identify the access barriers experienced by women who live in rural and peri-urban areas of the state. Methods We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 24 mothers who gave birth between July and August 2013, and who live in either shortage or non-shortage obstetric care service areas. We also conducted key informant interviews with four perinatal case managers, and analyzed all data using applied thematic analysis. We then utilized Thaddeus and Maine's "Three Delays to Care" theoretical framework structure to describe the recognized barriers to care. Results We identified delays in a woman's decision to seek PNC (such as awareness of pregnancy and stigma); delays in accessing an appropriate healthcare facility (such as choosing a doctor and receiving insurance coverage); and delays in receiving adequate and appropriate care (such as continuity of care and communication). Moreover, many participants perceived low self-worth and believed this influenced their PNC exchanges. Conclusion As a means of supporting Georgia's pregnant women who face barriers and delays to PNC, these data provide a rationale for developing contextually relevant solutions to both mothers and their providers. PMID:27053128

  4. a Model Study of the Influence of Nmhc and Nitrogen Oxides Emissions on Rural Ozone Concentrations in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiangfen

    Ambient concentrations of rm O_3, NO_{x}, NO, HNO_3, PAN, NO_ {y}, C_4-C_{10 } hydrocarbons including isoprene, and some meteorological parameters were measured at a rural site in Georgia from June 24 to July 13, 1990. Two days with the early evening ozone concentrations of about 80 ppb are identified and chosen for our model study. The rural "background" concentrations and the distribution of O_3 and its precursors over the region of our study are simulated first with an embedded "plumes" model. It is predicted that, for the period of our simulation, the rural "background" O _3 concentrations are below 60 ppb and only 12% of the region has O_3 above 80 ppb. It is also found that, due to large amount of NO_{rm x} released into the urban and power plant areas, the maximum concentrations of O_3, PAN and HNO_3 tend to occur 0-8 hours downwind of these major emission areas. The maximum rm H_2O _2 is likely found in the rural area because of the NO titration of HO_2. The comparison between this "plumes" model, which has multi -box structure, and the one-dimensional vertical model, which has no horizontal resolution, demonstrates the non -linearity possessed by the chemical system. A multi-level Lagrangian model of turbulent diffusion and photochemistry in the boundary layer is then applied to trace the oxidant formation in the air parcel arriving at Elberton, the rural site located 120 miles northeast of Atlanta. On the selected two days, the calculated Elberton pollutant levels are compared with observations. The comparison indicates that the Lagrangian model predicts a reasonably good pollutant levels. The impact of Atlanta anthropogenic emissions on this rural site is demonstrated. The sensitivity studies indicate that ozone concentrations at Elberton and in area downwind of Atlanta are more sensitive to NO _{rm x} emission reductions. It is also found that in area downwind of Atlanta 9-10 molecules of ozone can be formed when one molecule of NO_{rm x} is consumed

  5. 9. 'Central of Georgia' sign painted on the underside of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. 'Central of Georgia' sign painted on the underside of arch spanning West Boundary Street. - Central of Georgia Railway, 1860 Brick Arch Viaduct, Spanning West Boundary Street & Savannah-Ogeechee Canal, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  6. Georgia Health Policy Center Child Policy Briefs, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This set of briefs discuss state public policy and implications as they pertain to children in Georgia. The three briefs each address a single topic. The first, on benefits of child care for low-income children in Georgia, advocates implementation of the Georgia Early Learning Initiative (GELI) and details the program. The second brief, on the…

  7. Georgia Basin-Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report, 2012 was undertaken to characterize the air quality within the Georgia Basin/Puget Sound region,a vibrant, rapidly growing, urbanized area of the Pacific Northwest. The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characteri...

  8. 33 CFR 167.1332 - In the Strait of Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In the Strait of Georgia. 167... Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1332 In the Strait of Georgia. In the Strait of Georgia, the following are established: (a) Precautionary area “GS,” which is bounded by a line...

  9. 33 CFR 167.1332 - In the Strait of Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In the Strait of Georgia. 167... Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1332 In the Strait of Georgia. In the Strait of Georgia, the following are established: (a) Precautionary area “GS,” which is bounded by a line...

  10. 7. VIEW OF CENTRAL OF GEORGIA RAILROAD FACING EAST. CARRIED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF CENTRAL OF GEORGIA RAILROAD FACING EAST. CARRIED BY GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 215-00001D-00936N. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 215-00001D-00936N, Spanning US 27, State Route 1 & Fourth Avenue, Columbus, Muscogee County, GA

  11. 33 CFR 167.1332 - In the Strait of Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In the Strait of Georgia. 167... Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1332 In the Strait of Georgia. In the Strait of Georgia, the following are established: (a) Precautionary area “GS,” which is bounded by a line...

  12. 76 FR 32985 - Georgia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Georgia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Georgia (FEMA-1973-DR), dated April 29, 2011, and related... certain areas of the State of Georgia resulting from severe storms, tornadoes, straight line winds,...

  13. 33 CFR 167.1332 - In the Strait of Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In the Strait of Georgia. 167... Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1332 In the Strait of Georgia. In the Strait of Georgia, the following are established: (a) Precautionary area “GS,” which is bounded by a line...

  14. 76 FR 27739 - Georgia Disaster Number GA-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster Number GA-00032 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Georgia... State of Georgia, dated 04/29/2011 is hereby amended to include the following areas as...

  15. 76 FR 28120 - Georgia Disaster Number GA-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster Number GA-00032 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Georgia... State of Georgia, dated 04/29/2011 is hereby amended to include the following areas as...

  16. A Failed Experiment: Georgia's Tax Credit Scholarships for Private Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Education Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Georgia is one of seven states that currently allow tax credits for scholarships to private schools. Georgia's law was enacted in May 2008 in order to assist low income students to transfer out of low performing public schools. Operations under the new act began in late 2008. The law permits taxpayers in Georgia to reduce their annual state taxes…

  17. Georgia and the United States Constitution 1787-1789.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, J. David

    This pamphlet on revolutionary Georgia is one of a series designed for use in the state's public schools. The objective is to present a clear, concise picture of Georgia's history during the American Revolution. The first and major part of the text presents an historical summary. It describes how Georgia was an early and strong supporter of the…

  18. DVD Database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.; Simonia, Ts.; Abuladze, T.; Chkhikvadze, N.; Samkurashvili, L.; Pataridze, K.

    2016-06-01

    Little known and unknown Georgian, Persian, and Arabic astronomical manuscripts of IX-XIX centuries are kept in the centers, archives, and libraries of Georgia. These manuscripts has a form of treaties, handbooks, texts, tables, fragments, and comprises various theories, cosmological models, star catalogs, calendars, methods of observations. We investigated this large material and published DVD database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia. This unique database contains information about astronomical manuscripts as original works. It contains also descriptions of Georgian translations of Byzantine, Arabic and other sources. The present paper is dedicated to description of obtained results and DVD database. Copies of published DVD database are kept in collections of the libraries of: Ilia State University, Georgia; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, UK; Congress of the USA, and in other centers.

  19. Annotated checklist of Georgia birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaton, G.; Sykes, P.W., Jr.; Parrish, J.W., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    This edition of the checklist includes 446 species, of which 407 are on the Regular Species List, 8 on the Provisional, and 31 on the Hypothetical. This new publication has been greatly expanded and much revised over the previous checklist (GOS Occasional Publ. No. 10, 1986, 48 pp., 6x9 inches) to a 7x10-inch format with an extensive Literature Cited section added, 22 species added to the Regular List, 2 to the Provisional List, and 9 to the Hypothetical List. Each species account is much more comprehensive over all previous editions of the checklist. Among some of the new features are citations for sources of most information used, high counts of individuals for each species on the Regular List, extreme dates of occurrence within physiographic regions, a list of abbreviations and acronyms, and for each species the highest form of verifiable documentation given with its repository institution with a catalog number. This checklist is helpful for anyone working with birds in the Southeastern United States or birding in that region. Sykes' contribution to this fifth edition of the Annotated Checklist of Georgia Birds includes: suggestion of the large format and spiral binding, use of Richard A. Parks' painting of the Barn Owl on the front cover, use of literature citations throughout, and inclusion of high counts for each species. Sykes helped plan all phases of the publication, wrote about 90% of the Introduction and 84 species accounts (Osprey through Red Phalarope), designed the four maps in the introduction section and format for the Literature Cited, and with Giff Beaton designed the layout of the title page.

  20. Historical Earthquakes and Active Structure for Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashivli, Otar

    2014-05-01

    Long-term seismic history is an important foundation for reliable assessment of seismic hazard and risk. Therefore, completeness of earthquake catalogues in the longest historical part is very important. Survived historical sources, as well as special researches from the institutes, museums, libraries and archives in Georgia, the Caucasus and the Middle East indicate to high level of seismicity which entailed numerous human casualties and destruction on the territory of Georgia during the historical period. The study and detailed analysis of these original documents and researches have allowed us to create a new catalogue of historical earthquakes of Georgia from 1250 BC to 1900 AD. The method of the study is based on a multidisciplinary approach, i.e. on the joint use of methods of history and paleoseismology, archeoseismology, seismotectonics, geomorphology, etc. We present here a new parametric catalogue of 44 historic earthquakes of Georgia and a full "descriptor" of all the phenomena described in it. Constructed on its basis, the summarized map of the distribution of maximum damage in the historical period (before 1900) on the territory of Georgia clearly shows the main features of the seismic field during this period. In particular, in the axial part and the southern slope of the Greater Caucasus there is a seismic gap, which was filled in 1991 by the strongest earthquake and its aftershocks in Racha. In addition, it is also obvious that very high seismic activity in the central and eastern parts of the Javakheti highland is not described in historical materials and this fact requires further searches of various kinds of sources that contain data about historical earthquakes. We hope that this catalogue will enable to create a new joint (instrumental and historical) parametric earthquake catalogue of Georgia and will serve to assess the real seismic hazard and risk in the country.

  1. PREFACE TO SPECIAL SECTION: SOUTHERN OXIDANTS STUDY 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT (SOS3)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites Project consisted of a one-month intensive field program to compare advanced methods for measurement of PM2.5 mass, chemical composition, including single particle composition in real-time, and aerosol precursor species. The project was the first of EPA's ...

  2. An Overview of Synoptic and Mesoscale Factors Contributing to the Disastrous Atlanta Flood of 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this short communication is to present a brief overview of the hydrometeorological conditions leading to the historic Atlanta area flooding, present multiple observational perspectives on cumulative rainfall totals for the event, and consider a hypothesis for he prefe...

  3. 75 FR 56943 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Extension of Attainment Date for the Atlanta...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... concentrations is less than or equal to 0.08 ppm (i.e., 0.084 ppm when rounding is considered) (69 FR 23857...-hour ozone NAAQS on January 19, 2010 (75 FR 2938). Final 8-hour ozone NAAQS are expected to be... quality data (69 FR 23857, April 30, 2004). At the time of designation the Atlanta Area was classified...

  4. 77 FR 2981 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road...

  5. The Atlanta University Center: A Consortium-Based Dual Degree Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Marilyn T.

    2007-01-01

    The Atlanta University Center (AUC) comprises five historically black colleges and a centralized library. All are separate institutions, each having its own board of directors, president, infrastructure, students, faculty, staff, and traditions. To encourage coordination of effort and resources, the AUC was formed and the first formal cooperative…

  6. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  7. Social Support and Social Network Ties among the Homeless in a Downtown Atlanta Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitzes, Donald C.; Crimmins, Timothy J.; Yarbrough, Johanna; Parker, Josie

    2011-01-01

    This study applies a typology of social support with 3 categories of social networks to investigate social ties and their benefits for homeless people. Data were derived from a 2-year long series of participant observations of homeless or precariously housed people who came regularly to a downtown Atlanta public park. The findings are as follows:…

  8. 75 FR 76953 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 26 Under Alternative Site Framework, Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ..., Atlanta, GA Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U... Board adopted the alternative site framework (ASF) in December 2008 (74 FR 1170, 01/12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/09) as an option for the establishment or reorganization of general-purpose...

  9. COMPARISON OF INTEGRATED SAMPLERS FOR MASS AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first of EPA's Particulate Matter (PM) Supersites projects was established in Atlanta, GA during the summer of 1999 in conjunction with the Southern Oxidants Study. The short-term primary focus was a one month intensive field campaign to evaluate advanced PM measurement me...

  10. AIR QUALITY MONITORING IN ATLANTA WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    During July and August of 1990, a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) made by OPSIS Inc. was used to measure gaseous air pollutants over three separate open paths in Atlanta, GA. ver path 1 (1099 m) and path 2 (1824 m), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen d...

  11. Fight or Flight? Immigration, Competition, and Language Assistance Resources in Metropolitan Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasawa, Beth

    2013-01-01

    As the Latino/a immigrant population increases, racial conflict historically understood in terms of Black and White in the U.S. South has expanded to include new contestants in metro-Atlanta public schools. By examining market and sociological competition theoretical perspectives, this study investigates how language assistance resource…

  12. 78 FR 70895 - Proposed Establishment and Modification of Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes; Atlanta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    .... This proposed action is intended to enhance air traffic flow in the vicinity of the Atlanta, GA (ATL... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a.... 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0...

  13. The Effects of Georgia's Choice Curricular Reform Model on Third Grade Science Scores on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phemister, Art W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice reading curriculum on third grade science scores on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test from 2002 to 2008. In assessing the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice curriculum model this causal comparative study examined the 105 elementary schools that…

  14. Geology and industrial mineral resources of the Macon-Gordon Kaolin District, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buie, Bennett Frank; Hetrick, J.H.; Patterson, S.H.; Neeley, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    The Macon-Gordon kaolin district is about 80 miles (130 km) southeast of Atlanta, Georgia. It extends across the boundary between, and includes parts of, the Piedmont and Atlantic Coastal Plain physiographic provinces. The rocks in the Piedmont are mainly intensely folded sericite schist and granite gneiss containing irregular masses of amphibolite and feldspathic biotite gneiss and scattered igneous intrusive rocks. Most of the crystalline rocks are thought to be of Paleozoic age, but some of the intrusive rocks may be younger. The crystalline rocks are cut by a major unconformity and are overlain by sedimentary formations ranging in age from Cretaceous to Miocene. The valuable kaolin deposits occur in the Cretaceous beds, undivided, and in the Huber Formation which is of Paleocene to middle Eocene age. The resources of kaolin in the district are estimated in millions of metric tons as follows: reserves, 100; subeconomic resources, 700 to 900; undiscovered resources, probably 700 to 1,000. In addition to kaolin, the leading mineral commodity mined in the district, crushed stone and sand are now being produced, and fuller's earth and a minor amount of limestone were formerly produced. The crushed stone is quarried from igneous rocks in the Piedmont province. The sand is washed from the Cretaceous beds, undivided. The fuller's earth was mined from the Twiggs Clay Member of the Barnwell Formation, and limestone was dug from the Tivola Limestone.

  15. 75 FR 62323 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Atlanta, GA; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... failure to submit final rulemaking for the required SIPs (74 FR 62251). On July 6, 2010, Georgia submitted..., Forsyth, Fulton, Gwinnett, Hall, Henry, Newton, Paulding, Rockdale, Spalding, and Walton Counties...

  16. Progressive Education in Georgia: Tradition or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaliani, Bella; Harnisch, Delwyn L.; Doliashvili, Nana; Guetterman, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite differences among progressive educators, they share the conviction that democracy means active participation by all citizens in the social, political, and economic decisions of their countries. The aim of this paper is to explore how Georgia is meeting goals and perspectives of progressive education by widely implementing civic education…

  17. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iosava, Lela

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Georgia. States develop educational funding formulas to determine the total amount of funds needed for each student and to establish the state's share of those costs. Although the large majority of states use the common base or foundation formula (25 states and D.C.) or…

  18. Resiliency Programming for Adult Offenders in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, E. Frances

    2000-01-01

    Discusses resiliency programming as an alternative approach to program development for incarcerated adults, and describes a pilot project in a Georgia prison, Leadership Development, that uses the concept of resiliency to frame inmate education. Discusses implications of this model of correctional education. (SLD)

  19. Health Clinic Environments in Georgia Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Susan Rogers

    2005-01-01

    Schools seem to be the logical place to serve the health needs of students, since children spend a majority of their time there. Design standards were not available for health clinics in Georgia elementary schools; therefore, this study examined key characteristics of an elementary school clinic in order to determine the importance of each design…

  20. 40 CFR 81.408 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Georgia. 81.408 Section 81.408 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... manager Cohotta Wild 33,776 93-622 USDA-FS Okefenokee Wild 343,850 93-429 USDI-FWS Wolf Island Wild...

  1. 40 CFR 81.408 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Georgia. 81.408 Section 81.408 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... manager Cohotta Wild 33,776 93-622 USDA-FS Okefenokee Wild 343,850 93-429 USDI-FWS Wolf Island Wild...

  2. 40 CFR 81.408 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Georgia. 81.408 Section 81.408 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... manager Cohotta Wild 33,776 93-622 USDA-FS Okefenokee Wild 343,850 93-429 USDI-FWS Wolf Island Wild...

  3. 40 CFR 81.408 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Georgia. 81.408 Section 81.408 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... manager Cohotta Wild 33,776 93-622 USDA-FS Okefenokee Wild 343,850 93-429 USDI-FWS Wolf Island Wild...

  4. 77 FR 43411 - Georgia Disaster # GA-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  5. Factors Contributing to Teacher Retention in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locklear, Tina M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method, survey-based inquiry was to determine how Georgia public high school faculty members perceive various pressures and experiences associated with a career in education. These perceptions were then analyzed as possible indicators of teacher attrition in order to improve retention rates. The independent demographic…

  6. Biological Safety at the University of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Daryl E.

    1983-01-01

    The University of Georgia (UGA) biosafety program was initiated in response to requirements for recombinant DNA experiments rather than laboratory-acquired infections. This and other environmental safety programs at UGA are described, considering three of the four recognized levels of biocontainment. A fire extinguisher inspection computer program…

  7. Making Cultural Diversity Work in Suburban Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, J. Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Captures the cooperative spirit of a suburban Georgia high school with 2,000 highly mobile students from 60 countries and speaking over 30 different languages. Staff work to counter stereotypical assumptions and use diversity as a positive resource for learning and promotion of individual excellence. Diversity-management strategies related to…

  8. The Georgia Indian Frontier, 1773-1783.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, James H.

    One of a series of pamphlets about the American Revolution in Georgia, this document examines the relationship between Indians and Colonials in pre-revolutionary times. It can be used as supplementary reading or a two-week unit for junior or senior high school students. A brief teacher's guide is included. The main part of the document relates the…

  9. MODELING MERCURY FATE IN SEVEN GEORGIA WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field and modeling studies were conducted in support of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs)for mercury in six south Georgia rivers and the Savannah River. Mercury is introduced to these rivers primarily by atmospheric deposition, with minor point source loadings. To produce mercu...

  10. Examining School District Efficiency in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Eric A.; Rolle, R. Anthony; He, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relative production efficiency of school districts in Georgia using the modified quadriform method. Overall, we find that the modified quadriform allows state-level policymakers to access a basic tool for analysis that makes relative comparison of school district productivity for use in policy analysis and policy…

  11. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopkins, Laurie B.; Carter, John; Beavers, Barbara

    This Kids Count factbook examines statewide and county trends in the well-being of Georgia's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators in five domains: family and community, economic well-being, health, education, and safety and security. The 21 indicators of well-being are: (1) child population; (2) public school enrollment; (3)…

  12. Milkweed, stink bugs, and Georgia cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In peanut-cotton farmscapes in Georgia, stink bugs, i.e., Nezara viridula (L.)(Say) and Chinavia hilaris (Say), develop in peanut and then disperse at the crop-to-crop interface to feed on fruit in cotton. The main objective of this study was to examine the influence of a habitat of tropical milkwe...

  13. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  14. Community Types and Mortality in Georgia Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Using an "ecological regional analysis" methodology for defining types of communities and their associated mortality rates, this study of Georgia's 159 counties finds that the suburban and town centered counties have low mortality while the city-centered type predicts low mortality for the whites. The military-centered counties do not predict. The…

  15. Planning for Secondary Vocational Education in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asche, F. Marion

    A literature review and analysis was undertaken in order to present policymakers in Georgia with broad overview of the issues related to planning in vocational education and to propose a modified programmatic model for vocational education that would incorporate contemporary thinking about the mission of secondary vocational education and…

  16. Hantavirus Infection in the Republic of Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Danielle V.; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Pimentel, Guillermo; Imnadze, Paata

    2009-01-01

    We describe a laboratory-confirmed case of hantavirus infection in the Republic of Georgia. Limited information is available about hantavirus infections in the Caucasus, although the infection has been reported throughout Europe and Russia. Increasing awareness and active disease surveillance contribute to our improved understanding of the geographic range of this pathogen. PMID:19788822

  17. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Georgia edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  18. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1998-99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgians for Children, Atlanta, GA.

    This Kids Count factbook presents statistical data and examines trends for 10 indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight babies; (2) infant mortality; (3) child deaths; (4) teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; (5) juvenile arrests; (6) reading and math scores on the Iowa Test of Basic Skills;…

  19. The Principalship in Georgia: Teachers' Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Professional Standards Commission, Atlanta.

    This report, the last in a series of three studies on the nature of school administration in Georgia, provides an array of statistical tables and charts, along with interpretive information, on teachers' perceptions of the principalship. These data highlight the following issues: imbalance of the work force; role of the principal; quality and…

  20. School-Based Businesses in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatewood, Elizabeth J.; DeLargy, Paul F.

    A school-based business program in Georgia is attempting to broaden the education of high school students by making them more aware of the role of small business in the United States economy and the economic possibilities offered by entrepreneurship. Goals of school-based businesses are to create profit-making enterprises that meet unfilled needs…

  1. Can Georgia growers replace methyl bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The price and availability of methyl bromide is limiting its use on Georgia farms; the need for an alternative is essential for sustainable vegetable production in GA. Three alternatives were evaluated in on-farm trials in the spring 2007 in Tift, Colquitt and Echols Counties. Treatments were replic...

  2. GSCA (Georgia School Counselors Association) Journal, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Fran, Ed.; McCarthy, Susan, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    The articles presented in this journal issue include contributions that help meet the needs of all students. Six of the articles are based on programs presented at the Georgia School Counselor Association 2000 Fall Conference. The articles include: (1) "Effects of Group Counseling on Third Grade Students' Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement"…

  3. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Georgia has made some changes in its testing program in recent years. As a result, trend data were only available for reading in grades 4 and 8 from 2006 through 2009, and only at the proficient and advanced levels. In math, data were only available for the high school level from 2004 through 2009. Achievement data for low income students were…

  4. School transportation modes--Georgia, 2000.

    PubMed

    2002-08-16

    Moderate physical activity (e.g., walking or bicycling) offers substantial health benefits. Physical activity is especially important for young persons not only because of its immediate benefits but also because participation in healthy behaviors early in life might lead to healthier lifestyles in adulthood. Persons aged > 2 years should engage in > or = 30 minutes of moderately intense physical activity on all or most days of the week. However, sedentary after-school activities (e.g., watching television or using computers), decreased participation in physical education, and fewer students walking or riding their bicycles to school might contribute to the high rate of childhood obesity. Walking to school provides a convenient opportunity for children to be physically active. To examine modes of transportation to school for Georgia children, the Georgia Division of Public Health analyzed data from the Georgia Asthma Survey conducted during May-August 2000. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicate that < 19% of Georgia school-aged children who live < or = 1 mile from school walk to school the majority of days of the week. Statewide surveillance data of school transportation modes should be collected to monitor prevalence of walking to school. PMID:12206285

  5. Georgia Turns to the West for Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemtsova, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Georgia, along with a number of other former Soviet countries, is rapidly reforming its higher-education system. Russian is being replaced by English in classrooms and textbooks. Western-trained professors are flooding campuses with new methods of teaching and liberal-arts courses are replacing vocational training. This change is part of broader…

  6. 76 FR 59177 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of GEORGIA dated 09/13/2011. Incident: Tornado. Incident Period: 09/05/2011. Dates: Effective Date: 09/13/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 11/14/2011. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  7. 78 FR 11724 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Georgia dated 02/08/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 01/30/2013. Effective Date: 02/08/2013. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 04/09/2013. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  8. Educational Initiatives for Industrial Development in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starnes, Paul M.; Johnson, Berman E.

    Georgia's two-year technical institutes have played a prominant role in linking education with industry. Five major interrelated efforts have worked to transform the state from an agrarian economy to one utilizing advanced technologies. The first of these, the Quick-Start Program, offers state-paid services, such as consultation, employee…

  9. Preparation of public housing energy efficiency publications for the Atlanta Housing Authority

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) has produced and evaluated the effectiveness of pamphlets prepared to encourage utility cost conservation. The target population for this project is not only public housing residents but also the public housing maintenance staff (who also have a dramatic impact on facility energy costs). Because the majority of the problems associated with excess resident utility costs occur during extreme cold weather of the heating season, heating conservation was the focus of this study.

  10. Conservation and protection of Georgia's freshwater wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Georgia's freshwater wetlands are a valuable natural resource. Despite this fact, they are vanishing at an alarming rate. One objective of the research presented in this dissertation was to try to determine why freshwater wetlands have been so little esteemed historically that their destruction has until lately drawn little attention. In addition, it was hoped that this research would lead to conclusions about the extent of Georgia's freshwater wetlands and the status of their conservation and protection. A further goal of the study was to generate ideas about how better to protect this resource, and to examine policy issues that must be addressed in association with the problem. Interest in freshwater wetlands is part of a continuum of interests and events associated with environmental awareness that has its roots in the late 1800's and early 1900's. An understanding of the history of the environmental movement and the maturation of environmental philosophy provides needed background against which the issues associated with preservation of freshwater wetlands must be viewed. The first two chapters are thus devoted to an exploration of the history of environmental awareness and activism. In the third chapter, historical material about freshwater wetlands in the, US is presented. The final section is dedicated to a discussion of freshwater wetlands in Georgia. Georgia's boundaries encompass five physiographic provinces. Freshwater wetlands are found in all of these regions, but the type of wetland varies among them. In the northern part of the state, freshwater wetlands are scarce, but in the southern half of the state they are so common as to be considered a dominant feature of the landscape. Among the threats to Georgia's wetlands are urban development, agricultural conversion, impoundment, and pollution.

  11. The Use of GIS and Remotely Sensed Data in Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT): The HELIX-Atlanta Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Watts, Carol; Rickman, Douglas L.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Qualters, Judith R.; Sinclair, Amber H.; Tolsma, Dennis D.; Adeniyi, Kafayat A.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN), the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project in collaboration with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX-Atlanta). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of metropolitan Atlanta, GA. Under HELIX-Atlanta, pilot projects are being conducted to develop methods to characterize exposure; link health and environmental data; analyze the relationship between health and environmental factors; and communicate findings. There is evidence in the research literature that asthmatic persons are at increased risk of developing asthma exacerbations with exposure to environmental factors, including PM(sub 2.5). Thus, HELIX-Atlanta is focusing on methods for characterizing population exposure to PM(sub 2.5) for the Atlanta metropolitan area that could be used in ongoing surveillance. NASA/MSFC is working with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of fine particulate matter (PM(sub 2.5)) concentrations in a Geographic Information System (GIS) that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma on the aggregated grid level as well as the individual level at the geographic locations of the patients' residences.

  12. Urban Heat Islands and Summertime Convective Thunderstorms in Atlanta: Three Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, Robert; Lin, Qinglu; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Data from both 27 sites in the Atlanta mesonet surface meteorological network and eight National Weather Service sites were analyzed for the period from 26 July to 3 August 1996. Analysis of the six precipitation events over the city during the period (each on a different day) showed that its urban heat island (UHI) induced a convergence zone that initiated three of the storms at different times of the day, i.e., 0630,0845, and 1445 EDT. Previous analysis has shown that New York City (NYC) effects summer daytime thunderstorm formation and/or movement. That study found that during nearly calm regional flow conditions the NYC UHI initiates convective activity. Moving thunderstorms, however, tended to bifurcate and to move around the city, due to its building barrier effect. The current Atlanta results thus agree with the NYC results with respect to thunderstorm initiation.

  13. Refined estimates of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions for Atlanta. Interim report, January 1992-November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, T.E.; Coventry, D.H.; Van Meter, A.R.; Geron, C.D.

    1993-11-01

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) reportedly play an important role in ozone non-attainment for Atlanta. To better understand this problem, the Southern Oxidant Study participated in an intensive field experiment around Atlanta during the summer of 1992. This paper compares estimates from three different inventories. The first inventory uses the existing Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) in the Urban Airshed Model (UAM). UAM-BEIS relies on county-aggregated land use patterns and emission factors dating back to the 1970's. A second inventory incorporates recent (circa 1990) satellite data. Information from the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) is used to increase the coverage of trees in urban areas from 20% to 30%. The third inventory uses USFS forest inventory statistics to compute leaf biomass and tree species composition for about 1 acre forest survey plots, which are extrapolated to about 2000 hectares forest areas as delineated by aerial photography.

  14. Medical Education in Atlanta and Health Care of Black Minority and Low-Income People

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, Asa G.

    1988-01-01

    In this W. Montague Cobb lecture, the author addresses the status of hospitals for the black minority and the poor in Atlanta, the founding of Morehouse School of Medicine, health care for the disadvantaged, the need for minority health care professionals, and the lack of health insurance among the poor. A greater educational effort is needed to bring about change in the high incidence of homicide, the unhealthy lifestyles, and the disproportionate number of AIDS cases in the black population. PMID:3290504

  15. Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games event study, 1996. Final report, July 1996--August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Amodei, R.; Bard, E.; Brong, B.; Cahoon, F.; Jasper, K.

    1998-11-01

    The Atlanta metropolitan region was the location of one of the most ambitious Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) deployments in the United States. This deployment included several individual projects--a Central Transportation Management Center (TMC), six Traffic Control Centers (TCCs), one Transit Information Center (TIC), The Travel Information Showcase (TIS), and the extension of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) Rail network and the new high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-85 and I-75. The 1996 Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games created a focus for these projects. All of these systems were to be brought on-line in time for the Olympic Games. This report presents the findings of the 1996 Olympic and Paralympic Games Events Study--a compilation of findings of system performance, the benefits realized, and the lessons learned during their operations over the event period. The study assessed the performance of the various Travel Demand Management (TDM) plans employed for Olympic Games traffic management.

  16. 6. VIEW OF BALUSTRADE OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 11100060P00020N, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BALUSTRADE OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 111-00060P-00020N, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 111-00060P-00020N, Georgia State Route 60 spur spanning Hempton Creek, Mineral Bluff, Fannin County, GA

  17. Simulation of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Strategies in Atlanta, GA Using High-Resolution Land Use/Land Cover Data Set to Enhance Meteorological Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosson, William L.; Dembek, Scott; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Lapenta, William; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Johnson, Hoyt; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The specification of land use/land cover (LULC) and associated land surface parameters in meteorological models at all scales has a major influence on modeled surface energy fluxes and boundary layer states. In urban areas, accurate representation of the land surface may be even more important than in undeveloped regions due to the large heterogeneity within the urban area. Deficiencies in the characterization of the land surface related to the spatial or temporal resolution of the data, the number of LULC classes defined, the accuracy with which they are defined, or the degree of heterogeneity of the land surface properties within each class may degrade the performance of the models. In this study, an experiment was conducted to test a new high-resolution LULC data set for meteorological simulations for the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using a mesoscale meteorological model and to evaluate the effects of urban heat island (UHI) mitigation strategies on modeled meteorology for 2030. Simulation results showed that use of the new LULC data set reduced a major deficiency of the land use data used previously, specifically the poor representation of urban and suburban land use. Performance of the meteorological model improved substantially, with the overall daytime cold bias reduced by over 30%. UHI mitigation strategies were projected to offset much of a predicted urban warming between 2000 and 2030. In fact, for the urban core, the cooling due to UHI mitigation strategies was slightly greater than the warming associated with urbanization over this period. For the larger metropolitan area, cooling only partially offset the projected warming trend.

  18. Ground-water data for Georgia, 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, J.S.; Peck, M.F.; Longsworth, S.A.; McFadden, K.W.

    1984-01-01

    Continuous water-level records from 134 wells and more than 700 water-level measurements made in Georgia during 1983 provide the basic data for this report. Selected wells illustrate the effects that changes in recharge and pumping have had on the various ground-water resources in the State. Daily mean water levels are shown in hydrographs for 1983. Monthly means are shown for the 10-year period 1974-83. Mean annual water levels ranged from 9 feet higher to 6 feet lower in 1983 than in 1982. Water-quality samples are collected periodically throughout Georgia and analyzed as part of areal and regional ground-water studies. Along the coast, chloride concentrations in the upper and lower water-bearing zones of the Floridan aquifer system generally remained steady in the Brunswick and Hilton Head Island areas. (USGS)

  19. Ground-water data for Georgia, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, J.S.; Longsworth, S.A.; McFadden, K.W.; Peck, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    Continuous water-level records from 155 wells and more than 800 water-level measurements made in Georgia during 1984 provide the basic data for this report. Selected wells illustrate the effects that changes in recharge and pumping have had on the various ground-water resources in the State. Daily mean water levels are shown in hydrographs for 1984. Monthly means are shown for the 10-year period 1975-84. Mean annual water levels ranged from 7 feet lower to 7 feet higher in 1984 than in 1983. Water-quality samples are collected periodically throughout Georgia and analyzed as part of a real and regional ground-water studies. Along the coast, chloride concentrations in the Floridan aquifer system generally remained steady. (USGS)

  20. Ground-water data for Georgia, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, J.S.; Joiner, C.N.; Longsworth, S.A.; McFadden, K.W.; Peck, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Continuous water level records from 146 wells and water level measurements from an additional 1,100 wells in Georgia during 1985 provide the basic data for this report. Hydrographs for selected wells illustrate the effects that changes in recharge and discharge have had on the groundwater reservoirs in the State. Daily mean water levels are shown in hydrographs for 1985. Monthly mean water levels are shown for the 10-year period 1976-86. During 1985, annual mean water levels were generally lower than in 1984, and ranged from 11.4 feet lower to 0.6 feet higher. Much of the decline can be attributed to below-normal precipitation from mid-1984 to mid-1985. Water quality samples also are collected periodically throughout Georgia and analyzed as part of areal and regional groundwater studies. Along the coast, the chloride concentration in the Floridan aquifer system generally remained stable in the Savannah and Brunswick areas. (USGS)

  1. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Georgia High School/High Tech has been developing a suggested curriculum for use in its programs. The purpose of this instructional material is to provide a basic curriculum format for teachers of High School/High Tech students. The curriculum is designed to implement QCC classroom instruction that encourages career development in technological fields through post-secondary education, paid summer internships, and exposure to experiences in high technology.

  2. Earthquakes, vulnerability and disaster risk: Georgia case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashvili, Otar; Askan, Aysegul

    2015-04-01

    The Republic of Georgia, located on the East coast of the Black Sea, is prone to multiple natural hazards, the most dangerous and devastating of which are strong earthquakes. This work issues a call for advance planning and action to reduce natural disaster risks, notably seismic risk through the investigation of vulnerability and seismic hazard for Georgia. Ground motion prediction equations are essential for several purposes ranging from seismic design and analysis to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. Seismic hazard maps were calculated based on modern approach of selecting and ranking global and regional ground motion prediction equation for region. We have also applied the host-to-target method in two regions in Georgia with different source mechanisms. According to the tectonic regime of the target areas, two different regions are chosen as host regions. One of them is the North Anatolian Fault zone in Turkey with the dominant strike-slip source mechanism while the other is Tabas in Iran with mostly events of reverse mechanism. We performed stochastic finite-fault simulations in both host and target areas and employed the hybrid-empirical method as introduced and outlined in Campbell (2003). An initial hybrid empirical ground motion model is developed for PGA and SA at selected periods for Georgia. An application of these coefficients for ground motion models have been used in probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. Intensity based vulnerability study were completed for Georgian buildings. Finally, Probabilistic seismic risk assessment in terms of structural damage and casualties were calculated. This methodology gave prediction of damage and casualty for a given probability of recurrence, based on a probabilistic seismic hazard model, population distribution, inventory, and vulnerability of buildings

  3. Cesium-137 levels detected in Georgia otters

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Jenkins, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    Beginning in the 1940's and continuing through the 50's and early 60's, nuclear devices were tested by aerial detonation in the United States and other countries around the world. Cesium-137 (/sup 137/Cs) is one of the most important radionuclide by-products due to its abundance and slow decay (30-year half-life). The uptake of /sup 137/Cs in animal tissue is the result of its similarity to potassium. The somatic and genetic effects of /sup 137/Cs, along with its effect on reproductive cells, can pose great hazards to wildlife species. A reported buildup of /sup 137/Cs in white-tailed deer in the lower coastal plain of Georgia during the 1960's was followed by a gradual decline during the 1970's. Although numerous studies have involved terrestrial mammals of Georgia, few have involved aquatic mammals such as the river otter. With continued atmospheric testing by some foreign countries and the increased use of nuclear power as an energy source, there is a need for continued monitoring of radionuclides in wildlife to ascertain the quality of the environment. This study was initiated as part of an overall study of environmental pollutants in the river otter of Georgia and deals with analysis of the /sup 137/Cs accumulations in this species.

  4. Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Combination Smokestack, Water Tank & Privies, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  5. Nationwide Assessment of Seismic Hazard for Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, N. S.; Varazanashvili, O.; Mumladze, T.

    2014-12-01

    The work presents a framework for assessment of seismic hazards on national level for the Georgia. Based on a historical review of the compilation of seismic hazard zoning maps for the Georgia became evident that there were gaps in seismic hazard assessment and the present normative seismic hazard map needed a careful recalculation. The methodology for the probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard used here includes the following steps: produce comprehensive catalogue of historical earthquakes (up to 1900) and the period of instrumental observations with uniform scale of magnitudes; produce models of seismic source zones (SSZ) and their parameterization; develop appropriate ground motion prediction equation (GMPE) models; develop seismic hazard curves for spectral amplitudes at each period and maps in digital format. Firstly, the new seismic catalog of Georgia was created, with 1700 eqs from ancient times on 2012, Mw³4.0. Secondly, were allocated seismic source zones (SSZ). The identification of area SSZ was obtained on the bases of structural geology, parameters of seismicity and seismotectonics. In constructing the SSZ, the slope of the appropriate active fault plane, the width of the dynamic influence of the fault, power of seismoactive layer are taken into account. Finally each SSZ was defined with the parameters: the geometry, the percentage of focal mechanism, predominant azimuth and dip angle values, activity rates, maximum magnitude, hypocenter depth distribution, lower and upper seismogenic depth values. Thirdly, seismic hazard maps were calculated based on modern approach of selecting and ranking global and regional ground motion prediction equation for region. Finally, probabilistic seismic hazard assessment in terms of ground acceleration were calculated for the territory of Georgia. On the basis of obtained area seismic sources probabilistic seismic hazard maps were calculated showing peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral accelerations (SA) at

  6. Environmental setting and factors that affect water quality in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berndt, M.P.; Oaksford, E.T.; Darst, M.R.; Marella, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit covers an area of nearly 62,000 square miles in the southeastern United States, mostly in the Coastal Plain physiographic province. Land resource provinces have been designated based on generalized soil classifications. Land resource provinces in the study area include: the Coastal Flatwoods, the Southern Coastal Plain, the Central Florida Ridge, the Sand Hills, and the Southern Piedmont. The study area includes all or parts of seven hydrologic subregions: the Ogeechee-Savannah, the Altamaha- St.Marys, the Suwannee, the Ochlockonee, the St. Johns, the Peace-Tampa Bay, and the Southern Florida. The primary source of water for public supply in the study area is ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. In 1990, more than 90 percent of the 2,888 million gallons per day of ground water used came from this aquifer. The population of the study area was 9.3 million in 1990. The cities of Jacksonville, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Tallahassee, and Tampa, Florida, and parts of Atlanta and Savannah, Georgia, are located in the study area. Forest and agricultural areas are the most common land uses in the study area, accounting for 48 percent and 25 percent of the study area, respectively. Climatic conditions range from temperate in Atlanta, Georgia, where mean annual temperature is about 61.3 degrees Fahrenheit, to subtropical in Tampa, Florida, where mean annual temperature is about 72.4 degrees Fahrenheit. Long-term average precipitation (1961-90) ranges from 43.9 inches per year in Tampa, Florida, and 44.6 in Macon, Georgia, to 65.7 inches per year in Tallahassee, Florida. Floods in the study area result from frontal systems, hurricanes, tropical storms, or severe thunderstorms. Droughts are not common in the study area,especially in the Florida part of the study area due to extensive maritime exposure. The primary physical and cultural characteristics in the study area include physiography, soils and land resource provinces

  7. 75 FR 6612 - FM Table of Allotments, Chester, Georgia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ...The Audio Division dismisses a Petition for Rule Making filed by Georgia Eagle Broadcasting, Inc., requesting the allotment of Channel 244A at Chester, Georgia, as its first local transmission service. It is the Commission's policy to refrain from making a new allotment or reservation to a community absent an expression of...

  8. The Evolution of the Georgia Tech Library Circulation Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Karen

    2006-01-01

    The author reviews the evolution of the Circulation Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) Library and Information Center from 2001 to the present. It is shown how a traditional circulation department with poor customer relations transformed itself by adopting innovative policies and services leading to improved customer…

  9. Accountability Report: The University System of Georgia, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University System of Georgia, Atlanta.

    The accountability report of the Georgia University System summarizes expenditures and progress made in achieving earlier goals. Following an overview which identifies major strategies toward the goal of a more educated Georgia, a section summarizes progress on major initiatives broken down into those funded in 1995-1997 legislative sessions,…

  10. Georgia's Balancing Act: Using, Protecting, and Legislating Student Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickman, Dana

    2016-01-01

    By combining an overall vision for the use of data, a commitment to protecting student privacy and data integrity, and supportive legislation, Georgia emerged as a leader in the effective use of student data. But it easily could have gone another way. None of the three elements could be taken for granted when Georgia set out to develop its state…

  11. Organization of School Systems in Georgia. A Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Peabody Coll. for Teachers, Nashville, TN. Div. of Surveys and Field Services.

    In compliance with a Georgia legislative directive to search for efficient and economical methods of providing quality education for children in Georgia, a study of the organization of existing school systems was conducted. The purposes of the study were to develop criteria (1) for the evaluation of elementary and secondary schools and (2) for…

  12. The Stamp Act in Georgia, 1765-1766.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, James F.

    Effects of the Stamp Act in the Colony of Georgia in 1765 are explored. The pamphlet is one in a series of materials about the American Revolution in Georgia. Designed for junior and senior high school students, it can be used as supplementary reading or a short unit. A teacher's guide is included. The Stamp Act was levied by Britain to force the…

  13. The Future Is Now: Latino Education in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamann, Edmund T.

    Georgia's Latino student population has risen from less than 2,000 in 1976 to more than 28,000 in 1996. In 1995-96, Latinos were less likely than their peers to finish school, more likely to struggle in the classroom, and less likely to have instructors from their ethnic background. The current Georgia Department of Education, characterized by…

  14. 75 FR 67950 - The University of Georgia (UGA), et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Kingdom. Intended Use: See notice at 75 FR 57738, September 22, 2010. Comments: None received. Decision... International Trade Administration The University of Georgia (UGA), et al.; Notice of Decision on Applications...: 10-054. Applicant: The University of Georgia (UGA), Athens, GA 30602-7229. Instrument: HV...

  15. Uncharted Territory: An Examination of Restructuring Under NCLB in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffrin, Elizabeth; Scott, Caitlin; Kober, Nancy, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    When the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) went into effect in 2002, Georgia's statewide accountability system was already well underway. As a result, some schools faced the federal law's most serious consequences as early as 2004. That left Georgia policymakers with a dilemma on which there remains little federal guidance: what to do with…

  16. Running around in Circles: Quality Assurance Reforms in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jibladze, Elene

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the implementation of a quality assurance system in Georgia as a particular case of "Bologna transplant" in a transitioning country. In particular, the article discusses to what extent new concepts, institutions and models framed as "European" have been institutionalised in Georgia. Based on an outcome…

  17. Secondary School Counseling Job Description. Georgia Comprehensive Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Planning and Development.

    This booklet provides guidelines for writing job descriptions for secondary school counselors in Georgia, based on the "Program Planning Guide: Georgia Comprehensive Guidance" model. The counselor's role, as described in the document, focuses on four components: the guidance curriculum, individual planning, responsive services, and system support.…

  18. Dual Enrollment in Georgia's High Schools and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Richard; Hill, Frieda

    2008-01-01

    Georgia conducted a multiphase, mixed methods study over three years (2003-2006) to determine whether credit-based transition programs facilitate college access and success for students who participate in them. The study, conducted in collaboration with, and funding from, the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) and with cooperation from the…

  19. Focus on the Future of Georgia 1970-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schabacker, William H., Ed.; And Others

    As part of the Georgia Assessment Project (GAP), initiated in January 1969 to provide statewide measurement of the impact of educational programs, services, and resources on children and youth, 19 position papers were prepared by specialists to assist the Advisory Commission on Education Goals. The papers, some with critiques, concern Georgia's…

  20. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Mosulishvili, L.M.; Shoniya, N.I.; Katamadze, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric Chernobyl-released radioactivity, assessed at about 2 x 10{sup 18} Bq, caused global environmental contamination. Contaminated air masses appeared in the Transcaucasian region in early May, 1986. Rains that month promoted intense radionuclide deposition all over Georgia. The contamination level of western Georgia considerably exceeded the contamination level of eastern Georgia. The Black Sea coast of Georgia suffered from the Chernobyl accident as much as did strongly contaminated areas of the Ukraine and Belarus`. Unfortunately, governmental decrees on countermeasures against the consequences of the Chernobyl accident at that time did not even refer to the coast of Georgia. The authors observed the first increase in radioactivity background in rainfall samples collected on May 2, 1986, in Tbilisi. {gamma}-Spectrometric measurements of aerosol filters, vegetation, food stuffs, and other objects, in addition to rainfall, persistently confirmed the occurrence of short-lived radionuclides, including {sup 131}I. At first, this fact seemed unbelievable, because the Chernobyl accident had occurred only 4-5 days earlier and far from Georgia. However, these arguments proved to be faulty. Soon, environmental monitoring of radiation in Georgia became urgent. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia shortly after the Chernobyl accident, as well as the methods of analysis, are reported in this paper.

  1. "A Reversal of Fortune": Georgia Legislative Update 1992-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sielke, Catherine C.

    2011-01-01

    In the 1990s, teachers' and other educators' salaries increased enough to make Georgia number one in salaries in the South and solidly in the Midwest across the nation. Since 2004, school districts have been trying to make do with much less as this recession continues to force more cuts. Georgia has a very high unemployment rate of 10.25%, a high…

  2. National Observatory Report on Vocational Education and Training in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glonti, Kote; Ejibadze, A.; Nanobashvili, K.; Mickaia, L.; Natsvlishvili, E.; Imedashvili, M.; Mikeladze, A.

    The state of vocational education and training (VET) in the Georgia Republic in 1999-2000 was examined. The study focused on the following topics: (1) the socioeconomic context of VET; (2) Georgia's labor market (the current labor market situation, employment, unemployment); (3) management of VET (legislation and policy, responsible bodies,…

  3. Perceived Effectiveness of Clinical E-Learning for Georgia Midwives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    In the state of Georgia, approximately nine out of every 1,000 babies die during birth and approximately 18.6 out of every 1,000 women die from a pregnancy-related cause (Georgia Department of Public Health, 2011). Continuing to build capacities for the continuing education of midwives--specifically Certified Nurse Midwives (CNMs)--can ensure they…

  4. The Georgia Psychoeducational Network (GPN) Research Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, William W., Ed.; Brown, Carvin L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This collection of papers includes five articles on the education of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders participating in the Georgia Psychoeducational Network Program (GPN). "Training Needs of Fully Certified BD Teachers in the Georgia Psychoeducational Network" (Robert J. Stansberry) found, in a survey of 203 certified teachers…

  5. 2. Photocopy of section of panoramic map of 'Savannah, Georgia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of section of panoramic map of 'Savannah, Georgia 1891' showing Savannah Repair Shops; drawn and published by Augustus Koch, Morning-News Lithograph, Savannah, GA. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  6. Georgia's Health Professions: A Decade of Change, 1985-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.; Little, Catherine J.

    This report examines the supply of and demand for health care professionals in the state of Georgia, including information on education, demographics, and workforce changes. Supply data analyzed included licensure and certification records; a survey of Georgia's major health care institutions provided demand data. Additionally, institutions of…

  7. Corruption Risks of Private Tutoring: Case of Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on teacher-supplied private tutoring in the context of post-Soviet Georgia, and elucidates the ways in which teacher-supplied private tutoring can be related to educational corruption. The paper draws on data from in-depth interviews of 18 school teachers in different parts of Georgia in 2013. The findings of the qualitative…

  8. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.700 Georgia Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  9. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.700 Georgia Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  10. 78 FR 45898 - Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Continuance Referendum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 955 Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia... document directs that a referendum be conducted among eligible producers of Vidalia onions grown in Georgia... Vidalia onions produced in the production area. DATES: The referendum will be conducted from September...

  11. Integrating Engineering Design into Technology Education: Georgia's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Cameron D.; Kelley, Todd R.; Wicklein, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive research study reported on Georgia's secondary level (grades 6-12) technology education programs capability to incorporate engineering concepts and/or engineering design into their curriculum. Participants were middle school and high school teachers in the state of Georgia who currently teach technology education. Participants…

  12. The Georgia Health Education Study: A Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Health and Safety.

    This summary review of the Georgia Health Education Study is a statistical presentation of scores achieved by over four thousand freshman college students in the university system of Georgia to questions on health knowledge. Data compiled from the administration of the Fast-Tyson Health Knowledge Test (1975 revision) indicates that subject…

  13. Energy from Marine Biomass Program presentation at the Bio-Energy '80, World Congress and Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia, Wednesday, April 23, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The Energy from Marine Biomass Program, sponsored by the Gas Research Institute and the Department of Energy, now in the concept-validation phase, has the overall objective to develop integrated processes, (including feedstock production, harvesting, and conversion) to produce, from seaweed, methane and other fuels that are cost-competitive on a commercial basis with other alternative sources of energy. To accomplish this objective, quantitative determinations are being made through direct experimentation and evaluation of concepts for the feedstock production, harvesting, recovery of conversion by-products/co-products, and the essential supporting technologies required by integrated feedstock-to-product process systems. Work to date indicates that the technical developments required are within the state of the art of current engineering.

  14. Thinking Across the Disciplines. ISII 1986. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Society for Individualized Instruction (15th, Atlanta, Georgia, October 9-11, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Society for Individualized Instruction, Chico, CA.

    Papers presented at this conference focus primarily on the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills. Topics related to critical thinking include metacognition, curriculum development, and teaching strategies in foreign languages; teaching critical reading of literature to develop critical thinking skills; use of guided design in…

  15. Maintaining Relevancy in Programs of Agriculture. Proceedings: Southern Regional Meeting, Land Grant College and University Presidents and Administrators of Agriculture (Atlanta, Georgia, April 20-21, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA. Inst. for Higher Educational Opportunity.

    Recommendations for maintaining relevant programs which resulted from this meeting of college and university presidents and administrators are applicable to all colleges and universities offering programs of agriculture in the region. Given in this report are two major presentations entitled "The Integration of Knowledge in a Specialized Society"…

  16. Striving for Excellence. The International Conference of the Learning Disabilities Association of America (Atlanta, Georgia, March 4-7, 1992). Research Poster Session Abstract. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Steven C., Comp.

    Eleven abstracts of research projects related to individuals with learning disabilities are compiled in this booklet. The research projects were presented in poster sessions at the March 1992 International Conference of the Learning Disabilities Association of America. Titles and authors of poster sessions include: "Perceptual and Verbal Skills of…

  17. Graduate Education in Nursing: Issues and Future Directions. Proceedings of a Conference Sponsored by the Nursing Curriculum Project (Atlanta, Georgia, December 2-3, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary Howard, Ed.

    Proceedings of a conference on graduate education in nursing, which sought to provide a forum for discussion of issues and to share the findings and experiences of the graduate demonstration projects undertaken under the aegis of the Southern Regional Education Board's Nursing Curriculum Project, are presented. Contents include: "Purposes of…

  18. Black Student Retention in Higher Education. Proceedings of the National Conference (2nd, Atlanta, Georgia, November 2-5, 1986). Conference Agenda and Abstracts of Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida A and M Univ., Tallahassee.

    This document for participants comprises the agenda and abstracts of papers to be presented at the second national conference on the retention of black college students. The conference, as planned, offers 6 general sessions, 3 special sessions, 8 special activities, and 25 concurrent sessions. A total of 130 presenters from over 30 states and more…

  19. A Study of the Relationship Between the Level of Nutritional Consumption and the Education, Income, and Family Size of Selected Poor Families in Atlanta, Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Flora Powell

    The stated objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the differences in knowledge of nutrition, of income, and of family size in the upper and lower strata families; (2) the shopping practices of families; (3) average weekly food expenditures; (4) mean educational level; and (5) differences in the mean weekly food expenditures -- a…

  20. Collaboration between Researchers and Practitioners in Physical Education: An International Dialogue. Proceedings from the AIESEP-NAPEHE World Congress (Atlanta, Georgia, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, George M., Ed.; Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    Papers included are: (1) "The Mountain Yet To Be Climbed" (D. Siedentop); (2) "Collaboration between Researchers and Practitioners: Myth, Mirth, or Melody" (L. Lambert); (3) "The Recognition and Reward Structure in Higher Education in the United States--A Major Inhibitor to Collaboration bewteen Researcher and Practitioner" (J. Razor and J.…

  1. Panel discussion: Fumonisin Elimination. In: Proceedings of the Aflatoxin/Fumonisin Elimination and Fungal Genomics Workshops, October 22-24, 2007, Atlanta, Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Summary of Presentations: The session was moderated by Scott Averhoff of the Texas Corn Producers Board. Ron Riley and Anthony Glenn from the USDA-ARS Toxicology & Mycotoxin Research Unit in Athens, GA presented a set of reports on the effects of fumonisin on corn seedling development and disease. F...

  2. Linking Education Finance to Education Reform: Selected Proceedings of the Education Finance Workshop (3rd, Atlanta, Georgia, May 18-19, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    This document contains selected proceedings from an Education Finance Workshop. The workshop addressed various perspectives about the appropriateness and cost of some currently popular reform approaches. Two introductory papers are: (1) "Our Task: Building the Links," by Ron Henderson; and (2) "Is Public Education Necessary to a Democratic…

  3. Rural Infrastructure and Economic Development Issues: Information Systems, Transportation and Education. Proceedings of a Regional Workshop (Atlanta, Georgia, October 3-4, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clouser, Rod, Ed.

    The Southern Region Information Exchange Group-53 consists of 20 institutional members seeking a better understanding of the relationship between community infrastructure and economic development. This document contains four papers prepared for the group's working meeting in October 1990. "The Contribution of Four Lane Highway Investments to…

  4. A World without Walls. Dimension: Languages 71. Proceedings of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching (7th, Atlanta, Georgia, October 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, George W., Jr., Ed.

    Presentations on aspects of foreign language instruction include: "A World Without Walls" (Lorraine A. Strasheim); "Practical Aspects of Individualizing Foreign Language Instruction" (Howard B. Altman); "Teaching Foreign Language Through Literature" (Jeanne Varney Pleasants); "Individualization of Foreign Language Instruction" (Howard B. Altman);…

  5. Educational Assessment. Proceedings: Conference of the University/Urban Schools National Task Force (13th, Atlanta, Georgia, November 8-9, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossone, Richard M., Ed.; Polishook, Irwin H., Ed.

    At this conference on educational assessment, there was consensus among participants on the importance of the use of assessment to improve instruction, enhance the curriculum, and allow policy makers to measure achievement. There was less consensus about the best forms of assessment to use. The following conference papers are provided in this…

  6. School Finance in Transition. Proceedings of the National Conference on School Finance (16th, Atlanta, Georgia, April 1-3, 1973.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Educational Finance Project, Gainsville, FL.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 16th annual National Conference on School Finance. The Conference participants included representatives of State education agencies, professional associations, and State legislatures, as well as professors of school finance. Topics discussed include fiscal neutrality, cost differentials and cost…

  7. Infant Mortality, Morbidity, and Childhood Handicapping Conditions: Psychosocial Factors. Based on Proceedings of a Bi-Regional Conference (Atlanta, Georgia, June 2-5, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Elizabeth L., Ed.; Melnick, Leslie R., Ed.

    In Part I, "Extent of Knowledge and Implications for Social Work Intervention," the following conference papers are presented: (1) "Unintended Pregnancy and Infant Mortality, Strategies and Interventions" (Alfred W. Brann, Jr.); (2) "Implications for Social Work Intervention in Biopsychosocial Factors Associated with Infant Mortality and…

  8. Touch the Future: Discovering Abilities through Technology for Living, Learning, Working and Playing. Southeast Regional Conference (3rd, Atlanta, Georgia, April 10-12, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Human Resources, Atlanta. Div. of Rehabilitation Services.

    This packet of materials was originally intended for participants in a 1991 conference on assistive technology for the disabled. After a detailed listing of the conference schedule, individual sections provide abstracts, biographical sketches, and summaries concerning the following conference topics: blending, computer labs, family, grants and…

  9. American Council on Consumer Interests. Annual Conference. The Proceedings. Convention Theme: Ideas/Commitment/Action (22nd, Atlanta, Georgia, April 7-10, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Lillian Holmen

    These proceedings consist of 25 conference papers on consumer interests: (1) Consumer Leaders of Yesteryear, (2) Potentials for Professionalism in Consumer Affairs, (3) Legislative Priorities--The Washington Scene, (4) Consumer Protection--The Municipal Approach, (5) Virginia Approach to Consumer Protection, (6) An Explanation of Electric Utility…

  10. Technology Reinvestment Project Deployment Activity Areas. Lessons learned, workshops, presentation material. Held in Oakland, Cailfornia on March 2, 1994 and Atlanta, Georgia on March 9, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kilmer, R.

    1994-03-01

    One of the most significant developments in the world marketplace in the 1990's has been the increase in strategic partnering. Industry after industry has moved towards collaborative research and joint product development. Going it alone has become less and less viable. One powerful tool to bring companies together for collaborative research and production is the consortium. Recently, the Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP) invested more than $450 million to help integrate the defense and commercial industrial bases using consortia. The effectiveness of the consortia sponsored in the first round of the TRP, and those that will be financed in subsequent rounds, will heavily influence the success of the TRP.

  11. Evaluation of ERTS-1 data for inventory of forest and rangeland and detection of forest stress. [Atlanta, Georgia, Manitou, Colorado, and Black Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, R. C. (Principal Investigator); Aldrich, R. C.; Driscoll, R. S.; Francis, R. E.; Weber, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Results of photointerpretation indicated that ERTS is a good classifier of forest and nonforest lands (90 to 95 percent accurate). Photointerpreters could make this separation as accurately as signature analysis of the computer compatible tapes. Further breakdowns of cover types at each site could not be accurately classified by interpreters (60 percent) or computer analysts (74 percent). Exceptions were water, wet meadow, and coniferous stands. At no time could the large bark beetle infestations (many over 300 meters in size) be detected on ERTS images. The ERTS wavebands are too broad to distinguish the yellow, yellow-red, and red colors of the dying pine foliage from healthy green-yellow foliage. Forest disturbances could be detected on ERTS color composites about 90 percent of the time when compared with six-year-old photo index mosaics. ERTS enlargements (1:125,000 scale, preferably color prints) would be useful to forest managers of large ownerships over 5,000 hectares (12,500 acres) for broad area planning. Black-and-white enlargements can be used effectively as aerial navigation aids for precision aerial photography where maps are old or not available.

  12. An Analysis of Causal Factors of Burnout among School Counselors in a Large Urban School System in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Beatrice R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between school counselor participants' perceived levels of job burnout, as measured by Lee's 2007 Counselor Burnout Inventory (CBI) with the assignment of non-counseling duties, as measured by Scarborough's 2005 School Counselors Activity Rating Scale (SCARS) and the alignment of their…

  13. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference. Proceedings, Friday, Activity and Position Paper Sessions (Atlanta, Georgia, January 13-15, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    Precis are presented of the meetings, workshops, and seminars at the 1983 Conference on Elementary and Middle School Physical Education. Papers were presented on teacher burnout, physical fitness testing, teaching methods and learning processes, and curriculum development. Presentations included suggestions for adapting physical education for…

  14. Desertification risk in Kakheti Region, East Georgia.

    PubMed

    Basialashvili, Tsisana; Matchavariani, Lia; Lagidze, Lamzira

    2015-01-01

    Desertification or land degradation in drylands is caused by various factors. The most important of these is climate change, a significant global ecological problem. Desertification, like erosion, as an environmental process of ecosystem degradation, is often caused by human activity. It is a common misconception that droughts cause desertification. Well-managed lands can recover from drought if the rains return. These practices help to control erosion and maintain productivity during periods when moisture is available. Traditionally, the most vulnerable territories considered under the threat of desertification in Georgia is Kakheti region (East Georgia), which has been selected as one of the priority investigation area. In Eastern Georgia, intervals of atmospheric precipitation do not coincide with the phases of water demand of plants. In recent decades as a result of more frequent droughts in Kakheti, the region has already lost hundreds, thousands of hectares of fertile land. Based on the contemporary climate warming projections, the temperature is expected to increase and precipitation to decrease. This will lead to an increase in evaporation and reduction of river flow. Under such conditions the danger of desertification is evident. To mitigate the negative effects of desertification, it is recommended to put forward set of adaptation activities through rehabilitation of water use systems, prevention of loss of water, reconstruction and expansion of irrigation canals, accumulation of unused autumn-winter river water and spring floods in reservoirs, developing an optimal scheme of distributing water resources among water users, device windbreaks and work on breeding of drought resistant varieties, preparation of water volume forecasts of rivers and their role in planning of water use; application of apply drip and sprinkler irrigation, using artificial precipitation following increase as a result of active influence on clouds. All these activities will provide

  15. The effects of departmentalized and self-contained classrooms on fifth-grade students' achievement in science on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Lisa S.

    Elementary instruction of fifth grade classrooms was found to be primarily in two organizational models in a school district northwest of Atlanta, Georgia. The self-contained classroom provided a generalist teacher responsible for the instruction of all academic subjects to one group of students throughout the day, while departmentalized classrooms were structured utilizing one teacher for the instruction of one or two content areas, and students rotated throughout the day for each of the academic subjects. The majority of studies looking at the effect of instructional organization were concentrated in the content areas of mathematics and reading. This quantitative study, utilized an ex post facto methodology to determine whether fifth grade students attending departmentalized schools or self-contained classrooms had higher student achievement in science as measured by the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT). The statistical data was collected through the Georgia Department of Education and included raw mean scores of over 500 students attending departmentalized schools and 500 students attending self-contained classrooms, along with the various subgroups such as gender, ethnicity status, English language learners (ELL), and students with disability (SWD) placement. This data was analyzed to show if a significant statistical difference emerged from either instructional organization. The overall results that emerged from the archival data suggested no significant difference in student achievement existed for almost all subgroups tested of the total 1000+ participant scores used in the study. The results also did however, showed the departmentalization model of instruction had a slight advantage over self-contained classrooms for male students with disabilities.

  16. Bridging the Gaps in Obstetric Care: Perspectives of Service Delivery Providers on Challenges and Core Components of Care in Rural Georgia.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Meredith; Rochat, Roger; Hennink, Monique; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Spelke, Bridget

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In 2011, a workforce assessment conducted by the Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group found that 52 % of Primary Care Service Areas outside metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, had an overburdened or complete lack of obstetric care services. In response to that finding, this study's aim was twofold: to describe challenges faced by providers who currently deliver or formerly delivered obstetric care in these areas, and to identify essential core components that can be integrated into alternative models of care in order to alleviate the burden placed on the remaining obstetric providers. Methods We conducted 46 qualitative in-depth interviews with obstetricians, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, certified nurse midwives, and maternal and infant health leaders in Georgia. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, uploaded into MAXQDA software, and analyzed using a Grounded Theory Approach. Results Providers faced significant financial barriers in service delivery, including low Medicaid reimbursement, high proportions of self-pay patients, and high cost of medical malpractice insurance. Further challenges in provision of obstetric care in this region were related to patient's late initiation of prenatal care and lacking collaboration between obstetric providers. Essential components of effective models of care included continuity, efficient use of resources, and risk-appropriate services. Conclusion Our analysis revealed core components of improved models of care that are more cost effective and would expand coverage. These components include closer collaboration among stakeholder populations, decentralization of services with effective use of each type of clinical provider, improved continuity of care, and system-wide changes to increase Medicaid benefits. PMID:27090413

  17. Estimation of primary and secondary particulate matter intake fractions for power plants in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jonathan I; Wilson, Andrew M; Evans, John S; Spengler, John D

    2003-12-15

    Air pollution benefit-cost analyses depend on dispersion models to predict population exposures to pollutants, but it is difficult to determine the reasonableness of the model estimates. This is in part because validation with field measurements is not feasible for marginal concentration changes and because few models can capture the necessary spatial and temporal domains with adequate sophistication. In this study, we use the concept of an intake fraction (the fraction of a pollutant or its precursor emitted that is eventually inhaled) to provide insight about population exposures and model performance. We apply CALPUFF, a regional-scale dispersion model common in health benefits assessments, to seven power plants in northern Georgia, considering both direct emissions of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and secondarily formed ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate particles over a domain within 500 km of Atlanta. We estimate emission-weighted average intake fractions of 6 x 10(-7) for primary PM2.5, 2 x 10(-7) for ammonium sulfate from SO2, and 6 x 10(-8) for ammonium nitrate from NOx, with no effect of SO2 on ammonium nitrate. To provide insight about model strengths and limitations, we compare our findings with those from a frequently applied source-receptor (S-R) matrix. Using S-R matrix over an identical domain, the corresponding intake fractions are 5 x 10(-7), 2 x 10(-7), 3 x 10(-8), and -2 x 10(-8), respectively, with the values approximately doubling if the domain is expanded to cover the continental United States. Evaluation of model assumptions and comparison of past intake fraction estimates using these two models illustrates the importance of assumptions about the relative concentrations of ammonia, sulfate, and nitrate, which significantly influences ammonium nitrate intake fractions. These findings provide a framework for improved understanding of the factors that influence population exposures to particulate matter. PMID:14717160

  18. Notes from the Field: Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis - Georgia, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Straily, Anne; Feldpausch, Amanda; Ulbrich, Carl; Schell, Kiersten; Casillas, Shannon; Zaki, Sherif R; Denison, Amy M; Condit, Marah; Gabel, Julie; Paddock, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    During 2012-2014, five cases of Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis were identified by a single urgent care practice in Georgia, located approximately 40 miles southwest of Atlanta. Symptom onset occurred during June-October, and all patients had a known tick bite. Patients ranged in age from 27 to 72 years (median = 53 years), and all were male. The most commonly reported initial signs were erythema (n = 3) and swelling (n = 2) at the site of the bite. Two patients reported fever and a third patient reported a rash and lymphadenopathy without fever. Other symptoms included myalgia (n = 3), chills (n = 3), fatigue (n = 2), arthralgia (n = 2), and headache (n = 2). Eschar biopsy specimens were collected from each patient using a 4-mm or 5-mm punch and placed in 10% neutral buffered formalin or sterile saline. These specimens were tested by immunohistochemical (IHC) stains, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays, or cell culture isolation to determine if there was evidence of infection with a Rickettsia species (1). IHC evidence of spotted fever group rickettsiae was found in the eschar biopsy specimens in all five cases. In four cases, the biopsy specimens were also positive for R. parkeri by qPCR. The fifth case (specimen positive only by IHC testing) was considered a probable R. parkeri case based on clinical signs and symptoms. R. parkeri was grown in cell culture from one specimen from which isolation was attempted. All patients were treated with oral doxycycline (100 mg twice daily) for a minimum of 10 days, and all recovered. PMID:27442517

  19. Georgia, country of ancient medical traditions.

    PubMed

    Shengelia, R

    2000-06-01

    Georgian medicine as well as the whole culture of Georgia, is one of the oldest in the world. In more than the 500 medical manuscripts preserved and since described, there are traces of Sumerian medicine. Examples of Chinese, Indian and especially Arabic medicine are also clearly seen. At the same time close relationships with Graeco-Roman medical traditions are beyond doubt. Nursing homes established by Georgian healers, many of whom were canonized by the Orthodox Church are to be found in many churches and monasteries all over the world. They gave fruitful scientific research and practical help. PMID:11624591

  20. Reproductive health patterns: Georgia versus Australia.

    PubMed

    Asatiani, T; Abuladze, N; Ward, H; Angel, P

    2015-03-01

    The review compares a few reproductive indicators - fertility, abortion and contraception in both a developing (Georgia) and a developed (Australia) country. Fertility, abortion and contraception figures in both countries tend to reflect the attitude and the degree of development of each countries sexual health education and their use of effective contraception. Further research is required to accurately evaluate the need and access of Georgian women to modern methods of family planning and their knowledge of the benefits of modern contraception that can assist to reduce pregnancy termination rate. In Australia better insight is needed on how to facilitate a shift to more efficacious long-term contraceptives across all age groups. PMID:25879552