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Sample records for 7be decay rate

  1. Search for Environmental Influences on the ^7Be Decay Rate*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, E. B.; Rech, G. A.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Perillo Isaac, M. C.; Larimer, R.-M.

    1998-10-01

    ^7Be plays an important role in the generation of solar neutrinos. Because ^7Be decays via electron capture, its half life depends on the electron density at the nucleus. Two groups have recently reported observations of variations on the order of 1 percent in the decay rate of ^7Be as a function of the physical environment in which the ^7Be is located.^1,2 In order to test this idea, we measured the half life of ^7Be in four different materials. Samples of ^7Be in graphite, boron nitride, tantalum, and gold were produced at LBNL's 88" Cyclotron. Each ^7Be sample was packaged together with a ^133Ba reference source and then counted in 1-day time bins periodically over a 4-month period using a germanium detector. In order to reduce systematic effects from variations in detector or electronics performance, the ^7Be half life was determined by comparing the numbers of 478-keV ^7Be and 356-keV ^133Ba gamma rays from each sample. Results from analysis of this data will be presented. *Work supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract Nos. DE-AC03-76SF00098 and DE-FG03-98ER41060. 1. D. Souza et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 42, 1679 (1997). 2. A. Ray et al., submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (1998).

  2. Radioactive decay speedup at T=5 K: electron-capture decay rate of (7)Be encapsulated in C(60).

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, T; Ohno, K; Morisato, T; Mitsugashira, T; Hirose, K; Yuki, H; Kasagi, J

    2007-06-22

    The electron-capture (EC) decay rate of (7)Be in C(60) at the temperature of liquid helium (T=5 K) was measured and compared with the rate in Be metal at T=293 K. We found that the half-life of (7)Be in endohedral C(60) ((7)Be@C(60)) at a temperature close to T=5 K is 52.47+/-0.04 d, a value that is 0.34% faster than that at T=293 K. In this environment, the half-life of (7)Be is nearly 1.5% faster than that inside Be metal at room temperature (T=293 K). We then interpreted our observations in terms of calculations of the electron density at the (7)Be nucleus position inside the C(60); further, we estimate theoretically the temperature dependence (at T=0 K and 293 K) of the electron density at the Be nucleus position in the stable center inside C(60). The theoretical estimates were almost in agreement with the experimental observations.

  3. Precision measurement of the decay rate of {sup 7}Be in host materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nir-El, Y.; Haquin, G.; Yungreiss, Z.; Hass, M.; Goldring, G.; Chamoli, S. K.; Singh, B. S. Nara; Lakshmi, S.; Koester, U.; Champault, N.; Dorsival, A.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Georgiev, G.; Schumann, D.; Heidenreich, G.; Teichmann, S.

    2007-01-15

    A controlled and precise determination of the cross sections of the fusion reactions {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 3}He({sup 4}He,{gamma}){sup 7}Be, which play an important role in determining the solar neutrino flux, necessitates the knowledge of a precise value of the electron-capture half-life of {sup 7}Be. This half-life may depend on the material hosting the {sup 7}Be atoms via small modifications of the electron density around the {sup 7}Be nucleus. In this brief communication we report on the measurement of {sup 7}Be implanted in four materials: copper, aluminum, sapphire, and PVC. The four results are consistent with a null host dependence within two standard deviations and their weighted average of 53.236(39) d agrees very well with the adopted value in the literature, 53.22(6) d. The present results may exhibit a slight (0.22%) increase of the half-life at room temperature for metals compared to insulators that requires further studies.

  4. Absence of low-temperature dependence of the decay of {sup 7}Be and {sup 198}Au in metallic hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.; Hass, M.; Nir-El, Y.; Haquin, G.; Yungreiss, Z.

    2008-05-15

    The electron-capture (EC) decay rate of {sup 7}Be in metallic Cu host and the {beta}{sup -}-decay rate of {sup 198}Au in the host alloy Al-Au have been measured simultaneously at several temperatures, ranging from 0.350 K to 293 K. No difference of the half-life of {sup 198}Au between 12.5 K and 293 K is observed to a precision of 0.1%. By utilizing the special characteristics of our double-source assembly, possible geometrical effects that influence the individual rates could be eliminated. The ratio of {sup 7}Be to {sup 198}Au activity thus obtained also remains constant for this temperatures range to the experimental precision of 0.15{+-}0.16%. The resulting null temperature dependence is discussed in terms of the inadequacy of the often-used Debye-Hueckel model for such measurements.

  5. Atmospheric depositional fluxes of cosmogenic 35S and 7Be: Implications for the turnover rate of sulfur through the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyung-Mi; Hong, Young-Lim; Kim, Guebuem

    2011-08-01

    The wet depositional fluxes of cosmogenic 35S and 7Be, together with 210Pb, were measured in Seoul, Korea, from April 2004 to April 2005. Approximately half of the annual fluxes occurred in summer, during which about 60% of the precipitations occurred. Our simple box model shows that the theoretical scavenging ratio of 35S/ 7Be to the ground is approximately 0.013, which accounts for the decay for the duration of oxidation and settling. However, we observed ˜50% higher 35S/ 7Be activity ratios than the theoretical removal ratio over the entire sampling period, with particularly higher (˜133%) ratios during November 2004-April 2005. These higher ratios in the winter cannot be explained by sudden incursions of the stratospheric air or longer aerosol residence times, on the basis of 7Be/ 210Pb ratios. We hypothesize that the ratios could occur owing to biomass burning or as plants go dormant and dry during the autumn and winter. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a 35S/ 7Be mass balance model which yields the turnover rate of sulfur in the atmosphere through the biosphere to be 0.015 ± 0.007 d -1. Such a rapid sulfur turnover rate should be applied to the prediction model of sulfur inventory changes.

  6. Seasonal modulation of the 7Be solar neutrino rate in Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Atroshchenko, V.; Basilico, D.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Borodikhina, L.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Caprioli, S.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Ding, X. F.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Froborg, F.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, T.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A.; Jeschke, D.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Manuzio, G.; Marcocci, S.; Martyn, J.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Opitz, B.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Shakina, P.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stokes, L. F. F.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-06-01

    We present the evidence for the seasonal modulation of the 7Be neutrino interaction rate with the Borexino detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. The period, amplitude, and phase of the observed time evolution of the signal are consistent with its solar origin, and the absence of an annual modulation is rejected at 99.99% C.L. The data are analyzed using three methods: the analytical fit to event rate, the Lomb-Scargle and the Empirical Mode Decomposition techniques, which all yield results in excellent agreement.

  7. Precision measurement of the (7)Be solar neutrino interaction rate in Borexino.

    PubMed

    Bellini, G; Benziger, J; Bick, D; Bonetti, S; Bonfini, G; Buizza Avanzini, M; Caccianiga, B; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Carraro, C; Cavalcante, P; Chavarria, A; D'Angelo, D; Davini, S; Derbin, A; Etenko, A; Fomenko, K; Franco, D; Galbiati, C; Gazzana, S; Ghiano, C; Giammarchi, M; Goeger-Neff, M; Goretti, A; Grandi, L; Guardincerri, E; Hardy, S; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Koshio, Y; Kryn, D; Laubenstein, M; Lewke, T; Litvinovich, E; Loer, B; Lombardi, F; Lombardi, P; Ludhova, L; Machulin, I; Manecki, S; Maneschg, W; Manuzio, G; Meindl, Q; Meroni, E; Miramonti, L; Misiaszek, M; Montanari, D; Mosteiro, P; Muratova, V; Oberauer, L; Obolensky, M; Ortica, F; Pallavicini, M; Papp, L; Peña-Garay, C; Perasso, L; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Raghavan, R S; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Re, A; Romani, A; Sabelnikov, A; Saldanha, R; Salvo, C; Schönert, S; Simgen, H; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Sukhotin, S; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Vignaud, D; Vogelaar, R B; von Feilitzsch, F; Winter, J; Wojcik, M; Wright, A; Wurm, M; Xu, J; Zaimidoroga, O; Zavatarelli, S; Zuzel, G

    2011-09-30

    The rate of neutrino-electron elastic scattering interactions from 862 keV (7)Be solar neutrinos in Borexino is determined to be 46.0±1.5(stat)(-1.6)(+1.5)(syst) counts/(day·100  ton). This corresponds to a ν(e)-equivalent (7)Be solar neutrino flux of (3.10±0.15)×10(9)  cm(-2) s(-1) and, under the assumption of ν(e) transition to other active neutrino flavours, yields an electron neutrino survival probability of 0.51±0.07 at 862 keV. The no flavor change hypothesis is ruled out at 5.0 σ. A global solar neutrino analysis with free fluxes determines Φ(pp)=6.06(-0.06)(+0.02)×10(10)  cm(-2) s(-1) and Φ(CNO)<1.3×10(9)  cm(-2) s(-1) (95% C.L.). These results significantly improve the precision with which the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein large mixing angle neutrino oscillation model is experimentally tested at low energy.

  8. Absence of a day-night asymmetry in the 7Be solar neutrino rate in Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonetti, S.; Bonfini, G.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, E.; Hardy, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Koshio, Y.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Lombardi, F.; Ludhova, L.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Peña-Garay, C.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Sabelnikov, A.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Xu, J.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the result of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the 7Be solar neutrino interaction rate in the Borexino detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy. The measured asymmetry is Adn = 0.001 ± 0.012 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst), in agreement with the prediction of MSW-LMA solution for neutrino oscillations. This result disfavors MSW oscillations with mixing parameters in the LOW region at more than 8.5 σ. This region is, for the first time, strongly disfavored without the use of reactor anti-neutrino data and therefore the assumption of CPT symmetry. The result can also be used to constrain some neutrino oscillation scenarios involving new physics.

  9. Halo effective field theory constrains the solar 7Be + p → 8B + γ rate

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xilin; Nollett, Kenneth M.; Phillips, D. R.

    2015-11-06

    In this study, we report an improved low-energy extrapolation of the cross section for the process 7Be(p,γ)8B, which determines the 8B neutrino flux from the Sun. Our extrapolant is derived from Halo Effective Field Theory (EFT) at next-to-leading order. We apply Bayesian methods to determine the EFT parameters and the low-energy S-factor, using measured cross sections and scattering lengths as inputs. Asymptotic normalization coefficients of 8B are tightly constrained by existing radiative capture data, and contributions to the cross section beyond external direct capture are detected in the data at E < 0.5 MeV. Most importantly, the S-factor at zeromore » energy is constrained to be S(0) = 21.3 ± 0.7 eV b, which is an uncertainty smaller by a factor of two than previously recommended. That recommendation was based on the full range for S(0) obtained among a discrete set of models judged to be reasonable. In contrast, Halo EFT subsumes all models into a controlled low-energy approximant, where they are characterized by nine parameters at next-to-leading order. These are fit to data, and marginalized over via Monte Carlo integration to produce the improved prediction for S(E).« less

  10. Determination of astrophysical 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction rates from the 7Li(d, p)8Li reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, XianChao; Guo, Bing; Li, ZhiHong; Pang, DanYang; Li, ErTao; Liu, WeiPing

    2015-06-01

    The 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction plays a central role not only in the evaluation of solar neutrino fluxes but also in the evolution of the first stars. Study of this reaction requires the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay 8B g.s. → 7Be + p. By using the charge symmetry relation, we obtain this proton ANC with the single neutron ANC of 8Li g.s. →7Li + n, which is determined with the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) and adiabatic distorted wave approximation (ADWA) analysis of the 7Li(d, p)8Li angular distribution. The astrophysical S-factors and reaction rates of the direct capture process in the 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction are further deduced at energies of astrophysical relevance. The astrophysical S-factor at zero energy for direct capture, S 17(0), is derived to be (19.9 ± 3.5) eV b in good agreement with the most recent recommended value. The contributions of the 1+ and 3+ resonances to the S-factor and reaction rate are also evaluated. The present result demonstrates that the direct capture dominates the 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction in the whole temperature range. This work provides an independent examination to the current results of the 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction.

  11. Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2011-02-01

    Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for D{sub s} semileptonic decay is known to be (17.0{+-}5.3)% lower than those for D{sup 0} or D{sup +}, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing b quarks, this method implies that the B{sub s} semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for B semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For {Lambda}{sub b} semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy-quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub b})/{Gamma}(B)=1.13{+-}0.03 of total decay rates.

  12. On the decay rate of sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Dobias, J. J.; Preminger, D. G.; Walton, S. R.

    2003-02-01

    We have analyzed the decay of 32 sunspots observed during the years 1988 through 2001 at the San Fernando Observatory (SFO). The data are from digital images obtained in the red (672 nm) with the Cartesian Full Disk Telescope No.1 (CFDT1). We find that the rate of decay is strongly correlated with the total sunspot area and the umbral to total area ratio. The multiple correlation coefficient is 0.93. Thus, the unexplained variance from this simple model is (1-0.87). We find that for the sunspots of this study, the decay rate is not a constant and that there is no significant correlation between the decay rate and the square root of the total spot area.

  13. Top-down holographic glueball decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünner, F.; Parganlija, D.; Rebhan, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present new results on the decay patterns of scalar and tensor glueballs in the top-down holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model. This model, which has only one free dimensionless parameter, gives semi-quantitative predictions for the vector meson spectrum, their decay widths, and also a gluon condensate in agreement with SVZ sum rules. The holographic predictions for scalar glueball decay rates are compared with experimental data for the widely discussed gluon candidates f0(1500) and f0(1710).

  14. Top-down holographic glueball decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Brünner, F.; Parganlija, D.; Rebhan, A.

    2016-01-22

    We present new results on the decay patterns of scalar and tensor glueballs in the top-down holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model. This model, which has only one free dimensionless parameter, gives semi-quantitative predictions for the vector meson spectrum, their decay widths, and also a gluon condensate in agreement with SVZ sum rules. The holographic predictions for scalar glueball decay rates are compared with experimental data for the widely discussed gluon candidates f{sub 0}(1500) and f{sub 0}(1710)

  15. Power spectrum analyses of nuclear decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P. A.; Lasenby, R. N.; Lasenby, A. N.; Buncher, J. B.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Hoft, A. W.; Horan, T. J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Kerford, J. L.; Lee, R. H.; Longman, A.; Mattes, J. J.; Morreale, B. L.; Morris, D. B.; Mudry, R. N.; Newport, J. R.; O'Keefe, D.; Petrelli, M. A.; Silver, M. A.; Stewart, C. A.; Terry, B.

    2010-10-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are not a direct synchronous modulation. We conclude that the annual periodicity in these data sets is a real effect, but that further study involving additional carefully controlled experiments will be needed to establish its origin.

  16. Upwelling Rates and Vertical Diffusivities Determined During the 2013 US GEOTRACES Eastern Tropical Pacific Zonal Transect: Results from 7Be Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadko, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Upwelling is an important physical process affecting biogeochemical cycling within the global ocean. Direct measurements are difficult because of the relatively small velocities involved, and must therefore be inferred by indirect methods such as those provided by tracer observations. Measurements of the cosmogenic radioisotope 7Be (half-life = 53.3 d) were used to derive upwelling rates and upper thermocline vertical diffusivities during the 2013 US GEOTRACES Eastern Tropical Pacific Zonal Transect. In the eastern, upwelling zone of this transect, the 7Be activity in the mixed layer varied between low values of 63 dpm/m3 in areas with the coldest sea surface temperatures (SSTs) to values of 190 dpm/m3 associated with warm SSTs. The 7Be inventory in the coldest water was only 5,150 dpm/m2 while that in the warmer water was 19,000 dpm/m2. The decrease in mixed layer 7Be with decrease in temperature occurs as 7Be ''dead'', cold water is upwelled from below. The deficit of the 7Be inventory relative to the non-upwelling stations provides a measure of the upwelling rate. For the eastern-most station with the lowest SST (17.6 deg C) an upwelling rate of 2.56 m/d was derived. Towards the west, as SST increased, derived upwelling rates decreased. At SST of 20.9 deg C, upwelling was zero. With knowledge of upwelling rates, 7Be and temperature profiles were used to constrain vertical diffusivity within the upper thermocline. Diffusivities derived from 7Be profiles were approximately twice that derived from temperature, likely reflecting the difference in vertical resolution of these measurements. Diffusivities derived from temperature were on the order of 1-4 x 10-4 m2/s. These parameters will be applied to profiles of nutrients and trace elements to derive fluxes of these species into the mixed layer.

  17. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes ( M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the Wells and Coppersmith (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the Burkhard and Grünthal (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  18. Use of 7Be measurements to estimate rates of soil loss from cultivated land: Testing a new approach applicable to individual storm events occurring during an extended period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, Paolo; Walling, Des E.

    2014-10-01

    The techniques available for documenting rates and patterns of soil redistribution in the landscape have many limitations and the value of those employing fallout radionuclides (FRNs), including caesium-137 (137Cs) and excess lead-210 (210Pbex) is being increasingly recognized. However, the use of 137Cs and 210Pbex measurements is best suited to investigations of longer-term soil redistribution rates (i.e., ˜50-60 years for 137Cs and ˜100 years for 210Pbex). For many purposes, a much shorter timeframe is required. Beryllium-7 (7Be), another FRN (half-life 53 days), offers the potential to document soil redistribution associated with individual events or short periods of heavy rainfall. However, existing approaches for using 7Be possess important limitations related to both the timing of the study period and its length. This contribution reports the development of a new approach that permits estimation of the soil loss associated with all individual events or short periods of rainfall occurring during a study period extending over a year or more. The approach was validated using data collected from an erosion plot located in southern Italy. The close agreement of the measured and estimated values demonstrates the validity of the new approach which has the potential to greatly increase the scope for using 7Be measurements to document short-term soil redistribution associated with individual storm events.

  19. Heritable variation of mRNA decay rates in yeast.

    PubMed

    Andrie, Jennifer M; Wakefield, Jon; Akey, Joshua M

    2014-12-01

    Gene expression levels are determined by the balance between rates of mRNA transcription and decay, and genetic variation in either of these processes can result in heritable differences in transcript abundance. Although the genetics of gene expression has been a subject of intense interest, the contribution of heritable variation in mRNA decay rates to gene expression variation has received far less attention. To this end, we developed a novel statistical framework and measured allele-specific differences in mRNA decay rates in a diploid yeast hybrid created by mating two genetically diverse parental strains. We estimate that 31% of genes exhibit allelic differences in mRNA decay rates, of which 350 can be identified at a false discovery rate of 10%. Genes with significant allele-specific differences in mRNA decay rates have higher levels of polymorphism compared to other genes, with all gene regions contributing to allelic differences in mRNA decay rates. Strikingly, we find widespread evidence for compensatory evolution, such that variants influencing transcriptional initiation and decay have opposite effects, suggesting that steady-state gene expression levels are subject to pervasive stabilizing selection. Our results demonstrate that heritable differences in mRNA decay rates are widespread and are an important target for natural selection to maintain or fine-tune steady-state gene expression levels. © 2014 Andrie et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Heritable variation of mRNA decay rates in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Andrie, Jennifer M.; Wakefield, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression levels are determined by the balance between rates of mRNA transcription and decay, and genetic variation in either of these processes can result in heritable differences in transcript abundance. Although the genetics of gene expression has been a subject of intense interest, the contribution of heritable variation in mRNA decay rates to gene expression variation has received far less attention. To this end, we developed a novel statistical framework and measured allele-specific differences in mRNA decay rates in a diploid yeast hybrid created by mating two genetically diverse parental strains. We estimate that 31% of genes exhibit allelic differences in mRNA decay rates, of which 350 can be identified at a false discovery rate of 10%. Genes with significant allele-specific differences in mRNA decay rates have higher levels of polymorphism compared to other genes, with all gene regions contributing to allelic differences in mRNA decay rates. Strikingly, we find widespread evidence for compensatory evolution, such that variants influencing transcriptional initiation and decay have opposite effects, suggesting that steady-state gene expression levels are subject to pervasive stabilizing selection. Our results demonstrate that heritable differences in mRNA decay rates are widespread and are an important target for natural selection to maintain or fine-tune steady-state gene expression levels. PMID:25258386

  1. Astrophysical Impact of the Updated 9Be(p,α)6Li and 10B(p,α)7Be Reaction Rates As Deduced By THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    The complete understanding of the stellar abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron represents one of the most interesting open problems in astrophysics. These elements are largely used to probe stellar structure and mixing phenomena in different astrophysical scenarios, such as pre-main-sequence or main-sequence stars. Their different fragility against (p,α) burning reactions allows one to investigate different depths of the stellar interior. Such fusion mechanisms are triggered at temperatures between T ≈ (2-5) × {10}6 K, thus defining a corresponding Gamow energy between ≈ 3-10 keV, where S(E)-factor measurements need to be performed to get reliable reaction rate evaluations. The Trojan Horse Method is a well defined procedure to measure cross sections at Gamow energies overcoming the uncertainties due to low-energy S(E)-factor extrapolation as well as electron screening effects. Taking advantage of the {\\mathtt{THM}} measure of the 9Be(p,α)6Li and 10B(p,α)7Be cross sections, the corresponding reaction rates have been calculated and compared with the evaluations by the NACRE collaboration, widely used in the literature. The impact on surface abundances of the updated 9Be and 10B (p,α) burning rates is discussed for pre-MS stars.

  2. Detection and assessment of wood decay in glulam beams using a decay rate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senalik, Adam; Beall, Frank C.; Reis, Henrique

    2010-04-01

    A glulam beam retired from the field and without visible indications of wood decay was used. Towards detection and assessing wood decay, X-ray computer tomography and ultrasonic measurements were carried out. It was observed that decrease in mass density with increasing levels of wood decay affects x-rays attenuation and allows radioscopy to detect and assess wood decay. To detect and assess decay when only one lateral side of the beam is available, a modified impulse-echo is presented. The modified impulse-echo approach is based on observing the dynamic response of each lamina in the glulam beam to the drop of a steel sphere onto a steel plate coupled to the glulam beam lamina and upon a decay rate analysis of the corresponding time domain signal in a frequency band of interest. The selection of the frequency band of interest only requires knowledge of the nominal transverse dimensions of each lamina in the beam and of the corresponding wood species. It was observed that decay rate analysis allows detection and assessment of wood decay. The decay rate approach leads to an overall rate of false calls of 7.2%. Considering the variability that exists in wood including the presence of splits, orientation and thickness of growth rings, etc., this relative low rate of false calls makes this approach very attractive. Results show that results from both X-ray computer tomography and impulse-echo decay-rated based measurements are consistent with each other and can be used to detect and assess wood decay in structural lumber.

  3. Detection and Assessment of Wood Decay in Glulam Beams Using a Decay Rate Approach: A Review

    Treesearch

    C. Adam Senalik

    2013-01-01

    A glulam beam is subjected to X-ray computer tomography and acousto-ultrasonic measurements to detect and assess wood decay. A glulam beam without visible indications of wood decay was taken from field use. A modified impulse-echo technique is employed as an inspection method requiring access to only one side of the beam. It is observed that decay-rate analysis of the...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  9. Decay rates of the magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Xueke; Xu, Xiuli

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas. We prove the optimal decay rates for the solution to the constant state in the whole space in the Lp-norm with 2≤ p≤ 6 and its first derivatives in L2-norm. The proof is based on the optimal decay of the linearized equation and nonlinear energy estimates.

  10. Modern Measurements of Uranium Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons-Moss, T.; Faye, S. A.; Williams, R. W.; Wang, T. F.; Renne, P. R.; Mundil, R.; Harrison, M.; Bandong, B. B.; Moody, K.; Knight, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    It has been widely recognized that accurate and precise decay constants (λ) are critical to geochronology as highlighted by the EARTHTIME initiative, particularly the calibration benchmarks λ235U and λ238U. [1] Alpha counting experiments in 1971[2] measured λ235U and λ238U with ~0.1% precision, but have never been independently validated. We are embarking on new direct measurements of λ235U, λ238U, λ234Th, and λ234U using independent approaches for each nuclide. For the measurement of λ235U, highly enriched 235U samples will be chemically purified and analyzed for U concentration and isotopic composition by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Thin films will be electrodeposited from these solutions and the α activity will be measured in an α-γ coincidence counting apparatus, which allows reduced uncertainty in counting efficiency while achieving adequate counting statistics. For λ238U measurement we will measure ingrowth of 234Th in chemically purified, isotopically enriched 238U solutions, by quantitatively separating the Th and allowing complete decay to 234U. All of the measurements will be done using MC-ICP-MS aiming at 0.05% precision. This approach is expected to result in values of λ238U with less than 0.1% uncertainty, if combined with improved λ234Th measements. These will be achieved using direct decay measurements with an E-∆E charged particle telescope in coincidence with a gamma detector. This system allows measurement of 234Th β-decay and simultaneous detection and identification of α particles emitted by the 234U daughter, thus observing λ234U at the same time. The high-precision λ234U obtained by the direct activity measurements can independently verify the commonly used values obtained by indirect methods.[3] An overarching goal of the project is to ensure the quality of results including metrological traceability in order to facilitate implementation across diverse disciplines. [1] T

  11. {sup 7}Be in Stars and in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, Michael; Kumar, Vivek

    2008-01-24

    We discuss results and future plans for low-energy reactions that play an important role in current nuclear astrophysics research and that happen to concentrate around the region of A = 7. The {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and the {sup 3}He({sup 4}He,{gamma}){sup 7}Be reactions are crucial for understanding the solar-neutrino oscillations phenomenon and the latter one plays a central role in the issue of cosmic {sup 7}Li abundance and Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. The electron-capture (EC) decay rate of {sup 7}Be in metallic Cu host and the {beta}{sup -}decay rate of {sup 198}Au in the host alloy Al-Au have been measured simultaneously at several temperatures, ranging from 0.350 K to 293 K. The resulting null temperature dependence is discussed in terms of the inadequacy of the often-used Debye-Hueckel model for such measurements.

  12. Inverse method for estimating respiration rates from decay time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2012-09-01

    Long-term organic matter decomposition experiments typically measure the mass lost from decaying organic matter as a function of time. These experiments can provide information about the dynamics of carbon dioxide input to the atmosphere and controls on natural respiration processes. Decay slows down with time, suggesting that organic matter is composed of components (pools) with varied lability. Yet it is unclear how the appropriate rates, sizes, and number of pools vary with organic matter type, climate, and ecosystem. To better understand these relations, it is necessary to properly extract the decay rates from decomposition data. Here we present a regularized inverse method to identify an optimally-fitting distribution of decay rates associated with a decay time series. We motivate our study by first evaluating a standard, direct inversion of the data. The direct inversion identifies a discrete distribution of decay rates, where mass is concentrated in just a small number of discrete pools. It is consistent with identifying the best fitting "multi-pool" model, without prior assumption of the number of pools. However we find these multi-pool solutions are not robust to noise and are over-parametrized. We therefore introduce a method of regularized inversion, which identifies the solution which best fits the data but not the noise. This method shows that the data are described by a continuous distribution of rates, which we find is well approximated by a lognormal distribution, and consistent with the idea that decomposition results from a continuum of processes at different rates. The ubiquity of the lognormal distribution suggest that decay may be simply described by just two parameters: a mean and a variance of log rates. We conclude by describing a procedure that estimates these two lognormal parameters from decay data. Matlab codes for all numerical methods and procedures are provided.

  13. Inverse method for estimating respiration rates from decay time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2012-03-01

    Long-term organic matter decomposition experiments typically measure the mass lost from decaying organic matter as a function of time. These experiments can provide information about the dynamics of carbon dioxide input to the atmosphere and controls on natural respiration processes. Decay slows down with time, suggesting that organic matter is composed of components (pools) with varied lability. Yet it is unclear how the appropriate rates, sizes, and number of pools vary with organic matter type, climate, and ecosystem. To better understand these relations, it is necessary to properly extract the decay rates from decomposition data. Here we present a regularized inverse method to identify an optimally-fitting distribution of decay rates associated with a decay time series. We motivate our study by first evaluating a standard, direct inversion of the data. The direct inversion identifies a discrete distribution of decay rates, where mass is concentrated in just a small number of discrete pools. It is consistent with identifying the best fitting "multi-pool" model, without prior assumption of the number of pools. However we find these multi-pool solutions are not robust to noise and are over-parametrized. We therefore introduce a method of regularized inversion, which identifies the solution which best fits the data but not the noise. This method shows that the data are described by a continuous distribution of rates which we find is well approximated by a lognormal distribution, and consistent with the idea that decomposition results from a continuum of processes at different rates. The ubiquity of the lognormal distribution suggest that decay may be simply described by just two parameters; a mean and a variance of log rates. We conclude by describing a procedure that estimates these two lognormal parameters from decay data. Matlab codes for all numerical methods and procedures are provided.

  14. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  15. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  16. Decay rate of the second radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Robbins, D E

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  17. Li and B isotopic variations in an Allende CAI: Evidence for the in situ decay of short-lived 10Be and for the possible presence of the short-lived nuclide 7Be in the early solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussidon, Marc; Robert, François; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2006-01-01

    distributions occurred. Li and Be concentrations measured in different analytical spots are compared with those predicted by using experimentally determined partition coefficients according to a model of closed-system crystallization of the CAI melt. These criteria show that 56% of the spots in melilite, 38% in anorthite, and 8% in fassaite suffered post-crystallization perturbations of Li and/or Be distributions. In the remaining spots, which do not show obvious indication of redistribution of Li or Be, the 7Li/ 6Li isotopic variations (corrected for GCR exposure) are positively correlated with 9Be/ 6Li suggesting the in situ decay of now-extinct 7Be. The derived isochron implies that at the time of its formation, the CAI melt had a 7Be/ 9Be ratio of 0.0061 ± 0.0013 and a 7Li/ 6Li ratio of 11.49 ± 0.13. In contrast, all the spots in 3529-41, which do show evidence for post-magmatic redistribution of Li and Be, have relatively constant 7Li/ 6Li, averaging 11.72 ± 0.56, which is consistent with mass balance calculations for Li isotopic homogenization in the CAI after the decay of 7Be. The incorporation of live 7Be in 3529-41 requires, because of the very short half-life of this nuclide (53 days), that it be produced essentially contemporaneously with the formation of the CAI. Therefore, the irradiation processes responsible for production of 7Be must have occurred within the solar accretion disk. Calculations developed in the framework of the x-wind model [Gounelle, M., Shu, F.H., Shang, H., Glassgold, A.E., Rehm, E.K., Lee, T., 2004. The origin of short-lived radionuclides and early Solar System irradiation (abstract). Lunar Planet. Sci.35, 1829] reproduce the 7Be and 10Be abundances observed in 3529-41. The correlated presence of 7Be and 10Be in 3529-41 is thus a strong argument that 10Be, which is observed rather ubiquitously in CAIs, is also a product of irradiation in the early solar system, as might be a significant fraction of other short-lived radionuclides observed

  18. Effects of vacuum fluctuation suppression on atomic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, L.H.; Roman, Thomas A.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Excited atoms are shot through a cavity containing an electromagnetic field. > Cavity is in the lowest mode in a non-classical state. > Such a state can suppress the decay rate of the atoms in certain situations. > We show that this effect can be correlated with periods of negative energy density. - Abstract: The use of atomic decay rates as a probe of sub-vacuum phenomena will be studied. Because electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations are essential for radiative decay of excited atomic states, decay rates can serve as a measure of the suppression of vacuum fluctuations in non-classical states, such as squeezed vacua. In such states, the renormalized expectation value of the square of the electric field or the energy density can be periodically negative, representing suppression of vacuum fluctuations. We explore the extent to which atomic decays can be used to measure the mean squared electric field or energy density. We consider a scheme in which atoms in an excited state transit a closed cavity whose lowest mode contains photons in a non-classical state. A crucial feature of our analysis is that we do not employ the rotating wave approximation. The change in the decay probability of the atom in the cavity due to the non-classical state can, under certain circumstances, serve as a measure of the mean squared electric field or energy density in the cavity. We make some estimates of the magnitude of this effect, which indicate that an experimental test might be possible, although very challenging.

  19. Glueball decay rates in the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünner, Frederic; Parganlija, Denis; Rebhan, Anton

    2015-05-01

    We revisit and extend previous calculations of glueball decay rates in the Sakai-Sugimoto model, a holographic top-down approach for QCD with chiral quarks based on D 8 -D 8 ¯ probe branes in Witten's holographic model of nonsupersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The rates for decays into two pions, two vector mesons, four pions, and the strongly suppressed decay into four π0 are worked out quantitatively, using a range of the 't Hooft coupling which closely reproduces the decay rate of ρ and ω mesons and also leads to a gluon condensate consistent with QCD sum rule calculations. The lowest holographic glueball, which arises from a rather exotic polarization of gravitons in the supergravity background, turns out to have a significantly lower mass and larger width than the two widely discussed glueball candidates f0(1500 ) and f0(1710 ) . The lowest nonexotic and predominantly dilatonic scalar mode, which has a mass of 1487 MeV in the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model, instead provides a narrow glueball state, and we conjecture that only this nonexotic mode should be identified with a scalar glueball component of f0(1500 ) or f0(1710 ). Moreover the decay pattern of the tensor glueball is determined, which is found to have a comparatively broad total width when its mass is adjusted to around or above 2 GeV.

  20. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, William; Hysell, David

    2016-07-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  1. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, W. A.; Hysell, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  2. Time decay rates of non-Newtonian flows in RN+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bo-Qing; Chen, Zhi-Min

    2006-12-01

    This paper is concerned with time decay rates of the weak solutions of an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid motion model in half spaces for n[greater-or-equal, slanted]3. With the use of the spectral decomposition of the Stokes operator and Lp-Lq estimates, it is shown that the weak solutions decay in L2 norm like when the initial velocity u0[set membership, variant]L2[intersection]Lr for 1[less-than-or-equals, slant]r<2. The higher decay rates are obtained, if u0 satisfies the additional moment condition Moreover, the error estimates between the non-Newtonian flow and the Navier-Stokes flow are discussed.

  3. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-01

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  4. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-15

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  5. Litter decay rates are determined by lignin chemistry

    Treesearch

    Jennifer M. Talbot; Daniel J. Yelle; James Nowick; Kathleen K. Treseder

    2011-01-01

    Litter decay rates are often correlated with the initial lignin:N or lignin:cellulose content of litter, suggesting that interactions between lignin and more labile compounds are important controls over litter decomposition. The chemical composition of lignin may influence these interactions, if lignin physically or chemically protects labile components from microbial...

  6. Influences of the astrophysical environment on nuclear decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    In many astronomical environments, physical conditions are so extreme that nuclear decay rates can be significantly altered from their laboratory values. Such effects are relevant to a number of current problems in nuclear astrophysics. Experiments related to these problems are now being pursued, and will be described in this talk. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Beta-decay rates: towards a self-consistent approach

    SciTech Connect

    Borzov, I. N.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    1998-02-15

    An approximation to a self-consistent model of the ground state properties and spin-isospin excitations of neutron-rich nuclides is outlined. The structure of the Gamow-Teller strength functions in stable nuclei and short-lived nuclides undergoing high-energy {beta}-decay is discussed. The results of large-scale calculations of the {beta}-decay rates for spherical and slightly deformed nuclides of relevance to the r-process are analysed and compared with the results of existing global calculations.

  8. Uncertainties in Astrophysical β-decay Rates from the FRDM

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolli, M.G.; Möller, P.; Jones, S.

    2014-06-15

    β{sup −}-decay rates are of crucial importance in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, as they are a key component in stellar processes. Tabulated values of the decay rates as functions of both temperature T and density ρ are necessary input to stellar evolution codes such as MESA, or largescale nucleosynthesis simulations such as those performed by the NuGrid collaboration. Therefore, it is interesting to know the uncertainties in these rates and the effects of these uncertainties on stellar structure and isotopic yields. We have calculated β-strength functions and reaction rates for nuclei ranging from {sup 16}O to {sup 339}136, extending from the proton drip line to the neutron drip line based on a quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) in a deformed folded-Yukawa single-particle model. Q values are determined from the finite-range droplet mass model (FRDM). We have investigated the effect of model uncertainty on astrophysical β{sup −}-decay rates calculated by the FRDM. The sources of uncertainty considered are Q values and deformation. The rates and their uncertainties are generated for a variety of temperature and density ranges, corresponding to key stellar processes. We demonstrate the effects of these rate uncertainties on isotopic abundances using the NuGrid network calculations.

  9. Materials Outgassing Rate Decay in Vacuum at Isothermal Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Alvin Y.; Kastanas, George N.; Kramer, Leonard; Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    As a laboratory for scientific research, the International Space Station has been in Low Earth Orbit for nearly 20 years and is expected to be on-orbit for another 10 years. The ISS has been maintaining a relatively pristine contamination environment for science payloads. Materials outgassing induced contamination is currently the dominant source for sensitive surfaces on ISS and modeling the outgassing rate decay over a 20 to 30 year period is challenging. Materials outgassing is described herein as a diffusion-reaction process using ASTM E 1559 rate data. The observation of -1/2 (diffusion) or non-integers (reaction limited) as rate decay exponents for common ISS materials indicate classical reaction kinetics is unsatisfactory in modeling materials outgassing. Non-randomness of reactant concentrations at the interface is the source of this deviation from classical reaction kinetics. A diffusion limited decay was adopted as the result of the correlation of the contaminant layer thicknesses on returned ISS hardware, the existence of high outgassing silicone exhibiting near diffusion limited decay, and the confirmation of non-depleted material after ten years in the Low Earth Orbit.Keywords: Materials Outgassing, ASTM E 1559, Reaction Kinetics, Diffusion, Space Environments Effects, Contamination

  10. Materials outgassing rate decay in vacuum at isothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Alvin Y.; Kastanas, George N.; Kramer, Leonard; Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.

    2016-09-01

    As a laboratory for scientific research, the International Space Station has been in Low Earth Orbit for over 17 years and is planned to be on-orbit for another 10 years. The ISS has been maintaining a relatively pristine contamination environment for science payloads. Materials outgassing induced contamination is currently the dominant source for sensitive surfaces on ISS and modelling the outgassing rate decay over a 20 to 30 year period is challenging. Using ASTM E 1559 rate data, materials outgassing is described herein as a diffusion-reaction process with the interface playing a key role. The observation of -1/2 (diffusion) or non-integers (reaction limited) as rate decay exponents for common ISS materials indicate classical reaction kinetics is unsatisfactory in modelling materials outgassing. Nonrandomness of reactant concentrations at the interface is the source of this deviation from classical reaction kinetics. A t-1/2 decay is adopted as the result of the correlation of the contaminant layer thicknesses and composition on returned ISS hardware, the existence of high outgassing silicone exhibiting near diffusion limited decay, the confirmation of nondepleted material after ten years in Low Earth Orbit, and a potential slowdown of long term materials outgassing kinetics due to silicone contaminants at the interface.

  11. Power Spectrum Analysis of BNL Decay-Rate Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    93524, USA d Department of Physics, United States Air Force Academy, CO 80920, USA Keywords: Sun, Neutrinos • Corresponding author. Tel +1...irradiance data have been found to be closely related to rotation rate estimates derived from low-energy solar- neutrino data, this result supports the...recent conjecture that solar neutrinos may be responsible for variations in nuclear decay rates. We also carry out a similar comparison with local

  12. Validating a mass balance accounting approach to using 7Be measurements to estimate event-based erosion rates over an extended period at the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, Paolo; Walling, Des E.; Cogliandro, Vanessa; Callegari, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Use of the fallout radionuclides cesium-137 and excess lead-210 offers important advantages over traditional methods of quantifying erosion and soil redistribution rates. However, both radionuclides provide information on longer-term (i.e., 50-100 years) average rates of soil redistribution. Beryllium-7, with its half-life of 53 days, can provide a basis for documenting short-term soil redistribution and it has been successfully employed in several studies. However, the approach commonly used introduces several important constraints related to the timing and duration of the study period. A new approach proposed by the authors that overcomes these constraints has been successfully validated using an erosion plot experiment undertaken in southern Italy. Here, a further validation exercise undertaken in a small (1.38 ha) catchment is reported. The catchment was instrumented to measure event sediment yields and beryllium-7 measurements were employed to document the net soil loss for a series of 13 events that occurred between November 2013 and June 2015. In the absence of significant sediment storage within the catchment's ephemeral channel system and of a significant contribution from channel erosion to the measured sediment yield, the estimates of net soil loss for the individual events could be directly compared with the measured sediment yields to validate the former. The close agreement of the two sets of values is seen as successfully validating the use of beryllium-7 measurements and the new approach to obtain estimates of net soil loss for a sequence of individual events occurring over an extended period at the scale of a small catchment.

  13. Precision Measurement of the Singlet Positronium Decay Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ramadhan, Ali Hassan

    This is a new measurement of the annihilation decay rate, lambda_{S}, of parapositronium (p-Ps) as a test of quantum electrodynamics (QED). The measured value is lambda_ {S} = (7991.5 +/- 1.7) mu s^{-1}. At 210 ppm accuracy this result is 6.5 times more accurate than the previous measurement and is the first measurement sensitive enough to test the relative order alpha ^2lnalpha term in the QED calculation of lambda_{S}. This measurement, which is in agreement with theory, is particularly interesting in light of the 1500 ppm discrepancy between theory and experiment that still exists in the decay rate, lambda_{T}, of orthopositronium (o-Ps). This measurement is made using beta -decay positrons from a ^{68 }Ge-^{68}Ga source which form positronium in a variety of gas mixtures. The time interval between the emission of a positron and the detection of the annihilation gamma -ray is measured with a time-to-digital converter. The distribution of the time intervals is collected as an annihilation lifetime spectrum. lambda_{S } is measured indirectly by using magnetic mixing. In a magnetic field the m = 0 ground states mix to produce a state, o-Ps^', which has a faster decay rate, lambda_sp {T}{'}. Hence, at any gas density, rho, the histogram is fitted to two exponential components with decay rates, lambda_{T}(rho) and lambda_sp{T}{' }(rho). A quantity, Lambda( rho), linear in the gas density and equal to lambda_{S} at zero density, is calculated from the two measured decay rates and the value of the magnetic field. It is found that Lambda(rho) has a small slope due to spin exchange quenching in the gas. This slope is measured in a separate experiment and a correction is made for this. The quantity lambda_{S } is separately measured in N_2 and CO_2 (each mixed with various small percentages of isobutane) over a wide range of pressures and at two values of the magnetic field. The measured values of lambda_{S } are in agreement. The measurement in CO _2 is considered as a

  14. Effects of fog droplets on wake vortex decay rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moulden, T. H.; Frost, W.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model for the motion of particles in a laminar line vortex is discussed. The energy required to accelerate a set of these particles was determined and shown to be only a small fraction of the energy content of the vortex flow. It is shown that this energy transfer is unlikely to be sufficient to significantly modify the vortex decay rate. It is further argued that the effect of the particle on the viscous properties of the resulting two phase fluid leads to a slower decay rate than in single phase air flow. However, this conclusion may not necessarily follow for turbulence flows. Results show that the migration of particles to the outer flow results in a redistribution of the velocity profile in the vortex and in a non-uniform two phase viscosity across the core. It is suggested that these effects may accelerate vortex bursting.

  15. Solvent Polarity Effect on Nonradiative Decay Rate of Thioflavin T.

    PubMed

    Stsiapura, Vitali I; Kurhuzenkau, Siarhei A; Kuzmitsky, Valery A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Tikhomirov, Sergey A

    2016-07-21

    It has been established earlier that fluorescence quantum yield of thioflavin T (ThT)-a probe widely used for amyloid fibrils detection-is viscosity-dependent, and photophysical properties of ThT can be well-described by the fluorescent molecular rotor model, which associates twisted internal charge transfer (TICT) reaction with the main nonradiative decay process in the excited state of the dye. Solutions of ThT in a range of polar solvents were studied using steady-state fluorescence and sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy methods, and we showed that solvent effect on nonradiative transition rate knr cannot be reduced to the dependence on viscosity only and that ∼3 times change of knr can be observed for ThT in aprotic solvents and water, which correlates with solvent polarity. Different behavior was observed in alcohol solutions, particularly in longer n-alcohols, where TICT rate was mainly determined by rotational diffusion of ThT fragments. Quantum-chemical calculations of S0 → S1 transition energy were performed to get insight of polar solvent contribution to the excited-state energy stabilization. Effect of polar solvent on electronic energy levels of ThT was simulated by applying homogeneous electric field according to the Onsager cavity model. Static solvent effect on the excited-state potential energy surface, where charge transfer reaction takes place, was not essential to account for experimentally observed TICT rate differences in water and aprotic solvents. From the other side, nonradiative decay rate of ThT in water, ethylene glycol, and aprotic solvents was found to follow dynamics of polar solvation knr ∼ τS(-1), which can explain dependence of the TICT rate on both polarity and viscosity of the solvents.

  16. Precision measurements of positronium decay rate and energy level

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, S.; Kataoka, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Namba, T.; Suehara, T.; Akimoto, G.; Ishida, A.; Hashimoto, M. M.; Saito, H.; Idehara, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2008-08-08

    Positronium is an ideal system for the research of the bound state QED. New precise measurement of orthopositronium decay rate has been performed with an accuracy of 150 ppm, and the result combined with the last three is 7.0401{+-}0.0007 {mu}s{sup -1}. It is the first result to validate the 2nd order correction. The Hyper Fine Splitting of positronium is sensitive to the higher order corrections of the QED prediction and also to the new physics beyond Standard Model via the quantum oscillation into virtual photon. The discrepancy of 3.5{sigma} is found recently between the measured values and the QED prediction (O({alpha}{sup 3})). It might be due to the contribution of the new physics or the systematic problems in the previous measurements: (non-thermalized Ps and non-uniformity of the magnetic field). We propose new methods to measure HFS precisely without the these uncertainties.

  17. Fine root decay rates vary widely among lowland tropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Raich, James W; Russell, Ann E; Valverde-Barrantes, Oscar

    2009-08-01

    Prolific fine root growth coupled with small accumulations of dead fine roots indicate rapid rates of fine root production, mortality and decay in young tree plantations in lowland Costa Rica. However, published studies indicate that fine roots decay relatively slowly in tropical forests. To resolve this discrepancy, we used the intact-core technique to quantify first-year decay rates of fine roots in four single-species plantations of native tree species. We tested three hypotheses: first, that fine roots from different tree species would decay at different rates; second, that species having rapid fine root growth rates would also have rapid rates of fine root decay; and third, that differences in fine root decay among species could be explained by fine root chemistry variables previously identified as influencing decay rates. Fine roots in Virola koschnyi plantations decayed very slowly (k = 0.29 +/- 0.15 year(-1)); those of Vochysia guatemalensis decayed seven times faster (k = 2.00 +/- 0.13 year(-1)). Decay rates of the remaining two species, Hieronyma alchorneoides and Pentaclethra macroloba, were 1.36 and 1.28 year(-1), respectively. We found a positive, marginally significant correlation between fine root decay rates and the relative growth rates of live fine roots (R = 0.93, n = 4, P = 0.072). There was a highly significant negative correlation between fine root decay and fine root lignin:N (R = 0.99, P = 0.01), which supports the use of lignin:N as a decay-controlling factor within terrestrial ecosystem models. The decay rates that we observed in this single study location encompassed the entire range of fine root decay rates previously observed in moist tropical forests, and thus suggest great potential for individual tree species to alter belowground organic matter and nutrient dynamics within a biotically rich rainforest environment.

  18. Decay rates of human remains in an arid environment.

    PubMed

    Galloway, A; Birkby, W H; Jones, A M; Henry, T E; Parks, B O

    1989-05-01

    The environment of southern Arizona with mild winters and hot, dry summers produces great variability in decay rates of human remains. Summer temperatures, which range well over 38 degrees C (100 degrees F), induce rapid bloating as a result of the accumulation of decompositional gases. However, in certain circumstances, the aridity can lead to extensive mummification, allowing preservation of remains for hundreds of years. A retrospective study of 189 cases, concentrating on remains found on the desert floor or in the surrounding mountains and on remains found within closed structures, outlines the time frame and sequences of the decay process. Remains can retain a fresh appearance for a considerable time in the winter, but the onset of marked decomposition is rapid in the summer months. Bloating of the body usually is present two to seven days following death. Following this, within structures, there is frequently rapid decomposition and skeletonization. With outdoor exposure, remains are more likely to pass through a long period of dehydration of outer tissues, mummification, and reduction of desiccated tissue. Exposure of large portions of the skeleton usually does not occur until four to six months after death. Bleaching and exfoliation of bone--the beginning stages of destruction of the skeletal elements--begins at about nine months' exposure. Insect activity, including that of maggot and beetle varieties, may accelerate decomposition, but this process is greatly affected by location of the body, seasonal weather, and accessibility of the soft tissues. Carnivores and other scavengers also are contributing factors, as are clothing or covering of the body, substrate, elevation, and latitude.

  19. Decay rates of spherical and deformed proton emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C. N.; Esbensen, H.

    1999-11-23

    Using Green's function techniques, the authors derive expressions for the width of a proton decaying state in spherical and deformed nuclei. The authors show that the proton decay widths calculated by the exact expressions of Maglione et al. are equivalent to the distorted wave expressions of Bugrov et al., and that of {angstrom} berg et al. in the spherical case.

  20. Evaluating orangutan census techniques using nest decay rates: implications for population estimates.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, P D; Spehar, S N; Meijaard, E; Nardiyono; Purnomo; Sasmirul, A; Sudiyanto; Oman; Sulhnudin; Jasary; Jumali; Marshall, A J

    2008-01-01

    An accurate estimate for orangutan nest decay time is a crucial factor in commonly used methods for estimating orangutan population size. Decay rates are known to vary, but the decay process and, thus, the temporal and spatial variation in decay time are poorly understood. We used established line-transect methodology to survey orangutan nests in a lowland forest in East Kalimantan, Indonesia, and monitored the decay of 663 nests over 20 months. Using Markov chain analysis we calculated a decay time of 602 days, which is significantly longer than times found in other studies. Based on this, we recalculated the orangutan density estimate for a site in East Kalimantan; the resulting density is much lower than previous estimates (previous estimates were 3-8 times higher than our recalculated density). Our data suggest that short-term studies where decay times are determined using matrix mathematics may produce unreliable decay times. Our findings have implications for other parts of the orangutan range where population estimates are based on potentially unreliable nest decay rate estimates, and we recommend that for various parts of the orangutan range census estimates be reexamined. Considering the high variation in decay rates there is a need to move away from using single-number decay time estimates and, preferably, to test methods that do not rely on nest decay times as alternatives for rapid assessments of orangutan habitat for conservation in Borneo.

  1. How to calculate α-decay rates in the future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, B. Gillis; Ward, Daniel E.; Åberg, Sven

    2016-12-01

    New elements discovered during past decades have been created in fusion reactions where a lighter nucleus is collided with a heavier one. The new elements created often decay by emitting α particles. From the half-lives of the decays and the energies of the emitted particles one may extract some properties of the new elements. In this talk the recent work performed by the Lund group to model α decay starting from nuclear density-functional theory is reviewed and a possible extension is mentioned.

  2. Complex Degradation Processes Lead to Non-Exponential Decay Patterns and Age-Dependent Decay Rates of Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Deneke, Carlus; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Valleriani, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies on mRNA stability have established several, qualitatively distinct decay patterns for the amount of mRNA within the living cell. Furthermore, a variety of different and complex biochemical pathways for mRNA degradation have been identified. The central aim of this paper is to bring together both the experimental evidence about the decay patterns and the biochemical knowledge about the multi-step nature of mRNA degradation in a coherent mathematical theory. We first introduce a mathematical relationship between the mRNA decay pattern and the lifetime distribution of individual mRNA molecules. This relationship reveals that the mRNA decay patterns at steady state expression level must obey a general convexity condition, which applies to any degradation mechanism. Next, we develop a theory, formulated as a Markov chain model, that recapitulates some aspects of the multi-step nature of mRNA degradation. We apply our theory to experimental data for yeast and explicitly derive the lifetime distribution of the corresponding mRNAs. Thereby, we show how to extract single-molecule properties of an mRNA, such as the age-dependent decay rate and the residual lifetime. Finally, we analyze the decay patterns of the whole translatome of yeast cells and show that yeast mRNAs can be grouped into three broad classes that exhibit three distinct decay patterns. This paper provides both a method to accurately analyze non-exponential mRNA decay patterns and a tool to validate different models of degradation using decay data. PMID:23408982

  3. On the gauge invariance of the decay rate of false vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Motoi; Moroi, Takeo; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Shoji, Yutaro

    2017-08-01

    We study the gauge invariance of the decay rate of the false vacuum for the model in which the scalar field responsible for the false vacuum decay has gauge quantum number. In order to calculate the decay rate, one should integrate out the field fluctuations around the classical path connecting the false and true vacua (i.e., so-called bounce). Concentrating on the case where the gauge symmetry is broken in the false vacuum, we show a systematic way to perform such an integration and present a manifestly gauge-invariant formula of the decay rate of the false vacuum.

  4. Renormalization-scale uncertainty in the decay rate of false vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Motoi; Moroi, Takeo; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Shoji, Yutaro

    2016-01-01

    We study radiative corrections to the decay rate of false vacua, paying particular attention to the renormalization-scale dependence of the decay rate. The decay rate exponentially depends on the bounce action. The bounce action itself is renormalization-scale dependent. To make the decay rate scale-independent, radiative corrections, which are due to the field fluctuations around the bounce, have to be included. We show quantitatively that the inclusion of the fluctuations suppresses the scale dependence, and hence is important for the precise calculation of the decay rate. We also apply our analysis to a supersymmetric model and show that the radiative corrections are important for the Higgs-stau system with charge breaking minima.

  5. The 2νβ-β- decay rates within Pyatov's restoration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Serdar; Çakmak, Neçla; Selam, Cevad

    2017-01-01

    We try to give a detailed analysis of the 2 νβ-β- decay rates to the final ground states for decay emitters: 70Zn, 80Se, 86Kr, 94Zr, 104Ru, 110Pd, 114Cd and 124Sn. The nucleon-nucleon residual interaction potential is defined according to Pyatov's restoration method. The nuclear matrix element for 2 νβ-β- decay is obtained by including the virtual contributions coming from the isobar analogue excitations within the framework of proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pnQRPA). The calculated decay rates are compared with mean field, schematic model and other calculations.

  6. Comment on “Li and Be isotopic variations in an Allende CAI: Evidence for the in situ decay of short-lived 10Be and for the possible presence of the short-lived nuclide 7Be in the early solar system,” by M. Chaussidon, F. Robert, and K.D. McKeegan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desch, S. J.; Ouellette, N.

    2006-11-01

    Recently Chaussidon et al. reported isotopic measurements of the Allende meteorite Ca, Al-rich inclusion (CAI) 3529-41 that they claim as evidence that live 7Be was incorporated into this CAI at the time of its formation [Chaussidon, M., Robert, F., McKeegan, K.D., 2006. Li and Be isotopic variations in an Allende CAI: evidence for the in situ decay of short-lived 10Be and for the possible presence of the short-lived nuclide 7Be in the early solar system. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta70, 224-245]. They claim their data show excesses of 7Li/ 6Li above the chondritic value, and that the 7Li/ 6Li excesses correlate linearly with 9Be/ 6Li, implying that the excess 7Li arose from the decay of 7Be ( t1/2 = 53 days). In this Comment we dispute this claim. We show that the authors did not statistically analyze their data correctly, and that a linear correlation between 7Li/ 6Li and 9Be/ 6Li can in fact be ruled out. We show that the authors over-corrected for the effects of spallogenic Li, and in fact no statistically significant excesses of 7Li above chondritic ratios exist. Finally, we show that many of the spots in Allende 3529-41 that the authors counted as isotopically undisturbed show evidence of isotopic disturbance. We demonstrate that while their data support the late addition of isotopically light Li in spots with low Be/Li, their data are otherwise consistent with constant 7Li/ 6Li at near-chondritic levels. The data do not provide support for live 7Be in the early Solar System.

  7. Estimation of waste component-specific landfill decay rates using laboratory-scale decomposition data.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2010-06-15

    The current methane generation model used by the U.S. EPA (Landfill Gas Emissions Model) treats municipal solid waste (MSW) as a homogeneous waste with one decay rate. However, component-specific decay rates are required to evaluate the effects of changes in waste composition on methane generation. Laboratory-scale rate constants, k(lab), for the major biodegradable MSW components were used to derive field-scale decay rates (k(field)) for each waste component using the assumption that the average of the field-scale decay rates for each waste component, weighted by its composition, is equal to the bulk MSW decay rate. For an assumed bulk MSW decay rate of 0.04 yr(-1), k(field) was estimated to be 0.298, 0.171, 0.015, 0.144, 0.033, 0.02, 0.122, and 0.029 yr(-1), for grass, leaves, branches, food waste, newsprint, corrugated containers, coated paper, and office paper, respectively. The effect of landfill waste diversion programs on methane production was explored to illustrate the use of component-specific decay rates. One hundred percent diversion of yard waste and food waste reduced the year 20 methane production rate by 45%. When a landfill gas collection schedule was introduced, collectable methane was most influenced by food waste diversion at years 10 and 20 and paper diversion at year 40.

  8. Long-term measurements of 36Cl to investigate potential solar influence on the decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossert, Karsten; Nähle, Ole J.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, Jenkins et al. [6] reported on fluctuations in the detected decay events of 36Cl which were measured with a Geiger-Müller counter. Experimental data of 32Si measured by means of an end-window gas-flow proportional counter at the Brookhaven National Laboratory show similar periodicity, albeit a different amplitude. Jenkins et al. interpret the fluctuations as evidence of solar influence on the decay rates of beta-decaying radionuclides.

  9. Mechanisms and Rates of Decay of Marine Viruses in Seawater †

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, Curtis A.; Chen, Feng

    1992-01-01

    Loss rates and loss processes for viruses in coastal seawater from the Gulf of Mexico were estimated with three different marine bacteriophages. Decay rates in the absence of sunlight ranged from 0.009 to 0.028 h-1, with different viruses decaying at different rates. In part, decay was attributed to adsorption by heat-labile particles, since viruses did not decay or decayed very slowly in seawater filtered through a 0.2-μm-pore-size filter (0.2-μm-filtered seawater) and in autoclaved or ultracentrifuged seawater but continued to decay in cyanide-treated seawater. Cyanide did cause decay rates to decrease, however, indicating that biological processes were also involved. The observations that decay rates were often greatly reduced in 0.8- or 1.0-μm-filtered seawater, whereas bacterial numbers were not, suggested that most bacteria were not responsible for the decay. Decay rates were also reduced in 3-μm-filtered or cycloheximide-treated seawater but not in 8-μm-filtered seawater, implying that flagellates consumed viruses. Viruses added to flagellate cultures decayed at 0.15 h-1, corresponding to 3.3 viruses ingested flagellate-1 h-1. Infectivity was very sensitive to solar radiation and, in full sunlight, decay rates were 0.4 to 0.8 h-1. Even when UV-B radiation was blocked, rates were as high as 0.17 h-1. Calculations suggest that in clear oceanic waters exposed to full sunlight, most of the virus decay, averaged over a depth of 200 m, would be attributable to solar radiation. When decay rates were averaged over 24 h for a 10-m coastal water column, loss rates of infectivity attributable to sunlight were similar to those resulting from all other processes combined. Consequently, there should be a strong diel signal in the concentration of infectious viruses. In addition, since sunlight destroys infectivity more quickly than virus particles, a large proportion of the viruses in seawater is probably not infective. Images PMID:16348812

  10. The use of decay rates to analyse the performance of railway track in rolling noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Diehl, R. J.

    2006-06-01

    Through the development and testing of theoretical models for rolling noise in the past, it has been well demonstrated that the rate of decay of vibration along the rail is closely linked to the noise performance of the track, since it controls the effective radiating length of the rail. The decay rates of vibration along the rail have long been used by researchers as an intermediate, measurable parameter by which to test and improve the accuracy of prediction models. Recently, it has been suggested that the decay rates should be used as a criterion for the selection of track for noise measurements that are part of the acceptance testing of interoperable trains in Europe. In this context, a more detailed understanding of the factors that affect the measurement of decay rates and a consistent approach to the data processing have become important topics. Here, a method is suggested for the calculation of decay rates from frequency response measurements. Different effects are shown in the measured decay rates of a ballasted track with mono-bloc sleepers, a slab track and a ballasted track with bi-bloc sleepers. In the last case, a model for a periodically supported track is used to study the effects observed. It is shown that a peak in the decay rate just above the pinned-pinned frequency may be overestimated because of the measurement procedure that has been used.

  11. Resonances in (11)C observed in the (4)He((7)Be, alpha)(7)Be and (4)He((7)Be, p)(10)B reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Curtis, N.; Malcolm, J.; Munoz-Britton, T.; Price, D.; Wheldon, C.; Achouri, N. L.; Demaret, P.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Pain, Steven D; Brown, S.; Catford, W.; Harlin, Christopher W; Thomas, J. S.; Wilson, G.; Chipps, K.; Milin, M.; Raabe, R.; Soic, N.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the {sup 4}He({sup 7}Be,{alpha}){sup 7}Be and {sup 4}He({sup 7}Be,p){sup 10}B reactions were performed using {sup 7}Be beam energies of 7.1 and 23 MeV and a helium-4 target, employing the thick target technique. Resonances were observed between E{sub x}({sup 11}C) = 8.6 to 13.8 MeV. An R-matrix analysis was performed to characterize the spins and partial widths. This analysis showed that the observed sequence of states was consistent with that found for {sup 7}Li + {alpha} resonant scattering populating resonances in {sup 11}B. A comparison of the proposed partial widths for decay with the Wigner limit indicates that several of the states are associated with cluster-like structures.

  12. The microscopic approach to the rates of radioactive decay by emission of heavy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaşcu, M.; Silişteanu, I.

    1988-08-01

    We have applied a simple microscopic decay theory to the analysis of the rare decay modes. The absolute decay rates are estimated by using the shell model and resonance formation factors and optical model penetrabilities. The resonance formation factors are deduced from the strong interaction form of the theory where the wave function in the internal region is represented in terms of compound nucleus decay. In order to account fully for the data, the implication of internal degrees of freedom was found to be necessary, but no adjustment of Gamow factor was needed. The results have been discussed in the light of the previously reported results and data.

  13. Stability and decay rates of nonisotropic attractive Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Huepe, C.; Tuckerman, L. S.; Metens, S.; Brachet, M. E.

    2003-08-01

    Nonisotropic attractive Bose-Einstein condensates are investigated numerically with Newton and inverse Arnoldi methods. The stationary solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and their linear stability are computed. Bifurcation diagrams are calculated and used to find the condensate decay rates corresponding to macroscopic quantum tunneling, two-three-body inelastic collisions, and thermally induced collapse. Isotropic and nonisotropic condensates are compared. The effect of anisotropy on the bifurcation diagram and the decay rates is discussed. Spontaneous isotropization of the condensates is found to occur. The influence of isotropization on the decay rates is characterized near the critical point.

  14. Energy decay rate of transmission problem between thermoelasticity of type I and type II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Han, Zhong-Jie; Xu, Gen-Qi

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the energy decay rate of a 1-d mixed type I and type II thermoelastic system is considered. The system consists of two kinds of thermoelastic components. One is the classical thermoelasticity (so-called type I), another one is nonclassical thermoelasticity without dissipation (named type II). These two components are coupled at the interface satisfying certain transmission condition. We prove that the system is lack of uniform exponential decay rate and further obtain the sharp polynomial decay rate by resolvent estimates together with the diagonalization argument in linear algebra. Moreover, we present some numerical simulations to support these theoretical results.

  15. Biomass decay rates and tissue nutrient loss in bloom and non-bloom-forming macroalgal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Jessie; Green, Lindsay A.; Thornber, Carol S.

    2016-09-01

    Macroalgal blooms occur in shallow, low-wave energy environments and are generally dominated by fast-growing ephemeral macroalgae. When macroalgal mats undergo senescence and decompose they can cause oxygen depletion and release nutrients into the surrounding water. There are relatively few studies that examine macroalgal decomposition rates in areas impacted by macroalgal blooms. Understanding the rate of macroalgal bloom decomposition is essential to understanding the impacts of macroalgal blooms following senescence. Here, we examined the biomass, organic content, nitrogen decay rates and δ15N values for five macroalgal species (the bloom-forming Agardhiella subulata, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Ulva compressa, and Ulva rigida and the non-bloom-forming Fucus vesiculosus) in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, U.S.A. using a litterbag design. Bloom-forming macroalgae had similar biomass decay rates (0.34-0.51 k d-1) and decayed significantly faster than non-bloom-forming macroalgae (0.09 k d-1). Biomass decay rates also varied temporally, with a significant positive correlation between biomass decay rate and water temperature for U. rigida. Tissue organic content decreased over time in all species, although A. subulata and G. vermiculophylla displayed significantly higher rates of organic content decay than U. compressa, U. rigida, and F. vesiculosus. Agardhiella subulata had a significantly higher rate of tissue nitrogen decay (0.35 k d-1) than all other species. By contrast, only the δ15N of F. vesiculosus changed significantly over the decay period. Overall, our results indicate that bloom-forming macroalgal species decay more rapidly than non-bloom-forming species.

  16. The anharmonic phonon decay rate in group-III nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, G. P.

    2009-04-01

    Measured lifetimes of hot phonons in group-III nitrides have been explained theoretically by considering three-phonon anharmonic interaction processes. The basic ingredients of the theory include full phonon dispersion relations obtained from the application of an adiabatic bond charge model and crystal anharmonic potential within the isotropic elastic continuum model. The role of various decay routes, such as Klemens, Ridley, Vallée-Bogani and Barman-Srivastava channels, in determining the lifetimes of the Raman active zone-centre longitudinal optical (LO) modes in BN (zincblende structure) and A1(LO) modes in AlN, GaN and InN (wurtzite structure) has been quantified.

  17. Calculations on decay rates of various proton emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-03-01

    Proton radioactivity of neutron-deficient nuclei around the dripline has been systematically studied within the deformed density-dependent model. The crucial proton-nucleus potential is constructed via the single-folding integral of the density distribution of daughter nuclei and the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction or the proton-proton Coulomb interaction. After the decay width is obtained by the modified two-potential approach, the final decay half-lives can be achieved by involving the spectroscopic factors from the relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory combined with the BCS method. Moreover, a simple formula along with only one adjusted parameter is tentatively proposed to evaluate the half-lives of proton emitters, where the introduction of nuclear deformation is somewhat discussed as well. It is found that the calculated results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental values and consistent with other theoretical studies, indicating that the present approach can be applied to the case of proton emission. Predictions on half-lives are made for possible proton emitters, which may be useful for future experiments.

  18. Seasonal determinations of algal virus decay rates reveal overwintering in a temperate freshwater pond.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew M; Short, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    To address questions about algal virus persistence (i.e., continued existence) in the environment, rates of decay of infectivity for two viruses that infect Chlorella-like algae, ATCV-1 and CVM-1, and a virus that infects the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina parva, CpV-BQ1, were estimated from in situ incubations in a temperate, seasonally frozen pond. A series of experiments were conducted to estimate rates of decay of infectivity in all four seasons with incubations lasting 21 days in spring, summer and autumn, and 126 days in winter. Decay rates observed across this study were relatively low compared with previous estimates obtained for other algal viruses, and ranged from 0.012 to 11% h(-1). Overall, the virus CpV-BQ1 decayed most rapidly whereas ATCV-1 decayed most slowly, but for all viruses the highest decay rates were observed during the summer and the lowest were observed during the winter. Furthermore, the winter incubations revealed the ability of each virus to overwinter under ice as ATCV-1, CVM-1 and CpV-BQ1 retained up to 48%, 19% and 9% of their infectivity after 126 days, respectively. The observed resilience of algal viruses in a seasonally frozen freshwater pond provides a mechanism that can support the maintenance of viral seed banks in nature. However, the high rates of decay observed in the summer demonstrate that virus survival and therefore environmental persistence can be subject to seasonal bottlenecks.

  19. Seasonal determinations of algal virus decay rates reveal overwintering in a temperate freshwater pond

    PubMed Central

    Long, Andrew M; Short, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    To address questions about algal virus persistence (i.e., continued existence) in the environment, rates of decay of infectivity for two viruses that infect Chlorella-like algae, ATCV-1 and CVM-1, and a virus that infects the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina parva, CpV-BQ1, were estimated from in situ incubations in a temperate, seasonally frozen pond. A series of experiments were conducted to estimate rates of decay of infectivity in all four seasons with incubations lasting 21 days in spring, summer and autumn, and 126 days in winter. Decay rates observed across this study were relatively low compared with previous estimates obtained for other algal viruses, and ranged from 0.012 to 11% h−1. Overall, the virus CpV-BQ1 decayed most rapidly whereas ATCV-1 decayed most slowly, but for all viruses the highest decay rates were observed during the summer and the lowest were observed during the winter. Furthermore, the winter incubations revealed the ability of each virus to overwinter under ice as ATCV-1, CVM-1 and CpV-BQ1 retained up to 48%, 19% and 9% of their infectivity after 126 days, respectively. The observed resilience of algal viruses in a seasonally frozen freshwater pond provides a mechanism that can support the maintenance of viral seed banks in nature. However, the high rates of decay observed in the summer demonstrate that virus survival and therefore environmental persistence can be subject to seasonal bottlenecks. PMID:26943625

  20. Continuum-state and bound-state β--decay rates of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, M.; Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanova, V. A.; Marton, J.; Pitschmann, M.; Serebrov, A. P.; Troitskaya, N. I.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2009-09-01

    For the β--decay of the neutron we analyze the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. We calculate the decay rates, the electron energy spectrum for the continuum-state decay mode, and angular distributions of the decay probabilities for the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. The theoretical results are obtained for the new value for the axial coupling constant gA=1.2750(9), obtained recently by H. Abele [Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 60, 1 (2008)] from the fit of the experimental data on the coefficient of the correlation of the neutron spin and the electron momentum of the electron energy spectrum of the continuum-state decay mode. We take into account the contribution of radiative corrections and the scalar and tensor weak couplings. The calculated angular distributions of the probabilities of the bound-state decay modes of the polarized neutron can be used for the experimental measurements of the bound-state β--decays into the hyperfine states with total angular momentum F=1 and scalar and tensor weak coupling constants.

  1. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2015-10-15

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. Currently, a single large-scale calculation is available based on a QRPA calculation with a schematic interaction on top of the Finite Range Droplet Model. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei.

  2. Constraining spacetime variations of nuclear decay rates from light curves of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpikov, Ivan; Piskunov, Maxim; Sokolov, Anton; Troitsky, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    The luminosity of fading type Ia supernovae is governed by radioactive decays of Ni 56 and Co 56 . The decay rates are proportional to the Fermi coupling constant GF and, therefore, are determined by the vacuum expectation value v of the Brout-Englert-Higgs field. We use publicly available sets of light curves of type Ia supernova at various redshifts to constrain possible spacetime variations of the Ni 56 decay rate. The resulting constraint is not very tight; however, it is the only direct bound on the variation of the decay rate for redshifts up to z ˜1 . We discuss potential applications of the result to searches for nonconstancy of GF and v .

  3. WEST NILE VIRUS ANTIBODY DECAY RATE IN FREE-RANGING BIRDS.

    PubMed

    McKee, Eileen M; Walker, Edward D; Anderson, Tavis K; Kitron, Uriel D; Brawn, Jeffrey D; Krebs, Bethany L; Newman, Christina; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Levine, Rebecca S; Carrington, Mary E; McLean, Robert G; Goldberg, Tony L; Hamer, Gabriel L

    2015-07-01

    Antibody duration, following a humoral immune response to West Nile virus (WNV) infection, is poorly understood in free-ranging avian hosts. Quantifying antibody decay rate is important for interpreting serologic results and for understanding the potential for birds to serorevert and become susceptible again. We sampled free-ranging birds in Chicago, Illinois, US, from 2005 to 2011 and Atlanta, Georgia, US, from 2010 to 2012 to examine the dynamics of antibody decay following natural WNV infection. Using serial dilutions in a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we quantified WNV antibody titer in repeated blood samples from individual birds over time. We quantified a rate of antibody decay for 23 Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) of 0.198 natural log units per month and 24 individuals of other bird species of 0.178 natural log units per month. Our results suggest that juveniles had a higher rate of antibody decay than adults, which is consistent with nonlinear antibody decay at different times postexposure. Overall, most birds had undetectable titers 2 yr postexposure. Nonuniform WNV antibody decay rates in free-ranging birds underscore the need for cautious interpretation of avian serology results in the context of arbovirus surveillance and epidemiology.

  4. Probing CP violation with time integrated decay rates into non-CP eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, João P.

    1998-07-01

    Many of the experiments proposed to look for interference CP violation in neutral B mesons concentrate on tagged decay into CP eigenstates. Aleksan, Dunietz, Kayser and Le Diberder have shown that one can also look for interference CP violation using tagged decays into non-CP eigenstates. In all these methods, one must trace the time dependence of the decays. In this article we discuss a new method to search for interference CP violation by using only time integrated rates into non-CP eigenstates. The method hinges on the comparison between the decays of Υ(4S) into ff, f¯f¯, and ff¯, and also uses the rates for l+f and l-f. This method does not depend on how the Υ(4S) is produced; provided enough statistics, one can use both symmetric and asymmetric colliders.

  5. A measurement of the gluon splitting rate into /cc¯ pairs in hadronic Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2003-05-01

    The rate of gluon splitting into /cc¯ pairs in hadronic Z decays is measured using the data sample collected by ALEPH from 1991 to 1995. The selection is based on the identification of leptons (electrons and muons) originating from semileptonic charm decays, and on the topological properties of signal events. The result derived from the selected sample is gcc¯=(3.26+/-0.23(stat)+/-0.42(syst))%.

  6. Hawking-Moss Bounces and Vacuum Decay Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Erick J.

    2007-06-22

    The conventional interpretation of the Hawking-Moss (HM) solution implies a transition rate between vacua that depends only on the values of the potential in the initial vacuum and at the top of a potential barrier, leading to the implausible conclusion that transitions to distant vacua can be as likely as those to a nearby one. I analyze this issue using a nongravitational example with analogous properties. I show that such HM bounces do not give reliable rate calculations, but are instead related to the probability of finding a quasistable configuration at a local potential maximum.

  7. Short term memory bowing effect is consistent with presentation rate dependent decay.

    PubMed

    Tarnow, Eugen

    2010-12-01

    I reanalyze the free recall data of Murdock, J Exp Psychol 64(5):482-488 (1962) and Murdock and Okada, J Verbal Learn and Verbal Behav 86:263-267 (1970) which show the famous bowing effect in which initial and recent items are recalled better than intermediate items (primacy and recency effects). Recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall consistent with the tagging/retagging theory. The slope of the decay increases with increasing presentation rate. The initial items, with an effectively low presentation rate, decay with the slowest logarithmic slope, explaining the primacy effect. The finding that presentation rate limits the duration of short term memory suggests a basis for memory loss in busy adults, for the importance of slow music practice, for long term memory deficiencies for people with attention deficits who may be artificially increasing the presentation rates of their surroundings. A well-defined, quantitative measure of the primacy effect is introduced.

  8. Geometrical scaling and modal decay rates in periodic arrays of deeply subwavelength Terahertz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Isić, Goran Gajić, Radoš

    2014-12-21

    It is well known that due to the high conductivity of noble metals at terahertz frequencies and scalability of macroscopic Maxwell equations, a geometrical downscaling of a terahertz resonator results in the linear upscaling of its resonance frequency. However, the scaling laws of modal decay rates, important for the resonator excitation efficiency, are much less known. Here, we investigate the extent to which the scale-invariance of decay rates is violated due to the finite conductivity of the metal. We find that the resonance quality factor or the excitation efficiency may be substantially affected by scaling and show that this happens as a result of the scale-dependence of the metal absorption rate, while the radiative decay and the dielectric cavity absorption rates are approximately scale-invariant. In particular, we find that by downscaling overcoupled resonators, their excitation efficiency increases, while the opposite happens with undercoupled resonators.

  9. Proton resonance scattering of 7Be

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Niikura, M.; Kwon, Y. K.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.

    2006-07-12

    We have studied the proton resonance scattering of 7Be by using a pure 7Be beam produced at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator; CNS stands for Center of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo). The excitation function of 8B was measured up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV, with the thick-target method. The excited states of 8B higher than 3.5 MeV were not known by the past experiments. This proton elastic scattering is also of importance in relation with the 7Be(p,{gamma})8B reaction, which is a key reaction in the standard solar model.

  10. Beyond the bucket: testing the effect of experimental design on rate and sequence of decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbott, Sarah; Murdock, Duncan; Purnell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Experimental decay has revealed the potential for profound biases in our interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils, with non-random sequences of character loss distorting the position of fossil taxa in phylogenetic trees. By characterising these sequences we can rewind this distortion and make better-informed interpretations of the affinity of enigmatic fossil taxa. Equally, rate of character loss is crucial for estimating the preservation potential of phylogentically informative characters, and revealing the mechanisms of preservation themselves. However, experimental decay has been criticised for poorly modeling 'real' conditions, and dismissed as unsophisticated 'bucket science'. Here we test the effect of a differing experimental parameters on the rate and sequence of decay. By doing so, we can test the assumption that the results of decay experiments are applicable to informing interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils from diverse preservational settings. The results of our experiments demonstrate the validity of using the sequence of character loss as a phylogenetic tool, and sheds light on the extent to which environment must be considered before making decay-informed interpretations, or reconstructing taphonomic pathways. With careful consideration of experimental design, driven by testable hypotheses, decay experiments are robust and informative - experimental taphonomy needn't kick the bucket just yet.

  11. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: β-decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, M.; Cass, J.; Passucci, G.; Aprahamian, A.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The pattern of isotopic abundances produced in rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the nuclear physics properties of thousands of unstable neutron-rich nuclear species that participate in the process. It has long been recognized that the some of the most influential pieces of nuclear data for r-process simulations are β-decay lifetimes. In light of experimental advances that have pushed measurement capabilities closer to the classic r-process path, we revisit the role of individual β-decay rates in the r process. We perform β-decay rate sensitivity studies for a main (A > 120) r process in a range of potential astrophysical scenarios. We study the influence of individual rates during (n, γ)-(γ, n) equilibrium and during the post-equilibrium phase where material moves back toward stability. We confirm the widely accepted view that the most important lifetimes are those of nuclei along the r-process path for each astrophysical scenario considered. However, we find in addition that individual β-decay rates continue to shape the final abundance pattern through the post-equilibrium phase, for as long as neutron capture competes with β decay. Many of the lifetimes important for this phase of the r process are within current or near future experimental reach.

  12. Precision decay rate calculations in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, Anders; Farhi, David; Frost, William; Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2017-04-01

    Tunneling in quantum field theory is worth understanding properly, not least because it controls the long-term fate of our Universe. There are, however, a number of features of tunneling rate calculations which lack a desirable transparency, such as the necessity of analytic continuation, the appropriateness of using an effective instead of classical potential, and the sensitivity to short-distance physics. This paper attempts to review in pedagogical detail the physical origin of tunneling and its connection to the path integral. Both the traditional potential-deformation method and a recent, more direct, propagator-based method are discussed. Some new insights from using approximate semiclassical solutions are presented. In addition, we explore the sensitivity of the lifetime of our Universe to short-distance physics, such as quantum gravity, emphasizing a number of important subtleties.

  13. Coordinate-dependent diffusion coefficients: Decay rate in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Palchikov, Yu. V.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.

    2007-06-15

    Based on a master equation for the reduced density matrix of an open quantum collective system, the influence of coordinate-dependent microscopical diffusion coefficients on the decay rate from a metastable state is treated. For various frictions and temperatures larger than a crossover temperature, the quasistationary decay rates obtained with the coordinate-dependent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients are compared with those obtained with the coordinate-independent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients and coordinate-independent and -dependent phenomenological sets of diffusion coefficients. Neglecting the coordinate dependence of diffusion coefficients, one can strongly overestimate or underestimate the decay rate at low temperature. The coordinate-dependent phenomenological diffusion coefficient in momentum are shown to be suitable for applications.

  14. Best rates of decay for coupled waves with different propagation speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oquendo, Higidio Portillo; Raya, Raul Prado

    2017-08-01

    We consider an abstract system of two coupled evolution equations. One of these equations has an internal damping, and the other is simply elastic. When both equations have the same propagation speed, Alabau et al. (J Evol Equ 2:127-150, 2002) showed that the semigroup of this system decays polynomially in time with the rate t^{-1/2}. In this work, we consider this coupled system when the propagation speeds of the equations are different, and we study the asymptotic behavior of the semigroup. For this case, we show that the semigroup still decays polynomially with a slower rate as t^{-1/4}. Moreover, we prove that this rate of decay is the best.

  15. Change in decay rates of dioxin-like compounds in Yusho patients.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinya; Akahane, Manabu; Kanagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kajiwara, Jumboku; Mitoma, Chikage; Uchi, Hiroshi; Furue, Masutaka; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2016-09-07

    Once ingested, dioxins and dioxin-like compounds are excreted extremely slowly. Excretion can be evaluated by its half-life. Half-lives estimated from observed concentrations are affected by excretion and ongoing exposure. We investigated the change in apparent half-life using a theoretical model based on exposure to dioxin and dioxin-like compounds. We carried out longitudinal measurements of the blood concentration of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in a Yusho cohort during 2002 to 2010. We estimated the change in decay rates of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF and octachlorodibenzodioxin (OCDD) using a second-order equation. We found that the decay rate of OCDD increased, whereas the decay rate of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF of patients with a relatively high concentration of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF decreased. OCDD results were in accordance with decreasing levels of dioxin and dioxin-like compounds in the environment. The decay rate of OCDD in the body was affected by the decay rate of OCDD in the environment by ingestion because it was near the steady-state. In contrast, the decay rate of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF in the body was affected less by ingestion from the environment because it was far higher than in the steady-state. We demonstrated that the level of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF in the environment is decreasing. The excretion half-life is longer than the environmental half-life, thus the excretion half-life in a Yusho patient is increased.

  16. Backstepping approach to the arbitrary decay rate for Euler-Bernoulli beam under boundary feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bao-Zhu; Jin, Feng-Fei

    2010-10-01

    In this article, we are concerned with the boundary stabilisation of the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation for which all eigenvalues of the (control) free system are located on the imaginary axis of the complex plane. The fourth-order system in spacial variable is transformed into a coupled heat-like system. This enables us to make a natural backstepping transformation in vector form to transform the system into a target system which has arbitrary decay rate. The state feedback is thus designed. It is shown that the original closed-loop system is exponentially stable with the given arbitrary decay rate.

  17. Fluorescence decay rate statistics of a single molecule in a disordered cluster of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Carminati, R.; Saenz, J. J.

    2007-07-15

    The statistical properties of the fluorescence lifetime of single emitters in disordered systems are discussed. The contribution of radiative and nonradiative processes to the spontaneous decay rate is analyzed using a simple analytical model, in full agreement with exact numerical simulations. The relative fluctuations of the decay rate are shown to exhibit two well-defined regimes dominated either by near-field scattering or by absorption processes. In both regimes, the averaged apparent quantum yield remains high enough to permit practical measurements. Lifetime fluctuations could thus be used a probe of the local environment in complex systems at the nanometer scale.

  18. Constraints on the η η' decay rate of a scalar glueball from gauge/gravity duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünner, Frederic; Rebhan, Anton

    2015-12-01

    Predictions of glueball decay rates in the holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model for low-energy QCD can be uniquely extended to include finite quark masses up to an as-yet-undetermined parameter in the coupling of glueballs to the nonanomalous part of the pseudoscalar mass terms. The assumption of a universal coupling of glueballs to mass terms of the full nonet of pseudoscalar mesons leads to flavor asymmetries in the decay rates of scalar glueballs that agree well with experimental data for the glueball candidate f0(1710 ) and implies a vanishing decay rate into η η' pairs, for which only upper bounds for the f0(1710 ) meson are known at present from experiment. Relaxing this assumption, the holographic model gives a tight correlation between the decay rates into pairs of pseudo-Goldstone bosons of the same type and η η' pairs. If Γ (G →K K )/Γ (G →π π ) is kept within the range reported currently by the Particle Data Group for the f0(1710 ) meson, the rate Γ (G →η η')/Γ (G →π π ) is predicted to be ≲0.04 . The corresponding situation for f0(1500 ) is also discussed; however, this is found to be much less compatible with the interpretation of a largely unmixed glueball.

  19. Evidence for correlations between fluctuations in 54Mn decay rates and solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsinally, T.; Fancher, S.; Czerny, M.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Heim, J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Nistor, J.; O'Keefe, D.

    2016-02-01

    Following recent indications that several radioactive isotopes show fluctuating decay rates which may be influenced by solar activity, we present findings from a 2 year period of data collection on 54Mn. Measurements were recorded hourly from a 1 μCi sample of 54Mn monitored from January 2010-December 2011. A series of signal-detection algorithms determine regions of statistically significant fluctuations in decay behaviour from the expected exponential form. The 239 decay flags identified during this interval were compared to daily distributions of multiple solar indices, generated by NOAA, which are associated with heightened solar activity. The indices were filtered to provide a list of the 413 strongest events during a coincident period. We find that 49% of the strongest solar events are preceded by at least 1 decay flag within a 48 h interval, and 37% of decay flags are followed by a reported solar event within 48 h. These results are significant at the 0.9σ and 2.8σ levels respectively, based on a comparison to results obtained from a shuffle test, in which the decay measurements were randomly shuffled in time 10,000 times. We also present results from a simulation combining constructed data reflecting 10 sites which compared and filtered decay flags generated from all sites. The results indicate a potential 35% reduction in the false positive rate in going from 1 to 10 sites. By implication, the improved statistics attest to the benefit of analysing data from a larger number of geographically distributed sites in parallel.

  20. Blackbody-induced decay, excitation and ionization rates for Rydberg states in hydrogen and helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, I. L.; Nekipelov, E. A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2010-06-01

    New features of the blackbody-induced radiation processes on Rydberg atoms were discovered on the basis of numerical data for the blackbody-induced decay Pdnl(T), excitation Penl(T) and ionization Pionnl(T) rates of nS, nP and nD Rydberg states calculated together with the spontaneous decay rates Pspnl in neutral hydrogen, and singlet and triplet helium atoms for some values of the principal quantum number n from 10 to 500 at temperatures from T = 100 K to 2000 K. The fractional rates Rd(e, ion)nl(T) = Pnld(e, ion)(T)/Pspnl equal to the ratio of the induced decay (excitation, ionization) rates to the rate of spontaneous decay were determined as functions of T and n in every series of states with a given angular momentum l = 0, 1, 2. The calculated data reveal an essential difference between the asymptotic dependence of the ionization rate Pionnl(T) and the rates of decay and excitation Pd(e)nl(T)~T/n2. The departures appear in each Rydberg series for n > 100 and introduce appreciable corrections to the formula of Cooke and Gallagher. Two different approximation formulae are proposed on the basis of the numerical data, one for Rd(e)nl(T) and another one for Rionnl(T), which reproduce the calculated values in wide ranges of principal quantum number from n = 10 to 1000 and temperatures between T = 100 K and T = 2000 K with an accuracy of 2% or better. Modified Fues' model potential approach was used for calculating matrix elements of bound-bound and bound-free radiation transitions in helium.

  1. Radioactive 7Be materials flown on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Following the discovery of the atmospheric cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), we began a search for other known nuclides produced by similar mechanisms. None of the others have the narrow gamma-ray line emission of Be-7 decay which enable its rapid detection and quantification. A search for Be-10 atoms on LDEF clamp plates using accelerator mass spectrometry is described. An unexpected result was obtained.

  2. False vacuum transitions —Analytical solutions and decay rate values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, R. A. C.; Moraes, P. H. R. S.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-08-01

    In this work we show a class of oscillating configurations for the evolution of the domain walls in Euclidean space. The solutions are obtained analytically. Phase transitions are achieved from the associated fluctuation determinant, by the decay rates of the false vacuum.

  3. Stochastic stability of a class of unbounded delay neutral stochastic differential equations with general decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangzi; Wu, Fuke; Huang, Chengming

    2012-02-01

    Without the linear growth condition on the drift coefficient, this article examines the existence and uniqueness of global solutions of a class of neutral stochastic differential equations with unbounded delay and their asymptotic stabilities with general decay rate. To illustrate the application of our results, this article gives a two-dimensional system as an example.

  4. O(alpha{sup 3} ln alpha) Corrections to Positronium Decay Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, Kirill

    2001-07-25

    We compute O ({alpha}{sup 3} ln {alpha}) corrections to the decay rates of para- and orthopositronium into two and three photons, respectively. For this calculation we employ the nonrelativistic QED regularized dimensionally and we explain how in this framework the logarithms of the fine structure constant can be extracted.

  5. Estimate Of The Decay Rate Constant of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation From Landfilled Drywall

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to investigate the impact of particle size on H2S gas emissions and estimate a decay rate constant for H2S gas generation from the anaerobic decomposition of drywall. Three different particle sizes of regular drywall and one particle size of paperless drywa...

  6. Estimate Of The Decay Rate Constant of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation From Landfilled Drywall

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to investigate the impact of particle size on H2S gas emissions and estimate a decay rate constant for H2S gas generation from the anaerobic decomposition of drywall. Three different particle sizes of regular drywall and one particle size of paperless drywa...

  7. Configuration splitting and gamma-decay transition rates in the two-group shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, V. I.

    2015-09-15

    Expressions for reduced gamma-decay transition rates were obtained on the basis of the twogroup configuration model for the case of transitions between particles belonging to identical groups of nucleons. In practical applications, the present treatment is the most appropriate for describing decays for odd–odd nuclei in the vicinity of magic nuclei or for nuclei where the corresponding subshells stand out in energy. Also, a simple approximation is applicable to describing configuration splitting in those cases. The present calculations were performed for nuclei whose mass numbers are close to A ∼ 90, including N = 51 odd—odd isotones.

  8. The rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, David J.

    Determining the rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor is complex because of the number of isotopes involved, different types of decay, half-lives of the isotopes, and some isotopes decay into other radioactive isotopes. Traditionally, a simplified rule of 7s and 10s is used to determine the dose rate from nuclear weapons and can be to estimate the dose rate from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. An experiment was designed to determine the dose rate with respect to time from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. The experiment exposed 0.5 grams of unenriched Uranium to a fast and thermal neutron flux from a TRIGA Research Reactor (Lakewood, CO) for ten minutes. The dose rate from the fission products was measured by four Mirion DMC 2000XB electronic personal dosimeters over a period of six days. The resulting dose rate following a rule of 10s: the dose rate of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor decreases by a factor of 10 for every 10 units of time.

  9. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  10. Measurement of the decay rate of the SiH feature as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Kraus, George F.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the SiH fundamental stretch could serve as a diagnostic indicator of the oxidation state of silicate surfaces exposed to the solar wind for prolonged periods. We have now measured the primary decay rate of SiH in vacuo as a function of temperature and find that the primary rate constant for the decay can be characterized by the following equation: k(min(exp -1)) approximately equals 0.186 exp(-9/RT) min(exp -1), where R = 2 x 10(exp -3) kcal deg(exp -1) mole(exp -1). This means that the half-life for the decay of the SiH feature at room temperature is approximately 20 yrs, whereas the half-life at a peak lunar regolith temperature of approximately 500K would be only approximately 20 days. At the somewhat lower temperature of approximately 400K the half-life for the decay is on the order of 200 days. The rate of loss of SiH as a function of temperature provides an upper limit to the quantity of H implanted by the solar wind which can be retained by a silicate grain in a planetary regolith. This will be discussed in more detail here.

  11. Note on intrinsic decay rates for abstract wave equations with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasiecka, Irena; Messaoudi, Salim A.; Mustafa, Muhammad I.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we consider a viscoelastic abstract wave equation with memory kernel satisfying the inequality g' + H(g) ⩽ 0, s ⩾ 0 where H(s) is a given continuous, positive, increasing, and convex function such that H(0) = 0. We shall develop an intrinsic method, based on the main idea introduced by Lasiecka and Tataru ["Uniform boundary stabilization of semilinear wave equation with nonlinear boundary dissipation," Differential and Integral Equations 6, 507-533 (1993)], for determining decay rates of the energy given in terms of the function H(s). This will be accomplished by expressing the decay rates as a solution to a given nonlinear dissipative ODE. We shall show that the obtained result, while generalizing previous results obtained in the literature, is also capable of proving optimal decay rates for polynomially decaying memory kernels (H(s) ˜ sp) and for the full range of admissible parameters p ∈ [1, 2). While such result has been known for certain restrictive ranges of the parameters p ∈ [1, 3/2), the methods introduced previously break down when p ⩾ 3/2. The present paper develops a new and general tool that is applicable to all admissible parameters.

  12. Characterization of decay and emission rates of ultrafine particles in indoor ice rink.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Lee, K

    2013-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine indoor ultrafine particle (UFP, diameter <100 nm) levels in ice rinks and to characterize UFP decay and emission rates. All 15 public ice rinks in Seoul were investigated for UFP and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations. Three ice rinks did not show peaks in UFP concentrations, and one ice rink used two resurfacers simultaneously. High peaks of UFP and CO concentrations were observed when the resurfacer was operated. The average air change rate in the 11 ice rinks was 0.21 ± 0.13/h. The average decay rates of UFP number concentrations measured by the P-Trak and DiSCmini were 0.54 ± 0.21/h and 0.85 ± 0.34/h, respectively. The average decay rate of UFP surface area concentration was 0.33 ± 0.15/h. The average emission rates of UFP number concentrations measured by P-Trak and DiSCmini were 1.2 × 10(14) ± 6.5 × 10(13) particles/min and 3.3 × 10(14) ± 2.4 × 10(14) particles/min, respectively. The average emission rate of UFP surface area concentration was 3.1 × 10(11) ± 2.0 × 10(11) μm(2)/min. UFP emission rate was associated with resurfacer age. DiSCmini measured higher decay and emission rates than P-Trak due to their different measuring mechanisms and size ranges.

  13. A comprehensive study of Interatomic Coulombic Decay in argon dimers: Extracting R-dependent absolute decay rates from the experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rist, J.; Miteva, T.; Gaire, B.; Sann, H.; Trinter, F.; Keiling, M.; Gehrken, N.; Moradmand, A.; Berry, B.; Zohrabi, M.; Kunitski, M.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, T.; Landers, A. L.; Schöffler, M.; Williams, J. B.; Kolorenč, P.; Gokhberg, K.; Jahnke, T.; Dörner, R.

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we present a comprehensive and detailed study of Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) occurring after irradiating argon dimers with XUV-synchrotron radiation. A manifold of different decay channels is observed and the corresponding initial and final states are assigned. Additionally, the effect of nuclear dynamics on the ICD electron spectrum is examined for one specific decay channel. The internuclear distance-dependent width Γ(R) of the decay is obtained from the measured kinetic energy release distribution of the ions employing a classical nuclear dynamics model.

  14. Well hydraulics in pumping tests with exponentially decayed rates of abstraction in confined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhang; Zhan, Hongbin; Wang, Quanrong; Liang, Xing; Ma, Teng; Chen, Chen

    2017-05-01

    Actual field pumping tests often involve variable pumping rates which cannot be handled by the classical constant-rate or constant-head test models, and often require a convolution process to interpret the test data. In this study, we proposed a semi-analytical model considering an exponentially decreasing pumping rate started at a certain (higher) rate and eventually stabilized at a certain (lower) rate for cases with or without wellbore storage. A striking new feature of the pumping test with an exponentially decayed rate is that the drawdowns will decrease over a certain period of time during intermediate pumping stage, which has never been seen before in constant-rate or constant-head pumping tests. It was found that the drawdown-time curve associated with an exponentially decayed pumping rate function was bounded by two asymptotic curves of the constant-rate tests with rates equaling to the starting and stabilizing rates, respectively. The wellbore storage must be considered for a pumping test without an observation well (single-well test). Based on such characteristics of the time-drawdown curve, we developed a new method to estimate the aquifer parameters by using the genetic algorithm.

  15. Core hole screening and decay rates of double core ionized first row hydrides.

    PubMed

    Inhester, L; Groenhof, G; Grubmüller, H

    2013-04-28

    Because of the high intensity, X-ray free electron lasers allow one to create and probe double core ionized states in molecules. The decay of these multiple core ionized states crucially determines the evolution of radiation damage in single molecule diffractive imaging experiments. Here we have studied the Auger decay in hydrides of first row elements after single and double core ionization by quantum mechanical ab initio calculations. In our approach the continuum wave function of the emitted Auger electron is expanded into spherical harmonics on a radial grid. The obtained decay rates of double K-shell vacancies were found to be systematically larger than those for the respective single K-shell vacancies, markedly exceeding the expected factor of two. This enhancement is attributed to the screening effects induced by the core hole. We propose a simple model, which is able to predict core hole decay rates in molecules with low Z elements based on the electron density in the vicinity of the core hole.

  16. Polynomial decay rate of a thermoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko plate model with Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen, Marié

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with the polynomial stabilization of a two-dimensional thermoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko plate model with no mechanical damping. The model is subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on the elastic as well as the thermal variables. The work complements our earlier work in Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen (Z Angew Math Phys 64:1305-1325, 2013) on the polynomial stabilization of a Mindlin-Timoshenko model in a radially symmetric domain under Dirichlet boundary conditions on the displacement and thermal variables and free boundary conditions on the shear angle variables. In particular, our aim is to investigate the effect of the Dirichlet boundary conditions on all the variables on the polynomial decay rate of the model. By once more applying a frequency domain method in which we make critical use of an inequality for the trace of Sobolev functions on the boundary of a bounded, open connected set we show that the decay is slower than in the model considered in the cited work. A comparison of our result with our polynomial decay result for a magnetoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko model subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on the elastic variables in Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen (Z Angew Math Phys 63:1047-1065, 2012) also indicates a correlation between the robustness of the coupling between parabolic and hyperbolic dynamics and the polynomial decay rate in the two models.

  17. A study of the fully differential inclusive semileptonic B meson decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipeles, Elliot

    2004-12-01

    We present a study of the fully differential inclusive semileptonic B meson decay rate. Using a maximum likelihood fit, we extract the fractional contributions from the B → X clnu processes with Xc = D, D*, D**, and nonresonant Xc, and the process B → Xulnu. From the fit results, we extract moments of B → Xclnu differential decay rate and the partial branching fraction of the B → Xulnu decay in a restricted region of phase space. The region in which the B → Xulnu partial branching fraction is measured is MX < 1.5 GeV/c2, q2 > 11 GeV2/c4. This measurement is used to extract CKM parameter |Vub| = (4.73 +/- 0.23 +/- 0.82 +/- 0.18 +/- 0.56 +/- 0.66) x 10-3, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, detector systematics, B → Xcl nu model dependence, B → Xulnu model dependence, and theoretical uncertainties. From the < M2X-M2D > moment, the first moment of the photon energy spectrum in B → Xsgamma, and the semileptonic B branching fraction, we extract the CKM parameter |V cb| = (4.12 +/- .10 +/- 0.09 +/- 0.16) x 10-2, where the uncertainties are due to the measurement of the semileptonic B decay rate, the moments measurements, and theoretical uncertainties. Both CKM parameter extractions use Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) predictions for inclusive semileptonic B decay. The measured moments are also used to test related predictions.

  18. Analytic heating rate of neutron star merger ejecta derived from Fermi's theory of beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Sari, Re'em; Piran, Tsvi

    2017-06-01

    Macronovae (kilonovae) that arise in binary neutron star mergers are powered by radioactive beta decay of hundreds of r-process nuclides. We derive, using Fermi's theory of beta decay, an analytic estimate of the nuclear heating rate. We show that the heating rate evolves as a power law ranging between t-6/5 and t-4/3. The overall magnitude of the heating rate is determined by the mean values of nuclear quantities, e.g. the nuclear matrix elements of beta decay. These values are specified by using nuclear experimental data. We discuss the role of higher order beta transitions and the robustness of the power law. The robust and simple form of the heating rate suggests that observations of the late-time bolometric light curve ∝ t-4/3 would be direct evidence of a r-process driven macronova. Such observations could also enable us to estimate the total amount of r-process nuclei produced in the merger.

  19. Short term memory bowing effect is consistent with presentation rate dependent decay

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    I reanalyze the free recall data of Murdock, J Exp Psychol 64(5):482–488 (1962) and Murdock and Okada, J Verbal Learn and Verbal Behav 86:263–267 (1970) which show the famous bowing effect in which initial and recent items are recalled better than intermediate items (primacy and recency effects). Recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall consistent with the tagging/retagging theory. The slope of the decay increases with increasing presentation rate. The initial items, with an effectively low presentation rate, decay with the slowest logarithmic slope, explaining the primacy effect. The finding that presentation rate limits the duration of short term memory suggests a basis for memory loss in busy adults, for the importance of slow music practice, for long term memory deficiencies for people with attention deficits who may be artificially increasing the presentation rates of their surroundings. A well-defined, quantitative measure of the primacy effect is introduced. PMID:22132046

  20. Rates and C P asymmetries of charmless two-body baryonic Bu ,d ,s decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2017-05-01

    With the experimental evidences of B¯ 0→p p ¯ and B-→Λ p ¯ decays, it is now possible to extract both tree and penguin amplitudes of the charmless two-body baryonic B decays for the first time. The extracted penguin-tree ratio agrees with the expectation. Using the topological amplitude approach with the experimental results on B¯ 0→p p ¯ and B-→Λ p ¯ decay rates as input, predictions on all other B¯ q→B B ¯ , B D ¯ , D B ¯ and D D ¯ decay rates, where B and D are the low lying octet and decuplet baryons, respectively, are given. It is nontrivial that the results do not violate any existing experimental upper limit. From the analysis it is understandable that why B¯ 0→p p ¯ and B-→Λ p ¯ modes are the first two modes with experimental evidences. Relations on rates are verified using the numerical results. We note that the predicted B-→p Δ++ ¯ rate is close to the experimental bound, which has not been updated in the last ten years. Direct C P asymmetries of all B¯q→B B ¯, B D ¯, D B ¯ and D D ¯ modes are explored. Relations on C P asymmetries are examined using the numerical results. The direct C P asymmetry of B¯ 0→p p ¯ decay can be as large as ±50 %. Some of the C P asymmetries can serve as tests of the Standard Model. Most of them are pure penguin modes, which are expected to be sensitive to new physics contributions. In particular, B¯s 0→Ξ-Ξ- ¯ , B¯ 0→Ξ-Σ*- ¯ , B¯ 0→Ω-Ξ- ¯ , B¯s 0→Σ*-Σ*- ¯ , B¯s 0→Ω-Ω- ¯ , B¯s 0→Ξ-Ξ*- ¯ , B¯s 0→Ξ*-Ξ- ¯ , B¯ 0→Ξ*-Σ*- ¯ , B¯ 0→Ω-Ξ*- ¯ and B¯s 0→Ξ*-Ξ*- ¯ decays are Δ S =-1 pure penguin modes with unsuppressed rates, which can be searched in the near future. Their C P asymmetries are constrained to be of few % and are good candidates to be added to the list of the tests of the Standard Model.

  1. Bayesian meta-analysis to synthesize decay rate constant estimates for common fecal indicator bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Lauren E; Field, Katharine G

    2016-11-01

    For decades, fecal indicator bacteria have been used as proxies to quantitatively estimate fecal loading into water bodies. Widely used cultured indicators (e.g. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp.) and more recently developed genetic markers are well studied, but their decay in the environment is still poorly understood. We used Hierarchical Bayesian Linear Modeling to conduct a series of meta-analyses using published decay rate constant estimates, to synthesize findings into pooled estimates and identify gaps in the data preventing reliable estimates. In addition to the meta-analysis assuming all estimates come from the same population, meta-regressions including covariates believed to contribute to decay were fit and used to provided synthesized estimates for specific combinations of significant variables. Additionally, statements regarding the significance of variables across studies were made using the 95% confidence interval for meta-regression coefficients. These models were used to construct a mean decay rate constant estimate as well as credible intervals for the mean and the distribution of all likely data points. While synthesized estimates for each targeted indicator bacteria were developed, the amount of data available varied widely for each target, as did the predictive power of the models as determined by testing with additional data not included in the modeling. Temperature was found to be significant for all selected indicators, while light was found to be significant only for culturable indicators. Results from the models must be interpreted with caution, as they are based only on the data available, which may not be representative of decay in other scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimal decay rates of classical solutions for the full compressible MHD equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jincheng; Tao, Qiang; Yao, Zheng-an

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with optimal decay rates for higher-order spatial derivatives of classical solutions to the full compressible MHD equations in three-dimensional whole space. If the initial perturbation is small in {H^3}-norm and bounded in {L^q(qin [1, 6/5 ))}-norm, we apply the Fourier splitting method by Schonbek (Arch Ration Mech Anal 88:209-222, 1985) to establish optimal decay rates for the second-order spatial derivatives of solutions and the third-order spatial derivatives of magnetic field in {L^2}-norm. These results improve the work of Pu and Guo (Z Angew Math Phys 64:519-538, 2013).

  3. Relativistic two-photon decay rates of 2s12 hydrogenic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, S. P.; Drake, G. W. F.

    1981-07-01

    Rates are calculated for the decay of metastable 2s12 ions to the ground state by the simultaneous emission of two photons. The calculation includes all relativistic and retardation effects, and all combinations of photon multipoles which make significant contributions up to Z=100. Summations over intermediate states are performed by constructing a finite-basis-set representation of the Dirac Green's function. The estimated accuracy of the results is +/- 10 ppm for all Z up to 100. The decay rates are about 20 (αZ)2% larger than an earlier calculation by Johnson owing to the inclusion of higher-order retardation effects. The general question of gauge invariance in two-photon transitions is discussed.

  4. Casimir-Polder shift and decay rate in the presence of nonreciprocal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Crosse, J. A.; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the Casimir-Polder frequency shift and decay rate for an atom in front of a nonreciprocal medium by using macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The results are a generalization of the respective quantities for matter with broken time-reversal symmetry which does not fulfill the Lorentz reciprocity principle. As examples, we contrast the decay rates, the resonant and nonresonant frequency shifts of a perfectly conducting (reciprocal) mirror with those of a perfectly reflecting nonreciprocal mirror. We find different power laws for the distance dependence of all quantities in the retarded and nonretarded limits. As an example of a more realistic nonreciprocal medium, we investigate a topological insulator subject to a time-symmetry-breaking perturbation.

  5. The electron temperature and 44Ti decay rate in Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laming, J. Martin

    2001-11-01

    The effects of plasma elemental composition and ionization state on the effective decay rate of 44Ti are investigated. We essentially follow the methods of the first authors to treat this topic, Mochizuki et al., but use more realistic plasma models, including radiative cooling, to compute the evolution of the charge state distribution behind the reverse shock. For uniform density ejecta (i.e., no clumps or bubbles) we find a negligible change to the decay rate of 44Ti. We discuss the effects of non-uniform ejecta. We also briefly consider the effects on these calculations of collisionless electron heating associated with weak secondary shocks propagating throughout the Cas A shell as a result of foward or reverse shock encounters with density inhomogeneities, recently suggested as an explanation for the hard X-ray tail seen in BeppoSAX and RXTE/OSSE spectra. .

  6. Concentrations and decay rates of ozone in indoor air in dependence on building and surface materials.

    PubMed

    Moriske, H J; Ebert, G; Konieczny, L; Menk, G; Schöndube, M

    1998-08-01

    The decay of ozone in indoor air was measured in a closed chamber after contact with different building materials and residential surfaces. The tested materials were: vinyl wall paper, woodchip paper, plywood, latex paint, fitted carpet, and plaster. In the summer of 1996, the entry of ozone from ambient air into indoor air during ventilation and the ozone decay in indoor air, after windows had been closed again, were studied. Measurements were done in a residential house on the outskirts of Berlin. The following results were gained: the chamber measurements showed a decay of ozone after contact with most of the materials put inside the chamber. Higher decay rates have been obtained for wall papers, plywood, fitted carpet and plaster. As described in the literature, ozone is able to react with olefines inside the materials and is able to form formaldehyde and other components. This formation of formaldehyde could also be confirmed in our investigations. Thus, in most cases, the formaldehyde concentrations were lower than the German guideline value of 0.1 ppm. The formation of formaldehyde could be prevented when a special wall paper that was coated with activated carbon was used. In the house, a complete ozone diffusion into indoor air took place during ventilation within 30 min. After closing the windows, the ozone concentrations decreased to the basic level before ventilation within 60-90 min.

  7. Absorption cross-section and decay rate of rotating linear dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Aslan, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    We analytically study the scalar perturbation of non-asymptotically flat (NAF) rotating linear dilaton black holes (RLDBHs) in 4-dimensions. We show that both radial and angular wave equations can be solved in terms of the hypergeometric functions. The exact greybody factor (GF), the absorption cross-section (ACS), and the decay rate (DR) for the massless scalar waves are computed for these black holes (BHs). The results obtained for ACS and DR are discussed through graphs.

  8. Optimal decay rate for the wave equation on a square with constant damping on a strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahn, Reinhard

    2017-04-01

    We consider the damped wave equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the unit square parametrized by Cartesian coordinates x and y. We assume the damping a to be strictly positive and constant for x<σ and zero for x>σ . We prove the exact t^{-4/3}-decay rate for the energy of classical solutions. Our main result (Theorem 1) answers question (1) of Anantharaman and Léautaud (Anal PDE 7(1):159-214, 2014, Section 2C).

  9. Initial cooperative decay rate and cooperative Lamb shift of resonant atoms in an infinite cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2011-08-15

    We obtain in both the scalar and vector photon models the analytical expressions for the initial cooperative decay rate and the cooperative Lamb shift for an ensemble of resonant atoms distributed uniformly in an infinite cylindrical geometry for the case that the initial state of the system is prepared in a phased state modulated in the direction of the cylindrical axis. We find that qualitatively the scalar and vector theories give different results.

  10. Measurement of HOx• production rate due to radon decay in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huiling

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce (•OH and HO2 •) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HOx• production rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HOx• production rate was found to be (4.31±0.07) x 105 HOx• per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G(HOx•)-value, 7.86±0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HOx•] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HOx• produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HOx• production rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for •OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial •OH produced from the photolysis of O3/H2O.

  11. Measurement of the decay rate of single-frequency perturbations on blast waves.

    PubMed

    Edens, A D; Ditmire, T; Hansen, J F; Edwards, M J; Adams, R G; Rambo, P K; Ruggles, L; Smith, I C; Porter, J L

    2005-12-09

    To explore the validity of theories forwarded to explain the dynamics of hydrodynamic perturbations on high Mach number blast waves, we have studied the decay rate of perturbations on blast waves traveling through nitrogen gas. In our experiments, 1 kJ pulses from the Z-Beamlet laser at Sandia National Laboratories illuminated solid targets immersed in gas and created blast waves. The polytropic index implied by comparing experiment to theoretical predictions is compared to simulation results.

  12. Excitonic coupling effect on the nonradiative decay rate in molecular aggregates: Formalism and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenqiang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang; Ren, Jiajun; Peng, Qian; Shuai, Zhigang

    2017-09-01

    We present here an analytical thermal vibration correlation function formalism to calculate the nonradiative decay rate constant (knr) considering excitonic coupling effect (ECE) for molecular aggregates based on split-operator approximation. Combining with first-principles calculations, we found that knr is enhanced by ECE for both H- and J-aggregates. In addition, ECE is found to be minor for the AIEgens (aggregation-induced emission luminogens).

  13. Estimation of HF artificial ionospheric turbulence characteristics using comparison of calculated plasma wave decay rates with the measured decay rates of the stimulated electromagnetic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareev, D. D.; Gavrilenko, V. G.; Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown experimentally that the relaxation time of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) after the pump wave turn off decreases when frequency of the electromagnetic wave, responsible for the SEE generation (pump wave f0 or diagnostic wave fdw) approaches 4th harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency fce . Since the SEE relaxation is determined by the damping rate of plasma waves with the same frequency, responsible for the SEE generation, we calculated damping rates of plasma waves with ω ∼ωuh (ω is the plasma wave frequency, ωuh is the upper hybrid frequency) for frequencies close to and distant from the double resonance where ωuh ∼ 4ωce (ωce = 2 πfce). The calculations were performed numerically on the base of linear plasma wave dispersion relation at arbitrary ratio between | Δ | = ω - 4ωce and |k‖ |VTe (VTe is the electron thermal speed and k‖ is the projection of the wave vector onto the magnetic field direction. A comparison of calculation and experimental results has shown that obtained frequency dependence of the SEE decay rate is similar to the damping rate frequency dependence for plasma waves with wave vectors directed at the angles 60-70° to the magnetic field, and gives a strong hint that oblique upper hybrid plasma waves should be responsible for the SEE generation.

  14. Radiative decay rate of excitons in square quantum wells: Microscopic modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Khramtsov, E. S.; Grigoryev, P. S.; Ignatiev, I. V.; Verbin, S. Yu.; Belov, P. A. Efimov, Yu. P.; Eliseev, S. A.; Lovtcius, V. A.; Petrov, V. V.; Yakovlev, S. L.

    2016-05-14

    The binding energy and the corresponding wave function of excitons in GaAs-based finite square quantum wells (QWs) are calculated by the direct numerical solution of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The precise results for the lowest exciton state are obtained by the Hamiltonian discretization using the high-order finite-difference scheme. The microscopic calculations are compared with the results obtained by the standard variational approach. The exciton binding energies found by two methods coincide within 0.1 meV for the wide range of QW widths. The radiative decay rate is calculated for QWs of various widths using the exciton wave functions obtained by direct and variational methods. The radiative decay rates are confronted with the experimental data measured for high-quality GaAs/AlGaAs and InGaAs/GaAs QW heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The calculated and measured values are in good agreement, though slight differences with earlier calculations of the radiative decay rate are observed.

  15. 31Cl beta decay and the 30P31S reaction rate in nova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Michael; Wrede, C.; Brown, B. A.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; NSCL e12028 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The 30P31S reaction rate is critical for modeling the final isotopic abundances of ONe nova nucleosynthesis, identifying the origin of presolar nova grains, and calibrating proposed nova thermometers. Unfortunately, this rate is essentially experimentally unconstrained because the strengths of key 31S proton capture resonances are not known, due to uncertainties in their spins and parities. Using a 31Cl beam produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, we have populated several 31S states for study via beta decay and devised a new decay scheme which includes updated beta feedings and gamma branchings as well as multiple states previously unobserved in 31Cl beta decay. Results of this study, including the unambiguous identification due to isospin mixing of a new l = 0 , Jπ = 3 /2+ 31S resonance directly in the middle of the Gamow Window, will be presented, and significance to the evaluation of the 30P31S reaction rate will be discussed. Work supported by U.S. Natl. Sci. Foundation (Grants No. PHY-1102511, PHY-1404442, PHY-1419765, and PHY-1431052); U.S. Dept. of Energy, Natl. Nucl. Security Administration (Award No. DE-NA0000979); Nat. Sci. and Eng. Research Council of Canada.

  16. Direct Measurement of the Unimolecular Decay Rate of Criegee Intermediates to OH Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Fang, Yi; Klippenstein, Stephen; McCoy, Anne; Lester, Marsha

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important non-photolytic source of OH radicals in the troposphere. The production of OH radicals proceeds though formation and unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates such as syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO. These alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediates can undergo a 1,4-H transfer reaction to form an energized vinyl hydroperoxide species, which breaks apart to OH and vinoxy products. Recently, this laboratory used IR excitation in the C-H stretch overtone region to initiate the unimolecular decay of syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO Criegee intermediates, leading to OH formation. Here, direct time-domain measurements are performed to observe the rate of appearance of OH products under collision-free conditions utilizing UV laser-induced fluorescence for detection. The experimental rates are in excellent agreement with statistical RRKM calculations using barrier heights predicted from high-level electronic structure calculations. Accurate determination of the rates and barrier heights for unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates is essential for modeling the kinetics of alkene ozonolysis reactions, a significant OH radical source in atmospheric chemistry, as well as the steady-state concentration of Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. This research was supported through the National Science Foundation under grant CHE-1362835.

  17. 7Be solar neutrino observation with KamLAND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, Yasuhiro; KamLAND Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The result of 7Be solar neutrino observation with KamLAND was reviewed based on the latest KamLAND publication [A. Gando et al., (KamLAND collaboration), arxiv:arXiv:1405.6190 (2014)]. Prior to the observation, the 4 orders of reduction of significant background sources against 7Be solar neutrinos; 210Bi, 210Po, (and their mother isotopes), 85Kr and 40K were done by means of fractional distillation and nitrogen purging. Even though the fiducial volume had faced background intrusions due to convection of the liquid scintillator, 165.4 ktonṡdays exposure within 616 days livetime leads 7Be solar neutrino rate as 582 ± 90(kton ṡdays) - 1. With analysis based on a global three flavor neutrino oscillation, 7Be solar neutrino flux is interpreted as (5.82 ± 0.98) ×109 cm-2s-1, which confirms the consistency to the standard solar model predictions.

  18. Radionuclide mass inventory, activity, decay heat, and dose rate parametric data for TRIGA spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    Parametric burnup calculations are performed to estimate radionuclide isotopic mass and activity concentrations for four different Training, Research, and Isotope General Atomics (TRIGA) nuclear reactor fuel element types: (1) Aluminum-clad standard, (2) Stainless Steel-clad standard, (3) High-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP), and (4) Low-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP-LEU-1). Parametric activity data are tabulated for 145 important radionuclides that can be used to generate gamma-ray emission source terms or provide mass quantity estimates as a function of decay time. Fuel element decay heats and dose rates are also presented parametrically as a function of burnup and decay time. Dose rates are given at the fuel element midplane for contact, 3.0-feet, and 3.0-meter detector locations in air. The data herein are estimates based on specially derived Beginning-of-Life (BOL) neutron cross sections using geometrically-explicit TRIGA reactor core models. The calculated parametric data should represent good estimates relative to actual values, although no experimental data were available for direct comparison and validation. However, because the cross sections were not updated as a function of burnup, the actinide concentrations may deviate from the actual values at the higher burnups.

  19. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time.

  20. A realistic model of neutrino masses with a large neutrinoless double beta decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Aguila, Francisco; Aparici, Alberto; Bhattacharya, Subhaditya; Santamaria, Arcadi; Wudka, Jose

    2012-05-01

    The minimal Standard Model extension with the Weinberg operator does accommodate the observed neutrino masses and mixing, but predicts a neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay rate proportional to the effective electron neutrino mass, which can be then arbitrarily small within present experimental limits. However, in general 0 νββ decay can have an independent origin and be near its present experimental bound; whereas neutrino masses are generated radiatively, contributing negligibly to 0 νββ decay. We provide a realization of this scenario in a simple, well defined and testable model, with potential LHC effects and calculable neutrino masses, whose two-loop expression we derive exactly. We also discuss the connection of this model to others that have appeared in the literature, and remark on the significant differences that result from various choices of quantum number assignments and symmetry assumptions. In this type of models lepton flavor violating rates are also preferred to be relatively large, at the reach of foreseen experiments. Interestingly enough, in our model this stands for a large third mixing angle, {{si}}{{{n}}^{{2}}}{θ_{{{13}}}}{˜}}}{ > }}0.00{8} , when μ→ eee is required to lie below its present experimental limit.

  1. Combined Results on b-Hadron Production Rates and Decay Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dong

    2002-09-11

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates, B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system, the average number of c and {bar c} quarks in b-hadron decays, and searches for CP violation in the B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} system are presented. They have been obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 2000 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations. These results have been used to determine the parameters of the CKM unitarity triangle.

  2. Variation in radical decay rates in epoxy as a function of crosslink density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. M.; Memory, J. M.; Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the behavior of radicals generated by Co-60 gamma radiation in the epoxy system tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The molar ratio of TGDDM to DDS was varied in the epoxy samples, and they were prepared under the same curing conditions to obtain various extents of crosslinking. ESR spectrometry data suggest that the rate of decay of radicals is related to inhomogeneities in the resin, with radicals in the highly crosslinked regions having long decay times. The inhomogeneities are thought to be due to statistical variation associated with the complex crosslinking reactions or to difficulties in mixing the reactants.

  3. Nucleation rates of Lennard-Jones clusters from growth and decay simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vehkamäki, Hanna; Ford, Ian J.

    2000-08-01

    We have studied singles clusters of Lennard-Jones atoms using a novel Monte Carlo simulation technique. We computed canonical ensemble averages of the grand canonical growth and decay probabilities of the cluster as a function of the cluster size. The critical size is identified as the one for which growth and decay are equally probable. The size and average internal energy the critical cluster was found for different temperatures and vapor chemical potentials. We used this information together with nucleation theorems to predict the behavior of the nucleation rate as function of the two external parameters. Our results are in line with the results found in the literature, and roughly correspond to the predictions of classical theory.

  4. Initial colonization, community assembly and ecosystem function: fungal colonist traits and litter biochemistry mediate decay rate.

    PubMed

    Cline, Lauren C; Zak, Donald R

    2015-10-01

    Priority effects are an important ecological force shaping biotic communities and ecosystem processes, in which the establishment of early colonists alters the colonization success of later-arriving organisms via competitive exclusion and habitat modification. However, we do not understand which biotic and abiotic conditions lead to strong priority effects and lasting historical contingencies. Using saprotrophic fungi in a model leaf decomposition system, we investigated whether compositional and functional consequences of initial colonization were dependent on initial colonizer traits, resource availability or a combination thereof. To test these ideas, we factorially manipulated leaf litter biochemistry and initial fungal colonist identity, quantifying subsequent community composition, using neutral genetic markers, and community functional characteristics, including enzyme potential and leaf decay rates. During the first 3 months, initial colonist respiration rate and physiological capacity to degrade plant detritus were significant determinants of fungal community composition and leaf decay, indicating that rapid growth and lignolytic potential of early colonists contributed to altered trajectories of community assembly. Further, initial colonization on oak leaves generated increasingly divergent trajectories of fungal community composition and enzyme potential, indicating stronger initial colonizer effects on energy-poor substrates. Together, these observations provide evidence that initial colonization effects, and subsequent consequences on litter decay, are dependent upon substrate biochemistry and physiological traits within a regional species pool. Because microbial decay of plant detritus is important to global C storage, our results demonstrate that understanding the mechanisms by which initial conditions alter priority effects during community assembly may be key to understanding the drivers of ecosystem-level processes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, M. J. Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-15

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of {sup 22}Na, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  6. Precision long-term measurements of beta-decay-rate ratios in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, S. D.; Peatross, J.; Ware, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    We report on measurements of relative beta-decay rates of Na-22, Cl-36, Co-60, Sr-90, Cs-137 monitored for more than one year. The radioactive samples are mounted in an automated sample changer that sequentially positions the five samples in turn, with high spatial precision, in front of each of four Geiger-Müller tubes. The sample wheel, detectors, and associated electronics are housed inside a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate approaches a few times 0.01% with two weeks of averaging. Other sources of error are on a similar scale. The data are analyzed in variety of ways, comparing count rates of the various samples on one or more detectors, and comparing count rates of a particular sample across multiple detectors. We observe no statistically significant variations in the ratios of decay rates, either annual or at higher-frequency, at a level above 0.01%.

  7. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Ware, M J; Bergeson, S D; Ellsworth, J E; Groesbeck, M; Hansen, J E; Pace, D; Peatross, J

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of (22)Na, (36)Cl, (54)Mn, (60)Co, (90)Sr, (133)Ba, (137)Cs, (152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  8. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, M. J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of 22Na, 36Cl, 54Mn, 60Co, 90Sr, 133Ba, 137Cs, 152Eu, and 154Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  9. Aftershock decay, productivity, and stress rates in Hawaii: Indicators of temperature and stress from magma sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Fred W.; Wright, Tom; Nakata, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    We examined dozens of aftershock sequences in Hawaii in terms of Gutenberg-Richter and modified Omori law parameters. We studied p, the rate of aftershock decay; Ap, the aftershock productivity, defined as the observed divided by the expected number of aftershocks; and c, the time delay when aftershock rates begin to fall. We found that for earthquakes shallower than 20 km, p values >1.2 are near active magma centers. We associate this high decay rate with higher temperatures and faster stress relaxation near magma reservoirs. Deep earthquakes near Kilauea's inferred magma transport path show a range of p values, suggesting the absence of a large, deep magma reservoir. Aftershock productivity is >4.0 for flank earthquakes known to be triggered by intrusions but is normal (0.25 to 4.0) for isolated main shocks. We infer that continuing, post-main shock stress from the intrusion adds to the main shock's stress step and causes higher Ap. High Ap in other zones suggests less obvious intrusions and pulsing magma pressure near Kilauea's feeding conduit. We calculate stress rates and stress rate changes from pre-main shock and aftershock rates. Stress rate increased after many intrusions but decreased after large M7–8 earthquakes. Stress rates are highest in the seismically active volcano flanks and lowest in areas far from volcanic centers. We found sequences triggered by intrusions tend to have high Ap, high (>0.10 day) c values, a stress rate increase, and sometimes a peak in aftershock rate hours after the main shock. We interpret these values as indicating continuing intrusive stress after the main shock.

  10. Radiative and nonradiative spontaneous decay rates for an electric quadrupole source in the vicinity of a spherical particle

    SciTech Connect

    Guzatov, D. V.

    2016-04-15

    Analytic expressions for the radiative and nonradiative decay rates for an electric quadrupole source (atom, molecule) in the vicinity of a spherical particle (dielectric, metal) have been derived and analyzed within the classical electrodynamics. It has been shown that the highest increase in the decay rates appears in the quasi-static case, when the wavelength of the transition in question is much larger than the characteristic size of the system formed by the particle and the quadrupole. Asymptotic expressions for the decay rates have been derived for this case.

  11. Decay rate of critical fluctuations in ethane+carbon dioxide mixtures near the critical line including the critical azeotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.F.; Doiron, T.; Pegg, I.L.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1986-03-01

    Using the technique of photon correlation spectroscopy we have measured the decay rate of critical fluctuations in mixtures of ethane and carbon dioxide of various compositions including a near-azeotropic mixture. Our experimental data indicate that there is only one dominant mode of fluctuations and the decay rate is well described by the predictions of the mode-coupling theory with the exponent v=0.63 for all compositions. The decay rate, its background contributions, the shear viscosity, and the correlation length for the mixtures appear to interpolate simply between those of ethane and carbon dioxide.

  12. Magnetic Flux Emergence and Decay Rates for Preceder and Follower Sunspots Observed with HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, A. A.; Jones, E. H.; Linton, M. G.; Leake, J. E.

    2017-06-01

    We quantify the emergence and decay rates of preceder (p) and follower (f) sunspots within 10 active regions from 2010 to 2014 using Space-weather Helioseismic Magnetic Imager Active Region Patch data. The sunspots are small to mid-sized regions and contain a signed flux within a single polarity sunspot of (1.1{--}6.5)× {10}21 {Mx}. The net unsigned flux within the regions, including plage, ranges from (5.1{--}20)× {10}21 {Mx}. Rates are calculated with and without intensity contours to differentiate between sunspot formation and flux emergence. Signed flux emergence rates, calculated with intensity contours, for the p (f) spots average 6.8(4.9)× {10}19 {Mx} hr-1, while decay rates are -1.9(-3.4)× {10}19 {Mx} hr-1. The mean, signed flux emergence rate of the regions, including plage, is 7.1× {10}19 {Mx} hr-1, for a mean peak flux of 5.9× {10}21 {Mx}. Using a synthesis of these results and others reported previously, there is a clear trend for larger flux regions to emerge faster than smaller ones. Observed emergence rates (dφ /{dt}, Mx hr-1) scale with total signed peak flux, {\\tilde{φ }}\\max , as a power law with an exponent of 0.36, i.e., dφ /{dt}=A{\\tilde{φ }}\\max 0.36. The observed rates may assist in constraining the boundary and initial conditions in simulations which already demonstrate increased rates for flux tubes with higher buoyancy and twist, or in the presence of a strong upflow. Overall, the observed emergence rates are smaller than those in simulations, which may indicate a slower rise of the flux in the interior than what is captured in simulations.

  13. Optimal Decay Rate of the Compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson System in {mathbb {R}^3}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Liang; Matsumura, Akitaka; Zhang, Guojing

    2010-05-01

    The compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson (NSP) system is considered in {mathbb {R}^3} in the present paper, and the influences of the electric field of the internal electrostatic potential force governed by the self-consistent Poisson equation on the qualitative behaviors of solutions is analyzed. It is observed that the rotating effect of electric field affects the dispersion of fluids and reduces the time decay rate of solutions. Indeed, we show that the density of the NSP system converges to its equilibrium state at the same L 2-rate {(1+t)^{-frac {3}{4}}} or L ∞-rate (1 + t)-3/2 respectively as the compressible Navier-Stokes system, but the momentum of the NSP system decays at the L 2-rate {(1+t)^{-frac {1}{4}}} or L ∞-rate (1 + t)-1 respectively, which is slower than the L 2-rate {(1+t)^{-frac {3}{4}}} or L ∞-rate (1 + t)-3/2 for compressible Navier-Stokes system [Duan et al., in Math Models Methods Appl Sci 17:737-758, 2007; Liu and Wang, in Comm Math Phys 196:145-173, 1998; Matsumura and Nishida, in J Math Kyoto Univ 20:67-104, 1980] and the L ∞-rate (1 + t)- p with {p in (1, 3/2)} for irrotational Euler-Poisson system [Guo, in Comm Math Phys 195:249-265, 1998]. These convergence rates are shown to be optimal for the compressible NSP system.

  14. (7)Be behaviour and meteorological conditions associated with (7)Be peak events in Spain.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ceballos, M A; Brattich, E; Lozano, R L; Cinelli, G

    2017-01-01

    This work regards a comprehensive analysis of the overall distribution of (7)Be activity concentrations in Spain and the synoptic meteorological conditions associated with the highest (7)Be peaks (>8 mBq/m(3)). The use of four sampling stations (Barcelona, Bilbao, Madrid, and Sevilla) included in REMdb, with different latitudinal location, as well as the relatively long time period used in this study (2001-2010), allowed to improve the understanding of (7)Be spatio-temporal distribution in Spain. The comparison of the (7)Be activity concentrations mean values indicated a north-south gradient (from 3.1 ± 1.1 mBq/m(3) in Bilbao to 4.0 ± 1.8 mBq/m(3) in Sevilla), even though not statistically significant (as indicated by the t-test). However, the analysis of frequency distributions and temporal evolutions of (7)Be activity concentrations have suggested the presence of two main areas, namely northern (Bilbao and Barcelona) and southern (Sevilla) Spain. The identification and analysis of periods associated with the highest values of (7)Be have allowed studying the different synoptic patterns associated with stratospheric-tropospheric transport (STT). In particular, three episodes (one in the north and two in the south) potentially associated with vigorous STT have been identified and analysed in detail. The results displayed that the omega block configuration, extending either over western Russia and Scandinavia or into the Atlantic Ocean, forced the prevailing jet stream to the northeast and south of Spain respectively with subsequent subsidence. In summer, this blocking configuration at high latitudes was combined with the presence of the Azores high pressure system to the west of Spain, affecting the (7)Be activity concentration recorded in the south. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. V sup 0 r arrow P sup 0 P sup 0. gamma. decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Fajfer, S. ); Oakes, R.J. )

    1990-10-01

    The radiative decay processes of the type {ital V}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital P}{sup 0}{ital P}{sup 0}{gamma} are described by the gauged Wess-Zumino terms in a low-energy effective Lagrangian, there being no bremsstrahlung contributions. Using such an effective Lagrangian, describing pseudoscalar and vector mesons, we have calculated the branching ratios for the decays {omega}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, {omega}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{gamma}, {rho}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, {rho}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{gamma}, {phi}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, {phi}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{gamma}, and {phi}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup 0}{ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{gamma}. Since scalar mesons have been neglected, these rates provide estimates of the expected backgrounds in searches for {ital J}{sup {pi}}=0{sup +} resonances, particularly the possible four-quark states in {phi} decays.

  16. The impact of sea-level rise on organic matter decay rates in Chesapeake Bay brackish tidal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirwanm, M.L.; Langley, J.A.; Guntenspergen, Gleen R.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The balance between organic matter production and decay determines how fast coastal wetlands accumulate soil organic matter. Despite the importance of soil organic matter accumulation rates in influencing marsh elevation and resistance to sea-level rise, relatively little is known about how decomposition rates will respond to sea-level rise. Here, we estimate the sensitivity of decomposition to flooding by measuring rates of decay in 87 bags filled with milled sedge peat, including soil organic matter, roots and rhizomes. Experiments were located in field-based mesocosms along 3 mesohaline tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Mesocosm elevations were manipulated to influence the duration of tidal inundation. Although we found no significant influence of inundation on decay rate when bags from all study sites were analyzed together, decay rates at two of the sites increased with greater flooding. These findings suggest that flooding may enhance organic matter decay rates even in water-logged soils, but that the overall influence of flooding is minor. Our experiments suggest that sea-level rise will not accelerate rates of peat accumulation by slowing the rate of soil organic matter decay. Consequently, marshes will require enhanced organic matter productivity or mineral sediment deposition to survive accelerating sea-level rise.

  17. Effect of fungal decay on the hygroscopic thickness swelling rate of lignocellulosic filler-polyolefin biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kord, B.; Hosseinihashemi, S. Kh.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of fungal decay on the hygroscopic thickness swelling rate of lignocellulosic filler-polyolefin biocomposites has been investigated. Composites based on polypropylene (PP), bagasse fiber (BF), and a coupling agent (PP-g-MA) were made by melt compounding and injection molding. The weigt ratio of BF to PP was controlled at 60/40 for all blends. The amount of coupling agent was fixed at 2% for all formulations. The samples obtained were exposed to the action of brown-rot (Coniophora puteana) and white-rot (Trametes versicolor) fungi for 8, 12, and 16 weeks according to the Kolle-flask method. The thickness swelling of the samples was evaluated by immersing them in water at room temperature for several weeks. The morphology of the composites was characterized using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the fungal decay had an adverse affect on the dimensional stability of BF/PP composites due to an increase in the thickness swelling rate. The thickness swelling of white-rotted samples was higher than that of brown-rotted ones and control samples. Also, the thickness swelling of BF/PP composites increased with increasing time of fungal decay. In addition, after 16 weeks of exposure to white-rot fungi, the composites exhibited a higher parameter of swelling rate K SR than control samples. The K SR of the composites was influenced both by the type of rooting and the exposure time. Furthermore, the SEM micrographs showed that the extent of degradation increased with growing exposure time to fungi.

  18. Comparison of nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates computed in laboratory and center-of-mass coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    De Conti, C.; Barbero, C.; Galeão, A. P.; Krmpotić, F.

    2014-11-11

    In this work we compute the one-nucleon-induced nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates of {sub Λ}{sup 5}He, {sub Λ}{sup 12}C and {sub Λ}{sup 13}C using a formalism based on the independent particle shell model in terms of laboratory coordinates. To ascertain the correctness and precision of the method, these results are compared with those obtained using a formalism in terms of center-of-mass coordinates, which has been previously reported in the literature. The formalism in terms of laboratory coordinates will be useful in the shell-model approach to two-nucleon-induced transitions.

  19. Precision measurement of the ratio of the charged kaon leptonic decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NA62 Collaboration; Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.

    2013-02-01

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K±→e±ν and K±→μ±ν with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ˜150000 reconstructed K±→e±ν candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK=(2.488±0.010)×10-5, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  20. Precision measurement of the ratio of the charged kaon leptonic decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K± →e± ν and K± →μ± ν with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ∼ 150 000 reconstructed K± →e± ν candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK = (2.488 ± 0.010) ×10-5, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  1. An Examination of Sunspot Number Rates of Growth and Decay in Relation to the Sunspot Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of annual sunspot number averages, sunspot number rates of growth and decay are examined relative to both minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences using cycles 12 through present, the most reliably determined sunspot cycles. Indeed, strong correlations are found for predicting the minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences years in advance. As applied to predicting sunspot minimum for cycle 24, the next cycle, its minimum appears likely to occur in 2006, especially if it is a robust cycle similar in nature to cycles 17-23.

  2. Experimental Investigations of Changes in β-Decay Rate of 60Co and 137Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baurov, Yu. A.; Konradov, A. A.; Kushniruk, V. F.; Kuznetsov, E. A.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Ryabov, Yu. V.; Senkevich, A. P.; Zadorozsny, S. V.

    Results of simultaneous measurements of β-decay rate with the aid of Ge(Li)-detectors performed at two laboratories 140 km apart (INR RAS, Troitsk, 60Co, and JINR, Dubna, 137Cs) from 15 March 2000 to 10 April 2000 are presented. Regular deviations of the count rate of γ-quanta following the β-decay of ~0.7% (INR RAS, 60Co) and ~0.2% (JINR, 137Cs) from the statistical average, are observed. The analysis of extremum deviations of γ--quanta count rate shows that the set of directions of tangents to the Earth's parallels of latitude at the extremum points of trajectories of motion in the space of each laboratory clearly forms three separate compact subsets of directions which agree, for two laboratories, to an accuracy of +/-10°. This phenomenon is shown not to be explained on the basis of traditional notion. A possible explanation is suggested based on the hypothesis that there exists a new anisotropic interaction caused by the cosmological vectorial potential Ag, a new fundamental constant having, according to the experiments carried out, the coordinate of right ascension α ~ 285° in the second equatorial system. This is in agreement with earlier experiments.

  3. Ex vivo radioactive counts and decay rates of tissues resected during radioguided parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jordan; Repplinger, Dan; Bianco, Jesus; Chen, Herbert

    2006-12-01

    Radioguided parathyroidectomy using TC-99m-sestamibi injection and the handheld gamma probe allows more precise and rapid intraoperative localization of abnormal parathyroid glands. This technique is based on the principle that hypercellular parathyroid tissues have markedly higher in vivo radiotracer counts than surrounding tissue including thyroid and lymph nodes. While in vivo radioactivity after TC-99m-sestamibi administration in various tissues has been documented, there is a lack of data regarding ex vivo radioactive properties after surgical resection. During a 6-week period in June/July 2005, 21 patients underwent radioguided parathyroidectomy by a single surgeon. Fifty-four tissue samples (39 parathyroid, 15 nonparathyroid) from these patients were collected and analyzed for ex vivo radioactive counts over a 30-min period. These data were then compared with the pathologic results. There is a significant difference in ex vivo counts between parathyroid adenomas, hyperplastic glands, and nonparathyroid tissue immediately after resection. However, radioactive decay/slope rates do not differ between the tissues. Importantly, an ex vivo count of >20% of background is 100% specific for parathyroid tissue. These differences persisted for up to 30 min. This is the first comprehensive study of ex vivo radioactive properties after TC-99m-sestamibi injection during radioguided parathyroidectomy. Parathyroids have a greater rate of uptake compared to nonparathyroid tissue, allowing ex vivo counts to predict tissue type. These tissues have similar decay rates, allowing these predictions to be made anytime up to 30 min after gland resection.

  4. Global observation of Omori-law decay in the rate of triggered earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, T.

    2001-12-01

    Triggered earthquakes can be large, damaging, and lethal as evidenced by the 1999 shocks in Turkey and the 2001 events in El Salvador. In this study, earthquakes with M greater than 7.0 from the Harvard CMT catalog are modeled as dislocations to calculate shear stress changes on subsequent earthquake rupture planes near enough to be affected. About 61% of earthquakes that occurred near the main shocks are associated with calculated shear stress increases, while ~39% are associated with shear stress decreases. If earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases are interpreted as triggered, then such events make up at least 8% of the CMT catalog. Globally, triggered earthquakes obey an Omori-law rate decay that lasts between ~7-11 years after the main shock. Earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases occur at higher rates than background up to 240 km away from the main-shock centroid. Earthquakes triggered by smaller quakes (foreshocks) also obey Omori's law, which is one of the few time-predictable patterns evident in the global occurrence of earthquakes. These observations indicate that earthquake probability calculations which include interactions from previous shocks should incorporate a transient Omori-law decay with time. In addition, a very simple model using the observed global rate change with time and spatial distribution of triggered earthquakes can be applied to immediately assess the likelihood of triggered earthquakes following large events, and can be in place until more sophisticated analyses are conducted.

  5. Thermal decay analysis of fiber Bragg gratings at different temperature annealing rates using demarcation energy approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawardena, Dinusha Serandi; Lai, Man-Hong; Lim, Kok-Sing; Ahmad, Harith

    2017-03-01

    In this study the thermal degradation of gratings inscribed in three types of fiber namely, PS 1250/1500, SM 1500 and zero water peak single mode fiber is demonstrated. A comparative investigation is carried out on the aging characteristics of the gratings at three different temperature ramping rates of 3 °C/min, 6 °C/min and 9 °C/min. During the thermal annealing treatment, a significant enhancement in the grating reflectivity is observed for PS 1250/1500 fiber from ∼1.2 eV until 1.4 eV which indicates a thermal induced reversible effect. Higher temperature ramping rates lead to a higher regeneration temperature. In addition, the investigation also reflects that regardless of the temperature ramping rate the thermal decay behavior of a specific fiber can be successfully characterized when represented in a demarcation energy domain. Moreover, this technique can be accommodated when predicting the thermal decay characteristics of a specific fiber.

  6. Additional experimental evidence for a solar influence on nuclear decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jere H.; Herminghuysen, Kevin R.; Blue, Thomas E.; Fischbach, Ephraim; Javorsek, Daniel; Kauffman, Andrew C.; Mundy, Daniel W.; Sturrock, Peter A.; Talnagi, Joseph W.

    2012-09-01

    Additional experimental evidence is presented in support of the recent hypothesis that a possible solar influence could explain fluctuations observed in the measured decay rates of some isotopes. These data were obtained during routine weekly calibrations of an instrument used for radiological safety at The Ohio State University Research Reactor using 36Cl. The detector system used was based on a Geiger-Müller gas detector, which is a robust detector system with very low susceptibility to environmental changes. A clear annual variation is evident in the data, with a maximum relative count rate observed in January/February, and a minimum relative count rate observed in July/August, for seven successive years from July 2005 to June 2011. This annual variation is not likely to have arisen from changes in the detector surroundings, as we show here.

  7. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  8. Viral decay and viral production rates in continental-shelf and deep-sea sediments of the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Magagnini, Mirko; Danovaro, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    Here, for the first time, we have carried out synoptic measurements of viral production and decay rates in continental-shelf and deep-sea sediments of the Mediterranean Sea to explore the viral balance. The net viral production and decay rates (1.1-61.2 and 0.6-13.5 x 10(7) viruses g(-1) h(-1), respectively) were significantly correlated, and were also related to prokaryotic heterotrophic production. The addition of enzymes increased the decay rates in the surface sediments, but not in the subsurface sediments. Both the viral production and the decay rates decreased significantly in the deeper sediment layers, while the virus-to-prokaryote abundance ratio increased, suggesting a high preservation of viruses in the subsurface sediments. Viral decay did not balance viral production at any of the sites investigated, accounting on average for c. 32% of the gross viral production in the marine sediments. We estimate that the carbon (C) released by viral decay contributed 6-23% to the total C released by the viral shunt. Because only c. 2% of the viruses produced can infect other prokaryotes, the majority is not subjected to direct lysis and potentially remains as a food source for benthic consumers. The results reported here suggest that viral decay can play an important role in biogeochemical cycles and benthic trophodynamics.

  9. Gamma-ray line emission from 7Li and 7Be production by cosmic-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatischeff, V.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Kiener, J.; Cassé, M.; Vangioni-Flam, E.

    2001-09-01

    We calculate the total γ-ray line emission at ~450 keV that accompanies 7Li and 7Be production by cosmic-ray interactions, including the delayed line emission at 0.478 MeV from 7Be radioactive decay. We present a new γ-ray spectroscopic test which has the potential to give direct information on the nature of the interstellar regions into which 7Be ions propagate and decay. Finally, we evaluate the intensity of the predicted diffuse emission from the central radian of the Galaxy.

  10. Search for D0-D(-)0 mixing and a measurement of the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay rate in D0-->Kpi decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dorsten, M P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Bozzi, C; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Ernst, J A; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Lodovico, F Di; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-10-24

    We present results of a search for D0-D(-)0 mixing and a measurement of R(D), the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays to Cabibbo-favored decays, using D0-->K+pi- decays from 57.1 fb(-1) of data collected near sqrt[s]=10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. At the 95% confidence level, allowing for CP violation, we find the mixing parameters x('2)<0.0022 and -0.056rate R(M)<0.16%. In the limit of no mixing, R(D)=[0.357+/-0.022(stat)+/-0.027(syst)]% and the CP-violating asymmetry A(D)=0.095+/-0.061(stat)+/-0.083(syst).

  11. Search for D0-D¯0 Mixing and a Measurement of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Rate in D0→Kπ Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dorsten, M. P.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Ernst, J. A.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-10-01

    We present results of a search for D0-D¯0 mixing and a measurement of RD, the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays to Cabibbo-favored decays, using D0→K+π- decays from 57.1 fb-1 of data collected near (s)=10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. At the 95% confidence level, allowing for CP violation, we find the mixing parameters x'2<0.0022 and -0.056rate RM<0.16%. In the limit of no mixing, RD=[0.357±0.022(stat)±0.027(syst)]% and the CP-violating asymmetry AD=0.095±0.061(stat)±0.083(syst).

  12. Measurements of Gamma Rays from 7 Be Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. L.; Ahn, T.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Caprio, M. A.; Constantinou, Ch.; Fasano, P.; Frentz, B.; Hall, M.; Jensen, L.; Kolata, J. J.; Li, X.; McCoy, A. E.; Moylan, S.; O'Malley, P.; Re, C. S.; Riggins, J.; Simon, A.; Torres-Isea, R.; Strauss, S.

    2016-09-01

    Ab-initio methods have been successful in describing the structure of light nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions, but more experimental data is needed in the light unstable nuclei region. No-core configuration interaction calculations have made predictions for the M1 and a lower limit for the E2 electromagnetic transition strengths of the decay of the first excited state of 7Be where the latter has never before been measured. To measure the E2 transition strength, a Coulomb Excitation experiment was performed using TwinSol at the University of Notre Dame. A beam of 7Be ions were scattered off a gold target, and gamma rays from inelastically scattered ions were detected using clover Ge detectors. Preliminary results for the E2 transition strength and its comparison to the no-core configuration interaction approach will be shown. Extensions of this experimental method to other light unstable nuclei will be discussed. This work has been supported by US NSF Grant No. PHY 14-19765 and DOE Grant Number DE-FG02-95ER-40934.

  13. Atmospheric deposition of 7Be by rain events, incentral Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, J. Juri; Di Gregorio, D. E.; Huck, H.; Velasco, H.; Rizzotto, M.

    2008-08-01

    Beryllium-7 is a natural radionuclide that enters into the ecosystems through wet and dry depositions and has numerous environmental applications in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Atmospheric wet deposition of 7Be was measured in central Argentina. Rain traps were installed (1 m above ground) and individual rain events have been collected. Rain samples were filtered and analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The gamma counting was undertaken using a 40%-efficient p-type coaxial intrinsic high-purity natural germanium crystal built by Princeton Gamma-Tech. The cryostat was made from electroformed high-purity copper using ultralow-background technology. The detector was surrounded by 50 cm of lead bricks to provide shielding against radioactive background. The detector gamma efficiency was determined using a water solution with known amounts of chemical compounds containing long-lived naturally occurring radioisotopes, 176Lu, 138La and 40K. Due to the geometry of the sample and its position close to the detector, the efficiency points from the 176Lu decay, had to be corrected for summing effects. The measured samples were 400 ml in size and were counted curing one day. The 7Be detection limit for the present measurements was as low as 0.2 Bq l-1. Thirty two rain events were sampled and analyzed (November 2006-May 2007). The measured values show that the events corresponding to low rainfall (<20 mm) are characterized by significantly higher activity concentrations (Bq l-1). The activity concentration of each individual event varied from 0.8 to 3.5 Bq l-1, while precipitations varied between 4 and 70 mm. The integrated activity by event of 7Be was fitted with a model that takes into account the precipitation amount and the elapsed time between two rain events. The integrated activities calculated with this model show a good agreement with experimental values.

  14. No evidence for a decrease of nuclear decay rates with increasing heliocentric distance based on radiochronology of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Wieler, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    It has been argued that the decay rates of several radioactive nuclides are slightly lower at Earth's aphelion than at perihelion, and that this effect might depend on heliocentric distance. It might then be expected that nuclear decay rates be considerably lower at larger distances from the sun, e.g., in the asteroid belt at 2-3 AU from where most meteorites originate. If so, ages of meteorites obtained by analyses of radioactive nuclides and their stable daughter isotopes might be in error, since these ages are based on decay rates determined on Earth. Here we evaluate whether the large data base on nuclear cosmochronology offers any hint for discrepancies which might be due to radially variable decay rates. Chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301,000 a) is produced in meteorites by interactions with cosmic rays and is the nuclide for which a decay rate dependence from heliocentric distance has been proposed, which, in principle, can be tested with our approach and the current data base. We show that compilations of 36Cl concentrations measured in meteorites offer no support for a spatially variable 36Cl decay rate. For very short-lived cosmic-ray produced radionuclides (half-lives < 10-100 days), the concentration should be different for meteorites hitting the Earth on the incoming vs. outgoing part of their orbit. However, the current data base of very short-lived radionuclides in freshly fallen meteorites is far from sufficient to deduce solid constraints. Constraints on the age of the Earth and the oldest meteorite phases obtained by the U-Pb dating technique give no hints for radially variable decay rates of the α-decaying nuclides 235U or 238U. Similarly, some of the oldest phases in meteorites have U-Pb ages whose differences agree almost perfectly with respective age differences obtained with "short-lived" radionuclides present in the early solar system, again indicating no variability of uranium decay rates in different meteorite parent bodies in the asteroid belt

  15. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fussell, D.P.; McPhedran, R.C.; Martijn de Sterke, C.

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment - the 2D LDOS in a finite PC - with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC's. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  16. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Fussell, D P; McPhedran, R C; Martijn de Sterke, C

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment--the 2D LDOS in a finite PC--with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC's. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  17. Size and shape dependent photoluminescence and excited state decay rates of diamondoids.

    PubMed

    Richter, Robert; Wolter, David; Zimmermann, Tobias; Landt, Lasse; Knecht, Andre; Heidrich, Christoph; Merli, Andrea; Dopfer, Otto; Reiss, Philipp; Ehresmann, Arno; Petersen, Jens; Dahl, Jeremy E; Carlson, Robert M K; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas; Mitric, Roland; Rander, Torbjörn

    2014-02-21

    We present photoluminescence spectra and excited state decay rates of a series of diamondoids, which represent molecular structural analogues to hydrogen-passivated bulk diamond. Specific isomers of the five smallest diamondoids (adamantane-pentamantane) have been brought into the gas phase and irradiated with synchrotron radiation. All investigated compounds show intrinsic photoluminescence in the ultraviolet spectral region. The emission spectra exhibit pronounced vibrational fine structure which is analyzed using quantum chemical calculations. We show that the geometrical relaxation of the first excited state of adamantane, exhibiting Rydberg character, leads to the loss of Td symmetry. The luminescence of adamantane is attributed to a transition from the delocalized first excited state into different vibrational modes of the electronic ground state. Similar geometrical changes of the excited state structure have also been identified in the other investigated diamondoids. The excited state decay rates show a clear dependence on the size of the diamondoid, but are independent of the particle geometry, further indicating a loss of particle symmetry upon electronic excitation.

  18. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussell, D. P.; McPhedran, R. C.; Martijn de Sterke, C.

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment—the 2D LDOS in a finite PC—with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC’s. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  19. Sensitivity of β -decay rates to the radial dependence of the nucleon effective mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severyukhin, A. P.; Margueron, J.; Borzov, I. N.; Van Giai, N.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of β -decay rates in 78Ni and Sn,132100 to a correction term in Skyrme energy-density functionals (EDFs) which modifies the radial shape of the nucleon effective mass. This correction is added on top of several Skyrme parametrizations which are selected from their effective mass properties and predictions about the stability properties of 132Sn . The impact of the correction on high-energy collective modes is shown to be moderate. From the comparison of the effects induced by the surface-peaked effective mass in the three doubly magic nuclei, it is found that 132Sn is largely impacted by the correction, while 78Ni and 100Sn are only moderately affected. We conclude that β -decay rates in these nuclei can be used as a test of different parts of the nuclear EDF: 78Ni and 100Sn are mostly sensitive to the particle-hole interaction through the B (GT) values, while 132Sn is sensitive to the radial shape of the effective mass. Possible improvements of these different parts could therefore be better constrained in the future.

  20. Time Modulation of the {beta}{sup +}-Decay Rate of H-Like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kryshen, E. L.; Pitschmann, M.; Kienle, P.

    2008-10-31

    Recent experimental data at GSI on the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K-shell electron capture (EC) decays of the H-like ions {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} and {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, suggest that they are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC}{approx_equal}7 sec and amplitudes a{sub EC}{approx_equal}0.20. Since it is known that these ions are unstable also under the nuclear positron ({beta}{sup +}) decays, we study a possible time dependence of the nuclear {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion. We show that the time dependence of the {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion as well as any H-like heavy ions cannot be observed.

  1. Stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis of 7Be: measurement of 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be.

    PubMed

    Di Leva, A; Gialanella, L; Kunz, R; Rogalla, D; Schürmann, D; Strieder, F; De Cesare, M; De Cesare, N; D'Onofrio, A; Fülöp, Z; Gyürky, G; Imbriani, G; Mangano, G; Ordine, A; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Romano, M; Somorjai, E; Terrasi, F

    2009-06-12

    The 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be reaction presently represents the largest nuclear uncertainty in the predicted solar neutrino flux and has important implications on the big bang nucleosynthesis, i.e., the production of primordial 7Li. We present here the results of an experiment using the recoil separator ERNA (European Recoil separator for Nuclear Astrophysics) to detect directly the 7Be ejectiles. In addition, off-beam activation and coincidence gamma-ray measurements were performed at selected energies. At energies above 1 MeV a large discrepancy compared to previous results is observed both in the absolute value and in the energy dependence of the cross section. Based on the available data and models, a robust estimate of the cross section at the astrophysical relevant energies is proposed.

  2. Can a first-order exponential decay model fit heart rate recovery after resistance exercise?

    PubMed

    Bartels-Ferreira, Rhenan; de Sousa, Élder D; Trevizani, Gabriela A; Silva, Lilian P; Nakamura, Fábio Y; Forjaz, Cláudia L M; Lima, Jorge Roberto P; Peçanha, Tiago

    2015-03-01

    The time-constant of postexercise heart rate recovery (HRRτ ) obtained by fitting heart rate decay curve by a first-order exponential fitting has being used to assess cardiac autonomic recovery after endurance exercise. The feasibility of this model was not tested after resistance exercise (RE). The aim of this study was to test the goodness of fit of the first-order exponential decay model to fit heart rate recovery (HRR) after RE. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. The experimental sessions occurred in two separated days and consisted of performance of 1 set of 10 repetitions at 50% or 80% of the load achieved on the one-repetition maximum test [low-intensity (LI) and high-intensity (HI) sessions, respectively]. Heart rate (HR) was continuously registered before and during exercise and also for 10 min of recovery. A monoexponential equation was used to fit the HRR curve during the postexercise period using different time windows (i.e. 30, 60, 90, … 600 s). For each time window, (i) HRRτ was calculated and (ii) variation of HR explained by the model (R(2) goodness of fit index) was assessed. The HRRτ showed stabilization from 360 and 420 s on LI and HI, respectively. Acceptable R(2) values were observed from the 360 s on LI (R(2) > 0.65) and at all tested time windows on HI (R(2) > 0.75). In conclusion, this study showed that using a minimum length of monitoring (~420 s) HRR after RE can be adequately modelled by a first-order exponential fitting. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3–4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5–6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date. Key Points We report initial observations of ring current ions We show that He-ion decay rates are consistent with theory We show that O-ions with energies greater than 500 keV decay very rapidly PMID:26167435

  4. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-11-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3-4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5-6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date. We report initial observations of ring current ionsWe show that He-ion decay rates are consistent with theoryWe show that O-ions with energies greater than 500 keV decay very rapidly.

  5. The minimum energy decay rate in quasi-isotropic grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.

    2011-08-01

    We consider high Reynolds number, freely-decaying, isotropic turbulence in which the large scales evolve in a self-similar manner when normalized by the integral scales, u and ℓ. As it is well known, a range of possible behaviors may be observed depending on the form of the longitudinal velocity correlation at large separation, uf∞=u 2f(r →∞). We consider the cases u2f∞=cmr-m,2≤m ≤6, whose spectral counterpart is E(k →0)~cmkm -1 for m <6, with or without a lnk correction, and E(k →0)~I k4 for m =6. (I is Loitsyansky's integral.) It has long been known that the cmm=constant during the decay. This, in turn, sets the energy decay rate as u2~t-(1-p)2m /(m+2), where p is the power-law exponent for the normalized dissipation rate, εℓ/εℓu3u3~t-p, observed empirically to be a small positive number in grid turbulence. We systematically explore the properties of these different classes of turbulence and arrive at the following conclusions. (i) The invariance of cm is a direct consequence of linear momentum conservation for m ≤4, and angular momentum conservation for m =5. (ii) The classical spectra of Saffman, E(k →0)~c3k2, and Batchelor, E(k →0)~Ik4, are robust in the sense that they emerge from a broad class of initial conditions. In particular, it is necessary only that <ωi ω'j >∞ ≤O(r-8) at t =0. The non-classical spectra (m =2,4,5), on the other hand, require very specific initial conditions in order to be realized, of the form <ωiω'j>∞=O(r-(m +2)). (Note the equality rather than the inequality here.) This makes the non-classical spectra less likely to be observed in practice. (iii) The case of m =2, which is usually associated with the u2~t-1 decay law, is pathological in a number of respects. For example, its spectral tensor diverges as k →0, and the long-range correlations ∞=O(r-2) are too strong to be a consequence of the Biot-Savart law. (It is the Biot-Savart law that lies behind the long-range correlations in the

  6. Tyrosyl rotamer interconversion rates and the fluorescence decays of N-acetyltyrosinamide and short tyrosyl peptides.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Jay R; Liyanage, Mangala Roshan; Johnson, Carey K

    2007-05-17

    It has long been recognized that the fluorescence lifetimes of amino acid residues such as tyrosine and tryptophan depend on the rotameric configuration of the aromatic side chain, but estimates of the rate of interchange of rotameric states have varied widely. We report measurements of the rotameric populations and interchange rates for tyrosine in N-acetyltyrosinamide (NATyrA), the tripeptide Tyr-Gly-Gly (YGG), and the pentapeptide Leu-enkephalin (YGGFL). The fluorescence lifetimes were analyzed to determine the rotameric interchange rates in the context of a model incorporating exchange among three rotameric states. Maximum entropy method analysis verified the presence of three fluorescence decay components for YGGFL and two for YGG and NATyrA. Rotameric exchange between the gauche(-) and trans states occurred on the nanosecond time scale, whereas exchange with the gauche(+) state occurred on a longer time scale. Good agreement was obtained with rotameric populations and exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations. Quenching by iodide was used to vary the intrinsic fluorescence lifetimes, providing additional constraints on the determined interchange rates. The temperature dependence was measured to determine barriers to exchange of the two most populated rotamers of 3, 5, and 7 kcal/mol for NATyrA, YGG, and YGGFL, respectively.

  7. Temporal variation of (7)Be concentrations in atmosphere for 8y from 2000 at Yamagata, Japan: solar influence on the (7)Be time series.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sakurai, Hirohisa; Gunji, Shuichi; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2009-06-01

    We have been continuously observing the daily (7)Be concentrations in surface air at Yamagata, Japan (38.25 degrees N, 140.35 degrees E) since 2000. The yearly profile of the (7)Be concentration indicates the variation in galactic cosmic rays owing to solar modulation. Over 8y, the (7)Be concentration, cosmic neutrons, and number of sunspots varied by 37.4%, 12.2%, and 92.8%, respectively. The influence of precipitation on the (7)Be variability was approximately 5%. Hence, the yearly (7)Be concentration was mainly varied by the solar modulation of the (7)Be production rates. Based on the production rates found in an EXPACS simulation, the observed variability indicates (7)Be transport from high latitudes. The daily (7)Be concentrations have two significant periodic components of 19d and 36d. The 36-d component implies a relationship between the sun's rotation and the vertical transport of air masses under quiet solar activity.

  8. Tracing nitrogen accumulation in decaying wood and examining its impact on wood decomposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Katja T.; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Krista; Chen, Janet; Smolander, Aino; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2016-04-01

    Decomposition of dead wood, which is controlled primarily by fungi is important for ecosystem carbon cycle and has potentially a significant role in nitrogen fixation via diazotrophs. Nitrogen content has been found to increase with advancing wood decay in several studies; however, the importance of this increase to decay rate and the sources of external nitrogen remain unclear. Improved knowledge of the temporal dynamics of wood decomposition rate and nitrogen accumulation in wood as well as the drivers of the two processes would be important for carbon and nitrogen models dealing with ecosystem responses to climate change. To tackle these questions we applied several analytical methods on Norway spruce logs from Lapinjärvi, Finland. We incubated wood samples (density classes from I to V, n=49) in different temperatures (from 8.5oC to 41oC, n=7). After a common seven day pre-incubation period at 14.5oC, the bottles were incubated six days in their designated temperature prior to CO2 flux measurements with GC to determine the decomposition rate. N2 fixation was measured with acetylene reduction assay after further 48 hour incubation. In addition, fungal DNA, (MiSeq Illumina) δ15N and N% composition of wood for samples incubated at 14.5oC were determined. Radiocarbon method was applied to obtain age distribution for the density classes. The asymbiotic N2 fixation rate was clearly dependent on the stage of wood decay and increased from stage I to stage IV but was substantially reduced in stage V. CO2 production was highest in the intermediate decay stage (classes II-IV). Both N2 fixation and CO2 production were highly temperature sensitive having optima in temperature 25oC and 31oC, respectively. We calculated the variation of annual levels of respiration and N2 fixation per hectare for the study site, and used the latter data together with the 14C results to determine the amount of N2 accumulated in wood in time. The proportion of total nitrogen in wood

  9. Cooperative Lamb shift and the cooperative decay rate for an initially detuned phased state

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2010-04-15

    The cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) is hard to measure because in samples much larger than a resonant wavelength it is much smaller, for an initially prepared resonantly phased state, than the cooperative decay rate (CDR). We show, however, that if the phasing of the initial state is detuned so that the spatial wave vector is k{sub 1} congruent with k{sub 0{+-}}O((1/R)) (where k{sub 0}={omega}{sub 0}/c is the resonant frequency), the CLS grows to 'giant' magnitudes making it comparable to the CDR. Moreover, for certain controlled values of detuning, the initial CDR becomes small so that the dynamical Lamb shift (DLS) can be measured over a considerable period of time.

  10. Combined results on b-hadron production rates, lifetimes, oscillations and semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    WIllocq, stephane

    2000-08-02

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates B{sub d}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} system, and the values of the CKM matrix elements {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} are obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 99 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations.

  11. Spontaneous decay rate and Casimir-Polder potential of an atom near a lithographed surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Radiative corrections to an atom are calculated near a half-space that has arbitrarily shaped small depositions upon its surface. The method is based on calculation of the classical Green's function of the macroscopic Maxwell equations near an arbitrarily perturbed half-space using a Born-series expansion about the bare half-space Green's function. The formalism of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is used to carry this over into the quantum picture. The broad utility of the calculated Green's function is demonstrated by using it to calculate two quantities: the spontaneous decay rate of an atom near a sharp surface feature and the Casimir-Polder potential of a finite grating deposited on a substrate. Qualitatively different behavior is found for the latter case where it is observed that the periodicity of the Casimir-Polder potential persists even outside the immediate vicinity of the grating.

  12. Oscillating decay rate in electron capture and the neutrino mass difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkin, Murray

    2015-04-01

    Reported oscillations in the rate of decay of certain ions by K -electron capture have raised questions about whether and how such oscillations can arise in quantum-mechanical theory and whether they can measure the neutrino mass difference. Here I show that simple principles of quantum mechanics answer some questions and clarify what must be performed theoretically or experimentally to answer some others. The principal result is that quantum mechanics does allow mass-difference-dependent oscillations in principle, but it imposes conditions not obeyed by the approximate dynamical models that have been put forth up to now. In particular, indirect coupling between two neutrino mass channels must be taken into account. What needs to be done experimentally and theoretically is discussed.

  13. Indoor acrolein emission and decay rates resulting from domestic cooking events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Vincent Y.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Cahill, Thomas M.

    2009-12-01

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is a common constituent of both indoor and outdoor air, can exacerbate asthma in children, and may contribute to other chronic lung diseases. Recent studies have found high indoor levels of acrolein and other carbonyls compared to outdoor ambient concentrations. Heated cooking oils produce considerable amounts of acrolein, thus cooking is likely an important source of indoor acrolein. A series of cooking experiments were conducted to determine the emission rates of acrolein and other volatile carbonyls for different types of cooking oils (canola, soybean, corn and olive oils) and deep-frying different food items. Similar concentrations and emission rates of carbonyls were found when different vegetable oils were used to deep-fry the same food product. The food item being deep-fried was generally not a significant source of carbonyls compared to the cooking oil. The oil cooking events resulted in high concentrations of acrolein that were in the range of 26.4-64.5 μg m -3. These concentrations exceed all the chronic regulatory exposure limits and many of the acute exposure limits. The air exchange rate and the decay rate of the carbonyls were monitored to estimate the half-life of the carbonyls. The half-life for acrolein was 14.4 ± 2.6 h, which indicates that indoor acrolein concentrations can persist for considerable time after cooking in poorly-ventilated homes.

  14. 7-Be Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greife, Uwe; Erikson, L.; Patel, N.; Wimmer, M.; Dwiwedi, Y.; Laurent, M.; Chipps, K.; Blackmon, J.; Kozub, R.; Bardayan, D.; Gross, C.; Stracener, D.; Smith, M.; Nesaraya, C.; Rehm, E.; Ahmed, I.; Greene, J.

    2010-11-01

    The current generation of highly cross linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (PE) for hip and knee joint replacement have achieved such low in vitro wear rates that efforts have been underway to develop more sensitive methods to measure polyethylene wear. The most widely used technique, the gravimetric method, suffers from the notable disadvantage that mass gain by fluid absorption can considerably exceed mass loss by wear, making the wear measurement inaccurate, sometimes even leading to negative ``wear'' values. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the use of a radioactive tracer, beryllium-7 (7-Be), to circumvent the problem of fluid absorption and thereby achieve a much more sensitive and accurate wear measurement. This proof of principle study demonstrated the general feasibility of 7-Be implantation (performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory) for PE wear analysis.

  15. Spatio-temporal attributes of left ventricular pressure decay rate during isovolumic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Erina; Kovács, Sándor J

    2012-03-01

    Global left ventricular (LV) isovolumic relaxation rate has been characterized: 1) via the time constant of isovolumic relaxation τ or 2) via the logistic time constant τ(L). An alternate kinematic method, characterizes isovolumic relaxation (IVR) in accordance with Newton's Second Law. The model's parameters, stiffness E(k), and damping/relaxation μ result from best fit of model-predicted pressure to in vivo data. All three models (exponential, logistic, and kinematic) characterize global relaxation in terms of pressure decay rates. However, IVR is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. Apical and basal LV wall segments untwist at different times and rates, and transmural strain and strain rates differ due to the helically variable pitch of myocytes and sheets. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the exponential model (τ) or kinematic model (μ and E(k)) parameters will elucidate the spatiotemporal variation of IVR rate. Left ventricular pressures in 20 subjects were recorded using a high-fidelity, multipressure transducer (3 cm apart) catheter. Simultaneous, dual-channel pressure data was plotted in the pressure phase-plane (dP/dt vs. P) and τ, μ, and E(k) were computed in 1631 beats (average: 82 beats per subject). Tau differed significantly between the two channels (P < 0.05) in 16 of 20 subjects, whereas μ and E(k) differed significantly (P < 0.05) in all 20 subjects. These results show that quantifying the relaxation rate from data recorded at a single location has limitations. Moreover, kinematic model based analysis allows characterization of restoring (recoil) forces and resistive (crossbridge uncoupling) forces during IVR and their spatio-temporal dependence, thereby elucidating the relative roles of stiffness vs. relaxation as IVR rate determinants.

  16. Graphene plasmonics for tuning photon decay rate near metallic split-ring resonator in a multilayered substrate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongpin P; Sha, Wei E I; Jiang, Lijun; Hu, Jun

    2015-02-09

    Study of photon decay rate is essential to various optical devices, where graphene is an emerging building block due to its electrical tunability. In this paper, we study photon decay rate of a quantum emitter near a metallic split-ring resonator, which is embedded in a multilayered substrate incorporating a graphene layer. Analyzing photon decay rate in such a complex multilayered system is not only computationally challenging but also highly important to experimentally realizable devices. First, the dispersion relation of graphene plasmonics supported at a dieletric/graphene/dielectric structure is investigated systematically. Meanwhile, the dispersion relation of metallic plasmonics supported at a dielectric/metal structure is studied comparatively. According to our investigation, graphene offers several flexible tuning routes for manipulating photon decay rate, including tunable chemical potential and the emitter's position and polarization. Next, considering plasmonic waves in a graphene sheet occur in the infrared regime, we carefully design a metallic split ring resonating around the same frequency range. Consequently, this design enables a mutual interaction between graphene plasmonics and metallic plasmonics. The boundary element method with a multilayered medium Green's function is adopted in the numerical simulation. Blue-shifted and splitting resonance peaks are theoretically observed, which suggests a strong mode coupling. Moreover, the mode coupling has a switch on-off feature via electrostatically doping the graphene sheet. This work is helpful to dynamically manipulate photon decay rate in complex optical devices.

  17. Decay Rates and Semi-stable Fraction Formation after 12 years of Foliar Litter Decomposition in Canadian Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Smyth, C.; Moore, T.; Prescott, C.; Titus, B.; Siltanen, M.; Visser, S.; Preston, C. M.; Nault, J.

    2009-12-01

    Litter decay in early and midphases of decomposition have been shown to highly influenced by climate and substrate quality, however factors affecting decay during the late semi-stable phase are less well understood. The Canadian Intersite Decomposition Experiment (CIDET) was established in 1992 with the objective of providing data on the long-term rates of litter decomposition and nutrient mineralization for a range of forested ecoclimatic regions in Canada. Such data were needed to help verify models used for national C accounting, as well as aid in the development of other soil C models. CIDET examined the annual decay, over a 12-year period, of 10 standard foliar litters and 2 wood substrates at 18 forested upland and 3 wetland sites ranging from the cool temperate to subarctic regions, a nearly 20oC span in temperature. On a subset of sites and litter types, changes in litter C chemistry over time were also determined. Over the first 6 years, C/N ratio and iron increased, NMR showed an overall decline in O-alkyl C (carbohydrates) and increase in alkyl, aromatic, phenolic, and carboxyl C. Proximate analysis showed the acid unhydrolyzable residue (AUR) increases, but true lignin did not accumulate, in contrast to the conceptual ligno-cellulose model of decomposition. Litter decay during first phase was related to initial litter quality (AUR and water soluble extract), winter precipitation, but not temperature, suggesting the importance of leaching during this phase. Decay rate “k” during the mid phase was related to temperature, initial litter quality (AUR and AUR/N), summer precipitation, but not soil N. In most cases decay had approached an asymptote before end of experiment. Although annual temperature was the best single predictor for 12-year asymptotes, summer precipitation and forest floor pH and C/N ratio were the best set of combined predictors. The changes in the decay factors during different phases may explain some of the discrepancies in the

  18. Pressure Decay Testing Methodology for Quantifying Leak Rates of Full-Scale Docking System Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Wasowski, Janice L.; Garafolo, Nicholas G.; Penney, Nicholas; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. This system, called the Low Impact Docking System, is a mechanism designed to connect the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to the International Space Station, the lunar lander (Altair), and other future Constellation Project vehicles. NASA Glenn Research Center is playing a key role in developing the main interface seal for this docking system. This seal will be relatively large with an outside diameter in the range of 54 to 58 in. (137 to 147 cm). As part of this effort, a new test apparatus has been designed, fabricated, and installed to measure leak rates of candidate full-scale seals under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Using this test apparatus, a pressure decay testing and data processing methodology has been developed to quantify full-scale seal leak rates. Tests performed on untreated 54 in. diameter seals at room temperature in a fully compressed state resulted in leak rates lower than the requirement of less than 0.0025 lbm, air per day (0.0011 kg/day).

  19. Deprotonation yields, pKa, and aci-nitro decay rates in some substituted o-nitrobenzaldehydes.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Viappiani, Cristiano

    2003-07-01

    In this paper we report the deprotonation yields, the pKa, and decay kinetics of the aci-nitro intermediates of some substituted 2-nitrobenzaldehydes that can be used as photoactivatable caged proton compounds. The decay of the aci-nitro absorbance for 2-nitrobenzaldehyde occurs within a few nanoseconds from photoexcitation. Addition of electron donating methoxy substituents at positions 4 and 5 leads to lower deprotonation yields, higher pKa, and slower decays of the aci-nitro intermediates. On the contrary, the decay rate is accelerated by the introduction of an electron-withdrawing Cl atom at position 4 in the phenyl ring, with little influence on the deprotonation yield and pKa of the aci-nitro intermediate.

  20. Coupled-Channels Study of α-DECAY Rates for Deformed Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    The generalized density-dependent cluster model is devoted to calculate α-decay half-lives of spherical and deformed nuclei. The multi-channel cluster model is developed to describe the α-decay fine structure in heavy deformed nuclei, including half-lives and branching ratios. After a brief review of these two models, special cases of the α-decay fine structure are presented. Calculations are separately performed using the coupled-channels and WKB approaches.

  1. Anomalous effects of radioactive decay rates and capacitance values measured inside a modified Faraday cage: Correlations with space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholkmann, F.; Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V. A.; Verdú, G.

    2017-03-01

    Recently we reported (Milián-Sánchez V. et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A, 828 (2016) 210) our experimental results involving 226Ra decay rate and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage. Our measurements exhibited anomalous effects of unknown origin. In this letter we report new results regarding our investigation into the origins of the observed effects. We report preliminary findings of a correlation analysis between the radioactive decay rates and capacitance time series and space weather related variables (geomagnetic field disturbances and cosmic-ray neutron counts). A significant correlation was observed for specific data sets. The results are presented and possible implications for future work discussed.

  2. Energy-level shifts and the decay rate of an atom in the presence of a conducting wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Zahra; Kheirandish, Fardin

    2015-12-01

    In the present article explicit expressions for the decay rate and energy-level shifts of an atom in the presence of an ideal conducting wedge, two parallel plates, and a half sheet are obtained in the framework of the canonical quantization approach. The angular and radial dependences of the decay rate for different atomic polarizations of an excited atom and also of the energy-level shifts are depicted and discussed. The consistency of the present approach in some limiting cases is investigated by comparing the relevant results obtained here to the previously reported results.

  3. SU(3) flavor symmetry and CP violating rate differences for charmless B{yields}PV decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N. G.; He, Xiao-Gang; Shi, Jian-Qing

    2000-08-01

    We derive several relations between CP violating rate differences {delta}(B{yields}PV)={gamma}(B{yields}PV)-{gamma}(B(bar sign){yields}P(bar sign)V(bar sign)) for charmless B{yields}PV decays in the standard model using SU(3) flavor symmetry. It is found that although the relations between branching ratios of {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=-1 processes are complicated, there are simple relations independent of hadronic models between some of the {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=-1 rate differences due to the unitarity property of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, such as {delta}(B{yields}{pi}{sup +}{rho}{sup -})=-{delta}(B{yields}{pi}{sup +}K{sup *-}), {delta}(B{yields}{pi}{sup -}{rho}{sup +})=-{delta}(B{yields}K{sup -}{rho}{sup +}). SU(3) breaking effects are also estimated using the factorization approximation. These relations can be tested at B factories in the near future. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Design of cycler trajectories and analysis of solar influences on radioactive decay rates during space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Blake A.

    This thesis investigates the design of interplanetary missions for the continual habitation of Mars via Earth-Mars cyclers and for the detection of variations in nuclear decay rates due to solar influences. Several cycler concepts have been proposed to provide safe and comfortable quarters for astronauts traveling between the Earth and Mars. However, no literature has appeared to show how these massive vehicles might be placed into their cycler trajectories. Trajectories are designed that use either Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust to establish cycler vehicles in their desired orbits. In the cycler trajectory cases considered, the use of Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust substantially reduces the total propellant needed to achieve the cycler orbit compared to direct orbit insertion. In the case of the classic Aldrin cycler, the propellant savings due to Vinfinity leveraging can be as large as a 24 metric ton reduction for a cycler vehicle with a dry mass of 75 metric tons, and an additional 111 metric ton reduction by instead using low thrust. The two-synodic period cyclers considered benefit less from Vinfinity leveraging, but have a smaller total propellant mass due to their lower approach velocities at Earth and Mars. It turns out that, for low-thrust establishment, the propellant required is approximately the same for each of the cycler trajectories. The Aldrin cycler has been proposed as a transportation system for human missions between Earth and Mars. However, the hyperbolic excess velocity values at the planetary encounters for these orbits are infeasibly large, especially at Mars. In a new version of the Aldrin cycler, low thrust is used in the interplanetary trajectories to reduce the encounter velocities. Reducing the encounter velocities at both planets reduces the propellant needed by the taxis (astronauts use these taxis to transfer between the planetary surfaces and the cycler vehicle) to perform hyperbolic rendezvous. While the propellant

  5. Effect of Fungal Competition on Decay Rates in Bicultured Soil Bottle Assays

    Treesearch

    Grant T. Kirker; Amy Blodgett; Patricia K. Lebow; Carol A. Clausen

    2016-01-01

    For decades, wood scientists and preservative formulators have employed the monocultured soil bottle assay to test efficacy of wood treatment in the laboratory as a rapid predictor of field performance. This study examines the effects of bicultured soil bottle assays on the decay by common wood decay fungi. Mycelial interactions were noted in early stages of...

  6. Relaxation of the CH stretch in liquid CHBr3: Solvent effects and decay rates using classical nonequilibrium simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Sai G.; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2006-12-01

    This article addresses two questions regarding the decay of the CH stretch in liquid CHBr3. The first is whether the initial steps of the relaxation primarily involve energy redistribution within the excited molecule alone. Gas phase quantum mechanical and classical calculations are performed to examine the role of the solvent in this process. At the fundamental excitation level, it is found that CH stretch decay is, in fact, strongly solvent driven. The second question is on the applicability of a fully classical approach to the calculation of CH stretch condensed phase decay rates. To this end, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed. The results are compared with quantum mechanical rates computed previously. The two methods are found to be in fair agreement with each other. However, care must be exercised in the interpretation of the classical results.

  7. A Correlation Between Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Swift UVOT GRB Optical/UV Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oates, S. R.; Page, M. J.; De Pasquale, M.; Schady, P.; Breeveld, A. A.; Holland, S. T.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Marshall, F. E.

    2012-01-01

    We examine a sample of 48 Swift/UVOT long Gamma-ray Burst light curves and find a correlation between the logarithmic luminosity at 200s and average decay rate determined from 200s onwards, with a Spearman rank coefficient of -0.58 at a significance of 99.998% (4.2 sigma ). We discuss the causes of the log L200s - alpha (greater than) 200s correlation, finding it to be an intrinsic property of long GRBs, and not resulting from the selection criteria. We find two ways to produce the correlation. One possibility is that there is some property of the central engine, outflow or external medium that affects the rate of energy release so that the bright afterglows release their energy more quickly and decay faster than the fainter afterglows. Alternatively, the correlation may be produced by variation of the observers viewing angle, with observers at large viewing angles observing fainter and slower decaying light curves.

  8. Experimental investigation of effect of jet decay rate on jet-induced pressures on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ousterhout, D. S.; Warcup, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between a lift jet and an aircraft wing for a jet VTOL aircraft was performed for the simplified model of an unheated, subsonic, circular jet exiting at right angles to a flat plate into a uniform subsonic crosswind. The effects of jet dynamic pressure decay rate upon the jet location and jet induced pressure distribution on the plate were studied over a range of jet to crossflow velocity ratios of 2.2 or = R or = 10. Jet decay rate was varied through use of cylindrical centerbodies with flat or hemispherical tips submerged in the jet nozzle at various depths below the jet exit plane. Quicker jet dynamic pressure decay, caused by the presence of a centerbody, resulted in reductions in the jet induced lift loss by as much as 45 percent relative to values for jets with no centerbody. These reductions in lift loss were observed at the larger values of crossflow velocity.

  9. Using the Inflection Points and Rates of Growth and Decay to Predict Levels of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    The ascending and descending inflection points and rates of growth and decay at specific times during the sunspot cycle are examined as predictors for future activity. On average, the ascending inflection point occurs about 1-2 yr after sunspot minimum amplitude (Rm) and the descending inflection point occurs about 6-7 yr after Rm. The ascending inflection point and the inferred slope (including the 12-mo moving average (12-mma) of (Delta)R (the month-to-month change in the smoothed monthly mean sunspot number (R)) at the ascending inflection point provide strong indications as to the expected size of the ongoing cycle s sunspot maximum amplitude (RM), while the descending inflection point appears to provide an indication as to the expected length of the ongoing cycle. The value of the 12-mma of (Delta)R at elapsed time T = 27 mo past the epoch of RM (E(RM)) seems to provide a strong indication as to the expected size of Rm for the following cycle. The expected Rm for cycle 24 is 7.6 +/- 4.4 (the 90-percent prediction interval), occurring before September 2008. Evidence is also presented for secular rises in selected cycle-related parameters and for preferential grouping of sunspot cycles by amplitude and/or period.

  10. Precision measurement of the decay rate of the negative positronium ion Ps{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Ceeh, Hubert; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Schreckenbach, Klaus; Gaertner, Stefan A.; Thirolf, Peter G.; Fleischer, Frank; Schwalm, Dirk

    2011-12-15

    The negative positronium ion Ps{sup -} is a bound system consisting of two electrons and a positron. Its three constituents are pointlike leptonic particles of equal mass, which are subject only to the electroweak and gravitational force. Hence, Ps{sup -} is an ideal object in which to study the quantum mechanics of a three-body system. The ground state of Ps{sup -} is stable against dissociation but unstable against annihilation into photons. We report here on a precise measurement of the Ps{sup -} ground-state decay rate {Gamma}, which was carried out at the high-intensity NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh (NEPOMUC) at the research reactor FRM II in Garching. A value of {Gamma}=2.0875(50) ns{sup -1} was obtained, which is three times more precise than previous experiments and in agreement with most recent theoretical predictions. The achieved experimental precision is at the level of the leading corrections in the theoretical predictions.

  11. Probing Anderson localization of light via decay rate statistics in aperiodic Vogel spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofi, Aristi; Pinheiro, Felipe A.; Dal Negro, Luca

    We systematically investigate the spectral properties of different types of two-dimensional aperiodic Vogel spiral arrays of pointlike scatterers and three-dimensional metamaterials with Vogel spiral chirality using rigorous Green's function spectral method. We considered an efficient T-matrix approach to analyze multiple-scattering effects, including all scattering orders, and to understand localization properties through the statistics of the Green's matrix eigenvalues. The knowledge of the spectrum of the Green matrix of multi-particle scattering systems provides important information on the character of light propagation and localization in chiral media with deterministic aperiodic geometry. In particular, we analyze for the first time the statistics of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Green matrix and extract the decay rates of the eigenmodes, their inverse participation ratio (IPR), the Wigner delay times and their quality factors. We emphasize the unique properties of aperiodic Vogel spirals with respect to random scattering media, which have been investigated so far. This work was supported by the Army Research Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement Number W911NF-12-2-0023.

  12. Decay rates of a molecule in the vicinity of a spherical surface of an isotropic magnetodielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. Y.; Leung, P. T.; Tsai, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive study is presented on the decay rates of excited molecules in the vicinity of a magnetodielectric material of spherical geometry via electrodynamic modeling. Both the models based on a driven-damped harmonic oscillator and on energy transfers will be applied so that the total decay rates can be rigorously decomposed into the radiative and the nonradiative rates. Clarifications of the equivalence of these two models for arbitrary geometry will be provided. Different possible orientations and locations of the molecule are studied with the molecule being placed near a spherical particle or a cavity. Among other results, TE modes are observed which can be manifested via nonradiative transfer from a tangential dipole within a small range of dissipation parameters set for the spherical particle. In addition, spectral analysis shows that decay rates at such a particle with small absorption are largely dominated by radiative transfer except at multipolar resonances when nonradiative transfer becomes prominent, and relatively unmodified decay is possible when negative refraction takes place.

  13. Determination of plate wave velocities and diffuse field decay rates with braod-band acousto-ultrasonic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    Lowest symmetric and lowest antisymmetric plate wave modes were excited and identified in broad-band acousto-ultrasonic (AU) signals collected from various high temperature composite materials. Group velocities have been determined for these nearly nondispersive modes. An algorithm has been developed and applied to determine phase velocities and hence dispersion curves for the frequency ranges of the broad-band pulses. It is demonstrated that these data are sensitive to changes in the various stiffness moduli of the materials, in agreement by analogy, with the theoretical and experimental results of Tang and Henneke on fiber reinforced polymers. Diffuse field decay rates have been determined in the same specimen geometries and AU configuration as for the plate wave measurements. These decay rates are of value in assessing degradation such as matrix cracking in ceramic matrix composites. In addition, we verify that diffuse field decay rates respond to fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and density in ceramic matrix composites. This work shows that velocity/stiffness and decay rate measurements can be obtained in the same set of AU experiments for characterizing materials and in specimens with geometries useful for mechanical measurements.

  14. Atmospheric deposition of sup 7 Be and sup 10 Be

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L. ); Stensland, G.J. ); Klein, J.; Middleton, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of {sup 10}Be in precipitation taken in Hawaii, Illinois and New Jersey over a period of five years are reported. The problem of contamination by the isotope being resuspended on wind blown soil that is also collected is addressed. Rain collected at Mauna Loa, Hawaii has such low values of dust contamination that it has been taken as clean, and the data from Illinois and New Jersey are evaluated on that assumption. The conclusion is that the deposition in a given amount of rain for the non-resuspended component is the same for all three stations, and the authors propose that the annual rate for mid-latitude locations have moderate rainfall is proportional to the local rainfall. {sup 7}Be, which is probably negligibly contributed to the measurements by soil contamination was measured for individual rains in Illinois and found to have a deposition of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 4} atom/cm{sup 3}. The authors have found that concentration variations between precipitation events greater than a factor of 20 exist for both isotopes and that relatively rare, high concentration events dominate deposition, thereby requiring long periods of observation to avoid significant error. Based on their own and other data they conclude that the best value for {sup 10}Be deposition is 1.5 {times} 10{sup 4} atom/cm{sup 3}, uncertain by 20%, and for {sup 7}Be is 1.2 {times} 10{sup 4} atom/cm{sup 3}, uncertain by 25%. A global average deposition rate cannot be inferred directly for either isotope from these kinds of data; however, the theoretical global deposition rate for {sup 10}Be is shown to be consistent with the deposition reported here, if the concentration in equatorial rain is about 3300 atom/g.

  15. Exact evaluation of the rates of electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Layden, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-08-15

    Electrostatic decay of Langmuir waves into Langmuir and ion sound waves (L→L′+S) and scattering of Langmuir waves off thermal ions (L+i→L′+i′, also called “nonlinear Landau damping”) are important nonlinear weak-turbulence processes. The rates for these processes depend on the quadratic longitudinal response function α{sup (2)} (or, equivalently, the quadratic longitudinal susceptibility χ{sup (2)}), which describes the second-order response of a plasma to electrostatic wave fields. Previous calculations of these rates for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma have relied upon an approximate form for α{sup (2)} that is valid where two of the wave fields are fast (i.e., v{sub φ}=ω/k≫V{sub e} where ω is the angular frequency, k is the wavenumber, and V{sub e} is the electron thermal speed) and one is slow (v{sub φ}≪V{sub e}). Recently, an exact expression was derived for α{sup (2)} that is valid for any phase speeds of the three waves in an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma. Here, this exact α{sup (2)} is applied to the calculation of the three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions, and the resulting exact rates are compared with the approximate rates. The calculations are performed using previously derived three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay given in terms of a general α{sup (2)}, and newly derived three-dimensional rates for scattering off thermal ions; the scattering rate is derived assuming a Maxwellian ion distribution, and both rates are derived assuming arc distributions for the wave spectra. For most space plasma conditions, the approximate rate is found to be accurate to better than 20%; however, for sufficiently low Langmuir phase speeds (v{sub φ}/V{sub e}≈3) appropriate to some spatial domains of the foreshock regions of planetary bow shocks and type II solar radio bursts, the use of the exact rate may be necessary for accurate calculations. The relative rates of electrostatic decay

  16. Exact estimate of the α -decay rate and semiclassical approach in deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R.

    2015-11-01

    We compare the quantum mechanical procedures to estimate the total α -decay width from deformed nuclei in the laboratory and intrinsic systems of coordinates. Our analysis shows that the total half-life estimated in the intrinsic frame by neglecting the rotational motion of the core (adiabatic approach) is one order of magnitude smaller at β2=0.3 than the corresponding value in the spherical case. A similar calculation in the laboratory system of coordinates by considering the core motion (giving the correct theoretical estimate) predicts a reduction by only a factor of 2. The widely used "angular WKB" (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) semiclassical procedure provides decay widths which are comparable to the adiabatic approach. We propose a new and very simple semiclassical "angular momentum WKB" procedure to evaluate the decay width in deformed nuclei. It provides decay widths very close to the ones obtained by the exact laboratory coupling channels procedure.

  17. Decay rates of Gaussian-type I-balls and Bose-enhancement effects in 3+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masaki

    2014-02-03

    I-balls/oscillons are long-lived spatially localized lumps of a scalar field which may be formed after inflation. In the scalar field theory with monomial potential nearly and shallower than quadratic, which is motivated by chaotic inflationary models and supersymmetric theories, the scalar field configuration of I-balls is approximately Gaussian. If the I-ball interacts with another scalar field, the I-ball eventually decays into radiation. Recently, it was pointed out that the decay rate of I-balls increases exponentially by the effects of Bose enhancement under some conditions and a non-perturbative method to compute the exponential growth rate has been derived. In this paper, we apply the method to the Gaussian-type I-ball in 3+1 dimensions assuming spherical symmetry, and calculate the partial decay rates into partial waves, labelled by the angular momentum of daughter particles. We reveal the conditions that the I-ball decays exponentially, which are found to depend on the mass and angular momentum of daughter particles and also be affected by the quantum uncertainty in the momentum of daughter particles.

  18. Environmental Controls on Cumulative and Yearly Litter Decay Rates Over Four Years in Forested and Harvested Sites Across Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Thompson, E.; Cameron, A.; Pare, D.; Amiro, B. D.; Lavigne, M.; Smyth, C.; Black, T. A.; Barr, A. G.; Margolis, H. A.

    2010-12-01

    weak. Both temperature and moisture accounted for differences in cumulative decay rates and mass loss of surface litter among forest site type and cover, though soil microenvironment accounted for more variation than did site climate. Forest site type and cover effects were still significant even when controlled for microenvironment, suggesting other soil or biotic factors need to be accounted for in predicting litter decay.

  19. Large O(m-2c) nonperturbative corrections to the inclusive rate of the decay B -> Xsγ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshin, M. B.

    1997-02-01

    It is shown that the inclusive rate of the rare weak radiative decays B -> Xsγ contains a series of nonperturbative corrections, whose `short distance' scale is set by m-1c, rather than bym-1b . The first correction in this series is expressed through the chromomagnetic interaction of the b quark inside the B meson and the relative magnitude of the effect is determined by the ratio /m2c. Though the magnitude of this first correction is suppressed by a numerical coefficient, the sensitivity of the decay rate to the distance scale m-1c may significantly limit the accuracy of purely perturbative predictions for the rate.

  20. Large-scale evaluation of β -decay rates of r -process nuclei with the inclusion of first-forbidden transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketin, T.; Huther, L.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Background: r -process nucleosynthesis models rely, by necessity, on nuclear structure models for input. Particularly important are β -decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei. At present only a single systematic calculation exists that provides values for all relevant nuclei making it difficult to test the sensitivity of nucleosynthesis models to this input. Additionally, even though there are indications that their contribution may be significant, the impact of first-forbidden transitions on decay rates has not been systematically studied within a consistent model. Purpose: Our goal is to provide a table of β -decay half-lives and β -delayed neutron emission probabilities, including first-forbidden transitions, calculated within a fully self-consistent microscopic theoretical framework. The results are used in an r -process nucleosynthesis calculation to asses the sensitivity of heavy element nucleosynthesis to weak interaction reaction rates. Method: We use a fully self-consistent covariant density functional theory (CDFT) framework. The ground state of all nuclei is calculated with the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model, and excited states are obtained within the proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (p n -RQRPA). Results: The β -decay half-lives, β -delayed neutron emission probabilities, and the average number of emitted neutrons have been calculated for 5409 nuclei in the neutron-rich region of the nuclear chart. We observe a significant contribution of the first-forbidden transitions to the total decay rate in nuclei far from the valley of stability. The experimental half-lives are in general well reproduced for even-even, odd-A , and odd-odd nuclei, in particular for short-lived nuclei. The resulting data table is included with the article as Supplemental Material. Conclusions: In certain regions of the nuclear chart, first-forbidden transitions constitute a large fraction of the total decay rate and must be

  1. Calculation of the decay rate of tachyonic neutrinos against charged-lepton-pair and neutrino-pair Cerenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.; Nándori, István; Ehrlich, Robert

    2017-10-01

    We consider in detail the calculation of the decay rate of high-energy superluminal neutrinos against (charged) lepton pair Cerenkov radiation, and neutrino pair Cerenkov radiation, i.e., against the decay channels ν \\to ν {e}+ {e}- and ν \\to ν \\overline{ν } ν . Under the hypothesis of a tachyonic nature of neutrinos, these decay channels put constraints on the lifetime of high-energy neutrinos for terrestrial experiments as well as on cosmic scales. For the oncoming neutrino, we use the Lorentz-covariant tachyonic relation {E}ν =\\sqrt{{p}2-{m}ν 2}, where m ν is the tachyonic mass parameter. We derive both threshold conditions as well as on decay and energy loss rates, using the plane-wave fundamental bispinor solutions of the tachyonic Dirac equation. Various intricacies of rest frame versus lab frame calculations are highlighted. The results are compared to the observations of high-energy IceCube neutrinos of cosmological origin.

  2. Observation of Dicke superradiance for two artificial atoms in a cavity with high decay rate.

    PubMed

    Mlynek, J A; Abdumalikov, A A; Eichler, C; Wallraff, A

    2014-11-04

    An individual excited two-level system decays to its ground state in a process known as spontaneous emission. The probability of detecting the emitted photon decreases exponentially with the time passed since its excitation. In 1954, Dicke first considered the more subtle situation in which two emitters decay in close proximity to each other. He argued that the emission dynamics of a single two-level system is altered by the presence of a second one, even if it is in its ground state. Here, we present a close to ideal realization of Dicke's original two-spin Gedankenexperiment, using a system of two individually controllable superconducting qubits weakly coupled to a fast decaying microwave cavity. The two-emitter case of superradiance is explicitly demonstrated both in time-resolved measurements of the emitted power and by fully reconstructing the density matrix of the emitted field in the photon number basis.

  3. Enhanced Dark Matter Annihilation Rate for Positron and Electron Excesses from Q-Ball Decay

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, John

    2009-10-09

    We show that Q-ball decay in Affleck-Dine baryogenesis models can account for dark matter when the annihilation cross section is sufficiently enhanced to explain the positron and electron excesses observed by PAMELA, ATIC, and PPB-BETS. For Affleck-Dine baryogenesis along a d=6 flat direction, the reheating temperature is approximately 30 GeV and the Q-ball decay temperature is in the range of 10-100 MeV. The lightest supersymmetric particles produced by Q-ball decay annihilate down to the observed dark matter density if the cross section is enhanced by a factor approx10{sup 3} relative to the thermal relic cross section.

  4. Rates, polarizations, and asymmetries in charmless vector-vector B meson decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel De Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-10-24

    With a sample of approximately 89 x 10(6) B(-)B pairs collected with the BABAR detector, we perform a search for B meson decays into pairs of charmless vector mesons (phi, rho, and K*). We measure the branching fractions, determine the degree of longitudinal polarization, and search for CP violation asymmetries in the processes B+-->phiK(*+), B0-->phiK(*0), B+-->rho(0)K(*+), and B+-->rho(0)rho(+). We also set an upper limit on the branching fraction for the decay B0-->rho(0)rho(0).

  5. Shell-model calculations of beta-decay rates for s- and r-process nucleosyntheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Mathews, G. J.; Bloom, S. D.

    1985-10-01

    Examples of large-basis shell-model calculations of Gamow-Teller (BETA)-decay properties of specific interest in the astrophysical s- and r- processes are presented. Numerical results are given for: (1) the GT-matrix elements for the excited state decays of the unstable s-process nucleus Tc-99; and (2) the GT-strength function for the neutron-rich nucleus Cd-130, which lies on the r-process path. The results are discussed in conjunction with the astrophysics problems.

  6. Rates, Polarizations, and Asymmetries in Charmless Vector-Vector B Meson Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-10-01

    With a sample of approximately 89×106 BB¯ pairs collected with the BABAR detector, we perform a search for B meson decays into pairs of charmless vector mesons (φ, ρ, and K*). We measure the branching fractions, determine the degree of longitudinal polarization, and search for CP violation asymmetries in the processes B+→φK*+, B0→φK*0, B+→ρ0K*+, and B+→ρ0ρ+. We also set an upper limit on the branching fraction for the decay B0→ρ0ρ0.

  7. Residence times and decay rates of downed woody debris biomass/carbon in eastern US forests

    Treesearch

    Matthew B. Russell; Christopher W. Woodall; Shawn Fraver; Anthony W. D' Amato; Grant M. Domke; Kenneth E. Skog

    2014-01-01

    A key component in describing forest carbon (C) dynamics is the change in downed dead wood biomass through time. Specifically, there is a dearth of information regarding the residence time of downed woody debris (DWD), which may be reflected in the diversity of wood (for example, species, size, and stage of decay) and site attributes (for example, climate) across the...

  8. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Decay Rate Asymmetry of B to D_pi+ pi- pi0 K-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Oregon U. /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-10

    The authors report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay chain can be used to measure the CKM phase {gamma}. Using about 229 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup -}}) = (5.5 {+-} 1.0 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and the decay rate asymmetry A = -0.02 {+-} 0.16 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) for the full decay chain.

  9. Experimental investigation of effects of jet decay rate on jet-induced pressures on a flat plate: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ousterhout, D. S.; Warcup, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Tabular data are presented for an experimental study of the effects of jet decay rate on the jet-induced pressure distribution on a flat plate for a single jet issuing at right angle to the flat plate into a uniform crossflow. The data are presented in four sections: (1) presents the static nozzle calibration data; (2) lists the plate surface static pressure data and integrated loads; (3) lists the jet centerline trajectory data; and (4) lists the centerline dynamic pressure data.

  10. Power Spectrum Analysis of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Decay-Rate Data: Evidence for Solar Rotational Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Buncher, J. B.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Javorsek, D.; Jenkins, J. H.; Lee, R. H.; Mattes, J. J.; Newport, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Evidence for an anomalous annual periodicity in certain nuclear-decay data has led to speculation on a possible solar influence on nuclear processes. We have recently analyzed data concerning the decay rates of 36Cl and 32Si, acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), to search for evidence that might be indicative of a process involving solar rotation. Smoothing of the power spectrum by weighted-running-mean analysis leads to a significant peak at frequency 11.18 year-1, which is lower than the equatorial synodic rotation rates of the convection and radiative zones. This article concerns measurements of the decay rates of 226Ra acquired at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. We find that a similar (but not identical) analysis yields a significant peak in the PTB dataset at frequency 11.21 year-1, and a peak in the BNL dataset at 11.25 year-1. The change in the BNL result is not significant, since the uncertainties in the BNL and PTB analyses are estimated to be 0.13 year-1 and 0.07 year-1, respectively. Combining the two running means by forming the joint power statistic leads to a highly significant peak at frequency 11.23 year-1. We will briefly comment on the possible implications of these results for solar physics and for particle physics.

  11. General decay rates for the wave equation with mixed-type damping mechanisms on unbounded domain with finite measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias Silva, Flávio R.; Nascimento, Flávio A. F.; Rodrigues, José H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the study of the uniform decay rates of the energy associated with the wave equation subject to a locally distributed viscoelastic dissipation and a nonlinear frictional damping u_{tt}- Δ u+ int_0^t g(t-s)div[a(x)nabla u(s)] ds + b(x) f(u_t)=0 quad on quad Ω×]0,infty[, where {Ωsubset{R}^n, n≥ 2} is an unbounded open set with finite measure and unbounded smooth boundary {partialΩ = Γ}. Supposing that the localization functions satisfy the "competitive" assumption {a(x)+b(x)≥δ>0} for all {xin Ω} and the relaxation function g satisfies certain nonlinear differential inequalities introduced by Lasiecka et al. (J Math Phys 54(3):031504, 2013), we extend to our considered domain the prior results of Cavalcanti and Oquendo (SIAM J Control Optim 42(4):1310-1324, 2003). In addition, while in Cavalcanti and Oquendo (2003) the authors just consider exponential and polynomial decay rate estimates, in the present article general decay rate estimates are obtained.

  12. Computing decay rates for new physics theories with FEYNRULES and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwall, Johan; Duhr, Claude; Fuks, Benjamin; Mattelaer, Olivier; Öztürk, Deniz Gizem; Shen, Chia-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    We present new features of the FEYNRULES and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO programs for the automatic computation of decay widths that consistently include channels of arbitrary final-state multiplicity. The implementations are generic enough so that they can be used in the framework of any quantum field theory, possibly including higher-dimensional operators. We extend at the same time the conventions of the Universal FEYNRULES Output (or UFO) format to include decay tables and information on the total widths. We finally provide a set of representative examples of the usage of the new functions of the different codes in the framework of the Standard Model, the Higgs Effective Field Theory, the Strongly Interacting Light Higgs model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and compare the results to available literature and programs for validation purposes.

  13. Auger decay rates of core hole states using equation of motion coupled cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2017-01-01

    The recent development of Linac coherent light source high intense X-ray laser makes it possible to create double core ionization in the molecule. The generation of double core hole state and its decay is identified by Auger spectroscopy. The decay of this double core hole (DCH) states can be used as a powerful spectroscopic tool in chemical analysis. In the present work, we have implemented a promising approach, known as CAP-EOMCC method, which is a combination of complex absorbing potential (CAP) and equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) approach to calculate the lifetime of single and double core hole states. We have applied this method to calculate the lifetime of the single core hole (K-LL) and double core hole (KK-KLL) states of CH4, NH3 and HF molecules. The predicted lifetime is found to be extremely short.

  14. Evidence for CP violation in time-integrated D0→h(-)h(+) decay rates.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Navarro, A Puig; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-03-16

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D(0)→h(-)h(+) (h=K, π) decays is presented using 0.62 fb(-1) of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D(*+)→D(0)π(+) and D(*-)→D[over ¯](0)π(-) decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D(0)→K(-)K(+) and D(0)→π(-)π(+), ΔA(CP)≡A(CP)(K(-)K(+))-A(CP)(π(-)π(+)), is measured to be [-0.82±0.21(stat)±0.11(syst)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  15. Evidence for CP Violation in Time-Integrated D0→h-h+ Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G. A.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; de Bonis, I.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Estève, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Koopman, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S. K.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A. C.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F. J. P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M. T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-03-01

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D0→h-h+ (h=K, π) decays is presented using 0.62fb-1 of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D*+→D0π+ and D*-→D¯0π- decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D0→K-K+ and D0→π-π+, ΔACP≡ACP(K-K+)-ACP(π-π+), is measured to be [-0.82±0.21(stat)±0.11(syst)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  16. Decay rates of faecal indicator bacteria from sewage and ovine faeces in brackish and freshwater microcosms with contrasting suspended particulate matter concentrations.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Tracy L; Perrow, Karen; Rajko-Nenow, Paulina; Jago, Colin F; Jones, Davey L; Malham, Shelagh K; McDonald, James E

    2016-12-01

    To safeguard human health, legislative measures require the monitoring of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations in recreational and shellfish waters. Consequently, numerous studies have focussed on FIB survival in the water column and more recently in estuarine sediments. However, there is a paucity of information regarding the influence of contrasting suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations on the survival of FIB in the water column of estuaries. Here, microcosms containing freshwater or brackish water with low, high and extreme SPM concentrations were inoculated with sewage and ovine faeces and the decay rate of Escherichia coli, coliforms and enterococci were determined by enumeration over five consecutive days. E. coli derived from ovine faeces proliferated and persisted at high levels in both freshwater and brackish microcosms (no decay), whereas ovine enterococci demonstrated a net decay over the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, SPM concentration had a significant effect on the decay rates of both E. coli and enterococci from ovine faeces in brackish microcosms, but decay rate was greater at low SPM concentrations for E. coli, whereas the opposite was observed for enterococci, whose decay rates increased as SPM concentration increased. E. coli, enterococci and coliforms derived from wastewater demonstrated a net decay in both freshwater and brackish microcosms, with contrasting effects of SPM concentration on decay rate. In addition, some FIB groups demonstrated contrasting responses (decay or proliferation) in the first 24h following inoculation into freshwater versus brackish microcosms. Overall, SPM concentrations influenced the proliferation and decay rates of FIB in brackish waters, but had minimal influence in freshwater. These results demonstrate that the survival rates of FIB in aquatic environments are system specific, species and source dependent, and influenced by SPM concentration. This study has important implications

  17. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems.

  18. Decay Rate of Correlated Real-Space Delocalization Measures: Insights into Chemical Bonding and Mott Transitions from Hydrogen Chains.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Bueno, A; Kohout, M; Martı́n Pendás, A

    2016-07-12

    We study in this contribution the spatial decay rate of real-space localization and delocalization indices in correlated systems. To that end, we examine Hubbard and quantum chemical models of simple cyclic hydrogen chains, showing that all descriptors of delocalization converge quickly toward the infinite chain limits. It is then shown that the localization index may be understood as a generalization of the standard order parameter in Mott insulator transitions and that the origin of the enigmatic sigmoidal profile of delocalization indices in chemical bond-breaking processes lies in the nonlinear mapping between intersite distances and correlation parameters. Although the long-range asymptotic decay of delocalization indices is exponential, we show that as the correlation parameter decreases quantum mechanical interference sets in and a switch to an oscillating pattern, related to core chemical concepts such as resonance or mesomerism, appears.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of growth/decay rate constant ratios for small methanol clusters: Application to nucleation data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Barbara; Wilemski, Gerald; Viets, Aaron

    2013-05-01

    The Bennett Monte Carlo technique and the potential of van Leeuwen and Smit are used to calculate growth/decay rate constant ratios for small model methanol clusters at 220K, 240K and 260K. Temperature scaling properties of the rate constant ratios are demonstrated at these temperatures. The Monte Carlo results are used to study heat release from subcritical cluster formation in adiabatic nucleation rate measurements and to determine corrected final temperatures and supersaturation ratios for the methanol data of Strey, Wagner, and Schmeling. The corrected T and S values provide experimental rates with improved scaling properties. Nucleation rates are also calculated from the Monte Carlo free energy differences for the model methanol clusters and demonstrate the same scaling.

  20. Development of a water boil-off spent-fuel calorimeter system. [To measure decay heat generation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Creer, J.M.; Shupe, J.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A calorimeter system was developed to measure decay heat generation rates of unmodified spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactors. The system was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested using the following specifications: capacity of one BWR or PWR spent fuel assembly; decay heat generation range 0.1 to 2.5 kW; measurement time of < 12 h; and an accuracy of +-10% or better. The system was acceptance tested using a dc reference heater to simulate spent fuel assembly heat generation rates. Results of these tests indicated that the system could be used to measure heat generation rates between 0.5 and 2.5 kW within +- 5%. Measurements of heat generation rates of approx. 0.1 kW were obtained within +- 15%. The calorimeter system has the potential to permit measurements of heat generation rates of spent fuel assemblies and other devices in the 12- to 14-kW range. Results of calorimetry of a Turkey Point spent fuel assembly indicated that the assembly was generating approx. 1.55 kW.

  1. Rates, Polarizations, and Asymmetries in Charmless Vector-Vector B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Schaffer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu. G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hadavand, H K; Wright, Doug

    2003-03-11

    With a sample of approximately 89 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector, they measure branching fractions, determine the degree of longitudinal polarization, and search for direct CP violation in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K*{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {phi}K*{sup +}. They perform a search for other charmless vector-vector B decays involving {rho} and K*(892) resonances and observe the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0} K*{sup +} and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup +}. The branching fractions are measured to be {Beta}({phi}K*{sup 0}) = (11.1{sub -1.2}{sup +1.3} {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}({phi}K*{sup +}) = (12.1{sub -1.9}{sup +2.1} {+-} 1.5) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}({rho}{sup 0} K*{sup +}) = (7.7{sub -2.0}{sup +2.1} {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}({rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup +}) = (9.9{sub -2.5}{sup +2.6} {+-} 2.5) x 10{sup -6}. The longitudinal polarization fractions are measured to be {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda}({phi}K*{sup 0}) = 0.65 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.04 and {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda}({phi}K*{sup +}) = 0.46 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05. They measure the charge asymmetries: {Alpha}{sub CP}({phi}K*{sup 0}) = +0.04 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.02 and {Alpha}{sub CP}({phi}K*{sup +}) = +0.16 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.04.

  2. Submicrosecond isomer in 45117Rh72 and the role of triaxiality in its electromagnetic decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalkovski, S.; Bruce, A. M.; Denis Bacelar, A. M.; Górska, M.; Pietri, S.; Podolyák, Zs.; Bednarczyk, P.; Caceres, L.; Casarejos, E.; Cullen, I. J.; Doornenbal, P.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Geissel, H.; Gelletly, W.; Gerl, J.; Grębosz, J.; Hinke, C.; Ilie, G.; Ivanova, D.; Jaworski, G.; Kisyov, S.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Minkov, N.; Myalski, S.; Palacz, M.; Petkov, P.; Prokopowicz, W.; Regan, P. H.; Schaffner, H.; Steer, S.; Tashenov, S.; Walker, P. M.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    2013-08-01

    The neutron-rich nucleus 117Rh was synthesized in the fission of a relativistic 238U beam produced at the GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, Germany. An isomeric state with t1/2=138(17) ns decaying by a single γ ray was observed, providing the first information on the excited states in this nucleus. The experimental data are discussed in terms of systematics and interpreted by using the Woods-Saxon deformed shell model and triaxial-rotor-plus-particle calculations. The origin of the isomer is explained as being due to a hindered E2 transition to the ground state.

  3. Global existence and energy decay rates for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daewook; Kim, Dojin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Jung, Il Hyo

    2014-01-01

    The first objective of this paper is to prove the existence and uniqueness of global solutions for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation of the form Ku'' + M(|A (1/2) u|(2))Au + g(u') = 0 under suitable assumptions on K, A, M(·), and g(·). Next, we derive decay estimates of the energy under some growth conditions on the nonlinear dissipation g. Lastly, numerical simulations in order to verify the analytical results are given.

  4. Global Existence and Energy Decay Rates for a Kirchhoff-Type Wave Equation with Nonlinear Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dojin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Jung, Il Hyo

    2014-01-01

    The first objective of this paper is to prove the existence and uniqueness of global solutions for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation of the form Ku′′ + M(|A1/2u|2)Au + g(u′) = 0 under suitable assumptions on K, A, M(·), and g(·). Next, we derive decay estimates of the energy under some growth conditions on the nonlinear dissipation g. Lastly, numerical simulations in order to verify the analytical results are given. PMID:24977217

  5. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of tellurium-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogler, Laura Katherine

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2nubetabeta). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO2 crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of ˜10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with 130Te and 2 with 128Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2nubetabeta rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of ˜350 g 130Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130-enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2nubetabeta half-life was measured to be T1/2 = [9.81 +/- 0.96(stat) +/- 0.49(syst)] x 1020 y.

  6. Measurement of the rate of charm quark pairs produced by radiated gluons in hadronic Z decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyangkyu

    1998-11-01

    We have measured the probability of gluon splitting to charm quark pairs using 1.7 million hadronic Z decays collected in 1994 and 1995 at the L3 detector. Although this process, gluon splitting to charm quark pairs, is one of the basic processes in QCD, it has not been well understood both theoretically and experimentally. Furthermore, the limited knowledge of this process is one of the biggest sources of error in the measurement of the fraction of Z decays to bottom quark pairs (Rb). For this measurement, we have applied two methods to events with a three-jet event topology. One method. relies on tagging charm hadrons by identifying a lepton in the lowest energy jet. Another method uses a neural network technique for identifying events containing gluon splitting into charm quark pairs. Though the first method provides a simple way to tag a charm quark, it is limited by statistics. The second method improves the statistical accuracy by utilizing the entire hadronic event sample. Combining both methods, we measure the average number of gluons splitting into charm quark pairs per hadronic event to be overlinenoverlineg-->coverlinecoverline =(2.22+/-0.18+/-0.44) %. We performed a combined fit with this result and other existing measurements of overlinenoverlineg-->coverlinecoverline at LEP experiments. The result allows a stringent test of various QCD models and reduces the single biggest source of systematic error in the measurement of Rb.

  7. Constraints on the {tau} neutrino mass and mixing from precise measurements of {tau} decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, J.; Taylor, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have derived constraints on the {tau} neutrino mass and fourth generation mixing from an analysis of the partial widths of {tau} lepton decays, in particular, {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}e{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{mu}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{r_arrow}K{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. We present predictions for the {tau} decay widths, allowing for a nonzero {tau} neutrino mass m{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} and for mixing with a neutrino of mass m{sub {nu}{sub L}}{gt}M{sub Z}/2, which is parametrized using a Cabibbo-like mixing angle {theta}{sub L}. By comparison of these theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements, we obtain the following bounds at the 90{percent} confidence level: m{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}}{lt}42 MeV and sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub L}{lt}0.014. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Improving rate capability and decelerating voltage decay of Li-rich layered oxide cathodes via selenium doping to stabilize oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Quanxin; Li, Ruhong; Zheng, Rujuan; Liu, Yuanlong; Huo, Hua; Dai, Changsong

    2016-11-01

    To improve the rate performance and decelerate the voltage decay of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials, a series of cathode materials Li1.2[Mn0.7Ni0.2Co0.1]0.8-xSexO2 (x = 0, 0.07, 0.14 and 0.21) was synthesized via co-precipitation. Based on the characterization results, it can be concluded that uniform Se6+ doping can improve the degree of crystallinity of Li2MnO3, resulting in a better ordering of atoms in the transition metal layer of this type of cathode materials. In the electrochemical experiments, compared to un-doped samples, one of the Se doped samples (LLMO-Se0.14) exhibited a longer sloping region and shorter potential plateau in the initial charge curves, a larger first coulombic efficiency (ca. 77%), better rate capability (178 mAhm g-1 at 10 C) and higher mid-point voltage (MPV) retention (ca. 95%) after 100 cycles. These results prove that Se doping can effectively improve the rate capability and decelerate the voltage decay process of these cathode materials during cycling via suppressing the oxidation process of O2- to O2 and curbing a layered-to-spinel phase transformation. The above-mentioned functions of Se doping are probably due to the higher bonding energy of Sesbnd O than that of Mnsbnd O.

  9. (7)Be-recoil radiolabelling of industrially manufactured silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Holzwarth, Uwe; Bellido, Elena; Dalmiglio, Matteo; Kozempel, Jan; Cotogno, Giulio; Gibson, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelling of industrially manufactured nanoparticles is useful for nanoparticle dosimetry in biodistribution or cellular uptake studies for hazard and risk assessment. Ideally for such purposes, any chemical processing post production should be avoided as it may change the physico-chemical characteristics of the industrially manufactured species. In many cases, proton irradiation of nanoparticles allows radiolabelling by transmutation of a tiny fraction of their constituent atoms into radionuclides. However, not all types of nanoparticles offer nuclear reactions leading to radionuclides with adequate radiotracer properties. We describe here a process whereby in such cases nanoparticles can be labelled with (7)Be, which exhibits a physical half-life of 53.29 days and emits γ-rays of 478 keV energy, and is suitable for most radiotracer studies. (7)Be is produced via the proton-induced nuclear reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be in a fine-grained lithium compound with which the nanoparticles are mixed. The high recoil energy of (7)Be atoms gives them a range that allows the (7)Be-recoils to be transferred from the lithium compound into the nanoparticles by recoil implantation. The nanoparticles can be recovered from the mixture by dissolving the lithium compound and subsequent filtration or centrifugation. The method has been applied to radiolabel industrially manufactured SiO2 nanoparticles. The process can be controlled in such a way that no alterations of the (7)Be-labelled nanoparticles are detectable by dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Moreover, cyclotrons with maximum proton energies of 17-18 MeV that are available in most medical research centres could be used for this purpose.

  10. Disintegration rate and gamma ray emission probability per decay measurement of 123I.

    PubMed

    Koskinas, M F; Gishitomi, K C; Brito, A B; Yamazaki, I M; Dias, M S

    2012-09-01

    A series of (123)I measurements have been carried out in a 4π(e(A),X)-γ coincidence system. The experimental extrapolation curve was determined and compared to Monte Carlo simulation, performed by code ESQUEMA. From the slope of the experimental curve, the total conversion coefficient for the 159 keV total gamma transition, α(159), was determined. All radioactive sources were also measured in an HPGe spectrometry system, in order to determine the gamma-ray emission probability per decay for several gamma transitions. All uncertainties involved and their correlations were analyzed applying the covariance matrix methodology and the measured parameters were compared with those from the literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  12. Moments of the B meson inclusive semileptonic decay rate using neutrino reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csorna, S. E.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Bornheim, A.; Lipeles, E.; Pappas, S. P.; Shapiro, A.; Weinstein, A. J.; Briere, R. A.; Chen, G. P.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Berkelman, K.; Boisvert, V.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ecklund, K. M.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hsu, L.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Magerkurth, A.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Meyer, T. O.; Patterson, J. R.; Pedlar, T. K.; Peterson, D.; Pivarski, J.; Riley, D.; Sadoff, A. J.; Schwarthoff, H.; Shepherd, M. R.; Sun, W. M.; Thayer, J. G.; Urner, D.; Wilksen, T.; Weinberger, M.; Athar, S. B.; Avery, P.; Breva-Newell, L.; Potlia, V.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Gollin, G. D.; Karliner, I.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J. J.; Williams, J.; Edwards, K. W.; Besson, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Gong, D. T.; Kubota, Y.; Li, S. Z.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Smith, A.; Stepaniak, C. J.; Urheim, J.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Zweber, P.; Ernst, J.; Arms, K.; Eckhart, E.; Gan, K. K.; Gwon, C.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Asner, D. M.; Dytman, S. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mueller, J. A.; Nam, S.; Savinov, V.; Huang, G. S.; Miller, D. H.; Pavlunin, V.; Sanghi, B.; Shibata, E. I.; Shipsey, I. P.; Adams, G. S.; Chasse, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Napolitano, J.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Park, C. S.; Park, W.; Thayer, J. B.; Thorndike, E. H.; Coan, T. E.; Gao, Y. S.; Liu, F.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Boulahouache, C.; Blusk, S.; Butt, J.; Dambasuren, E.; Dorjkhaidav, O.; Haynes, J.; Menaa, N.; Mountain, R.; Muramatsu, H.; Nandakumar, R.; Redjimi, R.; Sia, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, Kevin; Mahmood, A. H.

    2004-08-01

    We present a measurement of the composition of B meson inclusive semileptonic decays using 9.4 fb-1 of e+e- data taken with the CLEO detector at the Υ(4S) resonance. In addition to measuring the charged lepton kinematics, the neutrino four-vector is inferred using the hermiticity of the detector. We perform a maximum likelihood fit over the full three-dimensional differential decay distribution for the fractional contributions from the B→Xclν processes with Xc=D, D*, D**, and nonresonant Xc, and the process B→Xulν. From the fit results we extract the first and second moments of the M2X and q2 distributions with minimum lepton-energy requirements of 1.0 GeV and 1.5 GeV. We find =(0.456±0.014±0.045±0.109) GeV2/c4 with a minimum lepton energy of 1.0 GeV and =(0.293±0.012±0.033±0.048) GeV2/c4 with minimum lepton energy of 1.5 GeV. The uncertainties are from statistics, detector systematic effects, and model dependence, respectively. As a test of the HQET and OPE calculations, the results for the M2X moment as a function of the minimum lepton energy requirement are compared to the predictions.

  13. Preparation of 7Be targets for nuclear astrophysics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maugeri, E. A.; Heinitz, S.; Dressler, R.; Barbagallo, M.; Kivel, N.; Schumann, D.; Ayranov, M.; Musumarra, A.; Gai, M.; Colonna, N.; Paul, M.; Halfon, S.; Cosentino, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pappalardo, A.

    2017-02-01

    This work describes the preparation of three 7Be targets which were used in two independent measurements of the 7Be(n,α)4He cross section in the energy range of interest for the Big-Bang nucleosynthesis at the n\\_TOF-CERN facility and at Soreq-SARAF . A more precise value of this cross section could shed light on the long lasting "Cosmological Lithium problem". Two methods for target preparation were used. A target was obtained by deposition and subsequent air-drying of (24.50± 0.54) GBq of Be(NO3)2 droplets precisely positioned onto a stretched low density polyethylene film 0.635 μm thick. The thickness of the deposited Be(NO3)2 layer was deduced using Monte-Carlo simulations to be 0.36 μm. The energy loss of 8500 keV alpha particles passing through the target obtained by air-drying of 7Be(NO3)2 droplets was estimated to be 88 keV . Two other targets were prepared via molecular plating onto ~ 5 μm and 1 mm thick aluminium backings, respectively. The first was obtained by molecular plating (24.47± 0.53) GBq of 7Be, resulting in a deposited layer of Be(OH)2, 1.04 μm thick. The second molecular plated target was obtained depositing (3.95± 0.08) GBq of 7Be. The mean energy loss of 8500 keV alpha particles, passing through the molecular plated target with 5 μm thick aluminium backings was estimated as 814 keV . The energy loss by 8500 keV alpha particles in all the obtained targets is considered tolerable for the envisaged cross section measurements. The preparation and characterization of the targets is here described.

  14. Air sampling by pumping through a filter: effects of air flow rate, concentration, and decay of airborne substances.

    PubMed

    Šoštarić, Marko; Petrinec, Branko; Babić, Dinko

    2016-12-01

    This paper tackles the issue of interpreting the number of airborne particles adsorbed on a filter through which a certain volume of sampled air has been pumped. This number is equal to the product of the pumped volume and particle concentration in air, but only if the concentration is constant over time and if there is no substance decomposition on the filter during sampling. If this is not the case, one must take into account the inconstancy of the concentration and the decay law for a given substance, which is complicated even further if the flow rate through the filter is not constant. In this paper, we develop a formalism which considers all of these factors, resulting in a single, compact expression of general applicability. The use of this expression is exemplified by addressing a case of sampling airborne radioactive matter, where the decay law is already well known. This law is combined with three experimentally observed time dependence of the flow rate and two models for the time dependence of the particle concentration. We also discuss the implications of these calculations for certain other situations of interest to environmental studies.

  15. Atmospheric deposition of cosmogenic 7Be and 137Cs from fallout of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Papastefanou, C; Ioannidou, A; Stoulos, S; Manolopoulou, M

    1995-08-18

    Atmospheric (tropospheric) depositional fluxes of the naturally occurring 7Be of cosmogenic origin and 137Cs from fallout of the Chernobyl accident were measured over a 7-year period (January 1987-December 1993) at Thessaloniki, Greece (40 degrees 38' N, 22 degrees 58' E). The annual total deposition fluxes of 7Be varied between 854 Bq/m2 (1987) and 1242 Bq/m2 (1992), showing a minimum in the years 1988-89. The annual total deposition fluxes of 137Cs varied between 183 Bq/m2 (1987) and 16.4 Bq/m2 (1992), showing a significant decrease as expected for natural removal and radioactive decay and no new releases from nuclear facilities or weapons testing. The annual average total deposition velocity for 7Be was from 0.3 cm/s (1988) up to 0.8 cm/s (1991), while for 137Cs the corresponding values were much higher, hence 137Cs was associated with larger atmospheric particles. High 7Be concentrations in air were related to the very little solar activity (1987-88 and 1993-94), while low 7Be concentrations in air related to the high solar activity (1989-91). Maximum 137Cs concentrations in air were registered during the spring 1991 and 1992, reflecting some stratospheric inputs. An unusual highly elevated value of 137Cs concentration in air, reaching 0.25 mBq/m3, was observed during the summer 1990.

  16. Production and separation of carrier-free 7Be

    DOE PAGES

    Gharibyan, N.; Moody, K. J.; Tumey, S. J.; ...

    2015-10-24

    A high-purity carrier-free 7Be was efficiently isolated following proton bombardment of a lithium hydroxide - aluminum target. The separation of beryllium from lithium and aluminum was achieved through a hydrochloric acid elution system utilizing cation exchange chromatography. The beryllium recovery, +99%, was assessed through gamma spectroscopy while the chemical purity was established by mass spectrometry. In conclusion, the decontamination factors of beryllium from lithium and aluminum were determined to be 6900 and 300, respectively.

  17. Seasonal variations of the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux

    SciTech Connect

    de Gouvea, A.; Friedland, A.; Murayama, H. |

    1999-11-01

    Measuring the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux is crucial towards solving the solar neutrino puzzle. The Borexino experiment, and possibly the KamLAND experiment, will be capable of studying the {sup 7}Be neutrinos in the near future. We discuss (1) how the seasonal variation of the Borexino and KamLAND data can be used to measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux in a background independent way and (2) how anomalous seasonal variations might be used to discover vacuum neutrino oscillations, independent of the solar model and the measurement of the background. In particular, we find that, after three years of Borexino or KamLAND running, vacuum neutrino oscillations can be either established or excluded for almost all values of (sin{sup 2}&hthinsp;2{theta},{Delta}m{sup 2}) preferred by the Homestake, GALLEX, SAGE, and Super-Kamiokande data. We also discuss how well seasonal variations of the data can be used to measure (sin{sup 2}&hthinsp;2{theta},{Delta}m{sup 2}) in the case of vacuum oscillations. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kogler, Laura K.

    2011-11-30

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2vββ). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO2 crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of 10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with 130Te and 2 with 128Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2vββ rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of 350 g 130Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2vββ half-life was measured to be T2v1/2 = [9.81± 0.96(stat)± 0.49(syst)] x1020 y.

  19. Λ_{c}→Λl^{+}ν_{l} Form Factors and Decay Rates from Lattice QCD with Physical Quark Masses.

    PubMed

    Meinel, Stefan

    2017-02-24

    The first lattice QCD calculation of the form factors governing Λ_{c}→Λℓ^{+}ν_{ℓ} decays is reported. The calculation was performed with two different lattice spacings and includes one ensemble with a pion mass of 139(2) MeV. The resulting predictions for the Λ_{c}→Λe^{+}ν_{e} and Λ_{c}→Λμ^{+}ν_{μ} decay rates divided by |V_{cs}|^{2} are 0.2007(71)(74) and 0.1945(69)(72)  ps^{-1}, respectively, where the two uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Taking the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |V_{cs}| from a global fit and the Λ_{c} lifetime from experiments, this translates to branching fractions of B(Λ_{c}→Λe^{+}ν_{e})=0.0380(19)_{LQCD}(11)_{τ_{Λ_{c}}} and B(Λ_{c}→Λμ^{+}ν_{μ})=0.0369(19)_{LQCD}(11)_{τ_{Λ_{c}}}. These results are consistent with, and two times more precise than, the measurements performed recently by the BESIII Collaboration. Using instead the measured branching fractions together with the lattice calculation to determine the CKM matrix element gives |V_{cs}|=0.949(24)_{LQCD}(14)_{τ_{Λ_{c}}}(49)_{B}.

  20. Time Modulation of the K-Shell Electron Capture Decay Rates of H-like Heavy Ions at GSI Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kienle, P.

    2009-08-07

    According to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EC}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d}{sup EC}approx0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  1. Λc→Λ l+νl Form Factors and Decay Rates from Lattice QCD with Physical Quark Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinel, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The first lattice QCD calculation of the form factors governing Λc→Λ ℓ+νℓdecays is reported. The calculation was performed with two different lattice spacings and includes one ensemble with a pion mass of 139(2) MeV. The resulting predictions for the Λc→Λe +νe and Λc→Λ μ+νμ decay rates divided by |Vc s|2 are 0.2007(71)(74) and 0.1945 (69 )(72 ) ps-1 , respectively, where the two uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Taking the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vc s| from a global fit and the Λc lifetime from experiments, this translates to branching fractions of B (Λc→Λ e+νe)=0.0380 (19 )LQCD(11 )τ Λ c and B (Λc→Λ μ+νμ)=0.0369 (19 )LQCD(11 )τΛc . These results are consistent with, and two times more precise than, the measurements performed recently by the BESIII Collaboration. Using instead the measured branching fractions together with the lattice calculation to determine the CKM matrix element gives |Vc s|=0.949 (24 )LQCD(14 )τΛc(49 )B .

  2. Damping rates of surface plasmons for particles of size from nano- to micrometers; reduction of the nonradiative decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolwas, K.; Derkachova, A.

    2013-01-01

    Damping rates of multipolar, localized surface plasmons (SPs) of gold and silver nanospheres of radii up to 1000 nm were found with the tools of classical electrodynamics. The significant increase in damping rates followed by noteworthy decrease for larger particles takes place along with substantial red-shift of plasmon resonance frequencies as a function of particle size. We also introduced interface damping into our modeling, which substantially modifies the plasmon damping rates of smaller particles. We demonstrate unexpected reduction of the multipolar SP damping rates in certain size ranges. This effect can be explained by the suppression of the nonradiative decay channel as a result of the lost competition with the radiative channel. We show that experimental dipole damping rates [H. Baida, et al., Nano Lett. 9(10) (2009) 3463, and C. Sönnichsen, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 077402], and the resulting resonance quality factors can be described in a consistent and straightforward way within our modeling extended to particle sizes still unavailable experimentally.

  3. 7Be(n,α) and 7Be(n,p) cross-section measurement for the cosmological lithium problem at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea, J.; Barros, S.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Furman, V.; Göbel, K.; García, A. R.; Gawlik, A.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S. J.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, J. I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Rout, P. C.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    The Cosmological Lithium Problem refers to the large discrepancy between the abundance of primordial 7Li predicted by the standard theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and the value inferred from the so-called "Spite plateau" in halo stars. A possible explanation for this longstanding puzzle in Nuclear Astrophysics is related to the incorrect estimation of the destruction rate of 7Be, which is responsible for the production of 95% of primordial Lithium. While charged-particle induced reactions have mostly been ruled out, data on the 7Be(n,α) and 7Be(n,p) reactions are scarce or completely missing, so that a large uncertainty still affects the abundance of 7Li predicted by the standard theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Both reactions have been measured at the n_TOF facility at CERN, providing for the first time data in a wide neutron energy range.

  4. Joint Inversion of Gravity and Gravity Tensor Data Using the Structural Index as Weighting Function Rate Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ialongo, S.; Cella, F.; Fedi, M.; Florio, G.

    2011-12-01

    Most geophysical inversion problems are characterized by a number of data considerably higher than the number of the unknown parameters. This corresponds to solve highly underdetermined systems. To get a unique solution, a priori information must be therefore introduced. We here analyze the inversion of the gravity gradient tensor (GGT). Previous approaches to invert jointly or independently more gradient components are by Li (2001) proposing an algorithm using a depth weighting function and Zhdanov et alii (2004), providing a well focused inversion of gradient data. Both the methods give a much-improved solution compared with the minimum length solution, which is invariably shallow and not representative of the true source distribution. For very undetermined problems, this feature is due to the role of the depth weighting matrices used by both the methods. Recently, Cella and Fedi (2011) showed however that for magnetic and gravity data the depth weighting function has to be defined carefully, under a preliminary application of Euler Deconvolution or Depth from Extreme Point methods, yielding the appropriate structural index and then using it as the rate decay of the weighting function. We therefore propose to extend this last approach to invert jointly or independently the GGT tensor using the structural index as weighting function rate decay. In case of a joint inversion, gravity data can be added as well. This multicomponent case is also relevant because the simultaneous use of several components and gravity increase the number of data and reduce the algebraic ambiguity compared to the inversion of a single component. The reduction of such ambiguity was shown in Fedi et al, (2005) decisive to get an improved depth resolution in inverse problems, independently from any form of depth weighting function. The method is demonstrated to synthetic cases and applied to real cases, such as the Vredefort impact area (South Africa), characterized by a complex density

  5. Stellar and Primordial Nucleosynthesis of {sup 7}Be: Measurement of {sup 3}He({alpha},{gamma}){sup 7}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Di Leva, A.; Gialanella, L.; Mangano, G.; Ordine, A.; Kunz, R.; Rogalla, D.; Schuermann, D.; Strieder, F.; Rolfs, C.; De Cesare, M.; D'Onofrio, A.; Terrasi, F.; De Cesare, N.; Fueloep, Z.; Gyuerky, G.; Somorjai, E.; Imbriani, G.; Roca, V.; Romano, M.

    2009-06-12

    The {sup 3}He({alpha},{gamma}){sup 7}Be reaction presently represents the largest nuclear uncertainty in the predicted solar neutrino flux and has important implications on the big bang nucleosynthesis, i.e., the production of primordial {sup 7}Li. We present here the results of an experiment using the recoil separator ERNA (European Recoil separator for Nuclear Astrophysics) to detect directly the {sup 7}Be ejectiles. In addition, off-beam activation and coincidence {gamma}-ray measurements were performed at selected energies. At energies above 1 MeV a large discrepancy compared to previous results is observed both in the absolute value and in the energy dependence of the cross section. Based on the available data and models, a robust estimate of the cross section at the astrophysical relevant energies is proposed.

  6. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report.

  7. Alpha-decay branching ratios of near-threshold states in 19Ne and the astrophysical rate of 15O(α,γ)19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davids, B.; van den Berg, A. M.; Dendooven, P.; Fleurot, F.; Hunyadi, M.; de Huu, M. A.; Rehm, K. E.; Segel, R. E.; Siemssen, R. H.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wörtche, H. J.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2003-05-01

    The 15O(α, γ)19Ne reaction is one of two routes for breakout from the hot CNO cycles into the rp process in accreting neutron stars. Its astrophysical rate depends critically on the decay properties of excited states in 19Ne lying just above the 15O + α threshold. We have measured the α-decay branching ratios for these states using the p(21Ne,t)19Ne reaction at 43 MeV/u.

  8. Direct measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino flux with 192 days of borexino data.

    PubMed

    Arpesella, C; Back, H O; Balata, M; Bellini, G; Benziger, J; Bonetti, S; Brigatti, A; Caccianiga, B; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Carraro, C; Cecchet, G; Chavarria, A; Chen, M; Dalnoki-Veress, F; D'Angelo, D; de Bari, A; de Bellefon, A; de Kerret, H; Derbin, A; Deutsch, M; di Credico, A; di Pietro, G; Eisenstein, R; Elisei, F; Etenko, A; Fernholz, R; Fomenko, K; Ford, R; Franco, D; Freudiger, B; Galbiati, C; Gatti, F; Gazzana, S; Giammarchi, M; Giugni, D; Goeger-Neff, M; Goldbrunner, T; Goretti, A; Grieb, C; Hagner, C; Hampel, W; Harding, E; Hardy, S; Hartman, F X; Hertrich, T; Heusser, G; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Joyce, M; Kiko, J; Kirsten, T; Kobychev, V; Korga, G; Korschinek, G; Kryn, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lamarche, P; Laubenstein, M; Lendvai, C; Leung, M; Lewke, T; Litvinovich, E; Loer, B; Lombardi, P; Ludhova, L; Machulin, I; Malvezzi, S; Manecki, S; Maneira, J; Maneschg, W; Manno, I; Manuzio, D; Manuzio, G; Martemianov, A; Masetti, F; Mazzucato, U; McCarty, K; McKinsey, D; Meindl, Q; Meroni, E; Miramonti, L; Misiaszek, M; Montanari, D; Monzani, M E; Muratova, V; Musico, P; Neder, H; Nelson, A; Niedermeier, L; Oberauer, L; Obolensky, M; Orsini, M; Ortica, F; Pallavicini, M; Papp, L; Parmeggiano, S; Perasso, L; Pocar, A; Raghavan, R S; Ranucci, G; Rau, W; Razeto, A; Resconi, E; Risso, P; Romani, A; Rountree, D; Sabelnikov, A; Saldanha, R; Salvo, C; Schimizzi, D; Schönert, S; Shutt, T; Simgen, H; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sonnenschein, A; Sotnikov, A; Sukhotin, S; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Vignaud, D; Vitale, S; Vogelaar, R B; von Feilitzsch, F; von Hentig, R; von Hentig, T; Wojcik, M; Wurm, M; Zaimidoroga, O; Zavatarelli, S; Zuzel, G

    2008-08-29

    We report the direct measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino signal rate performed with the Borexino detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The interaction rate of the 0.862 MeV 7Be neutrinos is 49+/-3stat+/-4syst counts/(day.100 ton). The hypothesis of no oscillation for 7Be solar neutrinos is inconsistent with our measurement at the 4sigma C.L. Our result is the first direct measurement of the survival probability for solar nu(e) in the transition region between matter-enhanced and vacuum-driven oscillations. The measurement improves the experimental determination of the flux of 7Be, pp, and CNO solar nu(e), and the limit on the effective neutrino magnetic moment using solar neutrinos.

  9. Periodic solutions of piecewise affine gene network models with non uniform decay rates: the case of a negative feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Farcot, Etienne; Gouzé, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-01

    This paper concerns periodic solutions of a class of equations that model gene regulatory networks. Unlike the vast majority of previous studies, it is not assumed that all decay rates are identical. To handle this more general situation, we rely on monotonicity properties of these systems. Under an alternative assumption, it is shown that a classical fixed point theorem for monotone, concave operators can be applied to these systems. The required assumption is expressed in geometrical terms as an alignment condition on so-called focal points. As an application, we show the existence and uniqueness of a stable periodic orbit for negative feedback loop systems in dimension 3 or more, and of a unique stable equilibrium point in dimension 2. This extends a theorem of Snoussi, which showed the existence of these orbits only.

  10. Experimental status of 7Be production and destruction at astrophysical relevant energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Leva, A.; Gialanella, L.; Strieder, F.

    2016-01-01

    The production and destruction of 7Be plays a significant role in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis as well as in the framework of the solar neutrino. The 3He(α, γ)7Be reaction cross sections has been measured several times in the last decades, but the precision achieved on reaction rate determinations at the relevant astrophysical energies is not yet satisfactory. The experimental status of this reaction will be critically reviewed, and the theoretical descriptions available will be discussed.

  11. The β-decay rates of 59Fe isotopes in shell burning environments and their influences on the production of 60Fe in massive star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Lam, Y. H.; Qi, C.; Tang, X.; Zhang, N.

    2016-02-01

    The experimental B(GT) strengths of the 59Fe excited states were employed to determine the transition strengths which greatly contribute 59Fe stellar β-decay at typical carbon shell burning temperature. The result has been compared with the theoretical rates FFN (Fuller-Fowler-Newman) and LMP (Langanke&Martinez-Pinedo). Impact of the newly determined rate on the synthesis of cosmic γ emitter 60Fe has also been studied using one-zone model calculation. Our results show 59Fe stellar β-decay rate plays an important role in the 60Fe nucleosynthesis. However the uncertainty of the decay rate is rather large due to the error of B(GT) strength that requires further studies.

  12. Detection and decay rates of prey and prey symbionts in the gut of a predator through metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Paula, Débora P; Linard, Benjamin; Andow, David A; Sujii, Edison R; Pires, Carmen S S; Vogler, Alfried P

    2015-07-01

    DNA methods are useful to identify ingested prey items from the gut of predators, but reliable detection is hampered by low amounts of degraded DNA. PCR-based methods can retrieve minute amounts of starting material but suffer from amplification biases and cross-reactions with the predator and related species genomes. Here, we use PCR-free direct shotgun sequencing of total DNA isolated from the gut of the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis at five time points after feeding on a single pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Sequence reads were matched to three reference databases: Insecta mitogenomes of 587 species, including H. axyridis sequenced here; A. pisum nuclear genome scaffolds; and scaffolds and complete genomes of 13 potential bacterial symbionts. Immediately after feeding, multicopy mtDNA of A. pisum was detected in tens of reads, while hundreds of matches to nuclear scaffolds were detected. Aphid nuclear DNA and mtDNA decayed at similar rates (0.281 and 0.11 h(-1) respectively), and the detectability periods were 32.7 and 23.1 h. Metagenomic sequencing also revealed thousands of reads of the obligate Buchnera aphidicola and facultative Regiella insecticola aphid symbionts, which showed exponential decay rates significantly faster than aphid DNA (0.694 and 0.80 h(-1) , respectively). However, the facultative aphid symbionts Hamiltonella defensa, Arsenophonus spp. and Serratia symbiotica showed an unexpected temporary increase in population size by 1-2 orders of magnitude in the predator guts before declining. Metagenomics is a powerful tool that can reveal complex relationships and the dynamics of interactions among predators, prey and their symbionts. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Reaction dynamics studies for the system 7Be+58Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Acosta, L.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Fierro, N.; Glodariu, T.; Grilj, L.; Guglielmetti, A.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Pakou, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Parkar, V. V.; Patronis, N.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Romoli, M.; Rusek, K.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Strano, E.; Stroe, L.; Zerva, K.

    2015-04-01

    The study of reactions induced by exotic weakly bound nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier had attracted a large interest in the last decade, since the features of these nuclei can deeply affect the reaction dynamics. The discrimination between different reaction mechanisms is, in general, a rather difficult task. It can be achieved by using detector arrays covering high solid angle and with high granularity that allow to measure the reaction products and, possibly, coincidences between them, as, for example, recently done for stable weakly bound nuclei [1, 2]. We investigated the collision of the weakly bound nucleus 7Be on a 58Ni target at the beam energy of 1.1 times the Coulomb barrier, measuring the elastic scattering angular distribution and the energy and angular distributions of 3He and 4He. The 7Be radioactive ion beam was produced by the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL with an energy of 22 MeV and an intensity of ~3×105 pps. Results showed that the 4He yeld is about 4 times larger than 3He yield, suggesting that reaction mechanisms other than the break-up mostly produce the He isotopes. Theoretical calculations for transfer channels and compound nucleus reactions suggest that complete fusion accounts for (41±5%) of the total reaction cross section extracted from optical model analysis of the elastic scattering data, and that 3He and 4He stripping are the most populated reaction channels among direct processes. Eventually estimation of incomplete fusion contributions to the 3,4He production cross sections was performed through semi-classical calculations with the code PLATYPUS [3].

  14. Elevated tropospheric CO2 and O3 may not alter initial wood decomposition rate or wood-decaying fungal community composition of Northern hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Emmanuel Ebanyenle; Andrew J. Burton; Andrew J. Storer; Dana L. Richter; Jessie A. Glaeser

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of elevated CO2 and/or O3 on the wood-decaying basidiomycete fungal community and wood decomposition rates at the Aspen Free-Air CO2 and O3 Enrichment (Aspen FACE) project. Mass loss rates were determined after one year of log decomposition on the soil...

  15. Measurement of the {beta}{sup +} and Orbital Electron-Capture Decay Rates in Fully Ionized, Hydrogenlike, and Heliumlike {sup 140}Pr Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinov, Yu. A.; Geissel, H.; Winckler, N.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Bosch, F.; Beckert, K.; Brandau, C.; Dimopoulou, C.; Hess, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Prochazka, A.; Reuschl, R.; Steck, M.; Stoehlker, T.; Trassinelli, M.

    2007-12-31

    We report on the first measurement of the {beta}{sup +} and orbital electron-capture decay rates of {sup 140}Pr nuclei with the simplest electron configurations: bare nuclei, hydrogenlike, and heliumlike ions. The measured electron-capture decay constant of hydrogenlike {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ions is about 50% larger than that of heliumlike {sup 140}Pr{sup 57+} ions. Moreover, {sup 140}Pr ions with one bound electron decay faster than neutral {sup 140}Pr{sup 0+} atoms with 59 electrons. To explain this peculiar observation one has to take into account the conservation of the total angular momentum, since only particular spin orientations of the nucleus and of the captured electron can contribute to the allowed decay.

  16. The integrated statistical rate function for superallowed Fermi ß-decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybisz, Leszek

    1984-09-01

    The impact that recently pointed out differences between the two sets of imtegrated statistical rate functions, i.e. f- values, calculated according to the widely adopted methods of Behrens, Jänecke and Bühring and Towner and Hardy have on the internal consistency of Ft-values of the eight best measured superallowed Fermi ß-transitions is analyzed. We find that, due to the dramatic improvement in the accuracy of experimental data, both sets of Ft-values show a statistical difference. In addition, we evaluate the second-forbidden corrections using an alternative way proposed by Jaus. This latter prescription yields results in good agreement with those obtained using the procedure of Behrens, Jänecke and Bühring. The author thanks Dr. H. Behrens for enlightening discussions.

  17. Decay Rates to Equilibrium for Nonlinear Plate Equations with Degenerate, Geometrically-Constrained Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Geredeli, Pelin G.; Webster, Justin T.

    2013-12-15

    We analyze the convergence to equilibrium of solutions to the nonlinear Berger plate evolution equation in the presence of localized interior damping (also referred to as geometrically constrained damping). Utilizing the results in (Geredeli et al. in J. Differ. Equ. 254:1193–1229, 2013), we have that any trajectory converges to the set of stationary points N . Employing standard assumptions from the theory of nonlinear unstable dynamics on the set N , we obtain the rate of convergence to an equilibrium. The critical issue in the proof of convergence to equilibria is a unique continuation property (which we prove for the Berger evolution) that provides a gradient structure for the dynamics. We also consider the more involved von Karman evolution, and show that the same results hold assuming a unique continuation property for solutions, which is presently a challenging open problem.

  18. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  19. Intravoxel distribution of DWI decay rates reveals C6 glioma invasion in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kevin M; Hyde, James S; Rand, Scott D; Bennett, Raoqiong; Krouwer, Hendrikus G J; Rebro, Kelly J; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2004-11-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the intravoxel distribution of water diffusion rates, as measured with a stretched-exponential model of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), is a marker of brain tumor invasion. Eight rats underwent intracerebral inoculation of C6 glioma cells. In three rats, cells were labeled with a fluorescent dye for microscopy. One rat was inoculated with a saline solution, and five more rats were imaged without inoculation as controls. Five healthy uninoculated rats were also imaged. DWI was performed 14-15 days after inoculation, with diffusion-weighting factor b = 500 to 6500 sec/mm2, and the resulting signal attenuation was fitted with the stretched-exponential model. The heterogeneity index values were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the peritumor ROI than in normal gray matter and significantly higher than in normal white matter. The distributed diffusion coefficient values were significantly lower than in normal white matter or normal gray matter. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the presence of tumors in the peritumor region that could be histologically distinguished from the main tumor mass. There was no change in proton density or T2-weighted images in the peritumor region, making vasogenic edema unlikely as a source of contrast. It is therefore thought that the heterogeneity parameter alpha is a marker of brain tumor invasion. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. An alternative marker for the effectiveness of water fluoridation: hospital extraction rates for dental decay, a two-region study.

    PubMed

    Elmer, T B; Langford, J W; Morris, A J

    2014-03-01

    Contemporary evidence for the effectiveness of water fluoridation schemes in the U.K. is sparse. The utility of routinely collected data in providing evidence warrants further research. To examine inpatient hospital episodes statistics for dental extractions as an alternative population marker for the effectiveness of water fluoridation by comparing hospital admissions between two major strategic health authority (SHA) areas, the West Midlands SHA-largely fluoridated--and the North West SHA--largely unfluoridated. Hospital episodes statistics (HES) were interrogated to provide data on admissions for simple and surgical dental extractions, which had a primary diagnostic code of either dental caries or diseases of pulp and periapical tissues for financial years 2006/7, 2007/8 and 2008/9. Data was aggregated by SHA area and quinary age group. Directly standardised rates (DSR) of admissions purchased for each primary care trust (PCT) were calculated and ranked by index of multiple deprivation (IMD). A significant difference in DSRs of admission between PCTs in the West Midlands and North West was observed (Mann-Whitney U test [p <0.0001]) irrespective of IMD ranking. The difference in rates between the two most deprived PCTs was 27-fold. After ranking by IMD, DSRs of hospital admissions for the extraction of decayed or pulpally/periapically involved teeth is lower in areas with a fluoridated water supply. The analysis of routinely collected HES data may help identify the impact of water fluoridation schemes.

  1. β -decay rate of 59Fe in shell burning environment and its influence on the production of 60Fe in a massive star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. A.; Lam, Y. H.; Qi, C.; Tang, X. D.; Zhang, N. T.

    2016-12-01

    We deduced the stellar β -decay rate of 59Fe at typical carbon-shell burning temperature by taking the experimental Gamow-Teller transition strengths of the 59Fe excited states. The result is also compared with those derived from large-scale shell model calculations. The new rate is up to a factor of 2.5 lower than the theoretical rate of Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (FFN) and up to a factor of 5 higher than decay rate of Langanke and Martínez-Pinedo (LMP) in the temperature region 0.5 ≤T ≤2 GK. We estimated the impact of the newly determined rate on the synthesis of cosmic γ emitter 60Fe in C-shell burning and explosive C/Ne burning using a one-zone model calculation. Our results show that 59Fe stellar β decay plays an important role in 60Fe nucleosynthesis, even though the uncertainty of the decay rate is rather large due to the error of B (GT) strengths.

  2. Trophic position and metabolic rate predict the long-term decay process of radioactive cesium in fish: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Tanaka, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the long-term behavior of radionuclides in organisms is important for estimating possible associated risks to human beings and ecosystems. As radioactive cesium (¹³⁷Cs) can be accumulated in organisms and has a long physical half-life, it is very important to understand its long-term decay in organisms; however, the underlying mechanisms determining the decay process are little known. We performed a meta-analysis to collect published data on the long-term ¹³⁷Cs decay process in fish species to estimate biological (metabolic rate) and ecological (trophic position, habitat, and diet type) influences on this process. From the linear mixed models, we found that 1) trophic position could predict the day of maximum ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in fish; and 2) the metabolic rate of the fish species and environmental water temperature could predict ecological half-lives and decay rates for fish species. These findings revealed that ecological and biological traits are important to predict the long-term decay process of ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in fish.

  3. Trophic Position and Metabolic Rate Predict the Long-Term Decay Process of Radioactive Cesium in Fish: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Tanaka, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the long-term behavior of radionuclides in organisms is important for estimating possible associated risks to human beings and ecosystems. As radioactive cesium (137Cs) can be accumulated in organisms and has a long physical half-life, it is very important to understand its long-term decay in organisms; however, the underlying mechanisms determining the decay process are little known. We performed a meta-analysis to collect published data on the long-term 137Cs decay process in fish species to estimate biological (metabolic rate) and ecological (trophic position, habitat, and diet type) influences on this process. From the linear mixed models, we found that 1) trophic position could predict the day of maximum 137Cs activity concentration in fish; and 2) the metabolic rate of the fish species and environmental water temperature could predict ecological half-lives and decay rates for fish species. These findings revealed that ecological and biological traits are important to predict the long-term decay process of 137Cs activity concentration in fish. PMID:22279534

  4. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  5. The in vivo efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors cannot be determined from the decay rates of influenza viral titers observed in treated patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, John; Dobrovolny, Hana M.; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral therapy is a first line of defence against new influenza strains. Current pandemic preparations involve stock- piling oseltamivir, an oral neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI), so rapidly determining the effectiveness of NAIs against new viral strains is vital for deciding how to use the stockpile. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to extract the drug efficacy of antivirals from the viral decay rate of chronic infections. In the present work, we use a nonlinear mathematical model representing the course of an influenza infection to explore the possibility of extracting NAI drug efficacy using only the observed viral titer decay rates seen in patients. We first show that the effect of a time-varying antiviral concentration can be accurately approximated by a constant efficacy. We derive a relationship relating the true treatment dose and time elapsed between doses to the constant drug dose required to approximate the time- varying dose. Unfortunately, even with the simplification of a constant drug efficacy, we show that the viral decay rate depends not just on drug efficacy, but also on several viral infection parameters, such as infection and production rate, so that it is not possible to extract drug efficacy from viral decay rate alone.

  6. The in vivo efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors cannot be determined from the decay rates of influenza viral titers observed in treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, John; Dobrovolny, Hana M.; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral therapy is a first line of defence against new influenza strains. Current pandemic preparations involve stock- piling oseltamivir, an oral neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI), so rapidly determining the effectiveness of NAIs against new viral strains is vital for deciding how to use the stockpile. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to extract the drug efficacy of antivirals from the viral decay rate of chronic infections. In the present work, we use a nonlinear mathematical model representing the course of an influenza infection to explore the possibility of extracting NAI drug efficacy using only the observed viral titer decay rates seen in patients. We first show that the effect of a time-varying antiviral concentration can be accurately approximated by a constant efficacy. We derive a relationship relating the true treatment dose and time elapsed between doses to the constant drug dose required to approximate the time- varying dose. Unfortunately, even with the simplification of a constant drug efficacy, we show that the viral decay rate depends not just on drug efficacy, but also on several viral infection parameters, such as infection and production rate, so that it is not possible to extract drug efficacy from viral decay rate alone. PMID:28067324

  7. THE LONG-TERM DECAY IN PRODUCTION RATES FOLLOWING THE EXTREME OUTBURST OF COMET 17P/HOLMES

    SciTech Connect

    Schleicher, David G.

    2009-10-15

    Numerous sets of narrowband filter photometry were obtained of Comet 17P/Holmes from Lowell Observatory during the interval of 2007 November 1 to 2008 March 5. Observations began 8 days following its extreme outburst, at which time the derived water production rate, based on OH measurements, was 5 x 10{sup 29} molecule s{sup -1} and the derived proxy of dust production, A({theta})f{rho}, was about 5 x 10{sup 5} cm. Relative production rates for the other gas species, CN, C{sub 2}, C{sub 3}, and NH, are consistent with 'typical' composition (based on our update to the classifications by A'Hearn et al.). An exponential decay in the logarithm of measured production rates as a function of time was observed for all species, with each species dropping by factors of about 200-500 after 125 days. All gas species exhibited clear trends with aperture size, and these trends are consistent with larger apertures having a greater proportion of older material that was released when production rates were higher. Much larger aperture trends were measured for the dust, most likely because the dust grains have smaller outflow velocities and longer lifetimes than the gas species; therefore, a greater proportion of older, i.e., higher production dust is contained within a given aperture. By extrapolating to a sufficiently small aperture size, we derive near-instantaneous water and dust production rates throughout the interval of observation, and also estimate values immediately following the outburst. The finite lifetime of the gas species requires that much higher ice vaporization rates were taking place throughout the observation interval than occurred prior to the outburst, likely due to the continued release of icy grains from the nucleus. The relatively small aperture trends for the gas species also imply that the bulk of fresh, excess volatiles are confined to the nucleus and near-nucleus regime, rather than being associated with the outburst ejecta cloud. A minimum of about 0

  8. Vibrational structure and partial rates of resonant Auger decay ofthe N 1s ->2pi core excitations in nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kukk, Edwin; Snell, Gyorgy; Bozek, John D.; Cheng, Wei-T.; Berrah, N.

    2000-07-06

    High-resolution resonant Auger electron spectra of NO measured in the vicinity of the N 1s {yields} 2{pi} core excitations are presented. The open shell electronic configuration of the molecule results in four excited electronic states, three of which are populated in the photoabsorption spectrum, {sup 2}{Delta}, {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup -} and {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}. Electron emission spectra obtained at different vibrational levels of the three N 1s core-excited states of NO are reported. Recently reported ab initio calculations [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 4038(1997)] are used to generate theoretical spectra for comparison with the experimental results taking lifetime vibration interference and Auger resonant Raman effects into account. Very good agreement is found for the lowest energy X {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} final ionic state. Spectra of the higher energy final ionic states are decomposed into contributions from the different 5{sigma}{sup -1}2{pi}{sup 1} and 1{pi}{sup -1}2{pi}{sup 1} configurations for comparison of the calculated and experimental partial Auger decay rates. A revised value for the adiabatic ionization energy of the {sup 1}{Delta} ionic state results from the deconvolution.

  9. Global Well-Posedness and Decay Rates of Strong Solutions to a Non-Conservative Compressible Two-Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evje, Steinar; Wang, Wenjun; Wen, Huanyao

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a compressible two-fluid model with constant viscosity coefficients and unequal pressure functions {P^+neq P^-}. As mentioned in the seminal work by Bresch, Desjardins, et al. (Arch Rational Mech Anal 196:599-629, 2010) for the compressible two-fluid model, where {P^+=P^-} (common pressure) is used and capillarity effects are accounted for in terms of a third-order derivative of density, the case of constant viscosity coefficients cannot be handled in their settings. Besides, their analysis relies on a special choice for the density-dependent viscosity [refer also to another reference (Commun Math Phys 309:737-755, 2012) by Bresch, Huang and Li for a study of the same model in one dimension but without capillarity effects]. In this work, we obtain the global solution and its optimal decay rate (in time) with constant viscosity coefficients and some smallness assumptions. In particular, capillary pressure is taken into account in the sense that {Δ P=P^+ - P^-=fneq 0} where the difference function {f} is assumed to be a strictly decreasing function near the equilibrium relative to the fluid corresponding to {P^-}. This assumption plays an key role in the analysis and appears to have an essential stabilization effect on the model in question.

  10. Probability of passing through a parabolic barrier and thermal decay rate: Case of linear coupling both in momentum and in coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyakin, R. A.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2011-09-15

    With the quantum diffusion approach, the probability of passing through the parabolic barrier and the quasistationary thermal decay rate from a metastable state are examined in the limit of linear coupling both in momentum and in coordinate between a collective subsystem and the environment. An increase of passing probability with friction coefficient is demonstrated to occur at subbarrier energies.

  11. Nuclear Structure of {sup 8}B Studied by Proton Resonance Scatterings on {sup 7}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Amadio, G.; Kubono, S.; Fujikawa, H.; Niikura, M.; Binh, D. N.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Khiem, L. H.

    2008-05-21

    A new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on {sup 7}Be was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV using the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. The excitation function of {sup 8}B above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B, which is the key reaction in the solar {sup 8}B neutrino production. For more intensive experimental studies with RI beams, the development of a cryogenic gas target system is ongoing at CNS. In this paper a preliminary result of the {sup 7}Be experiment and the present status of the development of the target system are presented.

  12. A new study of 10B(p,α)7Be reaction at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caciolli, A.; Depalo, R.; Broggini, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Menegazzo, R.; Mou, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rigato, V.; Romano, S.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A.

    2016-05-01

    The 10B(p,α)7Be reaction is of great interest since it has many applications in different fields of research such as nuclear astrophysics, nuclear physics, and models of new reactors for clean energy generation. This reaction has been studied at the AN2000 accelerator of the INFN National Laboratories of Legnaro (LNL). The total cross section has been measured in a wide energy range (250-1182 keV) by using the activation method. The decays of the 7Be nuclei produced by the reaction were measured at the low counting facility of LNL by using two fully shielded high-purity germanium detectors. The present dataset shows a large discrepancy with respect to one of the previous data at the same energies and reduces the total uncertainty to the level of 6%. An R-matrix calculation has been performed on the present data using the parameters from previous Trojan Horse measurements for the 10 and 500keV resonances. The present data do not lay on the R-matrix fit in one point suggesting the existence of a 11C level not observed yet. Further nuclear investigations are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  13. Atmospheric deposition of {sup 7}Be by rain events, incentral Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Ayub, J. Juri; Velasco, H.; Rizzotto, M.; Di Gregorio, D. E.; Huck, H.

    2008-08-07

    Beryllium-7 is a natural radionuclide that enters into the ecosystems through wet and dry depositions and has numerous environmental applications in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Atmospheric wet deposition of {sup 7}Be was measured in central Argentina. Rain traps were installed (1 m above ground) and individual rain events have been collected. Rain samples were filtered and analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The gamma counting was undertaken using a 40%-efficient p-type coaxial intrinsic high-purity natural germanium crystal built by Princeton Gamma-Tech. The cryostat was made from electroformed high-purity copper using ultralow-background technology. The detector was surrounded by 50 cm of lead bricks to provide shielding against radioactive background. The detector gamma efficiency was determined using a water solution with known amounts of chemical compounds containing long-lived naturally occurring radioisotopes, {sup 176}Lu, {sup 138}La and {sup 40}K. Due to the geometry of the sample and its position close to the detector, the efficiency points from the {sup 176}Lu decay, had to be corrected for summing effects. The measured samples were 400 ml in size and were counted curing one day. The {sup 7}Be detection limit for the present measurements was as low as 0.2 Bq l{sup -1}. Thirty two rain events were sampled and analyzed (November 2006-May 2007). The measured values show that the events corresponding to low rainfall (<20 mm) are characterized by significantly higher activity concentrations (Bq l{sup -1}). The activity concentration of each individual event varied from 0.8 to 3.5 Bq l{sup -1}, while precipitations varied between 4 and 70 mm. The integrated activity by event of {sup 7}Be was fitted with a model that takes into account the precipitation amount and the elapsed time between two rain events. The integrated activities calculated with this model show a good agreement with experimental values.

  14. Evaluating physical and biological influences on sedimentation in a tidal freshwater marsh with 7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palinkas, Cindy M.; Engelhardt, Katharina A. M.; Cadol, Dan

    2013-09-01

    Key differences exist between tidal fresh- and saltwater marshes, such as the relative importance of mineral versus organic sedimentation and plant species diversity, that likely result in different drivers of sedimentation. In tidal freshwater marshes, we hypothesize that vegetation composition, along with physical marsh features (i.e., elevation and tidal channels), play a critical role in sedimentation. This hypothesis is evaluated in Dyke Marsh Preserve (Potomac River, VA, USA) by examining sediment character (grain size, organic content) and deposition rates across the marsh in spring and summer 2010 and 2011. 7Be is especially well suited to capture seasonal sedimentation patterns owing to its short half-life (53.3 d) and ability to assess both sediment deposition and erosion. However, its use in marshes can be challenging, especially due the presence of vegetation. In this study, 7Be-derived sedimentation rates are compared with sediment deposition observed on ceramic tiles to assess its utility in tidal freshwater marshes, and biophysical influences on sediment deposition are examined through statistical models. 7Be- and tile-derived sedimentation rates show similar spatial and temporal patterns, with highest rates occurring at sites closer to tidal channels, highlighting the importance of sediment availability. In addition, complex feedbacks between sedimentation and the plant community are discussed.

  15. Modeling Peat Ages Using 7Be Data to Account for Downwash of 210Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manies, K.; Fuller, C.; Jones, M.

    2016-12-01

    In order to determine the amount of peat, and thus carbon, which has accumulated since the last thaw event, we are interested in dating the surface layers of boreal thermokarst bogs. However, there can often be a mismatch by several decades between dates obtained using 210Pb, 14C, or 137Cs. We found that 210Pb-based dates were almost always younger than 14C-based dates. One of the limitations often cited regarding the use of 210Pb dating for peatlands is the potential for this radionuclide to be transported down the soil profile, biasing the mean accumulation rate (MAR) towards higher values which, in turn, results in younger ages at a specific horizon. 7Be, which has similar depositional behaviors as 210Pb but a much shorter half-life (53.22 days), can be used to help determine if there is movement of 210Pb through surface layers and the depths to which 210Pb-bearing particles are transported (over the mean life of 7Be). These data can then be used in new models, such as the Linked Radionuclide aCcumulation model (LRC; Landis et al., 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ j.gca.2016.02.2013), which account for 210Pb downwash when calculating soil horizon ages. To this end, we measured 7Be within a bog four times over the growing season. 7Be was found to 4 cm in May, reached its maximum depth of penetration in July (7 cm), and then receded again to 4 cm. The maximum integrated 7Be activity was also found in July. This pattern is similar to other studies which found 7Be deposition decreased over the rainy season. Next, we will calculate peat ages with models that include downwash of 210Pb, the depths of which will be based on the penetration depth of 7Be. These ages will be compared to 210Pb ages obtained with both the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) and Constant Flux - Constant Sedimentation (CF:CS) models and to 137Cs- and 14C-derived ages. We anticipate that dates based on models that include some transport of 210Pb into the soil profile will provide more accurate peat

  16. Large beta-delayed one-neutron and two-neutron emission rates in the decay of 86Ga

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Gross, Carl J.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Miernik, Krzysztof A.; Anthony J. Mendez, II; Mazzocchi, C.; Madurga, M.; Liu, Yuan; Paulauskas, Stanley V.; Miller, D.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Winger, J. A.; Wolinska-Cichocka, M; Brewer, N. T.; Borzov, Ivan N.; Jost, Carola U.

    2013-09-24

    Beta decay of Ga86 was studied by means of β-neutron-γ spectroscopy. An isotopically pure 86Ga beam was produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility using a resonance ionization laser ion source and high-resolution electromagnetic separation. The decay of 86Ga revealed a half-life of 43+21-15 ms and large β-delayed one-neutron and two-neutron branching ratios of P1n=60(10)% and P2n=20(10)%. The βγ decay of 86Ga populated a 527 keV transition that is interpreted as the deexcitation of the first 2+ state in the N=54 isotone Ge86 and suggests a quick onset of deformation in Ge isotopes beyond N=50.

  17. Analysis of D0 -> K+ pi- pi0 Decays: Search for D0-D0bar Mixing, and Measurements of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Rate and Resonance Contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Michael Galante

    2005-12-13

    Analyzing D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays, herein are presented the methods and results of a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing, a measurement of the branching ratio R {equivalent_to} {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}), and measurements of the contributions from D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{rho}{sup -}, K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}; 230.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected from the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider during 2000-2004 (Runs 1-4) are analyzed. An event-level tagging technique is developed, which facilitates the accurate determination of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed resonance contributions by suppressing background from Cabibbo-favored decays. The branching ratio is measured as R = (0.214 {+-} 0.008 (stat) {+-} 0.008 (syst))%, with (46.1 {+-} 3.3 (stat) {+-} 2.9 (syst))% of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays proceeding through the channel D{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data are consistent with the null-D-mixing hypothesis at a confidence level of 10%, and the expected value of {+-} {radical}(x{sup 2} + y{sup 2}) is measured as -0.013 {+-} 0.010 (stat), indicating negative interference between mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay. The expected value of the integrated mixing rate is (x{sup 2} + y{sup 2})/2 = (0.013 {+-} 0.013 (stat))%.

  18. THEORETICAL ESTIMATES OF STELLAR e {sup -} CAPTURES. I. THE HALF-LIFE OF {sup 7}Be IN EVOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Simonucci, S.; Taioli, S.; Busso, M.; Palmerini, S. E-mail: taioli@fbk.eu

    2013-02-20

    The enrichment of Li in the universe is still unexplained, presenting various puzzles to astrophysics. One open issue is that of obtaining reliable estimates for the rate of e {sup -} captures on {sup 7}Be for T and {rho} conditions that are different from the solar ones. This is of crucial importance for modeling the Galactic nucleosynthesis of Li. In this framework, we present here a new theoretical method for calculating the e {sup -} capture rate in typical conditions for evolved stars. Furthermore, we show how our approach compares with state-of-the-art techniques for solar conditions, where various estimates are available. Our computations include (1) 'traditional' calculations of the electronic density at the nucleus, to which the e {sup -} capture rate for {sup 7}Be is proportional, for different theoretical approaches including the Thomas-Fermi, Poisson-Boltzmann, and Debye-Hueckel (DH) models of screening; and (2) a new computation, based on a formalism that goes beyond the previous ones, adopting a mean-field 'adiabatic' approximation to the scattering process. The results obtained with the new approach as well as with traditional ones and their differences are discussed in some detail, starting from solar conditions, where our approach and the DH model essentially converge to the same solution. We then analyze the applicability of both our method and the DH model to a rather broad range of T and {rho} values, embracing those typical of red giant stars, where both bound and continuum states contribute to the capture. We find that over a wide region of the parameter space explored, the DH approximation does not really stand, so that the more general method we suggest should be preferred. As a first application, we briefly reanalyze the {sup 7}Li abundances in red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch stars of the Galactic disk in light of a revision in the Be decay only; however, we emphasize that the changes we find in the electron density at the

  19. Measurements of radiative-decay rates of the 2s22p(2P°)-2s2p2(4P) intersystem transitions of C+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Wang, Jiebing; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-08-01

    The radiative-decay rates of the 2s22p(2P0)-2s2p2(4P) intersystem transitions of C+ ions have been measured by recording the time dependence of the ~233-nm emission. A cylindrical radio-frequency ion trap was used to store electron-impact-produced C+ ions. The time-dependent signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative-decay rates to the ground term are 146.4(+8.3,-9.2) s-1 for 4P1/2, 11.6(+0.8,-1.7) s-1 for 4P3/2, and 51.2(+2.6,-3.5) s-1 for 4P5/2. Comparison of the measured values with theoretical values is presented.

  20. Estimation of decay rates for fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens in agricultural field-applied manure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-applied manure is an important source of pathogenic exposure in surface water bodies for humans and ecological receptors. We analyzed the persistence and decay of fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens from three sources (cattle, poultry, swine) for agricultural f...

  1. Estimation of decay rates for fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens in agricultural field-applied manure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-applied manure is an important source of pathogenic exposure in surface water bodies for humans and ecological receptors. We analyzed the persistence and decay of fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens from three sources (cattle, poultry, swine) for agricultural f...

  2. Reshaping the epigenetic landscape during early flower development: induction of attractor transitions by relative differences in gene decay rates.

    PubMed

    Davila-Velderrain, Jose; Villarreal, Carlos; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2015-05-13

    Gene regulatory network (GRN) dynamical models are standard systems biology tools for the mechanistic understanding of developmental processes and are enabling the formalization of the epigenetic landscape (EL) model. In this work we propose a modeling framework which integrates standard mathematical analyses to extend the simple GRN Boolean model in order to address questions regarding the impact of gene specific perturbations in cell-fate decisions during development. We systematically tested the propensity of individual genes to produce qualitative changes to the EL induced by modification of gene characteristic decay rates reflecting the temporal dynamics of differentiation stimuli. By applying this approach to the flower specification GRN (FOS-GRN) we uncovered differences in the functional (dynamical) role of their genes. The observed dynamical behavior correlates with biological observables. We found a relationship between the propensity of undergoing attractor transitions between attraction basins in the EL and the direction of differentiation during early flower development - being less likely to induce up-stream attractor transitions as the course of development progresses. Our model also uncovered a potential mechanism at play during the transition from EL basins defining inflorescence meristem to those associated to flower organs meristem. Additionally, our analysis provided a mechanistic interpretation of the homeotic property of the ABC genes, being more likely to produce both an induced inter-attractor transition and to specify a novel attractor. Finally, we found that there is a close relationship between a gene's topological features and its propensity to produce attractor transitions. The study of how the state-space associated with a dynamical model of a GRN can be restructured by modulation of genes' characteristic expression times is an important aid for understanding underlying mechanisms occurring during development. Our contribution offers a

  3. A unified approach via convexity for optimal energy decay rates of finite and infinite dimensional vibrating damped systems with applications to semi-discretized vibrating damped systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabau-Boussouira, Fatiha

    The Liapunov method is celebrated for its strength to establish strong decay of solutions of damped equations. Extensions to infinite dimensional settings have been studied by several authors (see e.g. Haraux, 1991 [11], and Komornik and Zuazua, 1990 [17] and references therein). Results on optimal energy decay rates under general conditions of the feedback is far from being complete. The purpose of this paper is to show that general dissipative vibrating systems have structural properties due to dissipation. We present a general approach based on convexity arguments to establish sharp optimal or quasi-optimal upper energy decay rates for these systems, and on comparison principles based on the dissipation property, and interpolation inequalities (in the infinite dimensional case) for lower bounds of the energy. We stress the fact that this method works for finite as well as infinite dimensional vibrating systems and as well as for applications to semi-discretized nonlinear damped vibrating PDE's. A part of this approach has been introduced in Alabau-Boussouira (2004, 2005) [1,2]. In the present paper, we identify a new, simple and explicit criteria to select a class of nonlinear feedbacks, for which we prove a simplified explicit energy decay formula comparatively to the more general but also more complex formula we give in Alabau-Boussouira (2004, 2005) [1,2]. Moreover, we prove optimality of the decay rates for this class, in the finite dimensional case. This class includes a wide range of feedbacks, ranging from very weak nonlinear dissipation (exponentially decaying in a neighborhood of zero), to polynomial, or polynomial-logarithmic decaying feedbacks at the origin. In the infinite dimensional case, we establish a comparison principle on the energy of sufficiently smooth solutions through the dissipation relation. This principle relies on suitable interpolation inequalities. It allows us to give lower bounds for the energy of smooth initial data for the one

  4. 7Be as a tracer of flood sedimentation on the northern California continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sommerfield, C. K.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Alexander, C. R.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment inventories of the cosmogenic radionuclide 7Be (t1/2=53 d) were measured on the Eel River shelf and slope (northern California continental margin) to investigate sedimentation processes associated with coastal river flooding. Seabed coring shortly after major riverflow events in 1995 and 1997 documented a shelf-wide flood deposit, and subsequent radionuclide studies determined 7Be to be a powerful tracer of fine-grained river sediment. In addition, distinctive signatures of 234Th and 210Pb were observed in oceanic flood deposits and provided additional information regarding depositional processes. During the 1995–1997 monitoring period, 7Be was present (2–35 dpm cm-2) in shelf and slope sediments only after periods of high rainfall and river runoff during the winter months. It is suggested that fluvial input was the primary source of 7Be in shelf sediments after the floods. 7Be sediment inventories and sediment-trap fluxes determined after the 1997 flood revealed that fine-grained fluvial sediments were rapidly (within one month) broadcast over the continental margin, to the 500 m isobath. Dispersal was apparently facilitated by energetic storm waves, which resuspended and redistributed some fraction of the suspended load residing on the shelf prior to accretion as flood deposits. These observations illustrate that floods are an important sedimentary process for modern environments of the Eel shelf and slope, and perhaps for other fluviomarine sedimentary systems of the northern California continental margin. Ratios of the 210Pb sediment-accumulation rate (100 yr average) to the 7Be deposition rate (1–2 month average) for shelf sites illustrate the episodic nature of shelf sedimentation, and suggest that a minimum of 3–30 depositional events complete the most recent stratigraphic record. This observation is consistent with the magnetude and frequency of fluvial sediment input, as Eel River floods with return periods of 3–33 yr (3% of the time of

  5. Transition in the decay rates of stationary distributions of Lévy motion in an energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Kamil; Lőrinczi, József

    2016-02-01

    The time evolution of random variables with Lévy statistics has the ability to develop jumps, displaying very different behaviors from continuously fluctuating cases. Such patterns appear in an ever broadening range of examples including random lasers, non-Gaussian kinetics, or foraging strategies. The penalizing or reinforcing effect of the environment, however, has been little explored so far. We report a new phenomenon which manifests as a qualitative transition in the spatial decay behavior of the stationary measure of a jump process under an external potential, occurring on a combined change in the characteristics of the process and the lowest eigenvalue resulting from the effect of the potential. This also provides insight into the fundamental question of what is the mechanism of the spatial decay of a ground state.

  6. Transition in the decay rates of stationary distributions of Lévy motion in an energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleta, Kamil; Lőrinczi, József

    2016-02-01

    The time evolution of random variables with Lévy statistics has the ability to develop jumps, displaying very different behaviors from continuously fluctuating cases. Such patterns appear in an ever broadening range of examples including random lasers, non-Gaussian kinetics, or foraging strategies. The penalizing or reinforcing effect of the environment, however, has been little explored so far. We report a new phenomenon which manifests as a qualitative transition in the spatial decay behavior of the stationary measure of a jump process under an external potential, occurring on a combined change in the characteristics of the process and the lowest eigenvalue resulting from the effect of the potential. This also provides insight into the fundamental question of what is the mechanism of the spatial decay of a ground state.

  7. Measurement of the radiative and nonradiative decay rates of single CdSe nanocrystals through a controlled modification of their spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Brokmann, X; Coolen, L; Dahan, M; Hermier, J P

    2004-09-03

    We present a simple method to measure the radiative and nonradiative recombination rates of individual fluorescent emitters at room temperature. By placing a single molecule successively close and far from a dielectric interface and simultaneously measuring its photoluminescence decay and its orientation, both the radiative and nonradiative recombination rates can be determined. For CdSe nanocrystals, our results demonstrate that the fluorescence quantum efficiency, determined at the single-molecule level, is 98% in average, far above the value expected from conventional ensemble experiments. The bidimensional nature of the transition dipole is also directly evidenced from a single-particle measurement.

  8. α-decay branching ratios of near-threshold states in 19Ne and the astrophysical rate of 15O(α,γ)19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davids, B.; van den Berg, A. M.; Dendooven, P.; Fleurot, F.; Hunyadi, M.; de Huu, M. A.; Rehm, K. E.; Segel, R. E.; Siemssen, R. H.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wörtche, H. J.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    The 15O(α,γ)19Ne reaction is one of two routes for breakout from the hot CNO cycles into the rp process in accreting neutron stars. Its astrophysical rate depends critically on the decay properties of excited states in 19Ne lying just above the 15O+α threshold. We have measured the α-decay branching ratios for these states using the p(21Ne,t)19Ne reaction at 43 MeV/nucleon. Combining our measurements with previous determinations of the radiative widths of these states, we conclude that no significant breakout from the hot CNO cycle into the rp process in novas is possible via 15O(α,γ)19Ne, assuming that current models accurately represent their temperature and density conditions.

  9. DETERMINING THE RATIO OF THE H+ YIELDS TV TO H+ YIELDS TB DECAY RATES FOR LARGE TAN BETA AT THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    ASSAMAGAN,K.A.GUASCH,J.MORETTI,S.PENARANDA,S.

    2003-05-27

    We present results on the determination of the observable ratio R = BR(H{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sup -})/BR(H{sup +} {yields} t{bar b}) of charged Higgs boson decay rates as a discriminant quantity between Supersymmetric and non-Supersymmetric models. Simulation of measurements of this quantity through the analysis of the charged Higgs production process gb {yields} tbH{sup +} and relative backgrounds in the two above decay channels has been performed in the context of ATLAS. A {approx} 12-14% accuracy on R can be achieved for tan {beta} = 50, m{sub H{sup {+-}}} = 300-500 GeV and after an integrated luminosity of 300 fb{sup -1}. With this precision measurement, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can easily discriminate between models for the two above scenarios, so long as tan {beta} > 20.

  10. Quantitative retention of atmospherically deposited elements by native vegetation is traced by the fallout radionuclides 7Be and 210Pb.

    PubMed

    Landis, Joshua D; Renshaw, Carl E; Kaste, James M

    2014-10-21

    Atmospheric deposition is the primary mechanism by which remote environments are impacted by anthropogenic contaminants. Vegetation plays a critical role in intercepting atmospheric aerosols, thereby regulating the timing and magnitude of both contaminant and nutrient delivery to underlying soils. However, quantitative models describing the fate of atmospherically derived elements on vegetation are limited by a lack of long-term measurements of both atmospheric flux and foliar concentrations. We addressed this gap in understanding by quantifying weekly atmospheric deposition of the naturally occurring radionuclide tracers (7)Be and (210)Pb, as well as their activities in leaves of colocated trees, for three years in New Hampshire, U.S. The accumulation of both (7)Be and (210)Pb in deciduous and coniferous vegetation is predicted by a model that is based solely on measured atmospheric fluxes, duration of leaf exposure, and radioactive decay. Any "wash off" processes that remove (7)Be and (210)Pb from foliage operate with a maximum half-time of greater than 370 days (P > 99%), which is an order of magnitude longer than previously assumed. The retention of both (7)Be and (210)Pb on leaves is thus quantitative and permanent, coupling the fate of (7)Be, (210)Pb and similar atmospheric species to that of the leaf matter itself. These findings demonstrate that the long-standing paradigm of a short "environmental half-life" for atmospheric contaminants deposited on natural surfaces must be re-evaluated.

  11. Regional stressing rate appears to control duration and decay of off-fault aftershocks in the 2011 M=9.0 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, S.; Stein, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The 11 March 2001 M=9.0 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake brought the unprecedented broad increase in seismicity over inland Japan and far offshore. The seismicity rate increase was observed at distances of up to 425 km from the locus of high seismic slip on the megathrust, which roughly corresponds to the areas over 0.1 bar Coulomb stress increase (e.g., Toda et al., 2011). Such stress perturbation in the entire eastern Honshu island gives us a great opportunity to test one of the hypotheses in rate and state friction of Dieterich (1994): aftershock duration (ta) is inversely proportional to fault stressing rate. The Tohoku-oki mainshock indeed started a stopwatch simultaneously for all the off-fault and on-fault aftershocks in various tectonic situations. We have carefully examined the aftershock decays fitting the Omori-Utsu formula in several activated regions, including on the 2011 source fault, several inland areas of Tohoku (Akita, Iwaki, northern Sendai, and Fukushima), Tokyo metropolitan area, Choshi (east of Tokyo), Izu Peninsula, and areas along the most active Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) central Honshu. Comparing the regional aftershock decays with the background rates of seismicity estimated from the JMA catalog from 2000 to 2010, we measured ta. One of the extreme short duration was measured at the Izu Peninsula where the heightened seismicity was rapidly toned down to the normal in one month. Overall seismicity in the Tohoku mainshock zone has been mostly closing to normal in 2 - 3 years. Both regions are characterized by high loading rate due to plate collision and subduction. Seismicity beneath Tokyo, also characterized by complex plate interfaces and brought average 1 bar closer to failure, has not followed the simple Omori decay but being settled a new higher rate after a rapid decay. In contrast to these highly deformed regions, current seismicity in slowly loading Tohoku inland regions are still much higher than background rate, which

  12. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Toki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Ken’ichi

    2016-02-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M{sub ⊙}. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars.

  13. Is decay constant?

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Stroh, H; Altzitzoglou, T; Paepen, J; Van Ammel, R; Kossert, K; Nähle, O; Keightley, J D; Ferreira, K M; Verheyen, L; Bruggeman, M

    2017-09-07

    Some authors have raised doubt about the invariability of decay constants, which would invalidate the exponential-decay law and the foundation on which the common measurement system for radioactivity is based. Claims were made about a new interaction - the fifth force - by which neutrinos could affect decay constants, thus predicting changes in decay rates in correlation with the variations of the solar neutrino flux. Their argument is based on the observation of permille-sized annual modulations in particular decay rate measurements, as well as transient oscillations at frequencies near 11 year(-1) and 12.7 year(-1) which they speculatively associate with dynamics of the solar interior. In this work, 12 data sets of precise long-term decay rate measurements have been investigated for the presence of systematic modulations at frequencies between 0.08 and 20 year(-1). Besides small annual effects, no common oscillations could be observed among α, β(-), β(+) or EC decaying nuclides. The amplitudes of fitted oscillations to residuals from exponential decay do not exceed 3 times their standard uncertainty, which varies from 0.00023 % to 0.023 %. This contradicts the assertion that 'neutrino-induced' beta decay provides information about the deep solar interior. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. High precision 7Be solar neutrinos measurement and day night effect obtained with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testera, G.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonetti, S.; Bonfini, G.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Chavarria, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, E.; Hardy, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Korablev, D.; Kobychev, V.; Korga, G.; Koshio, Y.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Leung, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Lombardi, F.; Ludhova, L.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pena-Garay, C.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Romani, A.; Sabelnikov, A.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-11-01

    We report the direct measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino signal rate performed with the Borexino detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and the search for a day-night asymmetry of this interaction rate. The interaction rate of the 0.862 MeV 7Be neutrinos is 46±1.6(stat)-1.6+1.5(syst) counts/(day · 100 ton). The hypothesis of no oscillation for this solar neutrinos is inconsistent with our measurement at the 5.8σ C.L. Our result is the first direct measurement of solar neutrinos with an accuracy better than 5%. We report the survival probability for solar νe in the transition region between matter-enhanced and vacuum-driven oscillations. The measured day night asymmetry is Adn=0.001±0.012 (stat)±0.007 (syst), in agreement with the predicition of MSW-LMA neutrino [13] oscillations. This result discourages MSW oscillations with mixing parameters in the LOW region at more than 8.5σ, meaning that this region is, for the first time, strongly rejected without the assumption of CPT symmetry. The result can also be used to constrain some neutrino oscillation scenarios involving new physics.

  15. Symmetry relations in nucleon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlbert, Anya; Wilczek, Frank

    1980-05-01

    Some experimental consequences of the structure of the effective hamiltonian for nucleon decay are presented. New results concern relations among inclusive decay rates, a striking test of the kinship hypothesis involving μ+ polarization, and soft π theorems.

  16. A Novel Pulse-Chase SILAC Strategy Measures Changes in Protein Decay and Synthesis Rates Induced by Perturbation of Proteostasis with an Hsp90 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fierro-Monti, Ivo; Racle, Julien; Hernandez, Celine; Waridel, Patrice; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Quadroni, Manfredo

    2013-01-01

    Standard proteomics methods allow the relative quantitation of levels of thousands of proteins in two or more samples. While such methods are invaluable for defining the variations in protein concentrations which follow the perturbation of a biological system, they do not offer information on the mechanisms underlying such changes. Expanding on previous work [1], we developed a pulse-chase (pc) variant of SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture). pcSILAC can quantitate in one experiment and for two conditions the relative levels of proteins newly synthesized in a given time as well as the relative levels of remaining preexisting proteins. We validated the method studying the drug-mediated inhibition of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone, which is known to lead to increased synthesis of stress response proteins as well as the increased decay of Hsp90 “clients”. We showed that pcSILAC can give information on changes in global cellular proteostasis induced by treatment with the inhibitor, which are normally not captured by standard relative quantitation techniques. Furthermore, we have developed a mathematical model and computational framework that uses pcSILAC data to determine degradation constants kd and synthesis rates Vs for proteins in both control and drug-treated cells. The results show that Hsp90 inhibition induced a generalized slowdown of protein synthesis and an increase in protein decay. Treatment with the inhibitor also resulted in widespread protein-specific changes in relative synthesis rates, together with variations in protein decay rates. The latter were more restricted to individual proteins or protein families than the variations in synthesis. Our results establish pcSILAC as a viable workflow for the mechanistic dissection of changes in the proteome which follow perturbations. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000538. PMID:24312217

  17. Bivariate distributions in statistical spectroscopy studies: IV. Interacting particle Gamow-Teller strength densities and β-decay rates of fp-shell nuclei for presupernova stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, V. K. B.; Majumdar, D.

    1995-12-01

    A method to calculate temperature dependent β-decay rates is developed by writing the expression for the rates explicitly in terms of bivariate GT strength densities ( I {/O H } ( GT)) for a given hamiltonian H=h+V and state densities of the parent nucleus besides having the usual phase space factors. The theory developed in the preceding paper (III) for constructing NIP strength densities is applied for generating I {/O h } ( GT) and then I {/O H } ( GT) is constructed using the bivariate convolution form I {/O H } ( GT)=Σ S I {/O(GT) h,S }⊗ρ{/O(GT) V, S }; BIV-G . The spreading bivariate Gaussian ρ{/O(GT) V}; BIV-G, for fp-shell nuclei, is constructed by assuming that the marginal centroids are zero, the marginal variances are same as the corresponding state density variances and fixing the bivariate correlation coefficientbar ζ using experimental β-decay half lifes. With the deduced values ofbar ζ bar ζ ˜ 0.67, β-S-decay rates for61,62Fe and62 64Co isotopes are calculated at presupernova matter densities ρ=107 109 gm/cc, temperatures T=(3 5)×109 ∘K and electron fractions Ye=0.43 0.5. The convolution form for I {O(GT)/ H } led to a simple expression for calculating GT non-energy weighted sum rule strength and it describes (within 10%) the shell model results of fp-shell nuclei.

  18. 7Be and 10Be concentrations in recent firn and ice at Law Dome, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Fink, D.; Child, D.; Levchenko, V. A.; Morgan, V. I.; Curran, M.; Etheridge, D. M.; Elliott, G.

    2000-10-01

    Over the past three years, the Australian National Tandem for Applied Research (ANTARES) AMS facility at ANSTO has been expanding its sample preparation and measurement capability, particularly for 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl. During this time, ANSTO has continued its collaboration with the AAD and CSIRO Atmospheric Research on the measurement of cosmogenic isotopes from Law Dome, Antarctica. This research program has been supported by the construction of a dedicated geochemistry laboratory for the processing of ice and rock samples for the preparation of AMS targets. Here we present our first results for 10Be concentrations measured in ice cores from three sites at Law Dome and describe the sample processing protocol and aspects of the AMS measurement procedure. These sites are characterised by an eightfold difference in accumulation rate with a common precipitation source. In combination with an established ice chronology, this has enabled some preliminary findings concerning the relationship between the snow accumulation rate and the measured 10Be concentration for Law Dome during recent times. Additionally, we present 7Be and 10Be/ 7Be measurements made for a few surface snow samples from Law Dome and Australia.

  19. Carcass enrichment does not alter decay rates or arthropod community structure: a test of the arthropod saturation hypothesis at the anthropology research facility in Knoxville, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Shahid, S Adam; Schoenly, Kenneth; Haskell, Neal H; Hall, Robert D; Zhang, Wenjun

    2003-07-01

    In a test of an arthropod saturation hypothesis, we asked if the 30-yr history of carcass enrichment at the Anthropology Research Facility, Knoxville TN, has altered carcass decay rates or community structure of sarcosaprophagous arthropods, compared with three local nonenriched sites. Over a 12-d period in 1998, using pitfall traps and sweep nets, we sampled a total of 81,000 invertebrates from freshly euthanized pigs (Sus scrofa L.) placed in these sites. From this number, we sorted 69,286 forensically important (sarcosaprophagous) arthropods. The community structure of these organisms, as measured by species and individuals accumulation curves, rarefaction, and nonparametric correlation, was comparable in all four sites in taxonomic similarity, colonization rates, aerial species richness, and ranked abundances of forensically important taxa on a per carcass basis. Measures of carcass decay rate, remaining carcass weight (%) and periodic weight loss, also were similar. In most cases, carcass surface temperatures and maggot mass temperatures were also statistically indistinguishable. Probability-based results and posthoc power analyses of these variables led us to conclude that the sarcosaprophagous arthropod community of the Anthropology Research Facility is representative of surrounding sites.

  20. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  1. Enhancement of the lepton flavor violating Higgs boson decay rates from SUSY loops in the inverse seesaw model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arganda, E.; Herrero, M. J.; Marcano, X.; Weiland, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we study the full one-loop SUSY contributions to the lepton flavor violating Higgs decay h →τ μ ¯, within the context of the supersymmetric inverse seesaw model. We assume that both the right-handed neutrino masses, MR, and their supersymmetric partner masses, mν˜R , are not far from the interesting O (TeV ) energy scale, and we work with scenarios with large neutrino Yukawa couplings that transmit large lepton flavor violating effects. By exploring the behavior with the most relevant parameters, mainly MR, mν ˜R and the trilinear sneutrino coupling Aν, we will look for regions of the parameter space where the enhancement of BR (h →τ μ ¯ ) is large enough to reach values at the percent level, which could explain the excess recently reported by CMS and ATLAS at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Radioactive Decay

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  3. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    You call it a cavity. Your dentist calls it tooth decay or dental caries. They're all names for a hole in your tooth. The cause of tooth decay is plaque, a sticky substance in your mouth made up mostly of germs. Tooth decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without ...

  4. Trunk decays

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1989-01-01

    Trunk decays are major causes of low quality wood-wood with little or no economic value. As a forest practitioner you should be able to recognize trees at high risk for decay and remove them if timber production is your primary objective. Remember, however, that decayed trees often develop into den trees or nesting sites and provide essential habitat for wildlife....

  5. 7Be and hydrological model for more efficient implementation of erosion control measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Barri, Bashar; Bode, Samuel; Blake, William; Ryken, Nick; Cornelis, Wim; Boeckx, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    Increased concern about the on-site and off-site impacts of soil erosion in agricultural and forested areas has endorsed interest in innovative methods to assess in an unbiased way spatial and temporal soil erosion rates and redistribution patterns. Hence, interest in precisely estimating the magnitude of the problem and therefore applying erosion control measures (ECM) more efficiently. The latest generation of physically-based hydrological models, which fully couple overland flow and subsurface flow in three dimensions, permit implementing ECM in small and large scales more effectively if coupled with a sediment transport algorithm. While many studies focused on integrating empirical or numerical models based on traditional erosion budget measurements into 3D hydrological models, few studies evaluated the efficiency of ECM on watershed scale and very little attention is given to the potentials of environmental Fallout Radio-Nuclides (FRNs) in such applications. The use of FRN tracer 7Be in soil erosion/deposition research proved to overcome many (if not all) of the problems associated with the conventional approaches providing reliable data for efficient land use management. This poster will underline the pros and cones of using conventional methods and 7Be tracers to evaluate the efficiency of coconuts dams installed as ECM in experimental field in Belgium. It will also outline the potentials of 7Be in providing valuable inputs for evolving the numerical sediment transport algorithm needed for the hydrological model on field scale leading to assess the possibility of using this short-lived tracer as a validation tool for the upgraded hydrological model on watershed scale in further steps. Keywords: FRN, erosion control measures, hydrological modes

  6. mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium discoideum cells are heterogeneous, and cyclic AMP does not act directly to stabilize cell-type-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Manrow, R E; Jacobson, A

    1988-01-01

    We reevaluated the use of 32PO4 pulse-chases for analyzing mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium cells. We found that completely effective PO4 chases could not be obtained in developing cells and that, as a consequence, the decay rates exhibited by some mRNAs were influenced by the rates at which they were transcribed. In developing cells disaggregated in the presence of cyclic AMP, the poly(A)+ mRNA population turned over with an apparent half-life of 4 h, individual mRNA decay rates were heterogeneous, and some prestalk and prespore mRNAs appeared to decay with biphasic kinetics. In cells disaggregated in the absence of cyclic AMP, all prestalk and prespore mRNAs decayed with biphasic kinetics. During the first 1 to 1.5 h after disaggregation in the absence of cyclic AMP, the cell-type-specific mRNAs were selectively degraded, decaying with half-lives of 20 to 30 min; thereafter, the residual prestalk and prespore mRNA molecules decayed at rates that were similar to those measured in the presence of cyclic AMP. This short-term labilization of cell-type-specific mRNAs was observed even for those species not requiring cyclic AMP for their accumulation in developing cells. The observation that cell-type specific mRNAs can decay at similar rates in disaggregated cells with or without cyclic AMP indicates that this compound does not act directly to stabilize prestalk and prespore mRNAs during development and that its primary role in the maintenance of cyclic-AMP-dependent mRNAs is likely to be transcriptional. Images PMID:2847029

  7. Investigation and modeling of biomass decay rate in the dark and its potential influence on net productivity of solar photobioreactors for microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis.

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, François; Pruvost, Jérémy

    2013-06-01

    Biomass decay rate (BDR) in the dark was investigated for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (microalga) and Arthrospira platensis (cyanobacterium). A specific setup based on a torus photobioreactor with online gas analysis was validated, enabling us to follow the time course of the specific BDR using oxygen monitoring and mass balance. Various operating parameters that could limit respiration rates, such as culture temperature and oxygen deprivation, were then investigated. C. reinhardtii was found to present a higher BDR in the dark than A. platensis, illustrating here the difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. In both cases, temperature proved an influential parameter, and the Arrhenius law was found to efficiently relate specific BDR to culture temperature. The utility of decreasing temperature at night to increase biomass productivity in a solar photobioreactor is also illustrated.

  8. Theory of weak hypernuclear decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dubach, J.F.; Feldman, G.B.; Holstein, B.R. |; de la Torre, L.

    1996-07-01

    The weak nomesonic decay of {Lambda}-hypernuclei is studied in the context of a one-meson-exchange model. Predictions are made for the decay rate, the {ital p}/{ital n} stimulation ratio and the asymmetry in polarized hypernuclear decay. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  9. Hypernuclear Weak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itonaga, K.; Motoba, T.

    The recent theoretical studies of Lambda-hypernuclear weak decaysof the nonmesonic and pi-mesonic ones are developed with the aim to disclose the link between the experimental decay observables and the underlying basic weak decay interactions and the weak decay mechanisms. The expressions of the nonmesonic decay rates Gamma_{nm} and the decay asymmetry parameter alpha_1 of protons from the polarized hypernuclei are presented in the shell model framework. We then introduce the meson theoretical Lambda N -> NN interactions which include the one-meson exchanges, the correlated-2pi exchanges, and the chiral-pair-meson exchanges. The features of meson exchange potentials and their roles on the nonmesonic decays are discussed. With the adoption of the pi + 2pi/rho + 2pi/sigma + omega + K + rhopi/a_1 + sigmapi/a_1 exchange potentials, we have carried out the systematic calculations of the nonmesonic decay observables for light-to-heavy hypernuclei. The present model can account for the available experimental data of the decay rates, Gamma_n/Gamma_p ratios, and the intrinsic asymmetry parameters alpha_Lambda (alpha_Lambda is related to alpha_1) of emitted protons well and consistently within the error bars. The hypernuclear lifetimes are evaluated by converting the total weak decay rates Gamma_{tot} = Gamma_pi + Gamma_{nm} to tau, which exhibit saturation property for the hypernuclear mass A ≥ 30 and agree grossly well with experimental data for the mass range from light to heavy hypernuclei except for the very light ones. Future extensions of the model and the remaining problems are also mentioned. The pi-mesonic weak processes are briefly surveyed, and the calculations and predictions are compared and confirmed by the recent high precision FINUDA pi-mesonic decay data. This shows that the theoretical basis seems to be firmly grounded.

  10. Wear measurement of highly cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be tracer implantation technique.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Markus A; Laurent, Michel P; Dwiwedi, Yasha; Gallardo, Luis A; Chipps, Kelly A; Blackmon, Jeffery C; Kozub, Raymond L; Bardayan, Daniel W; Gross, Carl J; Stracener, Daniel W; Smith, Michael S; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Erikson, Luke; Patel, Nidhi; Rehm, Karl E; Ahmad, Irshad; Greene, John P; Greife, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The very low wear rates achieved with the current highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) used in joint prostheses have proven to be difficult to measure accurately by gravimetry. Tracer methods are therefore being explored. The purpose of this study was to perform a proof-of-concept experiment on the use of the radioactive tracer beryllium-7 ((7)Be) for the determination of in vitro wear in a highly cross-linked orthopedic UHMWPE. Three cross-linked and four conventional UHMWPE pins made from compression-molded GUR 1050, were activated with 10(9) to 10(10) (7)Be nuclei using a new implantation setup that produced a homogenous distribution of implanted nuclei up to 8.5 μm below the surface. The pins were tested for wear in a six-station pin-on-flat apparatus for up to 7.1 million cycles (178 km). A Germanium gamma detector was employed to determine activity loss of the UHMWPE pins at preset intervals during the wear test. The wear of the cross-linked UHMWPE pins was readily detected and estimated to be 17 ± 3 μg per million cycles. The conventional-to-cross-linked ratio of the wear rates was 13.1 ± 0.8, in the expected range for these materials. Oxidative degradation damage from implantation was negligible; however, a weak dependence of wear on implantation dose was observed limiting the number of radioactive tracer atoms that can be introduced. Future applications of this tracer technology may include the analysis of location-specific wear, such as loss of material in the post or backside of a tibial insert.

  11. Isovolumic pressure-to-early rapid filling decay rate relation: model-based derivation and validation via simultaneous catheterization echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Chung, Charles S; Ajo, David M; Kovács, Sándor J

    2006-02-01

    Transmitral Doppler echocardiography is the preferred method of noninvasive diastolic function assessment. Correlations between catheterization-based measures of isovolumic relaxation (IVR) and transmitral, early rapid filling (Doppler E-wave)-derived parameters have been observed, but no model-based, causal explanation has been offered. IVR has also been characterized in terms of its duration as IVR time (IVRT) and by tau, the time-constant of IVR, by approximating the terminal left ventricular IVR pressure contour as Pt= Pinfinity + P(o)e(-t/tau), where Pt is the continuity of pressure, Pinfinity and Po are constants, t is time, and tau is the time constant of IVR. To characterize the relation between IVR and early rapid filling more fully, simultaneous (micromanometric) left ventricular pressure and transmitral Doppler E-wave data from 25 subjects undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and having normal physiology were analyzed. The time constant tau was determined from the dP/dt vs. P (phase) plane and, simultaneous Doppler E-waves provided global indexes of chamber viscosity/relaxation (c), chamber stiffness (k), and load (xo). We hypothesize that temporal continuity of pressure decay at mitral valve opening and physiological constraints permit the algebraic derivation of linear relations relating 1/tau to both peak atrioventricular pressure gradient (kxo) and E-wave-derived viscosity/relaxation (c) but does not support a similar, causal (linear) relation between deceleration time and tau or IVRT. Both predicted linear relations were observed: kxo to 1/tau (r = 0.71) and viscosity/relaxation to 1/tau (r = 0.71). Similarly, as anticipated, only a weak linear correlation between deceleration time and IVRT or tau was observed (r = 0.41). The observed in vivo relationship provides insight into the isovolumic mechanism of relaxation and the changing-volume mechanism of early rapid filling via a link of the respective relaxation properties.

  12. Modification of the 3H-leucine Incorporation Technique for Quantifying Rates of Bacterial Secondary Production on Decaying Wetland Plant Litter: Effectiveness of Microdialysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, J. E.; Francoeur, S. N.; Kuehn, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    The radiolabelled 3H-leucine incorporation technique for quantifying rates of bacterial production has increased in popularity since its original description for bacterioplankton communities. Prior studies addressing incorporation conditions (e.g., substrate saturation) for bacterial communities in other habitats, such as decaying plant litter, have reported a wide range of final leucine concentrations (400nM to 50,000nM) to achieve saturation-level uptake. We assessed the application of the 3H-leucine incorporation procedure for measuring bacterial production on decaying wetland plant litter. Substrate saturation experiments (9 concentrations, 10nM to 50,000nM final leucine) were conducted for bacterial communities colonizing submerged litter of three emergent plant species (Typha angustifolia, Schoenoplectus validus, and Phragmites australis). A modified 3H-leucine protocol was developed by coupling previously described incubation and extraction protocols with microdialysis (500MWCO) of the final radiolabelled protein extract. Incorporation of 3H-leucine into protein exhibited a biphasic saturation curve, with lower Km values ranging from 400nM to 1200nM depending on the plant species studied. Upper Km values ranged from 4000nM to 6000nM. Dialysis of the crude protein extract significantly improved counting precision and the signal-to-noise ratio. These results suggest differential uptake by litter associated microbial assemblages, with lower Km values possibly representing bacterial uptake and higher Km values representing non-bacterial uptake.

  13. Comment on 'Time modulation of K-shell electron capture decay rates of H-like heavy ions at GSI experiments.'

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2010-04-16

    A Comment on the Letter by A.N. Ivanov and P. Kienle, Physical Review Letters volume 103, Issue 6, 062502 (2009). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EX}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d {sup EC}}{approx}0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  14. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  15. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  16. Evaluating uncertainty in 7Be-based soil erosion estimates: an experimental plot approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Will; Taylor, Alex; Abdelli, Wahid; Gaspar, Leticia; Barri, Bashar Al; Ryken, Nick; Mabit, Lionel

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion remains a major concern for the international community and there is a growing need to improve the sustainability of agriculture to support future food security. High resolution soil erosion data are a fundamental requirement for underpinning soil conservation and management strategies but representative data on soil erosion rates are difficult to achieve by conventional means without interfering with farming practice and hence compromising the representativeness of results. Fallout radionuclide (FRN) tracer technology offers a solution since FRN tracers are delivered to the soil surface by natural processes and, where irreversible binding can be demonstrated, redistributed in association with soil particles. While much work has demonstrated the potential of short-lived 7Be (half-life 53 days), particularly in quantification of short-term inter-rill erosion, less attention has focussed on sources of uncertainty in derived erosion measurements and sampling strategies to minimise these. This poster outlines and discusses potential sources of uncertainty in 7Be-based soil erosion estimates and the experimental design considerations taken to quantify these in the context of a plot-scale validation experiment. Traditionally, gamma counting statistics have been the main element of uncertainty propagated and reported but recent work has shown that other factors may be more important such as: (i) spatial variability in the relaxation mass depth that describes the shape of the 7Be depth distribution for an uneroded point; (ii) spatial variability in fallout (linked to rainfall patterns and shadowing) over both reference site and plot; (iii) particle size sorting effects; (iv) preferential mobility of fallout over active runoff contributing areas. To explore these aspects in more detail, a plot of 4 x 35 m was ploughed and tilled to create a bare, sloped soil surface at the beginning of winter 2013/2014 in southwest UK. The lower edge of the plot was bounded by

  17. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  18. 7Be(n, α and 7Be(n,p) cross-section measurement for the Cosmological Lithium Problem at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbagallo, M.

    2016-03-01

    The 7Be(n, α reaction cross-section has been measured for the first time in a wide neutron energy range, in order to investigate its role in the destruction of 7Be during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, as a possible solution to the Cosmological Lithium problem (CLiP). The measurement has been performed at the new vertical beam line of the neutron Time-of-Flight facility (n_TOF) at CERN, taking advantage of the extremely high instantaneous neutron flux which allows to obtain the useful signal-to-background ratio particularly suited for challenging measurements on short-lived radioisotopes, such as 7Be ( t1/2 ≃ 53.2 days) . The two alfa particles emitted back-to-back in the reaction have been detected by mean of sandwiches of silicon detectors and exploiting the coincidence technique. In order to complete the n_TOF program on CLiP, the 7Be(n,p) cross-section will be measured during the next n_TOF experimental campaign, using an high-purity sample and a silicon telescope device.

  19. EFFECT OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS AND AIR FILTERS ON DECAY RATES OF PARTICLES PRODUCED BY INDOOR SOURCES IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we me...

  20. EFFECT OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS AND AIR FILTERS ON DECAY RATES OF PARTICLES PRODUCED BY INDOOR SOURCES IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we me...

  1. Effect of ventilation systems and air filters on decay rates of particles produced by indoor sources in an occupied townhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Wallace, Lance A.; Emmerich, Steven J.

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we measured the deposition of particles ranging from 0.3 to 10 μm in an occupied townhouse and also in an unoccupied test house. Experiments were run with three different sources (cooking with a gas stove, citronella candle, pouring kitty litter), with the central heating and air conditioning (HAC) fan on or off, and with two different types of in-duct filters (electrostatic precipitator and ordinary furnace filter). Particle size, HAC fan operation, and the electrostatic precipitator had significant effects on particle loss rates. The standard furnace filter had no effect. Surprisingly, the type of source (combustion vs. mechanical generation) and the type of furnishings (fully furnished including carpet vs. largely unfurnished including mostly bare floor) also had no measurable effect on the deposition rates of particles of comparable size. With the HAC fan off, average deposition rates varied from 0.3 h -1 for the smallest particle range (0.3-0.5 μm) to 5.2 h -1 for particles greater than 10 μm. Operation of the central HAC fan approximately doubled these rates for particles <5 μm, and increased rates by 2 h -1 for the larger particles. An in-duct electrostatic precipitator increased the loss rates compared to the fan-off condition by factors of 5-10 for particles <2.5 μm, and by a factor of 3 for 2.5-5.0 μm particles. In practical terms, use of the central fan alone could reduce indoor particle concentrations by 25-50%, and use of an in-duct ESP could reduce particle concentrations by 55-85% compared to fan-off conditions.

  2. Radiative decay rate of a quantum well exciton in a semiconductor microcavity: Cross-over behavior of exciton- and cavity-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odani, Kensuke; Ohfuti, Yasushi; Cho, Kikuo

    1993-08-01

    A cross-over behavior was found between microcavity (MC) mode and quantum well (QW)-exciton mode as a function of parallel wave vector k for a QW in a MC, i.e., a 2D structure consisting of two sets of distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) with a QW at the center of them. The radiative widths of the two modes were calculated as functions of k, the layer number of DBR, and the non-radiative width of the QW-exciton. The radiative decay rate of the QW-exciton mode shows a remarkable enhancement at a critical value of k, which is determined by the relative frequencies of the "empty" MC and "bare" QW-exciton modes. The cross-over behavior is the result of the excessive mixing of the two modes.

  3. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-12-31

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  4. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  5. Spin-forbidden radiative decay rates from the 3 {sup 3}P{sub 1,2} and 3 {sup 1}P{sub 1} states of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Donald C.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2011-04-15

    We have calculated atomic helium spontaneous decay rates and absorption oscillator strengths for the spin-forbidden transitions from 3 {sup 3}P{sub 1,2} and 3 {sup 1}P{sub 1} to all lower {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} states. In particular we found A{sub 10}=44.33(4) s{sup -1} for the E1 transition 3 {sup 3}P{sub 1}-1 {sup 1}S{sub 0} and 0.1147(1) s{sup -1} for the M2 transition 3 {sup 3}P{sub 2}-1 {sup 1}S{sub 0}.

  6. Deposition of 7Be to Bermuda and the regional ocean: Environmental factors affecting estimates of atmospheric flux to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadko, David; Prospero, Joseph

    2011-02-01

    The distribution of 7Be in ocean surface waters is used as tracer of upper ocean transport and atmospheric deposition processes. However, there is very little ocean deposition data available to characterize the temporal and spatial input of 7Be to the oceans and test model results. Here we measure the deposition of 7Be in bulk collectors at two sites at Bermuda over a span of nearly 2 years (April 2007 to January 2009) and compare these rates to the flux required to sustain the inventory of 7Be measured in the nearby Sargasso Sea. The Tudor Hill collector site undersampled (by ˜40%) both the rainfall compared to other Bermuda sites and the 7Be flux required for the ocean inventory. On the other hand, the 7Be flux captured at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences station site (0.048 dpm cm-2 d-1) matched that expected from the ocean observations. Previously measured long-term atmospheric concentration of 7Be in surface air at Bermuda was used to estimate deposition velocities and scavenging ratios, and our estimates in this marine environment were found to be similar to those measured in continental regions. The deposition of 7Be to the oceans is overwhelmingly determined by wet processes; dry deposition to the ocean surface accounts for only a few percent, at most, of the total deposition to the ocean. We place these measurements in a longer-term and large-scale spatial context by using climatological rainfall data on Bermuda and ocean rainfall estimates from the Global Precipitation Climatology Program and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission.

  7. Comparing the stress change characteristics and aftershock decay rate of the 2011 Mineral, VA, earthquake with similar earthquakes from a variety of tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, L. S.; Montesi, L. G.; Sauber, J. M.; Watters, T. R.; Kim, W.; Martin, A. J.; Anderson, R.

    2011-12-01

    On August 23, 2011, the magnitude 5.8 Mineral, VA, earthquake rocked the U.S. national capital region (Washington, DC) drawing worldwide attention to the occurrence of intraplate earthquakes. Using regional Coulomb stress change, we evaluate to what extent slip on faults during the Mineral, VA, earthquake and its aftershocks may have increased stress on notable Cenozoic fault systems in the DC metropolitan area: the central Virginia seismic zone, the DC fault zone, and the Stafford fault system. Our Coulomb stress maps indicate that the transfer of stress from the Mineral, VA, mainshock was at least 500 times greater than that produced from the magnitude 3.4 Germantown, MD, earthquake that occurred northwest of DC on July 16, 2010. Overall, the Mineral, VA, earthquake appears to have loaded faults of optimum orientation in the DC metropolitan region, bringing them closer to failure. The distribution of aftershocks of the Mineral, VA, earthquake will be compared with Coulomb stress change maps. We further characterize the Mineral, VA, earthquake by comparing its aftershock decay rate with that of blind thrust earthquakes with similar magnitude, focal mechanism, and depth from a variety of tectonic settings. In particular, we compare aftershock decay relations of the Mineral, VA, earthquake with two well studied California reverse faulting events, the August 4, 1985 Kettleman Hills (Mw = 6.1) and October 1, 1987 Whittier Narrow (Mw = 5.9) earthquakes. Through these relations we test the hypothesis that aftershock duration is inversely proportional to fault stressing rate, suggesting that aftershocks in active tectonic margins may last only a few years while aftershocks in intraplate regions could endure for decades to a century.

  8. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  9. (7)Be in soil, deposited dust and atmospheric air and its using to infer soil erosion along Alexandria region, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Saleh, I H; Abdel-Halim, A A

    2017-03-14

    This study investigated the radioactivity behavior of (7)Be in surface soil, airborne and deposited dust along Alexandria region in Egypt. The results obtained were used to predict scavenging processes of (7)Be from surface soil to infer soil erosion and land vulnerable to accelerated sea-level rise. The areal activity concentrations of (7)Be in surface soil were investigated in 30 undisturbed sites and (7)Be inventories were determined via deposited dust in 10 locations. Results of the former were found to be ranged from 78 Bq/m(2) to 104 Bq/m(2). High levels were observed in western sites associated with high dust deposition rate. On the other hand, low levels were found in the eastern sites, those may be attributed to scavenging processes such as land erosion toward the direction to the sea. The effective removal rates of (7)Be were calculated using the box-model, showing a broad special trend of inventories generally decreasing eastwards. The scavenging rates were ranged between 3.13 yr(-1) in western sites to 5.34 yr(-1) in eastern ones which denote that the east of the city suffers from rapid soil erosion. The airborne (7)Be was monthly monitored along the period from October 2014 to September 2015 through one site located at the mid of the city. The results revealed lower values in winter and autumn than in summer and spring ranged between 6.2 mBq/m(3) and 10.5 mBq/m(3). These levels are comparable with that in other world regions and the seasonal variations are associated with the prevailing climatic conditions in Alexandria region.

  10. A theoretical investigation of the influence of gold nanosphere size on the decay and energy transfer rates and efficiencies of quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocico, Cristian A.; Zhang, Xia; Bradley, A. Louise

    2016-01-01

    We present in this contribution a comprehensive investigation of the effect of the size of gold nanospheres on the decay and energy transfer rates of quantum systems placed close to these nanospheres. These phenomena have been investigated before, theoretically and experimentally, but no comprehensive study of the influence of the nanoparticle size on important dependences of the decay and energy transfer rates, such as the dependence on the donor-acceptor spectral overlap and the relative positions of the donor, acceptor, and nanoparticle, exists. As such, different accounts of the energy transfer mechanism have been presented in the literature. We perform an investigation of the energy transfer mechanisms between emitters and gold nanospheres and between donor-acceptor pairs in the presence of the gold nanospheres using a Green's tensor formalism, experimentally verified in our lab. We find that the energy transfer rate to small nanospheres is greatly enhanced, leading to a strong quenching of the emission of the emitter. When the nanosphere size is increased, it acts as an antenna, increasing the emission of the emitter. We also investigate the emission wavelength and intrinsic quantum yield dependence of the energy transfer to the nanosphere. As evidenced from the literature, the energy transfer process between the quantum system and the nanosphere can have a complicated distance dependence, with a r-6 regime, characteristic of the Förster energy transfer mechanism, but also exhibiting other distance dependences. In the case of a donor-acceptor pair of quantum systems in the presence of a gold nanosphere, when the donor couples strongly to the nanosphere, acting as an enhanced dipole; the donor-acceptor energy transfer rate then follows a Förster trend, with an increased Förster radius. The coupling of the acceptor to the nanosphere has a different distance dependence. The angular dependence of the energy transfer efficiency between donor and acceptor

  11. A theoretical investigation of the influence of gold nanosphere size on the decay and energy transfer rates and efficiencies of quantum emitters.

    PubMed

    Marocico, Cristian A; Zhang, Xia; Bradley, A Louise

    2016-01-14

    We present in this contribution a comprehensive investigation of the effect of the size of gold nanospheres on the decay and energy transfer rates of quantum systems placed close to these nanospheres. These phenomena have been investigated before, theoretically and experimentally, but no comprehensive study of the influence of the nanoparticle size on important dependences of the decay and energy transfer rates, such as the dependence on the donor-acceptor spectral overlap and the relative positions of the donor, acceptor, and nanoparticle, exists. As such, different accounts of the energy transfer mechanism have been presented in the literature. We perform an investigation of the energy transfer mechanisms between emitters and gold nanospheres and between donor-acceptor pairs in the presence of the gold nanospheres using a Green's tensor formalism, experimentally verified in our lab. We find that the energy transfer rate to small nanospheres is greatly enhanced, leading to a strong quenching of the emission of the emitter. When the nanosphere size is increased, it acts as an antenna, increasing the emission of the emitter. We also investigate the emission wavelength and intrinsic quantum yield dependence of the energy transfer to the nanosphere. As evidenced from the literature, the energy transfer process between the quantum system and the nanosphere can have a complicated distance dependence, with a r(-6) regime, characteristic of the Förster energy transfer mechanism, but also exhibiting other distance dependences. In the case of a donor-acceptor pair of quantum systems in the presence of a gold nanosphere, when the donor couples strongly to the nanosphere, acting as an enhanced dipole; the donor-acceptor energy transfer rate then follows a Förster trend, with an increased Förster radius. The coupling of the acceptor to the nanosphere has a different distance dependence. The angular dependence of the energy transfer efficiency between donor and acceptor

  12. A theoretical investigation of the influence of gold nanosphere size on the decay and energy transfer rates and efficiencies of quantum emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Marocico, Cristian A.; Zhang, Xia; Bradley, A. Louise

    2016-01-14

    We present in this contribution a comprehensive investigation of the effect of the size of gold nanospheres on the decay and energy transfer rates of quantum systems placed close to these nanospheres. These phenomena have been investigated before, theoretically and experimentally, but no comprehensive study of the influence of the nanoparticle size on important dependences of the decay and energy transfer rates, such as the dependence on the donor-acceptor spectral overlap and the relative positions of the donor, acceptor, and nanoparticle, exists. As such, different accounts of the energy transfer mechanism have been presented in the literature. We perform an investigation of the energy transfer mechanisms between emitters and gold nanospheres and between donor-acceptor pairs in the presence of the gold nanospheres using a Green’s tensor formalism, experimentally verified in our lab. We find that the energy transfer rate to small nanospheres is greatly enhanced, leading to a strong quenching of the emission of the emitter. When the nanosphere size is increased, it acts as an antenna, increasing the emission of the emitter. We also investigate the emission wavelength and intrinsic quantum yield dependence of the energy transfer to the nanosphere. As evidenced from the literature, the energy transfer process between the quantum system and the nanosphere can have a complicated distance dependence, with a r{sup −6} regime, characteristic of the Förster energy transfer mechanism, but also exhibiting other distance dependences. In the case of a donor-acceptor pair of quantum systems in the presence of a gold nanosphere, when the donor couples strongly to the nanosphere, acting as an enhanced dipole; the donor-acceptor energy transfer rate then follows a Förster trend, with an increased Förster radius. The coupling of the acceptor to the nanosphere has a different distance dependence. The angular dependence of the energy transfer efficiency between donor and

  13. Few body hypernuclear systems: Weak decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical situation regarding mesonic and non-mesonic decays of light hypernuclei is reviewed. Although some models give reasonable results for pionic decays as well as the total weak decay rate, no existing approach explains, even qualitatively, the observed spin-isospin dependence of ..lambda..N ..-->.. NN non-mesonic weak decays. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Scavenging and fractionation of particle-reactive radioisotopes 7Be, 210Pb and 210Po in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinfang; Luo, Shangde; Huang, Yipu

    2016-09-01

    The scavenging and fractionation of 7Be, 210Pb, and 210Po in the atmosphere are investigated by measuring their activities in rainwater collected from 68 rain events during March 2004 to April 2006 at a coastal station of Xiamen, southeastern China. In addition to documenting the large temporal variations in activities, fluxes, and isotope ratios of 7Be, 210Pb and 210Po in rainwater and the role of rainfall intensity in radionuclide scavenging, our results show that an enhanced deposition of 7Be and 210Pb occurs in the spring than in other seasons and is attributed to the "funnel effect" due to the increased atmospheric vertical convective mixing in the spring. This latter hypothesis is further supported by the observed seasonal and inter-annual variations in 7Be/210Pb and 210Po/210Pb ratios showing that the weakening of vertical convective mixing or stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) at the study site is linked with the enhancement of summer monsoons. It appears that the rainfall intensity, in connection with the vertical (e.g., STE) and horizontal (summer monsoons) air transport, exerts an important control on the activities, fluxes, and isotope ratios of 7Be, 210Pb, and 210Po in the atmosphere. Application of the observational data to a theoretical model shows that there are significant fractionations among 7Be, 210Pb, and 210Po in the atmosphere, with the scavenging rate constant or reciprocal of the residence time of radionuclide in the atmosphere being 210Pb > 7Be > 210Po. A revised Poet et al. (1972)'s method is proposed for quantitative constraint on the scavenging behavior of radionuclide, aerosols, and aerosol-associated trace pollutants in the atmosphere.

  15. Beam suppression of the DRAGON recoil separator for 3He(α,γ)7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Nara Singh, B. S.; Adsley, P.; Buchmann, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Fulton, B. R.; Galinski, N.; Hager, U.; Hass, M.; Howell, D.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Laird, A. M.; Martin, L.; Ottewell, D.; Reeve, S.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Triambak, S.

    2013-02-01

    Preliminary studies in preparation for an absolute cross-section measurement of the radiative capture reaction 3He(α,γ)7Be with the DRAGON recoil separator have demonstrated beam suppression >1014 at the 90% confidence level. A measurement of this cross section by observation of 7Be recoils at the focal plane of the separator should be virtually background free.

  16. The First Measurement of Cross Section for the 7Be(n, α)4He Reaction at the Cosmological Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tomoya; Kawabata, Takahiro; Furono, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Masaya; Iwasa, Naohito; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Koshikawa, Ami; Kubono, Shigeru; Miyawaki, Eisuke; Morimoto, Takahiro; Murata, Motoki; Nanamura, Takuya; Nishimura, Shunji; Shikata, Yuki; Takahashi, Yu; Tsumura, Miho; Watanabe, Ken

    The cross section for the 4He(α, n)7Be reaction was measured at low energies between Eα = 38.50 and 39.64 MeV to solve the cosmological lithium problem. On the basis of the detailed balance principle, the cross section for the 7Be(n, α)4He reaction was obtained at Ec.m. = 0.20-0.81 MeV close to the Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) energy window for the first time. The obtained cross sections are significantly smaller than the theoretical estimation used in the BBN calculations. The present results suggest the 7Be(n, α)4He reaction rate is not large enough to solve the cosmological lithium problem.

  17. The effect of CaCl2 on growth rate, wood decay and oxalic acid accumulation in Serpula lacrymans and related brown-rot fungi

    Treesearch

    Anne Christine Steenkjaer Hastrup; Bo Jensen; Carol Clausen; Frederick Green

    2006-01-01

    The dry rot fungus, Serpula lacrymans, is one of the most destructive copper-tolerant fungi causing timber decay in buildings in temperate regions. Calcium and oxalic acid have been shown to play important roles in the mechanism of wood decay. The effect of calcium on growth and decay was evaluated for 12 strains of S. lacrymans and compared to five brown-rot fungi....

  18. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-06-30

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state.

  19. Separating soil CO2 efflux into C-pool-specific decay rates via inverse analysis of soil incubation data.

    PubMed

    Schädel, Christina; Luo, Yiqi; David Evans, R; Fei, Shenfeng; Schaeffer, Sean M

    2013-03-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is heterogeneous in structure and has been considered to consist of various pools with different intrinsic turnover rates. Although those pools have been conceptually expressed in models and analyzed according to soil physical and chemical properties, separation of SOM into component pools is still challenging. In this study, we conducted inverse analyses with data from a long-term (385 days) incubation experiment with two types of soil (from plant interspace and from underneath plants) to deconvolute soil carbon (C) efflux into different source pools. We analyzed the two datasets with one-, two- and three-pool models and used probability density functions as a criterion to judge the best model to fit the datasets. Our results indicated that soil C release trajectories over the 385 days of the incubation study were best modeled with a two-pool C model. For both soil types, released C within the first 10 days of the incubation study originated from the labile pool. Decomposition of C in the recalcitrant pool was modeled to contribute to the total CO2 efflux by 9-11 % at the beginning of the incubation. At the end of the experiment, 75-85 % of the initial soil organic carbon (SOC) was modeled to be released over the incubation period. Our modeling analysis also indicated that the labile C-pool in the soil underneath plants was larger than that in soil from interspace. This deconvolution analysis was based on information contained in incubation data to separate carbon pools and can facilitate integration of results from incubation experiments into ecosystem models with improved parameterization.

  20. Can the measurement of the cross-section of proton-capture on beryllium-7 be improved?

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.

    1993-01-01

    The solar neutrino ``problem`` arises from the discrepancy between the observations of solar neutrinos fluxes in experiments at Homestake and Kamiokande and the solar model predictions of those fluxes. Both experiments, which are sensitive mainly to high-energy neutrinos, observe fewer neutrinos than predicted by solar models. Most of the expected high-energy solar neutrinos come from the beta-decay of {sup 8}B, which is produced in the reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B. A study of all of the measurements to date of the zero-energy S-factor for the reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B concludes that S{sub 17}(0) = 0.0224 +{plus_minus} 0.0021 keV-barn. Although a 10% error in S{sub 17}(0) alone wig not solve the solar neutrino problem, it would still be useful to nail down all of the inputs of the solar models as well as possible. This serves to guard against the possibility that a conspiracy among the errors might be the source of the discrepancy and provides tighter constraints on the ``new physics`` interpretations of the experimentally measured solar neutrino spectrum. In this paper, we examine several ways of improving this measurement. None appear to offer a significant improvement over past experiments.

  1. Can the measurement of the cross-section of proton-capture on beryllium-7 be improved

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.

    1993-01-01

    The solar neutrino problem'' arises from the discrepancy between the observations of solar neutrinos fluxes in experiments at Homestake and Kamiokande and the solar model predictions of those fluxes. Both experiments, which are sensitive mainly to high-energy neutrinos, observe fewer neutrinos than predicted by solar models. Most of the expected high-energy solar neutrinos come from the beta-decay of [sup 8]B, which is produced in the reaction [sup 7]Be(p,[gamma])[sup 8]B. A study of all of the measurements to date of the zero-energy S-factor for the reaction [sup 7]Be(p,[gamma])[sup 8]B concludes that S[sub 17](0) = 0.0224 +[plus minus] 0.0021 keV-barn. Although a 10% error in S[sub 17](0) alone wig not solve the solar neutrino problem, it would still be useful to nail down all of the inputs of the solar models as well as possible. This serves to guard against the possibility that a conspiracy among the errors might be the source of the discrepancy and provides tighter constraints on the new physics'' interpretations of the experimentally measured solar neutrino spectrum. In this paper, we examine several ways of improving this measurement. None appear to offer a significant improvement over past experiments.

  2. Summary of: An alternative marker for the effectiveness of water fluoridation: hospital extraction rates for dental decay, a two-region study.

    PubMed

    Chestnutt, Ivor G

    2014-03-01

    Contemporary evidence for the effectiveness of water fluoridation schemes in the U.K. is sparse. The utility of routinely collected data in providing evidence warrants further research. To examine inpatient hospital episodes statistics for dental extractions as an alternative population marker for the effectiveness of water fluoridation by comparing hospital admissions between two major strategic health authority (SHA) areas, the West Midlands SHA--largely fluoridated--and the North West SHA--largely unfluoridated. Hospital episodes statistics (HES) were interrogated to provide data on admissions for simple and surgical dental extractions, which had a primary diagnostic code of either dental caries or diseases of pulp and periapical tissues for financial years 2006/7, 2007/8 and 2008/9. Data were aggregated by SHA area and quinary age group. Directly standardised rates (DSR) of admissions purchased for each primary care trust (PCT) were calculated and ranked by index of multiple deprivation (IMD). A significant difference in DSRs of admission between PCTs in the West Midlands and North West was observed (Mann-Whitney U test [p <0.0001]) irrespective of IMD ranking. The difference in rates between the two most deprived PCTs was 27-fold. After ranking by IMD, DSRs of hospital admissions for the extraction of decayed or pulpally/periapically involved teeth is lower in areas with a fluoridated water supply. The analysis of routinely collected HES data may help identify the impact of water fluoridation schemes.

  3. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  4. Monitoring of (7)Be in surface air of varying PM(10) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chao, J H; Liu, C C; Cho, I C; Niu, H

    2014-07-01

    In this study, beryllium-7 ((7)Be) concentrations of surface air were monitored throughout a span of 23 years (1992-2012) in the Taiwanese cities Yilan, Taipei, Taichung, and Kaohsiung. During this period, particulate matter (PM) concentrations, in terms of PM10, were collected monthly from the nearest air-quality pollutant monitoring stations and compared against (7)Be concentrations. Seasonal monsoons influenced (7)Be concentrations in all cities, resulting in high winter and low summer concentrations. In addition, the meteorological conditions caused seasonal PM10 variations, yielding distinct patterns among the cities. There was no correlation between (7)Be and PM10 in the case cities. The average annual (7)Be concentrations varied little among the cities, ranging from 2.9 to 3.5 mBq/m(3), while the PM10 concentrations varied significantly from 38 μg/m(3) in Yilan to 92 μg/m(3) in Kaohsiung depending on the degree of air pollution and meteorological conditions. The correlation between the (7)Be concentration and gross-beta activities (Aβ) in air implied that the (7)Be was mainly attached to crustal PM and its concentration varied little among the cities, regardless of the increase in anthropogenic PM in air-polluted areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sixteen years of X-ray monitoring of Sagittarius A*: Evidence for a decay of the faint flaring rate from 2013 August, 13 months before a rise in the bright flaring rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossoux, Enmanuelle; Grosso, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    rate from 1999 to 2015 and a rise in the flaring rate by a factor of three for the most luminous and most energetic flares from 2014 August 31, i.e., about four months after the pericenter passage of the Dusty S-cluster Object (DSO)/G2 close to Sgr A*. In addition, we identify a decay of the flaring rate for the less luminous and less energetic flares from 2013 August and November, respectively, i.e., about 10 and 7 months before the pericenter passage of the DSO/G2 and 13 and 10 months before the rise in the bright flaring rate. Conclusions: The decay of the faint flaring rate is difficult to explain in terms of the tidal disruption of a dusty cloud since it occurred well before the pericenter passage of the DSO/G2, whose stellar nature is now well established. Moreover, a mass transfer from the DSO/G2 to Sgr A* is not required to produce the rise in the bright flaring rate since the energy saved by the decay of the number of faint flares during a long period of time may be later released by several bright flares during a shorter period of time.

  6. /sup 7/Be in Sargasso Sea and Long Island Sound waters

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboe, E.; Dion, E.P.; Turekian, K.K.

    1981-04-20

    /sup 7/Be was measured in surface waters of the western Sargasso Sea and Long Island Sound. The calculated standing crop in the Sargasso Sea is equal to that predicted from precipitation collectors. Long Island Sound is deficient in /sup 7/Be; virtually none exists in the water column, and less than half of the expected standing crop has been reported for the sediments. A possible sink for the missing /sup 7/Be may be the salt marshes or tidal mud flats ringing Long Island Sound.

  7. Analysis of (7)Be behaviour in the air by using a multilayer perceptron neural network.

    PubMed

    Samolov, A; Dragović, S; Daković, M; Bačić, G

    2014-11-01

    A multilayer perceptron artificial neural network (ANN) model for the prediction of the (7)Be behaviour in the air as the function of meteorological parameters was developed. The model was optimized and tested using (7)Be activity concentrations obtained by standard gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of air samples collected in Belgrade (Serbia) during 2009-2011 and meteorological data for the same period. Good correlation (r = 0.91) between experimental values of (7)Be activity concentrations and those predicted by ANN was obtained. The good performance of the model in prediction of (7)Be activity concentrations could provide basis for construction of models which would forecast behaviour of other airborne radionuclides.

  8. Feasibility Study for the 7Be+n Reaction Measurements by Trojan Horse Method at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Hayakawa, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Lamia, L.

    The aim of this experiment is to reduce the uncertainty of 7Li abundance prediction by measuring cross sections of the relevant reactions, 7Be(n, p)7Li and 7Be(n, α )4He. To measure such neutron-induced reactions with Radio Isotopes, we planed to measure the cross sections by applying Trojan Horse method via three-body reactions 7Be(d, p7Li)p and 7Be(d, α α )p in inverse kinematics at CRIB (Center for Nuclear Study RI Beam separator). We present the feasibility for the simultaneous measurement of these reactions by showing designs of the experimental setup with kinematical simulations. Predictions of possible excitation functions by R-matrix calculation are also discussed.

  9. Rare decays and CP asymmetries in charged B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of loop induced rare decays and the rate asymmetry due to CP violation in charged B Decays in reviewed. After considering b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} se{sup +}e{sup {minus}} decays, the asymmetries for pure penguin process are estimated first. A larger asymmetry can result in those modes where a tree diagram and a penguin diagram interfere, however these estimates are necessarily model dependent. Estimates of Cabbibo suppressed penguins are also considered.

  10. Forecasting 7BE concentrations in surface air using time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bas, María del Carmen; Ortiz, Josefina; Ballesteros, Luisa; Martorell, Sebastián

    2017-04-01

    7Be is a cosmogenic radionuclide widely used as an atmospheric tracer, whose evaluation and forecasting can provide valuable information on changes in the atmospheric behavior. In this study, measurements of 7Be concentrations were made each month during the period 2007-2015 from samples of atmospheric aerosols filtered from the air. The aim was to propose a Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) model to develop an explanatory and predictive model of 7Be air concentrations. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and the Adapted Mean Absolute Percentage Error (AMAPE) were selected to measure forecasting accuracy in identifying the best historical data time window to explain 7Be concentrations. A measure based on the variance of forecast errors was calculated to determine the impact of the model uncertainty on forecasts. We concluded that the SARIMA method is a powerful explanatory and predictive technique for explaining 7Be air concentrations in a longterm series of at least eight years of historical data to forecast 7Be concentration trends up to one year in advance.

  11. A new capability for ANTARES: 7Be by AMS for ice samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.; Simon, K. J.

    2013-01-01

    ANSTO, in collaboration with the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) and the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), has an on-going program of 10Be (t½ = 1.39 × 106 a) concentration measurement in firn and ice at Law Dome, Antarctica. In recent years snow pit samples have also been measured for 7Be (t½ = 53.28 d) concentration as this isotope has the potential to give further insight into the transport and deposition of cosmogenic beryllium to Law Dome and so improve the use of 10Be as a proxy for solar activity. Early 7Be measurements were made by gamma-ray spectrometry (GRS) with typical counting times of 3 days. In 2010, we developed the capability for 7Be/9Be measurement on the 10 MV ANTARES (Australian National Tandem Accelerator for Applied Research) accelerator using carbon foil post-stripping of 7Be3+ to 7Be4+ to eliminate the 7Li isobar. We describe the method and explain the advantages of using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) over GRS for 7Be analysis.

  12. Determinants of mRNA stability in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae: differences in poly(A) tail length, ribosome loading, and mRNA size cannot account for the heterogeneity of mRNA decay rates.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, R A; Herrick, D; Manrow, R E; Blinder, D; Jacobson, A

    1988-01-01

    As an approach to understanding the structures and mechanisms which determine mRNA decay rates, we have cloned and begun to characterize cDNAs which encode mRNAs representative of the stability extremes in the poly(A)+ RNA population of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. The cDNA clones were identified in a screening procedure which was based on the occurrence of poly(A) shortening during mRNA aging. mRNA half-lives were determined by hybridization of poly(A)+ RNA, isolated from cells labeled in a 32PO4 pulse-chase, to dots of excess cloned DNA. Individual mRNAs decayed with unique first-order decay rates ranging from 0.9 to 9.6 h, indicating that the complex decay kinetics of total poly(A)+ RNA in D. discoideum amoebae reflect the sum of the decay rates of individual mRNAs. Using specific probes derived from these cDNA clones, we have compared the sizes, extents of ribosome loading, and poly(A) tail lengths of stable, moderately stable, and unstable mRNAs. We found (i) no correlation between mRNA size and decay rate; (ii) no significant difference in the number of ribosomes per unit length of stable versus unstable mRNAs, and (iii) a general inverse relationship between mRNA decay rates and poly(A) tail lengths. Collectively, these observations indicate that mRNA decay in D. discoideum amoebae cannot be explained in terms of random nucleolytic events. The possibility that specific 3'-structural determinants can confer mRNA instability is suggested by a comparison of the labeling and turnover kinetics of different actin mRNAs. A correlation was observed between the steady-state percentage of a given mRNA found in polysomes and its degree of instability; i.e., unstable mRNAs were more efficiently recruited into polysomes than stable mRNAs. Since stable mRNAs are, on average, "older" than unstable mRNAs, this correlation may reflect a translational role for mRNA modifications that change in a time-dependent manner. Our previous studies have demonstrated both a time

  13. Effect of electron-acceptor strength of zeolite on the luminescence decay rate of Ru(bpy)3(2+) incorporated within zeolites.

    PubMed

    Taira, Nobuyuki; Saitoh, Masashi; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Moon, Hyung Rang; Yoon, Kyung Byung

    2006-09-01

    We carried out time-resolved luminescence and transient absorption studies of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(ii) complex, Ru(bpy)3(2+) assembled in the supercages of zeolites X and Y exchanged with various alkali metal cations. The average lifetime of the luminescence decay, a measure of the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) rate, of Ru(bpy)3(2+)* was found to decrease with increasing the electron-acceptor strength of the host which is represented by the Sanderson's electronegativity scale. This result strongly suggests that the zeolite host plays the role of electron acceptor for Ru(bpy)3(2+)*. However, we could not detect Ru(bpy)3(3+) in the transient absorption spectra, most likely due to very low absorption coefficient of Ru(bpy)3(3+) and to the low efficiency of net PET. For the above observation to be made, it is essential to employ the dehydrated zeolite hosts to allow direct interaction between the guest Ru(ii) complex and the host framework. The present study demonstrates the active role of the zeolite hosts during the PET of incorporated Ru(bpy)3(2+) under the carefully controlled experimental conditions. This report demonstrates the fact that the zeolite hosts can serve as electron acceptors although in the past zeolites were shown to play the role of electron donors.

  14. Rare beauty and charm decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, T.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Rare beauty and charm decays can provide powerful probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. These proceedings summarise the latest measurements of rare beauty and charm decays from the LHCb experiment at the end of Run 1 of the LHC. Whilst the majority of the measurements are consistent with SM predictions, small differences are seen in the rate and angular distribution of ℓ- decay processes.

  15. Temporal variations of 7Be and 210Pb activity in aerosols at Xiamen, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dekun

    2016-04-01

    The radionuclides serve as powerful tracers to identify and quantify several atmospheric processes, such as source, transport and mixing of air masses, air masses exchanging between various atmospheric layers, residence times of atmospheric gasses and pollutants. 7Be and 210Pb activities in aerosols were measurement from October, 2013 to September, 2015 at Xiamen (24°26'7.44″N, 118°5'31.30″N) in South China. The activity of 7Be and 210Pb in aerosols from 2013 to 2015 in Xiamen ranged from 0.26 to 9.05 (mean:4.15) mBq m-3 and from 0.14 to 2.64 (mean:1.05) mBq m-3, respectively. The mean activity of 7Be was comparable with the activities of other places in the same latitude, while the mean activity of 210Pb was lower than the activity of the locations at high altitudes. The possible reason is that Xiamen is a coastal city located on southwest Pacific. The activities of 7Be and 210Pb had a commonly low value in summer (July-September) and a high value in autumn (October-December), it may be controlled by the rainfall. There is significant relationship between the monthly 210Pb activities and the concentration of PM 2.5 and PM 10. In contrast, monthly 7Be activities only show significant correlation with the concentration of PM 10, which implies that 7Be and 210Pb can be used to trace the different sources of the aerosols. And the dry 7Be depositional fluxes increased with latitude along the coast of China (R2=0.92, n=8).

  16. Rare Z decays and new physics

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, E.W.N.

    1990-04-01

    Although the signatures for rare Z decays are often spectacular, the predicted standard model rates are usually extremely small. In many cases, however, rare decays are very sensitive to new phenomena and may lead to an observable rate. In this talk, I select some interesting rare decays and discuss how new physics might be identified. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Low energy measurements of the 10B(p ,α )7Be reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiescher, M.; deBoer, R. J.; Görres, J.; Azuma, R. E.

    2017-04-01

    Background: The 11B(p,2 α ) 4He reaction is being discussed as a prime candidate for advanced aneutronic fusion fuel systems. Particular interest in this reaction has recently emerged for laser driven plasma systems for energy generation and jet-propulsion systems. The lack of long-lived radioactive reaction products has been suggested as the main advantage of proton-boron fusion fuel. However, 19% of natural boron is 10B, with the 10B(p ,α )7Be fusion reaction producing long-lived 7Be as a side product. Purpose: A detailed measurement of the 10B(p ,α )7Be reaction over the critical energy range of hot fusion plasma environments will help to determine the amount of 7Be radioactivity being produced. This information can be used in turn to monitor the actual fusion temperature by offline measurement of the extracted 7Be activity. The goal of the here presented experiment is to expand on the results of earlier experiments, covering a wider energy range of interest for aneutronic plasma fusion applications, including also both 10B(p ,α0)7Be and the 10B(p ,α1)7Be reaction channels. Method: The reaction cross section was measured over a wide energy range from Ep=400 to 1000 keV using particle detection and from Ep=80 to 1440 keV using γ -ray spectroscopic techniques. Reaction α particles were measured at different angles to obtain angular distribution information. The results are discussed in terms of an R -matrix analysis. Results: The cross section data cover a wider energy range than previously investigated and bridge a gap in the previously available data sets. The cross sections show good agreement with previous results in the low energy region and show that the 10B(p ,α0)7Be channel is considerably larger than that of the 10B(p ,α1)7Be channel up to Ep≈1 MeV . Conclusions: The new reaction data provides important new information about the reaction cross section over the entire energy range of plasma fusion facilities. This data, when coupled with

  18. Atmospheric deposition patterns of (210)Pb and (7)Be in Cienfuegos, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Hernández, Carlos M; Morera-Gómez, Yasser; Cartas-Águila, Héctor; Guillén-Arruebarrena, Aniel

    2014-12-01

    The radiometric composition of bulk deposition samples, collected monthly for one year, February 2010 until January 2011, at a site located in Cienfuegos (22° 03' N, 80° 29' W) (Cuba), are analysed in this paper. Measurement of (7)Be and (210)Pb activity concentrations were carried out in 12 bulk deposition samples. The atmospheric deposition fluxes of (7)Be and (210)Pb are in the range of 13.2-132 and 1.24-8.29 Bq m(-2), and their mean values are: 56.6 and 3.97 Bq m(-2), respectively. The time variations of the different radionuclide have been discussed in relation with meteorological factors and the mean values have been compared to those published in recent literature from other sites located at different latitudes. The annual average flux of (210)Pb and (7)Be were 47 and 700 Bq m(-2) y(-1), respectively. Observed seasonal variations of deposition data are explained in terms of different environmental features. The atmospheric deposition fluxes of (7)Be and (210)Pb were moderately well correlated with precipitation and well correlated with one another. The (210)Pb/(7)Be ratios in the monthly depositions samples varied in the range of 0.05-0.10 and showed a strong correlation with the number of rainy days. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. World-wide seasonal variation of 7Be related to large-scale atmospheric circulation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzi, Lucrezia; Kalinowski, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Meteorological processes can be deciphered using 7Be as aerosol tracer. Especially ground based observation of 7Be world-wide over a long period of time can reveal information about large-scale atmospheric circulation dynamics. The CTBT through its RN network collects the activity concentration of these tracers since over 15 years and built up unique and powerful datasets that can be interpolated into global concentration maps. Maps of observed 7Be global seasonal variation as an expression of atmospheric cell migration such as Hadley, Ferrel and Polar cells. Previous studies used data from IMS stations to correlate beryllium trends to atmospheric patterns but on a local or regional scale. In this paper, we demonstrate how for the first time a worldwide beryllium concentration map is reconstructed using 15 years of data from 63 IMS radionuclide stations. Findings can be presented on correlation between 7Be global patterns with ITCZ, sun spots, tropopause height, Walker circulation, ENSO, SSW, SEP, Indian Monsoon and QBO. 7Be might possibly serve as an early warning indicator and complement other methodologies for determining global atmospheric phenomena. These relations would benefit from further studies.

  20. Reanalysis of the 7Be (p,γ) 8B S factor in a microscopic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, P.

    2004-12-01

    A previous microscopic three-cluster calculation, applied to the 7Be (p,γ) 8B reaction, is updated in several ways: the 7Be description is improved, two nucleon-nucleon interactions are considered, and new experimental information about the scattering lengths is taken into account. Weak changes in the energy dependence of the S factor are obtained. A “theoretical” uncertainty is estimated. It amounts to 5% near 1 MeV but reaches more than 10% when energy increases. We suggest that reducing the current uncertainty on the experimental scattering length would significantly reduce the error bar on S17 (0) . Elastic 7Be +p phase shifts are briefly discussed and analyzed for different 7Be deformations. We show that the differences with the potential model are due to shortcomings of that model, such as the lack of 7Be deformation, included in the present approach. We also investigate the 8Li and 8B spectroscopy, electromagnetic transition probabilities, and spectroscopic factors. The 5He + 3H configuration (or mirror) is shown to be important in the ground-state structure.

  1. Elastic scattering measurements for {sup 7}Be+{sup 27}Al system at RIBRAS facility

    SciTech Connect

    Morcelle, V.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Morais, M. C.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Gasques, L.; Pires, K. C. C.; Condori, R. P.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Barioni, A.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Zamora, J. C.

    2013-05-06

    Elastic scattering angular distribution measurements of {sup 7}Be+{sup 27}Al system were performed at the laboratory energy of 15.6 MeV. The {sup 7}Be secondary beam was produced by the proton transfer reaction {sup 3}He({sup 6}Li,{sup 7}Be) and impinged on {sup 27}Al and {sup 197}Au targets, using the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, RIBRAS. The elastic angular distribution was obtained within the angular range of 15{sup 0} - 80{sup 0} at the center of mass frame. Optical model calculations have been performed using the Woods- Saxon form factors and the Sao Paulo potential to fit the experimental data. The total reaction cross section was derived.

  2. Study of inelastic contribution in the 7Be + p scattering experiment at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, G.; Yamaguchi, H.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Kwon, Y. K.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Niikura, M.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, S.

    2006-07-01

    The 7Be(p,γ)8B reaction is undoubtfully important to the understanding of the solar model. As a step in the direction of improving the accuracy of the S17 astrophysical factor, a study of the 7Be + p scattering was performed with the thick target method at the CRIB facility. In addition to its astrophysical significance, this reaction is also useful to clarify the nuclear structure of 8B. A primary beam of 7Li and a hydrogen gas target were used to produce a 7Be secondary beam at 7.69 MeV/u. This was the first time in which γ-rays were measured in coincidence with protons, and we have successfully measured the inelastic contribution to the scattering cross section.

  3. The development, retention and decay rates of strength and power in elite rugby union, rugby league and American football: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Daniel Travis; Gill, Nicholas; Cronin, John; McGuigan, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Strength and power are crucial components to excelling in all contact sports; and understanding how a player's strength and power levels fluctuate in response to various resistance training loads is of great interest, as it will inevitably dictate the loading parameters throughout a competitive season. This is a systematic review of training, maintenance and detraining studies, focusing on the development, retention and decay rates of strength and power measures in elite rugby union, rugby league and American football players. A literature search using MEDLINE, EBSCO Host, Google Scholar, IngentaConnect, Ovid LWW, ProQuest Central, ScienceDirect Journals, SPORTDiscus and Wiley InterScience was conducted. References were also identified from other review articles and relevant textbooks. From 300 articles, 27 met the inclusion criteria and were retained for further analysis. STUDY QUALITY: Study quality was assessed via a modified 20-point scale created to evaluate research conducted in athletic-based training environments. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) quality rating of the included studies was 16.2 ± 1.9; the rating system revealed that the quality of future studies can be improved by randomly allocating subjects to training groups, providing greater description and detail of the interventions, and including control groups where possible. Percent change, effect size (ES = [Post-Xmean - Pre-Xmean)/Pre-SD) calculations and SDs were used to assess the magnitude and spread of strength and power changes in the included studies. The studies were grouped according to (1) mean intensity relative volume (IRV = sets × repetitions × intensity; (2) weekly training frequency per muscle group; and (3) detraining duration. IRV is the product of the number of sets, repetitions and intensity performed during a training set and session. The effects of weekly training frequencies were assessed by normalizing the percent change values to represent the weekly changes in

  4. 7Be- and 8B-reaction dynamics at Coulomb barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Acosta, L.; Di Meo, P.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Iwasa, N.; Jeong, S. C.; Jia, H. M.; Keeley, N.; Kim, Y. H.; Kimura, S.; Kubono, S.; Lay, J. A.; Lin, C. J.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Miyatake, H.; Mukai, M.; Nakao, T.; Nicoletto, M.; Pakou, A.; Rusek, K.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sava, T.; Sgouros, O.; Stefanini, C.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stiliaris, E.; Stroe, L.; Teranishi, T.; Toniolo, N.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. Y.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the reaction dynamics induced by the Radioactive Ion Beams 7Be and 8B on a 208Pb target at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The two measurements are strongly interconnected, being 7Be (Sα = 1.586 MeV) the loosely bound core of the even more exotic 8B (Sp = 0.1375 MeV) nucleus. Here we summarize the present status of the data analysis for the measurement of the elastic scattering process for both reactions and the preliminary results for the optical model analysis of the collected data.

  5. Elastic scattering and transfer reactions for the system 7Be + 58Ni at Coulomb barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, M.; Torresi, D.; Acosta, L.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Glodariu, T.; Guglielmetti, A.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Lay, J. A.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Parascandolo, C.; Parkar, V. V.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Romoli, M.; Rusek, K.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Stroe, L.

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the reaction induced by the Radioactive Ion Beam 7Be on the closed proton shell nucleus 58Ni at 22.0 MeV bombarding energy. The 7Be beam was produced by means of the in-flight technique with the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL (Italy). Charged reaction products were mass and charge identified in a rather wide angular range and their energy distributions were analyzed to infer some information on the production mechanism. The relevance of direct processes, especially 3He- and 4He-stripping, as well as compound nucleus reactions is critically reviewed.

  6. Are AMS 7Be measurements for a lithium solar neutrino detector practical?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fireman, E. L.; Litherland, A. E.; Rowley, J. K.

    1987-11-01

    An efficient, low-background method of measuring 7Be is necessary to make a solar neutrino detector using lithium practical. Accelerator mass spectrometric 7Be measurements with BeO sputter sources are inefficient because of the small molecule (atom) to ion conversion. By collecting the sputtered BeO, that has not been accelerated, on an aluminum electrode and preparing additional sources from the collected Be, the overall efficiency might be raised sufficiently so that a lithium solar neutrino detector would be practical.

  7. Trials for the cosmological 7Li problem with 7Be beams at CRIB and collaborating studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, S.

    2017-09-01

    For many years, the cosmological ^7 Li problem has been tackled from various aspects. The nuclear reaction data have also been improved, but still there remains some ambiguities. We review our experimental plans to measure the cross sections of three key reactions which act to destroy ^7 Be during the Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). These experiments are all based on ^7 Be beams produced at Center-for-Nuclear-Study Radioactive Ion Beam separator (CRIB) in collaborations mainly with research groups from INFN-LNS and RCNP. The preliminary result of the previous experiment and the future plan are discussed.

  8. New Precision Measurement of the 3He(4He,γ) 7Be Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. S.; Hass, M.; Nir-El, Y.; Haquin, G.

    2004-12-01

    The 3He(4He,γ) 7Be reaction plays an important role in determining the high energy solar neutrino flux and in understanding the abundances of primordial 7Li. This Letter reports a new precision measurement of the cross sections of this direct capture reaction, determined by measuring the ensuing 7Be activity in the region of Ec.m.=420 to 950keV. Various recent theoretical fits to our data result in a consistent extrapolated value of S34(0)=0.53(2)(1) keV b.

  9. Penguin diagram dominance in radiative weak decays of bottom baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2005-05-01

    Radiative weak decays of antitriplet bottom baryons are studied under the assumption of penguin diagram dominance and flavor-SU(3) (or SU(2)) symmetry. Relations among decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  10. Rare B Decays at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Palombo, Fernando; Collaboration, for the BABAR

    2009-01-12

    The author presents some of the most recent BABAR measurements for rare B decays. These include rate asymmetries in the B decays to K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and branching fractions in the B decays to l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}, K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The author also reports a search for the B{sup +} decay to K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}.

  11. Precision measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino flux and its day-night asymmetry with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccianiga, Barbara; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonetti, S.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, E.; Hardy, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Koshio, Y.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Lombardi, L.; Ludhova, L.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Quirk, J.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Sabelnikov, A.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Xu, J.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.; Borexino Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    Borexino measures the 7Be solar neutrino flux on 740 live days of data-taking to be 46±1.5+1.6-1.5 events/(day · 100 tons) which corresponds to an equivalent unoscillated flux on Earth of (3.11±0.10+0.11-0.10)·109sec -1 cm-2. This result excludes the no-oscillation hypothesis at 5 σ and provides a precise measurement of the survival probability Pee in the vacuum dominated oscillation regime Pee = 0.51±0.07. Borexino also measures the day-night asymmetry of the 7Be neutrino rate with a total error of 1.4% and finds it to be consistent with zero. This result is in agreement with the MSW-LMA hypothesis and disfavours at more than 8.5 σ the so-called LOW region of the oscillation parameter space.

  12. Background considerations for the 2H(7Be,3H)6Be experimental data II: Three-body continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Guimarães, V.

    2015-11-01

    The present article reports second background considerations for the experimentally obtained 2H(7Be,3H)6Be differential cross sections. The one-neutron transfer reaction was measured in inverse kinematics by using radioactive 7Be ( t 1/2 = 53.2 days) beams at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2004 in order to search for the resonances in the unbound 6Be nucleus. Resonances in this nucleus would affect the 3He(3He,2 p)4He reaction rate of the proton-proton chain occurring in stars such as our sun. The result shows, however, that the direct transfer to 6Be resonances is not particularly strong compared to other reaction channels that can produce tritons in the exit channels. The goals of the present work is to better understand the cross section data from transfer reaction measurements by adopting background considerations using the three-body continuum.

  13. Source areas of airborne 7Be and 210Pb measured in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Paatero, J; Hatakka, J

    2000-12-01

    Daily aerosol samples were collected at Sodankylä, Northern Finland, from July 1995 to June 1997. The filter samples were analyzed for 7Be by semiconductor gamma spectrometry and for 210Pb by alpha counting of the in-grown 210Po. The concentrations were lognormally distributed with median concentrations of 2,500 and 160 muBq m(-3) for 7Be and 210Pb, respectively. The trajectory analysis performed showed that the highest 210Pb activity concentrations were associated with continental air masses originating in Central Russia. High 7Be activity concentrations were found in air masses from Central Russia and, during springtime, also in air masses coming from southwest. The latter cases were attributed to the transfer of stratospheric air masses into the troposphere along the polar front. Slightly elevated 7Be and 210Pb concentrations were found in air masses coming to Sodankyla from northwest between 70th and 80th latitudes. This was attributed to the long-range transport from continental North America.

  14. Temporal variation of 7Be and 210Pb size distributions in ambient aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Dietl, F.; Frank, G.; Tschiersch, J.

    The size distributions of the cosmogenic 7Be and of the long-lived radon progeny 210Pb in ambient aerosols were measured continuously from December 1994 to the end of March 1996 in ground-level air at a semi-rural location in south Germany. Aerosol sampling was performed at a height of 4 m above ground with a low-pressure cascade impactor of the Berner type covering the size range from 0.06 to 16 μm and simultaneously with an high-volume sampler. Each sampling period was 10 d. Activities of 7Be and 210Pb were measured by gamma spectrometry and aerosol mass was determined gravimetrically. In all experiments the activity distributions of 7Be as well as of 210Pb were unimodal (log-normal) and associated with submicron aerosols of about 0.5-0.6 μm aerodynamic diameter. On average, the activity median diameters of 7Be (AMD: 0.57 μm) and of 210Pb (AMD: 0.53 μm) have been found to be significantly lower than the average mass median diameter (MMD: 0.675 μm) and higher or at most equal than the respective surface median diameter (SMD: 0.465 μm) of the aerosols: SMD⩽AMD Pb2107Be and from 0.28 to 0.74 μm for 210Pb. While in the winter months (October to April) a difference between the activity distributions of 210Pb (AMD: 0.595 μm) and 7Be (AMD: 0.59 μm) was not detectable, in summer, 210Pb was associated with significantly smaller aerosols (AMD: 0.43 μm) than 7Be (AMD: 0.52 μm). Comparing the activity median diameters observed in summer with those in winter, on average significantly lower diameters were found in summer pointing to shorter residence times in the summer months.

  15. Passive transfer, rate of decay, and protein specificity of antibodies against equine arteritis virus in horses from a Standardbred herd with high seroprevalence.

    PubMed

    Hullinger, P J; Wilson, W D; Rossitto, P V; Patton, J F; Thurmond, M C; MacLachlan, N J

    1998-09-15

    To determine rate of decay of passively acquired antibodies in Standardbred foals on a farm with a high seroprevalence to equine arteritis virus (EAV) and to determine whether vertical or horizontal transmission of the virus was responsible for infection on the farm. Repeated-measures study. 46 Standardbred horses (15 brood mares and their foals, 5 stallions, and 11 young horses). Serum samples obtained from horses on the farm were evaluated by serum neutralization and western immunoblot analysis to detect EAV-specific antibodies. The half-life of passively acquired antibodies in foals was estimated by use of regression analysis. Most (14/15) of the mares evaluated were seropositive to EAV. After suckling, their foals were also seropositive. Mean biological half-life for passively acquired antibodies in serum samples obtained from foals was 32 days (r2 = 0.61). The foal born to a seronegative dam and all 11 young horses from the farm were seronegative to EAV. At least 2 of 5 stallions on the farm were persistently infected carriers that were shedding virus in their semen. Immunoblot analysis of seropositive serum samples most consistently recognized the M protein of EAV. Analysis of these data indicated that a modified-live EAV vaccine can be administered to foals after they are 8 months old without risk of interference from maternal antibodies, regardless of serologic status of the foal's dam. Horizontal transmission of EAV via the respiratory tract apparently was uncommon on the farm, indicating that mares primarily were infected by venereal transmission of virus from carrier stallions.

  16. A random matrix/transition state theory for the probability distribution of state-specific unimolecular decay rates: Generalization to include total angular momentum conservation and other dynamical symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, R.; Miller, W.H.; Moore, C.B. ); Polik, W.F. )

    1993-07-15

    A previously developed random matrix/transition state theory (RM/TST) model for the probability distribution of state-specific unimolecular decay rates has been generalized to incorporate total angular momentum conservation and other dynamical symmetries. The model is made into a predictive theory by using a semiclassical method to determine the transmission probabilities of a nonseparable rovibrational Hamiltonian at the transition state. The overall theory gives a good description of the state-specific rates for the D[sub 2]CO[r arrow]D[sub 2]+CO unimolecular decay; in particular, it describes the dependence of the distribution of rates on total angular momentum [ital J]. Comparison of the experimental values with results of the RM/TST theory suggests that there is mixing among the rovibrational states.

  17. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at √s = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. 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K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. 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C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. 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M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. 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    2016-01-05

    In this study, combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H → γγ, ZZ*, WW*, Zγ, bb¯, ττ and μμ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb–1 at √s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18+0.15-0.14. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.

  18. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin,

    2016-01-07

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H → γγ,ZZ*,WW*,Zγ, $b\\bar{b}$,ττ and μμ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb-1 at s√ = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at s√ = 8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18+0.15-0.14. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.

  19. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at [Formula: see text] and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment.

    PubMed

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    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text] TeV and 20.3 [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text] TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is [Formula: see text]. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.

  20. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at √s = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-01-05

    In this study, combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H → γγ, ZZ*, WW*, Zγ, bb¯, ττ and μμ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb–1 at √s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb–1 at √s =more » 8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18+0.15-0.14. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.« less

  1. Seasonal variations on the residence times and partitioning of short-lived radionuclides (234Th, 7Be and 210Pb) and depositional fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baskaran, M.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, Tampa Bay has been impacted heavily by a wide range of anthropogenic perturbations that may include, agricultural-, shipping-, phosphate mining/distribution-related activities, as well as a burgeoning coastal population. Due to the presence of U-rich underlying sediments, elevated activities of U- and Th-series daughter products may be naturally released into this system. This region is also known for summer thunderstorms and corresponding increases in precipitation and surface water runoff. Only limited work has been conducted on the partitioning of particle-reactive radionuclides (such as 7Be, 210Pb, and 234Th) in such a dynamic coastal system. We investigated both the removal residence time and partitioning of these radionuclides between filter-retained particulate matter (≥ 0.5 μm) and the filtrate ( Our results indicate that the partitioning of 7Be, 210Pb, and 234Th between filtrate and filter-retained phase is controlled foremost by enhanced bottom resuspension events during summer thunderstorms. As a consequence, no significant relationship exists between the distribution coefficients (Kd values) of these isotopes and the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM). Relatively faster recycling rates of atmospheric water vapor derived from the ocean results in lower atmospheric depositional fluxes of 210Pb to the study site than predicted. The relationship between 7Be and 210Pb in bulk (wet + dry) deposition is compared to their respective water column activities. The residence times of particulate and dissolved 234Th, 7Be and 210Pb, as well the distribution coefficients of these radionuclides, are then compared to values reported in other coastal systems.

  2. Energy-Dependent Scintillation Pulse Shape and Proportionality of Decay Components for CsI:Tl: Modeling with Transport and Rate Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Gridin, S.; Williams, R. T.; Mayhugh, M. R.; Gektin, A.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Moszynski, M.

    2017-01-01

    Relatively recent experiments on the scintillation response of CsI:Tl have found that there are three main decay times of about 730 ns, 3 μ s , and 16 μ s , i.e., one more principal decay component than had been previously reported; that the pulse shape depends on gamma-ray energy; and that the proportionality curves of each decay component are different, with the energy-dependent light yield of the 16 -μ s component appearing to be anticorrelated with that of the 0.73 -μ s component at room temperature. These observations can be explained by the described model of carrier transport and recombination in a particle track. This model takes into account processes of hot and thermalized carrier diffusion, electric-field transport, trapping, nonlinear quenching, and radiative recombination. With one parameter set, the model reproduces multiple observables of CsI:Tl scintillation response, including the pulse shape with rise and three decay components, its energy dependence, the approximate proportionality, and the main trends in proportionality of different decay components. The model offers insights on the spatial and temporal distributions of carriers and their reactions in the track.

  3. Distribution of 7Be, 210Pb and 210Po in Size Fractionated Aerosols From Northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Huh, C.

    2003-12-01

    The partition of 7Be, 210Pb and 210Po in size fractionated aerosols was studied using samples collected from Nankang (northern Taiwan) during July 2002-July 2003. A TSP air sampler coupled to a 6-stage cascade impactor was used to collect large-volume samples and separate the aerosols into six size classes with the cut-off points at 7.2 μ m, 3 μ m, 1.5 μ m, 0.95 μ m and 0.49 μ m. The total mass concentrations of the aerosol samples ranged from 23 to 99 μ g m-3, with a maximum (18-50 %) falling at the sixth stage (< 0.49 μ m) and a minimum (5-13 %) at the third stage (1.5-3.0 μ m). Total concentrations of 7Be, 210Pb and 210Po in the samples were 0.11-0.56, 0.012-0.100 and 0.0009-0.0158 dpm m-3, respectively. For most of the samples, more than 70 % of the radioactivities are found in the fifth and sixth stages (< 0.95 μ m). Concurrent with the measurements of 7Be and 210Pb concentrations in aerosols, we have also measured the fluxes of these nuclides. Coupling the concentration data with the flux data, we obtained an overall deposition velocity of 0.02-3.71 cm s-1 for 7Be and 0.09-6.18 cm s-1 for 210Pb, without any obvious seasonal variation during the experimental periods. The size of aerosol particles and the height of cloud are the major factors controlling the deposition velocity of 7Be and 210Pb. The time series of 210Po/210Pb was in phase with that of 7Be/210Pb and showed an increase during the spring and summer, probably reflecting stratospheric folding in the spring and more vigorous tropospheric mixing (e.g., due to typhoons) in the summer.

  4. Decay of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2005-01-01

    We examine the record of sunspot group areas observed over a period of 100 years to determine the rate of decay of solar active regions. We exclude observations of groups when they are more than 60deg in longitude from the central meridian and only include data when at least three days of observations are available following the date of maximum area for a spot group's disk passage. This leaves data for some 24,000 observations of active region decay. We find that the decay rate is a constant 20 microHem/day for spots smaller than about 200 microHem (about the size of a supergranule). This decay rate increases linearly to about 90 microHem/day for spots with areas of 1000 microHem. We find no evidence for significant variations in active region decay from one solar cycle to another. However, we do find that the decay rate is slower at lower latitudes. This gives a slower decay rate during the declining phase of sunspot cycles.

  5. Decay of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2005-01-01

    We examine the record of sunspot group areas observed over a period of 100 years to determine the rate of decay of solar active regions. We exclude observations of groups when they are more than 60deg in longitude from the central meridian and only include data when at least three days of observations are available following the date of maximum area for a spot group's disk passage. This leaves data for some 24,000 observations of active region decay. We find that the decay rate is a constant 20 microHem/day for spots smaller than about 200 microHem (about the size of a supergranule). This decay rate increases linearly to about 90 microHem/day for spots with areas of 1000 microHem. We find no evidence for significant variations in active region decay from one solar cycle to another. However, we do find that the decay rate is slower at lower latitudes. This gives a slower decay rate during the declining phase of sunspot cycles.

  6. Study of the 10B ( p ,α)7Be reaction through the indirect Trojan Horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglia, S. M. R.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Burjan, V.; Carlin, N.; Chengbo, L.; Del Santo, M. G.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; Irgaziev, B.; La Cognata, M.; Mrazek, J.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Pizzone, R. G.; Qungang, W.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Shu-Hua, Z.; Sergi, M. L.; Somoryai, E.; Souza, F.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tabacaru, G.; Tumino, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2015-02-01

    Boron abundances in stellar atmospheres, as well as berillium and lithium ones, can give useful hints for non-standard transport processes discrimination in stars. They can also be relevant for understanding several astrophysical processes (e.g. primordial nucleosynthesis and spallation reactions in ISM). A comprehensive study of Li Be B abundances can therefore confirm or not the presence of non-standard mixing processes in stellar envelopes. For this reason nuclear processes producing or depleting boron isotope abundance need to be studied at astrophysical energies. The 10B ( p ,α)7Be reaction has been studied by means of the Trojan Horse Method. The Trojan Horse Method was thus applied to the 10B ( d ,α7Be ) n reaction, studied at 24 MeV. The obtained results will be discussed.

  7. Study of elastic scattering of mirror nuclei 7Be + 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, S.; Das, J. J.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Madhavan, N.; Sugathan, P.; Verma, S.; Kalita, K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Datta, S. K.; Boruah, K.

    2004-12-01

    The angular distribution of 7Be + 7Li elastic scattering has been measured using 7Be from the Radioactive beam at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi at E cm = 9.87 MeV. A compact and highly efficient detector system in kinematic coincidence mode and an in-vacuum target transfer system have been developed to minimise contributions from unwanted channels. The angular ranges covered were θcm = 42°- 66°and θcm = 114°- 138°. The experimental angular distribution shows higher cross sections than the theoretical predictions at the backward angles. The experimental data could be fitted with an isospin dependent complex potential that is analogous to the Lane potential.

  8. Exploring Light Neutron Rich Nuclei via the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Lenske, H.; Petrascu, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2008-11-11

    A systematic study of the nuclei that can be described as an integer number of {alpha} particles plus three neutrons via the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be) reaction at about 8 MeV/u has shown the presence of Bound States Embedded in the Continuum in the energy spectra. These are experimental signatures of the dynamical correlations of an easily polarizable core with a single-particle state of the valence neutron.

  9. A Measurement of the Interaction of Neutrons With 7Be at Cosmological Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kading, E. E.; Gai, M.; Palchan, T.; Paul, M.; Tessler, M.; Weiss, A.; Berkovits, D.; Halfon, Sh.; Kijel, D.; Kreisel, A.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Weissman, L.; Dressler, R.; Heinitz, S.; Maugeri, E. A.; Schumann, D.; Hass, M.; Mukul, I.; Shachar, Y.; Seiffert, Ch,; Stora, Th.; Ticehurst, D.; Howell, C. R.; Kivel, N.

    2016-09-01

    We exposed the 4.4 GBq electroplated 7Be target prepared at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland to the high neutrons flux of 5x1010 /sec/cm2 generated by the LiLiT at the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) in Israel. The so produced quasi-Maxwelian neutron spectrum with an equivalent kT = 49.2 keV simulate directly BBN conditions with T = 700 - 500 MK (kT = 60 - 43 keV), allowing the first measurement at Big Bang energies. The measured alpha-particles emanating from all possible 8Be states populated in the 7Be(n, α) and 7Be(n, γα) reaction, detected with a CR39 plastic track detectors, will be shown and discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S - Israel Binational Science Foundation, under Award Number 2012098 and the US. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Award Number DE-FG02-94ER40870.

  10. Observations Of Cosmogenic 7Be and 22Na In Aerosol Samples in Northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppänen, Ari-Pekka; Grinsted, Aslak

    2008-08-01

    Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority-STUK monitors the amount of airborne radioactivity with three aerosol samplers in Northern Finland. Naturally occurring radioactive nuclei 7Be and 22Na can be seen. A time series was constructed for both nuclei observed at Rovaniemi (lat 66,3° N long 25,4° E). The most consistent time series was found to be from Ivalo (lat 68,64° N long 27,57° E). The time series of 7Be and 22Na were compared and the ratio was plotted. A time series analysis was performed for Ivalo time series to find periodicities. Two periodicities longer than one year was found 4,3 years and 11 years, also 3 periodicities shorter than one years was found 1,7 months, 4 months and 6 months. The annual average 7Be activities at Rovaniemi and Ivalo were also compared with the annual galactic cosmic ray intensity observed with neutron monitor at Oulu (65.05°N, 25.47°E) by Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory.

  11. Seasonal 7Be and 137Cs activities in surface air before and after the Chernobyl event.

    PubMed

    Kulan, A

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal fluctuations of cosmogenic (7)Be (T(1/2)=53.4 days) and anthropogenic (137)Cs (T(1/2)=30 years) activities in surface air (aerosols) have been extracted from a long data record (1972-2000) at high latitude (56 degrees N-68 degrees N, Sweden). Normalization to weekly average values was used to control long-term trends so that cyclical trends could be investigated. Enhanced (7)Be activity was observed in spring and summer seasons and likely relates to the seasonal thinning of the tropopause. Variations in the (137)Cs activity record seem to reflect how the isotope was injected in the atmosphere (stratospheric from bomb tests and tropospheric from the Chernobyl accident) and subsequent transport mechanisms. Accordingly, until 1986, the surface air (137)Cs activity was strongly related to nuclear weapons test fallout and exhibits temporal fluctuations resembling the (7)Be. Conversely, since 1986 the Chernobyl-produced (137)Cs dominates the long-term record that shows annual cycles that are strongly controlled by atmospheric boundary layer conditions. Additionally, short-term data within the post-Chernobyl period suggest subtle intrusion of air masses rich in (137)Cs that may occur throughout the year, and differences resulting from spatial occurrence at these latitudes. This is an important observation that may have to do with year-to-year variation and calls for caution when interpreting short-term data records.

  12. Highly enriched 7Be in the ejecta of Nova Sagittarii 2015 No. 2 (V5668 Sgr) and the Galactic 7Li origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, P.; Izzo, L.; Mason, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Della Valle, M.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the evidence of highly blueshifted resonance lines of the singly ionized isotope of 7Be II in high resolution UVES spectra of Nova Sagittarii 2015 No. 2 (V5668 Sgr). The resonance doublet lines 7Be II at λλ313.0583, 313.1228 nm are clearly detected in several non-saturated and partially resolved high velocity components during the evolution of the outburst. The total absorption identified with Be II has an equivalent width much larger than all other elements and comparable to hydrogen. We estimate an atomic fraction N(7Be)/N(Ca) ≈ 53-69 from unsaturated and resolved absorption components. The detection of 7Be in several high velocity components shows that 7Be has been freshly created in a thermonuclear runaway via the reaction 3He(α, γ)7Be during the Nova explosion, as postulated by Arnould & Norgaar, however in much larger amounts than predicted by current models. 7Be II decays to 7Li II with a half-life of 53.22 d, comparable to the temporal span covered by the observations. The non-detection of 7Li I requires that 7Li remains ionized throughout our observations. The massive Be II ejecta result into a 7Li production that is ≈ 4.7-4.9 dex above the meteoritic abundance. If such a high production is common even in a small fraction (≈5 per cent) of Novae, they can make all the stellar 7Li of the Milky Way.

  13. Rare decays in quark flavour physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Johannes; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Rare heavy-flavour decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. Recent results on Flavour Changing Neutral Current decays from the LHC are reviewed. An emphasis is put on the very rare decay Bs0 →μ+μ-, which was recently observed by the CMS and LHCb experiments, on a recent test of lepton universality in loop processes and on the analysis of the angular distributions of the B0 →K*0μ+μ- decays, both by the LHCb collaboration.

  14. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  15. Yukawa radiative corrections to the triple self-couplings of neutral CP-even Higgs bosons and to the H {sup {yields}} hh decay rate within the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Yu. P.

    2007-07-15

    Within the minimal supersymmetric standard model, four self-couplings, {lambda}{sub hhh}, {lambda}{sub hhH}, {lambda}{sub hHH}, and {lambda}{sub HHH}, and the decay rate {gamma}(H {sup {yields}} hh) are calculated with allowance for one-loop corrections induced by the contribution of the t, b, and c quarks, the {tau} lepton, and the corresponding superpartners and with the aid of the on-shell renormalization scheme. An analysis of the dependences of these features on tan{beta} and the mass of the A Higgs boson, M{sub A}, shows that, in a specific region of the model-parameter space, the calculated corrections can make a significant contribution to the couplings and decay rate in the one-loop approximation. The inclusion of the radiative corrections in question is mandatory in reconstructing the Higgs potential.

  16. Particle decay in inflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H.J. de

    2004-09-15

    We investigate the relaxation and decay of a particle during inflation by implementing the dynamical renormalization group. This investigation allows us to give a meaningful definition for the decay rate in an expanding universe. As a prelude to a more general scenario, the method is applied here to study the decay of a particle in de Sitter inflation via a trilinear coupling to massless conformally coupled particles, both for wavelengths much larger and much smaller than the Hubble radius. For superhorizon modes we find that the decay is of the form {eta}{sup {gamma}{sub 1}} with {eta} being conformal time and we give an explicit expression for {gamma}{sub 1} to leading order in the coupling which has a noteworthy interpretation in terms of the Hawking temperature of de Sitter space-time. We show that if the mass M of the decaying field is <decay rate during inflation is enhanced over the Minkowski space-time result by a factor 2H/{pi}M. For wavelengths much smaller than the Hubble radius we find that the decay law is e with C({eta}) the scale factor and {alpha} determined by the strength of the trilinear coupling. In all cases we find a substantial enhancement in the decay law as compared to Minkowski space-time. These results suggest potential implications for the spectrum of scalar density fluctuations as well as non-Gaussianities.

  17. Particle decay in inflationary cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; de Vega, H. J.

    2004-09-01

    We investigate the relaxation and decay of a particle during inflation by implementing the dynamical renormalization group. This investigation allows us to give a meaningful definition for the decay rate in an expanding universe. As a prelude to a more general scenario, the method is applied here to study the decay of a particle in de Sitter inflation via a trilinear coupling to massless conformally coupled particles, both for wavelengths much larger and much smaller than the Hubble radius. For superhorizon modes we find that the decay is of the form ηΓ1 with η being conformal time and we give an explicit expression for Γ1 to leading order in the coupling which has a noteworthy interpretation in terms of the Hawking temperature of de Sitter space-time. We show that if the mass M of the decaying field is ≪H then the decay rate during inflation is enhanced over the Minkowski space-time result by a factor 2H/πM. For wavelengths much smaller than the Hubble radius we find that the decay law is e with C(η) the scale factor and α determined by the strength of the trilinear coupling. In all cases we find a substantial enhancement in the decay law as compared to Minkowski space-time. These results suggest potential implications for the spectrum of scalar density fluctuations as well as non-Gaussianities.

  18. River-plume sedimentation and 210Pb/7Be seabed delivery on the Mississippi River delta front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Gregory; Bentley, Samuel J.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Maloney, Jillian; Miner, Michael D.; Xu, Kehui

    2017-06-01

    To constrain the timing and processes of sediment delivery and submarine mass-wasting events spanning the last few decades on the Mississippi River delta front, multi-cores and gravity cores (0.5 and <3 m length respectively) were collected seaward of the Mississippi River Southwest Pass in 25-75 m water depth in 2014. The cores were analyzed for radionuclide activity (7Be, 210Pb, 137Cs), grain size, bulk density, and fabric (X-radiography). Core sediments are faintly bedded, sparsely bioturbated, and composed mostly of clay and fine silt. Short-term sedimentation rates (from 7Be) are 0.25-1.5 mm/day during river flooding, while longer-term accumulation rates (from 210Pb) are 1.3-7.9 cm/year. In most cores, 210Pb activity displays undulatory profiles with overall declining activity versus depth. Undulations are not associated with grain size variations, and are interpreted to represent variations in oceanic 210Pb scavenging by river-plume sediments. The 210Pb profile of one gravity core from a mudflow gully displays uniform basal excess activity over a zone of low and uniform bulk density, interpreted to be a mass-failure event that occurred 9-18 years before core collection. Spatial trends in sediment deposition (from 7Be) and accumulation (from 210Pb) indicate that proximity to the river mouth has stronger influence than local facies (mudflow gully, depositional lobe, prodelta) over the timeframe and seabed depth represented by the cores (<40 years, <3 m length). This may be explained by rapid proximal sediment deposition from river plumes coupled with infrequent tropical cyclone activity near the delta in the last 7 years (2006-2013), and by the location of most sediment failure surfaces (from mass flows indicated by parallel geophysical studies) deeper than the core-sampling depths of the present study.

  19. River-plume sedimentation and 210Pb/7Be seabed delivery on the Mississippi River delta front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Gregory; Bentley, Samuel J.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Maloney, Jillian; Miner, Michael D.; Xu, Kehui

    2016-10-01

    To constrain the timing and processes of sediment delivery and submarine mass-wasting events spanning the last few decades on the Mississippi River delta front, multi-cores and gravity cores (0.5 and <3 m length respectively) were collected seaward of the Mississippi River Southwest Pass in 25-75 m water depth in 2014. The cores were analyzed for radionuclide activity (7Be, 210Pb, 137Cs), grain size, bulk density, and fabric (X-radiography). Core sediments are faintly bedded, sparsely bioturbated, and composed mostly of clay and fine silt. Short-term sedimentation rates (from 7Be) are 0.25-1.5 mm/day during river flooding, while longer-term accumulation rates (from 210Pb) are 1.3-7.9 cm/year. In most cores, 210Pb activity displays undulatory profiles with overall declining activity versus depth. Undulations are not associated with grain size variations, and are interpreted to represent variations in oceanic 210Pb scavenging by river-plume sediments. The 210Pb profile of one gravity core from a mudflow gully displays uniform basal excess activity over a zone of low and uniform bulk density, interpreted to be a mass-failure event that occurred 9-18 years before core collection. Spatial trends in sediment deposition (from 7Be) and accumulation (from 210Pb) indicate that proximity to the river mouth has stronger influence than local facies (mudflow gully, depositional lobe, prodelta) over the timeframe and seabed depth represented by the cores (<40 years, <3 m length). This may be explained by rapid proximal sediment deposition from river plumes coupled with infrequent tropical cyclone activity near the delta in the last 7 years (2006-2013), and by the location of most sediment failure surfaces (from mass flows indicated by parallel geophysical studies) deeper than the core-sampling depths of the present study.

  20. Atmospheric fluxes and marsh-soil inventories of /sup 7/Be and /sup 210/Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; Cutshall, N.H.; Todd, J.F.; Wong, G.T.F.; Casey, W.H.

    1996-10-20

    The atmospheric flux of /sup 7/Be over a 2-year period at a coastal site (Norfolk, Virginia) and at an inland site (Oak Ridge, Tennessee) typically supports inventories ranging from 1.0 to 2.0 pCi/cm/sup 2/ (1 pCi = 0.037 Bq), with the highest inventories generally occurring in the spring and the lowest occurring in the fall. The calculated average daily fluxes required to support these inventories range from 0.013 to 0.026 pCi cm/sup -2/ d/sup -1/. Despite the different production-source terms for /sup 7/Be and /sup 210/Pb, there is a high degree of correlation between their measured total monthly deposition reflecting the importance of washout in removing both radionuclides from the atmosphere. Beryllium 7 inventories in soil and vegetated marsh cores compare favorably with inventories calculated from the atmospheric deposition data. Lead 210 inventories in soil and vegetated marsh cores may be enriched (by 20--30%) in relation to inventories calculated from its depositional flux to bucket samples. Possible explanations for this enrichment are that above-ground vegetation is more efficient at collecting dry aerosols (containing short-lived radon daughters) than buckets or that foliage is an effective trap for particles containing sorbed /sup 210/Pb which may be eroded from unvegetated surfaces by wind or water. The vertical distribution and inventory of both /sup 7/Be and /sup 210/Pb in marsh cores are affected by the presence of vegetation and the location of the groundwater table.

  1. Using 7Be measurements to estimate the relative contributions of interrill and rill erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng-Bao; Yang, Ming-Yi; Walling, Des E.; Zhang, Bo

    2014-02-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for estimating the relative contribution of interrill and rill erosion during a rainfall event are needed to provide an improved understanding of soil erosion processes and to develop process-based soil erosion prediction models. Use of the radionuclide 7Be in controlled experiments provides a means of addressing this need and this paper reports an experimental study aimed at refining and testing procedures employed to estimate the relative contribution of the two components of erosion. Four experimental plots (area 5 × 2 m and 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25° slope), filled with a loessial soil, manually tilled, and kept free of weeds with herbicides, were subjected to high intensity rainfall (91.8-120.6 mm h- 1), in order to induce rill development. The evolution of the rill network was documented photographically during the rainfall events and the runoff and sediment output from the plots were collected and measured. The sediment was recovered from the runoff and its mass and 7Be activity were measured. The Yang model, reported previously, was used to estimate the relative contributions of interrill and rill erosion from the 7Be activity of the exported sediment and this model was further refined to take account of the dynamic growth of the rills during the rainfall event. The results from the experiments were also used to develop a simple empirical linear model for estimating the relative contributions of interrill and rill erosion from the 7Be measurements. A comparison of the results provided by the three models showed some differences in the estimates of the magnitude of the relative contributions, although their trend during the event was similar. The estimates provided by the empirical linear model tended to be higher than those obtained using the refined model and lower than those generated by the Yang model, but were closer to those provided by the refined model which was seen as being theoretically the most accurate model. The

  2. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors.

  3. Constraining the Astrophysical S Factor of the 3He(α,γ)7Be Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Rojas, A.; Nara Singh, B. S.; Akers, C.; Aviv, O.; Borge, M. J. G.; Christian, G.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Fulton, B. R.; Hager, U.; Haquin, G.; Hass, M.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Nir-El, Y.; Ottewell, D.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Tengblad, O.; Yaniv, R.; Yungreis, Z.

    The cross section of the 3He(α,γ)7Be reaction has been widely studied both from the theoretical and the experimental fronts due to its relevance to the standard solar model and to the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis calculations. We report here on cross section measurements in the energy region Ec.m. = 1-3 MeV using the direct recoil counting method in an attempt to resolve the discrepancies among the previous data sets and calculations in this energy region and thus to constrain the extrapolations of the S34(E) curve to astrophysical energies.

  4. How large is the {sup 7}Be neutrino flux from the Sun?

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfenstein, L.; Krastev, P.I.

    1997-04-01

    On the basis of present solar neutrino observations and relaxing the constraints from solar models it is possible that most (or nearly all) of the flux of electron neutrinos detected comes from electron capture in {sup 7}Be. These solutions arise from neutrino oscillations in which {nu}{sub e}-{nu}{sub {tau}} mixing suppresses high energy {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub e}-{nu}{sub {mu}} mixing suppresses low energy {nu}{sub e} as qualitatively suggested from some SO(10) grand unified models. The importance of future observations is emphasized. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Searching for resonances in the unbound 6Be nucleus using a radioactive 7Be beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, K. Y.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeffery C; Smith, Michael Scott; Champagne, A. E.; Fitzgerald, R. P.; Visser, D. W.; Das, Jiban; Guimaraes, V.; Jones, K. L.; Pain, S. D.; Thomas, J. S.; Johnson, M. S.; KOZUB, RAYMOND L; Livesay, R. J.; Ma, Z.; Nesaraja, Caroline D

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the 3He(3He,2p)4He reaction is important for understanding stellar burning and solar neutrino production. Previous measurements have found a surprisingly large rise in the cross section at low energies that could be due to a low energy resonance in the 3He + 3He (6Be) system or electron screening. In the 6Be nucleus, however, no excited states have been observed above the first 2+ state at Ex = 1:67 MeV up to 23 MeV, even though several are expected. The d(7Be,t)6Be reaction has been studied for the first time to search for resonances in the 6Be nucleus that may affect our understanding of the 3He(3He,2p)4He reaction. A 100-MeV radioactive 7Be beam from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) was used to bombard CD2 targets, and tritons were detected by the Silicon Detector Array (SIDAR). It appears that a combination of reaction mechanisms are necessary to explain the observed triton energy spectrum.

  6. Marrying ab initio calculations and Halo-EFT: 7Li and 7Be radiative nucleon captures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xilin; Nollett, Kenneth; Phillips, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    We combine ab initio quantum-Monte-Carlo (QMC) calculations with the Halo-Effective-Field-Theory (Halo-EFT) framework, in order to study low-energy radiative nucleon capture to a weakly bound (halo) nucleus. Here we focus on the reactions 7Li(n, γ)8Li and 7Be(p, γ)8B, which are subjects of long-standing interest for astrophysics. In the low-energy region we can approximate 8Li (8B) as composed of a 7Li (7Be) core (and also its excitation), and a neutron (proton) with an anomalously extended wave function. The scattering and bound states can be studied in Halo-EFT, in which both core and the nucleon are treated as fundamental degrees of freedom. In our leading order calculation, we use asymptotic normalization coefficients from QMC calculations to fix the parameters in the Lagrangian, which we then apply to study radiative captures. This obviates computing the captures by directly using numerically intensive QMC methods, while still incorporating the nuclear dynamics that these methods provide. In addition, the model-independent EFT framework provides novel insights into the manner in which these two nucleon-capture processes are related to one another. This work is supported by US Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-93ER-40756.

  7. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  8. Publisher's Note: Evidence for CP Violation in Time-Integrated D0→h-h+ decay rates [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 111602 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G. A.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; de Bonis, I.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Estève, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Koopman, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S. K.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A. C.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F. J. P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M. T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-03-01

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D0 -> h-h+ (h=K, pi) decays is presented using 0.62 fb^-1 of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D*+ -> D0 pi+ and D*- -> D0bar pi- decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D0 -> K-K+ and D0 -> pi-pi+, Delta ACP = ACP(K-K+) - ACP(pi-pi+), is measured to be [-0.82 \\pm 0.21(stat.) \\pm 0.11(syst.)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  9. Limits on the decay-rate difference of neutral B mesons and on CP, T, and CPT violation in B(0-0)B oscillations.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Shen, B C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Granges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-05-07

    Using events in which one of two neutral B mesons from the decay of an Upsilon(4S) meson is fully reconstructed, we determine parameters governing decay (DeltaGamma(d)/Gamma(d)), CP, and T violation (|q/p|), and CP and CPT violation (Re z,Im z). The results, obtained from an analysis of 88 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S) decays recorded by BABAR, are sgn(Re lambda(CP))DeltaGamma(d)/Gamma(d)=-0.008+/-0.037(stat)+/-0.018(syst)[-0.084,0.068],|q/p|=1.029+/-0.013(stat)+/-0.011(syst)[1.001,1.057],(Re lambda(CP)/|lambda(CP)|) Re z=0.014+/-0.035(stat)+/-0.034(syst)[-0.072,0.101],Im z=0.038+/-0.029(stat)+/-0.025(syst)[-0.028,0.104]. The values inside the square brackets indicate the 90% confidence-level intervals. These results are consistent with standard model expectations.

  10. Improving the luminescence properties of aequorin by conjugating to CdSe/ZnS quantum dot nanoparticles: Red shift and slowing decay rate.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Nezam; Shanehsaz, Maryam; Sajedi, Reza H; Gharaat, Morteza; Ghahremanzadeh, Ramin

    2016-09-01

    Changing the properties of photoprotein aequorin such as the wavelength emission and decay half-life by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) phenomenon is the main aim in this paper. BRET system was set up with CdSe/ZnS quantum dot nanoparticles as an acceptor molecule and photoprotein as an energy donor molecule. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanoparticles with very interesting optical properties, including broad excitation spectra, narrow and the symmetric band width emission spectra, tunable by their sizes, compositions, negligible photo-bleaching and good chemical and photo-stability. In this QD-BRET system, aequorin is conjugated to the carboxyl groups on quantum dot surface by EDC/NHS chemistry as cross linker. Bioluminescence energy generates by aequorin upon adding Ca(2+) and transfers to the quantum dots in a radiationless manner and emits at a longer wavelength. The determined bioluminescent parameters for this method included aequorin activity, emission spectra and decay half-life time. In fact, this spectrum tuning strategy resulted in a change in bioluminescent properties of photoprotein, therefore, the maximum emission wavelength shifted from 455 to 540nm and the