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Sample records for 7li induced natural

  1. Population of Nuclei Via 7Li-Induced Binary Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R M; Phair, L W; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Deleplanque, M A; Fallon, P; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Sinha, S; Stephens, F S; Ward, D; Wiedeking, M; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Church, J A

    2005-08-09

    The authors have investigated the population of nuclei formed in binary reactions involving {sup 7}Li beams on targets of {sup 160}Gd and {sup 184}W. The {sup 7}Li + {sup 184}W data were taken in the first experiment using the LIBERACE Ge-array in combination with the STARS Si {Delta}E-E telescope system at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By using the Wilczynski binary transfer model, in combination with a standard evaporation model, they are able to reproduce the experimental results. This is a useful method for predicting the population of neutron-rich heavy nuclei formed in binary reactions involving beams of weakly bound nuclei and will be of use in future spectroscopic studies.

  2. Population of Nuclei Via 7Li-Induced Binary Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Rodney M.; Phair, Larry W.; Descovich, M.; Cromaz, Mario; Deleplanque, M.A.; Fall on, Paul; Lee, I-Yang; Macchiavelli, A.O.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Moretto, Luciano G.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Sinha,Shrabani; Stephens, Frank S.; Ward, David; Wiedeking, Mathis

    2005-08-08

    The authors have investigated the population of nuclei formed in binary reactions involving {sup 7}Li beams on targets of {sup 160}Gd and {sup 184}W. The {sup 7}Li + {sup 184}W data were taken in the first experiment using the LIBERACE Ge-array in combination with the STARS Si {Delta}E-E telescope system at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By using the Wilczynski binary transfer model, in combination with a standard evaporation model, they are able to reproduce the experimental results. This is a useful method for predicting the population of neutron-rich heavy nuclei formed in binary reactions involving beams of weakly bound nuclei formed in binary reactions involving beams of weakly bound nuclei and will be of use in future spectroscopic studies.

  3. Nucleon and triton production from nucleon-induced reactions on 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Guo, Hairui; Nagaoka, Kohei; Matsumoto, Takuma; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Nucleon (N) and triton production from nucleon-induced reactions on 7Li at an incident energy of 14 MeV are analyzed by using three-body continuum discretized coupled channels method (CDCC), final state interaction (FSI) model, and sequential decay (SD) model. The CDCC is used to describe nucleon and triton production via breakup continuum channels, 7Li(N,N')7Li*→ t + α. Triton production from p(n) + 7Li → t + 5Li(5He) channel and nucleon production from sequential decay of the ground-state 5Li(5He) are calculated by the FSI model and the SD model, respectively. The calculated double differential cross sections for both nucleon and triton production are in good agreement with experimental ones except at relatively low nucleon emission energies.

  4. Indirect determination of Li via 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced by neutrons from 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Reddy, G. L. N.; Rao, Pritty; Verma, Rakesh; Ramana, J. V.; Vikramkumar, S.; Raju, V. S.

    2012-03-01

    An indirect method to determine Li by 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced in a high purity Ge (detector) crystal by neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a typical particle-induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy experimental set-up is described. Performed with proton beams of energies in excess of 1.88 MeV, the threshold energy (Eth) of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, the determination involves the activity measurement of 75mGe isotope that has a half-life of 47.7 s and decays with the emission of 139 keV γ-rays. Rapidity, selectivity and sensitivity down to ppm levels are the attractive features of the method. It is a suitable alternative to 7Li(p,p'γ)7Li reaction based PIGE technique in the analyses of matrices that contain light elements such as Be, B, F, Na and Al in significant proportions. Interferences can arise from elements, for example V and Ti, that have Eth ⩽ 1.88 MeV for (p,n) reaction. In the case of elements such as Cu, Mo which have with Eth > 1.88 MeV, the incident proton beam energy can be judiciously selected to avoid or minimize an interference. The method, under optimized irradiation conditions, does not entail a risk of neutron stimulated degradation of the performance of the detector. Besides analytical purposes, the measurement of the 75mGe activity can serve as a powerful tool to monitor even low (˜25 n/cm2 s) thermal neutron fluxes.

  5. Production cross section of At radionuclides from 7Li+natPb and 9Be+natTl reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2011-12-01

    Earlier we reported theoretical studies on the probable production of astatine radionuclides from 6,7Li- and 9Be-induced reactions on natural lead and thallium targets, respectively. The production of astatine radionuclides were investigated experimentally with two heavy-ion-induced reactions: 9Be + natTl and 7Li + natPb. Formation cross sections of the evaporation residues, 207,208,209,210At, produced in the (HI,xn) channel, were measured by the stacked-foil technique followed by off-line γ spectrometry at low incident energies (<50 MeV). Measured excitation functions were interpreted in terms of a compound nuclear reaction mechanism using Weisskopf-Ewing and Hauser-Feshbach models. Measured cross-section values are lower than the respective theoretical predictions.

  6. Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M.; Milin, M.

    2009-08-26

    Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

  7. Theory of laser enhancement and suppression of cold reactions: the fermion-boson 6Li+7Li2<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega0) 6Li7Li+7Li radiative collision.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Parker, Gregory A; Brumer, Paul; Thanopulos, Ioannis; Shapiro, Moshe

    2008-03-28

    We present a nonperturbative time-dependent quantum mechanical theory of the laser catalysis and control of a bifurcating A+BC<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0))ABC*(v)<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0) )AB+C reaction, with ABC*(v) denoting an intermediate, electronically excited, complex of ABC in the vth vibrational state. We apply this theory to the low collision energy fermion-boson light-induced exchange reaction, (6)Li((2)S)+(7)Li(2)((3)Sigma(u)(+))<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0))((6)Li(7)Li(7)Li)*<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0))(6)Li(7)Li((3)Sigma(+))+(7)Li((2)S). We show that at very low collision energies and energetically narrow (approximately 0.01 cm(-1)) initial reactant wave packets, it is possible to tune the yield of the exchange reaction from 0 to near-unity (yield >or=99%) values. Controllability is somewhat reduced at collisions involving energetically wider (approximately 1 cm(-1)) initial reactant wave packets. At these energetic bandwidths, the radiative reactive control, although still impressive, is limited to the 0%-76% reactive-probabilities range.

  8. Determination of the electric quadrupole moment of /sup 7/Li by Coulomb scattering of an aligned /sup 7/Li ions

    SciTech Connect

    Egelhof, P.; Dreves, W.; Moebius, K.; Steffens, E.; Tungate, G.; Zupranski, P.; Fick, D.; Boettger, R.; Roesel, F.

    1980-05-26

    The electric quadrapole moment of /sup 7/Li was determined by Coulomb scattering of aligned /sup 7/Li ions to be Q-34=(+- 6) exmb. This compares favorably with the value Q-41=(+- 6) exmb determined by atomic-beam spectroscopy.

  9. Photodisintegration of 7Li with progeny nuclei in excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurtz, W. A.; Pywell, R. E.; Norum, B. E.; Kucuker, S.; Sawatzky, B. D.; Weller, H. R.; Stave, S.; Ahmed, M. W.

    2015-10-01

    We study the reaction channels 7Li+γ →n +6Li (2.19 ) , 7Li+γ →n +6Li(3.56 ) , and 7Li+γ →d +5He(1.27 )→n +d +4He by detecting neutrons produced by photodisintegration events. We find absolute cross sections and angular dependence for 7Li+γ →n +6Li(2.19 ) at photon energies 13 and 15 MeV and for 7Li+γ →n +67Li+γ →d +5He(1.27 )→n +d +4He we obtain an upper bound on its cross section at photon energies 12, 13, and 15 MeV.

  10. The ^12C(^7Li,^6Li)^13C Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosz, E. E.; Keeley, N.; Kemper, K. W.

    2001-04-01

    We present the first complete set of analysing powers, including all third rank ones, for a ^7Li induced transfer reaction. Data were obtained for transfers to the 1/2^-, 1/2^+ and 5/2^+ states of ^13C at 0.0, 3.09 and 3.85 MeV excitation energies respectively, induced by a 34 MeV polarised ^7Li beam. This experiment was motivated by the complete failure of previous DWBA and CCBA calculations to describe transfers to the 1/2^+ state (K.W. Kemper, et al./, Phys. Rev. C 38, 2664 (1988).). Extensive coupled-discretised-continuum-channels (CDCC) calculations using cluster-folding (CF) model form-factors have been carried out and show that the failure to describe the 1/2^+ data is not a result of a dynamical effect.

  11. Electromagnetic excitation of aligned /sup 7/Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, A.; Egelhof, P.; Caplar, R.; Karban, O.; Kraemer, D.; Moebius, K.; Moroz, Z.; Rusek, K.; Steffens, E.; Tungate, G.

    1985-07-29

    Electric ground-state properties of /sup 7/Li have been measured in a consistent way by observation of the Coulomb interaction of aligned /sup 7/Li ions with heavy target nuclei. Besides the quadrupole moment (Q/sub s/ = 3.70 +- 0.08 e/sup 2/ fm/sup 2/) and the B(E2,(3/2)/sup -/..-->..(1/2)/sup -/) value (8.3 +- 0.5 e/sup 2/ fm/sup 4/), the tensor moments of the nuclear polarizability tau/sub 12/ and tau/sub 11/ were determined (tau/sub 12/ = tau/sub 11/ = 0.23 +- 0.06 fm/sup 3/). Present theoretical investigations on the structure of /sup 7/Li reveal difficulties in providing a unified description of all four properties.

  12. Barrier distributions for the 7Li+27Al reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, W. H. Z.

    2010-08-01

    Barrier distributions can be obtained from the first derivative of the elastic and quasielastic (QEL) backward angle excitation functions [1]. In this work we present a study of the barrier distribution for the 7Li+27Al reaction from a Coupled-Channels Born Approximation (CCBA) calculations using the code FRESCO [2].

  13. Gamma-ray line emission from 7Li and 7Be production by cosmic-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatischeff, V.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Kiener, J.; Cassé, M.; Vangioni-Flam, E.

    2001-09-01

    We calculate the total γ-ray line emission at ~450 keV that accompanies 7Li and 7Be production by cosmic-ray interactions, including the delayed line emission at 0.478 MeV from 7Be radioactive decay. We present a new γ-ray spectroscopic test which has the potential to give direct information on the nature of the interstellar regions into which 7Be ions propagate and decay. Finally, we evaluate the intensity of the predicted diffuse emission from the central radian of the Galaxy.

  14. Influence of the static deformation of /sup 7/Li on the /sup 7/Li-/sup 51/V total reaction cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Moebius, K.; Boettger, R.; Egelhof, P.; Moroz, Z.; Steffens, E.; Tungate, G.; Dreves, W.; Koenig, I.; Fick, D.

    1981-04-20

    The energy dependence of the reaction cross section and the corresponding tensor analyzing power has been measured for the system /sup 7/Li-/sup 51/V by two different methods. The tensor analyzing powers observed can be interpreted in a sharp cutoff model as caused entirely by the static deformation of the /sup 7/Li projectiles.

  15. Ultracold thermalization of {sup 7}Li and {sup 87}Rb

    SciTech Connect

    Marzok, C.; Deh, B.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Zimmermann, C.

    2007-11-15

    We report on measurements of cross-species thermalization inside a magnetically trapped spin-polarized mixture of {sup 87}Rb and {sup 7}Li atoms with both atoms in their respective low-field-seeking magnetic substates |F=2,m{sub F}=2>. Measurement of the thermalization velocity in the ultracold regime below 10 {mu}K allows for the derivation of the absolute value of the pure triplet s-wave scattering length governing the interaction. We find |a{sub 7,87}|=(59{+-}19)a{sub B}. We propose to study both species in the condensed regime to derive the sign of a{sub 7,87}. In this context, we present numerical solutions to the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equation based on the hypothesis of a positive sign. According to the simulations, phase separation of the Li and Rb |2,2> clouds occurs along with a mean-field stabilization allowing for larger atom numbers of condensed {sup 7}Li atoms before collapse sets in. Observation of this mean-field stabilization would directly fix the sign of a{sub 7,87}. We discuss our results in the light of this proposal.

  16. Metastable charged sparticles and the cosmological {sup 7}Li problem

    SciTech Connect

    Cyburt, Richard H.; Ellis, John; Luo, Feng; Fields, Brian D.; Olive, Keith A.; Spanos, Vassilis C. E-mail: John.Ellis@cern.ch E-mail: feng.luo@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: spanos@inp.demokritos.gr

    2012-12-01

    We consider the effects of metastable charged sparticles on Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), including bound-state reaction rates and chemical effects. We make a new analysis of the bound states of negatively-charged massive particles with the light nuclei most prominent in BBN, and present a new code to track their abundances, paying particular attention to that of {sup 7}Li. Assuming, as an example, that the gravitino is the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), and that the lighter stau slepton, τ-tilde {sub 1}, is the metastable next-to-lightest sparticle within the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM), we analyze the possible effects on the standard BBN abundances of τ-tilde {sub 1} bound states and decays for representative values of the gravitino mass. Taking into account the constraint on the CMSSM parameter space imposed by the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC, we delineate regions in which the fit to the measured light-element abundances is as good as in standard BBN. We also identify regions of the CMSSM parameter space in which the bound state properties, chemistry and decays of metastable charged sparticles can solve the cosmological {sup 7}Li problem.

  17. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  18. Non-Gaussian error distribution of 7Li abundance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Sara; Houston, Stephen; Ratra, Bharat

    2015-07-01

    We construct the error distribution of 7Li abundance measurements for 66 observations (with error bars) used by Spite et al. (2012) that give A(Li) = 2.21 ± 0.065 (median and 1σ symmetrized error). This error distribution is somewhat non-Gaussian, with larger probability in the tails than is predicted by a Gaussian distribution. The 95.4% confidence limits are 3.0σ in terms of the quoted errors. We fit the data to four commonly used distributions: Gaussian, Cauchy, Student’s t and double exponential with the center of the distribution found with both weighted mean and median statistics. It is reasonably well described by a widened n = 8 Student’s t distribution. Assuming Gaussianity, the observed A(Li) is 6.5σ away from that expected from standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) given the Planck observations. Accounting for the non-Gaussianity of the observed A(Li) error distribution reduces the discrepancy to 4.9σ, which is still significant.

  19. Studies of the Efimov Effect in 7 Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, D.; Nguyen, J. H. V.; Hulet, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases provide an ideal environment to study few body physics in the universal regime. Passive techniques, such as monitoring loss of the atomic sample while varying the hold time allows us to explore properties such as the scaling behavior of Efimov trimers. In our experiment, we explore how the Efimov states are affected by non-zero temperature. We measure the three-body loss rate for a 7 Li atom gas at different scattering lengths and extract the location and width of an Efimov recombination minimum for various temperatures. Alternatively, we may perform more active experiments such as creating dimers using RF-field modulation as a probe of molecular binding energies. We use RF-association to form Feshbach dimers and Efimov trimers, and find a strong enhancement of the dimer formation rate at the atom-dimer resonance, which could be explained by an avalanche mechanism. In the past the enhancement in the three-body recombination rate at the same location had also been observed, and attributed to the avalanche. We explore the link between these findings with a side-by-side comparison of the dimer-formation rate and the three-body loss rate. Work supported by the NSF, an ARO MURI Grant, and the Welch Foundation.

  20. Processes controlling δ7Li in rivers illuminated by study of streams and groundwaters draining basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Wanner, Christoph; Rudnick, Roberta L.; McDonough, William F.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the factors influencing the abundance, [Li], and isotopic composition of riverine Li delivered to the oceans through analyses and modeling of [Li] and δ7Li in streams and groundwaters draining a single continental lithology, the Columbia River Basalts (CRBs). The streams were sampled in different climate zones that lie east (dry), and west (wet) of the Cascades Mountains, and during two different seasons (summer and late winter) in order to evaluate climatic and seasonal influences on Li isotopes in rivers. Dissolved Li (δLi7dis = + 9.3 to +30.4) is systematically heavier than that of fresh or weathered CRBs (-4.7 to +6.0, Liu et al., 2013), suspended loads (-5.9 to -0.3), and shallow groundwaters (+6.7 to +9.4), consistent with previous studies showing that Li isotope fractionation is affected by equilibration between stream water and secondary minerals. However, the lack of correlation between δ7Lidis and climate zone, the uniform secondary minerals and bedrock, coupled with the highly variable (> 20 ‰) δLi7dis indicate that other factors exert a strong control on δ7Lidis. In particular, the heavier Li in streams compared to the shallow groundwaters that feed them indicates that continued isotopic fractionation between stream water and suspended and/or bed loads has a major influence on riverine δ7Li. Seasonal δ7Li variation is observed only for streams west of the Cascades, where the difference in precipitation rate between the dry and wet seasons is greatest. Reactive transport model simulations reveal that riverine δ7Li is strongly controlled by subsurface residence times and the Li isotope fractionation occurring within rivers. The latter explains why there is no positive correlation between δ7Li and traditional weathering proxies such as Si or normalized Si in rivers, as riverine Li isotope fractionation drives δ7Li to higher values during transport, whereas the concentrations of major cations and anions are diluted. The varying

  1. The interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio toward Zeta Ophiuchi and Zeta Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel; Wright, Edward L.

    1993-01-01

    High S/N, high-resolution observations of the interstellar Li absorption lines toward the stars Zeta Ophiuchi and Zeta Persei are reported. Li I line profiles indicate the presence of both the Li-7 and Li-6 doublets in these two sightlines. Best-fit values for the interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio are 6.8 (+1.4/-1.7) towards Zeta Ophiuchi and 5.5 (+ 1.3/-1.1) toward Zeta Persei. Measurement of 6.8 (+1.4/-1.7) for the interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio towards Zeta Ophiuchi does not support the lower limit of 25 determined by Ferlet and Dennefeld (1984). The current value of the interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio is the result of various lithium production and destruction processes involving stars, cosmic rays, and the big bang.

  2. Lithium Visibility in Rat Brain and Muscle in Vivoby 7Li NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoroski, Richard A.; Pearce, John M.; Newton, Joseph E. O.

    1998-07-01

    The apparent concentration of lithium (Li)in vivowas determined for several regions in the brain and muscle of rats by7Li NMR imaging at 4.7 T with inclusion of an external standard of known concentration and visibility. The average apparent concentrations were 10.1 mM for muscle, and 4.2-5.3 mM for various brain regions under the dosing conditions used. The results were compared to concentrations determinedin vitroby high-resolution7Li NMR spectroscopy of extracts of brain and muscle tissue from the same rats. The comparison provided estimates of the7Li NMR visibility of the Li cation in each tissue region. Although there was considerable scatter of the calculated visibilities among the five rats studied, the results suggested essentially full visibility (96%) for Li in muscle, and somewhat reduced visibility (74-93%) in the various brain regions.

  3. Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-08-19

    To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.

  4. Effect of breakup coupling on fusion for 6,7Li+24Mg systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, M. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Dasmahapatra, B.

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of breakup coupling on fusion we have derived fusion cross sections in the framework of continuum discretised coupled channels (CDCC) method using the coupled channels code FRESCO for the systems 6,7Li+24Mg. The CDCC predicted fusion cross sections for the 7Li+24Mg system agree well with the experimental fusion data whereas for the 6Li+24Mg system the agreement is reasonable at below barrier energies. However, within the limits of the present work no definite conclusion could be obtained from the quality of agreement at above barrier energies for the 6Li+24Mg system.

  5. Barrier distributions for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, W. H. Z.

    2010-08-04

    Barrier distributions can be obtained from the first derivative of the elastic and quasielastic (QEL) backward angle excitation functions [1]. In this work we present a study of the barrier distribution for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al reaction from a Coupled-Channels Born Approximation (CCBA) calculations using the code FRESCO [2].

  6. Line shift, line asymmetry, and the ^6Li/^7Li isotopic ratio determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayrel, R.; Steffen, M.; Chand, H.; Bonifacio, P.; Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Petitjean, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.

    2007-10-01

    Context: Line asymmetries are generated by convective Doppler shifts in stellar atmospheres, especially in metal-poor stars, where convective motions penetrate to higher atmospheric levels. Such asymmetries are usually neglected in abundance analyses. The determination of the ^6Li/^7Li isotopic ratio is prone to suffering from such asymmetries, as the contribution of ^6Li is a slight blending reinforcement of the red wing of each component of the corresponding ^7Li line, with respect to its blue wing. Aims: The present paper studies the halo star HD 74000 and estimates the impact of convection-related asymmetries on the Li isotopic ratio determination. Methods: Two methods are used to meet this aim. The first, which is purely empirical, consists in deriving a template profile from another element that can be assumed to originate in the same stellar atmospheric layers as Li I, producing absorption lines of approximately the same equivalent width as individual components of the ^7Li I resonance line. The second method consists in conducting the abundance analysis based on NLTE line formation in a 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere, taking into account the effects of photospheric convection. Results: The results of the first method show that the convective asymmetry generates an excess absorption in the red wing of the ^7Li absorption feature that mimics the presence of ^6Li at a level comparable to the hitherto published values. This opens the possibility that only an upper limit on ^6Li/^7Li has thus far been derived. The second method confirms these findings. Conclusions: From this work, it appears that a systematic reappraisal of former determinations of ^6Li abundances in halo stars is warranted. Based on observations carried out at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), under prog. ID 75.D-0600. Tables 1-3, and additional references are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. The cosmological {sup 7}Li problem from a nuclear physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Broggini, C.; Canton, L.; Fiorentini, G.; Villante, F.L. E-mail: luciano.canton@pd.infn.it E-mail: francesco.villante@lngs.infn.it

    2012-06-01

    The primordial abundance of {sup 7}Li as predicted by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) is more than a factor 2 larger than what has been observed in metal-poor halo stars. Herein, we analyze the possibility that this discrepancy originates from incorrect assumptions about the nuclear reaction cross sections relevant for BBN. To do this, we introduce an efficient method to calculate the changes in the {sup 7}Li abundance produced by arbitrary (temperature dependent) modifications of the nuclear reaction rates. Then, considering that {sup 7}Li is mainly produced from {sup 7}Be via the electron capture process {sup 7}Be+e{sup −} → {sup 7}Li+ν{sub e}, we assess the impact of the various channels of {sup 7}Be destruction. Differently from previous analysis, we consider the role of unknown resonances by using a complete formalism which takes into account the effect of Coulomb and centrifugal barrier penetration and that does not rely on the use of the narrow-resonance approximation. As a result of this, the possibility of a nuclear physics solution to the {sup 7}Li problem is significantly suppressed. Given the present experimental and theoretical constraints, it is unlikely that the {sup 7}Be+n destruction rate is underestimated by the 2.5 factor required to solve the problem. We exclude, moreover, that resonant destruction in the channels {sup 7}Be+t and {sup 7}Be+{sup 3}He can explain the {sup 7}Li puzzle. New unknown resonances in {sup 7}Be+d and {sup 7}Be+α could potentially produce significant effects. Recent experimental results have ruled out such a possibility for {sup 7}Be+d. On the other hand, for the {sup 7}Be+α channel very favorable conditions are required. The possible existence of a partially suitable resonant level in {sup 11}C is studied in the framework of a coupled-channel model and the possibility of a direct measurement is considered.

  8. A spectroscopic study of the 3(1) pi g Rydberg state of 7Li2.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Yi, Peng; Dai, Xing-can; Liu, Yao-ming; Li, Li

    2002-06-01

    With pulsed optical-optical double resonance (OODR) fluorescence excitation spectroscopy Rydberg states of 7Li2 in the energy region of 35,500-38,000 cm-1 were studied and 146 transitions into the 3(1) pi g state of 7Li2 were measured. They were assigned to 10 vibrational levels of the 3(1) pi g state. A new set of Dunham constants, RKR potential curve, and Franck-Condon factors for the transitions form the A 1 sigma u+ state are derived. The perturbations between the 4(F)1 sigma g+, 5 (1) sigma g+, 6 (1) sigma g+, 2 (G) 1 pi g Rydberg states with the 3 (1) pi g state are discussed. The lambda-doubling splitting of the observed levels can be ignored with our accuracy (0.2 cm-1).

  9. Role of the cluster structure of 7Li in the dynamics of fragment capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, A.; Navin, A.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Nanal, V.; Ramachandran, K.; Rejmund, M.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.; Lemasson, A.; Palit, R.; Parkar, V. V.; Pillay, R. G.; Rout, P. C.; Sawant, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Exclusive measurements of prompt γ-rays from the heavy-residues with various light charged particles in the 7Li + 198Pt system, at an energy near the Coulomb barrier (E /Vb ∼ 1.6) are reported. Recent dynamic classical trajectory calculations, constrained by the measured fusion, α- and t-capture cross-sections have been used to explain the excitation energy dependence of the residue cross-sections. These calculations distinctly illustrate a two-step process, breakup followed by fusion, in case of the capture of t and α clusters; whereas for 6He + p and 5He + d configurations, massive transfer is inferred to be the dominant mechanism. The present work clearly demonstrates the role played by the cluster structures of 7Li in understanding the reaction dynamics at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  10. Coupled channel effect in elastic scattering and fusion for 6,7Li+28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Mandira; Roy, Subinit; Basu, P.; Majumdar, H.; Santra, S.; Parkar, V. V.; Golda, K. S.; Kailas, S.

    2011-10-01

    The fusion excitation and elastic angular distribution were measured for 6,7Li+28Si from below to above Coulomb barrier (≤ 3Vb) energies. The barrier distribution derived from the fusion data was found to be broad and asymmetric at the sub-barrier region, compared to 1D BPM estimation. Effect of rotational coupling on fusion was found to be not so dominant. Phenomenological optical potential parameters, with surface and volume type imaginary potentials, were obtained from f tting of elastic scattering data and energy dependence of real and imaginary surface strengths were investigated around the barrier. CDCC calculations considering only breakup of projectile were performed for 6,7Li+28Si with the elastic scattering data, using the code FRESCO. The effects of breakup of projectile on elastic cross section do not agree with the energy dependence of real and imaginary strength with volume type imaginary potential around the barrier.

  11. New measurement of the 10B(n,α)7 Li through the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spartá, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    B(n,α) Li reaction cross section has been measured using the Trojan Horse method, with the specific aim to separate the α1 contribution (coming from the first Li excited level) by the αo (related to the Li ground state), using a very thin target. Preliminary results are shown of the three-body B(d,α7 Li)H cross section.

  12. Exploring Light Neutron Rich Nuclei via the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Lenske, H.; Petrascu, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2008-11-11

    A systematic study of the nuclei that can be described as an integer number of {alpha} particles plus three neutrons via the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be) reaction at about 8 MeV/u has shown the presence of Bound States Embedded in the Continuum in the energy spectra. These are experimental signatures of the dynamical correlations of an easily polarizable core with a single-particle state of the valence neutron.

  13. An update on the big bang nucleosynthesis prediction for {sup 7}Li: the problem worsens

    SciTech Connect

    Cyburt, Richard H; Fields, Brian D; Olive, Keith A E-mail: bdfields@uiuc.edu

    2008-11-15

    The lithium problem arises from the significant discrepancy between the primordial {sup 7}Li abundance as predicted by big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) theory and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) baryon density, and the pre-Galactic lithium abundance inferred from observations of metal-poor (Population II) stars. This problem has loomed for the past decade, with a persistent discrepancy of a factor of 2-3 in {sup 7}Li/H. Recent developments have sharpened all aspects of the Li problem. Namely: (1) BBN theory predictions have sharpened due to new nuclear data; in particular, the uncertainty on the reaction rate for{sup 3}He({alpha},{gamma}){sup 7}Be has reduced to 7.4%, nearly a factor of 2 tighter than previous determinations. (2) The WMAP five-year data set now yields a cosmic baryon density with an uncertainty reduced to 2.7%. (3) Observations of metal-poor stars have tested for systematic effects. With these, we now find that the BBN+WMAP predicts{sup 7}Li/H = (5.24{sub -0.67}{sup +0.71}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}. The central value represents an increase by 23%, most of which is due to the upward shift in the{sup 3}He({alpha},{gamma}){sup 7}Be rate. More significant is the reduction in the{sup 7}Li/H uncertainty by almost a factor of 2, tracking the reduction in the{sup 3}He({alpha},{gamma}){sup 7}Be error bar. These changes exacerbate the Li problem; the discrepancy is now a factor 2.4 or 4.2{sigma} (from globular cluster stars) to 4.3 or 5.3{sigma} (from halo field stars). Possible resolutions to the lithium problem are briefly reviewed, and key experimental and astronomical measurements highlighted.

  14. Neutron Energy Spectra and Yields from the 7Li(p,n) Reaction for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessler, M.; Friedman, M.; Schmidt, S.; Shor, A.; Berkovits, D.; Cohen, D.; Feinberg, G.; Fiebiger, S.; Krása, A.; Paul, M.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Reifarth, R.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrons produced by the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction close to threshold are widely used to measure the cross section of s-process nucleosynthesis reactions. While experiments have been performed so far with Van de Graaff accelerators, the use of RF accelerators with higher intensities is planned to enable investigations on radioactive isotopes. In parallel, high-power Li targets for the production of high-intensity neutrons at stellar energies are developed at Goethe University (Frankfurt, Germany) and SARAF (Soreq NRC, Israel). However, such setups pose severe challenges for the measurement of the proton beam intensity or the neutron fluence. In order to develop appropriate methods, we studied in detail the neutron energy distribution and intensity produced by the thick-target 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and compared them to state-of- the-art simulation codes. Measurements were performed with the bunched and chopped proton beam at the Van de Graaff facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) using the time-of-flight (TOF) technique with thin (1/8") and thick (1") detectors. The importance of detailed simulations of the detector structure and geometry for the conversion of TOF to a neutron energy is stressed. The measured neutron spectra are consistent with those previously reported and agree well with Monte Carlo simulations that include experimentally determined 7Li(p,n) cross sections, two-body kinematics and proton energy loss in the Li-target.

  15. Factors affecting the nature of induced mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Russell, W.L.; Rinchik, E.M.; Hunsicker, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The recent considerable expansion of specific-locus-mutation data has made possible an examination of the effects of germ-cell stage on both quantity of mutation yield and nature of mutations. For chemicals mutagenic in poststem-cell stages, three patterns have been identified according to the stages in which they elicit maximum response: (1) early spermatozoa and late spermatids; (2) early spermatids; and (3) differentiating spermatogonia. The majority of chemicals tested fall into Pattern 1. Chemicals that are also mutagenic in stem-cell spermatogonia do not preferentially belong to any one of these three categories. For only one chemical (CHL) has an entire set of mutations been analyzed molecularly. However, the results of genetic and molecular analyses of genomic regions surrounding six of the specific-locus markers allow us to conclude that any mutation that causes lethality of homozygotes (in the case of d, prenatal lethality, specifically) must involve one or more loci in addition to the marked one. Such mutations have been classified as large lesions'' (LL), the remainder as other lesions'' (OL). Analysis of the data shows that, regardless of the nature of the chemical (Pattern-1, -2, or -3), (1) LLs constitute a very low proportion of the mutations induced in either stem-cell or differentiating spermatogonia, and (b) LLs constitute a high proportion of mutations induced in postmeiotic stages. Chemicals that are active in both pre- and postmeiotic stages produce LL or OL mutations depending on cell stage.

  16. Probing the fusion of 7Li with 64Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Md. Moin; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Nanal, V.; Pal, S.; Shrivastava, A.; Saha, S.; Pillay, R. G.

    2016-04-01

    Background: The stable isotopes of Li, 6Li6 and 7Li, have two-body cluster structures of α +d and α +t with α -separation energies or breakup thresholds at 1.47 and 2.47 MeV, respectively. The weak binding of these projectiles introduces several new reaction channels not usually observed in the case of strongly bound projectiles. The impact of these breakup or breakup-like reaction channels on fusion, the dominant reaction process at near-barrier energies, with different target masses is of current interest. Purpose: Our purpose is to explore the fusion, at above and below the Coulmb barrier, of 7Li with 64Ni target in order to understand the effect of breakup or breakup-like processes with medium-mass target in comparison with 6Li, which has a lower breakup threshold. Measurement: The total fusion (TF) excitation of the weakly bound projectile 7Li with the medium-mass target 64Ni has been measured at the near-barrier energies (0.8 to 2 VB). The measurement was performed using the online characteristic γ -ray detection method. The complete fusion (CF) excitation function for the system was obtained using the x n -evaporation channels with the help of statistical model predictions. Results: At the above barrier energies CF cross sections exhibit an average suppression of about 6.5% compared to the one-dimensional barrier penetration model (1DBPM) predictions, while the model describes the measured TF cross section well. But below the barrier, both TF and CF show enhancements compared to 1DBPM predictions. Unlike 6Li, enhancement of CF for 7Li could not be explained by inelastic coupling alone. Conclusion: Whereas the σTF cross sections are almost the same for both the systems in the above barrier region, the suppression of σCF at above the barrier is less for the 7Li+64Ni system than for the 6+64Ni system. Also direct cluster transfer has been identified as the probable source for producing large enhancement in TF cross sections.

  17. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 15N ions by 7Li at 81 MeV versus that of 14N ions by 7Li at 80 and 110 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudchik, A. T.; Rudchik, A. A.; Muravynets, L. M.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.; Piasecki, E.; Trzcińska, A.; Koshchy, E. I.; Pirnak, Val. M.; Ponkratenko, O. A.; Strojek, I.; Stolarz, A.; Herashchenko, O. V.; Stepanenko, Yu. M.; Plujko, V. A.; Sakuta, S. B.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A.

    2017-02-01

    Angular distributions of the elastic and inelastic scattering of 15N ions by 7Li nuclei were measured at the energy Elab (15N) = 81 MeV (Ec.m. = 25.77 MeV). The data were analyzed within the coupled-reaction-channels method. The elastic and inelastic scattering, spin reorientations of 7Li as well as the more important one- and two-step transfer reactions were included in the channels-coupling scheme. The parameters of 7Li +15N optical potential of Woods-Saxon form as well as deformation parameters of these nuclei were deduced. The analysis showed that the forward angle elastic scattering is dominated by pure potential scattering whereas the middle and large angle scattering gets a contribution from the ground state reorientation of 7Li. Contributions from particle transfers were negligible for the present scattering system. The 7Li +15N elastic scattering was compared with that of 7Li +14N at the energies Elab (14N) = 80 MeV and 110 MeV. Different contributions to the elastic scatterings from other nuclear processes are shown to be responsible for the isotopic difference observed in the large angle scattering.

  18. Natural Antioxidants Against Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munesh; Lalit, Minakshi; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic is present in water, soil, and air in organic as well as in inorganic forms. However, inorganic arsenic is more toxic than organic and can cause many diseases including cancers in humans. Its genotoxic effect is considered as one of its carcinogenic actions. Arsenic can cause DNA strand breaks, deletion mutations, micronuclei formation, DNA-protein cross-linking, sister chromatid exchange, and DNA repair inhibition. Evidences indicate that arsenic causes DNA damage by generation of reactive free radicals. Nutritional supplementation of antioxidants has been proven highly beneficial against arsenic genotoxicity in experimental animals. Recent studies suggest that antioxidants protect mainly by reducing excess free radicals via restoring the activities of cellular enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants and decreasing the oxidation processes such as lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature on arsenic-induced genotoxicity and its mitigation by naturally derived antioxidants in various biological systems.

  19. {alpha} resonance structure in {sup 11}B studied via resonant scattering of {sup 7}Li+{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kawabata, T.; Teranishi, T.

    2011-03-15

    A new measurement of {alpha} resonant scattering on {sup 7}Li was performed over the excitation energy of 10.2-13.0 MeV in {sup 11}B at the low-energy RI beam facility CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator (CRIB) of the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo. The excitation function of {sup 7}Li+{alpha} at 180 deg. in the center-of-mass system was successfully measured for the first time with the inverse kinematics method, providing important information on the {alpha} cluster structure in {sup 11}B and the reaction rate of {sup 7}Li({alpha},{gamma}), which is relevant to the {sup 11}B production in the {nu} process in core-collapse supernovae. The excitation function of the {sup 7}Li({alpha},p) reaction cross section for 11.7-13.1 MeV was also measured.

  20. Brane induced gravity: Ghosts and naturalness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglseer, Ludwig; Niedermann, Florian; Schneider, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Linear stability of brane induced gravity in two codimensions on a static pure tension background is investigated. The brane is regularized as a ring of finite circumference in extra space. By explicitly calculating the vacuum persistence amplitude of the corresponding quantum theory, we show that the parameter space is divided into two regions—one corresponding to a stable Minkowski vacuum on the brane and one being plagued by ghost instabilities. This analytical result affirms a recent nonlinear, but mainly numerical analysis. The main result is that the ghost is absent for a sufficiently large brane tension, in perfect agreement with a value expected from a natural effective field theory point of view. Unfortunately, the linearly stable parameter regime is either ruled out phenomenologically or becomes unstable for nontrivial cosmologies. We argue that supercritical brane backgrounds constitute the remaining window of opportunity. In the special case of a tensionless brane, we find that the ghost exists for all phenomenologically relevant values of the induced gravity scale. Regarding this case, there are contradicting results in the literature, and we are able to fully resolve this controversy by explicitly uncovering the errors made in the "no-ghost" analysis. Finally, a Hamiltonian analysis generalizes the ghost result to more than two codimensions.

  1. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors.

  2. Analogs of the giant dipole and spin-dipole resonances in {sup 4}He and in {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li studied by the {sup 4}He,{sup 6,7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, S.; Matsumoto, E.; Fushimi, K.; Hayami, R.; Kawasuso, H.; Yasuda, K.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Ikemizu, H.; Asaji, S.; Ishida, T.; Kudoh, T.; Sagara, K.; Fujiwara, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Oota, T.; Yosoi, M.; Greenfield, M. B.

    2008-07-15

    We studied analogs of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li via the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions on {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 7}Li at an incident energy of 455 MeV and at a scattering angle of 0 deg. by measuring spin-nonflip and spin-flip spectra. The reaction Q-values for the analogs of the GDR and SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were found to be more negative than those in {sup 4}He by 2.0{+-}0.5 MeV. The ratios of the cross section for the analog of the GDR to that for the analog of the SDR in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li were found to be the same within errors, 0.5{+-}0.1. The cross sections for the analogs of the GDR as well as those for the analogs of the SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were 0.6{approx}0.8 times smaller than those in {sup 4}He. These results suggest that excitations of {alpha} clusters embedded in nuclei are suppressed as compared with excitations of free {alpha} particles.

  3. Depth absorbed dose and LET distributions of therapeutic {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, Johanna; Gudowska, Irena; Brahme, Anders

    2007-01-15

    The depth absorbed dose and LET (linear energy transfer) distribution of different ions of clinical interest such as {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C ions have been investigated using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT. The energies of the projectiles correspond to ranges in water and soft tissue of approximately 260 mm. The depth dose distributions of the primary particles and their secondaries have been calculated and separated with regard to their low and high LET components. A LET value below 10 eV/nm can generally be regarded as low LET and sparsely ionizing like electrons and photons. The high LET region may be assumed to start at 20 eV/nm where on average two double-strand breaks can be formed when crossing the periphery of a nucleosome, even though strictly speaking the LET limits are not sharp and ought to vary with the charge and mass of the ion. At the Bragg peak of a monoenergetic high energy proton beam, less than 3% of the total absorbed dose is comprised of high LET components above 20 eV/nm. The high LET contribution to the total absorbed dose in the Bragg peak is significantly larger with increasing ion charge as a natural result of higher stopping power and lower range straggling. The fact that the range straggling and multiple scattering are reduced by half from hydrogen to helium increases the possibility to accurately deposit only the high LET component in the tumor with negligible dose to organs at risk. Therefore, the lateral penumbra is significantly improved and the higher dose gradients of {sup 7}Li and {sup 12}C ions both longitudinally and laterally will be of major advantage in biological optimized radiation therapy. With increasing charge of the ion, the high LET absorbed dose in the beam entrance and the plateau regions where healthy normal tissues are generally located is also increased. The dose distribution of the high LET components in the {sup 7}Li beam is only located around the Bragg peak, characterized by a Gaussian

  4. Corrosion barriers processed by Al electroplating and their resistance against flowing Pb-15.7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Wolfgang; Konys, Jürgen; Wulf, Sven-Erik

    2014-12-01

    In the HCLL blanket design, ferritic-martensitic steels are in direct contact with the flowing liquid breeder Pb-15.7Li and have to withstand severe corrosion attack. Beyond corrosion, T-permeation from the breeder into the RAFM-steels is also an important issue and has to be reduced significantly. Earlier work showed that Al-based coatings can act as barriers for both, however, applied processes e.g. HDA or VPS exhibited strong drawbacks in the past. Meanwhile new industrial relevant coating processes, using electroplating technology are under development and called ECA (electrochemical aluminization) and ECX (electrochemical deposition from ionic liquids) process. In this study electrochemically Al-coated and heat-treated Eurofer samples were tested in PICOLO loop for exposure times up to 12,000 h (ECA) and 2000 h (first results ECX) respectively to determine corrosion properties in flowing Pb-15.7Li (550 °C, 0.1 m/s). Cross section analysis afterward corrosion testing proved the ability of thin Al-based barriers made by electrochemical techniques to protect the bare Eurofer from corrosion attack even at exposure times of 12,000 h. Determined radial corrosion rates lay between 10 and 20 μm/a. First results for ECX coated samples (2000 h) revealed more homogeneous corrosion behavior of the barrier layer itself compared to ECA.

  5. (7)Li in situ 1D NMR imaging of a lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Klamor, S; Zick, K; Oerther, T; Schappacher, F M; Winter, M; Brunklaus, G

    2015-02-14

    The spatial distribution of charge carriers in lithium ion batteries during current flow is of fundamental interest for a detailed understanding of transport properties and the development of strategies for future improvements of the electrolyte-electrode interface behaviour. In this work we explored the potential of (7)Li 1D in situ NMR imaging for the identification of concentration gradients under constant current load in a battery cell. An electrochemical cell based on PTFE body and a stack of glass microfiber discs that are soaked with a technically relevant electrolyte suitable for high-temperature application and squeezed between a Li metal and a nano-Si-graphite composite electrode was assembled to acquire (7)Li 1D in situ NMR profiles with an improved NMR pulse sequence as function of time and state of charge, thereby visualizing the course of ion concentration during charge and discharge. Surface localized changes of Li concentration were attributed to processes such as solid electrolyte interphase formation or full lithiation of the composite electrode. The method allows the extraction of lithium ion transport properties.

  6. Marrying ab initio calculations and Halo-EFT: 7Li and 7Be radiative nucleon captures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xilin; Nollett, Kenneth; Phillips, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    We combine ab initio quantum-Monte-Carlo (QMC) calculations with the Halo-Effective-Field-Theory (Halo-EFT) framework, in order to study low-energy radiative nucleon capture to a weakly bound (halo) nucleus. Here we focus on the reactions 7Li(n, γ)8Li and 7Be(p, γ)8B, which are subjects of long-standing interest for astrophysics. In the low-energy region we can approximate 8Li (8B) as composed of a 7Li (7Be) core (and also its excitation), and a neutron (proton) with an anomalously extended wave function. The scattering and bound states can be studied in Halo-EFT, in which both core and the nucleon are treated as fundamental degrees of freedom. In our leading order calculation, we use asymptotic normalization coefficients from QMC calculations to fix the parameters in the Lagrangian, which we then apply to study radiative captures. This obviates computing the captures by directly using numerically intensive QMC methods, while still incorporating the nuclear dynamics that these methods provide. In addition, the model-independent EFT framework provides novel insights into the manner in which these two nucleon-capture processes are related to one another. This work is supported by US Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-93ER-40756.

  7. Non-monotonic potentials and vector analyzing powers of 6,7Li scattering by 12C, 26Mg, 58Ni, and 120Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, A. K.; Billah, M. M.; Kobra, M. J.; Sarkar, M. K.; Mizanur Rahman, M.; Das, Pretam K.; Hossain, S.; Abdullah, M. N. A.; Tariq, A. S. B.; Uddin, M. A.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Reichstein, I.; Malik, F. B.

    2011-06-01

    The data on the elastic scattering cross-section (CS) and vector analyzing power (VAP) of 6,7Li incident on 12C , 26Mg, 58Ni and 120Sn nuclei are analyzed in terms of an optical model (OM) potential, the real part of which is generated from a realistic two-nucleon interaction using the energy-density functional (EDF) formalism. The EDF-generated real part of the potential is non-monotonic (NM) in nature. This NM real potential part, without any renormalization, along with an empirically determined imaginary part and spin-orbit potential, embodying the underlying physics of projectile excitation, can successfully account for both CS and VAP data in all four cases. This investigation, for the first time, using the simple OM analysis accounts well for the opposite signs of the VAP data of elastically scattered 6,7Li by 58Ni at Elab≈20 MeV and by 120Sn at Elab=44 MeV. The ramification of successfully describing the data by the EDF-generated potential to the equation of state of nuclear matter is discussed.

  8. The 181Ta(7Li,5n)183Os reaction: Measurement and analysis of the excitation function and isomeric cross-section ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Sharma, R. P.; Rashid, M. H.

    1998-03-01

    Excitation function and isomeric cross-section ratios for the production of 183Osm,g by 7Li-induced reactions on 181Ta are obtained from the measurements of the residual activities by the conventional stacked-foils technique from threshold to 50 MeV. The excitation function and isomeric cross-section ratios for nuclear reaction 181Ta(7Li,5n)183Osm,g are compared with the theoretical statistical model calculation by using the ALICE/91, STAPRE, and CASCADE codes. In the energy range of the present measurement the excitation functions are fitted fairly well by both the geometry dependent hybrid (GDH) model and the hybrid model of Blann with initial exciton number n0=7 (nn=4, np=3, nh=0) using the ALICE/91 code. The experimental isomeric cross-section ratios are also reproduced fairly well by the calculation using the STAPRE code. However, the CASCADE code calculations slightly underpredict the cross section but reproduce the shape. In general, the statistical model under a suitable set of global assumptions, can reproduce the excitation function as well as isomeric cross-section ratios.

  9. Lamb shifts and hyperfine structure in 6Li+ and 7Li+: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riis, E.; Sinclair, A. G.; Poulsen, O.; Drake, G. W. F.; Rowley, W. R. C.; Levick, A. P.

    1994-01-01

    High-precision laser-resonance measurements accurate to +/-0.5 MHz or better are reported for transitions among the 1s2s 3S1-1s2p 3PJ hyperfine manifolds for each of J=0, 1, and 2 in both 6Li+ and 7Li+. A detailed analysis of hyperfine structure is performed for both the S and P states, using newly calculated values for the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole coupling constants, and the hyperfine shifts subtracted from the measurements. The resulting transition frequencies are then analyzed on three different levels. First, the isotope shifts in the fine-structure splittings are calculated from the relativistic reduced mass and recoil terms in the Breit interaction, and compared with experiment at the +/-0.5-MHz level of accuracy. This comparison is particularly significant because J-independent theoretical uncertainties reduce through cancellation to the +/-0.01-MHz level. Second, the isotope shifts in the full transition frequencies are used to deduce the difference in rms nuclear radii. The result is Rrms(6Li)-Rrms(7Li)=0.15+/-0.01 fm, in agreement with nuclear scattering data, but with substantially improved accuracy. Third, high-precision calculations of the low-order non-QED contributions to the transition frequencies are subtracted from the measurements to obtain the residual QED shifts. The isotope-averaged and spin-averaged effective shift for 7Li+ is 37 429.40+/-0.39 MHz, with an additional uncertainty of +/-1.5 MHz due to finite nuclear size corrections. The accuracy of 11 parts per million is the best two-electron Lamb shift measurement in the literature, and is comparable to the accuracies achieved in hydrogen. Theoretical contributions to the two-electron Lamb shift are discussed, including terms of order (αZ)4 recently obtained by Chen, Cheng, and Johnson [Phys. Rev. A 47, 3692 (1993)], and the results used to extract a QED shift for the 2 3S1 state. The result of 30 254+/-12 MHz is shown to be in good accord with theory (30 250+/-30 MHz) when

  10. Measurement of fusion excitation function for 7Li+64Ni near the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin Shaikh, Md.; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Shrivastava, A.; Saha, S.; Pillay, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    Total fusion (TF) excitation function has been measured for the system 7Li + 64Ni at the energies near the Coulomb barrier of the system. The evaporation residue (ER) cross sections have been estimated through the online detection of characteristic γ-rays of the ERs. The summed ER cross sections yielding the experimental TF cross section have been compared with the theoretical one dimensional barrier penetration model (1DBPM) prediction. The measured and the model cross sections are very close to each other at above barrier energies. However, an enhancement of the experimental TF cross section with respect to the 1DBPM prediction is observed at below barrier energies. Coupled channels (CC) calculation with inelastic excitations alone could not explain the enhancement. The origin of the enhancement is identified as due to the enhanced population of the αxn channels.

  11. Dynamics of fragment capture for cluster structures of weakly bound 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, A.; Navin, A.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Nanal, V.; Ramachandran, K.; Rejmund, M.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.; Lemasson, A.; Palit, R.; Parkar, V. V.; Pillay, R. G.; Rout, P. C.; Sawant, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Role of cluster structures of 7Li on reaction dynamics have been studied by performing exclusive measurements of prompt-γ rays from residues with scattered particles at energy, E/Vb = 1.6, with 198Pt target. Yields of the residues resulting after capture of t and 4,5,6He, corresponding to different excitation energies of the composite system were estimated. The results were compared with three body classical-dynamical model for breakup fusion, constrained by the measured fusion, α and t capture cross-sections. The cross-section of residues from capture of α and t agreed well with the prediction of the model showing dominance of the two step process - breakup fusion, while those from tightly bound 6He showed massive transfer to be the dominant mechanism.

  12. TLD efficiency of 7LiF for doses deposited by high-LET particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of 7 LiF TLDs (TLD-700) in registering dose from high-LET (> or = 10 keV/micrometers) charged particles (relative to 137Cs gamma rays) has been measured for a number of accelerated heavy ions at various particle accelerator facilities. These measured efficiency values have been compared with similar results obtained from the open literature and a dose efficiency function has been fitted to the combined data set. While it was found that the dose efficiency is not only a function of LET, but also of the charge of the incident particle, the fitted function can be used to correct the undermeasured value of dose from exposures made in mixed radiation fields where LET information is available. This LET-dependent dose efficiency function is used in our laboratory in determining total absorbed dose and dose equivalent from combined TLD and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector measurements.

  13. Asymptotic and near-target direct breakup of 6Li and 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Simpson, E. C.; Luong, D. H.; Cook, K. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Jeung, D. Y.; Mohanto, G.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Prasad, E.; Rafferty, D. C.; Simenel, C.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Williams, E.; Gasques, L. R.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Linares, R.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Li,76 and 9Be are weakly bound against breakup into their cluster constituents. Breakup location is important for determining the role of breakup in above-barrier complete fusion suppression. Recent works have pointed out that experimental observables can be used to separate near-target and asymptotic breakup. Purpose: Our purpose is to distinguish near-target and asymptotic direct breakup of Li,76 in reactions with nuclei in different mass regions. Method: Charged particle coincidence measurements are carried out with pulsed Li,76 beams on 58Ni and 64Zn targets at sub-barrier energies and compared with previous measurements using 208Pb and 209Bi targets. A detector array providing a large angular coverage is used, along with time-of-flight information to give definitive particle identification of the direct breakup fragments. Results: In interactions of 6Li with 58Ni and 64Zn, direct breakup occurs only asymptotically far away from the target. However, in interactions with 208Pb and 209Bi, near-target breakup occurs in addition to asymptotic breakup. Direct breakup of 7Li into α -t is not observed in interactions with 58Ni and 64Zn. However, near-target dominated direct breakup was observed in measurements with 208Pb and 209Bi. A modified version of the Monte Carlo classical trajectory model code platypus, which explicitly takes into account lifetimes associated with unbound states, is used to simulate sub-barrier breakup reactions. Conclusions: Near-target breakup in interactions with Li,76 is an important mechanism only for the heavy targets 208Pb and 209Bi. There is insignificant near-target direct breakup of 6Li and no direct breakup of 7Li in reactions with 58Ni and 64Zn. Therefore, direct breakup is unlikely to suppress the above-barrier fusion cross section in reactions of Li,76 with 58Ni and 64Zn nuclei.

  14. Fast neutron measurements with 7Li and 6Li enriched CLYC scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaz, A.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Cattadori, C.; Ceruti, S.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Mattei, I.; Mentana, A.; Million, B.; Pellegri, L.; Rebai, M.; Riboldi, S.; Salamida, F.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-07-01

    The recently developed Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) crystals are interesting scintillation detectors not only for their gamma energy resolution (<5% at 662 keV) but also for their capability to identify and measure the energy of both gamma rays and fast/thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons were detected by the 6Li(n,α)t reaction while for the fast neutrons the 35Cl(n,p)35S and 35Cl(n,α)32P neutron-capture reactions were exploited. The energy of the outgoing proton or α particle scales linearly with the incident neutron energy. The kinetic energy of the fast neutrons can be measured using both the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique and using the CLYC energy signal. In this work, the response to monochromatic fast neutrons (1.9-3.8 MeV) of two CLYC 1″×1″ crystals was measured using both the TOF and the energy signal. The observables were combined to identify fast neutrons, to subtract the thermal neutron background and to identify different fast neutron-capture reactions on 35Cl, in other words to understand if the detected particle is an α or a proton. We performed a dedicated measurement at the CN accelerator facility of the INFN Legnaro National Laboratories (Italy), where the fast neutrons were produced by impinging a proton beam (4.5, 5.0 and 5.5 MeV) on a 7LiF target. We tested a CLYC detector 6Li-enriched at about 95%, which is ideal for thermal neutron measurements, in parallel with another CLYC detector 7Li-enriched at more than 99%, which is suitable for fast neutron measurements.

  15. Reactions induced by {sup 7}Li beam and optimization of silicon detector telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Uroic, M.; Milin, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Martel, I.; Miljanic, D.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Prepolec, L.; Sanchez Benitez, A. M.; Scuderi, V.; Soic, N.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.

    2012-10-20

    Focus of this article is put on a method of compensating for non-uniformity of 50{mu}m thin silicon detectors, rather than measurement results. The same high sensitivity of particle identification on thin-detector thickness enables to accurately model thickness variation using the measurement data, rather than measuring the thickness separately.

  16. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV 7Li (d, n) neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J. R.; Zhang, X. P.; Yuan, D. W.; Li, Y. T.; Li, D. Z.; Rhee, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Li, F.; Zhu, B. J.; Li, Yan F.; Han, B.; Liu, C.; Ma, Y.; Li, Yi F.; Tao, M. Z.; Li, M. H.; Guo, X.; Huang, X. G.; Fu, S. Z.; Zhu, J. Q.; Zhao, G.; Chen, L. M.; Fu, C. B.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel “laser-collider” method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via 7Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons. PMID:27250660

  17. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV (7)Li (d, n) neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J R; Zhang, X P; Yuan, D W; Li, Y T; Li, D Z; Rhee, Y J; Zhang, Z; Li, F; Zhu, B J; Li, Yan F; Han, B; Liu, C; Ma, Y; Li, Yi F; Tao, M Z; Li, M H; Guo, X; Huang, X G; Fu, S Z; Zhu, J Q; Zhao, G; Chen, L M; Fu, C B; Zhang, J

    2016-06-02

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel "laser-collider" method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via (7)Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons.

  18. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV 7Li (d, n) neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. R.; Zhang, X. P.; Yuan, D. W.; Li, Y. T.; Li, D. Z.; Rhee, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Li, F.; Zhu, B. J.; Li, Yan F.; Han, B.; Liu, C.; Ma, Y.; Li, Yi F.; Tao, M. Z.; Li, M. H.; Guo, X.; Huang, X. G.; Fu, S. Z.; Zhu, J. Q.; Zhao, G.; Chen, L. M.; Fu, C. B.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel “laser-collider” method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via 7Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons.

  19. NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of 7Li and 93Nb nuclei in Ti- or Fe-doped LiNbO3:Mg single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Tae Ho; Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-04-01

    In this study, to understand the effects of paramagnetic impurities, we investigated the temperature dependent of the spin-lattice relaxation times of pure LiNbO3, LiNbO3:Mg, LiNbO3:Mg/Ti, LiNbO3:Mg/Fe, and LiNbO3:Mg/Fe (thermally treated at 500°C) single crystals. The results for the LiNbO3:Mg single crystals doped with Fe3+ or Ti3+ are discussed with respect to the site distribution and atomic mobility of Li and Nb. In addition, the effects of a thermal treatment on LiNbO3:Mg/Fe single crystals were examined based on the T1 analysis of 7Li and 93Nb. It was found that the presence of impurities in the crystals induced systematic changes of activation energies concerning atomic mobility.

  20. Laser-induced natural convection and thermophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.; Morse, T. F.; Cipolla, J. W., Jr.

    1985-02-01

    The influence of axial laser volumetric heating and forced convection on the motion of aerosol particles in a vertical tube has been studied using the Boussinesq approximation. For constant wall temperature, an asymptotic case provides simple temperature and velocity profiles that determine the convection and thermophoretic motion of small aerosol particles. Laser heating induces upward buoyant motion near the tube center, and when forced convection is downward, there may be an inflection in the velocity profile. For constant laser heating (a small absorption limit), a velocity profile may be found that will minimize the distance over which particles are deposited on the wall. Such an observation may have some bearing on the manufacture of preforms from which optical fibers are drawn.

  1. Measurement of the ^7Li(d,n)^8Be Reaction at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourov, A.; Ahmed, M.; Crowell, A.; Howell, C.; Joshi, K.; Nelson, S.; Perdue, B.; Sabourov, K.; Tonchev, A.; Weller, H. R.; Prior, R.; Spraker, M.; Kalantar, N.

    2003-10-01

    We have measured the differential cross section and the polarization observables T_20(θ), T_21(θ), T_22(θ), and iT_11(θ) for the ^7Li(d,n)^8Be reaction at low energies. Polarized deuterons of Ed = 160 keV to 80 keV were stopped in an evaporated lithium target. Nine liquid scintillation detectors were used to detect the emitted neutrons. The present experimental results are being compared to theoretical calculations performed with the DWUCK4 (P.D. Kunz, http://spot.colorado.edu/ ˜kunz/DWBA.html) code. Due to the very low energies of the present experiment, only s- and p-waves are likely to contribute in the entrance channel, limiting the number of transition matrix elements (TMEs) contributing to the reaction. Detailed information on the amplitudes and phases of these TMEs will be obtained by performing a simultaneous fit to the cross section and polarization observables. These results should provide new insight into the dynamics of this reaction at low energies.

  2. Comparison of corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steels in flowing Pb-15.7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konys, J.; Krauss, W.; Zhu, Z.; Huang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Ferritic martensitic steels are envisaged to be applied as structural materials in HCLL blanket systems. Their compatibility with the liquid breeder, which is in direct contact with the structural alloy, will be essential for reliable and safe operation of the designed blankets. Formerly performed corrosion tests of RAFM steels in PICOLO loop of KIT were mainly done at high flow velocities, e.g., 0.22 m/s and delivered severe attack with material loss rates above 400 μm/yr at 823 K. Meanwhile, flow velocities for corrosion testing have been reduced into the "cm range" to be near fusion relevant conditions. Among the international ITER-partners, many varieties of RAFM steels have been developed and manufactured within the last decade, e.g., the so-called Chinese Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM). In this paper, the long term corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steel in flowing Pb-15.7Li will be presented at a flow velocity of about 0.10 m/s and compared with earlier obtained results of RAFM steels exposed at other operation parameters of PICOLO loop. The observed corrosion attack is near 220 μm/yr and fits well to predictions made by MATLIM-modeling for low flow velocities in the turbulent flow regime.

  3. Investigation of local symmetry in LiH3(SeO3)2 single crystals by 1H and 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2013-10-01

    The local environments of 1H and 7Li nuclei in LiH3(SeO3)2 crystals were investigated using FT NMR. The 7Li spectrum does changes from three resonance lines to one resonance line near Tm (=383 K). The variation in the splitting of the 7Li resonance lines with temperature indicates that the EFG at the Li sites produced by the (SeO3)2- groups varies with temperature. The changes in the temperature dependence of the intensity, line width, and spin-lattice relaxation time T1 near Tm for the 1H and 7Li nuclei coincide with the distortion of the structural framework surrounding each 1H and 7Li ion. Finally, the NMR results obtained here are compared to MH3(SeO3)2 (M = Na, K, and Cs) crystals previously reported.

  4. Natural and Induced Environment in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Heinbockel, John H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Badhwar, Gautam D.; Atwell, William; Huston, Stuart L.

    2002-01-01

    The long-term exposure of astronauts on the developing International Space Station (ISS) requires an accurate knowledge of the internal exposure environment for human risk assessment and other onboard processes. The natural environment is moderated by the solar wind which varies over the solar cycle. The neutron environment within the Shuttle in low Earth orbit has two sources. A time dependent model for the ambient environment is used to evaluate the natural and induced environment. The induced neutron environment is evaluated using measurements on STS-31 and STS-36 near the 1990 solar maximum.

  5. The influence of temperature and salinity on the Li/Ca and d7Li of inorganic and biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriott, C.; Staubwasser, M.; Crompton, R.; Henderson, G.

    2003-04-01

    Lithium is the sixth most abundant metal in the ocean. It is conservative with a residence time of around 1Ma and has two stable isotopes ^7Li and ^6Li that are not actively involved in biological processes. Isotopic fractionation is observed during incorporation into calcium carbonate but no previous work has systematically examined the controls on this fractionation. We have investigated Li incorporation and isotopic fraction in both inorganically precipitated calcite and coralline aragonite (1). In both cases there is an inverse correlation of Li concentration with temperature and no significant variation in isotopic fractionation. A decrease in D Li/Ca from 0.0092 to 0.0030 is seen over a temperature range of 5--30^oC, whilst an offset of approximately -8.5 ppm is seen in the δ^7Li ratio relative to the growth solution. The temperature dependence of Li/Ca has an increased sensitivity at low temperatures and might therefore be useful in examining changes in bottom water temperature. We are now investigating Li/Ca and δ^7Li of foraminifera. Previous work (2) has suggested little variability in Li/Ca with temperature, although this was for samples from warmer water where Li/Ca is not sensitive. In this study, Uvigerina are examined in a series of core top samples from the Arabian Sea with a depth range of 95--1800m and corresponding temperature range of 5--20^oC. A series of inorganic calcite samples have also been precipitated in order to examine the effect of salinity on Li/Ca, δ^7Li and δ44Ca over a salinity range of 10--50 psu. The distribution coefficient of Li shows a positive correlation with salinity over this range. δ^7Li and δ44Ca measurements for these samples are presently being analysed. (1) Marriott et al., 2002, GCA, 66, A485 (2) Delaney et al., 1985, GCA, 49, 1327

  6. 7Li and 14N NMR studies of phase II-III transition in LiNH4SO4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-12-01

    The NMR spectra of 7Li and 14N nuclei in LiNH4SO4 crystals were obtained near the phase transition temperature TC2=284.5 K. Below TC2, the two physically inequivalent Li groups in phase III were distinguished in 7Li NMR spectra. Meanwhile, the 14N NMR spectra in phase II above TC2 showed four pairs of lines, where as those in phase III showed eight pairs. These changes in the resonance frequencies near TC2 were attributed to the structural phase transition. The 7Li and 14N nuclei in the structure are coordinated through the Li-O-H-N skeleton. Therefore, changes in their NMR spectra with temperature are correlated. The displacements of 7Li and 14N in LiNH4SO4 crystals play important roles in the phase transition near TC2.

  7. Natural disaster induced cognitive disruption: impacts on action slips.

    PubMed

    Helton, William S; Head, James; Kemp, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Previous research has indicated an increase in stress levels and cognitive intrusions after natural disasters. These previous studies have not, however, assessed the impact disaster induced cognitive disruption has on human performance. In the present report, we investigated the impact of the 7.1 magnitude 2010 Christchurch, New Zealand earthquake on self-reported earthquake-induced cognitive disruption and its relationship to performance on the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). Participants who self-reported greater cognitive disruption induced by the earthquake also had higher levels of errors of commission during SART (r=.80, p<.001). This was even the case when controlling for earthquake-induced anxiety, depression, participant sex, and self-reported sleep amount. Post-disaster assessments need to include the impact of the events directly on cognitive self-regulation and conscious thoughts, in addition to more clinical constructs, such as anxiety and depression.

  8. Destructions of 7Be and 7Li in Big Bang nucleosynthesis through reactions with exotic long-lived sub-strongly interacting massive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    An observed plateau abundance of 7Li in metal-poor halo stars indicates its primordial origin. The 7Li abundances are about a factor of three smaller than that predicted in standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. In addition, some of the stars possibly contain 6Li in abundances larger than standard BBN prediction. Particle models sometimes include heavy longlived colored particles which are confined in exotic strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs). We have found reactions which destroy 7Be and 7Li during BBN in the scenario of BBN affected by a long-lived sub-strongly interactingmassive particle (sub-SIMP, X). The reactions are non radiative X captures of 7Be and 7Li which can operate if the X particle interacts with nuclei strongly enough to drive 7Be destruction but not strongly enough to form a bound state with 4He of relative angular momentum L = 1. The processes can be a cause of the 7Li problem. In this paper we suggest new possible reactions for 6Li production. Especially, a 6Li production through the deuteron capture of 4He bound to X can operate in the parameter region solving the 7Li problem.

  9. Destructions of {sup 7}Be and {sup 7}Li in Big Bang nucleosynthesis through reactions with exotic long-lived sub-strongly interacting massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2012-11-12

    An observed plateau abundance of {sup 7}Li in metal-poor halo stars indicates its primordial origin. The {sup 7}Li abundances are about a factor of three smaller than that predicted in standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. In addition, some of the stars possibly contain {sup 6}Li in abundances larger than standard BBN prediction. Particle models sometimes include heavy longlived colored particles which are confined in exotic strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs). We have found reactions which destroy {sup 7}Be and {sup 7}Li during BBN in the scenario of BBN affected by a long-lived sub-strongly interactingmassive particle (sub-SIMP, X). The reactions are non radiative X captures of {sup 7}Be and {sup 7}Li which can operate if the X particle interacts with nuclei strongly enough to drive {sup 7}Be destruction but not strongly enough to form a bound state with {sup 4}He of relative angular momentum L = 1. The processes can be a cause of the {sup 7}Li problem. In this paper we suggest new possible reactions for {sup 6}Li production. Especially, a {sup 6}Li production through the deuteron capture of {sup 4}He bound to X can operate in the parameter region solving the {sup 7}Li problem.

  10. Complete and incomplete fusion dynamics of 6,7Li + 159Tb reactions near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh; Grover, Neha; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-01-01

    The complete fusion (CF) and incomplete fusion (ICF) cross-sections are estimated for 6, 7Li + 159Tb reactions using the energy-dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) and dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM). The CF data of the 6Li + 159Tb(7Li + 159Tb) reaction at above barrier energies is suppressed with reference to expectations of the EDWSP model by 25% (20%) which is smaller than the reported data by ˜ 9% (6%). This suppression is correlated with the projectile breakup effect. The projectiles 6,7Li are loosely bound systems, which may break up into charged fragments prior to reaching the fusion barrier and subsequently one of the fragment is captured by the target leading to the suppression of fusion data at above barrier energies. The sum of CF and ICF, which is termed as total fusion cross-section (TF), removes the discrepancies between theoretical predictions and the above barrier complete fusion data and hence is adequately explained via the EDWSP model over a wide range of energy spread across the Coulomb barrier. In addition to fusion, the decay mechanism of 6Li + 159Tb reaction is studied within the framework of the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM). The breakup of the projectile (6Li) in the entrance channel indicates the presence of ICF, which is investigated further using the collective clusterization approach of DCM. The present theoretical analysis suggests that a larger barrier modification is needed to address the fusion data of chosen reactions in the below barrier energy region.

  11. Quantifying the Seismic Hazard From Natural and Induced Earthquakes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Llenos, A. L.; Ellsworth, W. L.; McGarr, A.; Michael, A. J.; Mueller, C. S.; Petersen, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the past 12 years, seismicity rates in portions of the central and eastern United States (CEUS) have increased. In 2011, the year of peak activity, three M ≥ 5 earthquakes occurred, causing millions of dollars in damage. Much of the increase in seismicity is believed to have been induced by wastewater from oil and gas activity that is injected deep underground. This includes damaging earthquakes in southern Colorado, central Arkansas, and central Oklahoma in 2011. Earthquakes related to oil and gas activities contribute significantly to the total seismic hazard in some areas of the CEUS, but most of the tens of thousands of wastewater disposal wells in the CEUS do not cause damaging earthquakes. The challenge is to better understand this contribution to the hazard in a realistic way for those wells that are inducing earthquakes or wells that may induce earthquakes in the future. We propose a logic-tree approach to estimate the hazard posed by the change in seismicity that deemphasizes the need to evaluate whether the seismicity is natural or man-made. We first compile a list of areas of increased seismicity, including areas of known induced earthquakes. Using areas of increased seismicity (instead of just induced earthquakes) allows us to assess the hazard over a broader region, avoiding the often-difficult task of judging whether an earthquake sequence is induced. With the zones of increased seismicity defined, we then estimate the earthquake hazard for each zone using a four-branch logic tree: (1) The increased seismicity rate is natural, short-term variation within the longer-term background seismicity rate. Thus, these earthquakes would be added to the catalog when computing the background seismicity rate. (2) The increased seismicity rate represents a new and permanent addition to the background seismicity. In this branch, a new background seismicity rate begins at the time of the change in earthquake rate. (3) Induced earthquakes account for the

  12. Effect of breakup on elastic scattering for the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 59}Co systems

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, F. A.; Leal, L. A. S.; Carlin, N.; Munhoz, M. G.; Neto, R. Liguori; Moura, M. M. de; Suaide, A. A. P.; Szanto, E. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto de; Takahashi, J.

    2007-04-15

    The elastic scattering for the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 59}Co systems was investigated in the bombarding energy range 12 MeV{<=}E{sub lab}{<=}30 MeV by means of an analysis using the Sao Paulo potential, through which the behavior of the real and imaginary parts as function of the bombarding energy was established. The experimental results suggest that overall there is an evidence of the usual threshold anomaly for both systems, although for the {sup 6}Li+{sup 59}Co system, an evidence of the breakup threshold anomaly could also be questioned.

  13. Epithermal neutron beams from the 7 Li(p,n) reaction near the threshold for neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Arias de Saavedra, F.; Pedrosa, M.; Esquinas, P.; L. Jiménez-Bonilla, P.

    2016-11-01

    Two applications for neutron capture therapy of epithermal neutron beams calculated from the 7Li ( p , n reaction are discussed. In particular, i) for a proton beam of 1920 keV of a 30 mA, a neutron beam of adequate features for BNCT is found at an angle of 80° from the forward direction; and ii) for a proton beam of 1910 keV, a neutron beam is obtained at the forward direction suitable for performing radiobiology experiments for the determination of the biological weighting factors of the fast dose component in neutron capture therapy.

  14. Acute CNS syndrome from /sup 10/B(n,. cap alpha. )/sup 7/Li irradiation of mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, D.N.; Stoner, R.D.; Rosander, K.M.; Kalef-Ezra, J.K.; Laissue, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare absorbed doses of /sup 10/B-neutron capture radiation and x radiation in the brains of head-exposed, body-shielded mice, at LD/sub 50/ for acute (<4 days post exposure) mortality from the central nervous system (CNS) radiation syndrome. This comparison leads to an estimate of the in vivo relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of heavy particle radiation (helium and lithium ions) from the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li nuclear reaction.

  15. Ab initio no-core properties of 7Li and 7Be with the JISP16 and chiral NNLOopt interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Taihua; Vary, James P.; Maris, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the properties of 7Li with the JISP16 and chiral NNLOopt at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) nucleon-nucleon interactions and 7Be with the JISP16 interaction in the ab initio no-core full configuration approach. We calculate selected observables that include energy spectra, point proton root-mean-square radii, electromagnetic moments, and transitions. We compare our results with experimental results, where available, as well as with results obtained using nucleon-nucleon plus three-nucleon interactions. We obtain reasonable agreement between theory and experiment for low-lying states that are dominated by p -shell configurations.

  16. The Bare Astrophysical S(E) Factor of the 7Li(p, α)α Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattuada, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Typel, S.; Figuera, P.; Miljanić, Đ.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Rolfs, C.; Spitaleri, C.; Wolter, H. H.

    2001-12-01

    The astrophysically important 7Li(p, α)α reaction has been studied via the Trojan horse method in the energy range E=10-400 keV. A new theoretical description, based on the distorted-wave Born approximation approach, allows one to extract information on the bare astrophysical S-factor, Sb(E), with Sb(0)=55+/-3 keV barns. The results are compared with direct experimental data leading to a model-independent value of the electron screening potential energy, Ue=330+/-40 eV, much higher than the adiabatic limit Uad=175 eV.

  17. A TPD and AR based comparison of accelerator neutron irradiation fields between (7)Li and W targets for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Yonai, Shunsuke; Baba, Mamoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2014-06-01

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension was investigated for the usage of (7)Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.3-2.8MeV protons and W(p,n) neutrons by 50MeV protons. The indexes were the treatable protocol depth (TPD) and advantage depth (AD). Consequently, a configuration for W target with the Fe filter, Fluental moderator, Pb reflector showed the TPD of 5.8cm and AD of 9.3cm. Comparable indexes were found for the Li target in a geometry with the MgF2 moderator and Teflon reflector.

  18. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  19. Supersonic Jet Mixing Enhancement due to Natural and Induced Screech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.; Raman, G.

    1999-01-01

    Outline of presentation are: (1) Review of experimental apparatus. (2) Effect of natural screech of jet mixing; converging nozzle, underexpanded jet and converging-diverging nozzle, design pressure.(3) Effect of induced screech on jet mixing: produced by paddles in shear layers, similar to edge tones, and converging-diverging nozzle, design pressure. (4) Effect of paddles on near-field jet noise. and (5) Concluding remarks.

  20. 7Li-nuclear magnetic resonance observations of lithium insertion into coke carbon modified with mesophase-pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuichi; Tanuma, Ken-ichi; Takayama, Toshio; Kobayakawa, Koichi; Kawai, Takanobu; Yokoyama, Akira

    Lithium intercalation into coke carbon modified with mesophase-pitch and heat-treated at 800, 1000, and 3000°C was observed using solid-state 7Li-nuclear magnetic resonance ( 7Li-NMR) spectroscopy. It was found that the fully lithiated state charged to 0 V in the modified coke heat-treated at 3000°C showed a peak at about 45 ppm; on the other hand, two peaks appeared at about 45 and 16-17 ppm in the modified coke heat-treated below 1000°C. The peak appearing at 45 ppm indicated that Li-GIC is present in the first stage, and the peak at about 16-17 ppm indicated that the lithium stored in the modified part has an ionic character greater than in the coke part and is not a lithium cluster. The lithiated states charged to 0.1 and 0.2 V and discharged to 0.1, 0.2 and 1.5 V from the charged state (0 V) are also described.

  1. Caterpillar-induced plant volatiles attract conspecific adults in nature

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf M.; Knight, Alan L.; Byers, John A.; Judd, Gary J. R.; Suckling, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants release volatiles in response to caterpillar feeding that attract natural enemies of the herbivores, a tri-trophic interaction which has been considered an indirect plant defence against herbivores. The caterpillar-induced plant volatiles have been reported to repel or attract conspecific adult herbivores. To date however, no volatile signals that either repel or attract conspecific adults under field conditions have been chemically identified. Apple seedlings uniquely released seven compounds including acetic acid, acetic anhydride, benzyl alcohol, benzyl nitrile, indole, 2-phenylethanol, and (E)-nerolidol only when infested by larvae of the light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana. In field tests in New Zealand, a blend of two of these, benzyl nitrile and acetic acid, attracted a large number of conspecific male and female adult moths. In North America, male and female adults of the tortricid, oblique-banded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana, were most attracted to a blend of 2-phenylethanol and acetic acid. Both sexes of the eye-spotted bud moth, Spilonota ocellana, were highly attracted to a blend of benzyl nitrile and acetic acid. This study provides the first identification of caterpillar-induced plant volatiles that attract conspecific adult herbivores under natural conditions, challenging the expectation of herbivore avoidance of these induced volatiles. PMID:27892474

  2. Nature of radiation-induced defects in quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bu; Yu, Yingtian; Bauchy, Mathieu; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-07-14

    Although quartz (α-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage has not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si–O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si–O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on E′ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz.

  3. Atomic frequency comb memory in an isotopically pure 143Nd3+:Y7LiF4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, R. A.; Gushchin, L. A.; Kalachev, A. A.; Korableva, S. L.; Sobgayda, D. A.; Zelensky, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    We implemented the atomic frequency comb protocol for optical quantum memory in an isotopically pure crystal of Y7LiF4 doped by 143Nd3+ ions. Echo signals were observed on the 4I9/2(1)-4F3/2(1) transition, which had inhomogeneous broadening much smaller than the hyperfine splitting of the ground and excited states. We performed hole-burning spectroscopy measurements on several transitions, obtaining information about the hyperfine state lifetimes. An intrinsic hole structure was found on some of the transitions, which allowed us to prepare a comb structure with two clearly defined periods and to observe echo pulses with different time delays.

  4. Two-dimensional diffusion in Li0.7NbS2 as directly probed by frequency-dependent 7Li NMR.

    PubMed

    Epp, V; Nakhal, S; Lerch, M; Wilkening, M

    2013-05-15

    Li ion diffusion in layer-structured Li0.7NbS2 has been complementary investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy from an atomic scale point of view. In the present case, (7)Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) rates R1ρ probed in the rotating frame of reference proved very informative in characterizing the Li self-diffusion process in the van der Waals gap between the NbS2 layers. While temperature-variable SLRρ measurements were used to determine dynamic parameters such as jump rates (τ(-1)) and the activation energy (Ea), frequency-dependent measurements were used to specify the dimensionality of the diffusion process. In particular, the effect of annealing, i.e., the distribution of Li ions between the layers, on overall Li dynamics has been studied. When plotted in an Arrhenius diagram, the R1ρ rates of an annealed sample, which were recorded at a locking frequency of 20 kHz, pass through a diffusion-induced relaxation peak whose maximum shows up at 320 K. Employing an appropriate diffusion model and appropriately accounting for a non-diffusive background relaxation, a Li jump rate τ(-1)(300 K) ≈ 1.3 × 10(5) s(-1) and an activation energy Ea of 0.43(2) eV can be deduced. Most importantly, in the high-T limit of the diffusion-induced rate peak, i.e., when ω1τ < 1 holds, the rates follow a logarithmic frequency dependence. This points to a diffusion process of low dimensionality and is in good agreement with predictions of relaxation models developed for 2D diffusion.

  5. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption of Natural and Functionalized Biochromophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) has recently been established as a tool for analytical chemistry. It is capable of launching intact, neutral, or low charged molecules into a high vacuum environment. This makes it ideally suited to mass spectrometry. LIAD can be used with fragile biomolecules and very massive compounds alike. Here, we apply LIAD time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) to the natural biochromophores chlorophyll, hemin, bilirubin, and biliverdin and to high mass fluoroalkyl-functionalized porphyrins. We characterize the variation in the molecular fragmentation patterns as a function of the desorption and the VUV postionization laser intensity. We find that LIAD can produce molecular beams an order of magnitude slower than matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD), although this depends on the substrate material. Using titanium foils we observe a most probable velocity of 20 m/s for functionalized molecules with a mass m = 10 000 Da. PMID:25946522

  6. Laser-induced acoustic desorption of natural and functionalized biochromophores.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Uğur; Wörner, Lisa; Horak, Johannes; Felix, Lukas; Tüxen, Jens; Götz, Christoph; Vaziri, Alipasha; Mayor, Marcel; Arndt, Markus

    2015-06-02

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) has recently been established as a tool for analytical chemistry. It is capable of launching intact, neutral, or low charged molecules into a high vacuum environment. This makes it ideally suited to mass spectrometry. LIAD can be used with fragile biomolecules and very massive compounds alike. Here, we apply LIAD time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) to the natural biochromophores chlorophyll, hemin, bilirubin, and biliverdin and to high mass fluoroalkyl-functionalized porphyrins. We characterize the variation in the molecular fragmentation patterns as a function of the desorption and the VUV postionization laser intensity. We find that LIAD can produce molecular beams an order of magnitude slower than matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD), although this depends on the substrate material. Using titanium foils we observe a most probable velocity of 20 m/s for functionalized molecules with a mass m = 10,000 Da.

  7. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    PubMed

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-07

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  8. The Nature of Mutations Induced by Replication-Transcription Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, T. Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D.; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A.; Wang, Jue D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on1,2. Replication-transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity1–10. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors of genetic disease and evolution5,7,11. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequence of replication-transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the well-characterized base substitutions in coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are likely caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide conserved in promoters recognized by the major sigma factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication-transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements. PMID:27362223

  9. Vector analyzing power measurement of pion scattering from polarized [sup 7]Li in the region of the [Delta][sub 33] resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, R.; Boschitz, E.; Brinkmoeller, B.; Buehler, J.; Ritt, S.; Wessler, M. ); Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; van den Brandt, B. ); Efimovykh, V.A.; Kovalev, A.I.; Prokofiev, A.N.; Polyakov, V.V. ); Chaumette, P.; Deregel, J.; Durand, G.; Fabre, J. ); Mach, R. ); Tacik, R. )

    1994-01-01

    The inclusive vector analyzing power [ital iT][sub 11] of [pi][sup +][r arrow][sup 7]Li elastic scattering and inelastic scattering to the 0.47 MeV excited state was measured at several angles for [ital T][sub [pi

  10. Cross-section measurement for the /sup 7/Li(n,n't)/sup 4/He reaction at 14. 74 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Meadows, J.W.; Bretscher, M.M.; Cox, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    The cross section for the /sup 7/Li(n,n't)/sup 4/He reaction is measured at an average neutron energy of 14.74 MeV, with a resolution of 0.324 MeV, relative to the /sup 238/U neutron-fission cross section. Tritium activities for the irradiated lithium-metal samples (enriched to 99.95% in /sup 7/Li) are deduced using a liquid-scintillation counting method which relies upon the tritiated-water standard from the US National Bureau of Standards. The measured cross section ratio of /sup 7/Li(n,n't)/sup 4/He to /sup 238/U neutron fission is 0.2523 (+- 2.2%). The derived /sup 7/Li(n,n't)/sup 4/He reaction cross section is 0.301 (+- 5.3%) barn, based on the ENDF/B-V value of 1.193 (+- 4.8%) barn for the /sup 238/U neutron-fission cross section. 59 references.

  11. Highly enriched 7Be in the ejecta of Nova Sagittarii 2015 No. 2 (V5668 Sgr) and the Galactic 7Li origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, P.; Izzo, L.; Mason, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Della Valle, M.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the evidence of highly blueshifted resonance lines of the singly ionized isotope of 7Be II in high resolution UVES spectra of Nova Sagittarii 2015 No. 2 (V5668 Sgr). The resonance doublet lines 7Be II at λλ313.0583, 313.1228 nm are clearly detected in several non-saturated and partially resolved high velocity components during the evolution of the outburst. The total absorption identified with Be II has an equivalent width much larger than all other elements and comparable to hydrogen. We estimate an atomic fraction N(7Be)/N(Ca) ≈ 53-69 from unsaturated and resolved absorption components. The detection of 7Be in several high velocity components shows that 7Be has been freshly created in a thermonuclear runaway via the reaction 3He(α, γ)7Be during the Nova explosion, as postulated by Arnould & Norgaar, however in much larger amounts than predicted by current models. 7Be II decays to 7Li II with a half-life of 53.22 d, comparable to the temporal span covered by the observations. The non-detection of 7Li I requires that 7Li remains ionized throughout our observations. The massive Be II ejecta result into a 7Li production that is ≈ 4.7-4.9 dex above the meteoritic abundance. If such a high production is common even in a small fraction (≈5 per cent) of Novae, they can make all the stellar 7Li of the Milky Way.

  12. Gamow shell model description of radiative capture reactions 6Li(p, γ)7Be and 6Li(n, γ)7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, G. X.; Michel, N.; Fossez, K.; Płoszajczak, M.; Jaganathen, Y.; Betan, R. M. Id

    2017-04-01

    Background. According to standard stellar evolution, lithium abundance is believed to be a useful indicator of the stellar age. However, many evolved stars like red giants show huge fluctuations around expected theoretical abundances that are not yet fully understood. The better knowledge of nuclear reactions that contribute to the creation and destruction of lithium can help to solve this puzzle. Purpose. In this work we apply the Gamow shell model formulated in the coupled-channel representation to investigate the mirror radiative capture reactions 6Li(p, γ)7Be and 6Li(n, γ)7Li. Method. The cross-sections are calculated using a translationally invariant Hamiltonian with the finite-range interaction which is adjusted to reproduce spectra, binding energies and one-nucleon separation energies in 6–7Li, 7Be. The reaction channels are built by coupling the wave functions of ground state {1}1+ and excited states {3}1+, {0}1+, {2}1+ of 6Li with the projectile wave function in different partial waves. Results. We include all relevant E1, M1, and E2 transitions from the initial continuum states to the final bound states J=3/{2}1- and J=1/{2}- of 7Li and 7Be. Our microscopic astrophysical factor for the 6Li(p, γ)7Be reaction follows the average trend of the experimental value as a function of the center of mass energy. For {}6{Li}(n,γ ){}7{Li}, the calculated cross section agrees well with the data from the direct measurement of this reaction at stellar energies. Conclusion. We demonstrate that the s-wave radiative capture of proton (neutron) to the first excited state {J}π =1/{2}1+ of 7Be (7Li) is crucial and increases the total astrophysical S-factor by about 40%.

  13. Natural and induced reduction of hexavalent chromium in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leita, Liviana; Margon, Alja; Sinicco, Tania; Mondini, Claudio; Valentini, Massimiliano; Cantone, Pierpaolo

    2013-04-01

    Even though naturally elevated levels of chromium can be found naturally in some soils, distressing amounts of the hexavalent form (CrVI) are largely restricted to sites contaminated by anthropogenic activities. In fact, the widespread use of chromium in various industries and the frequently associated inadequate disposal of its by-products and wastes have created serious environmental pollution problems in many parts of the world. CrVI is toxic to plants, animals and humans and exhibits also mutagenic effects. However, being a strong oxidant, CrVI can be readily reduced to the much less harmful trivalent form (CrIII) when suitable electron donors are present in the environment. CrIII is relatively insoluble, less available for biological uptake, and thus definitely less toxic for web-biota. Various electron donors in soil can be involved in CrVI reduction in soil. The efficiency of CrVI reducing abiotic agents such as ferrous iron and sulphur compounds is well documented. Furthermore, CrVI reduction is also known to be significantly enhanced by a wide variety of cell-produced monosaccharides, including glucose. In this study we evaluated the dynamics of hexavalent chromium (CrVI) reduction in contaminated soil amended or not with iron sulphate or/and glucose and assessed the effects of CrVI on native or glucose-induced soil microbial biomass size and activity. CrVI negatively affected both soil microbial activity and the size of the microbial biomass. During the incubation period, the concentration of CrVI in soil decreased over time whether iron sulphate or/and glucose was added or not, but with different reduction rates. Soil therefore displayed a natural attenuation capacity towards chromate reduction. Addition of iron sulphate or/and glucose, however, increased the reduction rate by both abiotic and biotic mechanisms. Our data suggest that glucose is likely to have exerted an indirect role in the increased rate of CrVI reduction by promoting growth of

  14. A telluric method for natural field induced polarization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorin, Nikita; Epishkin, Dmitrii; Yakovlev, Andrey

    2016-12-01

    Natural field induced polarization (NFIP) is a branch of low-frequency electromagnetics designed for detection of buried polarizable objects from magnetotelluric (MT) data. The conventional approach to the method deals with normalized MT apparent resistivity. We show that it is more favorable to extract the IP effect from solely electric (telluric) transfer functions instead. For lateral localization of polarizable bodies it is convenient to work with the telluric tensor determinant, which does not depend on the rotation of the receiving electric dipoles. Applicability of the new method was verified in the course of a large-scale field research. The field work was conducted in a well-explored area in East Kazakhstan known for the presence of various IP sources such as graphite, magnetite, and sulfide mineralization. A new multichannel processing approach allowed the determination of the telluric tensor components with very good accuracy. This holds out a hope that in some cases NFIP data may be used not only for detection of polarizable objects, but also for a rough estimation of their spectral IP characteristics.

  15. Natural variation in herbivore-induced volatiles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Snoeren, Tjeerd A. L.; Broekgaarden, Colette; Mumm, Roland; Dicke, Marcel; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2010-01-01

    To study whether natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana could be used to dissect the genetic basis of responses to herbivory in terms of induced volatile emissions, nine accessions were characterized upon herbivory by biting-chewing Pieris rapae caterpillars or after treatment with the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA). Analysis of 73 compounds in the headspace showed quantitative differences in the emission rates of several individual compounds among the accessions. Moreover, variation in the emission of volatile compounds after JA treatment was reflected in the behaviour of the parasitoid Diadegma semiclausum when they were offered the headspace volatiles of several combinations of accessions in two-choice experiments. Accessions also differ in transcript levels of genes that are associated with the emission of plant volatiles. The genes BSMT1 and Cyp72A13 could be connected to the emission of methyl salicylate and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyltrideca-1,3,7,11-tetraene (TMTT), respectively. Overall, Arabidopsis showed interesting phenotypic variations with respect to the volatile blend emitted in response to herbivory that can be exploited to identify genes and alleles that underlie this important plant trait. PMID:20488836

  16. Central nervous system radiation syndrome in mice from preferential 10B(n, alpha)7Li irradiation of brain vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, D.N.; Stoner, R.D.; Rosander, K.M.; Kalef-Ezra, J.A.; Laissue, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    Ionizing radiations were directed at the heads of anesthetized mice in doses that evoked the acute central nervous system (CNS) radiation syndrome. Irradiations were done using either a predominantly thermal neutron field at a nuclear reactor after intraperitoneal injection of 10B-enriched boric acid or 250-kilovolt-peak x-rays with and without previous intraperitoneal injection of equivalent unenriched boric acid. Since 10B concentrations were approximately equal to 3-fold higher in blood than in cerebral parenchyma during the reactor irradiations, more radiation from alpha and 7Li particles was absorbed by brain endothelial cells than by brain parenchymal cells. Comparison of the LD50 dose for CNS radiation lethality from the reactor experiments with the LD50 dose from the x-ray experiments gives results compatible with morphologic evidence that endothelial cell damage is a major determinant of acute lethality from the CNS radiation syndrome. It was also observed that boric acid is a low linear energy transfer radiation-enhancement agent in vivo.

  17. Measurement of Nuclear Reaction Q-values with High Accuracy: 7Li(p, n)7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E.; Barker, P. H.; Lovelock, D. M. J.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is described for the measurement of nuclear reaction Q-values with an accuracy of a few parts in 105, in which the ultimate reference is a one-volt standard. As a test of the technique the accurately known threshold energy of the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction, 1880.51 +/- 0.08 keV, has been remeasured. The value found using the present technique is 1880.443 +/- 0.020 keV, in good agreement with previous values. An attempt to see evidence for atomic excitation effects in the 27A1(p,n)27Si reaction is also discussed. This yielded a new value of 5803.73 +/- 0.12 keV for the threshold of this reaction, again in a good agreement with, but more accurate than, previous values. Further test measurements are summarized. The main application of the technique, in measurements related to the theory of weak interactions, is discussed briefly and the results obtained to date are presented.

  18. Non-Destructive Monitoring of Charge-Discharge Cycles on Lithium Ion Batteries using 7Li Stray-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Joel A.; Dugar, Sneha; Zhong, Guiming; Dalal, Naresh S.; Zheng, Jim P.; Yang, Yong; Fu, Riqiang

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging provides a noninvasive method for in situ monitoring of electrochemical processes involved in charge/discharge cycling of batteries. Determining how the electrochemical processes become irreversible, ultimately resulting in degraded battery performance, will aid in developing new battery materials and designing better batteries. Here we introduce the use of an alternative in situ diagnostic tool to monitor the electrochemical processes. Utilizing a very large field-gradient in the fringe field of a magnet, stray-field-imaging (STRAFI) technique significantly improves the image resolution. These STRAFI images enable the real time monitoring of the electrodes at a micron level. It is demonstrated by two prototype half-cells, graphite∥Li and LiFePO4∥Li, that the high-resolution 7Li STRAFI profiles allow one to visualize in situ Li-ions transfer between the electrodes during charge/discharge cyclings as well as the formation and changes of irreversible microstructures of the Li components, and particularly reveal a non-uniform Li-ion distribution in the graphite. PMID:24005580

  19. 7Li NMR spectroscopy and ion conduction mechanism in mesoporous silica (SBA-15) composite poly(ethylene oxide) electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Jaipal; Chu, Peter P.

    A composite of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) with a polyethylene oxide (PEO) polymer electrolyte is examined for use in various electrochemical devices. Incorporation of SBA-15 in a PEO:LiClO 4 polymer electrolyte facilitates salt dissociation, enhances ion conductivity, and improves miscibility between organic and inorganic moieties. Optimized conductivity is found at 10 wt.% SBA-15 composition, above this concentration the conductivity is reduced due to aggregation of a SBA-15:Li rich phase. Heating above melt temperature of PEO allows more of the polymer segments to interact with SBA-15. This results in a greater degree of disorder upon cooling, and the ion conductivity is enhanced. A 7Li MAS NMR study reveals three types of lithium-ion coordination. Two major types of conduction mechanism can be identified: one through conventional amorphous PEO; a second via hopping in a sequential manner by replacing the nearby vacancies ('holes') on the surface (both interior and exterior) of the SBA-15 channels.

  20. Excitation function shape and neutron spectrum of the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Hernández, Guido; Mastinu, Pierfrancesco; Maggiore, Mario; Pranovi, Lorenzo; Prete, Gianfranco; Praena, Javier; Capote-Noy, Roberto; Gramegna, Fabiana; Lombardi, Augusto; Maran, Luca; Scian, Carlo; Munaron, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The forward-emitted low energy tail of the neutron spectrum generated by the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction on a thick target at a proton energy of 1893.6 keV was measured by time-of-flight spectroscopy. The measurement was performed at BELINA (Beam Line for Nuclear Astrophysics) of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. Using the reaction kinematics and the proton on lithium stopping power the shape of the excitation function is calculated from the measured neutron spectrum. Good agreement with two reported measurements was found. Our data, along with the previous measurements, are well reproduced by the Breit-Wigner single-resonance formula for s -wave particles. The differential yield of the reaction is calculated and the widely used neutron spectrum at a proton energy of 1912 keV was reproduced. Possible causes regarding part of the 6.5% discrepancy between the 197Au(n ,γ ) cross section measured at this energy by Ratynski and Kappeler [Phys. Rev. C 37, 595 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevC.37.595] and the one obtained using the Evaluated Nuclear Data File version B-VII.1 are given.

  1. Examination of naturally occurring polyacetylenes and alpha-terthienyl for their ability to induce cytogenetic damage.

    PubMed

    MacRae, W D; Chan, G F; Wat, C K; Towers, G H; Lam, J

    1980-09-15

    alpha-Terthienyl and 5 polyacetylenes were examined for chromosome damaging activity using Syrian hamster cells. None of these naturally occurring compounds induced sister chromatid exchanges and neither alpha-terthienyl nor phenylheptatriyne induced chromosome aberrations.

  2. Accurate Analytic Potential Energy Function and Spectroscopic Study for G1Πg State of Dimer 7Li2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, De-Heng; Ma, Heng; Sun, Jin-Feng; Zhu, Zun-Lue

    2007-06-01

    The reasonable dissociation limit for the G1Πg state of dimer 7Li2 is determined. The equilibrium internuclear distance, dissociation energy, harmonic frequency, vibrational zero energy, and adiabatic excitation energy are calculated using a symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction method in complete active space in Gaussian03 program package at such numerous basis sets as 6-311++G, 6-311++G(2df,2pd), 6-311++G(2df,p), cc-PVTZ, 6-311++G(3df,3pd), CEP-121G, 6-311++G(2df,pd), 6-311++G(d,p),6-311G(3df,3pd), D95(3df,3pd), 6-311++G(3df,2p), 6-311++G(2df), 6-311++G(df,pd) D95V++, and DGDZVP. The complete potential energy curves are obtained at these sets over a wide internuclear distance range and have least squares fitted to Murrell-Sorbie function. The conclusion shows that the basis set 6-311++G(2df,p) is a most suitable one for the G1Πg state. At this basis set, the calculated spectroscopic constants Te, De, E0, Re, ωe, ωeχe, αe, and Be are of 3.9523 eV, 0.813 06 eV, 113.56 cm-1, 0.320 15 nm, 227.96 cm-1, 1.6928 cm-1, 0.004 436 cm-1, and 0.4689 cm-1, respectively, which are in good agreement with measurements whenever available. The total 50 vibrational levels and corresponding inertial rotation constants are for the first time calculated and compared with available RKR data. And good agreement with measurements is obtained.

  3. Characterization of Hundreds of MeV 7Li(p,n) Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutron Source at RCNP Using a Proton Recoil Telescope and TOF Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Iwase, Hiroshi; Yashima, Hiroshi; Satoh, Daiki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Masuda, Akihiko; Nakane, Yoshihiro; Tamii, Atsushi; Shima, Tatsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Nakamura, Takashi

    The peak neutron fluence of a quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p,n) neutron source at RCNP of Osaka University have been measured for four incident proton energies between 100 and 300 MeV, using a proton recoil telescope (PRT) with event selection by a time-of-flight technique. We deduced the cross section of the peak neutron production reaction, 7Li(p,n0,1)7Be, at 0° and compared with that previously obtained with a time-of-flight (TOF) method employing an organic liquid scintillator. The results obtained with different methods are in agreement within their uncertainties and generally consistent with the other experimental data in several hundreds of MeV region.

  4. A new measurement of the 7Li(d,p)8Li cross section and consequences for 7Be(p,γ)8B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, L.; Broude, C.; Goldring, G.; Hadar, R.; Hass, M.; Schwamm, F.; Shaanan, M.

    1998-02-01

    A novel scheme for measuring the cross section of the 7Be(p,γ)8B reaction, the major source of high energy neutrinos from the sun, is presented. The scheme involves a strictly uniform particle beam and overcomes some of the recognized experimental uncertainties of previous measurements. A new measurement of σ[7Li(d,p)8Li] has been carried out using this setup, and the present value of σ[7Li(d,p)8Li] = 155(8) mb at the top of the Ed(lab.) = 776 keV resonance is compared with previous measurements. A new issue regarding both the (d,p) and (p,γ) reactions has been examined: reaction-product nuclei which are backscattered out of the target. Measurements and simulations carried out in the course of this investigation are presented and discussed in the context of possible effects on the measured cross sections of these reactions.

  5. Synthesis and optical characterization of LiKB4O7, Li2B6O10, and LiCsB6O10 glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Adamiv, V.; Teslyuk, I.; Dyachok, Ya.; Romanyuk, G.; Krupych, O.; Mys, O.; Martynyuk-Lototska, I.; Burak, Ya.; Vlokh, R.

    2010-10-01

    In the current work we report on the synthesis of LiKB4O7, Li2B6O10, and LiCsB6O10 borate glasses. The results for their piezo-optic, acousto-optic, acoustic, elastic, refractive, optical transmission, and optical resistance properties are also presented. It is shown that some of these glasses represent efficient acousto-optic materials that are transparent down to the vacuum ultraviolet range and highly resistant to laser radiation.

  6. {alpha}-cluster states in {sup 38}Ar observed via the {sup 34}S({sup 7}Li,t{alpha}){sup 34}S reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, M.; Ohmura, M.; Harima, F.; Ogino, K.; Takimoto, K.; Ohkubo, S.

    2005-06-01

    To study the {alpha}-cluster states in the {sup 38}Ar nucleus, angular correlation functions between t and {alpha} in the {sup 34}S({sup 7}Li, t{alpha}){sup 38}Ar reaction have been measured. Seven states at 10.2, 10.8, 11.4, 12.2, 12.7, 14.3, and 15.0 MeV were newly observed.

  7. Synthesis and optical characterization of LiKB4O7, Li2B6O10, and LiCsB6O10 glasses.

    PubMed

    Adamiv, V; Teslyuk, I; Dyachok, Ya; Romanyuk, G; Krupych, O; Mys, O; Martynyuk-Lototska, I; Burak, Ya; Vlokh, R

    2010-10-01

    In the current work we report on the synthesis of LiKB(4)O(7), Li(2)B(6)O(10), and LiCsB(6)O(10) borate glasses. The results for their piezo-optic, acousto-optic, acoustic, elastic, refractive, optical transmission, and optical resistance properties are also presented. It is shown that some of these glasses represent efficient acousto-optic materials that are transparent down to the vacuum ultraviolet range and highly resistant to laser radiation.

  8. Au, Bi, Co and Nb cross-section measured by quasimonoenergetic neutrons from p + 7Li reaction in the energy range of 18-36 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majerle, M.; Bém, P.; Novák, J.; Šimečková, E.; Štefánik, M.

    2016-09-01

    Au, Bi, Co and Nb samples were irradiated several times with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from p + 7Li reaction in the energy range of 18-36 MeV. The activities of the samples were measured with the HPGe detector and the reaction rates were calculated. The cross-sections were extracted using the SAND-II method with the reference cross-sections from the EAF-2010 database. The uncertainties of the final results are discussed.

  9. Determination of lithium isotopes at natural abundance levels by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li hollow cathode lamp emissions are used to determine lithium isotopic composition in the natural abundance range of geologic materials. Absorption was found to have a nonlinear dependence upon total lithium concentration and isotopic composition. A method using nonlinear equations to describe the relationship of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li lamp radiation is proposed as a means of calculating isotopic composition that is independent of total lithium concentration.

  10. The nature of fisheries- and farming-induced evolution.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Fraser, Dylan J

    2008-01-01

    Humans have a penchant for unintentionally selecting against that which they desire most. In fishes, unprecedented reductions in abundance have been associated with unprecedented changes in harvesting and aquaculture technologies. Fishing, the predominant cause of fish-population collapses, is increasingly believed to generate evolutionary changes to characters of import to individual fitness, population persistence and levels of sustainable yield. Human-induced genetic change to wild populations can also result from interactions with their domesticated counterparts. Our examination of fisheries- and farming-induced evolution includes factors that may influence the magnitude, rate and reversibility of genetic responses, the potential for shifts in reaction norms and reduced plasticity, loss of genetic variability, outbreeding depression and their demographic consequences to wild fishes. We also suggest management initiatives to mitigate the effects of fisheries- and farming-induced evolution. Ultimately, the question of whether fishing or fish farming can cause evolutionary change is moot. The key issue is whether such change is likely to have negative conservation- or socio-economic consequences. Although the study of human-induced evolution on fishes should continue to include estimates of the magnitude and rate of selection, there is a critical need for research that addresses short- and long-term demographic consequences to population persistence, plasticity, recovery and productivity.

  11. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications.

  12. All-optical production of dual Bose-Einstein condensates of paired fermions and bosons with 6Li and 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikemachi, Takuya; Ito, Aki; Aratake, Yukihito; Chen, Yiping; Koashi, Masato; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto; Horikoshi, Munekazu

    2017-01-01

    We report the first all-optical production of dual Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of paired 6Li (fermion) and one spin state of 7Li (boson) at the magnetic field where the s-wave interactions between fermions are resonant. Fermions are cooled efficiently by evaporative cooling and they serve as coolant for bosons. As a result, the dual condensates can be achieved by using a simple experimental apparatus and procedures, as in the case of the all-optical production of a single BEC. We show that the all-optical method enables us to realize variety of ultracold Bose-Fermi mixtures.

  13. Coincident emission of neutrons and charged particles after π- absorption in 6Li, 7Li, 12C, 59Co and 197Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusi, P.; Isaak, H. P.; Pruys, H. S.; Engfer, R.; Hermes, E. A.; Kozlowski, T.; Sennhauser, U.; Walter, H. K.

    1983-10-01

    Energy spectra d 3W/d E1 d E2 d cos ϑ of neutron-neutron and neutron-charged particle pairs (nn, np, nd, nt) emitted after the absorption of stopped negative pions in 6Li, 7Li, 12C, 59Co and 197Au have been measured for opening angles between 50° and 180°. Particle pairs emitted from light nuclei without energy loss due to final-state interactions were identified by the energy balance. Pion absorption on two nucleons (quasi-deuteron mechanism) was found to be the main process. The yields of nucleon pairs from quasi-free absorption on a quasi-deuteron are 0.52 ± 0.09 per π-stop, 0.57 ± 0.10 per π-stop and 0.19 ± 0.04 per π-stop for 6Li, 7Li and 12C, respectively. The ratio R of np to pp pairs that absorb the pion was determined for quasi-free absorption on p-shell nucleons of 12C: R(p-shell) = 6.3 ± 1.4. For pion absorption on s-shell nucleons of lithium lower limits R(s-shell) > 4.4 for 6Li and R(s-shell) > 7.8 for 7Li were determined. These values are larger than the statistical ratios Rstat = 2 N/( Z - 1) of np to pp pairs in the nucleus. Lower limits for the probability for pion absorption on heavier clusters ( 3He, α) are W(hc) > 0.16 per π-stop for 6Li, W(hc) > 0.11 per π-stop for 7Li and W( α) > 0.01 per π-stop for 12C. The shape of the energy spectra of pairs emitted directly after quasi-free absorption on 2 or 4 nucleons could be explained by a simple model for the momentum distribution of the absorbing nucleons. The results are in agreement with the parameters of the momentum distributions known from other reactions. Energy spectra and opening-angle distributions were compared with the intranuclear cascade calculations of Chiang, Hüfner and Hachenberg. For 59Co and 197Au the spectra are strongly influenced by the final-state interactions; lower limits of R > 1.8 for 59Co and R > 2.5 for 197Au were determined.

  14. Breakup coupling effects on near-barrier quasi-elastic scattering of {sup 6,7}Li on {sup 144}Sm

    SciTech Connect

    Otomar, D. R.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Monteiro, D. S.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Guimaraes, V.; Chamon, L. C.

    2009-09-15

    Excitation functions of quasi-elastic scattering at backward angles have been measured for the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems at near-barrier energies, and fusion barrier distributions have been extracted from the first derivatives of the experimental cross sections with respect to the bombarding energies. The data have been analyzed in the framework of continuum discretized coupled-channel calculations, and the results have been obtained in terms of the influence exerted by the inclusion of different reaction channels, with emphasis on the role played by the projectile breakup.

  15. Bistability induced by generalist natural enemies can reverse pest invasions.

    PubMed

    Madec, Sten; Casas, Jérôme; Barles, Guy; Suppo, Christelle

    2017-01-17

    Analytical modeling of predator-prey systems has shown that specialist natural enemies can slow, stop and even reverse pest invasions, assuming that the prey population displays a strong Allee effect in its growth. We aimed to formalize the conditions in which spatial biological control can be achieved by generalists, through an analytical approach based on reaction-diffusion equations. Using comparison principles, we obtain sufficient conditions for control and for invasion, based on scalar bistable partial differential equations. The ability of generalist predators to control prey populations with logistic growth lies in the bistable dynamics of the coupled system, rather than in the bistability of prey-only dynamics as observed for specialist predators attacking prey populations displaying Allee effects. As a consequence, prey control is predicted to be possible when space is considered in additional situations other than those identified without considering space. The reverse situation is also possible. None of these considerations apply to spatial predator-prey systems with specialist natural enemies.

  16. Natural and induced B-1 cell immunity to infections raises questions of nature versus nurture.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Nicole; Waffarn, Elizabeth E; Nguyen, Trang T T

    2015-12-01

    Mouse B-1 cells are not only major producers of steady-state natural antibodies but also rapid responders to infections and inflammation. These discrete functions may be the outcomes of distinct environmental or developmental triggers that drive B-1 cells toward IgM production or an effector cell fate. Alternatively, distinct B-1 cell subsets may exist, which differ in their functional plasticity. In this paper, we summarize existing data suggesting that B-1 cells form a heterogeneous group of cells with distinct developmental requirements and nonoverlapping functions. Most spleen B-1 cells differ in development from that of bone marrow and peritoneal cavity B-1 cells, in that they develop in the absence of natural IgM. Functional heterogeneity is revealed by findings that B-1 cells in the bone marrow and spleen, but not the peritoneal cavity, generate natural serum IgM, while the latter are rapid responders to inflammatory and infectious insults, resulting in their relocation to secondary lymphoid tissues. A clearer understanding of the developmental and functional differences within the B-1 cell pool may reveal how they might be harnessed for prophylaxis or therapy.

  17. Natural and Human-induced Disturbances and Their Impacts on Forest Carbon Budgets in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Birdsey, R.; Chen, J. M.; McCullough, K.; Zhang, F.

    2014-12-01

    Natural and human-induced disturbances have profound impacts on forest carbon dynamics, and may cause the greatest uncertainty in estimating forest carbon budgets. In North America, three countries show very different forest disturbance patterns: Canadian forests are dominated by natural disturbances such as wildfires and insect outbreaks; forests of Mexico are more affected by human-induced land disturbances such as land-use change; while US forests are equally affected by human-induced and natural disturbances. As human-induced disturbances are closely linked to socioeconomic factors, natural disturbances are usually viewed as a natural process in forests and have equilibrium impacts on forests over the long run. However, with climate change and related changes in natural disturbance regimes in terms of frequency, intensity and scale, there are now fundamental changes in the nature of the impact of natural disturbances on forest carbon dynamics and even greater uncertainty about forest carbon budgets and feedbacks to the atmosphere and climate. In this study, we synthesize disturbance information for North America based on existing remote-sensing products, ground-based observations and modeling studies, evaluating impacts of disturbances on forest carbon budgets that are relevant to disturbance types, scales, frequency and intensity. The work represents the initial step of a more ambitious project tackling this research challenge for North America that crosses a broad climate gradient and diverse socioeconomic entities. The goal is to ultimately improve the estimates of forest carbon budgets and their potential for climate mitigation under changing environments.

  18. Thermal annealing-induced electric dipole relaxation in natural alexandrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalvi, Rosa M. Fernandes; Li, Maximo Siu; Scalvi, Luis V. A.

    2005-02-01

    Electrical properties of natural alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) are investigated by the thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) technique. Samples are submitted to consecutive annealing processes and TSDC is carried out after each annealing, yielding bands with different parameters. These bands are fitted by a continuous distribution of relaxation parameters: activation energy and pre-exponential factor of the Arrhenius equation. It has been observed that annealing influences the dipole relaxation behavior, since it promotes a modification of Fe3+ and Cr3+ impurity distributions on sites of distinct symmetry: Al1 and Al2. In order to have a reference for comparison, TSDC is also carried out on a synthetic alexandrite sample, where the only impurity present is Cr3+ ion.

  19. Surface restoration induced by lubricant additive of natural minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Gu, Jialin; Kang, Feiyu; Kong, Xianqing; Mo, Wei

    2007-07-01

    The effect of a new-fashioned lubricant additive is studied. The additive is prepared out of natural minerals containing flaky silicate, schungite and some other catalyzers. Applications of the additive obviously improve the surface mechanics properties of steel-steel friction pairs, and the nanohardness and the modulus of the friction surface are increased by 67 and 90%, respectively. The friction surface is especially examined with the high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and an amorphous restoration film mostly made up of C with some Si or Si-O amorphous structure doped was found. Considering all research results about the restoration film, this study suggests the film is a sort of diamond-like carbon film (DLC film).

  20. Natural and sun-induced aging of human skin.

    PubMed

    Rittié, Laure; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-05

    With worldwide expansion of the aging population, research on age-related pathologies is receiving growing interest. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the decline of skin structure and function induced by the passage of time (chronological aging) and chronic exposure to solar UV irradiation (photoaging). Nearly every aspect of skin biology is affected by aging. The self-renewing capability of the epidermis, which provides vital barrier function, is diminished with age. Vital thermoregulation function of eccrine sweat glands is also altered with age. The dermal collagenous extracellular matrix, which comprises the bulk of skin and confers strength and resiliency, undergoes gradual fragmentation, which deleteriously impacts skin mechanical properties and dermal cell functions. Aging also affects wound repair, pigmentation, innervation, immunity, vasculature, and subcutaneous fat homeostasis. Altogether, age-related alterations of skin lead to age-related skin fragility and diseases.

  1. Natural and Sun-Induced Aging of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rittié, Laure; Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    With worldwide expansion of the aging population, research on age-related pathologies is receiving growing interest. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the decline of skin structure and function induced by the passage of time (chronological aging) and chronic exposure to solar UV irradiation (photoaging). Nearly every aspect of skin biology is affected by aging. The self-renewing capability of the epidermis, which provides vital barrier function, is diminished with age. Vital thermoregulation function of eccrine sweat glands is also altered with age. The dermal collagenous extracellular matrix, which comprises the bulk of skin and confers strength and resiliency, undergoes gradual fragmentation, which deleteriously impacts skin mechanical properties and dermal cell functions. Aging also affects wound repair, pigmentation, innervation, immunity, vasculature, and subcutaneous fat homeostasis. Altogether, age-related alterations of skin lead to age-related skin fragility and diseases. PMID:25561721

  2. Contributions of biosurfactants to natural or induced bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Lawniczak, Lukasz; Marecik, Roman; Chrzanowski, Lukasz

    2013-03-01

    The number of studies dedicated to evaluating the influence of biosurfactants on bioremediation efficiency is constantly growing. Although significant progress regarding the explanation of mechanisms behind biosurfactant-induced effects could be observed, there are still many factors which are not sufficiently elucidated. This corresponds to the fact that although positive influence of biosurfactants is often reported, there are also numerous cases where no or negative effect was observed. This review summarizes the recent finding in the field of biosurfactant-amended bioremediation, focusing mainly on a critical approach towards potential limitations and causes of failure while investigating the effects of biosurfactants on the efficiency of biodegradation and phytoextraction processes. It also provides a summary of successive steps, which should be taken into consideration when designing biosurfactant-related treatment processes.

  3. Dusty plasma cavities: Probe-induced and natural.

    PubMed

    Harris, B J; Matthews, L S; Hyde, T W

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive exploration of regional dust evacuation in complex plasma crystals is presented. Voids created in three-dimensional crystals on the International Space Station have provided a rich foundation for experiments, but cavities in dust crystals formed in ground-based experiments have not received as much attention. Inside a modified Gaseous Electronics Conference rf cell, a powered vertical probe was used to clear the central area of a dust crystal, producing a cavity with high cylindrical symmetry. Cavities generated by three mechanisms are examined. First, repulsion of micrometer-sized particles by a negatively charged probe is investigated. A model of this effect developed for a dc plasma is modified and applied to explain experimental data in rf plasma. Second, the formation of natural cavities is surveyed; a radial ion drag proposed to occur due to a curved sheath is considered in conjunction with thermophoresis and a flattened confinement potential above the center of the electrode. Finally, cavity formation upon increasing the probe potential above the plasma floating potential is justified by a combination of ion drag and sheath edge modification. The cavities produced by these methods appear similar, but each is shown to be facilitated by fundamentally different processes.

  4. Natural Sesquiterpene Lactones Induce Oxidative Stress in Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Patricia; Sülsen, Valeria P.; Lozano, Esteban; Rivera, Mónica; Beer, María Florencia; Tonn, Carlos; Martino, Virginia S.; Sosa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a worldwide parasitic disease, caused by monoflagellate parasites of the genus Leishmania. In the search for more effective agents against these parasites, the identification of molecular targets has been attempted to ensure the efficiency of drugs and to avoid collateral damages on the host's cells. In this work, we have investigated some of the mechanisms of action of a group of natural sesquiterpene lactones that are effective against Leishmania mexicana mexicana promastigotes. We first observed that the antiproliferative effect of mexicanin I (Mxc), dehydroleucodine (DhL), psilostachyin (Psi), and, at lesser extent, psilostachyin C (Psi C) is blocked by 1.5 mM reduced glutathione. The reducing agent was also able to reverse the early effect of the compounds, suggesting that lactones may react with intracellular sulfhydryl groups. Moreover, we have shown that all the sesquiterpene lactones, except Psi C, significantly decreased the endogenous concentration of glutathione within the parasite. Consistent with these findings, the active sesquiterpene lactones increased between 2.7 and 5.4 times the generation of ROS by parasites. These results indicate that the induction of oxidative stress is at least one of the mechanisms of action of DhL, Mxc, and Psi on parasites while Psi C would act by another mechanism. PMID:23861697

  5. Dusty plasma cavities: Probe-induced and natural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, B. J.; Matthews, L. S.; Hyde, T. W.

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive exploration of regional dust evacuation in complex plasma crystals is presented. Voids created in three-dimensional crystals on the International Space Station have provided a rich foundation for experiments, but cavities in dust crystals formed in ground-based experiments have not received as much attention. Inside a modified Gaseous Electronics Conference rf cell, a powered vertical probe was used to clear the central area of a dust crystal, producing a cavity with high cylindrical symmetry. Cavities generated by three mechanisms are examined. First, repulsion of micrometer-sized particles by a negatively charged probe is investigated. A model of this effect developed for a dc plasma is modified and applied to explain experimental data in rf plasma. Second, the formation of natural cavities is surveyed; a radial ion drag proposed to occur due to a curved sheath is considered in conjunction with thermophoresis and a flattened confinement potential above the center of the electrode. Finally, cavity formation upon increasing the probe potential above the plasma floating potential is justified by a combination of ion drag and sheath edge modification. The cavities produced by these methods appear similar, but each is shown to be facilitated by fundamentally different processes.

  6. Production of 93mMo through natY(7Li, 3n) reaction and subsequent studies on separation and extraction behaviour of no-carrier-added 93mMo from an yttrium target.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Dalia; Lahiri, Susanta

    2008-12-01

    The present work reports heavy-ion-assisted production of (93m)Mo from a natural yttrium target using the (89)Y((7)Li, 3n)(93m)Mo reaction. Three different methodologies based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLX), aqueous biphasic extraction and precipitation, have been developed for separation and extraction of no-carrier-added (nca) (93m)Mo (T(1/2)=6.85h) radionuclide from bulk yttrium target. Complete separation of nca Mo from the target Y has been achieved by employing LLX technique with 0.1M trioctylamine (TOA) dissolved in cyclohexane and 8M HCl. Quantitative separation of (93m)Mo from the yttrium target is also possible by precipitating bulk yttrium with 1M oxalic acid. However, for this particular case, studies have shown that the aqueous biphasic extraction is not the method of choice for separation of nca Mo. Nevertheless, the extraction pattern is important in the context of simulation experiments for studying the behaviour of (106)Sg. Similarity or dissimilarity between the extraction patterns in various analytical systems will be helpful to decisively place Sg in the right position in the periodic table.

  7. Cellular cation transport studied by 6/7Li and 23Na NMR in a porous Mo132 Keplerate type nano-capsule as model system.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Dieter; Haupt, Erhard T K; Müller, Achim

    2008-01-01

    Li+ ions can interplay with other cations intrinsically present in the intra- and extra-cellular space (i.e. Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) have therapeutic effects (e.g. in the treatment of bipolar disorder) or toxic effects (at higher doses), likely because Li+ interferes with the intra-/extra-cellular concentration gradients of the mentioned physiologically relevant cations. The cellular transmembrane transport can be modelled by molybdenum-oxide-based Keplerates, i.e. nano-sized porous capsules containing 132 Mo centres, monitored through 6/7Li as well as 23Na NMR spectroscopy. The effects on the transport of Li+ cations through the 'ion channels' of these model cells, caused by variations in water amount, temperature, and by the addition of organic cationic 'plugs' and the shift reagent [Dy(PPP)2](7-) are reported. In the investigated solvent systems, water acts as a transport mediator for Li+. Likewise, the counter-transport (Li+/Na+, Li+/K+, Li+/Cs+ and Li+/Ca2+) has been investigated by 7Li NMR and, in the case of Li+/Na+ exchange, by 23Na NMR, and it has been shown that most (in the case of Na+ and K+, all (Ca2+) or almost none (Cs+) of the Li cations is extruded from the internal sites of the artificial cell to the extra-cellular medium, while Na+, K+ and Ca2+ are partially incorporated.

  8. Lithium ion micrometer diffusion in a garnet-type cubic Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO) studied using 7Li NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Seki, Shiro; Haishi, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Mobile lithium ions in a cubic garnet Li7La3Zr2O12 (Al-stabilized) were studied using 7Li NMR spectroscopy for membrane and powder samples, the latter of which was ground from the membrane. Lithium diffusion in a micrometer space was measured using the pulsed-gradient spin-echo 7Li NMR method between 70 and 130 °C. When the observation time (Δ ) was shorter than 20 ms, the echo attenuation showed diffusive diffraction patterns, indicating that the Li+ diffusing space is not free but restricted. For longer Δ, the values of apparent diffusion constant (Dapparent) became gradually smaller to approach an equilibrated value (close to a tracer diffusion constant). In addition, the Dapparent depends on the pulse field gradient strength (g) and became smaller as g became larger. These experimental results suggest that the lithium ions diffuse through Li+ pathways surrounded by stationary anions and lithium ions, and are affected by collisions and diffractions. One-dimensional profiles of the membrane sample of thickness 0.5 mm were observed from 65 to 110 °C and the area intensity, as well as the lithium occurrence near the surface, increased with the increase in temperature. The temperature-dependent area intensity showed a correspondence to the number of Li+ carrier ions estimated from the ionic conductivity and the equilibrated diffusion constant through the Nernst-Einstein relationship.

  9. Determination of astrophysical 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction rates from the 7Li(d, p)8Li reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, XianChao; Guo, Bing; Li, ZhiHong; Pang, DanYang; Li, ErTao; Liu, WeiPing

    2015-06-01

    The 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction plays a central role not only in the evaluation of solar neutrino fluxes but also in the evolution of the first stars. Study of this reaction requires the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay 8B g.s. → 7Be + p. By using the charge symmetry relation, we obtain this proton ANC with the single neutron ANC of 8Li g.s. →7Li + n, which is determined with the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) and adiabatic distorted wave approximation (ADWA) analysis of the 7Li(d, p)8Li angular distribution. The astrophysical S-factors and reaction rates of the direct capture process in the 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction are further deduced at energies of astrophysical relevance. The astrophysical S-factor at zero energy for direct capture, S 17(0), is derived to be (19.9 ± 3.5) eV b in good agreement with the most recent recommended value. The contributions of the 1+ and 3+ resonances to the S-factor and reaction rate are also evaluated. The present result demonstrates that the direct capture dominates the 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction in the whole temperature range. This work provides an independent examination to the current results of the 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction.

  10. Parsec-scale Variations in the 7Li i/6Li i Isotope Ratio Toward IC 348 and the Perseus OB 2 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauth, D. C.; Taylor, C. J.; Ritchey, A. M.; Federman, S. R.; Lambert, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the lithium isotopic ratio in the diffuse interstellar medium from high-resolution spectra of the Li i λ6708 resonance doublet have now been reported for a number of lines of sight. The majority of the results for the 7Li/6Li ratio are similar to the solar system ratio of 12.2, but the line of sight toward o Per, a star near the star-forming region IC 348, gave a ratio of about two, the expected value for gas exposed to spallation and fusion reactions driven by cosmic rays. To examine the association of IC 348 with cosmic rays more closely, we measured the lithium isotopic ratio for lines of sight to three stars within a few parsecs of o Per. One star, HD 281159, has 7Li/6Li ≃ 2 confirming production by cosmic rays. The lithium isotopic ratio toward o Per and HD 281159 together with published analyses of the chemistry of interstellar diatomic molecules suggest that the superbubble surrounding IC 348 is the source of the cosmic rays. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  11. On natural metamorphosis inducers of the cnidarians Hydractinia echinata (Hydrozoa) and Aurelia aurita (Scyphozoa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroiher, M.; Berking, S.

    1999-11-01

    Hydractinia echinata and Aurelia aurita produce motile larvae which undergo metamorphosis to sessile polyps when induced by external cues. The polyps are found at restricted sites, A. aurita predominantly on rocks close to the shore, H. echinata on shells inhabited by hermit crabs. It has been argued that the differential distribution of the polyps in their natural environment largely reflects the distribution of the natural metamorphosis-inducing cues. In the case of H. echinata, bacteria of the genus Alteromonas were argued to meet these conditions. We found that almost all substrates collected in the littoral to induce metamorphosis in H. echinata, and several bacterial strains isolated from the sea, including the common E. coli, induce metamorphosis efficiently. In A. aurita metamorphosis may be induced by the water-air interface, whereby metamorphosis precedes (final) settlement.

  12. Mycolic acid-containing bacteria induce natural-product biosynthesis in Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Mori, Yukiko; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2011-01-01

    Natural products produced by microorganisms are important starting compounds for drug discovery. Secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, have been isolated from different Streptomyces species. The production of these metabolites depends on the culture conditions. Therefore, the development of a new culture method can facilitate the discovery of new natural products. Here, we show that mycolic acid-containing bacteria can influence the biosynthesis of cryptic natural products in Streptomyces species. The production of red pigment by Streptomyces lividans TK23 was induced by coculture with Tsukamurella pulmonis TP-B0596, which is a mycolic acid-containing bacterium. Only living cells induced this pigment production, which was not mediated by any substances. T. pulmonis could induce natural-product synthesis in other Streptomyces strains too: it altered natural-product biosynthesis in 88.4% of the Streptomyces strains isolated from soil. The other mycolic acid-containing bacteria, Rhodococcus erythropolis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, altered biosynthesis in 87.5 and 90.2% of the Streptomyces strains, respectively. The coculture broth of T. pulmonis and Streptomyces endus S-522 contained a novel antibiotic, which we named alchivemycin A. We concluded that the mycolic acid localized in the outer cell layer of the inducer bacterium influences secondary metabolism in Streptomyces, and this activity is a result of the direct interaction between the mycolic acid-containing bacteria and Streptomyces. We used these results to develop a new coculture method, called the combined-culture method, which facilitates the screening of natural products.

  13. Rainfall Induced Natural Disaster in Central America, a challenge for Regional Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estuardo Guinea Barrientos, Héctor; Swain, Ashok

    2013-04-01

    Rainfall induced natural disasters rank first among all natural disasters in Central America. According to the records of the EM-DAT international database, 248 out of 486 disasters registered in Central America were disasters triggered by rainfall invents, in countries like Belize and Honduras, rainfall-induced natural disasters, mainly floods and landslides, account for more than 90% of the total number of casualties as well as the economic damage of all the disasters. Due to the natural conditions of the Central American Isthmus, precipitation events often struck more than one country at the time, for example Hurricane Mitch in 1998 affected the entire Central American region causing more than 18,000 casualties. In this context, the Central America countries have been working on joint programs and policies aiming transboundary cooperation and management of natural disasters, a clear example of this effort is CEPREDENAC which is the intergovernmental body with the mandate of promoting activities, projects and programs towards reduction of the risks to disasters in order to avoid loss of life and economic assets in the Central America, however, transnational management face several challenges that fall mostly in the political, economical and technical areas. In this paper we described and analyzed the rainfall induced natural disasters, their impacts and the inherent management challenges in the Central American context. Key words: Central America, Natural Disasters, Risk Management, International Cooperation

  14. TPD-based evaluation of near threshold mono-energetic proton energies for the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be production of neutrons for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bengua, Gerard; Kobayashi, Tooru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Unesaki, Hironobu

    2006-08-21

    An evaluation of mono-energetic proton energies ranging from 1.885 MeV to 1.920 MeV was carried out to determine the viability of these near threshold energies in producing neutrons for BNCT via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. Neutron fields generated at these proton energies were assessed using the treatable protocol depth (TPD) and the maximum TPD (TPD(max)) as evaluation indices. The heavy charged particle (HCP) dose rate to tumour was likewise applied as a figure of merit in order to account for irradiation time and required proton current. Incident proton energies closer to the reaction threshold generated deeper TPDs compared to higher energy protons when no boron dose enhancers (BDE) were placed in the irradiation field. Introducing a BDE resulted in improved TPDs for high proton energies but their achievable TPD(max) were comparatively lower than that obtained for lower proton energies. In terms of the HCP dose rate to tumour, higher proton energies generated neutron fields that yielded higher dose rates both at TPD(max) and at fixed depths of comparison. This infers that higher currents are required to deliver the prescribed treatment dose to tumours for proton beams with energies closer to the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction threshold and more achievable proton currents of around 10 mA or less for proton energies from 1.900 MeV and above. The dependence on incident proton energy of the TPD, TPD(max) and the HCP dose rate to tumour with respect to the (10)B concentration in tumour and healthy tissues were also clarified in this study. Increasing the (10)B concentration in tumour while maintaining a constant T/N ratio resulted in deeper TPD(max) where a greater change in TPD(max) was obtained for proton energies closer to the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction threshold. The HCP dose rates to tumour for all proton energies also went up, with the higher proton energies benefiting more from the increased (10)B concentration.

  15. Some differences in seismic hazard assessment for natural and fluid-induced earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarr, A.

    2014-12-01

    Although there is little doubt that fluid-induced earthquakes contribute significantly to the seismic hazard in some parts of the United States, assessing this contribution in ways consistent with hazard assessment for natural earthquakes is proving to be challenging. For natural earthquakes, the hazard is considered to be independent of time whereas for fluid-induced seismicity there is considerable time dependence as evidenced, for instance, by the dramatic increase in recent years of the seismicity in Oklahoma. Case histories of earthquakes induced by the development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems and wastewater injection at depth illustrate a few of the problems. Analyses of earthquake sequences induced by these operations indicate that the rate of earthquake occurrence is proportional to the rate of injection, a factor that, on a broad scale, depends on the level of energy production activities. For natural earthquakes, in contrast, the rate of earthquake occurrence depends on time-independent tectonic factors including the long-term slip rates across known faults. Maximum magnitude assessments for natural and fluid-induced earthquake sources also show a contrast in behavior. For a natural earthquake source, maximum magnitude is commonly assessed from empirical relations between magnitude and the area of a potentially-active fault. The same procedure applied to fluid-induced earthquakes yields magnitudes that are systematically higher than what is observed. For instance, the maximum magnitude estimated from the fault area of the Prague, OK, main shock of 6 November 2011 is 6.2 whereas the magnitude measured from seismic data is 5.65 (Sun and Hartzell, 2014). For fluid-induced earthquakes, maximum magnitude appears to be limited according to the volume of fluid injected before the largest earthquake. This implies that for a given fluid-injection project, the upper limit on magnitude increases as long as injection continues.

  16. Bistability of the naturally induced lactose utilization system of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stajic, Jelena; Wall, Michael

    2006-03-01

    In the absence of the preferred sugar glucose, lactose utilization machinery in the bacterium E. coli is activated. The genetic circuit responsible for this response, lac operon, has been observed to exhibit bistability when induced by an artificial inducer, TMG. Here we investigate conditions under which bistability might be observed in response to lactose. The aim of our study is to establish whether the natural system exhibits bistability, as is often assumed despite the lack of experimental support.

  17. Identification of Li-Ion Battery SEI Compounds through (7)Li and (13)C Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huff, Laura A; Tavassol, Hadi; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Xing, Wenting; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Solid-state (7)Li and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of cycled graphitic Li-ion anodes demonstrate SEI compound formation upon lithiation that is followed by changes in the SEI upon delithiation. Solid-state (13)C DPMAS NMR shows changes in peaks associated with organic solvent compounds (ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, EC/DMC) upon electrochemical cycling due to the formation of and subsequent changes in the SEI compounds. Solid-state (13)C NMR spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time measurements of lithiated Li-ion anodes and reference poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) powders, along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results, indicate that large-molecular-weight polymers are formed in the SEI layers of the discharged anodes. MALDI-TOF MS and NMR spectroscopy results additionally indicate that delithiated anodes exhibit a larger number of SEI products than is found in lithiated anodes.

  18. Trajectory-dependent resonant neutralization of low energy [sup 7]Li[sup +] scattered from clean and Na-covered Al(100)

    SciTech Connect

    German, K.A.H.; Weare, C.B.; Varekamp, P.R.; Yarmoff, J.A. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 ); Andersen, J.N. )

    1993-07-01

    Trajectory-dependent neutralization is observed for low energy (1--5 keV) [sup 7]Li[sup +] ions scattered at large angles from Na-covered Al(100). Energy spectra and angular scans of the scattered Li[sup +] ion yield are collected as a function of Na coverage. Li[sup +] ions are partially neutralized upon single scattering from Al sites and completely neutralized when scattered from Na. This site-specific neutralization indicates that the surface electrostatic potential is nonuniform. The neutralization probability is also shown to be a function of the exit angle from the surface. The results are analyzed using theoretical ion fractions based on a semiclassical resonant charge exchange model.

  19. HOTSPUR progress report: neutron source spectrum characterization, and /sup 6/Li(n,x. cap alpha. ) and /sup 7/Li(n,x. cap alpha. ) cross section determination

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, E.; Haight, R.

    1984-04-02

    As a prerequisite to high accuracy measurements involving the bulk configuration of /sup 6/LiD we must have a good grasp of the details of the RTNS-I neutron source energy spectrum. Experiments to this end involving neutron yield vs deuteron energy, ratios of foil activation of selected elements, and pulse height distributions of a Si surface barrier detector are described. With this knowledge, the /sup 4/He-production cross sections for /sup 6/Li and /sup 7/Li are found experimentally to be 0.512b and 0.336b, respectively, at anti E/sub N/ = 15.0 MeV in free-field geometry. 14 references.

  20. Search for solar axion emission from {sup 7}Li and D(p, γ){sup 3}He nuclear decays with the CAST γ-ray calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; Dafni, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Autiero, D.; Barth, K.; Davenport, M.; Lella, L. Di; Belov, A.; Beltrán, B.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrián, S.; Bräuninger, H.; Englhauser, J.; Friedrich, P.; Collar, J.I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Collaboration: CAST collaboration; and others

    2010-03-01

    We present the results of a search for a high-energy axion emission signal from {sup 7}Li (0.478 MeV) and D(p, γ){sup 3}He (5.5 MeV) nuclear transitions using a low-background γ-ray calorimeter during Phase I of the CAST experiment. These so-called ''hadronic axions'' could provide a solution to the long-standing strong-CP problem and can be emitted from the solar core from nuclear M1 transitions. This is the first such search for high-energy pseudoscalar bosons with couplings to nucleons conducted using a helioscope approach. No excess signal above background was found.

  1. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence of specialized DC subsets that act to expand Natural T-regs or induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. For example, two major subsets of DCs in lymphoid organs act differentially in inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− cells or expanding Natural T-regs with model-antigen delivery by anti-DC subset monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Furthermore, DCs expressing CD103 in the intestine induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells with endogenous TGF-β and retinoic acid. In addition, antigen-presenting DCs have a capacity to generate Foxp3+ T-regs in the oral cavity where many antigens and commensals exist, similar to intestine and skin. In skin and skin-draining lymph nodes, at least six DC subsets have been identified, suggesting a complex DC-T-reg network. Here, we will review the specific activity of DCs in expanding Natural T-regs and inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− precursors, and further discuss the critical function of DCs in maintaining tolerance at various locations including skin and oral cavity. PMID:23801989

  2. In situ 7Li and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance investigations on the role of Cs+ additive in lithium-metal deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Zhao, Zhenchao; Hu, Mary Y.; Feng, Ju; Deng, Xuchu; Chen, Xilin; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2016-02-01

    Application of Li metal electrode in rechargeable lithium battery is hindered by safety concerns due to dendritic growth on the electrode over several charge-discharge cycles. We have found previously that adding low concentration Cs+ in electrolytes can promote smooth deposition of lithium onto metal electrode during repeated charge-discharge cycling using idea Li|Cu battery without the using of a separator. In this work, quantitative in situ 7Li and 133Cs NMR investigations using real planar symmetric lithium battery cells with and without Cs+ additives were carried out. It is found that the deposited lithium atoms on electrodes are highly porous. Detailed analysis of the data were carried out by separating the 7Li signal from deposited lithium that was oriented parallel to the electrode surface with the signal from the Li-metal nanorodes oriented perpendicular or nearly perpendicular to the electrode surface. The results demonstrate that addition of Cs+ can significantly enhance both the formation of uniform Li nanorods, and the reversibility of electrode. In situ 133Cs NMR directly confirms that Cs+ migrates to the electrode to form a positively charged electrostatic shield during cycling process. Combining the quantitative analysis of the orientation dependent signals of deposited metal Li and previous ex-situ results, different Li deposition models are proposed. During cycling process, more “active” lithium participates in the Li transfer between the electrode and nanorods for the battery with Cs+, while for the battery without Cs+ more dead and thinker lithium rods are formed and Li transfer between dendrites from different electrodes dominates.

  3. The influence of high-energy 7Li ions on the TL response and glow curve structure of CaSO4 : Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Numan; Sahare, P. D.

    2006-07-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) of CaSO4 : Dy phosphor, irradiated by 48 MeV 7Li ions with different fluences in the range 1 × 109-5 × 1011 ions cm-2 has been studied. The samples from the same batch were also exposed to γ-rays from a Co60 source for comparative studies. The TL glow curve of the material, irradiated with the ion beam has a simple structure with a prominent peak at around 494 K along with three small shoulders at around 424, 592 and 662 K. The TL saturation has been observed at around the fluence 1 × 1011 ions cm-2. As the fluence is increased from 1 × 109 to 5 × 1011 ions cm-2, a shift in the peak positions towards the lower temperature side, by around 7 K was observed. However, with increasing fluence, the TL glow curve structure remains invariant with no change in the relative intensities between the 494 and 424 K peaks, while in the case of γ-irradiated samples, in contrast, the intensity ratios of these peaks increase exponentially with exposures. Theoretical analysis of the glow curves of the ion beam and γ-irradiated samples was done by the glow curve deconvolution method. The efficiency of CaSO4 : Dy to 48 MeV 7Li ions has been measured relative to γ-rays of Co60 and found to be 0.81. This result, along with the observed good linearity over a large span of fluences, shows that this phosphor is quite suitable as a dosimeter for heavy charged particles.

  4. New Madrid Seismic Zone: a test case for naturally induced seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, S.J.

    1983-09-01

    Induced seismicity caused by man-made events, such as the filling of reservoirs has been well documented. In contrast, naturally induced seismicity has received little attention. It has been shown that a fluctuation of as little as several bars can trigger reservoir induced earthquakes. Naturally occurring phenomena generate similar fluctuations and could trigger earthquakes where the faults in ambient stress field are suitably oriented and close to failure. The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) presents an ideal test case for the study of naturally induced seismicity. The ideal data set for a study of triggering effects must contain a statistically significant number of events, a constant accumulated strain, and a limited focal region. New Madrid earthquakes are well documented from 1974 to the present, down to a magnitude approx. 1.8. They lie in a distinct fault pattern and occur as a reaction to the regional stress regime. A statistical correlation was made between the earthquakes and a variety of different types of loads, to see if New Madrid seismicity could be triggered by natural fluctuations. The types of triggers investigated ranged from solid earth tides to variations in barometric pressure, rainfall, and stages of the Mississippi River. This analysis becomes complex because each factor investigated creates individual stresses, as well as having imbedded in it a reaction to other factors.

  5. Carbamate pesticide-induced apoptosis and necrosis in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Kobayashi, M; Kawada, T

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that ziram, a carbamate fungicide, significantly induced apoptosis and necrosis in human NK-92MI, a natural killer cell line. To investigate whether other carbamate pesticides also induce apoptosis and necrosis in human natural killer cell, we conducted further experiments with NK-92CI, a human natural killer cell line using a more sensitive assay. NK-92CI cells were treated with ziram, thiram, maneb or carbaryl at 0.031-40 microM for 2-24 h in the present study. Apoptosis and necrosis were determined by FITC-Annexin-V/PI staining. To explore the mechanism of apoptosis, intracellular levels of active caspases 3 and mitochondrial cytochrome-c release were determined by flow cytometry. We found that ziram and thiram also induced apoptosis and necrosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner; however, maneb and carbaryl induced apoptosis and necrosis only at higher doses in NK-92CI cells. The strength of the apoptosis-inducing effect differed among the pesticides, and the order was as follows: thiram > ziram greater than maneb greater than carbaryl. NK-92CI was more sensitive to ziram than NK-92MI. Moreover, ziram and thiram significantly increased the intracellular level of active caspase 3 in NK-92CI and caspase inhibitor significantly inhibited the apoptosis. Ziram and thiram significantly caused mitochondrial cytochrome-c release in NK-92CI. These findings indicate that carbamate pesticides can induce apoptosis in natural killer cells, and the apoptosis is mediated by both the caspase-cascade and mitochondrial cytochrome-c pathways.

  6. Discriminating induced seismicity from natural earthquakes using moment tensors and source spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Eaton, David W.; Li, Ge; Liu, Yajing; Harrington, Rebecca M.

    2016-02-01

    Earthquake source mechanisms and spectra can provide important clues to aid in discriminating between natural and induced events. In this study, we calculate moment tensors and stress drop values for eight recent induced earthquakes in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin with magnitudes between 3.2 and 4.4, as well as a nearby magnitude 5.3 event that is interpreted as a natural earthquake. We calculate full moment tensor solutions by performing a waveform-fitting procedure based on a 1-D transversely isotropic velocity model. In addition to a dominant double-couple (DC) signature that is common to nearly all events, most induced events exhibit significant non-double-couple components. A parameter sensitivity analysis indicates that spurious non-DC components are negligible if the signal to noise ratio (SNR) exceeds 10 and if the 1-D model differs from the true velocity structure by less than 5%. Estimated focal depths of induced events are significantly shallower than the typical range of focal depths for intraplate earthquakes in the Canadian Shield. Stress drops of the eight induced events were estimated using a generalized spectral-fitting method and fall within the typical range of 2 to 90 MPa for tectonic earthquakes. Elastic moduli changes due to the brittle damage production at the source, presence of multiple intersecting fractures, dilatant jogs created at the overlapping areas of multiple fractures, or non-planar pre-existing faults may explain the non-DC components for induced events.

  7. Meiotic chromosome pairing behaviour of natural tetraploids and induced autotetraploids of Actinidia chinensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Hu; Datson, Paul M; Manako, Kelvina I; Murray, Brian G

    2014-03-01

    Non-preferential chromosome pairing was identified in tetraploid Actinidia chinensis and a higher mean multivalent frequency in pollen mother cells was found in colchine-induced tetraploids of A. chinensis compared with naturally occurring tetraploids. Diploid and tetraploid Actinidia chinensis are used for the development of kiwifruit cultivars. Diploid germplasm can be exploited in a tetraploid breeding programme via unreduced (2n) gametes and chemical-induced chromosome doubling of diploid cultivars and selections. Meiotic chromosome behaviour in diploid A. chinensis 'Hort16A' and colchicine-induced tetraploids from 'Hort16A' was analysed and compared with that in a diploid male and tetraploid males of A. chinensis raised from seeds sourced from the wild in China. Both naturally occurring and induced tetraploids formed multivalents, but colchicine-induced tetraploids showed a higher mean multivalent frequency in the pollen mother cells. Lagging chromosomes at anaphase I and II were observed at low frequencies in the colchicine-induced tetraploids. To investigate whether preferential or non-preferential chromosome pairing occurs in tetraploid A. chinensis, the inheritance of microsatellite alleles was analysed in the tetraploid progeny of crosses between A. chinensis (4x) and A. arguta (4x). The frequencies of inherited microsatellite allelic combinations in the hybrids suggested that non-preferential chromosome pairing had occurred in the tetraploid A. chinensis parent.

  8. Natural or Induced: Identifying Natural and Induced Swarms from Pre-production and Co-production Microseismic Catalogs at the Coso Geothermal Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenball, Martin; Kaven, Joern; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of seismicity coinciding with injection of reservoir fluids have prompted interest in methods to distinguish induced from natural seismicity. Discrimination between induced and natural seismicity is especially difficult in areas that have high levels of natural seismicity, such as the geothermal fields at the Salton Sea and Coso, both in California. Both areas show swarm-like sequences that could be related to natural, deep fluid migration as part of the natural hydrothermal system. Therefore, swarms often have spatio-temporal patterns that resemble fluid-induced seismicity, and might possibly share other characteristics. The Coso Geothermal Field and its surroundings is one of the most seismically active areas in California with a large proportion of its activity occurring as seismic swarms. Here we analyze clustered seismicity in and surrounding the currently produced reservoir comparatively for pre-production and co-production periods. We perform a cluster analysis, based on the inter-event distance in a space-time-energy domain to identify notable earthquake sequences. For each event j, the closest previous event i is identified and their relationship categorized. If this nearest neighbor’s distance is below a threshold based on the local minimum of the bimodal distribution of nearest neighbor distances, then the event j is included in the cluster as a child to this parent event i. If it is above the threshold, event j begins a new cluster. This process identifies subsets of events whose nearest neighbor distances and relative timing qualify as a cluster as well as a characterizing the parent-child relationships among events in the cluster. We apply this method to three different catalogs: (1) a two-year microseismic survey of the Coso geothermal area that was acquired before exploration drilling in the area began; (2) the HYS_catalog_2013 that contains 52,000 double-difference relocated events and covers the years 1981 to 2013; and (3) a

  9. Induced defences alter the strength and direction of natural selection on reproductive traits in common milkweed.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K A; Cory, K A; Johnson, M T J

    2017-01-30

    Evolutionary biologists have long sought to understand the ecological processes that generate plant reproductive diversity. Recent evidence indicates that constitutive antiherbivore defences can alter natural selection on reproductive traits, but it is unclear whether induced defences will have the same effect and whether reduced foliar damage in defended plants is the cause of this pattern. In a factorial field experiment using common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., we induced plant defences using jasmonic acid (JA) and imposed foliar damage using scissors. We found that JA-induced plants experienced selection for more inflorescences that were smaller in size (fewer flowers), whereas control plants only experienced a trend towards selection for larger inflorescences (more flowers); all effects were independent of foliar damage. Our results demonstrate that induced defences can alter both the strength and direction of selection on reproductive traits, and suggest that antiherbivore defences may promote the evolution of plant reproductive diversity.

  10. Resistance to RadLV-induced leukemia: non-participation of splenic natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    St.-Pierre, Y.; Hugo, P.; Lemieux, S.; Lussier, G.; Potworowski, E.F.

    1988-08-01

    The phenotypic expression of genetically determined resistance to radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia in mice has been shown to reside in the bone marrow. Because the bone marrow contains precursors of natural killer (NK) cells, known to play a role in retrovirally induced infections, and because these cells have been suggested as participating in resistance to radiation-induced leukemia, it was pertinent to establish whether their levels differed in strains of mice susceptible and resistant to leukemia. We therefore tested splenic NK cell levels in C57BL/Ka (susceptible) and B10.A(5R) (resistant) mice before viral inoculation, immediately after viral inoculation, and throughout the preleukemic period and showed that they were not different. This indicates that splenic NK cell levels have no bearing on the resistance to RadLV-induced leukemia and that other immune or non-immune mechanisms must be sought.

  11. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sairazi, Nur Shafika; Sirajudeen, K. N. S.; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Mummedy, Swamy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA). KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:26793262

  12. Natural chlorophyll but not chlorophyllin prevents heme-induced cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects in rat colon.

    PubMed

    de Vogel, Johan; Jonker-Termont, Denise S M L; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof

    2005-08-01

    Diets high in red meat and low in green vegetables are associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. In rats, dietary heme, mimicking red meat, increases colonic cytotoxicity and proliferation of the colonocytes, whereas addition of chlorophyll from green vegetables inhibits these heme-induced effects. Chlorophyllin is a water-soluble hydrolysis product of chlorophyll that inhibits the toxicity of many planar aromatic compounds. The present study investigated whether chlorophyllins could inhibit the heme-induced luminal cytotoxicity and colonic hyperproliferation as natural chlorophyll does. Rats were fed a purified control diet, the control diet supplemented with heme, or a heme diet with 1.2 mmol/kg diet of chlorophyllin, copper chlorophyllin, or natural chlorophyll for 14 d (n = 8/group). The cytotoxicity of fecal water was determined with an erythrocyte bioassay and colonic epithelial cell proliferation was quantified in vivo by [methyl-(3)H]thymidine incorporation into newly synthesized DNA. Exfoliation of colonocytes was measured as the amount of rat DNA in feces using quantitative PCR analysis. Heme caused a >50-fold increase in the cytotoxicity of the fecal water, a nearly 100% increase in proliferation, and almost total inhibition of exfoliation of the colonocytes. Furthermore, the addition of heme increased TBARS in fecal water. Chlorophyll, but not the chlorophyllins, completely prevented these heme-induced effects. In conclusion, inhibition of the heme-induced colonic cytotoxicity and epithelial cell turnover is specific for natural chlorophyll and cannot be mimicked by water-soluble chlorophyllins.

  13. Diffraction dissociation of {sup 7}Li and {sup 7}Be relativistic nuclei on proton targets through the {sup 3}H({sup 3}He)+{sup 4}He channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fetisov, V. N.

    2015-07-15

    For the fragmentation of {sup 7}Li and {sup 7}Be relativistic nuclei (with momenta of, respectively, P = 3 GeV/c and P = 1.6 GeV/c per nucleon) on proton targets through the {sup 3}H({sup 3}He) + {sup 4}He channels, the differential cross sections with respect to the momentum transfer Q to the fragments were calculated on the basis of the cluster version of Akhiezer–Glauber–Sitenko diffraction theory by employing the twobody cluster model for the {sup 7}Li ({sup 3}H + {sup 4}He) and {sup 7}Be ({sup 3}He + {sup 4}He) nuclei. These calculations, performed in the impulse approximation in the interaction of intranuclear clusters with the target nucleus, explained a strong suppression of the cross sections for reactions on protons at Q lower than 100 MeV/c and higher than 350 MeV/c and the observed irregularities in the behavior off the cross section for {sup 7}Li fragmentation on complex track-emulsion nuclei. Cross-section values close to their experimental counterparts were obtained upon setting the coefficient of two-body clustering in the {sup 7}Li and {sup 7}Be nuclei to k ≃ 0.7.

  14. Connecting model species to nature: predator-induced long-term sensitization in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Mason, Maria J; Watkins, Amanda J; Wakabayashi, Jordann; Buechler, Jennifer; Pepino, Christine; Brown, Michelle; Wright, William G

    2014-08-01

    Previous research on sensitization in Aplysia was based entirely on unnatural noxious stimuli, usually electric shock, until our laboratory found that a natural noxious stimulus, a single sublethal lobster attack, causes short-term sensitization. We here extend that finding by demonstrating that multiple lobster attacks induce long-term sensitization (≥24 h) as well as similar, although not identical, neuronal correlates as observed after electric shock. Together these findings establish long- and short-term sensitization caused by sublethal predator attack as a natural equivalent to sensitization caused by artificial stimuli.

  15. Ammonia-induced injury in pure cultures and natural populations of coliform bacteria.

    PubMed

    Naundorf, G; Aumen, N G

    1989-11-01

    Ammonia-induced injury was investigated in pure cultures of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes, and in natural coliform populations obtained from the oligotrophic Luxapallila and the eutrophic Sunflower Rivers in northern Mississippi. Pure cultures were affected by ammonia exposure as indicated by changes in the injury ratio (IR) of CFU on m-T7 agar/CFU on m-Endo agar. Ammonia concentrations between 0 and 20 (mg NH3-N/1) had little or no effect and concentrations between 40 and 80 caused the greatest injury. Natural coliform populations from the oligotrophic river were more prone to ammonia-induced injury than those from the eutrophic river. The results stress the need for the routine use of m-T7 media and the enumeration of injured cells when using the membrane filter procedure to ascertain domestic water quality.

  16. Computational, electrochemical and {sup 7}Li NMR studies of lithiated disordered carbons electrodes in lithium ion cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, G.; Gerald, R., II; Scanlon, L. G.; Carrado, K. A.; Winans, R. E.

    1998-01-07

    Disordered carbons that deliver high reversible capacity in electrochemical cells have been synthesized by using inorganic clays as templates to control the pore size and the surface area. The capacities obtained were much higher than those calculated if the resultant carbon had a graphitic-like structure. Computational chemistry was used to investigate the nature of lithium bonding in a carbon lattice unlike graphite. The lithium intercalated fullerene Li{sub n}-C{sub 60} was used as a model for our (non-graphitic) disordered carbon lattice. A dilithium-C{sub 60} system with a charge and multiplicity of (0,1) and a trilithium-C{sub 60} system with a charge and multiplicity of (0,4) were investigated. The spatial distribution of lithium ions in an electrochemical cell containing this novel disordered carbon material was investigated in situ by Li-7 NMR using an electrochemical cell that was incorporated into a toroid cavity nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imager. The concentration of solvated Li{sup +} ions in the carbon anode appears to be larger than in the bulk electrolyte, is substantially lower near the copper/carbon interface, and does not change with cell charging.

  17. Coherent HF Radar System for the Study of Natural and Heater Induced Ionospheric Irregularities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Services HF Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) in Alaska. The DPS characterizes the bulk parameters of the ionosphere including changes of the...electron density, plasma structure and the plasma convection. In the absence of the HAARP facility at the present time, the high latitude ionosphere at...AD-A273 804 COHERENT HF RADAR SYSTEM FOR THE STUDY OF NATURAL AND HEATER INDUCED IONOSPHERIC IRREGULARITIES Bodo W. Reinisch James L. Scali D. Mark

  18. A mechanism of action for morphine-induced immunosuppression: corticosterone mediates morphine-induced suppression of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Freier, D O; Fuchs, B A

    1994-09-01

    Morphine is a drug of abuse with an ability to down-regulate immune responsiveness that could have potentially serious consequences in both heroin addicts and in the clinical environment. The exact mechanism of action by which morphine induces immunosuppression has yet to be clearly determined. A direct mechanism of action is suggested to operate through lymphocyte opiate receptors, but the nature of such receptors is still in question. The alternative, an indirect mechanism of action is proposed to be mediated by two possible pathways, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation with increased production of adrenal corticosteroids, or activation of the sympathetic nervous system and concomitant catecholamine release. Natural killer (NK) cell activity was used to determine potential indirect mechanisms of action for morphine. NK activity in the B6C3F1 mouse was suppressed between 12 and 48 hr after implantation of 75 mg timed-release morphine pellets. Morphine suppressed NK activity in a dose-responsive manner. The opiate antagonists naloxone and naltrexone completely blocked morphine-induced suppression of NK activity, whereas naloxone methiodide, a congener that crosses the blood-brain barrier much more slowly than naloxone, produced very little blockade. Implantation of the 75-mg morphine pellets produced a significant elevation in serum corticosterone levels. In vitro exposure to corticosterone is known to suppress NK activity directly, whereas in vitro morphine was unable to alter directly NK activity. The glucocorticoid receptor antagonist Roussel-Uclaf 38486 blocked morphine-induced suppression of NK activity in a dose-responsive fashion. Naltrexone (10-mg pellet) antagonized the morphine-induced elevation in serum corticosterone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Effects of Natural Products on Fructose-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Wang, Tingting; Li, Jian; Wang, Sijian; Qiu, Feng; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    As a sugar additive, fructose is widely used in processed foods and beverages. Excessive fructose consumption can cause hepatic steatosis and dyslipidemia, leading to the development of metabolic syndrome. Recent research revealed that fructose-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is related to several pathological processes, including: (1) augmenting lipogenesis; (2) leading to mitochondrial dysfunction; (3) stimulating the activation of inflammatory pathways; and (4) causing insulin resistance. Cellular signaling research indicated that partial factors play significant roles in fructose-induced NAFLD, involving liver X receptor (LXR)α, sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1/1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α (PPARα), leptin nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), c-Jun amino terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Until now, a series of natural products have been reported as regulators of NAFLD in vivo and in vitro. This paper reviews the natural products (e.g., curcumin, resveratrol, and (−)-epicatechin) and their mechanisms of ameliorating fructose-induced NAFLD over the past years. Although, as lead compounds, natural products usually have fewer activities compared with synthesized compounds, it will shed light on studies aiming to discover new drugs for NAFLD. PMID:28146130

  20. Estrus behavior and fecal steroid profiles in the Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica) during natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus.

    PubMed

    Umapathy, Govindhaswamy; Sontakke, Sadanand D; Srinivasu, K; Kiran, Thomas; Kholkute, S D; Shivaji, S

    2007-10-01

    In this paper the behavior of the Asiatic lion was studied during natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus in relation to fecal estradiol and progesterone concentration. The average length of estrus was 5.4 days and no significant difference was observed between natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus. Vocalization and rolling were the major estrus behavioral activities of Asiatic lions and the frequency of these activities were similar in both natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus and treatment with exogenous gonadotropin did not alter estrus behavioral activities. A significant positive correlation was observed between fecal estradiol and frequency of estrus behavior during natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus. Following gonadotropin treatment estrus could be induced in 69% of animals and these induced animals ovulated following hCG treatment. This study reports for the first time the successful use of the non-invasive fecal steroid assay for monitoring the induction of estrus and ovulation in the Asiatic lion.

  1. Natural pyrethrins induces apoptosis in human hepatocyte cells via Bax- and Bcl-2-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun; Zong, Mimi; Xu, Wenping; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Bo; Yang, Mingjun; Tao, Liming

    2017-01-25

    Natural pyrethrins have been widely used for pest control in organic farming and for residential indoor pest managements. Although the specific mechanisms underlying their activity are incompletely understood, natural pesticides are considered the safest based on their target specificity and rapid degradation in the environment. Here, we used in vitro bioassays to characterize the cytotoxic effects of natural pyrethrins and attempted to delineate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of their cytotoxicity against human hepatocytes. The results demonstrate that natural pyrethrins reduce cell viability and enhance apoptosis in HepG2 cells. In addition, the current data indicate that natural pyrethrins cause a reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), increase reactive oxygen species production, and up-regulate the Bax/Bcl-2 expression, leading to the release of cytochrome-c into the cytosol, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Taken together, the results indicate that natural pyrethrins has potentially exert adverse effects on human health by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis in hepatocytes through Bax- and Bcl-2-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  2. The Nature of Emission from Optical Breakdown Induced by Pulses of fs and ns Duration

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Demange, P; Kucheyev, S; Shirk, M D; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

    2004-11-09

    Spectral emission from optical breakdown in the bulk of a transparent dielectric contains information about the nature of the breakdown medium. We have made time resolved measurements of the breakdown induced emission caused by nanosecond and femtosecond infrared laser pulses. We previously demonstrated that the emission due to ns pulses is blackbody in nature allowing determination of the fireball temperature and pressure during and after the damage event. The emission due to femtosecond pulse breakdown is not blackbody in nature; two different spectral distributions being noted. In one case, the peak spectral distribution occurs at the second harmonic of the incident radiation, in the other the distribution is broader and flatter and presumably due to continuum generation. The differences between ns and fs breakdown emission can be explained by the differing breakdown region geometries for the two pulse durations. The possibility to use spectral emission as a diagnostic of the emission region morphology will be discussed.

  3. Serum Albumin and Ca2+ Are Natural Competence Inducers in the Human Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German Matias; Quinn, Brettni; Schramm, Sareda T J; Soler-Bistue, Alfonso; Ramirez, Maria Soledad

    2016-08-01

    The increasing frequency of bacteria showing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) raises the menace of entering into a postantibiotic era. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is one of the prime reasons for AMR acquisition. Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen with outstanding abilities to survive in the hospital environment and to acquire resistance determinants. Its capacity to incorporate exogenous DNA is a major source of AMR genes; however, few studies have addressed this subject. The transformation machinery as well as the factors that induce natural competence in A. baumannii are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that naturally competent strain A118 increases its natural transformation frequency upon the addition of Ca(2+)or albumin. We show that comEA and pilQ are involved in this process since their expression levels are increased upon the addition of these compounds. An unspecific protein, like casein, does not reproduce this effect, showing that albumin's effect is specific. Our work describes the first specific inducers of natural competence in A. baumannii Overall, our results suggest that the main protein in blood enhances HGT in A. baumannii, contributing to the increase of AMR in this threatening human pathogen.

  4. Serum Albumin and Ca2+ Are Natural Competence Inducers in the Human Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Traglia, German Matias; Quinn, Brettni; Schramm, Sareda T. J.; Soler-Bistue, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The increasing frequency of bacteria showing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) raises the menace of entering into a postantibiotic era. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is one of the prime reasons for AMR acquisition. Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen with outstanding abilities to survive in the hospital environment and to acquire resistance determinants. Its capacity to incorporate exogenous DNA is a major source of AMR genes; however, few studies have addressed this subject. The transformation machinery as well as the factors that induce natural competence in A. baumannii are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that naturally competent strain A118 increases its natural transformation frequency upon the addition of Ca2+or albumin. We show that comEA and pilQ are involved in this process since their expression levels are increased upon the addition of these compounds. An unspecific protein, like casein, does not reproduce this effect, showing that albumin's effect is specific. Our work describes the first specific inducers of natural competence in A. baumannii. Overall, our results suggest that the main protein in blood enhances HGT in A. baumannii, contributing to the increase of AMR in this threatening human pathogen. PMID:27270286

  5. Magic angle magnetic resonance imaging of diode laser induced and naturally occurring lesions in equine tendons.

    PubMed

    Spriet, Mathieu; Murphy, Brian; Vallance, Stuart A; Vidal, Martin A; Whitcomb, Mary Beth; Wisner, Erik R

    2012-01-01

    Magic angle magnetic resonance (MR) imaging consists of imaging tendons at 55° to the magnetic field. In people, magic angle MR imaging is valuable for detection of chronic tendon lesions and allows calculation of tendon T1 values. Increased T1 values occur in people with chronic tendinopathy. The T1 values of normal equine tendons have been reported but there are no available data for abnormal equine tendons. Twelve limbs were studied. Two limbs had diode laser tendon lesions induced postmortem, four limbs had diode laser tendon lesions induced in vivo and six limbs had naturally occurring tendon lesions. The limbs were imaged at 1.5 T using both conventional MR imaging and magic angle MR imaging. The post-mortem laser induced lesions were identified only with magic angle MR imaging. The in vivo induced lesions and naturally occurring lesions were identified with both techniques but had a different appearance with the two imaging techniques. Magic angle imaging was helpful at identifying lesions that were hypointense on conventional imaging. Increased T1 values were observed in all abnormal tendons and in several tendons with a subjectively normal MR appearance. The increased T1 value may reflect diffuse changes in the biochemical composition of tendons. Magic angle imaging has potential as a useful noninvasive tool to assess the changes of the extracellular tendon matrix using T1 values.

  6. Koetjapic acid, a natural triterpenoid, induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Zeyad D; Aisha, Abdalrahim F A; Idris, Norshirin; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B; Ismail, Zhari; Abu-Salah, Khalid M; Alrokayan, Salman A; Shah Abdul Majid, Amin Malik

    2012-03-01

    Deregulated cell signaling pathways result in cancer development. More than one signal transduction pathway is involved in colorectal cancer pathogenesis and progression. Koetjapic acid (KA) is a naturally occurring seco-A-ring oleanene triterpene isolated from the Sandoricum koetjape stem bark. We report the cellular and molecular mechanisms of anticancer activity of KA towards human colorectal cancer. The results showed that KA induces apoptosis in HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma cells by inducing the activation of extrinsic and intrinsic caspases. We confirmed that KA-induced apoptosis was mediated by DNA fragmentation, nuclear condensation and disruption in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Further studies on the effect of KA on cancer pathways show that the compound causes down-regulation of Wnt, HIF-1α, MAP/ERK/JNK and Myc/Max signaling pathways and up-regulates the NF-κB signaling pathway. The result of this study highlights the anticancer potential of KA against colorectal cancer.

  7. Natural Product-Derived Small Molecule Activators of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1)

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key mediator of oxygen homeostasis that was first identified as a transcription factor that is induced and activated by decreased oxygen tension. Upon activation, HIF-1 upregulates the transcription of genes that promote adaptation and survival under hypoxic conditions. HIF-1 is a heterodimer composed of an oxygen-regulated subunit known as HIF-1α and a constitutively expressed HIF-1β subunit. In general, the availability and activity of the HIF-1α subunit determines the activity of HIF-1. Subsequent studies have revealed that HIF-1 is also activated by environmental and physiological stimuli that range from iron chelators to hormones. Preclinical studies suggest that HIF-1 activation may be a valuable therapeutic approach to treat tissue ischemia and other ischemia/hypoxia-related disorders. The focus of this review is natural product-derived small molecule HIF-1 activators. Natural products, relatively low molecular weight organic compounds produced by plants, animals, and microbes, have been and continue to be a major source of new drugs and molecular probes. The majority of known natural product-derived HIF-1 activators were discovered through pharmacological evaluation of specifically selected individual compounds. The combination of natural products chemistry with appropriate high-throughput screening bioassays could provide an alternative approach to discover novel natural product-derived HIF-1 activators. Potent natural product-derived HIF-1 activators that exhibit a low level of toxicity and side effects hold promise as new treatment options for diseases such as myocardial and peripheral ischemia, and as chemopreventative agents that could be used to reduce the level of ischemia/reperfusion injury following heart attack and stroke. PMID:16842166

  8. Recent Advances in Remote Sensing of Natural Hazards-Induced Atmospheric and Ionospheric Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. M.; Komjathy, A.; Meng, X.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Langley, R. B.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) induced by acoustic-gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere have significant impact on trans-ionospheric radio waves such as Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS, including Global Position System (GPS)) measurements. Natural hazards and solid Earth events, such as earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions are actual sources that may trigger acoustic and gravity waves resulting in traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in the upper atmosphere. Trans-ionospheric radio wave measurements sense the total electron content (TEC) along the signal propagation path. In this research, we introduce a novel GPS-based detection and estimation technique for remote sensing of atmospheric wave-induced TIDs including space weather phenomena induced by major natural hazard events, using TEC time series collected from worldwide ground-based dual-frequency GNSS (including GPS) receiver networks. We demonstrate the ability of using ground- and space-based dual-frequency GPS measurements to detect and monitor tsunami wave propagation from the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and tsunami. Major wave trains with different propagation speeds and wavelengths were identified through analysis of the GPS remote sensing observations. Dominant physical characteristics of atmospheric wave-induced TIDs are found to be associated with specific tsunami propagations and oceanic Rayleigh waves. In this research, we compared GPS-based observations, corresponding model simulations and tsunami wave propagation. Results are shown to lead to a better understanding of the tsunami-induced ionosphere responses. Based on current distribution of Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations, the results indicate that tsunami-induced TIDs may be detected about 60 minutes prior to tsunamis arriving at the U.S. west coast. It is expected that this GNSS-based technology will become an integral part of future early-warning systems.

  9. A microdosimetric study of {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li and {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.K.C.; Sutton, M.; Evans, T.M.; Laster, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the microdosimetric analysis for the most interesting cell survival experiment recently performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this experiment, the cells were first treated with a gadolinium (Gd) labeled tumor-seeking boronated porphyrin (Gd-BOPP) or with BOPP alone, and then irradiated with thermal neutrons. The resulting cell survival curves indicate that the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions is very effective in cell killing. The death of a cell treated with GD-BOPP were attributed to either the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}) {sup 7}Li reactions or the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions (or both). However, the quantitative relationship between the two types of reaction and the cell survival fraction was not clear. This paper presents the microdosimetric analysis for the BNL experiment based on the measured experimental parameters, and the results clearly suggest a quantitative relationship between the two types of reaction and the cell survival fraction. The results also suggest new research in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GDNCT) which may lead to a more practical modality than the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for treating cancers.

  10. A microdosimetric study of {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li and {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.K.C.; Sutton, M.; Evans, T.M.; Laster, B.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the microdosimetric analysis for the most interesting cell survival experiment recently performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this experiment, the cells were first treated with a gadolinium (Gd) labeled tumor-seeking boronated porphyrin (Gd-BOPP) or with BOPP alone, and then irradiated with thermal neutrons. The resulting cell-survival curves indicate that the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions are very effective in cell killing. The death of a cell treated with Gd-BOPP was attributed to either the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reactions or the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions (or both). However, the quantitative relationship between the two types of reaction and the cell-survival fraction was not clear. This paper presents the microdosimetric analysis for the BNL experiment based on the measured experimental parameters, and the results clearly suggest a quantitative relationship between the two types of reaction and the cell survival fraction. The results also suggest new research in gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) which may lead to a more practical modality than the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for treating cancers.

  11. Formation of ultracold {sup 7}Li{sup 85}Rb molecules in the lowest triplet electronic state by photoassociation and their detection by ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Altaf, Adeel Dutta, Sourav; Lorenz, John; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Chen, Yong P.; Elliott, D. S.

    2015-03-21

    We report the formation of ultracold {sup 7}Li{sup 85}Rb molecules in the a{sup 3}Σ{sup +} electronic state by photoassociation (PA) and their detection via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With our dual-species Li and Rb magneto-optical trap apparatus, we detect PA resonances with binding energies up to ∼62 cm{sup −1} below the {sup 7}Li 2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} + {sup 85}Rb 5p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} asymptote. In addition, we use REMPI spectroscopy to probe the a{sup 3}Σ{sup +} state and excited electronic 3{sup 3}Π and 4{sup 3}Σ{sup +} states and identify a{sup 3}Σ{sup +} (v″ = 7–13), 3{sup 3}Π (v{sub Π}′ = 0–10), and 4{sup 3}Σ{sup +} (v{sub Σ}′ = 0–5) vibrational levels. Our line assignments agree well with ab initio calculations. These preliminary spectroscopic studies on previously unobserved electronic states are crucial to discovering transition pathways for transferring ultracold LiRb molecules created via PA to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  12. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling.

  13. Metals, a Plasma of the Poor Man: Electron Screening in 7Li(p,{alpha}){alpha} and 6Li(p,{alpha})3He for Different Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfs, C.

    2006-05-24

    The electron screening in the 7Li(p,{alpha}){alpha} reaction has been studied at Ep = 30 to 100 keV for different environments: Li2WO4 insulator, Li metal, and PdLi alloys. For the insulator a screening potential energy of Ue = 185{+-}150 eV was observed, consistent with previous work and the atomic adiabatic limit. However, for the Li metal and the PdLi alloys we find large values of Ue = 1280{+-}60 and 3790{+-}330 eV, respectively: the values can be explained by the plasma model of Debye applied to the quasi-free metallic electrons in these samples. Similar results have been found for the 6Li(p,{alpha})3He reaction supporting the hypothesis of the isotopic independence of the electron screening effect. The data together with previous studies of d(d,p)t and 9Be(p,{alpha})6Li in metals verify the Debye model scaling Ue {proportional_to} Zt (charge number of target)

  14. Collective-coupling analysis of spectra of mass-7 isobars: {sup 7}He, {sup 7}Li, {sup 7}Be, and {sup 7}B

    SciTech Connect

    Canton, L.; Pisent, G.; Amos, K.; Karataglidis, S.; Svenne, J. P.; Knijff, D. van der

    2006-12-15

    A nucleon-nucleus interaction model has been applied to ascertain the underlying character of the negative-parity spectra of four isobars of mass-7, from neutron- to proton-emitter drip lines. With a single nuclear potential defined by a simple coupled-channel model, a multichannel algebraic scattering approach (MCAS) has been used to determine the bound and resonant spectra of the four nuclides, of which {sup 7}He and {sup 7}B are particle unstable. Incorporation of Pauli blocking into the model enables a description of all known spin-parity states of the mass-7 isobars. We have also obtained spectra of similar quality by using a large space no-core shell model. Additionally, we have studied {sup 7}Li and {sup 7}Be using a dicluster model. We have found a dicluster-model potential that can reproduce the lowest four states of the two nuclei, as well as the relevant low-energy elastic scattering cross sections. But, with this model, the rest of the energy spectra cannot be obtained.

  15. Prenatal nicotine exposure changes natural and drug-induced reinforcement in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Franke, Ryan M; Park, Minjung; Belluzzi, James D; Leslie, Frances M

    2008-06-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated an increased incidence of substance misuse and obesity in adolescents whose mothers smoked during pregnancy. Although dopamine systems that mediate natural and drug-induced reinforcement have been shown in animal studies to be altered by gestational nicotine treatment, it is not clear whether there are concomitant changes in reinforcement sensitivity. To test whether prenatal nicotine exposure influences sensitivity to natural and drug rewards, timed pregnant rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps delivering saline or nicotine (3 mg/kg/day) from gestational day 4 to 18. Male offspring were tested as adolescents, on postnatal day 32, for operant responding maintained by sucrose pellets or i.v. cocaine (200 or 500 mug/kg per injection). Cocaine-induced stereotypy and c-fos mRNA expression in cortex and striatum were also examined. Complex changes in reward circuitry were observed in the offspring of nicotine-exposed dams. Nicotine-exposed adolescents did not self-administer the low dose of cocaine, but, at the higher dose, exhibited significantly greater cocaine intake and c-fos mRNA expression in nucleus accumbens than did controls. In contrast, control animals showed significantly greater drug-induced stereotypy at both cocaine doses. Operant responding maintained by sucrose was also influenced by gestational nicotine exposure. At a fixed ratio (FR) 1 schedule, although the number of pellets eaten by the two experimental groups was equivalent, more pellets were left uneaten by nicotine-exposed offspring. At FR2 and FR5 schedules, the responding maintained by sucrose pellets was lower in nicotine-exposed offspring. These findings suggest that nicotine exposure during gestation may induce changes in both natural and drug reward pathways.

  16. A novel method for evaluating natural and vaccine induced serological responses to Bordetella pertussis antigens.

    PubMed

    Berbers, G A M; van de Wetering, M S E; van Gageldonk, P G M; Schellekens, J F P; Versteegh, F G A; Teunis, P F M

    2013-08-12

    We studied the time course of serum IgG antibodies against 3 different pertussis vaccine antigens: PT (pertussis toxin), FHA (filamentous hemagglutinin), Prn (pertactin) in sera from individuals vaccinated with four different pertussis vaccines at 4 years of age: (N=44, 44, 23 and 23, respectively,) and compared the responses to/after natural infection with Bordetella pertussis (N=44, age 1-8 years). These longitudinal data were analyzed with a novel method, using a mathematical model to describe the observed responses, and their variation among subjects. This allowed us to estimate biologically meaningful characteristics of the serum antibody response, like peak level and decay rate, and to compare these among natural infections and vaccine responses. Compared to natural infection, responses to PT after vaccination with the tested vaccines are smaller in magnitude and tend to decay slightly faster. When present in vaccines, FHA and Prn tend to produce high peak levels, higher than those in naturally infected patients, but these decay faster. As expected, the Dutch whole cell vaccine produced lower antibody responses than the acellular vaccines. This model allows a better comparison of the kinetics of vaccine induced antibody responses and after natural infection over a long follow up period.

  17. Distinguishing induced seismicity from natural seismicity in Ohio: Demonstrating the utility of waveform template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoumal, Robert J.; Brudzinski, Michael R.; Currie, Brian S.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the utility of multistation waveform cross correlation to help discern induced seismicity. Template matching was applied to all Ohio earthquakes cataloged since the arrival of nearby EarthScope TA stations in late 2010. Earthquakes that were within 5 km of fluid injection activities in regions that lacked previously documented seismicity were found to be swarmy. Moreover, the larger number of events produced by template matching for these swarmy sequences made it easier to establish more detailed temporal and spatial relationships between the seismicity and fluid injection activities, which is typically required for an earthquake to be considered induced. Study results detected three previously documented induced sequences (Youngstown, Poland Township, and Harrison County) and provided evidence that suggests two additional cases of induced seismicity (Belmont/Guernsey County and Washington County). Evidence for these cases suggested that unusual swarm-like behaviors in regions that lack previously documented seismicity can be used to help distinguish induced seismicity, complementing the traditional identification of an anthropogenic source spatially and temporally correlated with the seismicity. In support of this finding, we identified 17 additional cataloged earthquakes in regions of previously documented seismicity and away from disposal wells or hydraulic fracturing that returned very few template matches. The lack of swarminess helps to indicate that these events are most likely naturally occurring.

  18. Numerical and experimental investigation of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Lelong, Alexandra; Astolfi, Jacques Andre; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present combined numerical and experimental studies of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils. The focus is on identifying the dependence of the foil's vibration frequencies and damping characteristics on the inflow velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. Experimental results are shown for a cantilevered polyacetate (POM) hydrofoil tested in the cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy Research Institute (IRENav). The foil is observed to primarily behave as a chordwise rigid body and undergoes spanwise bending and twisting deformations, and the flow is observed to be effectively two-dimensional (2D) because of the strong lift retention at the free tip caused by a small gap with a thickness less than the wall boundary layer. Hence, the viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is formulated by coupling a 2D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) model with a two degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) model representing the spanwise tip bending and twisting deformations. Good agreements were observed between viscous FSI predictions and experimental measurements of natural flow-induced vibrations in fully turbulent and attached flow conditions. The foil vibrations were found to be dominated by the natural frequencies in absence of large scale vortex shedding due to flow separation. The natural frequencies and fluid damping coefficients were found to vary with velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. In addition, the numerical results showed that the in-water to in-air natural frequency ratios decreased rapidly, and the fluid damping coefficients increased rapidly, as the solid-to-fluid added mass ratio decreases. Uncoupled mode (UM) linear potential theory was found to significantly over-predict the fluid damping for cases of lightweight flexible hydrofoils, and this over-prediction increased with higher velocity and lower solid-to-fluid added mass ratio.

  19. Differentiating induced and natural seismicity using space-time-magnitude statistics applied to the Coso Geothermal field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenball, Martin; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable characteristic of earthquakes is their clustering in time and space, displaying their self-similarity. It remains to be tested if natural and induced earthquakes share the same behavior. We study natural and induced earthquakes comparatively in the same tectonic setting at the Coso Geothermal Field. Covering the preproduction and coproduction periods from 1981 to 2013, we analyze interevent times, spatial dimension, and frequency-size distributions for natural and induced earthquakes. Individually, these distributions are statistically indistinguishable. Determining the distribution of nearest neighbor distances in a combined space-time-magnitude metric, lets us identify clear differences between both kinds of seismicity. Compared to natural earthquakes, induced earthquakes feature a larger population of background seismicity and nearest neighbors at large magnitude rescaled times and small magnitude rescaled distances. Local stress perturbations induced by field operations appear to be strong enough to drive local faults through several seismic cycles and reactivate them after time periods on the order of a year.

  20. The collapse of the Maya: Effects of natural and human-induced drought

    SciTech Connect

    Oglesby, Robert J; Erickson III, David J

    2010-02-01

    The collapse of the Maya civilization during the ninth century A.D. is a major conundrum in the history of mankind. This civilization reached a spectacular peak but then almost completely collapsed in the space of a few decades. While numerous explanations have been put forth to explain this collapse, in recent years, drought has gained favor. This is because water resources were a key for the Maya, especially to ensure their survival during the lengthy dry season that occurs where they lived. Natural drought is a known, recurring feature of this region, as evidenced by observational data, reconstructions of past times, and global climate model output. Results from simulations with a regional climate model demonstrate that deforestation by the Maya also likely induced warmer, drier, drought-like conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the drought conditions devastating the Maya resulted from a combination of natural variability and human activities. Neither the natural drought or the human-induced effects alone were sufficient to cause the collapse, but the combination created a situation the Maya could not recover from. These results may have sobering implications for the present and future state of climate and water resources in Mesoamerica as ongoing massive deforestation is again occurring.

  1. Effect of natural organic matter on the photo-induced toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wormington, Alexis M; Coral, Jason; Alloy, Matthew M; Damarè, Carmen L; Mansfield, Charles M; Klaine, Stephen J; Bisesi, Joseph H; Roberts, Aaron P

    2016-12-07

    Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) is the most widely used form of nanoparticles in commercial industry and comes in 2 main configurations: rutile and anatase. Rutile TiO2 is used in ultraviolet (UV) screening applications, whereas anatase TiO2 crystals have a surface defect that makes them photoreactive. There are numerous reports in the literature of photo-induced toxicity to aquatic organisms following coexposure to anatase nano-TiO2 and UV. All natural freshwater contains varying amounts of natural organic matter (NOM), which can drive UV attenuation and quench reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aquatic ecosystems. The present research examined how NOM alters the photo-induced toxicity of anatase nano-TiO2 . Daphnia magna neonates were coexposed to NOM and photoexcited anatase nano-TiO2 for 48 h. Natural organic matter concentrations as low as 4 mg/L reduced anatase nano-TiO2 toxicity by nearly 100%. These concentrations of NOM attenuated UV by <10% in the exposure system. However, ROS production measured using a fluorescence assay was significantly reduced in a NOM concentration--dependent manner. Taken together, these data suggest that NOM reduces anatase nano-TiO2 toxicity via an ROS quenching mechanism and not by attenuation of UV. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-6. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. Inducing uniform single-crystal like orientation in natural rubber with constrained uniaxial stretch.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiming; Meng, Lingpu; Lu, Jie; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Wenhua; Huang, Ningdong; Chen, Liang; Li, Liangbin

    2015-07-07

    The effect of flow on crystallization is commonly attributed to entropic reduction, which is caused by stretch and orientation of polymer chains but overlooks the role of flow on final-state free energy. With the aid of in situ synchrotron radiation wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and a homemade constrained uniaxial tensile testing machine, polycrystals possessing single-crystal-like orientation rather than uniaxial orientation are found during the constrained stretch of natural rubber, whereas the c-axis and a-axis align in the stretch direction (SD) and constrained direction (CD), respectively. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that aligning the a-axis of crystal nuclei in CD leads to the lowest free energy increase and favors crystal nucleation. This indicates that the nomenclature of strain-induced crystallization may not fully account for the nature of flow-induced crystallization (FIC) as strain mainly emphasizes the entropic reduction of initial melt, whereas stress rather than strain plays the dominant role in crystal deformation. The current work not only contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of flow-induced crystallization but also demonstrates the potential application of constrained uniaxial tensile stretch for the creation of functional materials containing polycrystals that possess single-crystal-like orientation.

  3. Mitochondrial changes induced by natural and synthetic asbestos fibers: studies on isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, C; Fato, R; Biagini, G; Pugnaloni, A; Giantomassi, F; Foresti, E; Lesci, G I; Roveri, N; Lenaz, G

    2007-01-21

    Asbestos fibers, such as chrysotile and crocidolite, are known to have cytotoxic effects on different cell types. In vivo exposure to asbestos fibers can induce both fibrotic and malignant lung diseases , however, the mechanisms linking exposure to the subsequent development of the diseases are unknown. Numerous investigations suggest the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are known to damage biological macromolecules including proteins, cell membrane lipids and nucleic acids; alterations of these essential cellular components can alter cell function and can drive the cell to neoplastic transformation or to cell death. Because the mitochondrial respiratory chain is an important source of ROS and RNS (reactive nitogen species) in the cells, we have investigated the effects of aqueous extracts of asbestos (natural and synthetic) fibers on some mitochondrial activities. Our data show that crocidolite fibers release substances in solution that may interfere directly with the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase complex. Moreover, the calcium ions released from these fibers induce opening of the permeability transition pore of the inner membrane leading to a possible cytotoxic effect due to the release of apoptotic factors normally localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. In addition, crocidolite extracts enhance the mitochondrial production of ROS. No significant biochemical effects are exerted by chrysotile, either natural or synthetic, on isolated mitochondria. Nevertheless, all asbestos fibers tested induce morphological alterations visualized by transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis.

  4. Mitochondrial changes induced by natural and synthetic asbestos fibers: studies on isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, C; Fato, R; Biagini, G; Pugnaloni, A; Giantomassi, F; Foresti, E; Lesci, G I; Roveri, N; Lenaz, G

    2004-01-01

    Asbestos fibers, such as chrysotile and crocidolite, are known to have cytotoxic effects on different cell types. in vivo exposure to asbestos fibers can induce both fibrotic and malignant lung diseases , however, the mechanisms linking exposure to the subsequent development of the diseases are unknown. Numerous investigations suggest the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are known to damage biological macromolecules including proteins, cell membrane lipids and nucleic acids; alterations of these essential cellular components can alter cell function and can drive the cell to neoplastic transformation or to cell death. Because the mitochondrial respiratory chain is an important source of ROS and RNS (reactive nitogen species) in the cells, we have investigated the effects of aqueous extracts of asbestos (natural and synthetic) fibers on some mitochondrial activities. Our data show that crocidolite fibers release substances in solution that may interfere directly with the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase complex. Moreover, the calcium ions released from these fibers induce opening of the permeability transition pore of the inner membrane leading to a possible cytotoxic effect due to the release of apoptotic factors normally localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. In addition, crocidolite extracts enhance the mitochondrial production of ROS. No significant biochemical effects are exerted by chrysotile, either natural or synthetic, on isolated mitochondria. Nevertheless, all asbestos fibers tested induce morphological alterations visualized by transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis.

  5. Annexin A1 modulates natural and glucocorticoid-induced resolution of inflammation by enhancing neutrophil apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Vago, Juliana P; Nogueira, Camila R C; Tavares, Luciana P; Soriani, Frederico M; Lopes, Fernando; Russo, Remo C; Pinho, Vanessa; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed at assessing whether AnxA1, a downstream mediator for the anti-inflammatory effects of GCs, could affect the fate of immune cells in tissue exudates, using LPS-induced pleurisy in BALB/c mice. AnxA1 protein expression in exudates was increased during natural resolution, as seen at 48-72 h post-LPS, an effect augmented by treatment with GC and associated with marked presence of apoptotic neutrophils in the pleural exudates. The functional relevance of AnxA1 was determined using a neutralizing antibody or a nonspecific antagonist at FPR/ALXRs: either treatment inhibited both spontaneous and GC-induced resolution of inflammation. Injection of Ac2-26 (100 μg, given 4 h into the LPS response), an AnxA1-active N-terminal peptide, promoted active resolution and augmented the extent of neutrophil apoptosis. Such an effect was prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. Mechanistically, resolution of neutrophilic inflammation was linked to cell apoptosis with activation of Bax and caspase-3 and inhibition of survival pathways Mcl-1, ERK1/2, and NF-κB. These novel in vivo data, using a dynamic model of acute inflammation, provide evidence that AnxA1 is a mediator of natural and GC-induced resolution of inflammation with profound effects on neutrophil apoptosis.

  6. Resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, L.D.; Sandberg, S.K.

    2000-04-01

    The authors demonstrate the use of resistivity/induced polarization (IP) monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic loads. Electrical monitoring of saline tracer transport during forced injection has been demonstrated previously. Detection of tracer transport under natural hydraulic loading is difficult because neither the hydraulic load nor the tracer resistivity can be controlled. In one study, the authors identify the electrical response to salt transport in a dynamic beach environment. Resistivity/IP imagine resolved the structure of the saltwater-freshwater interface and evidence for tide-induced groundwater transport. Resistivity increases in the near surface and at depth, upbeach of the high-tide mark, accompanied by tidal transgression. They attribute this to desaturation and decreasing salinity in the near surface and to decreasing salinity at depth, despite tidal transgression. Monitoring of groundwater levels indicates a phase lag between the tide level and groundwater level, supporting the electrical data. IP was insensitive to groundwater salinity variation. In a second study, the authors identify the electrical response to recharge-induced salt transport from a road-sale storage facility. Conductivity and IP models for monitoring lines, located on the basis of an EM31 survey, resolved the subsurface salt distribution, IP modeling resolved the sediment-bedrock interface. Modeling of monthly conductivity differences revealed conductivity increases and decreases at the locations of salt contamination, which correlate with the recharge pattern. They attribute near-surface conductivity increases after heavy rainfall to increasing saturation and ion dissolution. Corresponding conductivity decreases at depth are attributed to flushing of the bedrock with freshwater. Essentially, the opposite response was observed during a quiet monitoring period following heavy recharge. Near-surface IP changes are consistent with this interpretation. Salt

  7. Natural Product-Based Inhibitors of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1)

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) regulates the expression of more than 70 genes involved in cellular adaptation and survival under hypoxic stress. Activation of HIF-1 is associated with numerous physiological and pathological processes that include tumorigenesis, vascular remodeling, inflammation, and hypoxia/ischemia-related tissue damage. Clinical studies suggested that HIF-1 activation correlates directly with advanced disease stages and treatment resistance among cancer patients. Preclinical studies support the inhibition of HIF-1 as a major molecular target for antitumor drug discovery. Considerable effort is underway, in government laboratories, industry and academia, to identify therapeutically useful small molecule HIF-1 inhibitors. Natural products (low molecular weight organic compounds produced by plants, microbes, and animals) continue to play a major role in modern antitumor drug discovery. Most of the compounds discovered to inhibit HIF-1 are natural products or synthetic compounds with structures that are based on natural product leads. Natural products have also served a vital role as molecular probes to elucidate the pathways that regulate HIF-1 activity. Natural products and natural product-derived compounds that inhibit HIF-1 are summarized in light of their biological source, chemical class, ancd effect on HIF-1 and HIF-mediated gene regulation. When known, the mechanism(s) of action of HIF-1 inhibitors are described. Many of the substances found to inhibit HIF-1 are non-druggable compounds that are too cytotoxic to serve as drug leads. The application of high-throughput screening methods, complementary molecular-targeted assays, and structurally diverse chemical libraries hold promise for the discovery of therapeutically useful HIF-1 inhibitors. PMID:16515532

  8. Natural widths and blackbody radiation induced shift and broadening of Rydberg levels in magnesium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, Igor L.; Mokhnenko, Sergey N.; Nikitina, Elizaveta A.; Ovsiannikov, Vitaly D.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical analysis is presented of the natural lifetimes and blackbody-radiation (BBR)-induced shifts and widths of Rydberg states with small and large angular momenta l. Asymptotic presentations in elementary functions are derived for matrix elements of bound-bound, bound-free and threshold radiative transitions from hydrogenic-type states with large angular momenta, applicable to both hydrogen-like and many-electron atoms and ions. For states with small angular momenta two numerical methods based on the quantum defects were used and corresponding data are compared with one another and with the most reliable data of the literature. Asymptotic approximations are derived for natural lifetimes, thermal shifts and broadening of Rydberg states of small and high l and principal quantum numbers n ≫ 1.

  9. Inhibition of hematopoietic recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantel, K.; Boertman, J.; Nakeff, A. )

    1990-05-01

    We have examined the role of natural killer (NK) cells in situ in the recovery of marrow hematopoiesis in B6D2F1 mice receiving various doses of total-body irradiation (TBI) as a well-characterized model for treatment-induced myelosuppression. Applying an in situ cytotoxic approach for ablating NK 1.1 cells, we have demonstrated that NK 1.1 cells differentially inhibit the recovery of hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) and their progenitor cells committed to granulocyte-macrophage differentiation from a sublethal dose of TBI (9 Gy) while not affecting the recovery of progenitor cells committed to either erythroid or megakaryocyte differentiation from TBI. However, recoveries of CFU-S and progenitor cells were unaffected by the ablation of NK cells prior to a moderate dose of TBI (2 Gy). These findings provide in situ evidence that NK cells are potential inhibitors of hematopoietic recovery from treatment-induced myelosuppression.

  10. Naturally occurring branched-chain polyamines induce a crosslinked meshwork structure in a giant DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Akira; Shimizu, Yuta; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Fukuda, Wakao; Umezawa, Naoki; Horai, Yuhei; Higuchi, Tsunehiko; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-12-01

    We studied the effect of branched-chain polyamines on the folding transition of genome-sized DNA molecules in aqueous solution by the use of single-molecule observation with fluorescence microcopy. Detailed morphological features of polyamine/DNA complexes were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations indicated that branched-chain polyamines tend to induce a characteristic change in the higher-order structure of DNA by forming bridges or crosslinks between the segments of a DNA molecule. In contrast, natural linear-chain polyamines cause a parallel alignment between DNA segments. Circular dichroism measurements revealed that branched-chain polyamines induce the A-form in the secondary structure of DNA, while linear-chain polyamines have only a minimum effect. This large difference in the effects of branched- and linear-chain polyamines is discussed in relation to the difference in the manner of binding of these polyamines to negatively charged double-stranded DNA.

  11. Serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity in experimentally induced and naturally occurring canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis).

    PubMed

    Mylonakis, Mathios E; Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Theodorou, Konstantina; Siarkou, Victoria I; Steiner, Jörg M; Harrus, Shimon; Leontides, Leonidas; Rallis, Timoleon; Suchodolski, Jan S; Koutinas, Christos K; Koutinas, Alexander F

    2014-03-14

    Ehrlichia canis infection causes multisystemic disease in dogs (canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, CME) which is associated with variable morbidity and mortality. Atypical clinical manifestations, including gastrointestinal signs, may occasionally occur in CME and approximately 10-15% of dogs are presented with historical or clinical evidence of vomiting, diarrhea, and/or abdominal discomfort. The objective of this study was to investigate if there are any alterations in serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) in dogs with experimentally induced or naturally occurring monocytic ehrlichiosis. Serum samples from 10 Beagle dogs experimentally infected with E. canis and two healthy uninfected Beagles were serially examined; samples from 20 naturally infected dogs (10 with non-myelosuppressive [NME] and 10 with myelosuppressive [ME] ehrlichiosis) were also examined at a given point in time (cross-sectional sampling). None of the experimentally infected Beagles showed gastrointestinal signs or increased cPLI concentrations prior to or following the artificial infection. Three naturally infected dogs with NME and one with ME demonstrated serum cPLI concentrations in the diagnostic range for pancreatitis (>400 μg/L) without showing gastrointestinal signs. The results of the present study indicated that 4/20 (20%) of dogs naturally infected with E. canis demonstrated increased serum cPLI concentrations consistent with mild and clinically inapparent pancreatitis.

  12. Nature of chiral-induced equilibrium shifts in racemic labile lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shuguang; Hilmes, G.L.; Riehl, J.P. )

    1989-03-23

    An analysis of the chiral-induced equilibrium shift of racemic D{sub 3} tris-terdendate complexes of lanthanides with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylate is presented in terms of the associated/dissociated models of Schipper. Results are presented which indicate that the so-called Pfeiffer effect in these lanthanide complexes is best described by the dissociated model, as was determined for similar labile transition-metal complexes. The nature of the chiral discriminatory interaction is shown to be largely electrostatic by measurements in mixed solvents of varying dielectric constant.

  13. Photo-induced toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under natural sunlight.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, C M; Alloy, M M; Hamilton, J; Verbeck, G F; Newton, K; Klaine, S J; Roberts, A P

    2015-02-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NP) are one of the most abundantly utilized nanoparticles in the world. Studies have demonstrated the ability of the anatase crystal of TiO2 NP to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a co-exposure likely to occur in aquatic ecosystems. The goal of this study was to examine the photo-induced toxicity of anatase TiO2 NP under natural sunlight to Daphnia magna. D. magna were exposed to a range of UVR intensities and anatase TiO2 concentrations in an outdoor exposure system using the sun as the source of UVR. Different UVR intensities were achieved using UVR opaque and transparent plastics. AnataseTiO2-NP demonstrated the reciprocal relationship seen in other phototoxic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at higher UVR treatments. The calculated 8h LC50 of anatase TiO2 NP was 139 ppb under full intensity ambient natural sunlight, 778 ppb under 50% natural sunlight, and >500 ppm under 10% natural sunlight. Mortality was also compared between animals allowed to accumulate a body burden of anatase TiO2 for 1h and organisms whose first exposure to anatase TiO2 aqueous suspensions occurred under UVR. A significantly greater toxic effect was observed in aqueous, low body burden suspensions than that of TiO2 1h body burdens, which is dissimilar from the model presented in PAHs. Anatase TiO2 presents a unique photo-induced toxic model that is different than that of established phototoxic compounds.

  14. Near-threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutrons on the practical conditions using thick Li-target and Gaussian proton energies for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kenichi; Bengua, Gerard; Nakao, Noriaki; Kosako, Kazuaki

    2014-06-01

    The near threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutrons generated by incident proton energy having Gaussian distribution with mean energies from 1.85 to 1.95MeV, were studied as a practical neutron source for BNCT wherein an RFQ accelerator and a thick Li-target are used. Gaussian energy distributions with the standard deviation of 0, 10, 20 and 40keV for mean proton energies from 1.85 to 1.95MeV were surveyed in 0.01MeV increments. A thick liquid Li-target whose dimensions were established in our previous experiments (i.e., 1mm-thick with 50mm width and 50mm length) was considered in this study. The suitable incident proton energy and physical dimensions of Pb layer which serves as a gamma absorber and a Polyethylene layer which is used as a BDE were surveyed by means of the concepts of TPD. Dose distribution were calculated by using MCNP5. A proton beam with mean energy of 1.92MeV and a Gaussian energy distribution with a standard deviation of 20keV at a current of 10mA was selected from the viewpoint of irradiation time and practically achievable proton current. The suitable thicknesses of Pb gamma absorber was estimated to be about 3cm. The estimated thickness of the polyethylene BDE was about 24mm for an ideal proton current of 13mA, and was 18mm for a practical proton current of 10mA.

  15. Prediction of {sup 2}D Rydberg energy levels of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li based on very accurate quantum mechanical calculations performed with explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Sharkey, Keeper L.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-04-28

    Very accurate variational nonrelativistic finite-nuclear-mass calculations employing all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions are carried out for six Rydberg {sup 2}D states (1s{sup 2}nd, n= 6, Horizontal-Ellipsis , 11) of the {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li isotopes. The exponential parameters of the Gaussian functions are optimized using the variational method with the aid of the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The experimental results for the lower states (n= 3, Horizontal-Ellipsis , 6) and the calculated results for the higher states (n= 7, Horizontal-Ellipsis , 11) fitted with quantum-defect-like formulas are used to predict the energies of {sup 2}D 1s{sup 2}nd states for {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li with n up to 30.

  16. Inducing physiological stress recovery with sounds of nature in a virtual reality forest--results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Annerstedt, Matilda; Jönsson, Peter; Wallergård, Mattias; Johansson, Gerd; Karlson, Björn; Grahn, Patrik; Hansen, Ase Marie; Währborg, Peter

    2013-06-13

    Experimental research on stress recovery in natural environments is limited, as is study of the effect of sounds of nature. After inducing stress by means of a virtual stress test, we explored physiological recovery in two different virtual natural environments (with and without exposure to sounds of nature) and in one control condition. Cardiovascular data and saliva cortisol were collected. Repeated ANOVA measurements indicated parasympathetic activation in the group subjected to sounds of nature in a virtual natural environment, suggesting enhanced stress recovery may occur in such surroundings. The group that recovered in virtual nature without sound and the control group displayed no particular autonomic activation or deactivation. The results demonstrate a potential mechanistic link between nature, the sounds of nature, and stress recovery, and suggest the potential importance of virtual reality as a tool in this research field.

  17. Assay Development for the Discovery of Semaphorin 3B Inducing Agents from Natural Product Sources

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yeonjoong; Pan, Li; Ren, Yulin; Fatima, Nighat; Ahmed, Safia; Chang, Leng Chee; Zhang, Xiaoli; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Swanson, Steven M.; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.

    2014-01-01

    Semaphorins are a class of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. They have been found to regulate basic cell functions such as axonal growth cone guidance and recent studies have focused on their effect on tumor progression. Semaphorin 3B (Sema 3B) particularly is a secreted protein that has been known to modulate proliferation and apoptosis, processes that are critical for tumor progression and development. In spite of its importance, there is yet no high-throughput screening assay available to detect or quantify the expression of Sema 3B for natural product anticancer drug discovery purposes. Therefore, the development of a new high-throughput bioassay for the discovery of Sema 3B inducing agents from natural product sources is described herein. A wide variety of pure compounds and extracts from plants and microorganisms has been found suitable for screening using this Sema 3B assay to detect and quantify the effect of Sema 3B inducing agents and thereby identify new selective bioactive Sema 3B lead compounds for anticancer drug discovery and development. Also, this new bioassay procedure is based on a high-throughput platform using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that involves the optimization of sensitivity and selectivity levels as well as accuracy, reproducibility, robustness, and cost effectiveness. PMID:25016954

  18. Examining the impact of thought substitution on intentional forgetting in induced and naturally occurring dysphoria.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Saima; Ridout, Nathan

    2016-07-30

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if natural and induced dysphoria is associated with impaired forgetting and, whether a thought-substitution strategy would ameliorate any observed deficits. Study 1: 36 dysphoric & 36 non-dysphoric participants learnt a series of emotional word pairs. Participants were subsequently presented with some of the cues and were asked to recall the targets or prevent the targets from coming to mind. Half of the participants were provided with substitute words to recall instead of the original targets (aided suppression). At final memory testing, participants were asked to recall the targets to all cues. Dysphoric participants exhibited impaired forgetting, even when using a thought substitution strategy. Non-dysphoric participants, however, were able to use substitutes to suppress words. Study 2: 50 healthy participants initially completed the aided condition of the forgetting task. Participants were then given a positive or negative mood-induction, followed by another version of the forgetting task. Although all participants showed a forgetting effect prior to the mood-induction, only the positive group was successful at forgetting after the mood induction. Taken together, these findings do not support the utility of thought-substitution as an aid to forgetting in individuals in a naturally or induced dysphoric mood.

  19. Assay development for the discovery of semaphorin 3B inducing agents from natural product sources.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yeonjoong; Pan, Li; Ren, Yulin; Fatima, Nighat; Ahmed, Safia; Chang, Leng Chee; Zhang, Xiaoli; Kinghorn, A Douglas; Swanson, Steven M; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J

    2014-10-01

    Semaphorins are a class of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. They have been found to regulate basic cell functions such as axonal growth cone guidance and recent studies have focused on their effect on tumor progression. Semaphorin 3B (Sema3B) particularly is a secreted protein that has been known to modulate proliferation and apoptosis, processes that are critical for tumor progression and development. In spite of its importance, there is yet no high-throughput screening assay available to detect or quantify the expression of Sema3B for natural product anticancer drug discovery purposes. Therefore, the development of a new high-throughput bioassay for the discovery of Sema3B inducing agents from natural product sources is described herein. A wide variety of pure compounds and extracts from plants and microorganisms has been found suitable for screening using this Sema3B assay to detect and quantify the effect of Sema3B inducing agents and thereby identify new selective bioactive Sema3B lead compounds for anticancer drug discovery and development. Also, this new bioassay procedure is based on a high-throughput platform using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that involves the optimization of sensitivity and selectivity levels as well as accuracy, reproducibility, robustness, and cost effectiveness.

  20. Magnetic fluctuations and possible formation of a spin-singlet cluster under pressure in the heavy-fermion spinel LiV2O4 probed by 7Li and 51V NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hikaru; Kato, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Itoh, Masayuki; Niitaka, Seiji; Takagi, Hidenori

    2015-07-01

    7Li and 51V NMR measurements up to 9.8 GPa have been made to elucidate local magnetic properties of a heavy-fermion spinel oxide LiV2O4 which undergoes a metal-insulator transition above ˜7 GPa. The temperature T and pressure P dependences of the 7Li and 51V Knight shifts and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates 1 /T1 show that in the metallic phase, there is a crossover from a high-T region with weak ferromagnetic fluctuations to a low-T one with antiferromagnetic (AFM) fluctuations. The AFM fluctuations are enhanced below 20 K and 1.5 GPa, where a heavy Fermi-liquid state with the modified Korringa relation is formed. The evolution of the magnetic fluctuations is discussed from the aspect of the competition among several magnetic interactions. Above PMI˜6.7 GPa, we find the coexistence of metallic and insulating phases due to the first-order metal-insulator transition. The 7Li and 51V NMR spectra coming from the insulating phase have T -independent small Knight shifts and 7(1 /T1 ) with the thermally activated T dependence, indicating the formation of a spin-singlet cluster. We propose a model of a spin-singlet tetramer as discussed in geometrically frustrated materials.

  1. SmI2-induced cyclizations and their applications in natural product synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Tadashi

    2010-06-01

    Since the isolation of brevetoxin-B, a red tide toxin, many bioactive marine natural products featuring synthetically challenging trans-fused polycyclic ether ring systems have been reported. We have developed SmI(2)-induced cyclization of beta-alkoxyacrylate with aldehyde, affording 2,6-syn-2,3-trans-tetrahydropyran (THP) or 2,7-syn-2,3-trans-oxepane with complete stereoselection, as a key reaction of efficient iterative and bi-directional strategies for the construction of these polycyclic ethers. This reaction is also applicable to the synthesis of 3-, 5-, and 6-methyl-THPs and 3,5-dimethyl-THP. The synthesis of 2-methyl- and 2,6-dimethyl-THPs was accomplished by means of a unique methyl insertion. Recently, the SmI(2)-induced cyclization was extended to similar reactions using beta-alkoxyvinyl sulfone and sulfoxide. Reaction of (E)- and (Z)-beta-alkoxyvinyl sulfone-aldehyde afforded 2,6-syn-2,3-trans- and 2,6-syn-2,3-cis- THPs, respectively. Reaction of (E)-beta-alkoxyvinyl (R)- and (S)-sulfoxides gave 2,6-anti-2,3-cis- and 2,6-syn-2,3-trans-THPs, respectively. Reaction of (Z)-beta-alkoxyvinyl (R)-sulfoxides gave 2,6-syn-2,3-cis-THP and an olefinic product, while that of (Z)-beta-alkoxyvinyl (S)-sulfoxide afforded a mixture of many products. These SmI(2)-induced cyclizations have been applied to the total syntheses of various natural products, including brevetoxin-B, mucocin, pyranicin, and pyragonicin. Synthetic studies on gambierol and maitotoxin are also introduced.

  2. Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP Low Permeability Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Willis; Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2008-09-30

    Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

  3. AAV natural infection induces broad cross-neutralizing antibody responses to multiple AAV serotypes in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to sero-negative nonhuman primates which is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified three distinct groups of animals: those which never sero-converted to AAV (naïve); those which were persistently seropositive (chronic); and those that seroconverted during the 10 year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad sero-response characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes.

  4. AAV Natural Infection Induces Broad Cross-Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Multiple AAV Serotypes in Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to seronegative nonhuman primates that is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified 3 distinct groups of animals: those that never seroconverted to AAV (naïve), those that were persistently seropositive (chronic), and those that seroconverted during the 10-year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad seroresponse characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes.

  5. Internal stress induced natural self-chemisorption of ZnO nanostructured films

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Po-Wei; Su, Chih-Wei; Wei, Da-Hua

    2017-01-01

    The energetic particles bombardment can produce large internal stress in the zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film, and it can be used to intentionally modify the surface characteristics of ZnO films. In this article, we observed that the internal stress increased from −1.62 GPa to −0.33 GPa, and the naturally wettability of the textured ZnO nanostructured films changed from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity. According to analysis of surface chemical states, the naturally controllable wetting behavior can be attributed to hydrocarbon adsorbates on the nanostructured film surface, which is caused by tunable internal stress. On the other hand, the interfacial water molecules near the surface of ZnO nanostructured films have been identified as hydrophobic hydrogen structure by Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflection. Moreover, a remarkable near-band-edge emission peak shifting also can be observed in PL spectra due to the transition of internal stress state. Furthermore, our present ZnO nanostructured films also exhibited excellent transparency over 80% with a wise surface wetting switched from hydrophobic to hydrophilic states after exposing in ultraviolet (UV) surroundings. Our work demonstrated that the internal stress of the thin film not only induced natural wettability transition of ZnO nanostructured films, but also in turn affected the surface properties such as surface chemisorption. PMID:28233827

  6. Internal stress induced natural self-chemisorption of ZnO nanostructured films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Po-Wei; Su, Chih-Wei; Wei, Da-Hua

    2017-02-01

    The energetic particles bombardment can produce large internal stress in the zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film, and it can be used to intentionally modify the surface characteristics of ZnO films. In this article, we observed that the internal stress increased from ‑1.62 GPa to ‑0.33 GPa, and the naturally wettability of the textured ZnO nanostructured films changed from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity. According to analysis of surface chemical states, the naturally controllable wetting behavior can be attributed to hydrocarbon adsorbates on the nanostructured film surface, which is caused by tunable internal stress. On the other hand, the interfacial water molecules near the surface of ZnO nanostructured films have been identified as hydrophobic hydrogen structure by Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflection. Moreover, a remarkable near-band-edge emission peak shifting also can be observed in PL spectra due to the transition of internal stress state. Furthermore, our present ZnO nanostructured films also exhibited excellent transparency over 80% with a wise surface wetting switched from hydrophobic to hydrophilic states after exposing in ultraviolet (UV) surroundings. Our work demonstrated that the internal stress of the thin film not only induced natural wettability transition of ZnO nanostructured films, but also in turn affected the surface properties such as surface chemisorption.

  7. Toddaculin, a natural coumarin from Toddalia asiatica, induces differentiation and apoptosis in U-937 leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Ramiro; Riveiro, María E; Vermeulen, Mónica; Mondillo, Carolina; Coombes, Philip H; Crouch, Neil R; Ismail, Fathima; Mulholland, Dulcie A; Baldi, Alberto; Shayo, Carina; Davio, Carlos

    2012-06-15

    Chemotherapeutics represent the main approach for the treatment of leukemia. However, the occurrence of adverse side effects and the complete lack of effectiveness in some cases make it necessary to develop new drugs. As part of our screening program to evaluate the potential chemotherapeutic effect of natural coumarins, we investigated the anti-leukemic activities of a series of six prenylated coumarins isolated from the stem bark of Toddalia asiatica (Rutaceae). Among these, 6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (toddaculin) displayed the most potent cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects in U-937 cells. To determine whether these effects resulted from induction of cell death or differentiation, we further evaluated the expression of several apoptosis and maturation markers. Interestingly, while toddaculin at 250 μM was able to induce apoptosis in U-937 cells, involving decreased phosphorylation levels of ERK and Akt, 50 μM toddaculin exerted differentiating effects, inducing both the capacity of U-937 cells to reduce NBT and the expression of differentiation markers CD88 and CD11b, but no change in p-Akt or p-ERK levels. Taken together, these findings indicate that toddaculin displays a dual effect as a cell differentiating agent and apoptosis inducer in U-937 cells, suggesting it may serve as a pharmacological prototype for the development of novel anti-leukemic agents.

  8. Strain-induced crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized graphene sheet-filled natural rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbas, Bulent; Toki, Shigeyuki; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Chu, Benjamin; Register, Richard A.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Prud'homme, Robert K.; Adamson, Douglas H.

    2012-03-11

    The effects of functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) on the mechanical properties and strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber (NR) are investigated. FGSs are predominantly single sheets of graphene with a lateral size of several hundreds of nanometers and a thickness of 1.5 nm. The effect of FGS and that of carbon black (CB) on the strain-induced crystallization of NR is compared by coupled tensile tests and X-ray diffraction experiments. Synchrotron X-ray scattering enables simultaneous measurements of stress and crystallization of NR in real time during sample stretching. The onset of crystallization occurs at significantly lower strains for FGS-filled NR samples compared with CB-filled NR, even at low loadings. Neat-NR exhibits strain-induced crystallization around a strain of 2.25, while incorporation of 1 and 4 wt % FGS shifts the crystallization to strains of 1.25 and 0.75, respectively. In contrast, loadings of 16 wt % CB do not significantly shift the critical strain for crystallization. Two-dimensional (2D) wide angle X-ray scattering patterns show minor polymer chain alignment during stretching, in accord with previous results for NR. Small angle X-ray scattering shows that FGS is aligned in the stretching direction, whereas CB does not show alignment or anisotropy. The mechanical properties of filled NR samples are investigated using cyclic tensile and dynamic mechanical measurements above and below the glass transition of NR.

  9. New-to-nature sophorose analog: a potent inducer for gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom Tao; Wages, John M

    2016-04-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of lactonic sophorolipids from Starmerella bombicola yields a previously undescribed sophorose analog that potently induces cellulase in Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30. Acid treatment of natural sophorolipids results in a mixture of monoacetylated, deacetylated, and diacetylated sophorolipids in acidic and lactonic forms. Isolation of the active components of the mixture, followed by structure determination by MS and NMR, reveals a new chemical entity, in which the lactone ring has been opened at the C-1' rather than at the C-4″ position of the sophorose moiety. This sophorose ester is resistant to degradation by the host and is at least 28 times more powerful an inducer than sophorose in shake-flask culture. Even at low concentrations (0.05 mM), the chemically modified sophorolipid effectively induces cellulase. With further improvements, this highly enabling technology can potentially reduce the cost of enzymes produced in T. reesei and can facilitate the rapid deployment of enzyme plants to support the nascent cellulosic biofuels and biochemicals industries.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhances IL-15-induced natural killer cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiwon; Lee, Suk Hyung; Shin, Nara; Jeong, Mira; Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Mi Jeong; Yoon, Suk Ran; Chung, Jin Woong; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2009-09-04

    The differentiation of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by various factors including soluble growth factors and transcription factors. Here, we have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) is a positive regulator of NK cell differentiation. TNF-{alpha} augmented the IL-15-induced expression of NK1.1 and CD122 in mature NK cells, and TNF-{alpha} alone also induced NK cell maturation as well as IL-15. TNF-{alpha} also increased IFN-{gamma} production in NK cells in the presence of IL-15. Meanwhile, mRNA expression of several transcription factors, including T-bet and GATA-3, was increased by the addition of TNF-{alpha} and IL-15. In addition, TNF-{alpha} increased nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in NK cells and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B impeded TNF-{alpha}-enhanced NK cell maturation. Overall, these data suggest that TNF-{alpha} significantly increased IL-15-driven NK cell differentiation by increasing the expression of transcription factors that play crucial roles in NK cell maturation and inducing the NF-{kappa}B activity.

  11. Hyperfiltration-induced fractionation of lithium isotopes in geologic systems. Progress report, April 1, 1991--December 1, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    Effective modeling of hyperfiltration-induced fractionation of lithium isotopes is hindered by a lack of data on aqueous diffusion coefficients of {sup 6}Li{sup +} and {sup 7}Li{sup +}. Several experiments were conducted this past year on yielded a value for the ratio of diffusion coefficients between {sup D6}Li+Cl{minus}/{sup D7}Li+Cl{minus}. A 0.9450 M LiCl solution was placed within sealed dialysis tubing and osmoted against a kilogram of deionized water at 22C. Osmotic equilibrium occurred at 143 minutes, and the ratio of {omega}{sup 6}Li{sup +}Cl{minus}/{omega}{sup 7}Li+Cl{minus} was measured to be 1.011. Because this experimental value is close to the square root of the mass ratio between {sup 7}LiCl and {sup 6}LiCl (1.012), Graham`s Law may be a convenient way to calculate such ratios for aqueous diffusion coefficients of individual isotopic components. In evolution of this closed-system osmotic cell as a function of time, Li isotopic ratios of beaker and bag solutions exhibit a minimum and a maximum before the {sup 6}Li/{sup 7}Li ratios of both solutions assume the inevitable asymptotic approach toward isotopic equilibrium. Max difference in {sup 6}Li/{sup 7}Li ratio between beaker and bag solution was 0.00156 {plus_minus} 0.00015.

  12. Natural and induced endoreic hydrological conditions in the Alta Murgia karstic region (Apulia, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canora, F.; Fidelibus, M. D.; Spilotro, G.

    2009-04-01

    , very large flow can cascade down towards more depressed areas. Another important feature of the Alta Murgia territory is that the whole area is characterised by a high degree of division into parcels, physically delimited by a well developed network of drystone walls. These have been built during centuries by using stones retrieved from the same fields, having the main role of preserving soils from erosion. The drystone walls that limit the parcels define induced endoreic conditions, where runoff, mostly prevented from discharging out, rather converges toward natural drainage systems and internal depressions, where afterwards infiltrates: the walls allow a high infiltration rate of precipitation of low and medium intensity with low evapotranspiration, while the runoff basically activates only during highest intensity events. The drystone walls have preserved in the time the characteristics of the karst surface, with its high hydraulic conductivity consequent to the negligible outcrop of soils; because of their capability of decreasing the runoff triggering threshold, drystone walls have always worked positively inside the endoreic and quasi-endoreic basins. The above characteristics of both natural and artificial endoreic basins indicate that the definition of the water balance for the Alta Murgia aquifer is complex, requiring a model able to take into account, not only the absorption capacity of the karstic surface textures (which, indeed, are able to delay the start of the runoff due to the need to reach first the saturation of terra rossa in the fissures, pockets and fillings of karst hollows) but also the hydraulic behaviour and geomorphological features of the basins constituting on the whole the recharge area. To make the situation even more complex, in the last decades, the territory was subject to a particular type of land use change, the stone shattering (that is performed by crushing and grinding the karst surface), aimed at making suitable the parcels for

  13. Competition between Na + and Li + for Unsealed and Cytoskeleton-Depleted Human Red Blood Cell Membrane: A 23Na Multiple Quantum Filtered and 7Li NMR Relaxation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Chandra; Minadeo, Nicole; Toon, Jason; Graham, Daniel; Mota de Freitas, Duarte; Geraldes, Carlos F. G. C.

    1999-09-01

    Evidence for competition between Li+ and Na+ for binding sites of human unsealed and cytoskeleton-depleted human red blood cell (csdRBC) membranes was obtained from the effect of added Li+ upon the 23Na double quantum filtered (DQF) and triple quantum filtered (TQF) NMR signals of Na+-containing red blood cell (RBC) membrane suspensions. We found that, at low ionic strength, the observed quenching effect of Li+ on the 23Na TQF and DQF signal intensity probed Li+/Na+ competition for isotropic binding sites only. Membrane cytoskeleton depletion significantly decreased the isotropic signal intensity, strongly affecting the binding of Na+ to isotropic membrane sites, but had no effect on Li+/Na+ competition for those sites. Through the observed 23Na DQF NMR spectra, which allow probing of both isotropic and anisotropic Na+ motion, we found anisotropic membrane binding sites for Na+ when the total ionic strength was higher than 40 mM. This is a consequence of ionic strength effects on the conformation of the cytoskeleton, in particular on the dimer-tetramer equilibrium of spectrin. The determinant involvement of the cytoskeleton in the anisotropy of Na+ motion at the membrane surface was demonstrated by the isotropy of the DQF spectra of csdRBC membranes even at high ionic strength. Li+ addition initially quenched the isotropic signal the most, indicating preferential Li+/Na+ competition for the isotropic membrane sites. High ionic strength also increased the intensity of the anisotropic signal, due to its effect on the restructuring of the membrane cytoskeleton. Further Li+ addition competed with Na+ for those sites, quenching the anisotropic signal. 7Li T1 relaxation data for Li+-containing suspensions of unsealed and csdRBC membranes, in the absence and presence of Na+ at low ionic strength, showed that cytoskeleton depletion does not affect the affinity of Na+ for the RBC membrane, but increases the affinity of Li+ by 50%. This clearly indicates that cytoskeleton

  14. Protective Effects of Essential Oils as Natural Antioxidants against Hepatotoxicity Induced by Cyclophosphamide in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sheweita, Salah A.; El-Hosseiny, Lobna S.; Nashashibi, Munther A.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical application of cyclophosphamide (CP) as an anticancer drug is often limited due to its toxicity. CP is metabolized mainly in the liver by cytochrome P450 system into acrolein which is the proximate toxic metabolite. Many different natural antioxidants were found to alleviate the toxic effects of various toxic agents via different mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aimed at investigating the role of essential oils extracted from fennel, cumin and clove as natural antioxidants in the alleviation of hepatotoxicity induced by CP through assessment of hepatotoxicity biomarkers (AST, ALT, ALP), histopathology of liver tissues as well as other biochemical parameters involved in the metabolism of CP. The data of the present study showed that treatment of male mice with cyclophosphamide (2.5 mg/Kg BW) as repeated dose for 28 consecutive days was found to induce hepatotoxicity through the elevation in the activities of AST, ALT, and ALP. Combined administration of any of these oils with CP to mice partially normalized the altered hepatic biochemical markers caused by CP, whereas administration of fennel, clove or cumin essential oils alone couldn’t change liver function indices. Moreover, CP caused histological changes in livers of mice including swelling and dilation in sinusoidal space, inflammation in portal tract and hepatocytes, as well as, hyperplasia in Kuppfer cells. However, co-administration of any of the essential oils with CP alleviated to some extent the changes caused by CP but not as the normal liver. CP was also found to induce free radical levels (measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and catalase as well as activities and protein expressions of both glutathione S-transferase (GSTπ) and glutathione peroxidase. Essential oils restored changes in activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GR, GST, and GPx) caused by CP to their normal levels compared

  15. The natural compounds piperovatine and piperlonguminine induce autophagic cell death on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Santos, Phercyles; Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Miranda, Nathielle; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias-Filho, Benedito Prado; Silva, Sueli Oliveira; Cortez, Diogenes Aparício Garcia; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2013-03-01

    The currently available treatments for Chagas disease show limited therapeutic potential and are associated with serious side effects. Our group has been attempting to find alternative drugs isolated from natural products as a potential source of pharmacological agents against Trypanosoma cruzi. Here, we demonstrate the antitrypanosomal activity of the amides piperovatine and piperlonguminine isolated from Piper ovatum against epimastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. We also investigated the mechanisms of action of these compounds on extracellular amastigote and epimastigote forms of T. cruzi. These amides showed low toxicity to LLCMK(2) mammalian cells. By using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, we observed that the compounds caused severe alterations in T. cruzi. These alterations were mainly located in plasma membrane and mitochondria. Furthermore, the study of treated parasites labeled with Rh123, PI and MDC corroborate with our TEM data. These mitochondrial dysfunctions induced by the amides might trigger biochemical alterations that lead to cell death. Altogether, our data evidence a possible autophagic process.

  16. Detection of cysteine protease in Taenia solium-induced brain granulomas in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Mkupasi, Ernatus Martin; Sikasunge, Chummy Sikalizyo; Ngowi, Helena Aminiel; Leifsson, Pall S; Johansen, Maria Vang

    2013-10-18

    In order to further characterize the immune response around the viable or degenerating Taenia solium cysts in the pig brain, the involvement of cysteine protease in the immune evasion was assessed. Brain tissues from 30 adult pigs naturally infected with T. solium cysticercosis were subjected to histopathology using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and immunohistochemistry using caspase-3 antibodies. Histopathological evaluation revealed lesions of stage I which was characterized by presence of viable parasite surrounded with minimal to moderate inflammatory cells and stage III characterized by the presence of a disintegrating parasite surrounded with high inflammatory cells. The results of immunohistochemistry indicated caspase-3 positive cells interspaced between inflammatory infiltrate mainly in stage I lesions, indicating the presence of cysteine protease. This result confirms the earlier hypothesis that cysteine protease may play a role in inducing immune evasion through apoptosis around viable T. solium cysts.

  17. Nature of Defects Induced by Au Implantation in Hexagonal Silicon Carbide Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gentils, Aurelie; Barthe, Marie-France; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter

    2009-03-10

    Pulsed-slow-positron-beam-based positron lifetime spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of vacancy defects induced by 20 MeV Au implantation in single crystals 6H-SiC. Preliminary analysis of the data shows that at lower fluence, below 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, a positron lifetime of 220 ps has been obtained: it could be associated with the divacancy V{sub Si}-V{sub C} in comparison with the literature. At higher fluence, above 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, a positron lifetime of 260-270 ps, increasing with the incident positron energy, has been observed after decomposition of the lifetime spectra. By comparison with lifetime calculations, open-volumes such as quadrivacancy (V{sub Si}-V{sub C}){sub 2} clusters could be associated with this value.

  18. Human-induced nitrogen-phosphorus imbalances alter natural and managed ecosystems across the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñuelas, Josep; Poulter, Benjamin; Sardans, Jordi; Ciais, Philippe; van der Velde, Marijn; Bopp, Laurent; Boucher, Olivier; Godderis, Yves; Hinsinger, Philippe; Llusia, Joan; Nardin, Elise; Vicca, Sara; Obersteiner, Michael; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2013-12-01

    The availability of carbon from rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and of nitrogen from various human-induced inputs to ecosystems is continuously increasing; however, these increases are not paralleled by a similar increase in phosphorus inputs. The inexorable change in the stoichiometry of carbon and nitrogen relative to phosphorus has no equivalent in Earth’s history. Here we report the profound and yet uncertain consequences of the human imprint on the phosphorus cycle and nitrogen:phosphorus stoichiometry for the structure, functioning and diversity of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and ecosystems. A mass balance approach is used to show that limited phosphorus and nitrogen availability are likely to jointly reduce future carbon storage by natural ecosystems during this century. Further, if phosphorus fertilizers cannot be made increasingly accessible, the crop yields projections of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment imply an increase of the nutrient deficit in developing regions.

  19. Polypropylene/natural rubber thermoplastic vulcanizates by eco-friendly and sustainable electron induced reactive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Manas; Gohs, Uwe; Wagenknecht, Udo; Heinrich, Gert

    2013-07-01

    TPVs are a special class of thermoplastic and elastomer blend where cross-linking of elastomeric phase takes place during melt mixing process known as dynamic vulcanization (DV). A 50/50 blend of natural rubber (NR) and polypropylene (PP) were dynamically vulcanized using Electron Induced Reactive Processing (EIReP) as a function of absorbed dose (150, 250, and 350 kGy) at fixed electron energy (1.5 MeV) and dose per rotation. Different methods like tensile test, DSC, melt rheology, and SEM have been employed to understand the structure-property relationship of the prepared samples. The results suggest that EIReP is a novel technique to offer handful of additional features without compromising the end user property.

  20. Four decades of opposing natural and human-induced artificial selection acting on Windermere pike (Esox lucius).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Stephanie M; Edeline, Eric; Asbjørn Vøllestad, L; Haugen, Thrond O; Winfield, Ian J; Fletcher, Janice M; Ben James, J; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2007-06-01

    The ability of natural selection to drive local adaptation has been appreciated ever since Darwin. Whether human impacts can impede the adaptive process has received less attention. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying natural selection and harvest selection acting on a freshwater fish (pike) over four decades. Across the time series, directional natural selection tended to favour large individuals whereas the fishery targeted large individuals. Moreover, non-linear natural selection tended to favour intermediate sized fish whereas the fishery targeted intermediate sized fish because the smallest and largest individuals were often not captured. Thus, our results unequivocally demonstrate that natural selection and fishery selection often acted in opposite directions within this natural system. Moreover, the two selective factors combined to produce reduced fitness overall and stronger stabilizing selection relative to natural selection acting alone. The long-term ramifications of such human-induced modifications to adaptive landscapes are currently unknown and certainly warrant further investigation.

  1. Pressure induced stiffening, thermal softening of bulk modulus and brittle nature of mercury chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Shriya, Swarna; Sapkale, Raju; Varshney, Meenu; Ameri, M.

    2015-07-01

    The pressure and temperature dependent elastic properties of mercury chalcogenides (HgX; X = S, Se and Te) with pressure induced structural transition from ZnS-type (B3) to NaCl-type (B1) structure have been analyzed within the framework of a model interionic interaction potential with long-range Coulomb and charge transfer interactions, short-range overlap repulsion and van der Waals (vdW) interactions as well as zero point energy effects. Emphasis is on the evaluation of the Bulk modulus with pressure and temperature dependency to yield the Poisson's ratio ν, the Pugh ratio ϕ, anisotropy parameter, Shear and Young's modulus, Lamé's constant, Klein man parameter, elastic wave velocity and Debye temperature. The Poisson's ratio behavior infers that HgX are brittle in nature. To our knowledge this is the first quantitative theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of elastic and thermodynamical properties explicitly the ductile (brittle) nature of HgX and still awaits experimental confirmations.

  2. Natural Products and Complementary Therapies for Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Brami, Cloé; Bao, Ting; Deng, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a serious dose-limiting side-effect without any FDA-approved treatment option. Prior reviews focus mostly on pharmacological interventions, but nonpharmaceutical interventions have also been evaluated. A Web of Science and PubMed database search to identify relevant RCTs from January 2005 to May 2015 included the terms: CIPN, cancer; and supplements, vitamin E, goshajinkigan, kampo, acetyl-L-carnitine, carnitine, alpha-lipoic acid, omega-3, glutamine, or glutamate; or massage, acupuncture, mind-body practice, yoga, meditation, Tai-Chi, physical activity, or exercise. Of 1465 publications screened, 12 RCTs evaluated natural products and one evaluated electroacupuncture. Vitamin E may help prevent CIPN. L-glutamine, goshajinkigan, and omega-3 are also promising. Acetyl-L-carnitine may worsen CIPN and alpha-lipoic acid activity is unknown. Electroacupuncture was not superior to placebo. No RCTs were published regarding other complementary therapies, although some studies mention positive incidental findings. Natural products and complementary therapies deserve further investigation, given the lack of effective CIPN interventions. PMID:26652982

  3. Investigations of plasma induced effects on the surface properties of lignocellulosic natural coir fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, K. M.; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves; Mozetič, Miran; Junkar, Ita; Primc, Gregor; Gorjanc, Marija

    2016-04-01

    The development of lignocellulosic natural-fibre-reinforced polymers composites are constrained by two limitations: the upper temperature at which the fibre can be processed and the significant differences between the surface energy of the fibre and the polymer matrix. Since the fibres and matrices are chemically different, strong adhesion at their interface is needed for the effective transfer of stress and bond distribution throughout the interface. The present study investigated the plasma induced effects on the surface properties of natural coir fibres. Weakly ionized oxygen plasma was created in two different discharge chambers by an inductively coupled radiofrequency (RF) discharge. The water absorption studies showed an increase of water sorption from 39% to 100%. The morphological study using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis also confirmed the surface changes which were observed after the plasma treatment. The topographic measurements and phase imaging done using atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated difference in topographic features and etching of coir wall, which points to the removal of the first layer of coir fibre. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that the oxygen content measured for samples treated at 50 Pa increased from initial 18% to about 32%.

  4. Natural haemozoin induces expression and release of human monocyte tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1.

    PubMed

    Polimeni, Manuela; Valente, Elena; Ulliers, Daniela; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Giribaldi, Giuliana; Prato, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Recently matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and its endogenous inhibitor (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, TIMP-1) have been implicated in complicated malaria. In vivo, mice with cerebral malaria (CM) display high levels of both MMP-9 and TIMP-1, and in human patients TIMP-1 serum levels directly correlate with disease severity. In vitro, natural haemozoin (nHZ, malarial pigment) enhances monocyte MMP-9 expression and release. The present study analyses the effects of nHZ on TIMP-1 regulation in human adherent monocytes. nHZ induced TIMP-1 mRNA expression and protein release, and promoted TNF-α, IL-1β, and MIP-1α/CCL3 production. Blocking antibodies or recombinant cytokines abrogated or mimicked nHZ effects on TIMP-1, respectively. p38 MAPK and NF-κB inhibitors blocked all nHZ effects on TIMP-1 and pro-inflammatory molecules. Still, total gelatinolytic activity was enhanced by nHZ despite TIMP-1 induction. Collectively, these data indicate that nHZ induces inflammation-mediated expression and release of human monocyte TIMP-1 through p38 MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent mechanisms. However, TIMP-1 induction is not sufficient to counterbalance nHZ-dependent MMP-9 enhancement. Future investigation on proteinase-independent functions of TIMP-1 (i.e. cell survival promotion and growth/differentiation inhibition) is needed to clarify the role of TIMP-1 in malaria pathogenesis.

  5. The effect of induced mutations on quantitative traits in Arabidopsis thaliana: Natural versus artificial conditions.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Frank W; Fenster, Charles B

    2016-12-01

    Mutations are the ultimate source of all genetic variations. New mutations are expected to affect quantitative traits differently depending on the extent to which traits contribute to fitness and the environment in which they are tested. The dogma is that the preponderance of mutations affecting fitness will be skewed toward deleterious while their effects on nonfitness traits will be bidirectionally distributed. There are mixed views on the role of stress in modulating these effects. We quantify mutation effects by inducing mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia accession) using the chemical ethylmethane sulfonate. We measured the effects of new mutations relative to a premutation founder for fitness components under both natural (field) and artificial (growth room) conditions. Additionally, we measured three other quantitative traits, not expected to contribute directly to fitness, under artificial conditions. We found that induced mutations were equally as likely to increase as decrease a trait when that trait was not closely related to fitness (traits that were neither survivorship nor reproduction). We also found that new mutations were more likely to decrease fitness or fitness-related traits under more stressful field conditions than under relatively benign artificial conditions. In the benign condition, the effect of new mutations on fitness components was similar to traits not as closely related to fitness. These results highlight the importance of measuring the effects of new mutations on fitness and other traits under a range of conditions.

  6. Investigation of the α-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sections of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+), 94Ru, 95Ru,97Ru, 103Ru and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha energy by using a stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of alpha beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analyzed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011).

  7. Natural Disaster Induced Losses at Household Level: A Study on the Disaster Affected Migrants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishtiaque, A.; Nazem, N. I.; Jerin, T.

    2015-12-01

    Given its geographical location Bangladesh frequently confronts natural disasters. Disaster induced losses often obligate socio-economic dislocation from rural areas to large urban centers. After incurring what type/amount of losses people migrate is still unknown. In this paper we focus on migrants who migrated due to natural disasters. Thus, the objectives of this paper are, first, ascertaining the proportion of disaster migrants in Dhaka city; second, determining types of natural disasters which compel rural out-migration; third, assessing the resource and economic losses stem from these disasters at household level. Using the slum database (N = 4966), we select eight slums randomly with a purpose to include migrants from maximum districts available. In order to identify the proportion of disaster affected migrants a census is conducted in 407 households of those 8 slums and the result demonstrates that 18.43% of the migrants are disaster affected, which was only 5% in 1993. Out of all hydro-meteorological disasters, river bank erosion (RBE), followed by flood, drives most people out of their abode. However, unlike RBE migrants, migrants affected by flood usually return to their origin after certain period. In-depth interviews on the disaster migrants reveal that RBE claims total loss of homestead land & agricultural land while flood causes 20% and 23% loss respectively. Agricultural income decreases 96% because of RBE whereas flood victims encounter 98% decrease. People also incur 79% & 69% loss in livestock owing to RBE and flood severally. These disasters cause more than eighty percent reduction in total monthly income. Albeit RBE appears more vigorous but total economic loss is greater in flood- on average each household experiences a loss of BDT 350,555 due to flood and BDT 300,000 on account of RBE. Receiving no substantial support from community or government the affected people are compelled to migrate.

  8. On the dual nature of lichen-induced rock surface weathering in contrasting micro-environments.

    PubMed

    Marques, Joana; Gonçalves, João; Oliveira, Cláudia; Favero-Longo, Sergio E; Paz-Bermúdez, Graciela; Almeida, Rubim; Prieto, Beatriz

    2016-10-01

    Contradictory evidence from biogeomorphological studies has increased the debate on the extent of lichen contribution to differential rock surface weathering in both natural and cultural settings. This study, undertaken in Côa Valley Archaeological Park, aimed at evaluating the effect of rock surface orientation on the weathering ability of dominant lichens. Hyphal penetration and oxalate formation at the lichen-rock interface were evaluated as proxies of physical and chemical weathering, respectively. A new protocol of pixel-based supervised image classification for the analysis of periodic acid-Schiff stained cross-sections of colonized schist revealed that hyphal spread of individual species was not influenced by surface orientation. However, hyphal spread was significantly higher in species dominant on northwest facing surfaces. An apparently opposite effect was noticed in terms of calcium oxalate accumulation at the lichen-rock interface; it was detected by Raman spectroscopy and complementary X-ray microdiffraction on southeast facing surfaces only. These results suggest that lichen-induced physical weathering may be most severe on northwest facing surfaces by means of an indirect effect of surface orientation on species abundance, and thus dependent on the species, whereas lichen-induced chemical weathering is apparently higher on southeast facing surfaces and dependent on micro-environmental conditions, giving only weak support to the hypothesis that lichens are responsible for the currently observed pattern of rock-art distribution in Côa Valley. Assumptions about the drivers of open-air rock-art distribution patterns elsewhere should also consider the micro-environmental controls of lichen-induced weathering, to avoid biased measures of lichen contribution to rock-art deterioration.

  9. Photosensitized rose Bengal-induced phototoxicity on human melanoma cell line under natural sunlight exposure.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Ajeet K; Mujtaba, Syed Faiz; Dwivedi, Ashish; Amar, Saroj K; Goyal, Shruti; Verma, Ankit; Kushwaha, Hari N; Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2016-03-01

    Rose Bengal (RB) is an anionic water-soluble xanthene dye, which used for many years to assess eye cornea and conjunctiva damage. RB showed strong absorption maxima (λmax) under visible light followed by UV-B and UV-A. RB under sunlight exposure showed a time-dependent photodegradation. Our results show that photosensitized RB generates (1)O2 via Type-II photodynamic pathway and induced DNA damage under sunlight/UV-R exposure. 2'dGuO degradation, micronuclei formation, and single- and double-strand breakage were the outcome of photogenotoxicity caused by RB. Quenching studies with NaN3 advocate the involvement of (1)O2 in RB photogenotoxicity. RB induced linoleic acid photoperoxidation, which was parallel to (1)O2-mediated DNA damage. Oxidative stress in A375 cell line (human melanoma cell line) was detected through DCF-DA assay. Photosensitized RB decreased maximum cellular viability under sunlight followed by UV-B and UV-A exposures. Apoptosis was detected as a pattern of cell death through the increased of caspase-3 activity, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and PS translocation through inner to outer plasma membrane. Increased cytosolic levels of Bax also advocate the apoptotic cell death. We propose a p53-mediated apoptosis via increased expression of Bax gene and protein. Thus, the exact mechanism behind RB phototoxicity was the involvement of (1)O2, which induced oxidative stress-mediated DNA and membrane damage, finally apoptotic cell death under natural sunlight exposure. The study suggests that after the use of RB, sunlight exposure may avoid to prevent from its harmful effects.

  10. Hot colors: the nature and specificity of color-induced nasal thermal sensations.

    PubMed

    Michael, George A; Galich, Hélène; Relland, Solveig; Prud'hon, Sabine

    2010-03-05

    The nature of the recently discovered color-induced nasal thermal sensations was investigated in four Experiments. Subjects were required to fixate a bottle containing a red or green solution presented centrally (Exp1 and Exp4) or laterally (Exp2) and to sniff another bottle, always the same one, but which they were not allowed to see, containing 10 ml of a colorless, odorless and trigeminal-free solution. Each nostril was tested separately, and subjects were asked whether the sniffed solution induced warming or cooling sensations (plus an ambient sensation in Exp4) in the nasal cavity. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 confirmed the warming/left nostril-cooling/right nostril dissociation, suggesting the existence of different lateralized processes for thermal processing. However, Experiment 2 failed to demonstrate dominance of warming responses when subjects' eyes were directed to the left or cooling responses when they were directed to the right. Nor did gaze direction interact with the tested nostril. This suggests that the color-induced thermal sensations are specifically related to the nasal trigeminal system, rather than a general process related to general hemispheric activity. When the exposed bottles were colorless (Exp3), no lateralized patterns were observed, suggesting, in combination with the results of Experiments 1 and 2, that both color cues and nasal stimulations are necessary for lateralized patterns to arise. Rendering the temperature judgment even more difficult (Exp4), made the lateralized patterns shift towards the associated (i.e., ambient) responses. The results are discussed in a general framework which considers that, even in the absence of real thermal stimulus, preparing to process thermal stimuli in the nasal cavity may activate the underlying lateralized neural mechanisms, and that those mechanisms are reflected in the responses.

  11. Natural and gonadotropin-induced ovarian activity in tigers (Panthera tigris) assessed by fecal steroid analyses.

    PubMed

    Graham, L H; Byers, A P; Armstrong, D L; Loskutoff, N M; Swanson, W F; Wildt, D E; Brown, J L

    2006-07-01

    Fecal samples were collected from female tigers (n = 17) to compare endocrine patterns associated with natural ovarian activity with those after chorionic gonadotropin ovulation induction and artificial insemination (AI). Baseline fecal estradiol concentrations were 65.77 +/- 3.61 ng/g with estrual peaks of 167.39 +/- 9.92 ng/g and an anovulatory cycle length of 17.96 +/- 0.70 days. Peak fecal estradiol was higher when females were housed with a male for breeding (262.30 +/- 41.43 vs. 165.30 +/- 3.67 ng/g; P < 0.05). The majority of animals showed some seasonal differences in fecal estradiol however, patterns were inconsistent. Fecal progestagens increased only after breeding confirming tigers are primarily induced ovulators. The non-pregnant luteal phase was 34.50 +/- 1.85 days in duration. In pregnant tigers, fecal progestagens remained elevated for 108 days until parturition and the diagnosis of pregnancy was possible based on the elevated fecal progestagens after 35 days of gestation. Tigers were administered equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) to stimulate follicular growth and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to induce ovulation prior to AI [200 IU eCG/100 IU hCG (n = 5); 400 IU eCG/200 IU hCG (n = 2); 500 IU eCG/100 IU hCG (n = 2); 1000 IU eCG/750 IU hCG (n = 11); 1000 IU eCG/1000 IU hCG (n = 4)]. None of the tigers subjected to AI became pregnant (n = 9). Fecal endocrine patterns in gonadotropin-stimulated tigers were considerably different from those observed in naturally bred tigers. In particular, fecal estradiol concentrations were higher than those observed during natural estrus and remained elevated for longer periods of time in tigers administered the higher doses of gonadotropins typically used in conjunction with AI in this species. These abnormal endocrine patterns may help explain the poor success rate of AI in this species.

  12. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Biswas, Jaydip; Roy, Madhumita

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent

  13. Discrimination between induced and natural seismicity by means of nonlinear analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuntaev, S. B.; Melchaeva, O. Yu.; Vorohobina, S. V.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of human activity on the Earth's interior often causes activation of seismic processes, i.e., generates induced seismicity. Nowadays, the problem of distinguishing between the natural and induced seismicity have become important. The increasing interest to this problem is caused by the issues which seem to be far from related to seismicity, for examples, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere through the transition to the so-called green energy sources (such as hydrothermal power plants). Some geothermal power plants are located in the seismically active regions, which impedes referring the increase in seismic activity to the induced effects or natural variations. Efficient methods for analyzing the behavior of complex dynamical systems (to which the geophysical systems pertain) were developed in the field of nonlinear dynamics. In particular, these methods allow one to identify the changes in the state of the system, which are caused by external action. If a system exposed to some impact has changed its state, the processes in this system will contain a deterministic component defined by the external factor. The appearance of the deterministic component should decrease the fractal dimension of the attractor in the phase space of the system states (if such attractor is distinguished) and decrease the dimension of the embedding space (the number of the key parameters required for describing the behavior of the system). The Grassberger-Procaccia method is the widest-adopted approach for estimating the dimensions of the attractor and the embedding space. In the presented work, we use this method for analyzing the seismicity in several regions that suffered from technogeneous impacts. In some cases considered, the seismicity was not obviously induced. Four data sets were analyzed: (1) the seismicity in the region of the Romashkino oil field, Russia; (2) the seismic activity before and after the large-scale explosions on Burlykiya and

  14. Measurements of the neutron yields from 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (thick target) with incident energies from 1.885 to 2.0 MeV.

    PubMed

    Yu, W; Yue, G; Han, X; Chen, J; Tian, B

    1998-07-01

    Accelerator-based neutron source have been considered to be practical for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Based on experience with a parameters of the Brookhaven National Laboratory BMRR reactor neutron source, which has been used in treatment experiments, the future accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT should have the properties of low energy distribution (< 100 keV) and high flux (about 10(9) neutrons per second per square centimeter) in the patient zone. Using protons to bombard thick 7Li targets, generating neutrons via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, is one of the optimal choices for this kind of neutron source. Neutron yield data versus incident energy are necessary in order to select the proper incident energy and for estimating how high the incident proton current should be. The required proton beam current intensity is one of the key parameters for an accelerator useful for BNCT. In the present work, neutron yields of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction with a thick lithium target and incident energies of 1.885 and 1.9 MeV were measured at 0 degree with respect to the incident beam direction. The results are (3.08 +/- 0.17) x 10(12) and (5.71 +/- 0.32) x 10(12) neutrons/C sr, respectively. Neutron yield angular distribution measurements at 2 MeV incident energy were also performed. The proton beams were generated by the Peking University 4.5 MV electrostatic accelerator. The emitted neutrons from these reactions have the advantages of low energy distribution and forward angular distribution, which are requirements for a BNCT neutron source. The data obtained in this work can be used as a reference to study the accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT.

  15. Natural bond orbital analyses of persulfoxide stabilization by remote functional groups. The conformationally induced electrostatic stabilization sulfide photooxygenation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Clennan, Edward L; Hightower, Sean E

    2006-02-03

    The conformationally induced electrostatic stabilization (CIES) sulfide photooxygenation mechanism was computationally examined using an ab initio model and extended to the study of new donor atoms. The MP2/6-31G(d) geometries and a natural population analysis of natural lone-pair orbitals on the donor atoms support the mechanism and reveal that oxygen and nitrogen donor groups are more stabilizing than sulfur.

  16. Natural radioactivity contents in tobacco and radiation dose induced from smoking.

    PubMed

    Shousha, Hany A; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2012-06-01

    One of the causative factors for cancer-inducing mechanisms in humans is radioactive elements present in tobacco leaves used in the manufacture of cigarettes. Smoking of tobacco and its products increases the internal intake and radiation dose due to naturally occurring radionuclides that are considered to be one of the most significant causes of lung cancer. In this work, different commercial types of cigarettes, cigar and moassel were collected from market. Naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra and (214)Bi ((238)U series), (228)Ac and (228)Ra ((232)Th series), (40)K  and man-made (137)Cs were measured in tobacco using gamma-ray spectrometer. Results show that the average concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K were 4.564, 3.940 and 1289.53 Bq kg(-1), respectively. This reflects their origin from the soil by root uptake and fertilisers used in the cultivation of tobacco plants. Concentration of (137)Cs was 0.348 Bq kg(-1) due to root uptake or deposition onto the leaf foliage. For smokers, the annual effective dose due to inhalation of (238)U varied from 49.35 to 139.40 μSv(-1) (average 104.27 μSv y(-1)), while of (232)Th from 23.86 to 111.06 μSv y(-1) (average 65.52 μSv y(-1)). The annual effective dose resulting from (137)Cs was varied from 10.96 to 24.01 nSv y(-1) (average 19.41 nSv y(-1)).

  17. Photochemically-induced fluorescence properties of two benzoyl- and phenylurea pesticides and determination in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Diaw, P A; Mbaye, O M A; Gaye-Seye, M D; Aaron, J-J; Coly, A; Tine, A; Oturan, N; Oturan, M A

    2014-07-01

    A photo-induced fluorescence (PIF) method was developed for the determination of two benzoyl- and phenylurea pesticides, namely diflubenzuron (DFB) and fenuron (FEN). The photoconversion under UV irradiation of both pesticides into strongly fluorescent photoproducts was performed in several media (methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile, pH4 aqueous solution and pH4 water-methanol (30:70, v/v) mixture). PIF parameters were optimized. Analytical figures of merit for the PIF determination of DFB and FEN were satisfactory, with rather wide linear dynamic range (LDR) values of one to two orders of magnitude, relatively low limit of detection (LOD) values of, respectively, 9-24 ng/mL for DFB and 1-28 ng/mL for FEN, and limit of quantification (LOQ) values of, respectively, 30-80 ng/mL for DFB and 4-95 ng/mL for FEN, according to the medium. Relative standard deviation (RSD) values were in the range 1.7-5.6%. PIF was validated by comparing its analytical performances to those of a standard UV absorption spectrophotometric method. The optimized PIF method was applied to the quantitative analysis of both pesticides in various spiked natural water samples collected in a Senegal agricultural area by the standard addition procedure prior to extraction steps in dichloromethane, with satisfactory mean recovery percentage values (97.0-105.3 for DFB and 98.3-102.8% for FEN). An interference study of foreign species, including pesticides and inorganic ions, likely to be present in natural waters, was also carried out.

  18. Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis Induced by Osthole, A Natural Coumarin, in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lurong; Jiang, Guorong; Yao, Fei; He, Yan; Liang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Yinsheng; Hu, Bo; Wu, Yan; Li, Yunsen; Liu, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed tumors worldwide and is known to be resistant to conventional chemotherapy. New therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for treating HCC. Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative, has been shown to have anti-tumor activity. However, the effects of osthole on HCC have not yet been reported. Methods and Findings HCC cell lines were treated with osthole at various concentrations for 24, 48 and 72 hours. The proliferations of the HCC cells were measured by MTT assays. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. HCC tumor models were established in mice by subcutaneously injection of SMMC-7721 or Hepa1-6 cells and the effect of osthole on tumor growths in vivo and the drug toxicity were studied. NF-κB activity after osthole treatment was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and the expression of caspase-3 was measured by western blotting. The expression levels of other apoptosis-related genes were also determined by real-time PCR (PCR array) assays. Osthole displayed a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of the HCC cell proliferations in vitro. It also induced apoptosis and caused cell accumulation in G2 phase. Osthole could significantly suppress HCC tumor growth in vivo with no toxicity at the dose we used. NF-κB activity was significantly suppressed by osthole at the dose- and time-dependent manner. The cleaved caspase-3 was also increased by osthole treatment. The expression levels of some apoptosis-related genes that belong to TNF ligand family, TNF receptor family, Bcl-2 family, caspase family, TRAF family, death domain family, CIDE domain and death effector domain family and CARD family were all increased with osthole treatment. Conclusion Osthole could significantly inhibit HCC growth in vitro and in vivo through cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis by suppressing NF-κB activity and promoting the expressions of apoptosis

  19. Naturally induced humoral immunity to West Nile virus infection in raptors.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Nicole M; Kratz, Gail E; Bates, Rebecca; Scherpelz, Judy A; Bowen, Richard A; Komar, Nicholas

    2008-09-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection can be fatal to many bird species, including numerous raptors, though population- and ecosystem-level impacts following introduction of the virus to North America have been difficult to document. Raptors occupy a diverse array of habitats worldwide and are important to ecosystems for their role as opportunistic predators. We documented initial (primary) WNV infection and then regularly measured WNV-specific neutralizing antibody titers in 16 resident raptors of seven species, plus one turkey vulture. Most individuals were initially infected and seroconverted between July and September of 2003, though three birds remained seronegative until summer 2006. Many of these birds became clinically ill upon primary infection, with clinical signs ranging from loss of appetite to moderate neurological disease. Naturally induced WNV neutralizing antibody titers remained essentially unchanged in some birds, while eight individuals experienced secondary rises in titer presumably due to additional exposures at 1, 2, or 3 years following primary infection. No birds experienced clinical signs surrounding or following the time of secondary exposure, and therefore antibodies were considered protective. Results of this study have implications for transmission dynamics of WNV and health of raptor populations, as well as the interpretation of serologic data from free-ranging and captive birds. Antibodies in raptors surviving WNV may persist for multiple years and protect against potential adverse effects of subsequent exposures.

  20. Coding deficits in hidden hearing loss induced by noise: the nature and impacts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qiang; Shen, Pei; Li, Xiaowei; Shi, Lijuan; Liu, Lijie; Wang, Jiping; Yu, Zhiping; Stephen, Kegan; Aiken, Steve; Yin, Shankai; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Hidden hearing refers to the functional deficits in hearing without deterioration in hearing sensitivity. This concept is proposed based upon recent finding of massive noise-induced damage on ribbon synapse between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the cochlea without significant permanent threshold shifts (PTS). Presumably, such damage may cause coding deficits in auditory nerve fibers (ANFs). However, such deficits had not been detailed except that a selective loss of ANFs with low spontaneous rate (SR) was reported. In the present study, we investigated the dynamic changes of ribbon synapses and the coding function of ANF single units in one month after a brief noise exposure that caused a massive damage of ribbon synapses but no PTS. The synapse count and functional response measures indicates a large portion of the disrupted synapses were re-connected. This is consistent with the fact that the change of SR distribution due to the initial loss of low SR units is recovered quickly. However, ANF coding deficits were developed later with the re-establishment of the synapses. The deficits were found in both intensity and temporal processing, revealing the nature of synaptopathy in hidden hearing loss. PMID:27117978

  1. Electron-beam-induced annealing of natural zircon: a Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Váczi, Tamás; Nasdala, Lutz

    2016-12-01

    The annealing of radiation damage in zircon by low-energy electron irradiation was explored systematically. Natural zircon samples spanning a wide range of self-irradiation damage were irradiated with the focused electron beam of an electron probe microanalyser. The effects of beam current and irradiation time were tested systematically, and the changes in zircon were measured using Raman spectroscopy. Our results confirm the damage-annealing effect of an accelerated electron beam. We demonstrate that non-thermal annealing occurs through electron-enhanced defect reactions and that the extent of the annealing is a function of both the irradiation time and the beam current. The complete annealing of radiation damage in zircon by an accelerated electron beam was not possible under the conditions of our experiments. Our results indicate that Raman band broadening in ion-irradiated zircon can possibly be explained through phonon confinement, as the estimated domain sizes of the crystalline volume amid recoil clusters decrease with increasing α dose. The results underlay the importance of doing Raman spectroscopy before electron-beam and ion-beam analysis. To avoid unwanted beam-induced annealing of damage in zircon during EPMA analysis, the electron energy transferred per volume unit of sample should be minimised, for instance by keeping the integrated charge low and/or by defocusing the electron beam.

  2. TGF-β-inducible microRNA-183 silences tumor-associated natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Donatelli, Sarah S; Zhou, Jun-Min; Gilvary, Danielle L; Eksioglu, Erika A; Chen, Xianghong; Cress, W Douglas; Haura, Eric B; Schabath, Matthew B; Coppola, Domenico; Wei, Sheng; Djeu, Julie Y

    2014-03-18

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β), enriched in the tumor microenvironment and broadly immunosuppressive, inhibits natural killer (NK) cell function by yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we show that TGF-β-treated human NK cells exhibit reduced tumor cytolysis and abrogated perforin polarization to the immune synapse. This result was accompanied by loss of surface expression of activating killer Ig-like receptor 2DS4 and NKp44, despite intact cytoplasmic stores of these receptors. Instead, TGF-β depleted DNAX activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12), which is critical for surface NK receptor stabilization and downstream signal transduction. Mechanistic analysis revealed that TGF-β induced microRNA (miR)-183 to repress DAP12 transcription/translation. This pathway was confirmed with luciferase reporter constructs bearing the DAP12 3' untranslated region as well as in human NK cells by use of sense and antisense miR-183. Moreover, we documented reduced DAP12 expression in tumor-associated NK cells in lung cancer patients, illustrating this pathway to be consistently perturbed in the human tumor microenvironment.

  3. Natural and man-induced stress evolution of slopes: the Monte Mario hill in Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzano, F.; Martino, S.; Priori, M.

    2006-07-01

    The paper deals with stress-release effects induced by man-made cuts or excavations into natural stiff clay slopes that experienced erosion in response to valley deepening. The study was focused on the Monte Mario hill in Rome (Italy), which formed part of an area of recent urban expansion. The methodology of the study relied on a reference engineering-geology model, which was developed on the basis of site and laboratory data and stress-strain analyses. The latter analyses were carried out with the finite-difference code FLAC 4.0. Numerical modelling was based on a sequential approach, taking into account the main evolutionary stages of the Tiber river valley in Romeȁ9s urban area and then making cuts at the bottom of the slope located south of the Monte Mario Astronomical Observatory. The simulation revealed the stress-release effects that fluvial erosion and excavation fronts have caused on the investigated slopes and their consequent gravitational instabilities. These processes appear with metre-scale displacements, followed by stress-release cracks (actually observed on the slopes under review). In quantifying stress-release deformations, the simulation took into account the possible role of creep in the observed retardation of stress-release effects.

  4. Effects of natural and human-induced hypoxia on coastal benthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, L. A.; Ekau, W.; Gooday, A. J.; Jorissen, F.; Middelburg, J. J.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Neira, C.; Rabalais, N. N.; Zhang, J.

    2009-10-01

    Coastal hypoxia (defined here as <1.42 ml L-1; 62.5 μM; 2 mg L-1, approx. 30% oxygen saturation) develops seasonally in many estuaries, fjords, and along open coasts as a result of natural upwelling or from anthropogenic eutrophication induced by riverine nutrient inputs. Permanent hypoxia occurs naturally in some isolated seas and marine basins as well as in open slope oxygen minimum zones. Responses of benthos to hypoxia depend on the duration, predictability, and intensity of oxygen depletion and on whether H2S is formed. Under suboxic conditions, large mats of filamentous sulfide oxidizing bacteria cover the seabed and consume sulfide. They are hypothesized to provide a detoxified microhabitat for eukaryotic benthic communities. Calcareous foraminiferans and nematodes are particularly tolerant of low oxygen concentrations and may attain high densities and dominance, often in association with microbial mats. When oxygen is sufficient to support metazoans, small, soft-bodied invertebrates (typically annelids), often with short generation times and elaborate branchial structures, predominate. Large taxa are more sensitive than small taxa to hypoxia. Crustaceans and echinoderms are typically more sensitive to hypoxia, with lower oxygen thresholds, than annelids, sipunculans, molluscs and cnidarians. Mobile fish and shellfish will migrate away from low-oxygen areas. Within a species, early life stages may be more subject to oxygen stress than older life stages. Hypoxia alters both the structure and function of benthic communities, but effects may differ with regional hypoxia history. Human-caused hypoxia is generally linked to eutrophication, and occurs adjacent to watersheds with large populations or agricultural activities. Many occurrences are seasonal, within estuaries, fjords or enclosed seas of the North Atlantic and the NW Pacific Oceans. Benthic faunal responses, elicited at oxygen levels below 2 ml L-1, typically involve avoidance or mortality of large

  5. Lithium ion dynamics in Li2S+GeS2+GeO2 glasses studied using (7)Li NMR field-cycling relaxometry and line-shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Jan; Petrov, Oleg V; Kim, Youngsik; Martin, Steve W; Vogel, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We use (7)Li NMR to study the ionic jump motion in ternary 0.5Li2S+0.5[(1-x)GeS2+xGeO2] glassy lithium ion conductors. Exploring the "mixed glass former effect" in this system led to the assumption of a homogeneous and random variation of diffusion barriers in this system. We exploit that combining traditional line-shape analysis with novel field-cycling relaxometry, it is possible to measure the spectral density of the ionic jump motion in broad frequency and temperature ranges and, thus, to determine the distribution of activation energies. Two models are employed to parameterize the (7)Li NMR data, namely, the multi-exponential autocorrelation function model and the power-law waiting times model. Careful evaluation of both of these models indicates a broadly inhomogeneous energy landscape for both the single (x=0.0) and the mixed (x=0.1) network former glasses. The multi-exponential autocorrelation function model can be well described by a Gaussian distribution of activation barriers. Applicability of the methods used and their sensitivity to microscopic details of ionic motion are discussed.

  6. New observations and mass-reduced analyses of the laser-excited fluorescence of the B1Π u- X1Σ g+ bands of the 6Li 7Li molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, K. K.; Koch, M. E.; Stwalley, W. C.

    1981-06-01

    An Ar + laser at 4579 Å is used to excite the B1Π u- X1Σ g+ fluorescence of the 6Li 7Li molecule in a crossed heat pipe oven. The spectrum in the region 4400-6300 Å is recorded photoelectrically with an emphasis on the observation of higher vibrational levels in the ground state close to the dissociation limit. P and R doublets corresponding to v″ ≤ 26 originating from the ( v' = 13, J' = 19) level are observed and identified using mass-reduced quantum numbers. Two additional 6Li 7Li series, known from earlier work of Velasco, Ottinger, and Zare, are also analyzed. These data are used to construct effective Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) potentials for specific J″ (=9, 19) quantum numbers of the ground state and from them the true (rotationless) potential energy curve (for X1Σ g+) is derived. This extends the previously known curve of Li 2 from 4.28 to 5.18 Å (outer turning point); this turning point corresponds to an energy which is approximately 88% of the dissociation energy, which is estimated here to be 8516 ± 18 cm -1.

  7. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Natural Killer Cells for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, David L; Bendzick, Laura; Pribyl, Lee; McCullar, Valarie; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Miller, Jeff S; Geller, Melissa A; Kaufman, Dan S

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can provide effective immunotherapy for ovarian cancer. Here, we evaluated the ability of NK cells isolated from peripheral blood (PB) and NK cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) to mediate killing of ovarian cancer cells in a mouse xenograft model. A mouse xenograft model was used to evaluate the intraperitoneal delivery of three different NK cell populations: iPSC-derived NK cells, PB-NK cells that had been activated and expanded in long-term culture, and overnight activated PB-NK cells that were isolated through CD3/CD19 depletion of PB B and T cells. Bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor tumor burden of luciferase expressing tumor lines. Tumors were allowed to establish prior to administering NK cells via intraperitoneal injection. These studies demonstrate a single dose of any of the three NK cell populations significantly reduced tumor burden. When mice were given three doses of either iPSC-NK cells or expanded PB-NK cells, the median survival improved from 73 days in mice untreated to 98 and 97 days for treated mice, respectively. From these studies, we conclude iPSC-derived NK cells mediate antiovarian cancer killing at least as well as PB-NK cells, making these cells a viable resource for immunotherapy for ovarian cancer. Due to their ability to be easily differentiated into NK cells and their long-term expansion potential, iPSCs can be used to produce large numbers of well-defined NK cells that can be banked and used to treat a large number of patients including treatment with multiple doses if necessary.

  8. Studying human respiratory disease in animals--role of induced and naturally occurring models.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kurt; Roman, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory disorders like asthma, emphysema, and pulmonary fibrosis affect millions of Americans and many more worldwide. Despite advancements in medical research that have led to improved understanding of the pathophysiology of these conditions and sometimes to new therapeutic interventions, these disorders are for the most part chronic and progressive; current interventions are not curative and do not halt disease progression. A major obstacle to further advancements relates to the absence of animal models that exactly resemble the human condition, which delays the elucidation of relevant mechanisms of action, the unveiling of biomarkers of disease progression, and identification of new targets for intervention in patients. There are currently many induced animal models of human respiratory disease available for study, and even though they mimic features of human disease, discoveries in these models have not always translated into safe and effective treatments in humans. A major obstacle relates to the genetic, anatomical, and functional variations amongst species, which represents the major challenge to overcome when searching for appropriate models of respiratory disease. Nevertheless, rodents, in particular mice, have become the most common species used for experimentation, due to their relatively low cost, size, and adequate understanding of murine genetics, among other advantages. Less well known is the fact that domestic animals also suffer from respiratory illnesses similar to those found in humans. Asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, and pulmonary fibrosis are among the many disorders occurring naturally in dogs, cats, and horses, among other species. These models might better resemble the human condition and are emphasized here, but further investigations are needed to determine their relevance.

  9. Effect of resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound, on platelet activation induced by endotoxin or thrombin.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Zieliński, Tomasz

    2002-08-15

    Resveratrol (3, 4', 5-trihydroxystilbene), a natural polyphenol, is found in some plants that are used in human nutrition. Grapes are a major source for resveratrol, and a significant amount can also be found in red wine. Several experimental studies have demonstrated biological properties of resveratrol, especially its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-platelet and antitumor effects. In the present study, we investigated the first step of platelet activation-platelet adhesion stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Proteus mirabilis (weak stimulator) and thrombin (strong activator) in the presence of resveratrol. Our studies show that endotoxin (0.3 microg/10(8) platelets), like thrombin (0.2 U/10(8) platelets), induced the adhesion of platelets (expressed as absorbance of cell attached proteins) to collagen and fibrinogen. Preincubation of washed platelets with resveratrol at physiological plasma concentrations (25-100 microg/ml, 30 min, 37 degrees C) had an inhibitory effect on adhesion of platelets to collagen after activation by LPS alone or LPS with thrombin. The strongest effect on this process was caused by resveratrol at the concentration of 100 microg/ml. Pretreatment of platelets with resveratrol (25-100 microg/ml, 30 min, 37 degrees C) had also inhibitory effects on adhesion of platelets to fibrinogen after stimulation of these cells by LPS alone or by LPS with thrombin at the same concentration. In conclusion, we suggest that resveratrol present in human diet may be an important compound responsible for the reduction of platelet adhesion and changed reactivity of blood platelets in inflammatory process.

  10. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  11. Design And Ground Testing For The Expert PL4/PL5 'Natural And Roughness Induced Transition'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masutti, Davie; Chazot, Olivier; Donelli, Raffaele; de Rosa, Donato

    2011-05-01

    Unpredicted boundary layer transition can impact dramatically the stability of the vehicle, its aerodynamic coefficients and reduce the efficiency of the thermal protection system. In this frame, ESA started the EXPERT (European eXPErimental Reentry Testbed) program to pro- vide and perform in-flight experiments in order to obtain aerothermodynamic data for the validation of numerical models and of ground-to-flight extrapolation methodologies. Considering the boundary layer transition investigation, the EXPERT vehicle is equipped with two specific payloads, PL4 and PL5, concerning respectively the study of the natural and roughness induced transition. The paper is a survey on the design process of these two in-flight experiments and it covers the major analyses and findings encountered during the development of the payloads. A large amount of transition criteria have been investigated and used to estimate either the dangerousness of the height of the distributed roughness, arising due to nose erosion, or the effectiveness of height of the isolated roughness element forcing the boundary layer transition. Supporting the PL4 design, linear stability computations and CFD analyses have been performed by CIRA on the EXPERT flight vehicle to determine the amplification factor of the boundary layer instabilities at different point of the re-entry trajectory. Ground test experiments regarding the PL5 are carried on in the Mach 6 VKI H3 Hypersonic Wind Tunnel with a Reynolds numbers ranging from 18E6/m to 26E6/m. Infrared measurements (Stanton number) and flow visualization are used on a 1/16 scaled model of the EXPERT vehicle and a flat plate to validate the Potter and Whitfield criterion as a suitable methodology for ground-to-flight extrapolation and the payload design.

  12. Induction of the metabolic regulator Txnip in fasting-induced and natural torpor.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laura E; Saer, Ben R C; Hui, Simon T; Jinnah, Hyder A; Steinlechner, Stephan; Loudon, Andrew S I; Bechtold, David A

    2013-06-01

    Torpor is a physiological state characterized by controlled lowering of metabolic rate and core body temperature, allowing substantial energy savings during periods of reduced food availability or harsh environmental conditions. The hypothalamus coordinates energy homeostasis and thermoregulation and plays a key role in directing torpor. We recently showed that mice lacking the orphan G protein-coupled receptor Gpr50 readily enter torpor in response to fasting and have now used these mice to conduct a microarray analysis of hypothalamic gene expression changes related to the torpor state. This revealed a strong induction of thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) in the hypothalamus of torpid mice, which was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. In situ hybridization identified the ependyma lining the third ventricle as the principal site of torpor-related expression of Txnip. To characterize further the relationship between Txnip and torpor, we profiled Txnip expression in mice during prolonged fasting, cold exposure, and 2-deoxyglucose-induced hypometabolism, as well as in naturally occurring torpor bouts in the Siberian hamster. Strikingly, pronounced up-regulation of Txnip expression was only observed in wild-type mice when driven into torpor and during torpor in the Siberian hamster. Increase of Txnip was not limited to the hypothalamus, with exaggerated expression in white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue, and liver also demonstrated in torpid mice. Given the recent identification of Txnip as a molecular nutrient sensor important in the regulation of energy metabolism, our data suggest that elevated Txnip expression is critical to regulating energy expenditure and fuel use during the extreme hypometabolic state of torpor.

  13. Differential regulation of interleukin-12- and interleukin-15-induced natural killer cell activation by interleukin-4.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, O; Mami-Chouaib, F; Moreau, J L; Thèze, J; Chehimi, J; Chouaib, S

    1996-11-01

    The regulation of human natural killer (NK) cell activation is under the control of a network of regulatory signals provided by cytokines. In the present study, we investigated the functional interaction between interleukin (IL)-4 and two monocyte/macrophage-derived cytokines, IL-12 and IL-15, during the process of NK stimulation. Using freshly isolated human NK cells, we have demonstrated that IL-4 negatively regulates lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity induced by IL-15 against the NK-resistant Daudi target cells. In contrast, IL-4 had no effect on IL-12-stimulated LAK generation. The differential effect of IL-4 on NK cell activation by IL-12 and IL-15 correlates with its ability to increase or to down-regulate the level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma release by NK cells, respectively. In contrast, endogenous transforming growth factor-beta 1 does not appear to be involved in the IL-4 regulatory pathway. Furthermore, while IL-4 was found to decrease the basal expression of the IL-2 receptor beta subunit utilized by IL-15, it had no effect on the expression of the beta 1 chain of the IL-12 receptor compared to untreated cells. Northern blot analysis indicated that the IL-4 regulatory effect on NK lytic function was associated with its capacity to down-regulate granzyme B and perforin gene transcription in response to IL-15 and its failure to affect the expression of both gene's in response to IL-12. Together, these data suggest the existence of a distinct cross-talk between IL-4 and IL-15 or IL-12 signaling pathways during the regulation of human non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxicity.

  14. Structural and spectroscopic changes to natural nontronite induced by experimental impacts between 10 and 40 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlander, Lonia R.; Glotch, Timothy D.; Bish, David L.; Dyar, M. Darby; Sharp, Thomas G.; Sklute, Elizabeth C.; Michalski, Joseph R.

    2015-05-01

    Many phyllosilicate deposits remotely detected on Mars occur within bombarded terrains. Shock metamorphism from meteor impacts alters mineral structures, producing changed mineral spectra. Thus, impacts have likely affected the spectra of remotely sensed Martian phyllosilicates. We present spectral analysis results for a natural nontronite sample before and after laboratory-generated impacts over five peak pressures between 10 and 40 GPa. We conducted a suite of spectroscopic analyses to characterize the sample's impact-induced structural and spectral changes. Nontronite becomes increasingly disordered with increasing peak impact pressure. Every infrared spectroscopic technique used showed evidence of structural changes at shock pressures above ~25 GPa. Reflectance spectroscopy in the visible near-infrared region is primarily sensitive to the vibrations of metal-OH and interlayer H2O groups in the nontronite octahedral sheet. Midinfrared (MIR) spectroscopic techniques are sensitive to the vibrations of silicon and oxygen in the nontronite tetrahedral sheet. Because the tetrahedral and octahedral sheets of nontronite deform differently, impact-driven structural deformation may contribute to differences in phyllosilicate detection between remote sensing techniques sensitive to different parts of the nontronite structure. Observed spectroscopic changes also indicated that the sample's octahedral and tetrahedral sheets were structurally deformed but not completely dehydroxylated. This finding is an important distinction from previous studies of thermally altered phyllosilicates in which dehydroxylation follows dehydration in a stepwise progression preceding structural deformation. Impact alteration may thus complicate mineral-specific identifications based on the location of OH-group bands in remotely detected spectra. This is a key implication for Martian remote sensing arising from our results.

  15. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies.

  16. Activation of decidual invariant natural killer T cells promotes lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Li, Liping; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Yao; Tu, Jiaoqin; Schust, Danny J

    2015-04-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are crucial for host defense against a variety of microbial pathogens, but the underlying mechanisms of iNKT cells activation by microbes are not fully explained. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of iNKT cell activation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated preterm birth using an adoptive transfer system and diverse neutralizing antibodies (Abs) and inhibitors. We found that adoptive transfer of decidual iNKT cells to LPS-stimulated iNKT cell deficient Jα18(-/-) mice that lack invariant Vα14Jα281T cell receptor (TCR) expression significantly decreased the time to delivery and increased the percentage of decidual iNKT cells. Neutralizing Abs against Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), CD1d, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18, and inhibitors blocking the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly reduced in vivo percentages of decidual iNKT cells, their intracellular interferon (IFN)-γ production and surface CD69 expression. In vitro, in the presence of the same Abs and inhibitors used as in vivo, decidual iNKT cells co-cultured with LPS-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) showed significantly decreased extracellular and intracellular IFN-γ secretion and surface CD69 expression. Our data demonstrate that the activation of decidual iNKT cells plays an important role in inflammation-induced preterm birth. Activation of decidual iNKT cells also requires TLR4-mediated NF-κB, MAPK p38 and ERK pathways, the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18, and endogenous glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d.

  17. A Novel Natural Product, KL-21, Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adan Gökbulut, Aysun; Yaşar, Mustafa; Baran, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to examine the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of KL-21, a novel plant product (produced by Naturin Natural Products, İzmir, Turkey), on 232B4 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells and to determine the cytotoxic effects on healthy BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: The cytotoxic effect of KL-21 was determined by MTT cell proliferation assay. Changes in caspase-3 enzyme activity were measured using the caspase-3 colorimetric assay. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were determined using the JC-1 dye-based method. Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was performed to measure the apoptotic cell population. Effects of KL-21 on cell cycle profiles of CLL cells were investigated by flow cytometry. Results: We detected time- and concentration-dependent increases in the cytotoxic effect of KL-21 on 232B4 CLL cells. However, we also showed that, especially at higher concentrations, KL-21 was less cytotoxic towards BEAS-2B healthy cells than towards CLL cells. Annexin-V/PI double staining results showed that the apoptotic cell population increased in 232B4 cells. Increasing concentrations of KL-21 increased caspase-3 enzyme activity and induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. KL-21 administration resulted in small increases in the percentage of the cells in the G0/G1 phase while it decreased the S phase cell population up to 1 mg/mL. At the highest concentration, most of the cells accumulated in the G0/G1 phase. Conclusion: KL-21 has a growth-inhibitory effect on 232B4 CLL cells. KL-21 causes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1. PMID:26316479

  18. A quantitative analysis of microbially-induced calcite precipitation employing artificial and naturally-occurring sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokier, Stephen; Krieg Dosier, Ginger

    2013-04-01

    Microbially-induced calcite precipitation is a strong candidate for the production of sustainable construction materials. The process employs the microbe Sporosarcina pasteurii as an agent to microbially mediate the precipitation of calcium carbonate to bind unconsolidated sediment. As this process can be achieved under ambient temperature conditions and can utilise a wide variety of easily-available sediments, potentially including waste materials, it is envisioned that this procedure could significantly reduce carbon-dioxide emissions in the construction industry. This study describes and quantifies the precipitation of calcite cement in a range of naturally-occurring sediments compared with a control matrix. The study establishes the optimum treatment time for effective cement precipitation in order to produce a material that meets the standards required for construction whilst keeping economic and environmental outlays at a minimum. The 'control sediment' employed industrial-grade glass beads with a grain size range of 595-1180 microns (16-30 US mesh). Sporosarcina pasteurii were mixed in a solution of urea and calcium chloride and then inoculated into the control sediment. The microbes attach to the surface of the sediment grains and employ urea as a source of energy to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide. By so doing, they increase the pH of the solution allowing calcium carbonate to precipitate at the cell walls to act as nucleation points facilitating the precipitation of cements as a grain-coating and biocementing the unconsolidated sediment. The solution treatment was repeated at eight hour intervals with samples removed for detailed analysis after each every five consecutive treatments (i.e. 40 hours). The process was repeated to produce 20 samples with treatment times between 40 and 800 hours. Cemented samples were impregnated with blue epoxy and examined petrographically to monitor cement development. Modal analysis was undertaken on each cemented

  19. 2016 one-year seismic hazard forecast for the Central and Eastern United States from induced and natural earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Mueller, Charles S.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Hoover, Susan M.; Llenos, Andrea L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Michael, Andrew J.; Rubinstein, Justin L.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.

    2016-03-28

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a 1-year seismic hazard forecast for 2016 for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) that includes contributions from both induced and natural earthquakes. The model assumes that earthquake rates calculated from several different time windows will remain relatively stationary and can be used to forecast earthquake hazard and damage intensity for the year 2016. This assessment is the first step in developing an operational earthquake forecast for the CEUS, and the analysis could be revised with updated seismicity and model parameters. Consensus input models consider alternative earthquake catalog durations, smoothing parameters, maximum magnitudes, and ground motion estimates, and represent uncertainties in earthquake occurrence and diversity of opinion in the science community. Ground shaking seismic hazard for 1-percent probability of exceedance in 1 year reaches 0.6 g (as a fraction of standard gravity [g]) in northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas, and about 0.2 g in the Raton Basin of Colorado and New Mexico, in central Arkansas, and in north-central Texas near Dallas. Near some areas of active induced earthquakes, hazard is higher than in the 2014 USGS National Seismic Hazard Model (NHSM) by more than a factor of 3; the 2014 NHSM did not consider induced earthquakes. In some areas, previously observed induced earthquakes have stopped, so the seismic hazard reverts back to the 2014 NSHM. Increased seismic activity, whether defined as induced or natural, produces high hazard. Conversion of ground shaking to seismic intensity indicates that some places in Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Arkansas may experience damage if the induced seismicity continues unabated. The chance of having Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) VI or greater (damaging earthquake shaking) is 5–12 percent per year in north-central Oklahoma and southern Kansas, similar to the chance of damage caused by natural earthquakes

  20. High-resolution phenotypic profiling of natural products-induced effects on the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Kremb, Stephan; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2017-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are highly evolved molecules making them a valuable resource for new therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of broad-spectrum phenotypic profiling of NP-induced perturbations on single cells with imaging-based High-Content Screening to inform on physiology, mechanisms-of-actions, and multi-level toxicity. Our technology platform aims at broad applicability using a comprehensive marker panel with standardized settings streamlined towards an easy implementation in laboratories dedicated to natural products research. PMID:28295057

  1. The influence of age and genetics on natural resistance to experimentally induced feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Niels C; Liu, Hongwei; Gandolfi, Barbara; Lyons, Leslie A

    2014-11-15

    Naturally occurring feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is usually fatal, giving the impression that immunity to the FIP virus (FIPV) is extremely poor. This impression may be incorrect, because not all cats experimentally exposed to FIPV develop FIP. There is also a belief that the incidence of FIP may be affected by a number of host, virus, and environmental cofactors. However, the contribution of these cofactors to immunity and disease incidence has not been determined. The present study followed 111 random-bred specific pathogen free (SPF) cats that were obtained from a single research breeding colony and experimentally infected with FIPV. The cats were from several studies conducted over the past 5 years, and as a result, some of them had prior exposure to feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) or avirulent FIPVs. The cats were housed under optimized conditions of nutrition, husbandry, and quarantine to eliminate most of the cofactors implicated in FIPV infection outcome and were uniformly challenge exposed to the same field strain of serotype 1 FIPV. Forty of the 111 (36%) cats survived their initial challenge exposure to a Type I cat-passaged field strains of FIPV. Six of these 40 survivors succumbed to FIP to a second or third challenge exposure, suggesting that immunity was not always sustained. Exposure to non-FIP-inducing feline coronaviruses prior to challenge with virulent FIPV did not significantly affect FIP incidence but did accelerate the disease course in some cats. There were no significant differences in FIP incidence between males and females, but resistance increased significantly between 6 months and 1 or more years of age. Genetic testing was done on 107 of the 111 infected cats. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) segregated the 107 cats into three distinct families based primarily on a common sire(s), and resistant and susceptible cats were equally distributed within each family. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on 73 cats that died of FIP

  2. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  3. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  4. Discrimination between induced, triggered and natural earthquakes close to hydrocarbon reservoirs: A probabilistic approach based on the modeling of depletion-induced stress changes and seismological source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, T.; Cesca, S.; Hainzl, S.; Krueger, F.

    2011-12-01

    Earthquakes occurring close to hydrocarbon fields under production are often under critical view of being induced or triggered. However, clear and testable rules to discriminate the different events have rarely been developed and tested. The unresolved scientific problem may lead to lengthy public disputes with unpredictable impact on the local acceptance of the exploitation and field operations. We propose a quantitative approach to discriminate induced, triggered and natural earthquakes, which is based on testable input parameters. Maxima of occurrence probability distributions (PdF) are compared for the cases under question, and a single probability of being induced is reported. The uncertainties of earthquake location and seismicity rate is considered in terms of joint probabilities. The PdF of induced events is derived from the modeling of Coulomb stress changes and a rate and state dependent seismicity model. In our case a 3D boundary element method has been modified to estimate the stress changes outside the reservoir, which are related to pore pressure changes in the field formation. The predicted rate of natural earthquakes is either derived from the background seismicity or, in case of rare events, from an estimate of the tectonic loading. Instrumentally derived, seismological information on the event location, source mechanism and the size of the rupture plane is of advantage for the method. If the rupture plane has been estimated, the discrimination between induced or only triggered events is theoretically possible if joint PdF's are integrated over the rupture plane. We apply the approach to two recent events: (1) the Mw 4.3 Ekofisk 2002, North Sea earthquake close to the Ekofisk oil field, and the 2004 Mw 4.4 Rotenburg, Northern Germany earthquake in the vicinity of the Soehlingen gas field. While one event was clearly triggered and induced, the other is possibly only triggered.

  5. Acute, lethal, natural killer cell-resistant myeloproliferative disease induced by polyomavirus in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Szomolanyi-Tsuda, E.; Dundon, P. L.; Joris, I.; Shultz, L. D.; Woda, B. A.; Welsh, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Infection of severe combined immunodeficient mice, which lack T and B lymphocytes, with polyomavirus (PyV) induced an acute hematological disorder leading to the death of the mice by 2 weeks postinfection. The disease was characterized by a dramatic decrease in megakaryocytes, multiple hemorrhages, anemia, thrombocytopenia, splenomegaly, a massive myeloproliferation and splenic erythroproliferation with a defect in maturation of the myeloid elements similar to that in acute leukemia. This pathology in severe combined immunodeficient mice is very different from that of the well-characterized tumor profiles induced by PyV in normal newborn or nude mice. Viral T and capsid (VP1) antigens and viral genome were detected in some cells in the spleen, but not in the majority of the proliferating myeloid cells. This suggests that the myeloproliferation is induced by some indirect mechanism, such as secretion of growth factors or cytokines by virus-infected cells, rather than by direct transformation by PyV. Neither the spread of PyV, its replication in different organs, nor the pathogenesis or the time of death were altered by depleting natural killer cells in vivo by anti-natural killer cell antibodies. Analysis of the spleen leukocyte population indicated that the cells expressed high levels of class I major histocompatibility complex antigens and were resistant to lysis by activated natural killer cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8311119

  6. Natural compound oblongifolin C inhibits autophagic flux, and induces apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction in human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiqing; He, Wei; Shi, Huimin; Huang, Xiaodan; Ji, Guozhong

    2016-01-01

    The compounds, which are obtained from natural plants or microbes may offer potential as one of the strategies for the management of cholangiocarcinoma. Oblongifolin C (OC), a natural small molecule compound extracted and purified from Garcinia yunnanensis Hu, can activate the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human cervical cancer cells. However, the direct effects of OC on cholangiocarcinoma cells are not well defined. The effect of OC on cell apoptosis and its underlying mechanisms were investigated in cultured QBC939 cells by the methyl thiazol tetrazolium assay, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP content and western blot analysis. The present study reported that the in vitro treatment of human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells with different concentrations (5, 10, 20 and 40 μM) of OC decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The results of the present study also showed that OC-induced QBC939 cell apoptosis was mediated through the inhibition of autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD). Additionally, inhibiting autophagy increased OC-induced apoptosis and MtD, whereas exposure to the autophagy inducer, rapmycin, attenuated these changes. Together, the results of the present study are the first, to the best of our knowledge, to identify OC as a chemotherapeutic agent against human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells in vitro via the regulation of autophagy and MtD. PMID:27499017

  7. Stopping powers of sup 7 Li, sup 11 B, sup 12 C, sup 14 N, and sup 16 O ions in C sub 16 H sub 14 O sub 3 polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Rauhala, E.; Raeisaenen, J. )

    1990-09-01

    The stopping powers of bisphenol {ital A}-polycarbonate C{sub 16}H{sub 14}O{sub 3} for {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O ions in the 0.5--2.1-MeV/amu energy region have been determined. To avoid direct beam exposure on the film, a modified transmission geometry was used. The areal density of the foil, at exactly the position where the stopping power data were measured, was obtained by combining weighing and proton energy-loss measurements. The experimental stopping powers are compared with predictions of three semiempirical models, which are based on the heavy-ion scaling rule, and with our previous data for the same ions in Mylar. The systematics and deviations of the data from the predicted stopping powers, and the validity of Bragg's additivity rule, are discussed.

  8. Ectoin: an effective natural substance to prevent UVA-induced premature photoaging.

    PubMed

    Buenger, J; Driller, H

    2004-01-01

    With the help of a new 'UVA stress model', it was shown that Ectoin protects the skin from the effects of UVA-induced cell damage in a number of different ways. Using cell cultures, high-performance thin-layer chromatography, gel electrophoresis mobility shift assays, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, ion exchange chromatography and UV spectroscopy, it was demonstrated that the UVA-induced second messenger release, transcription factor AP-2 activation, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression and mitochondrial DNA mutation could be prevented. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that Ectoin counteracts the effects of UVA-induced and accelerated skin aging at different cell levels.

  9. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-05-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival.

  10. Lithium Ion Mobility in Lithium Phosphidosilicates: Crystal Structure, (7) Li, (29) Si, and (31) P MAS NMR Spectroscopy, and Impedance Spectroscopy of Li8 SiP4 and Li2 SiP2.

    PubMed

    Toffoletti, Lorenzo; Kirchhain, Holger; Landesfeind, Johannes; Klein, Wilhelm; van Wüllen, Leo; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Fässler, Thomas F

    2016-12-05

    The need to improve electrodes and Li-ion conducting materials for rechargeable all-solid-state batteries has drawn enhanced attention to the investigation of lithium-rich compounds. The study of the ternary system Li-Si-P revealed a series of new compounds, two of which, Li8 SiP4 and Li2 SiP2 , are presented. Both phases represent members of a new family of Li ion conductors that display Li ion conductivity in the range from 1.15(7)×10(-6) Scm(-1) at 0 °C to 1.2(2)×10(-4) Scm(-1) at 75 °C (Li8 SiP4 ) and from 6.1(7)×10(-8) Scm(-1) at 0 °C to 6(1)×10(-6) Scm(-1) at 75 °C (Li2 SiP2 ), as determined by impedance measurements. Temperature-dependent solid-state (7) Li NMR spectroscopy revealed low activation energies of about 36 kJ mol(-1) for Li8 SiP4 and about 47 kJ mol(-1) for Li2 SiP2 . Both compounds were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (single crystal and powder methods) and by (7) Li, (29) Si, and (31) P MAS NMR spectroscopy. Both phases consist of tetrahedral SiP4 anions and Li counterions. Li8 SiP4 contains isolated SiP4 units surrounded by Li atoms, while Li2 SiP2 comprises a three-dimensional network based on corner-sharing SiP4 tetrahedra, with the Li ions located in cavities and channels.

  11. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors.

  12. Light-Induced Transformations of the C60 Derivative, Fullerenol: Interactions with Natural Organic Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have indicated that fullerenes, an important class of nanomaterials, are photodegraded by solar radiation and can sensitize the photoproduction of reactive oxygen species such as singlet oxygen. Because natural organic matter (NOM) can retard photoreactions that a...

  13. Axl signaling induces development of natural killer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Hee; Lee, Hwa-Yeon; Choi, Ha-Rim; Ji, Kon-Young; Kim, Su-Man; Kim, Kwang Dong; Kang, Hyung-Sik

    2017-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been well known to play a critical role in innate immunity, but they are also capable of regulating adaptive immunity through the induction of T cell-mediated memory response and B cell-mediated autoimmune response. NK cells are differentiated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow (BM), and a series of surface molecules are expressed on NK cells in a differentiation stage-specific manner. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is originally identified as homeostatic regulators for antigen-presenting cells, and its ligand, growth-arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), has been reported to promote cell survival, proliferation, and migration, but their regulatory role in the development and effector function of NK cells is not yet fully understood. In this study, to investigate whether Axl is required for the regulation of NK cell development, the expression of mature NK (mNK) cell-specific receptors and NK cell-associated genes was analyzed in the differentiated HSCs-derived NK cells in vitro and the NK cells harvested from Axl(-/-) mice. We found that agonistic anti-Axl antibody or recombinant Gas6 specifically upregulated the expression of mNK cell-specific receptors, such as LY49A, Ly49G2, Ly49C/F/I, NKG2A/C/E (1.5- to 3.5-fold increase), and NK cell-associated genes, such as IL-2Rβ (2.3- or 2.4-fold increase), Perforin (4.1- or 2.1-fold increase), IL-15Rα (2.14- or 2.04-fold increase), and IFN-γ (3.3- or 2.8-fold increase) compared to each isotype control, whereas it was abrogated by treatment of Axl-Ig. Anti-Axl antibody or rGas6 also induced a 2.5- or 1.9-fold increase in the proliferation of developing NK cells compared to each control, respectively. mNK cell populations expressing mNK cell-specific receptors were reduced about twofold in NK cells differentiated from HSCs of Axl(-/-) mice compared with those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, the triggering of Axl signaling by agonistic anti-Axl antibody promoted the

  14. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, Qing; Tou, Fangfang; Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  15. Amphetamine-induced disruption and haloperidol-induced potentiation of latent inhibition depend on the nature of the stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ruob, C; Elsner, J; Weiner, I; Feldon, J

    1997-10-01

    If a stimulus (e.g. light) is repeatedly preexposed without consequences, it subsequently develops a weaker association with a reinforcer (e.g. foot shock) than does a non-preexposed stimulus. This retarded conditioning to the preexposed as compared to the non-preexposed stimulus, is latent inhibition (LI). It is well documented that LI is disrupted by low doses of amphetamine and potentiated by neuroleptic drugs, and there is evidence that the action of these agents on LI can be modified by changes in the parameters of preexposure or conditioning. The present experiments tested whether the effects of DA agents on LI are influenced by the nature of the stimulus. In two experiments, LI was assessed using an off-baseline conditioned emotional response (CER) procedure in rats licking for water, consisting of three stages: preexposure, in which the stimulus (a light) to be conditioned, was repeatedly presented without being followed by reinforcement; conditioning, in which the preexposed stimulus was paired with reinforcement (a foot-shock); and test, in which LI was indexed by animals' degree of suppression of licking during stimulus presentation. In both experiments, different groups of animals were preexposed and conditioned with four different preexposed visual stimuli: three steady side-lights, three flashing side-lights, one flashing side-light, and a flashing houselight. Experiment 1 used 40 stimulus preexposures and tested the effects of 1 mg/kg D-amphetamine, whereas experiment 2 used 10 preexposures and tested the effects of 0.1 mg/kg haloperidol. The results showed that of the four stimuli used, both drugs were effective with only one and the same stimulus, namely, flashing houselight. This demonstrates that the disruptive effect of amphetamine and the potentiating effect of haloperidol on LI, are modifiable by manipulating the nature of the preexposed stimulus.

  16. Study on interaction between induced and natural fractures by extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, DanDan; Liu, ZhanLi; Zhuang, Zhuo; Zeng, QingLei; Wang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Fracking is one of the kernel technologies in the remarkable shale gas revolution. The extended finite element method is used in this paper to numerically investigate the interaction between hydraulic and natural fractures, which is an important issue of the enigmatic fracture network formation in fracking. The criteria which control the opening of natural fracture and crossing of hydraulic fracture are tentatively presented. Influence factors on the interaction process are systematically analyzed, which include the approach angle, anisotropy of in-situ stress and fluid pressure profile.

  17. Connecting Model Species to Nature: Predator-Induced Long-Term Sensitization in "Aplysia Californica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Maria J.; Watkins, Amanda J.; Wakabayashi, Jordann; Buechler, Jennifer; Pepino, Christine; Brown, Michelle; Wright, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research on sensitization in "Aplysia" was based entirely on unnatural noxious stimuli, usually electric shock, until our laboratory found that a natural noxious stimulus, a single sublethal lobster attack, causes short-term sensitization. We here extend that finding by demonstrating that multiple lobster attacks induce…

  18. The natural antioxidant otobaphenol delays the permeability transition of mitochondria and induces their aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V; Lopez, Luis F; Solano, Sigifredo; Torres, Ricardo

    2003-06-01

    The lignan otobaphenol, (8R,8'R,7R)-4'-hydroxy-5'-methoxy-3,4-methylenedioxy-2',7,8,8'-neolignan, extracted from Virola Aff. Pavonis leaves, completely inhibits at a concentration of 2.5 micro M the Fe(3+)-ascorbate-induced lipoperoxidation of rat liver mitochondria that was determined by oxygen consumption and accumulation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive species. At 25 micro M, it delays the mitochondrial permeability transition induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide or Ca(2+), substantially inhibits the state 3 respiration, does not affect the state 4 respiration and the ADP/O ratio (with succinate), diminishes the rate of Ca(2+) uptake by mitochondria, and delays the ruthenium red-insensitive uncoupler-induced release of the loaded Ca(2+). Dose-dependent delaying of the calcium-induced swelling of mitochondria in the presence of otobaphenol nonlinearly correlates with its 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity. At 75 micro M and higher, this lignan causes mitochondrial aggregation and is able to aggregate itself, without mitochondria. The formed aggregates of otobaphenol do not cause an aggregation of subsequently added mitochondria. Thus, otobaphenol seems to be a promising target to prevent the oxidative stress death of cells.

  19. An interpretation of induced electric currents in long pipelines caused by natural geomagnetic sources of the upper atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    Electric currents in long pipelines can contribute to corrosion effects that limit the pipe's lifetime. One cause of such electric currents is the geomagnetic field variations that have sources in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Knowledge of the general behavior of the sources allows a prediction of the occurrence times, favorable locations for the pipeline effects, and long-term projections of corrosion contributions. The source spectral characteristics, the Earth's conductivity profile, and a corrosion-frequency dependence limit the period range of the natural field changes that affect the pipe. The corrosion contribution by induced currents from geomagnetic sources should be evaluated for pipelines that are located at high and at equatorial latitudes. At midlatitude locations, the times of these natural current maxima should be avoided for the necessary accurate monitoring of the pipe-to-soil potential. ?? 1986 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  20. Evidence that accumulation of mutants in a biofilm reflects natural selection rather than stress-induced adaptive mutation.

    PubMed

    Banas, Jeffrey A; Miller, Justin D; Fuschino, Meghan E; Hazlett, Karsten R O; Toyofuku, Wendy; Porter, Kristen A; Reutzel, Sarah B; Florczyk, Matthew A; McDonough, Kathleen A; Michalek, Suzanne M

    2007-01-01

    The accumulation of mutant genotypes within a biofilm evokes the controversy over whether the biofilm environment induces adaptive mutation or whether the accumulation can be explained by natural selection. A comparison of the virulence of two strains of the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans showed that rats infected with one of the strains accumulated a high proportion (average, 22%) of organisms that had undergone a deletion between two contiguous and highly homologous genes. To determine if the accumulation of deletion mutants was due to selection or to an increased mutation rate, accumulations of deletion mutants within in vitro planktonic and biofilm cultures and within rats inoculated with various proportions of deletion organisms were quantified. We report here that natural selection was the primary force behind the accumulation of the deletion mutants.

  1. Physcion, a naturally occurring anthraquinone derivative, induces apoptosis and autophagy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ming-jie; Yang, Zhun; Zhang, Xing-lin; Liu, Zhao-fang; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Hong-ying

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Physcion is a major bioactive ingredient in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix et Rhizoma Rhei, which has an anthraquinone chemical structure and exhibits a variety of pharmacological activities including laxative, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-proliferative effects. In this study we investigated the effect of physcion on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in vitro and in vivo, as well as the mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor action. Methods: The nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE2 was treated with physcion, and cell viability was detected using MTT and colony formation assays. Flow cytometry was used to assess the cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, apoptosis, autophagy and intracellular ROS generation. Apoptotic cell death was also confirmed by a TUNEL assay. The expression of target or marker molecules was determined using Western blotting. The activity of caspase-3, 8, and 9 was detected with an ELISA kit. A xenograft murine model was used to evaluate the in vivo anti-tumor action of physcion, the mice were administered physcion (10, 20 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 30 d. Results: Treatment with physcion (5, 10, and 20 μmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed the cell viability and colony formation in CNE2 cells. Physcion (10 and 20 μmol/L) dose-dependently blocked cell cycle progression at G1 phase and induced both caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy in CNE2 cells. Furthermore, physcion treatment induced excessive ROS generation in CNE2 cells, and subsequently disrupted the miR-27a/ZBTB10 axis, resulting in repression of the transcription factor Sp1 that was involved in physcion-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Moreover, physcion-induced autophagy acted as a pro-apoptotic factor, and possibly contributed to physcion-induced apoptosis. In the xenograft murine model, administration of physcion dose-dependently suppressed the tumor growth without affecting the body weight. Furthermore, the anti

  2. Discrimination between induced, triggered, and natural earthquakes close to hydrocarbon reservoirs: A probabilistic approach based on the modeling of depletion-induced stress changes and seismological source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, Torsten; Cesca, Simone; Hainzl, Sebastian; Braun, Thomas; Krüger, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes occurring close to hydrocarbon fields under production are often under critical view of being induced or triggered. However, clear and testable rules to discriminate the different events have rarely been developed and tested. The unresolved scientific problem may lead to lengthy public disputes with unpredictable impact on the local acceptance of the exploitation and field operations. We propose a quantitative approach to discriminate induced, triggered, and natural earthquakes, which is based on testable input parameters. Maxima of occurrence probabilities are compared for the cases under question, and a single probability of being triggered or induced is reported. The uncertainties of earthquake location and other input parameters are considered in terms of the integration over probability density functions. The probability that events have been human triggered/induced is derived from the modeling of Coulomb stress changes and a rate and state-dependent seismicity model. In our case a 3-D boundary element method has been adapted for the nuclei of strain approach to estimate the stress changes outside the reservoir, which are related to pore pressure changes in the field formation. The predicted rate of natural earthquakes is either derived from the background seismicity or, in case of rare events, from an estimate of the tectonic stress rate. Instrumentally derived seismological information on the event location, source mechanism, and the size of the rupture plane is of advantage for the method. If the rupture plane has been estimated, the discrimination between induced or only triggered events is theoretically possible if probability functions are convolved with a rupture fault filter. We apply the approach to three recent main shock events: (1) the Mw 4.3 Ekofisk 2001, North Sea, earthquake close to the Ekofisk oil field; (2) the Mw 4.4 Rotenburg 2004, Northern Germany, earthquake in the vicinity of the Söhlingen gas field; and (3) the Mw 6

  3. Characterization of electron-beam induced damage structures in natural fluorite, CaF2, by analytical electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Freund, Friedemann; Allard, L. F.; Echer, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the damage structure induced in natural CaF2 by the electron beam when using TEM. The observed 10-20 nm periodic features with coherent fringe patterns and the pronounced loss of fluorine found after the TEM exposure of 100-line-oriented and 111-oriented sections of CaF2 provides support for the mechanism of damage by decomposition of CaF2 into 2F and Ca, with the Ca precipitates maintaining a close topotaxial relationship with the parent CaF2.

  4. Validation of GEANT4 simulations for 62,63Zn yield estimation in proton induced reactions of natural copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostampour, Malihe; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Aboudzadeh, Mohammadreza; Hamidi, Saeid; Hosseini, Seyedeh Fatemeh

    2017-03-01

    A useful approach to optimize of radioisotope production is the use of Monte Carlo simulations prior to experimentation. In this paper, the GEANT4 code was employed to calculate the saturation yields of 62,63Zn from proton-induced reactions of natural copper, enriched 63Cu and 65Cu. In addition, the saturation yields of the investigated radio-nuclides were calculated using the stopping power from the SRIM-2013 and reported experimental data for cross sections. The simulated saturation yields were compared with experimental values. Good agreement between the experimental and corresponding simulated data demonstrated that GEANT4 provides a suitable tool for radionuclide simulation production using proton irradiation.

  5. Optimal culture conditions for the generation of natural killer cell-induced dendritic cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Pham, Thanh-Nhan; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Nguyen, Truc-Anh Thi; Lim, Mi-Seon; Hong, Cheol Yi; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Youn-Kyung; Cho, Duck; Bae, Soo-Young; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Chung, Ik-Joo; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines continue to be considered an attractive tool for cancer immunotherapy. DCs require an additional signal from the environment or other immune cells to polarize the development of immune responses toward T helper 1 (Th1) or Th2 responses. DCs play a role in natural killer (NK) cell activation, and NK cells are also able to activate and induce the maturation of DCs. We investigated the types of NK cells that can induce the maturation and enhanced function of DCs and the conditions under which these interactions occur. DCs that were activated by resting NK cells in the presence of inflammatory cytokines exhibited increased expression of several costimulatory molecules and an enhanced ability to produce IL-12p70. NK cell-stimulated DCs potently induced Th1 polarization and exhibited the ability to generate tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Our data demonstrate that functional DCs can be generated by coculturing immature DCs with freshly isolated resting NK cells in the presence of Toll-like receptor agonists and proinflammatory cytokines and that the resulting DCs effectively present antigens to induce tumor-specific T-cell responses, which suggests that these cells may be useful for cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Efficacy of various natural and synthetic androgens to induce ductal branching morphogenesis in the developing anterior rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Foster, B A; Cunha, G R

    1999-01-01

    The studies presented herein quantitated ductal branching morphogenesis in the anterior prostate (AP) of the newborn rat. Four parameters were measured: epithelial area, epithelial perimeter, node number, and form factor. Nine natural and synthetic androgens were tested for their effectiveness in inducing postnatal prostatic development using 808 newborn rat APs in 68 dose-response experiments. Based on these studies it was shown that testosterone (T) was slightly more effective than dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in supporting ductal branching morphogenesis in the developing rat AP. Furthermore, the activity of T could not be accounted for simply by conversion of T to DHT. Synthetic androgens, 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone and methyltrienolone (R1881), which cannot be 5alpha-reduced to DHT, also induced extensive ductal branching and elicited responses less than those to T and not statistically different from those to DHT. This suggests that although DHT is sufficient for prostatic development, it is not necessary for postnatal ductal branching morphogenesis and growth of the prostate. 5Alpha-androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol was particularly potent in inducing ductal branching, eliciting a response greater than or comparable to those of T and DHT. Androsterone, androstanedione, 5alpha-androstan-3beta,17beta-diol and 5beta-androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol induced ductal branching, but to a lesser extent than either T or DHT. These studies challenge the assumption that DHT is essential for prostatic development, specifically during ductal branching morphogenesis of the neonatal rat prostate.

  7. Defensive function of herbivore-induced plant volatile emissions in nature.

    PubMed

    Kessler, A; Baldwin, I T

    2001-03-16

    Herbivore attack is known to increase the emission of volatiles, which attract predators to herbivore-damaged plants in the laboratory and agricultural systems. We quantified volatile emissions from Nicotiana attenuata plants growing in natural populations during attack by three species of leaf-feeding herbivores and mimicked the release of five commonly emitted volatiles individually. Three compounds (cis-3-hexen-1-ol, linalool, and cis-alpha-bergamotene) increased egg predation rates by a generalist predator; linalool and the complete blend decreased lepidopteran oviposition rates. As a consequence, a plant could reduce the number of herbivores by more than 90% by releasing volatiles. These results confirm that indirect defenses can operate in nature.

  8. New Insights into the Relationship Between Network Structure and Strain Induced Crystallization in Unvolcanized Natural Rubber by Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, S.; Hsiao, B; Amnuaypornsri, S; Sakdapipanich, J

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between the network structure and strain-induced crystallization in un-vulcanized as well as vulcanized natural rubbers (NR) and synthetic poly-isoprene rubbers (IR) was investigated via synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) technique. It was found that the presence of a naturally occurring network structure formed by natural components in un-vulcanized NR significantly facilitates strain-induced crystallization and enhances modulus and tensile strength. The stress-strain relation in vulcanized NR is due to the combined effect of chemical and naturally occurring networks. The weakness of naturally occurring network against stress and temperature suggests that vulcanized NR has additional relaxation mechanism due to naturally occurring network. The superior mechanical properties in NR compared with IR are mainly due to the existence of naturally occurring network structure.

  9. Radiation-induced vulcanisation of natural rubber latex in presence of styrene-butadiene rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, C. V.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Patil, N. D.; Dubey, K. A.; Kumar, Virendra; Sabharwal, S.

    2005-04-01

    Radiation vulcanisation of natural rubber latex in presence of styrene butadiene rubber latex (SBRL) has been investigated. The cast films were characterised for their swelling properties, tensile strength and thermal stability as a function of radiation dose as well as SBRL content. The gel content, tensile strength and thermal stability of the copolymer films were found to increase with increasing the SBRL content in the feed solution and radiation dose.

  10. Natural Cardiogenesis-Based Template Predicts Cardiogenic Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Li, Xing; Hartjes, Katherine A.; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac development is a complex process resulting in an integrated, multi-lineage tissue with developmental corruption in early embryogenesis leading to congenital heart disease. Interrogation of individual genes has provided the backbone for cardiac developmental biology, yet a comprehensive transcriptome derived from natural cardiogenesis is required to gauge innate developmental milestones. Methods and Results Stage-specific cardiac structures were dissected from eight distinctive mouse embryonic time points to produce genome-wide expressome analysis across cardiogenesis. In reference to this native cardiogenic expression roadmap, divergent iPSC-derived cardiac expression profiles were mapped from pro-cardiogenic 3-factor (SOX2, OCT4, KLF4) and less-cardiogenic 4-factor (plus c-MYC) reprogrammed cells. Expression of cardiac-related genes from 3F-iPSC differentiated in vitro at days 5 and 11 recapitulated expression profiles of natural embryos at days E7.5–E8.5 and E14.5–E18.5, respectively. In contrast, 4F-iPSC demonstrated incomplete cardiogenic gene expression profiles beginning at day 5 of differentiation. Differential gene expression within the pluripotent state revealed 23 distinguishing candidate genes among pluripotent cell lines with divergent cardiogenic potentials. A confirmed panel of 12 genes, differentially expressed between high and low cardiogenic lines, was transformed into a predictive score sufficient to discriminate individual iPSC lines according to relative cardiogenic potential. Conclusions Transcriptome analysis attuned to natural embryonic cardiogenesis provides a robust platform to probe coordinated cardiac specification and maturation from bioengineered stem cell-based model systems. A panel of developmental-related genes allowed differential prognosis of cardiogenic competency, thus prioritizing cell lines according to natural blueprint to streamline functional applications. PMID:24036272

  11. Study of plasma natural convection induced by electron beam in atmosphere [

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yongfeng Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2014-06-15

    Using high-energy electron beams to ionize air is an effective way to produce a large-size plasma in the atmosphere. In particular, with a steady-state high power generator, some unique phenomena can be achieved, including natural convection of the plasma. The characteristics of this convection are studied both experimentally and numerically. The results show that an asymmetrical temperature field develops with magnitudes that vary from 295 K to 389 K at a pressure of 100 Torr. Natural convection is greatly enhanced under 760 Torr. Nevertheless, plasma transport is negligible in this convection flow field and only the plasma core tends to move upward. Parameter analysis is performed to discern influencing factors on this phenomenon. The beam current, reflecting the Rayleigh number Ra effect, correlates with convection intensity, which indicates that energy deposition is the underlying key factor in determining such convections. Finally, natural convection is concluded to be an intrinsic property of the electron beam when focused into dense air, and can be achieved by carefully adjusting equipment operations parameters.

  12. Protection of Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage Y2 from UV-induced damage by natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Born, Yannick; Bosshard, Lars; Duffy, Brion; Loessner, Martin J.; Fieseler, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages have regained much attention as biocontrol agents against bacterial pathogens. However, with respect to stability, phages are biomolecules and are therefore sensitive to a number of environmental influences. UV-irradiation can readily inactivate phage infectivity, which impedes their potential application in the plant phyllosphere. Therefore, phages for control of Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight, need to be protected from UV-damage by adequate measures. We investigated the protective effect of different light-absorbing substances on phage particles exposed to UV-light. For this, natural extracts from carrot, red pepper, and beetroot, casein and soy peptone in solution, and purified substances such as astaxanthin, aromatic amino acids, and Tween 80 were prepared and tested as natural sunscreens for phage. All compounds were found to significantly increase half-life of UV-irradiated phage particles and they did not negatively affect phage viability or infectivity. Altogether, a range of readily available, natural substances are suitable as UV-protectants to prevent phage particles from UV-light damage. PMID:26904378

  13. Variation in oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved orthophosphate induced by uptake process in natural coral holobionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, Charissa M.; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Umezawa, Yu; Morimoto, Naoko; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A model incubation experiment using natural zooxanthellate corals was conducted to evaluate the influence of phosphate uptake by coral holobionts on oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved PO4 3- (δ18Op). Live coral samples of Acropora digitifera, Porites cylindrica, and Heliopora coerulea were collected from coral reefs around Ishigaki Island (Okinawa, Japan) and Bolinao (northern Luzon, Philippines) and incubated for 3-5 d after acclimatization under natural light conditions with elevated concentrations of PO4 3-. Phosphate uptake by corals behaved linearly with incubation time, with uptake rate depending on temperature. δ18Op usually increased with time toward the equilibrium value with respect to oxygen isotope exchange with ambient seawater, but sometimes became higher than equilibrium value at the end of incubation. The magnitude of the isotope effect associated with uptake depended on coral species; the greatest effect was in A. digitifera and the smallest in H. coerulea. However, it varied even within samples of a single coral species, which suggests multiple uptake processes with different isotope effects operating simultaneously with varying relative contributions in the coral holobionts used. In natural environments where concentrations of PO4 3- are much lower than those used during incubation, PO4 3- is presumably turned over much faster and the δ18Op easily altered by corals and other major primary producers. This should be taken into consideration when using δ18Op as an indicator of external PO4 3- sources in coastal ecosystems.

  14. Snag characteristics and dynamics following natural and artificially induced mortality in a managed loblolly pine forest

    SciTech Connect

    Zarnoch, Stanley J.; Vukovich, Mark A.; Kilgo, John C.; Blake, John I.

    2013-09-01

    A 14-year study of snag characteristics was established in 41- to 44-year old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stands in southeastern USA. During the initial 5.5 years, no stand manipulation or unusually high-mortality events occurred. Afterwards, three treatments were applied consisting of trees thinned and removed, trees felled and not removed, and artificial creation of snags produced by girdling and herbicide injection. The thinned treatments were designed to maintain the same live canopy density as the snag-created treatment, disregarding snags that remained standing.We monitored snag height, diameter, density, volume, and bark percentage; the number of cavities was monitored in natural snags only. During the first 5.5 years, recruitment and loss rates were stable, resulting in a stable snag population. Large snags (≥25 cm diameter) were common, but subcanopy small snags (10 to <25 cm diameter) dominated numerically. Large natural snags survived (90% quantile) significantly longer (6.0–9.4 years) than smaller snags (4.4–6.9 years). Large artificial snags persisted the longest (11.8 years). Cavities in natural snags developed within 3 years following tree death. The mean number of cavities per snag was five times greater in large versus small snags and large snags were more likely to have multiple cavities, emphasizing the importance of mature pine stands for cavity-dependent wildlife species.

  15. Natural Antioxidant Betanin Protects Rats from Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further. PMID:25861636

  16. Nature of nontargeted radiation effects observed during fractionated irradiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Hideo; Ishii-Ohba, Hiroko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Shiomi, Naoko; Katsube, Takanori; Mori, Masahiko; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Ohno, Mizuki; Yoshimura, Daisuke; Oka, Sugako; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Tatsumi, Kouichi; Muto, Masahiro; Sado, Toshihiko

    2013-05-01

    Changes in the thymic microenvironment lead to radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis, but the phenomena are not fully understood. Here we show that radiation-induced chromosomal instability and bystander effects occur in thymocytes and are involved in lymphomagenesis in C57BL/6 mice that have been irradiated four times with 1.8-Gy γ-rays. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated in descendants of irradiated thymocytes during recovery from radiation-induced thymic atrophy. Concomitantly, descendants of irradiated thymocytes manifested DNA lesions as revealed by γ-H2AX foci, chromosomal instability, aneuploidy with trisomy 15 and bystander effects on chromosomal aberration induction in co-cultured ROS-sensitive mutant cells, suggesting that the delayed generation of ROS is a primary cause of these phenomena. Abolishing the bystander effect of post-irradiation thymocytes by superoxide dismutase and catalase supports ROS involvement. Chromosomal instability in thymocytes resulted in the generation of abnormal cell clones bearing trisomy 15 and aberrant karyotypes in the thymus. The emergence of thymic lymphomas from the thymocyte population containing abnormal cell clones indicated that clones with trisomy 15 and altered karyotypes were prelymphoma cells with the potential to develop into thymic lymphomas. The oncogene Notch1 was rearranged after the prelymphoma cells were established. Thus, delayed nontargeted radiation effects drive thymic lymphomagenesis through the induction of characteristic changes in intrathymic immature T cells and the generation of prelymphoma cells.

  17. Natural antioxidant betanin protects rats from paraquat-induced acute lung injury interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further.

  18. Natural micro-scale heterogeneity induced solute and nanoparticle retardation in fractured crystalline rock.

    PubMed

    Huber, F; Enzmann, F; Wenka, A; Bouby, M; Dentz, M; Schäfer, T

    2012-05-15

    We studied tracer (Tritiated Water (HTO); Tritium replaces one of the stable hydrogen atoms in the H(2)O molecule) and nanoparticle (quantum dots (QD)) transport by means of column migration experiments and comparison to 3D CFD modeling. Concerning the modeling approach, a natural single fracture was scanned using micro computed tomography (μCT) serving as direct input for the model generation. The 3D simulation does not incorporate any chemical processes besides the molecular diffusion coefficient solely reflecting the impact of fracture heterogeneity on mass (solute and nanoparticles) transport. Complex fluid velocity distributions (flow channeling and flowpath heterogeneity) evolve as direct function of fracture geometry. Both experimental and simulated solute and colloidal breakthrough curves show heavy tailing (non-Fickian transport behavior), respectively. Regarding the type of quantum dots and geochemical conditions prevailing (Grimsel ground water chemistry, QD and diorite surface charge, respectively and porosity of the Äspö diorite drill core) experimental breakthrough of the quantum dots always arrives faster than the solute tracer in line with the modeling results. Besides retardation processes like sorption, filtration, straining or matrix diffusion, the results show that natural 3D fracture heterogeneity represents an important additional retardation mechanism for solutes and colloidal phases. This is clearly verified by the numerical simulations, where the 3D real natural fracture geometry and the resulting complex flow velocity distribution is the only possible process causing solute/nanoparticle retardation. Differences between the experimental results and the simulations are discussed with respect to uncertainties in the μCT measurements and experimental and simulation boundary conditions, respectively.

  19. The biphasic nature of hypoxia-induced directional migration of activated human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Novo, Erica; Povero, Davide; Busletta, Chiara; Paternostro, Claudia; di Bonzo, Lorenzo Valfrè; Cannito, Stefania; Compagnone, Alessandra; Bandino, Andrea; Marra, Fabio; Colombatto, Sebastiano; David, Ezio; Pinzani, Massimo; Parola, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Liver fibrogenesis is sustained by pro-fibrogenic myofibroblast-like cells (MFs), mainly originating from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC/MFs) or portal (myo)fibroblasts, and is favoured by hypoxia-dependent angiogenesis. Human HSC/MFs were reported to express vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF-receptor type 2 and to migrate under hypoxic conditions. This study was designed to investigate early and delayed signalling mechanisms involved in hypoxia-induced migration of human HSC/MFs. Signal transduction pathways and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated by integrating morphological, cell, and molecular biology techniques. Non-oriented and oriented migration were evaluated by using wound healing assay and the modified Boyden's chamber assay, respectively. The data indicate that hypoxia-induced migration of HSC/MFs is a biphasic process characterized by the following sequence of events: (a) an early (15 min) and mitochondria-related increased generation of intracellular ROS which (b) was sufficient to switch on activation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 that were responsible for the early phase of oriented migration; (c) a delayed and HIF-1α-dependent increase in VEGF expression (facilitated by ROS) and its progressive, time-dependent release in the extracellular medium that (d) was mainly responsible for sustained migration of HSC/MFs. Finally, immunohistochemistry performed on HCV-related fibrotic/cirrhotic livers revealed HIF-2α and haem-oxygenase-1 positivity in hepatocytes and α-SMA-positive MFs, indicating that MFs were likely to be exposed in vivo to both hypoxia and oxidative stress. In conclusion, hypoxia-induced migration of HSC/MFs involves an early, mitochondrial-dependent ROS-mediated activation of ERK and JNK, followed by a delayed- and HIF-1α-dependent up-regulation and release of VEGF.

  20. The pepper's natural ingredient capsaicin induces autophagy blockage in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Torres, Ágata; Bort, Alicia; Morell, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Henche, Nieves; Díaz-Laviada, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of red hot chili peepers, has been shown to have anti-cancer activities in several cancer cells, including prostate cancer. Several molecular mechanisms have been proposed on its chemopreventive action, including ceramide accumulation, endoplasmic reticulum stress induction and NFκB inhibition. However, the precise mechanisms by which capsaicin exerts its anti-proliferative effect in prostate cancer cells remain questionable. Herein, we have tested the involvement of autophagy on the capsaicin mechanism of action on prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells. The results showed that capsaicin induced prostate cancer cell death in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, increased the levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II, a marker of autophagy) and the accumulation of the cargo protein p62 suggesting an autophagy blockage. Moreover, confocal microscopy revealed that capsaicin treatment increased lysosomes which co-localized with LC3 positive vesicles in a similar extent to that produced by the lysosomal protease inhibitors E64 and pepstatin pointing to an autophagolysosomes breakdown inhibition. Furthermore, we found that capsaicin triggered ROS generation in cells, while the levels of ROS decreased with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger. Co-treatment of cells with NAC and capsaicin abrogated the effects of capsaicin on autophagy and cell death. Normal prostate PNT2 and RWPE-1 cells were more resistant to capsaicin-induced cytotoxicity and did not accumulate p62 protein. Taken together, these results suggest that ROS-mediated capsaicin-induced autophagy blockage contributes to antiproliferation in prostate cancer cells, which provides new insights into the anticancer molecular mechanism of capsaicin. PMID:26625315

  1. Sensitization of squamous cell carcinoma to cisplatin induced killing by natural agents

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shadan; Varghese, Lalee; Pereira, Lucio; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E.; Kucuk, Omer; Carey, Thomas E.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance is a major problem in the successful treatment of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In the present study we showed, for the first time, that the constitutive activation of NF-κB partly contributes to cisplatin resistance and that the inactivation of NF-κB by natural agents [G2535 (isoflavone mixture containing genistein and diadzein), 3,3′-diindolylmethane (Bioresponse BR-DIM referred to as B-DIM)] could overcome this resistance, resulting in the inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis, which might be an useful strategy for achieving better treatment outcome in patients diagnosed with cisplatin-resistant tumors of SCC. PMID:19231069

  2. Delivering sustainable crop protection systems via the seed: exploiting natural constitutive and inducible defence pathways.

    PubMed

    Pickett, John A; Aradottír, Gudbjorg I; Birkett, Michael A; Bruce, Toby J A; Hooper, Antony M; Midega, Charles A O; Jones, Huw D; Matthes, Michaela C; Napier, Johnathan A; Pittchar, Jimmy O; Smart, Lesley E; Woodcock, Christine M; Khan, Zeyaur R

    2014-04-05

    To reduce the need for seasonal inputs, crop protection will have to be delivered via the seed and other planting material. Plant secondary metabolism can be harnessed for this purpose by new breeding technologies, genetic modification and companion cropping, the latter already on-farm in sub-Saharan Africa. Secondary metabolites offer the prospect of pest management as robust as that provided by current pesticides, for which many lead compounds were, or are currently deployed as, natural products. Evidence of success and promise is given for pest management in industrial and developing agriculture. Additionally, opportunities for solving wider problems of sustainable crop protection, and also production, are discussed.

  3. Delivering sustainable crop protection systems via the seed: exploiting natural constitutive and inducible defence pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, John A.; Aradottír, Gudbjorg I.; Birkett, Michael A.; Bruce, Toby J. A.; Hooper, Antony M.; Midega, Charles A. O.; Jones, Huw D.; Matthes, Michaela C.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Pittchar, Jimmy O.; Smart, Lesley E.; Woodcock, Christine M.; Khan, Zeyaur R.

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the need for seasonal inputs, crop protection will have to be delivered via the seed and other planting material. Plant secondary metabolism can be harnessed for this purpose by new breeding technologies, genetic modification and companion cropping, the latter already on-farm in sub-Saharan Africa. Secondary metabolites offer the prospect of pest management as robust as that provided by current pesticides, for which many lead compounds were, or are currently deployed as, natural products. Evidence of success and promise is given for pest management in industrial and developing agriculture. Additionally, opportunities for solving wider problems of sustainable crop protection, and also production, are discussed. PMID:24535389

  4. Experimental investigation and modelling of compressibility induced by damage in carbon black-reinforced natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantournet, Sabine; Layouni, Khaled; Laiarinandrasana, Lucien; Piques, Roland

    2014-05-01

    While natural rubber is commonly considered as an incompressible material, this study shows how carbon black-reinforced natural rubber (NR-CB), when subjected to various mechanical loading conditions (uniaxial, hydrostatic, monotonic, cyclic), is affected by volume change. Experiments show a volume variation even for low straining values and a significant volume change for large elongations. Moreover, volume change can be either reversible or not, depending on the loading conditions. It is related to a competition between void growth, chain orientation, and stress softening. At a microscopic scale, in situ Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examinations and image analysis allow one to record damage and microscopic volume change as a function of elongation. Therefore the volume change measured at the microscopic scale is equal to the macroscopic one. Based on the experimental results, this paper shows that the hypothesis of incompressibility is worth being revisited. Thus, a nearly compressible approach was considered, where the strain energy is assumed to be the sum of spherical and deviatoric parts that are both affected by damage. The model was then implemented in a finite-element code. Good agreement was obtained between experimental results and model predictions for low triaxiality test conditions.

  5. Differential impact of lipoxygenase 2 and jasmonates on natural and stress-induced senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Martin A; Stingl, Nadja E; Lautenschlaeger, Jens K; Krischke, Markus; Mueller, Martin J; Berger, Susanne

    2010-04-01

    Jasmonic acid and related oxylipins are controversially discussed to be involved in regulating the initiation and progression of leaf senescence. To this end, we analyzed profiles of free and esterified oxylipins during natural senescence and upon induction of senescence-like phenotypes by dark treatment and flotation on sorbitol in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Jasmonic acid and free 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid increased during all three processes, with the strongest increase of jasmonic acid after dark treatment. Arabidopside content only increased considerably in response to sorbitol treatment. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerols and digalactosyldiacylglycerols decreased during these treatments and aging. Lipoxygenase 2-RNA interference (RNAi) plants were generated, which constitutively produce jasmonic acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid but do not exhibit accumulation during natural senescence or upon stress treatment. Chlorophyll loss during aging and upon dark incubation was not altered, suggesting that these oxylipins are not involved in these processes. In contrast, lipoxygenase 2-RNAi lines and the allene oxid synthase-deficient mutant dde2 were less sensitive to sorbitol than the wild type, indicating that oxylipins contribute to the response to sorbitol stress.

  6. Cytotoxicity induced by exposure to natural and synthetic tremolite asbestos: an in vitro pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Armanda; Giantomassi, Federica; Lucarini, Guendalina; Capella, Silvana; Bloise, Andrea; Di Primio, Roberto; Belluso, Elena

    2013-03-01

    Mineral fibers are potential carcinogens to humans. In order to help clarify the etiology of the pathological effects of asbestos, cellular reactions to natural and synthetic asbestos fibers were compared using a lung alveolar cancer cell line (A549 epithelial cells), considered the first target of inhaled micro-environmental contaminants. Natural asbestos tremolite (NAT) fibers were collected from rocks in NW Italy. Synthetic asbestos tremolite (SAT) was iron-free and therefore considered as standard tremolite. Both fibers, subjected to mineralogical characterization by X-ray powder diffractometry, electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry, fell within the definition of respirable and potentially carcinogenic fibers. Several signs of functional and structural cell damage were found after treatment with both fibers, documented by viability, motility, and morphological perturbations. Phalloidin labeling showed irregular distribution of cytoskeletal F-actin, whereas immunohistochemical investigations showed abnormal expression of VEGF, Cdc42, β-catenin, assessed as risks indicators for cancer development. Both fibers caused significant loss of viability, even compared to UICC crocidolite, but, while SAT fibers exerted a more direct cytotoxic effect, survival of damaged cells expressing high VEGF levels was detected after NAT contact. This in vitro pilot study outlines potential health risks of NAT fibers in vivo related to their iron content, which could trigger signaling networks connected with cell proliferation and neoplastic transformation.

  7. Radiation-induced damage to cellular DNA: Chemical nature and mechanisms of lesion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J. Richard

    2016-11-01

    This mini-review focuses on the recent identification of several novel radiation-induced single and tandem modifications in cellular DNA. For this purpose accurate high-performance electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was applied allowing their quantitative measurement and unambiguous characterization. Exposure of human cells to gamma rays led to the formation of several modified bases arising from the rearrangement of the pyrimidine ring of thymine, cytosine and 5-methylcytosine subsequent to initial addition of an hydroxyl radical (•OH) to the 5,6-ethylenic bond. In addition, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, an novel epigenetic mark, and 5-formylcytosine, were found to be generated consecutively to •OH-mediated hydrogen abstraction from the methyl group of 5-methylcytosine. Relevant mechanistic information on one-oxidation reactions of cellular DNA was also gained from the detection of 5-hydroxycytosine and guanine-thymine intra-strand adducts whose formation is rationalized by the generation of related base radical cation. Attempts to search for the radiation-induced formation of purine 5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyribonucleosides were unsuccessful with the exception of trace amounts of (5‧S)-5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyadenosine.

  8. Stuttering, Induced Fluency, and Natural Fluency: A Hierarchical Series of Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Kristin S.; Barron, Daniel S.; Fox, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder most likely due to a heritable form of developmental dysmyelination impairing the function of the speech-motor system. Speech-induced brain-activation patterns in persons who stutter (PWS) are anomalous in various ways; the consistency of these aberrant patterns is a matter of ongoing debate. Here, we present a hierarchical series of coordinate-based meta-analyses addressing this issue. Two tiers of meta-analyses were performed on a 17-paper dataset (202 PWS; 167 fluent controls). Four large-scale (top-tier) meta-analyses were performed, two for each subject group (PWS and controls). These analyses robustly confirmed the regional effects previously postulated as “neural signatures of stuttering” (Brown 2005) and extended this designation to additional regions. Two smaller-scale (lower-tier) meta-analyses refined the interpretation of the large-scale analyses: 1) a between-group contrast targeting differences between PWS and controls (stuttering trait); and 2) a within-group contrast (PWS only) of stuttering with induced fluency (stuttering state). PMID:25463820

  9. An activation-induced IL-15 isoform is a natural antagonist for IL-15 function

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Yinsheng; Song, Yuan; Lin, Dandan; Liu, Yonghao; Mei, Yu; Sandikin, Dedy; Sun, Weiping; Zhuang, Min; Liu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) expression induces the secretion of inflammatory cytokines, inhibits the apoptosis of activated T cells and prolongs the survival of CD8+ memory T cells. Here we identified an IL-15 isoform lacking exon-6, IL-15ΔE6, generated by alternative splicing events of activated immune cells, including macrophages and B cells. In vitro study showed that IL-15ΔE6 could antagonize IL-15-mediated T cell proliferation. The receptor binding assay revealed that IL-15ΔE6 could bind to IL-15Rα and interfere with the binding between IL-15 and IL-15Rα. Over-expression of IL-15ΔE6 in the murine EAE model ameliorated the EAE symptoms of the mice. The clinical scores were significantly lower in the mice expressing IL-15ΔE6 than the control mice and the mice expressing IL-15. The inflammation and demyelination of the EAE mice expressing IL-15ΔE6 were less severe than the control group. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that IL-15ΔE6 expression reduced the percentages of inflammatory T cells in the spleen and spinal cord, and inhibited the infiltration of macrophages to the CNS. Our results demonstrated that IL-15ΔE6 could be induced during immune activation and function as a negative feedback mechanism to dampen IL-15-mediated inflammatory events. PMID:27166125

  10. Natural cutaneous stimulation induces late and long-lasting facilitation of extensor motoneurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Schieppati, M; Crenna, P

    1984-02-20

    An investigation was made of the effects of physiological cutaneous stimulation on the excitability of extensor motoneurons in spinal unanesthetized cats. The time course of changes in the monosynaptic reflex (MSR) amplitude of the soleus (Sol) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and lateralis (GL) was studied after conditioning stimulation with air jets (delivered to different regions of the skin of the ipsilateral hind limb), pinpricks, or stretching of the skin of the heel induced by passive rotation of the tibio-tarsal joint. Low-intensity electrical stimulation of the sural or saphenous nerves was also employed in order to condition the MSRs of the triceps surae muscles. Hair bending, skin indentation or stretching, as well as electrical nerve stimulation, can induce a similar biphasic excitability cycle of the extensor MSRs, characterized by an early inhibition followed by a late facilitatory period (LFP). The LFP started approximately 20 ms after the arrival of the cutaneous afferent volley, and lasted about 80 ms. Conditioned MSRs could attain values corresponding to 200% or more of controls. The receptive field of the LFP evoked by the air jet proved to be as large as the whole leg and foot skin surface. No significant differences were found in the extent of the late facilitation in the MSRs of Sol, GM and GL, conditioned by electrical stimulation. The LFP was also present, after conditioning stimulation of the same types as above, in intact (and spinal) chloralose-anesthetized cats.

  11. Stuttering, induced fluency, and natural fluency: a hierarchical series of activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Budde, Kristin S; Barron, Daniel S; Fox, Peter T

    2014-12-01

    Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder most likely due to a heritable form of developmental dysmyelination impairing the function of the speech-motor system. Speech-induced brain-activation patterns in persons who stutter (PWS) are anomalous in various ways; the consistency of these aberrant patterns is a matter of ongoing debate. Here, we present a hierarchical series of coordinate-based meta-analyses addressing this issue. Two tiers of meta-analyses were performed on a 17-paper dataset (202 PWS; 167 fluent controls). Four large-scale (top-tier) meta-analyses were performed, two for each subject group (PWS and controls). These analyses robustly confirmed the regional effects previously postulated as "neural signatures of stuttering" (Brown, Ingham, Ingham, Laird, & Fox, 2005) and extended this designation to additional regions. Two smaller-scale (lower-tier) meta-analyses refined the interpretation of the large-scale analyses: (1) a between-group contrast targeting differences between PWS and controls (stuttering trait); and (2) a within-group contrast (PWS only) of stuttering with induced fluency (stuttering state).

  12. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-03-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes.

  13. Fitness consequences of natural variation in flooding-induced shoot elongation in Rumex palustris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Visser, Eric J W; de Kroon, Hans; Pierik, Ronald; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Huber, Heidrun

    2011-04-01

    • Plants can respond to their environment by morphological plasticity. Generally, the potential benefits of adaptive plastic responses are beyond doubt under predictable environmental changes. However, the net benefits may be less straightforward when plants encounter temporal stresses, such as flooding in river flood plains. • Here, we tested whether the balance of costs and benefits associated with flooding-induced shoot elongation depends on the flooding regime, by subjecting Rumex palustris plants with different elongation capacity to submergence of different frequency and duration. • Our results showed that reaching the surface by shoot elongation is associated with fitness benefits, as under less frequent, but longer, flooding episodes plants emerging above the floodwater had greater biomass production than plants that were kept below the surface. As we predicted, slow-elongating plants had clear advantages over fast-elongating ones if submergence was frequent but of short duration, indicating that elongation also incurs costs. • Our data suggest that high costs select for weak plasticity under frequent environmental change. In contrast to our predictions, however, fast-elongating plants did not have an overall advantage over slow-elongating plants when floods lasted longer. This indicates that the delicate balance between benefits and costs of flooding-induced elongation depends on the specific characteristics of the flooding regime.

  14. TU-F-BRE-07: In Vivo Neutron Detection in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Primary Kidney Cancer Using 6Li and 7Li Enriched TLD Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Lonski, P; Kron, T; Franich, R; Keehan, S; Siva, S; Taylor, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for primary kidney cancer often involves the use of high-energy photons combined with a large number of monitor units. While important for risk assessment, the additional neutron dose to untargeted healthy tissue is not accounted for in treatment planning. This work aims to detect out-of-field neutrons in vivo for patients undergoing SABR with high-energy (>10 MV) photons and provides preliminary estimates of neutron effective dose. Methods: 3 variations of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material, each with varying {sup 6}Li / {sup 7}Li concentrations, were used in custom-made Perspex holders for in vivo measurements. The variation in cross section for thermal neutrons between Li isotopes was exploited to distinguish neutron from photon signal. Measurements were made out-of-field for 7 patients, each undergoing 3D-conformal SABR treatment for primary kidney cancer on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. Results: In vivo measurements show increased signal for the {sup 6}Li enriched material for patients treated with 18 MV photons. Measurements on one SABR patient treated using only 6 MV showed no difference between the 3 TLD materials. The out-of-field photon signal decreased exponentially with distance from the treatment field. The neutron signal, taken as the difference between {sup 6}Li enriched and {sup 7}Li enriched TLD response, remains almost constant up to 50 cm from the beam central axis. Estimates of neutron effective dose from preliminary TLD calibration suggest between 10 and 30 mSv per 1000 MU delivered at 18 MV for the 7 patients. Conclusion: TLD was proven to be a useful tool for the purpose of in vivo neutron detection at out-of-field locations. Further work is required to understand the relationship between TL signal and neutron dose. Dose estimates based on preliminary TLD calibration in a neutron beam suggest the additional neutron dose was <30 mSv per 1000 MU at 18 MV.

  15. Isotopic evidence ( 87Sr/ 86Sr, δ 7Li) for alteration of the oceanic crust at deep-rooted mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz, NE Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Hensen, Christian; Reitz, Anja; Romer, Rolf L.; Liebetrau, Volker; Meixner, Anette; Weise, Stephan M.; Haeckel, Matthias

    2009-09-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of pore fluids is presented for five deep-rooted mud volcanoes aligned on a transect across the Gulf of Cadiz continental margin at water depths between 350 and 3860 m. Generally decreasing interstitial Li concentrations and 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios with increasing distance from shore are attributed to systematically changing fluid sources across the continental margin. Although highest Li concentrations at the near-shore mud volcanoes coincide with high salinities derived from dissolution of halite and late-stage evaporites, clayey, terrigenous sediments are identified as the ultimate Li source to all pore fluids investigated. Light δ 7Li values, partly close to those of hydrothermal vent fluids (δ 7Li: +11.9‰), indicate that Li has been mobilized during high-temperature fluid/sediment or fluid/rock interactions in the deep sub-surface. Intense leaching of terrigenous clay has led to radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (˜0.7106) in pore fluids of the near-shore mud volcanoes. In contrast, non-radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (˜0.7075) at the distal locations are attributed to admixing of a basement-derived fluid component, carrying an isotopic signature from interaction with the basaltic crust. This inference is substantiated by temperature constraints from Li isotope equilibrium calculations suggesting exchange processes at particularly high temperatures (>200 °C) for the least radiogenic pore fluids of the most distal location. Advective pore fluids in the off-shore reaches of the Gulf of Cadiz are influenced by successive exchange processes with both oceanic crust and terrigenous, fine-grained sediments, resulting in a chemical and isotopic signature similar to that of fluids in near-shore ridge flank hydrothermal systems. This suggests that deep-rooted mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz represent a fluid pathway intermediate between mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vent and shallow, marginal cold seep. Due to the thicker sediment

  16. Effect of natural honey from Ilam and metformin for improving glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Nasrolahi, Ozra; Heidari, Reza; Rahmani, Fatima; Farokhi, Farah

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s): Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem and one of the five leading causes of death globally. In the present study, the effect of Metformin with natural honey was investigated on glycemia in the Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty Wistar male rats were randomly divided into six groups including C: non diabetic rats received distilled water, CH: non diabetic rats received honey, CD: diabetic rats administered with distilled water, DM: Metformin treated diabetic rats, DH: honey treated diabetic rats, and DMH: diabetic rats treated with a combination of Metformin and natural honey. Diabetes was induced by a single dose of Streptozotocin (65 mg/kg; i.p.). The animals were treated by oral gavage once daily for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and their blood samples collected. Amount of glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, VLDL cholesterol, total bilirubin, and albumin were determined in serum. Results: Group CD: showed hyperglycemia (252.2±4.1 mg/dl), while level of blood glucose was significantly (p<0.01) reduced in groups DH (124.2±2.7 mg/dl), DM (108.0±3.4 mg/dl), and DMH (115.4±2.1 mg/dl). Honey in combination with Metformin significantly (p<0.01) reduced level of bilirubin but Metformin alone did not reduce bilirubin. Honey alone and in combination with Metformin also significantly reduced triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, VLDL and increased HDL, but Metformin did not reduced triglycerides and increased HDL. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrated that consuming natural honey with Metformin improves glycemic control and is more useful than consuming Metformin alone. The higher therapeutic effect of Ilam honey on lipid abnormalities than Tualang honey was also evident. PMID:25050251

  17. Immunocytochemical localization of the surfactant apoprotein and Clara cell antigen in chemically induced and naturally occurring pulmonary neoplasms of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J. M.; Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.; Anderson, L. M.; Kovatch, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The localization of surfactant apoprotein (SAP) and the Clara cell antigen(s) (CCA) was studied in naturally occurring and experimentally induced pulmonary hyperplasias and neoplasms by avidin-biotin peroxidase complex (ABC) immunocytochemistry. Lungs of B6C3F1 and A strain mice with naturally occurring lesions, B6C3F1 mice given injections of N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), BALB/c nu/nu or nu/+ mice exposed transplacentally on Day 16 of gestation to ethylnitrosourea (ENU), or BALB/c nu/+ mice exposed to ENU at 8-12 weeks of age were preserved in formalin or Bouin's fixative. After ABC immunocytochemistry, SAP was found in the cytoplasm of normal alveolar Type II cells; in the majority of cells in focal alveolar and solid hyperplasias originating in peribronchiolar or peripheral locations; and in solid, tubular, papillary, and mixed adenomas and carcinomas. The larger mixed-pattern neoplasms and small or large tubular neoplasms usually had the least number of cells with SAP. The majority of large papillary adenomas and carcinomas in BALB/c mice exposed to ENU and in untreated A strain mice contained SAP in the nuclei of many neoplastic cells but only in the cytoplasm of a few neoplastic cells. CCA was found in normal Clara cells of bronchi and bronchioles but not in any hyperplastic or neoplastic lesion of any mouse studied. This study provided immunocytochemical evidence that the vast majority of naturally occurring and experimentally induced pulmonary neoplasms of mice are alveolar Type II cell adenomas and carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3883798

  18. The Murphy Roths Large (MRL) mouse strain is naturally resistant to high fat diet-induced hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Nathan W.; Heydemann, Ahlke

    2014-01-01

    Objective Due to their previously identified naturally and chronically increased levels of skeletal muscle pAMPK we hypothesized and now investigated whether the MRL/MpJ (MRL) mice would be resistant to high fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic changes. Materials/Methods Three-week old male MRL and control C57Bl/6 (B6) mice were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of high fat diets (HFD) or control diets (CD). Weekly animal masses and fasting blood glucose measurements were acquired. During the last week of diet intervention, fasted animals were subjected to glucose and insulin tolerance tests. At harvest, tissues were dissected for immunoblots and serum was collected for elisa assays. Results The MRL mouse strain is known for its ability to regenerate ear punch wounds, cardiac cryoinjury, and skeletal muscle disease. Despite gaining weight and increasing their fat deposits the MRL mice were resistant to all other indicators of HFD-induced metabolic alterations assayed. Only the HFD-B6 mice displayed fasting hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hypersensitivity to glucose challenge. HFD-MRL mice were indistinguishable from their CDMRL counterparts in these metrics. Skeletal muscles from the HFD-MRL contained heightened levels of pAMPK, even above their CD counterparts. Conclusions The MRL mouse strain is the first naturally occurring mouse strain that we are aware of that is resistant to HFD-induced metabolic changes. Furthermore, the increased pAMPK suggests a proximal mechanism for these beneficial metabolic differences. We further hypothesize that these metabolic differences and plasticity provide the basis for the MRL mouse strain’s super healing characteristics. This project’s ultimate aim is to identify novel therapeutic targets, which specifically increase pAMPK. PMID:25308446

  19. Monitoring natural and anthropogenic induced variations in water availability across Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Sultan, M.; Wahr, J. M.; Yan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Africa, the second-driest continent in the world after Australia, is one of the most vulnerable continents to climate change. Understanding the impacts of climatic and anthropogenic factors on Africa's hydrologic systems is vital for the assessment and utilization of Africa's water resources. In this study, we utilize the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and land surface models (LSM; GLDAS and CLM4.5) in conjunction with other readily-available temporal climatic and remote sensing, geological and hydrological datasets for monitoring the spatial and temporal trends in Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) over a time period of 10 years (01/2003-12/2012) over the African continent and to investigate the nature (e.g., climatic and/or human pressures-related) of, and the controlling factors causing, these variations. Spatial and temporal (i.e., time series analysis) correlations of the trends extracted from GRACE-derived (TWSGRACE) and LSM-derived (TWSLSM) TWS indicate the following: (1) Large (≥ 90 % by area) sectors of Africa are undergoing statistically significant TWSGRACE and TWSLSM variations due to natural and anthropogenic causes; (2) a general correspondence between TWSGRACE and TWSLSM over areas (e.g., Niger and Mozambique NE basins in eastern and western Africa) largely controlled by natural (i.e., increase/decrease in precipitation and/or temperature) causes; (3) discrepancies are observed over areas that witnessed extensive anthropogenic effects measured by TWSGRACE but unaccounted for by TWSLSM. Examples include: (a) strong (compared to that observed by TWSLSM) negative TWSGRACE trends were observed over areas that witnessed heavy groundwater extraction (e.g., Western, Desert, Egypt); (b) strong (compared to that observed by TWSLSM) positive TWSGRACE over Lake Volta reservoir; and (c) strong (compared to that observed by TWSLSM) negative trends over areas undergoing heavy deforestation (e.g., northern and NW Congo Basin); (4) additional

  20. Preliminary investigation of topical nitroglycerin formulations containing natural wound healing agent in diabetes-induced foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hotkar, Mukesh S; Avachat, Amelia M; Bhosale, Sagar S; Oswal, Yogesh M

    2015-04-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) is an organic nitrate rapidly denitrated by enzymes to release free radical nitric oxide and shows improved wound healing and tissue protection from oxidative damage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether topical application of NTG in the form of gel/ointment along with a natural wound healing agent, aloe vera, would bring about wound healing by using diabetes-induced foot ulcer model and rat excision wound model. All these formulations were evaluated for pH, viscosity, drug content and ex vivo diffusion studies using rat skin. Based on ex vivo permeation studies, the formulation consisting of carbopol 974p as a gelling agent and aloe vera was found to be suitable. The in vivo study used streptozotocin-induced diabetic foot ulcer and rat excision wound models to analyse wound healing activity. The wound size in animals of all treated groups was significantly reduced compared with that of the diabetic control and marketed treated animals. This study showed that the gel formed with carbopol 974p (1%) and aloe vera promotes significant wound healing and closure in diabetic rats compared with the commercial product and provides a promising product to be used in diabetes-induced foot ulcer.

  1. EHHM, a novel phenolic natural product from Livistona chinensis, induces autophagy-related apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinsheng; Zhong, Feng; He, Kun; Sun, Shibo; Chen, Hongbo; Zhou, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ranks the second cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. In the present study, the effects and mechanisms of a new phenolic natural product E-[6′-(5′-hydroxypentyl)tricosyl]-4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamate (EHHM) isolated from Livistona chinensis on the growth of HCC cells were investigated. It was observed that EHHM treatment significantly suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, and induced cell apoptosis via a mitochondria-dependent caspase pathway in HepG2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, EHHM treatment also led to upregulated expression of autophagy protein 5 (Atg5), Beclin 1 and light chain 3 (LC3)-II proteins, and accumulation of green fluorescent protein-LC3 punctate florescent foci in HCC cells, suggesting that EHHM-induced apoptosis is accompanied by autophagy induction. Western blotting revealed that EHHM-induced autophagy is related to the inhibition of the Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin/p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, treatment with Atg5 small interfering RNA or autophagy inhibitors significantly enhanced EHHM-mediated growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death, indicating that autophagy serves as a self-protective mechanism in EHHM-treated HCC cells, and that combined treatment with EHHM and autophagy inhibitors may be an effective therapeutic strategy for HCC. PMID:27895725

  2. The Natural Pesticide Dihydrorotenone Induces Human Plasma Cell Apoptosis by Triggering Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Activating p38 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Biyin; Zhang, Zubin; Li, Jie; Schimmer, Aaron D.; He, Sudan; Mao, Xinliang

    2013-01-01

    Dihydrorotenone (DHR) is a natural pesticide widely used in farming industry, such as organic produces. DHR is a potent mitochondrial inhibitor and probably induces Parkinsonian syndrome, however, it is not known whether DHR is toxic to other systems. In the present study, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of DHR on human plasma cells. As predicted, DHR impaired mitochondrial function by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential in plasma cells. Because mito-dysfunction leads to unfolded protein response (UPR) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, we examined the signature proteins in ER stress, including GRP78, ATF4, and CHOP. After DHR treatment, these proteins were significantly upregulated. It is reported that activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and JNK are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, in the subsequent study, DHR was found to activate p38 but not the JNK signaling. When pre-treated with p38 inhibitor SB203580, activation of p38 and cell apoptosis induced by DHR was partially blocked. Thus, we found that DHR induced human plasma cell death by activating the p38 but not the JNK signaling pathway. Because plasma cells are very important in the immune system, this study provided a new insight in the safety evaluation of DHR application. PMID:23922854

  3. Glutathione diminishes tributyltin- and dibutyltin-induced loss of lytic function in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeralyn J; Davis, McLisa V; Whalen, Margaret M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether reduced glutathione (GSH) was able to alter the negative effects of tributyltin (TBT) or dibutyltin (DBT) on the lytic function of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against the development of tumors or viral infections. TBT and DBT are widespread environmental contaminants, due to their various industrial applications. Both TBT and DBT have been shown to decrease the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells (lytic function). The results indicated that the presence of GSH during the exposure of NK cells to TBT or DBT diminished the negative effect of the butyltin on the lytic function of NK cells. This suggests that the interaction of TBT and DBT with functionally relevant sulfhydryl groups in NK cells may be part of the mechanism by which they decrease NK lytic function.

  4. Anticedants and natural prevention of environmental toxicants induced accelerated aging of skin.

    PubMed

    Tanuja Yadav; Mishra, Shivangi; Das, Shefali; Aggarwal, Shikha; Rani, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    Skin is frequently exposed to a variety of environmental and chemical agents that accelerate ageing. External stress such as UV radiations (UVR) and environmental pollutants majorly deteriorate the skin morphology, by activating certain intrinsic factors such as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) which trigger the activation of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and inflammatory responses hence damaging the extracellular matrix (ECM) components. To counter this, an exogenous supply of anti-oxidants, is required since the endogenous anti-oxidant system cannot alone suffice the need. Bio-prospecting of natural resources for anti-oxidants has hence been intensified. Immense research is being carried out to identify potential plants with potent anti-oxidant activity against skin ageing. This review summarizes the major factors responsible for premature skin ageing and the plants being targeted to lessen the impact of those.

  5. [Music therapy induced alternations in natural killer cell count and function].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Kubota, N; Inagaki, T; Shinagawa, N

    2001-03-01

    The effects of music therapy on natural killer (NK) cell count and activity (NKCA) were studied in 19 persons. Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovessel disease and Parkinson's disease subjects were assigned to a music therapy. Blood samples were drawn at rest and after completion of music therapy. Music therapy did not change the number of circulating lymphocytes. The percentage of NK cells increased during music therapy, along with an increase in the NK cell activity. The proportion of T cells, CD4 and CD8 did not change significantly during music therapy. One hour after the music therapy session, plasma adrenaline increased but cortisol and noradrenalin did not change. The results indicate that music therapy can significantly increase NK cell count and activity. The change in NK cell and function were independent of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  6. Plasma-Induced Degradation of Polypropene Plastics in Natural Volatile Constituents of Ledum palustre Herb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hong; Yu, Shenjing; Ren, Chunsheng; Xiu, Zhilong

    2012-02-01

    Polypropene (PP) plastics can be effectively degraded by natural volatile constituents from Ledum palustre catalyzed by atmospheric air dielectric barrier (DBD) plasma. The electron spin resonance (ESR) result indicates that the volatile constituents produce radicals in aerobic condition energized by power sources such as light, UV, plasma and so on. The degradation is a novel chemically oxidative way and it is initiated by a series of radical reactions. Lots of active and oxidative species, radicals, products and high energy electromagnetic field in plasma aggravate the degradation process. The results about PP maximum tensile strength (σbmax) confirm this conclusion. PP plastic heavily loses its extensibility, mechanical integrity and strength in a short time after suffering a synergetic treatment of the herb extract and air DBD plasma with no toxic residues left. The components of herb extract keep almost unchanged and may be reused. This study offers a new approach to manage and recycle typical plastics.

  7. Stress-induced stabilization of crystals in shape memory natural rubber.

    PubMed

    Heuwers, Benjamin; Quitmann, Dominik; Hoeher, Robin; Reinders, Frauke M; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Sternemann, Christian; Tolan, Metin; Katzenberg, Frank; Tiller, Joerg C

    2013-01-25

    In contrast to all known shape memory polymers, the melting temperature of crystals in shape memory natural rubber (SMNR) can be greatly manipulated by the application of external mechanical stress. As shown previously, stress perpendicular to the prior programming direction decreases the melting temperature by up to 40 K. In this study, we investigated the influence of mechanical stress parallel to prior stretching direction during programming on the stability of the elongation-stabilizing crystals. It was found that parallel stress stabilizes the crystals, which is indicated by linear increase of the trigger temperature by up to 17 K. The crystal melting temperature can be increased up to 126.5 °C under constrained conditions as shown by X-ray diffraction measurements.

  8. Can Dark Matter Induce Cosmological Evolution of the Fundamental Constants of Nature?

    PubMed

    Stadnik, Y V; Flambaum, V V

    2015-11-13

    We demonstrate that massive fields, such as dark matter, can directly produce a cosmological evolution of the fundamental constants of nature. We show that a scalar or pseudoscalar (axionlike) dark matter field ϕ, which forms a coherently oscillating classical field and interacts with standard model particles via quadratic couplings in ϕ, produces "slow" cosmological evolution and oscillating variations of the fundamental constants. We derive limits on the quadratic interactions of ϕ with the photon, electron, and light quarks from measurements of the primordial (4)He abundance produced during big bang nucleosynthesis and recent atomic dysprosium spectroscopy measurements. These limits improve on existing constraints by up to 15 orders of magnitude. We also derive limits on the previously unconstrained linear and quadratic interactions of ϕ with the massive vector bosons from measurements of the primordial (4)He abundance.

  9. Toxic hepatitis induced by Gymnema sylvestre, a natural remedy for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shiyovich, Arthur; Sztarkier, Ignacio; Nesher, Lior

    2010-12-01

    Toxic hepatitis or drug-induced liver injury (DILI) encompasses a spectrum of conditions ranging from mild biochemical abnormalities to acute liver failure. Recent studies report that 35% to 48% of patients with diabetes use some form of complementary and alternative medical therapy. Moreover, >800 plants have been traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes. Despite this widespread use, only few were supported by rigorous clinical evidence. Gymnema sylvestre, also known as gurmar (sugar destroyer in Hindi), is a plant considered to be with potent antidiabetic effects and, hence, widely used in folk, ayurvedic and homeopathic systems in medicine. The authors were unable to find previous reports associating G sylvestre to liver injury. Herein, the authors report a case of DILI in a patient who was treated with G sylvestre for diabetes mellitus and review the literature to suggest possible mechanisms that led to this acute condition.

  10. A 107-year-old coral from Florida Bay: barometer of natural and man- induced catastrophes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, J.H.; Powell, G.V.N.; Robblee, M.B.; Smith, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    The 107-yr growth history of a massive coral Solenastrea bournoni from Florida Bay was reconstructed with X-ray imagery from a single 4 in. diameter (10 cm) core that penetrated the exact epicenter of the 95.3 cm high colony. Growth increments totalled 952.9 mm, averaging 8.9 mm/yr over the life of the coral. Growth rate trends in the Florida Bay coral were compared to those in a Montastraea annularis of similar age from a nearby patch reef on the Atlantic Ocean side of the Florida Keys. It was concluded that growth rate, at least in these specimens, is a questionable indicator of past hurricanes and freezes. There does appear to be, however, a possible cause-and-effect relationship between major man-induced environmental perturbations and a prolonged reduction in growth rate in each coral's growth record. -from Authors

  11. Natural and human-induced sinkhole hazards in Saudi Arabia: distribution, investigation, causes and impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Ahmed M.; Al-Harbi, Hasan M.; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Zabramwi, Yasser A.; Bulkhi, Ali B.; Zahrani, Saeed A.; Bahamil, Alaa M.; Zahrani, Ahmed J.; Otaibi, Zaam A.; El-Haddad, Bosy A.

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 60 % of the 2,150,000 km2 area of Saudi Arabia is underlain by soluble sediments (carbonate and evaporite rock formations, salt diapirs, sabkha deposits). Despite its hyper-arid climate, a wide variety of recent sinkholes have been reported in numerous areas, involving significant property losses. Human activities, most notably groundwater extraction, have induced unstable conditions on pre-existing cavities. This work provides an overview of the sinkhole hazard in Saudi Arabia, a scarcely explored topic. It identifies the main karst formations and the distribution of the most problematic sinkhole areas, illustrated through several case studies covering the wide spectrum of subsidence mechanisms. Some of the main investigation methods are presented through selected examples, including remote sensing, trenching and geophysics. Based on the available data, the main causal factors are identified and further actions that should be undertaken to better assess and manage the risk are discussed.

  12. Naturally-induced endocrine disruption by the parasite Ligula intestinalis (Cestoda) in roach (Rutilus rutilus).

    PubMed

    Trubiroha, Achim; Kroupova, Hana; Wuertz, Sven; Frank, Sabrina N; Sures, Bernd; Kloas, Werner

    2010-04-01

    Fish represent the most frequently used vertebrate class for the investigation of endocrine disruption (ED) in wildlife. However, field studies are complicated by exposure scenarios involving a variety of anthropogenic and natural influences interfering with the endocrine system. One natural aspect rarely considered in ecotoxicological studies is how parasites modulate host physiology. Therefore, investigations were carried out to characterise the impacts of the parasitic tapeworm Ligula intestinalis on plasma sex steroid levels and expression of key genes associated with the reproduction in roach (Rutilus rutilus), a sentinel species for wildlife ED research. Parasitisation by L. intestinalis suppressed gonadal development in both genders of roach and analysis of plasma sex steroids revealed substantially lower levels of 17beta-oestradiol (E2) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in infected females as well as E2, 11-KT, and testosterone in infected males. Consistently, in both, infected females and males, expression of the oestrogen dependent genes such as vitellogenin and brain-type aromatase in liver and brain was reduced. Furthermore, parasitisation differentially modulated mRNA expression of the oestrogen and androgen receptors in brain and liver. Most prominently, liver expression of oestrogen receptor 1 was reduced in infected females but not in males, whereas expression of oestrogen receptor 2a was up-regulated in both genders. Further, insulin-like growth factor 1 mRNA in the liver was increased in infected females but not in males. Despite severe impacts on plasma sex steroids and pituitary gonadotropin expression, brain mRNA levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) precursors encoding GnRH2 and GnRH3 were not affected by L. intestinalis-infection. In summary, the present results provide basic knowledge of the endocrine system in L. intestinalis-infected roach and clearly demonstrate that parasites can cause ED in fish.

  13. Grazing-induced vegetation patchiness controls net N mineralization rate in a semi-natural grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, Nicolas; Bonis, Anne; Bouzillé, Jan-Bernard

    2011-05-01

    Herbivores influence nutrient cycling either through direct effects (e.g. excreta) or through indirect effects such as a modification of plant-soil feedbacks. This work investigated if grazing-enhanced net N mineralization rates were related to (1) enhanced quality of plant litter and/or (2) reduced plant litter inputs. Rates of net N mineralization in soil and both the quantity and quality of litters were characterized in various plant patches occurring within a grazed grassland. Soil incubations were performed in controlled conditions to assess the respective role of litter quantity and quality on N mineralization. In laboratory incubations, the effect of litter quantity on net N mineralization rates was found to depend on litter quality. High inputs of litter produced by grazing-promoted species ( C/ N 11) stimulated net N mineralization rates, while high inputs of litter produced by grazing-reduced species ( C/ N 46) decreased rates of net N mineralization. The intensity of either the negative or positive effects of litter was then regulated by litter quantity. In the field, litter quality only varied within a limited range. Litter with the highest quality in the field ( C/ N 22) increased N mineralization minimally compared to the lowest quality litter ( C/ N 46). Grazing-induced variations in litter quality monitored in the field thus appeared unlikely to cause measured variations in net N mineralization rates. Litter with C/ N ratios of 46 and 22 stimulated N immobilization and reduction of their inputs increased the rate of N mineralization due to decreased microbial N immobilization. Within-grassland variations of litter quantity were large and negatively correlated with net N mineralization rates. Our results support the hypothesis that grazing-induced patchiness modifies net N mineralization rates by controlling microbial N immobilization mainly through changes in the quantity of litter-C supplied to the soil.

  14. The gene pat-2, which induces natural parthenocarpy, alters the gibberellin content in unpollinated tomato ovaries.

    PubMed

    Fos, M; Nuez, F; García-Martínez, J L

    2000-02-01

    We investigated the role of gibberellins (GAs) in the effect of pat-2, a recessive mutation that induces facultative parthenocarpic fruit development in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) using near-isogenic lines with two different genetic backgrounds. Unpollinated wild-type Madrigal (MA/wt) and Cuarenteno (CU/wt) ovaries degenerated, but GA(3) application induced parthenocarpic fruit growth. On the contrary, parthenocarpic growth of MA/pat-2 and CU/pat-2 fruits, which occurs in the absence of pollination and hormone application, was not affected by GA(3). Pollinated MA/wt and parthenocarpic MA/pat-2 ovary development was negated by paclobutrazol, and this inhibitory effect was counteracted by GA(3). The main GAs of the early-13-hydroxylation pathway (GA(1), GA(3), GA(8), GA(19), GA(20), GA(29), GA(44), GA(53), and, tentatively, GA(81)) and two GAs of the non-13-hydroxylation pathway (GA(9) and GA(34)) were identified in MA/wt ovaries by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring. GAs were quantified in unpollinated ovaries at flower bud, pre-anthesis, and anthesis. In unpollinated MA/pat-2 and CU/pat-2 ovaries, the GA(20) content was much higher (up to 160 times higher) and the GA(19) content was lower than in the corresponding non-parthenocarpic ovaries. The application of an inhibitor of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases suggested that GA(20) is not active per se. The pat-2 mutation may increase GA 20-oxidase activity in unpollinated ovaries, leading to a higher synthesis of GA(20), the precursor of an active GA.

  15. Fast Li ion dynamics in the solid electrolyte Li7 P3 S11 as probed by (6,7) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wohlmuth, Dominik; Epp, Viktor; Wilkening, Martin

    2015-08-24

    The development of safe and long-lasting all-solid-state batteries with high energy density requires a thorough characterization of ion dynamics in solid electrolytes. Commonly, conductivity spectroscopy is used to study ion transport; much less frequently, however, atomic-scale methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are employed. Here, we studied long-range as well as short-range Li ion dynamics in the glass-ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . Li(+) diffusivity was probed by using a combination of different NMR techniques; the results are compared with those obtained from electrical conductivity measurements. Our NMR relaxometry data clearly reveal a very high Li(+) diffusivity, which is reflected in a so-called diffusion-induced (6) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation peak showing up at temperatures as low as 313 K. At this temperature, the mean residence time between two successful Li jumps is in the order of 3×10(8) s(-1) , which corresponds to a Li(+) ion conductivity in the order of 10(-4) to 10(-3) S cm(-1) . Such a value is in perfect agreement with expectations for the crystalline but metastable glass ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . In contrast to conductivity measurements, NMR analysis reveals a range of activation energies with values ranging from 0.17 to 0.26 eV, characterizing Li diffusivity in the bulk. In our case, through-going Li ion transport, when probed by using macroscopic conductivity spectroscopy, however, seems to be influenced by blocking grain boundaries including, for example, amorphous regions surrounding the Li7 P3 S11 crystallites. As a result of this, long-range ion transport as seen by impedance spectroscopy is governed by an activation energy of approximately 0.38 eV. The findings emphasize how surface and grain boundary effects can drastically affect long-range ionic conduction. If we are to succeed in solid-state battery technology, such effects have to be brought under control by, for example, sophisticated densification or through the preparation

  16. Effects of natural and human-induced hypoxia on coastal benthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, L. A.; Ekau, W.; Gooday, A. J.; Jorissen, F.; Middelburg, J. J.; Naqvi, W.; Neira, C.; Rabalais, N. N.; Zhang, J.

    2009-04-01

    Coastal hypoxia (<1.42 ml L-1; 62.5 μM; 2 mg L-1, approx. 30% oxygen saturation) occurs seasonally in many estuaries, fjords, and along open coasts subject to upwelling or excessive riverine nutrient input, and permanently in some isolated seas and marine basins. Underlying causes of hypoxia include enhanced nutrient input from natural causes (upwelling) or anthropogenic origin (eutrophication) and reduction of mixing by limited circulation or enhanced stratification; combined these lead to higher surface water production, microbial respiration and eventual oxygen depletion. Advective inputs of low-oxygen waters may initiate or expand hypoxic conditions. Responses of estuarine, enclosed sea, and open shelf benthos to hypoxia depend on the duration, predictability, and intensity of oxygen depletion and on whether H2S is formed. Under suboxic conditions, large mats of filamentous sulfide oxidizing bacteria cover the seabed and consume sulfide, thereby providing a detoxified microhabitat for eukaryotic benthic communities. Calcareous foraminiferans and nematodes are particularly tolerant of low oxygen concentrations and may attain high densities and dominance, often in association with microbial mats. When oxygen is sufficient to support metazoans, small, soft-bodied invertebrates (typically annelids), often with short generation times and elaborate branchial structures, predominate. Large taxa are more sensitive than small taxa to hypoxia. Crustaceans and echinoderms are typically more sensitive to hypoxia, with lower oxygen thresholds, than annelids, sipunculans, molluscs and cnidarians. Mobile fish and shellfish will migrate away from low-oxygen areas. Within a species, early life stages may be more subject to oxygen stress than older life stages. Hypoxia alters both the structure and function of benthic communities, but effects may differ with regional hypoxia history. Human-caused hypoxia is generally linked to eutrophication, and occurs adjacent to watersheds

  17. Were the 2011 Prague, Oklahoma Earthquakes Natural, Induced, or Something in Between?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarr, A.

    2013-12-01

    Two hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of the Prague, Oklahoma earthquake sequence, which is under debate. I offer a third explanation, whereby this sequence was triggered by approximately 12 million cubic m of wastewater injected into the epicentral zone, from five high-volume injection wells. This sequence included three earthquakes of M5 or greater: a M5 foreshock, the M5.7 main shock, and a M5 aftershock (Keranen et al., Geology, 2013). The main shock, which caused substantial damage, is of exceptional importance in the central and eastern United States because it is the second largest earthquake that has been recorded in this vast region. Because of its importance in assessing seismic hazard, especially in central Oklahoma, there is an urgent need to understand its origin. The first hypothesis argues that the Prague earthquakes are of natural origin (Keller and Holland, OGS website, 2013). As shown by Ellsworth et al. (abstract, SSA Meeting, 2012,), the seismicity in central Oklahoma has increased dramatically starting in 2009. This increase is inconsistent with natural processes that are likely to occur in this geologically stable area. Instead, it seems more likely that the increase in seismicity is related to the increase of fluid injection activities related to expanding oil and gas operations. Even so, the Prague earthquakes themselves could be a natural sequence. The second hypothesis argues that the M5 foreshock was triggered by pore pressure increase due to wastewater injected from two wells near the northeast end of the epicentral zone. This M5 event, in turn, increased the Coulomb stress on a pre-existing fault triggering the M5.7 mainshock and its numerous aftershocks (Keranen, et al., 2013). This hypothesis focuses on two nearly co-located disposal wells, Stasta 1 and 2, that together injected nearly 100,000 cubic m of wastewater into the basal aquifer during the years leading up to the Prague earthquakes. There are, however, five much

  18. Geochemical Controls on Natural Attenuation of Arsenic Solubilized by Human-Induced Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgin, A.; Hering, J. G.; Harrington, J.; Horst, J.; Burris, D.; Reisinger, H. J.

    2005-12-01

    Naturally-occurring arsenic (As) in soils can be solubilized into groundwater as a result of anthropogenic changes in subsurface redox conditions. However, the presence of As in groundwater may not lead to human exposure if As is attenuated before intercepting a water source. Dissolved As can be attenuated by sorption and precipitation processes whose effectiveness may be strongly influenced by redox transformations. Anaerobic bioremediation has been employed at a site in the Northeastern U.S. to treat a tetrachloroethene (PCE) plume in groundwater. An organic carbon source is injected via a transect of wells oriented perpendicular to groundwater flow. The resulting anaerobic reducing zone extends 30 meters down gradient of the injection transect. At the down gradient edge of the reducing zone, dissolved As and Fe concentrations have been observed at over 0.7 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and 450 mg/L, respectively. However, 60 m down gradient (and outside of the reducing zone), As and Fe concentrations have been maintained at levels below their detection limits (0.005 mg/L and 1 mg/L) for over 900 days, demonstrating natural attenuation of As. The sorption of As onto Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides under changing geochemical conditions is investigated by using the reactive transport modeling program Geochemist's Work Bench (GWB). Down gradient conditions are simulated where reduced constituents of contaminated groundwater react with Fe(III) and Mn(III, IV) oxyhydroxides in the soil/aquifer matrix or with dissolved oxygen in uncontaminated groundwater at the periphery of the reducing zone. Dissolved Fe(II) and Mn(II) are re-oxidized and precipitate as oxyhydroxide coatings on the soil or aquifer sediments. These coatings then serve as sorbents for both As(III) and As(V). Simulations allow us to examine As sequestration as a function of groundwater composition (e.g., pH and competing sorbates such as phosphate) and of the rate and extent of the precipitation of Fe(III) and Mn

  19. Arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitili, Aisha; Shu, Zunhua; Cheng, Xiaojiang; Kaheerman, Kadeer; Sikandeer, Alifu; Li, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the anticancer potential of arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, in malignant gliomas. The U87MG and T98G human glioma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of arctigenin for 48 h and the effects of arctigenin on the aggressive phenotypes of glioma cells were assessed. The results demonstrated that arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited the growth of U87MG and T98G cells, as determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Arctigenin exposure also induced a 60–75% reduction in colony formation compared with vehicle-treated control cells. However, arctigenin was not observed to affect the invasiveness of glioma cells. Arctigenin significantly increased the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reduced the number of cells in the S phase, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Western blot analysis demonstrated that arctigenin increased the expression levels of p21, retinoblastoma and p53 proteins, and significantly decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 proteins. Additionally, arctigenin was able to induce apoptosis in glioma cells, coupled with increased expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein. Furthermore, arctigenin-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed by the pretreatment of cells with Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, the results suggest that arctigenin is able to inhibit cell proliferation and may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in glioma cells. These results warrant further investigation of the anticancer effects of arctigenin in animal models of gliomas. PMID:28356992

  20. Research on stress-induced apoptosis of natural killer cells and the alteration of their killing activity in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Xin; Yu, Hai-Long; Li, Ming-Qi; Tomiyama-Miyaji, Chikako; Abo, Toru; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the stress-induced apoptosis of natural killer (NK) cells and the changes in their killing activity in mouse livers. METHODS: A restraint stress model was established in mice. Flow cytometry was employed to measure the percentage of NK cells and the changes in their absolute number in mouse liver. The cytotoxicity of hepatic and splenic NK cells was assessed against YAC-1 target cells via a 4 h 51Cr-release assay. RESULTS: The restraint stress stimulation induced the apoptosis of NK cells in the liver and the spleen, which decreased the cell number. The number and percentage of NK cells in the spleen decreased. However, the number of NK cells in the liver decreased, whereas the percentage of NK cells was significantly increased. The apoptosis of NK cells increased gradually with prolonged stress time, and the macrophage-1 (Mac-1)+ NK cells were more susceptible to apoptosis than Mac-1- NK cells. Large numbers of Mac-1- NK cells in the liver, which are more resistant to stress-induced apoptosis, were observed than the Mac-1- NK cells in the spleen. The stress stimulation diminished the killing activity of NK cells in the spleen was significantly decreased, but the retention of numerous Mac-1- NK cells in the liver maintained the killing ability. CONCLUSION: Significant stress-induced apoptosis was observed among Mac-1+ NK cells, but not Mac-1- NK cells in the mouse liver. Stress stimulation markedly decreased the killing activity of NK cells in the spleen but remained unchanged in the liver. PMID:24115824

  1. 2017 one-year seismic hazard forecast for the central and eastern United States from induced and natural earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Mueller, Charles; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Hoover, Susan M.; Shumway, Allison; McNamara, Daniel E.; Williams, Robert A.; Llenos, Andrea L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Michael, Andrew J.; Rubinstein, Justin L.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.

    2017-01-01

    We produce the 2017 one-year seismic hazard forecast for the central and eastern United States from induced and natural earthquakes that updates the 2016 one-year forecast; this map is intended to provide information to the public and to facilitate the development of induced seismicity forecasting models, methods, and data. The 2017 hazard model applies the same methodology and input logic tree as the 2016 forecast, but with an updated earthquake catalog. We also evaluate the 2016 seismic hazard forecast to improve future assessments. The 2016 forecast indicated high seismic hazard (greater than 1% probability of potentially damaging ground shaking in one-year) in five focus areas: Oklahoma-Kansas, the Raton Basin (Colorado/New Mexico border), north Texas, north Arkansas, and the New Madrid Seismic Zone. During 2016, several damaging induced earthquakes occurred in Oklahoma within the highest hazard region of the 2016 forecast; all of the 21 magnitude (M) ≥ 4 and three M ≥ 5 earthquakes occurred within the highest hazard area in the 2016 forecast. Outside the Oklahoma-Kansas focus area two earthquakes with M ≥ 4 occurred near Trinidad, Colorado (in the Raton Basin focus area), but no earthquakes with M ≥ 2.7 were observed in the north Texas or north Arkansas focus areas. Several observations of damaging ground shaking levels were also recorded in the highest hazard region of Oklahoma. The 2017 forecasted seismic rates are lower in regions of induced activity due to lower rates of earthquakes in 2016 compared to 2015, which may be related to decreased wastewater injection, caused by regulatory actions or by a decrease in unconventional oil and gas production. Nevertheless, the 2017 forecasted hazard is still significantly elevated in Oklahoma compared to the hazard calculated from seismicity before 2009.

  2. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine, a natural, mixed dopamine receptor antagonist, inhibits methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaokang; Yue, Kai; Ma, Baomiao; Xing, Junqiao; Gan, Yongping; Wang, Daisong; Jin, Guozhang; Li, Chaoying

    2016-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of methamphetamine (METH) use, no FDA-approved pharmacological treatment is currently available for individuals with a METH addiction. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is an alkaloid substance derived from corydalis and stephania that has been used in traditional Asian medicine for its analgesic, sedative and hypnotic properties. Previous pharmacological studies of l-THP indicated that it not only binds to D1 and D2 receptors but also has a low affinity for D3 receptors and may function as an antagonist. The unique pharmacological profile of l-THP suggests that it may have potential therapeutic effects on drug addiction; however, the effects of l-THP in individuals with METH addictions are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of l-THP on METH self-administration and METH-induced reinstatement. In our experiments, l-THP (1.25, 2.50 and 5.00 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased METH self-administration under the fixed-ratio 1 schedule. l-THP (2.50 and 5.00 mg/kg, i.p) also prevented the METH-induced reinstatement of METH-seeking behaviors. Interestingly, l-THP (1.25 and 2.50mg/kg, i.p) did not affect locomotor activity following METH injection (1mg/kg) suggesting that the observed effects of l-THP (2.50mg/kg) on METH-induced reinstatement were not due to motor impairments. Thus, l-THP (a natural, mixed dopamine (DA) receptor antagonist) attenuates METH self-administration and METH-induced reinstatement.

  3. Sphingosine kinase inhibitors decrease viability and induce cell death in natural killer-large granular lymphocyte leukemia

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Francis R; Liu, Xin; Hengst, Jeremy; Fox, Todd; Calvert, Valerie; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Yun, Jong; Feith, David J; Loughran, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism has been identified as a potential therapeutic target in cancer. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent bioactive sphingolipid metabolite produced by sphingosine kinases-1 and −2 (SPHK1 and SPHK2). Elevated SPHK1 has been found in numerous cancer types and been shown to contribute to survival, chemotherapeutic resistance and malignancy. However, its role in large granular Natural Killer (NK) large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia has not been investigated. Here, we examine SPHK1 as a therapeutic target in LGL leukemia. We found that SPHK1 is overexpressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from LGL leukemia patients which results in elevated S1P in the sera. The use of SPHK1 inhibitors, SKI-II or SKI-178, decreased leukemic NK cell viability and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. SKI-II and SKI-178 restored the sphingolipid balance by increasing ceramide and decreasing S1P in leukemic NKL cells. SKI-II and SKI-178 also induced apoptosis in primary NK-LGLs from leukemia patients. Mechanistic studies in NK-LGL cell lines demonstrated that SKI-178 and SKI-II induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M. We found that SKI-178 induced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at Ser70, and that this was dependent on CDK1. We further show that SPHK1 inhibition with SKI-178 leads to decreased JAK-STAT signaling. Our data demonstrate that SPHK1 represents a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of NK-LGL leukemia. PMID:26252351

  4. Arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Maimaitili, Aisha; Shu, Zunhua; Cheng, Xiaojiang; Kaheerman, Kadeer; Sikandeer, Alifu; Li, Weimin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the anticancer potential of arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, in malignant gliomas. The U87MG and T98G human glioma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of arctigenin for 48 h and the effects of arctigenin on the aggressive phenotypes of glioma cells were assessed. The results demonstrated that arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited the growth of U87MG and T98G cells, as determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Arctigenin exposure also induced a 60-75% reduction in colony formation compared with vehicle-treated control cells. However, arctigenin was not observed to affect the invasiveness of glioma cells. Arctigenin significantly increased the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reduced the number of cells in the S phase, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Western blot analysis demonstrated that arctigenin increased the expression levels of p21, retinoblastoma and p53 proteins, and significantly decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 proteins. Additionally, arctigenin was able to induce apoptosis in glioma cells, coupled with increased expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein. Furthermore, arctigenin-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed by the pretreatment of cells with Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, the results suggest that arctigenin is able to inhibit cell proliferation and may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in glioma cells. These results warrant further investigation of the anticancer effects of arctigenin in animal models of gliomas.

  5. Indirect study of the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction via the {sup 13}C({sup 7}Li,t){sup 17}O transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegriti, M. G.; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Vilmay, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Tatischeff, V.; Stanoiu, M.

    2008-04-15

    The {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction is considered the main neutron source for the s process in low mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In the Gamow peak, the cross section sensitively depends on the 1/2{sup +} subthreshold state of {sup 17}O (E{sub x}=6.356 MeV). In this work, we determined the astrophysical S factor through an evaluation of the {alpha} spectroscopic factor and the corresponding asymptotic normalization factor (ANC) of the 6.356 MeV state using the transfer reaction {sup 13}C({sup 7}Li,t){sup 17}O at two different incident energies. Our result confirms that the contribution of the 1/2{sup +} state is dominant at astrophysical energies. Our reaction rate at T=0.09 GK is slightly lower than the value adopted in the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates (NACRE), but two times larger than the one obtained in a recent ANC measurement.

  6. Development of a quasi-monoenergetic neutron field using the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in the energy range from 250 to 390 MeV at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, S; Nakao, N; Nakamura, T; Yashima, H; Iwamoto, Y; Satoh, D; Nakane, Y; Nakashima, H; Itoga, T; Tamii, A; Hatanaka, K

    2007-01-01

    A quasi-monoenergetic neutron field using the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction has been developed at the ring cyclotron facility at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. Neutrons were generated from a 10-mm-thick Li target injected by 250, 350 and 392 MeV protons and neutrons produced at 0 degrees were extracted into the time-of-flight (TOF) room of 100-m length through the concrete collimator of 10 x 12 cm aperture and 150 cm thickness. The neutron energy spectra were measured by a 12.7-cm diam x 12.7-cm long NE213 organic liquid scintillator using the TOF method. The peak neutron fluence was 1.94 x 10(10), 1.07 x 10(10) and 1.50 x 10(10) n sr(-1) per muC of 250, 350 and 392 MeV protons, respectively. The neutron spectra generated from various thick (stopping length) targets of carbon, aluminium, iron and lead, bombarded by 250 and 350 MeV protons, were also measured with the TOF method. Although these measurements were performed to obtain thick target neutron yields, they are also used as a continuous energy neutron field. These neutron fields are very useful for characterising neutron detectors, measuring neutron cross sections, testing irradiation effects for various materials and performing neutron shielding experiments.

  7. The use of enriched 6Li and 7Li Lif:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescent dosemeters for linear accelerator out-of-field radiation dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Takam, R; Bezak, E; Liu, G; Marcu, L

    2012-06-01

    (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were used for measurements of out-of-field photon and neutron doses produced by Varian iX linear accelerator. Both TLDs were calibrated using 18-MV X-ray beam to investigate their dose-response sensitivity and linearity. CR-39 etch-track detectors (Luxel+, Landauer) were employed to provide neutron dose data to calibrate (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs at various distances from the isocentre. With cadmium filters employed, slow neutrons (<0.5 eV) were distinguished from fast neutrons. The average in-air photon dose equivalents per monitor unit (MU) ranged from 1.5±0.4 to 215.5±94.6 μSv at 100 and 15 cm from the isocentre, respectively. Based on the cross-calibration factors obtained with CR-39 etch-track detectors, the average in-air fast neutron dose equivalents per MU range from 10.6±3.8 to 59.1±49.9 μSv at 100 and 15 cm from the isocentre, respectively. Contribution of thermal neutrons to total neutron dose equivalent was small: 3.1±7.2 μSv per MU at 15 cm from the isocentre.

  8. Synthesis, crystal chemistry, and magnetic properties of RE7Li8Ge10 and RE11Li12Ge16 (RE = La-Nd, Sm): new members of the [REGe2](n)[RELi2Ge](m) homologous series.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng-Ping; You, Tae-Soo; Jung, Ya-Ho; Bobev, Svilen

    2012-06-18

    Eight new rare-earth metal-lithium-germanides belonging to the [REGe(2)](n)[RELi(2)Ge](m) homologous series have been synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structures of the title compounds can be rationalized as linear intergrowths of imaginary RELi(2)Ge (MgAl(2)Cu structure type) and REGe(2) (AlB(2) structure type) slabs. The compounds with general formula RE(7)Li(8)Ge(10) (RE = La-Nd, Sm), i.e., [REGe(2)](3)[RELi(2)Ge](4), crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Cmmm (No. 65) with a new structure type. Similarly, the compounds with general formula RE(11)Li(12)Ge(16) (RE = Ce-Nd), i.e., [REGe(2)](5)[RELi(2)Ge](6), crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Immm (No. 71) also with its own structure type. Temperature-dependent DC magnetization measurements indicate Curie-Weiss paramagnetism in the high-temperature regime and hint at complex magnetic ordering at low temperatures. The measured effective moments are consistent with RE(3+) ground states in all cases. The experimental results have been complemented by tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital (TB-LMTO) electronic structure calculations.

  9. The anticancer natural product ophiobolin A induces cytotoxicity by covalent modification of phosphatidylethanolamine

    PubMed Central

    Chidley, Christopher; Trauger, Sunia A; Birsoy, Kıvanç; O'Shea, Erin K

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic screens allow the identification of small molecules with promising anticancer activity, but the difficulty in characterizing the mechanism of action of these compounds in human cells often undermines their value as drug leads. Here, we used a loss-of-function genetic screen in human haploid KBM7 cells to discover the mechanism of action of the anticancer natural product ophiobolin A (OPA). We found that genetic inactivation of de novo synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) mitigates OPA cytotoxicity by reducing cellular PE levels. OPA reacts with the ethanolamine head group of PE in human cells to form pyrrole-containing covalent cytotoxic adducts and these adducts lead to lipid bilayer destabilization. Our characterization of this unusual cytotoxicity mechanism, made possible by unbiased genetic screening in human cells, suggests that the selective antitumor activity displayed by OPA may be due to altered membrane PE levels in cancer cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14601.001 PMID:27403889

  10. Preventing postoperative metastatic disease by inhibiting surgery-induced dysfunction in natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Tai, Lee-Hwa; de Souza, Christiano Tanese; Bélanger, Simon; Ly, Lundi; Alkayyal, Almohanad A; Zhang, Jiqing; Rintoul, Julia L; Ananth, Abhirami A; Lam, Tiffany; Breitbach, Caroline J; Falls, Theresa J; Kirn, David H; Bell, John C; Makrigiannis, Andrew P; Auer, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell clearance of tumor cell emboli following surgery is thought to be vital in preventing postoperative metastases. Using a mouse model of surgical stress, we transferred surgically stressed NK cells into NK-deficient mice and observed enhanced lung metastases in tumor-bearing mice as compared with mice that received untreated NK cells. These results establish that NK cells play a crucial role in mediating tumor clearance following surgery. Surgery markedly reduced NK cell total numbers in the spleen and affected NK cell migration. Ex vivo and in vivo tumor cell killing by NK cells were significantly reduced in surgically stressed mice. Furthermore, secreted tissue signals and myeloid-derived suppressor cell populations were altered in surgically stressed mice. Significantly, perioperative administration of oncolytic parapoxvirus ovis (ORFV) and vaccinia virus can reverse NK cell suppression, which correlates with a reduction in the postoperative formation of metastases. In human studies, postoperative cancer surgery patients had reduced NK cell cytotoxicity, and we show for the first time that oncolytic vaccinia virus markedly increases NK cell activity in patients with cancer. These data provide direct in vivo evidence that surgical stress impairs global NK cell function. Perioperative therapies aimed at enhancing NK cell function will reduce metastatic recurrence and improve survival in surgical cancer patients.

  11. Altered sterol profile induced in Leishmania amazonensis by a natural dihydroxymethoxylated chalcone

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Santos, Eduardo Caio; Sampaio-Santos, Maria Isabel; Buckner, Frederick S.; Yokoyama, Kohei; Gelb, Michael; Urbina, Julio A.; Rossi-Bergmann, Bartira

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The effects of the antileishmanial chalcone 2′,6′-dihydroxy-4′-methoxychalcone (DMC) on Leishmania amazonensis sterol composition and biosynthesis were investigated to obtain information about the mechanism of growth inhibition by DMC on this parasite. Methods The interference of sterol biosynthesis by DMC was studied in drug-treated promastigotes by two different methods. (i) Newly synthesized sterols from parasites grown in the presence of [3H]mevalonate were analysed by thin layer chromatography (TLC)/fluorography. (ii) Total sterols extracted from the parasites grown with or without DMC were characterized by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). Results TLC and GC/MS analyses of sterols extracted from DMC-treated promastigotes revealed the accumulation of early precursors and a reduction in the levels of C-14 demethylated and C-24 alkylated sterols, as well as a reduction in exogenous cholesterol uptake. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the natural chalcone DMC alters the sterol composition of L. amazonensis and suggests that the parasite target is different from other known sterol inhibitors. PMID:19176591

  12. Naturally occurring and experimentally induced castor bean (Ricinus communis) poisoning in ducks.

    PubMed

    Jensen, W I; Allen, J P

    1981-01-01

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis) poisoning accounted for the death of several thousand ducks in the Texas panhandle in the fall and winter months of 1969-1971. Signs of intoxication resembled those of botulism, except for mucoid, blood-tinged excreta. The most common lesions were severe fatty change in the liver, widely distributed internal petechial hemorrhages or ecchymoses, and catarrhal enteritis. Nearly intact castor beans were found in the stomach of one duck during field necropsy. Fragments of seed coat resembling castor bean were found in the stomachs of 10 of 14 ducks examined in the laboratory. Clinical signs and postmortem lesions observed in wild ducks were induced experimentally in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) by force-feeding intact castor beans. Toxicity titrations were erratic, but the LD50 appeared to be between three and four seeds. The mouse toxicity test, used to detect Clostridium botulinum toxin in the blood serum of intoxicated ducks, was negative in every case. Hemagglutination and precipitin tests generally failed to detect castor bean in extracts of excreta or intestinal contents of experimentally intoxicated ducks.

  13. Naturally occurring and experimentally induced castor bean (Ricinus communis) poisoning in ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jensen, W.I.; Allen, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis) poisoning accounted for the death of several thousand ducks in the Texas panhandle in the fall and winter months of 1969-1971. Signs of intoxication resembled those of botulism, except for mucoid, blood-tinged excreta. The most common lesions were severe fatty change in the liver, widely distributed internal petechial hemorrhages or ecchymoses, and catarrhal enteritis. Nearly intact castor beans were found in the stomach of one duck during field necropsy. Fragments of seed coat resembling castor bean were found in the stomachs of 10 of 14 ducks examined in the laboratory. Clinical signs and postmortem lesions observed in wild ducks were induced experimentally in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) by force-feeding intact castor beans. Toxicity titrations were erratic, but the LD50 appeared to be between three and four seeds. The mouse toxicity test, used to detect Clostridium botulinum toxin in the blood serum of intoxicated ducks, was negative in every case. Hemagglutination and precipitin tests generally failed to detect castor bean in extracts of excreta or intestinal contents of experimentally intoxicated ducks.

  14. A Multicomponent Seismic Investigation of Natural and Induced Fracturing, Saskatchewan, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, Edward Andrew

    Fractures in the subsurface are known to impact seismic imaging. This study focuses on multicomponent, time-lapse analysis of fracture-induced anisotropy in the Devonian Dawson Bay Formation in southern Saskatchewan. The baseline and monitor, PP and PS seismic volumes were divided into 4 sub-volumes consisting of a 45 degree stack of source-receiver ray paths. Weak azimuthal anisotropy was observed through the interpretation of these volumes. Travel-time analysis located areas which are interpreted to exhibit a higher density of preferential fracturing which appears to be related to mining operations. Vp/Vs analysis, through the registration of PP and PS horizons, confirmed the presence of a high Vp/Vs anomaly which is interpreted to be caused by fractures networks without a preferential orientation within the Dawson Bay Formation in the centre of the survey area. Seismic attribute analysis was used to determine that fractures extend vertically from the Dawson Bay Formation to the top of the Souris River Formation.

  15. The natural compound forskolin synergizes with dexamethasone to induce cell death in myeloma cells via BIM.

    PubMed

    Follin-Arbelet, Virginie; Misund, Kristine; Naderi, Elin Hallan; Ugland, Hege; Sundan, Anders; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil

    2015-08-26

    We have previously demonstrated that activation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway kills multiple myeloma (MM) cells both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we have investigated the potential of enhancing the killing of MM cell lines and primary MM cells by combining the cAMP-elevating compound forskolin with the commonly used MM therapeutic drugs melphalan, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, bortezomib and dexamethasone. We observed that forskolin potentiated the killing induced by all the tested agents as compared to treatment with the single agents alone. In particular, forskolin had a synergistic effect on the dexamethasone-responsive cell lines H929 and OM-2. By knocking down the proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BIM, we proved this protein to be involved in the synergistic induction of apoptosis by dexamethasone and forskolin. The ability of forskolin to maintain the killing of MM cells even at lower concentrations of the conventional agents suggests that forskolin may be used to diminish treatment-associated side effects. Our findings support a potential role of forskolin in combination with current conventional agents in the treatment of MM.

  16. Tracking Down the Causes of Recent Induced and Natural Intraplate Earthquakes with 3D Seismological Analyses in Northwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uta, P.; Brandes, C.; Boennemann, C.; Plenefisch, T.; Winsemann, J.

    2015-12-01

    Northwest Germany is a typical low strain intraplate region with a low seismic activity. Nevertheless, 58 well documented earthquakes with magnitudes of 0.5 - 4.3 affected the area in the last 40 years. Most of the epicenters were located in the vicinity of active natural gas fields and some inside. Accordingly, the earthquakes were interpreted as a consequence of hydrocarbon recovery (e.g. Dahm et al. 2007, Bischoff et al. 2013) and classified as induced events in the bulletins of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR). The two major ones have magnitudes of 4.3 and 4.0. They are the strongest earthquakes ever recorded in Northern Germany. Consequently, these events raise the question whether the ongoing extraction itself can cause them or if other natural tectonic processes like glacial isostatic adjustment may considerably contribute to their initiation. Recent studies of Brandes et al. (2012) imply that lithospheric stress changes due to post glacial isostatic adjustment might be also a potential natural cause for earthquakes in Central Europe. In order to better analyse the earthquakes and to test this latter hypothesis we performed a relocalization of the events with the NonLinLoc (Lomax et al. 2000) program package and two differently scaled 3D P-wave velocity models. Depending on the station coverage for a distinct event, either a fine gridded local model (88 x 73 x 15 km, WEG-model, made available by the industry) or a coarse regional model (1600 x 1600 x 45 km, data from CRUST1.0, Laske et al. 2013) and for some cases a combination of both models was used for the relocalization. The results confirm the trend of the older routine analysis: The majority of the events are located at the margins of the natural gas fields, some of them are now located closer to them. Focal depths mostly vary between 3.5 km and 10 km. However, for some of the events, especially for the older events with relatively bad station coverage, the error bars

  17. Efficacy of selamectin against experimentally induced and naturally acquired ascarid (Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina) infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    McTier, T L; Siedek, E M; Clemence, R G; Wren, J A; Bowman, D D; Hellmann, K; Holbert, M S; Murphy, M G; Young, D R; Cruthers, L R; Smith, D G; Shanks, D J; Rowan, T G; Jernigan, A D

    2000-08-23

    The efficacy of selamectin against adult ascarids was evaluated in eight controlled and masked studies in dogs. Three laboratory studies evaluated selamectin against experimentally induced infections of Toxocara canis; three laboratory studies evaluated selamectin against naturally acquired infections of T. canis; one laboratory study evaluated selamectin against naturally acquired infections of both T. canis and Toxascaris leonina; one field study evaluated selamectin against naturally acquired infections of ascarids (T. canis and/or T. leonina) in dogs presented as veterinary patients. Selamectin was administered topically to the skin of dogs in unit doses designed to deliver a minimum of 6mgkg(-1) (range, 6-12mgkg(-1)). In all studies, dogs were allocated randomly to treatment assignments (selamectin or vehicle control in laboratory studies: selamectin or reference product in the field study) on the basis of pretreatment fecal egg counts. For induced infections, there were significant reductions in geometric mean numbers of adult T. canis after a single application of selamectin (93.9-98.1%, P=0.0001), after two monthly applications (> or =88.3%, P< or =0.0001), and after three monthly applications (100%, P< or =0.0002). In the natural infection laboratory studies, when selamectin was administered twice at an interval of 30 days, the percentage reductions in geometric mean numbers of adult T. canis at necropsy were 84.6, 91.3, and 97.9%, and when selamectin was administered on days 0, 14, and 30, the percentage reductions were 91.1 and 97.6%. Geometric mean fecal T. canis egg counts were reduced by > or =92.9% (P< or =0.0067) at the end of the studies. In the field study, geometric mean fecal ascarid egg counts were reduced by 89.5 and 95. 5% (P=0.0001) for 14 and 30 days, respectively, after a single treatment with selamectin, and by 94.0% (P=0.0001) 30 days after the second treatment with selamectin. These reductions compared favorably with the egg count

  18. Crystal chemistry of volcanic allanites indicative of naturally induced oxidation-dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Mihoko; Kimata, Mitsuyoshi; Chesner, Craig A.; Nishida, Norimasa; Shimizu, Masahiro; Akasaka, Takeshi

    2010-05-01

    welding of the Youngest Toba Tuff caused the following post-crystallization changes to occur in YTT allanite: oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+, release of H2, and the concomitant replacement of OH- by O2-. These oxidation and dehydrogenation processes advanced during the welding to thereby produce oxyallanite. Oxyallanite had been reported only in laboratory studies where it was produced by heating natural allanite. Our report on natural oxyallanite suggests that it may be present in other welded silicic volcanic rocks as well.

  19. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase induces positive cooperativity toward the natural cofactor.

    PubMed

    Gersting, Søren W; Staudigl, Michael; Truger, Marietta S; Messing, Dunja D; Danecka, Marta K; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Kemter, Kristina F; Muntau, Ania C

    2010-10-01

    Protein misfolding with loss-of-function of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is the molecular basis of phenylketonuria in many individuals carrying missense mutations in the PAH gene. PAH is complexly regulated by its substrate L-Phenylalanine and its natural cofactor 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)). Sapropterin dihydrochloride, the synthetic form of BH(4), was recently approved as the first pharmacological chaperone to correct the loss-of-function phenotype. However, current knowledge about enzyme function and regulation in the therapeutic setting is scarce. This illustrates the need for comprehensive analyses of steady state kinetics and allostery beyond single residual enzyme activity determinations to retrace the structural impact of missense mutations on the phenylalanine hydroxylating system. Current standard PAH activity assays are either indirect (NADH) or discontinuous due to substrate and product separation before detection. We developed an automated fluorescence-based continuous real-time PAH activity assay that proved to be faster and more efficient but as precise and accurate as standard methods. Wild-type PAH kinetic analyses using the new assay revealed cooperativity of activated PAH toward BH(4), a previously unknown finding. Analyses of structurally preactivated variants substantiated BH(4)-dependent cooperativity of the activated enzyme that does not rely on the presence of l-Phenylalanine but is determined by activating conformational rearrangements. These findings may have implications for an individualized therapy, as they support the hypothesis that the patient's metabolic state has a more significant effect on the interplay of the drug and the conformation and function of the target protein than currently appreciated.

  20. Thyroid iodine content and serum thyroglobulin: cues to the natural history of destruction-induced thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Smallridge, R.C.; De Keyser, F.M.; Van Herle, A.J.; Butkus, N.E.; Wartofsky, L.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-eight patients with destructive thyroiditis were followed to study the natural history of healing of thyroid gland injury. All had sequential measurements of thyroidal iodine (/sup 127/I) content by fluorescent scanning (normal mean, 10.1 mg), 17 had serial serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurements (normal, less than 21 ng/ml), and 13 had perchlorate discharge studies during the recovery phase. Seventeen patients had painful subacute thyroiditis (SAT), 9 had painless thyroiditis with thyrotoxicosis (PTT), and 2 had postpartum thyroiditis with thyrotoxicosis (PPT). Thyroidal iodine content decreased from a mean of 9.8 to a nadir of 3.8 mg in patients with SAT and from 8.5 to a nadir of 3.5 mg in patients with PTT. Mean serum Tg concentrations were highest (approximately 165 ng/ml) in both groups 1-3 months after the onset of symptoms. Abnormalities in both /sup 127/I content and Tg levels persisted for 2 or more yr in some individuals. No patient had detectable Tg antibodies by hemagglutination, but low titers were detected intermittently by sensitive RIA in 5 PTT patients. Microsomal antibodies were positive in only 1 of 16 SAT patients, but in 4 of 7 PTT patients and in both PPT patients. Three patients had positive perchlorate discharge tests (2 of 8 with SAT, 0 of 4 with PTT, and 1 of 1 with PPT). Permanent hypothyroidism occurred in 3 patients (2 with PTT; 1 with SAT and positive antibodies), but did not correlate with perchlorate results. HLA typing and serum immunoglobulin measurements were not useful for predicting the clinical course. These data indicate that several years may be necessary for complete resolution of destructive thyroiditis; many patients have evidence of thyroid injury persisting long after serum thyroid hormone and TSH levels become normal.

  1. Foraminiferal Range Expansions: The Mediterranean Sea as a natural laboratory for climate induced invasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortense Mouanga, Gloria; Langer, Martin R.

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and biological invasions are key processes that modify biodiversity. One of the most severely affected areas of global change is the Mediterranean Sea, where global warming and the opening of the Suez Canal triggered a mass invasion of tropical Red Sea taxa into Mediterranean territories. Climate models prognosticate that the Mediterranean Sea will be one of the most affected ocean regions and may thus serve as a natural laboratory of future global changes. Among the key taxa that are rapidly expanding their latitudinal range in the Mediterranean Sea are symbiont-bearing foraminifera of the genus Amphistegina. Their range expansion strongly correlates with rising sea surface temperatures and mirrors processes of global change. Amphisteginid foraminifera are among the most prolific foraminiferal species and contribute significantly to shallow-water carbonate sediments. Given their prominent environmental role, rapid biogeographic range expansion, and impact on native ecosystems, amphisteginid range expansion and invasion into new territory are likely to trigger changes in ecosystem functioning. Among the uncertainties, it is not known whether all parts of the Mediterranean will be affected equally and to what extent amphisteginid invasions will impact native biotas. We have initiated a new baseline study to explore the effects of invasive amphisteginids on native foraminiferal biotas and to monitor expansion rates and effects on ecosystem functioning along the current range expansion front. We will present new data on recent shift along the range expansion front and discuss cascading effects on community structures and species richness of native foraminiferal biotas. The magnitude and effects that climate change will have on the Mediterranean foraminiferal faunas may ultimately serve as an example of what would happen along expansion fronts in global oceans.

  2. A marching-walking hybrid induces step length adaptation and transfers to natural walking.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew W; Finley, James M; Bastian, Amy J

    2015-06-01

    Walking is highly adaptable to new demands and environments. We have previously studied adaptation of locomotor patterns via a split-belt treadmill, where subjects learn to walk with one foot moving faster than the other. Subjects learn to adapt their walking pattern by changing the location (spatial) and time (temporal) of foot placement. Here we asked whether we can induce adaptation of a specific walking pattern when one limb does not "walk" but instead marches in place (i.e., marching-walking hybrid). The marching leg's movement is limited during the stance phase, and thus certain sensory signals important for walking may be reduced. We hypothesized that this would produce a spatial-temporal strategy different from that of normal split-belt adaptation. Healthy subjects performed two experiments to determine whether they could adapt their spatial-temporal pattern of step lengths during the marching-walking hybrid and whether the learning transfers to over ground walking. Results showed that the hybrid group did adapt their step lengths, but the time course of adaptation and deadaption was slower than that for the split-belt group. We also observed that the hybrid group utilized a mostly spatial strategy whereas the split-belt group utilized both spatial and temporal strategies. Surprisingly, we found no significant difference between the hybrid and split-belt groups in over ground transfer. Moreover, the hybrid group retained more of the learned pattern when they returned to the treadmill. These findings suggest that physical rehabilitation with this marching-walking paradigm on conventional treadmills may produce changes in symmetry comparable to what is observed during split-belt training.

  3. Natural Outbreak of BVDV-1d-Induced Mucosal Disease Lacking Intestinal Lesions.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M V; Konradt, G; de Souza, S O; Bassuino, D M; Silveira, S; Mósena, A C S; Canal, C W; Pavarini, S P; Driemeier, D

    2017-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) belongs to the Pestivirus genus, which is further divided into subgenotypes (1a-1u and 2a-c). When persistent infection occurs, the calf will be immunotolerant to BVDV and possibly develop mucosal disease. This study describes an outbreak of BVDV-1d-induced mucosal disease lacking intestinal lesions. Eleven calves presented with anorexia, sialorrhea, lameness, recumbency, and death. Three calves were necropsied, showing ulceration of the interdigital skin and the oral and nasal mucosa; linear ulcers in the tongue, esophagus, and rumen; and rounded ulcers in the abomasum. Microscopically, mucosa and skin had superficial necrosis, with single-cell necrosis and vacuolation in epithelial cells, and severe parakeratosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed BVDV antigen in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells in skin and mucosa. All 11 dead calves were positive upon reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of Pestivirus along with another 11 live calves from the herd, which were positive again by RT-PCR and IHC after a 4-week interval. Sequencing of the 5' untranslated region and N-terminal protease showed that viruses from these 22 calves were homologous and of subgenotype BVDV-1d. Cytopathic BVDV was isolated from 8 of 11 dead calves, but only noncytopathic BVDV was isolated from the 11 live animals. The findings indicate that this was an outbreak of mucosal disease caused by BVDV-1d, with high morbidity, and lesions restricted to the upper alimentary system and skin and absent from intestine. Thus, the epidemiological and pathological features in this form of mucosal disease may be similar to vesicular diseases, including foot and mouth disease.

  4. Natural and human-induced sinkholes in gypsum terrain and associated environmental problems in NE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, G.; Del Campo, P. Pérez; Gutiérrez-Elorza, M.; Sancho, C.

    1995-04-01

    The central Ebro Basin comprises thick evaporite materials whose high solubility produces typically karstic landforms. The sinkhole morphology developed in the overlying alluvium has been studied using gravimetry and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) on stream terraces, as well as analyzing the evolution of sinkhole morphologies observed in aerial photographs taken in 1928, 1957, and 1985. The sinkhole morphologies give some idea of possible subsurface processes as well as an indication of the final mechanisms involve in sinkhole development. On stream terraces and cover pediments the most commonly encountered dolines are bowl-shaped in their morphology with both diffuse and scarped edges. In contrast, dolines developed in the gypsiferous silt infilled valleys have a funnel and well-shaped morphology. The diffuse-edged bowl-shaped dolines are developed through the progressive subsidence of the alluvial cover, due to washing down of alluvial particles through small voids and cracks into deeper subsurface caves, resulting in a decrease alluvial density. Future compaction of the alluvial cover will produce surface subsidences. This type of dolines are associated with negative gravity anomalies. In contrast, the scarped-edge dolines are formed by the sudden collapse of a cavity roof. The cavities and cracks formed in the gypsum karst may migrate to the surface through the alluvial deposits by piping, and they may subsequently collapse. In this instance, the cavities can be detected by both gravity and GPR anomalies where the voids are not deeper than 4 5 m from the surface. These processes forming sinkholes can be enhanced by man-induced changes in the groundwater hydrologic regime by both inflows, due to irrigation, ditch losses, or pipe leakages, and by outflows from pumping activities.

  5. A marching-walking hybrid induces step length adaptation and transfers to natural walking

    PubMed Central

    Long, Andrew W.; Finley, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is highly adaptable to new demands and environments. We have previously studied adaptation of locomotor patterns via a split-belt treadmill, where subjects learn to walk with one foot moving faster than the other. Subjects learn to adapt their walking pattern by changing the location (spatial) and time (temporal) of foot placement. Here we asked whether we can induce adaptation of a specific walking pattern when one limb does not “walk” but instead marches in place (i.e., marching-walking hybrid). The marching leg's movement is limited during the stance phase, and thus certain sensory signals important for walking may be reduced. We hypothesized that this would produce a spatial-temporal strategy different from that of normal split-belt adaptation. Healthy subjects performed two experiments to determine whether they could adapt their spatial-temporal pattern of step lengths during the marching-walking hybrid and whether the learning transfers to over ground walking. Results showed that the hybrid group did adapt their step lengths, but the time course of adaptation and deadaption was slower than that for the split-belt group. We also observed that the hybrid group utilized a mostly spatial strategy whereas the split-belt group utilized both spatial and temporal strategies. Surprisingly, we found no significant difference between the hybrid and split-belt groups in over ground transfer. Moreover, the hybrid group retained more of the learned pattern when they returned to the treadmill. These findings suggest that physical rehabilitation with this marching-walking paradigm on conventional treadmills may produce changes in symmetry comparable to what is observed during split-belt training. PMID:25867742

  6. Influenza virus-induced encephalopathy in mice: interferon production and natural killer cell activity during acute infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wabuke-Bunoti, M A; Bennink, J R; Plotkin, S A

    1986-01-01

    Mice injected intracerebrally with infectious influenza virus (60 hemagglutinin units) developed lethargy, seizures, comas, and died 2 to 5 days postinfection. As early as 6 h after infection, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in these animals was infiltrated with polymorphonuclear cells, mononuclear leukocytes, and large granular lymphocytes. Potent natural killer (NK) cell activity was observed for both CSF and spleen cell populations over the same period. This NK cell activity correlated with interferon (IFN) levels in the CSF and serum. Treatment of lethally infected mice with either anti-IFN alpha-IFN beta or anti-ganglio-n-tetraoglyceramide antiserum ameliorated the disease, reduced mortality, and effected changes in the relative proportions of inflammatory cell populations infiltrating the CSF. The possible significance of IFN and NK cell activity in the development of this influenza virus-induced encephalopathy is discussed. PMID:2431159

  7. Simple quantitative PCR approach to reveal naturally occurring and mutation-induced repetitive sequence variation on the Drosophila Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, John C; Maggert, Keith A

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is a significant component of the human genome and the genomes of most model organisms. Although heterochromatin is thought to be largely non-coding, it is clear that it plays an important role in chromosome structure and gene regulation. Despite a growing awareness of its functional significance, the repetitive sequences underlying some heterochromatin remain relatively uncharacterized. We have developed a real-time quantitative PCR-based method for quantifying simple repetitive satellite sequences and have used this technique to characterize the heterochromatic Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. In this report, we validate the approach, identify previously unknown satellite sequence copy number polymorphisms in Y chromosomes from different geographic sources, and show that a defect in heterochromatin formation can induce similar copy number polymorphisms in a laboratory strain. These findings provide a simple method to investigate the dynamic nature of repetitive sequences and characterize conditions which might give rise to long-lasting alterations in DNA sequence.

  8. Information from specific-locus mutants on the nature of induced and spontaneous mutations in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.

    1985-01-01

    Genetic and molecular analyses of mutations are increasing the qualitative capabilities of the specific-locus test (SLT). Some mutations are found to be deletions of large numbers of genes, including some that control survival at various developmental stages, neurological functions, enzyme syntheses, etc. Smaller (including possibly single-gene) deletions are also detected. A third group of SLT mutations represents intragenic lesions. For at least three of the loci, mutations may now be qualitatively grouped on the basis of simple phenotypic findings. Type of mutagen and germ-cell stage exposed strongly influence the nature of the lesions. The qualitative information from SLT results makes possible conclusions about relative potential harmfulness of different types of exposures that may yield equal mutation rates, about differences between induced and spontaneous mutations, etc. It also identifies genetic material suitable for basic studies. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Information from specific-locus mutants on the nature of induced and spontaneous mutations in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.

    1986-01-01

    Genetic and molecular analyses of mutations are increasing the qualitative capabilities of the specific-locus test (SLT). Some mutations are found to be deletions of large numbers of genes, including some that control survival at various developmental stages, neurological functions, enzyme syntheses, etc. Smaller (including possibly single-gene) deletions are also detected. A third group of SLT mutations represents intragenic lesions. For at least three of the loci, mutations may now be qualitatively grouped on the basis of simple phenotypic findings. Type of mutagen and germ-cell stage exposed strongly influence the nature of the lesions. The qualitative information from SLT results makes possible conclusions about relative potential harmfulness of different types of exposures that may yield equal mutation rates, about differences between induced and spontaneous mutations, etc. It also identifies genetic material suitable for basic studies.

  10. Simple Quantitative PCR Approach to Reveal Naturally Occurring and Mutation-Induced Repetitive Sequence Variation on the Drosophila Y Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, John C.; Maggert, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is a significant component of the human genome and the genomes of most model organisms. Although heterochromatin is thought to be largely non-coding, it is clear that it plays an important role in chromosome structure and gene regulation. Despite a growing awareness of its functional significance, the repetitive sequences underlying some heterochromatin remain relatively uncharacterized. We have developed a real-time quantitative PCR-based method for quantifying simple repetitive satellite sequences and have used this technique to characterize the heterochromatic Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. In this report, we validate the approach, identify previously unknown satellite sequence copy number polymorphisms in Y chromosomes from different geographic sources, and show that a defect in heterochromatin formation can induce similar copy number polymorphisms in a laboratory strain. These findings provide a simple method to investigate the dynamic nature of repetitive sequences and characterize conditions which might give rise to long-lasting alterations in DNA sequence. PMID:25285439

  11. Naturally occurring hypothermia is more advantageous than fever in severe forms of lipopolysaccharide- and Escherichia coli-induced systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Elaine; Lewis, Kevin; Al-Saffar, Hiba; Krall, Catherine M.; Singh, Anju; Kulchitsky, Vladimir A.; Corrigan, Joshua J.; Simons, Christopher T.; Petersen, Scott R.; Musteata, Florin M.; Bakshi, Chandra S.; Romanovsky, Andrej A.; Sellati, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The natural switch from fever to hypothermia observed in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation is a phenomenon that continues to puzzle clinicians and scientists. The present study was the first to evaluate in direct experiments how the development of hypothermia vs. fever during severe forms of systemic inflammation impacts the pathophysiology of this malady and mortality rates in rats. Following administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 or 18 mg/kg) or of a clinical Escherichia coli isolate (5 × 109 or 1 × 1010 CFU/kg), hypothermia developed in rats exposed to a mildly cool environment, but not in rats exposed to a warm environment; only fever was revealed in the warm environment. Development of hypothermia instead of fever suppressed endotoxemia in E. coli-infected rats, but not in LPS-injected rats. The infiltration of the lungs by neutrophils was similarly suppressed in E. coli-infected rats of the hypothermic group. These potentially beneficial effects came with costs, as hypothermia increased bacterial burden in the liver. Furthermore, the hypotensive responses to LPS or E. coli were exaggerated in rats of the hypothermic group. This exaggeration, however, occurred independently of changes in inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins. Despite possible costs, development of hypothermia lessened abdominal organ dysfunction and reduced overall mortality rates in both the E. coli and LPS models. By demonstrating that naturally occurring hypothermia is more advantageous than fever in severe forms of aseptic (LPS-induced) or septic (E. coli-induced) systemic inflammation, this study provides new grounds for the management of this deadly condition. PMID:22513748

  12. Historical changes in channel network extent and channel planform in an intensively managed landscape: Natural versus human-induced effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Bruce L.; Lewis, Quinn W.; Andresen, William

    2016-01-01

    Humans have become major geomorphological agents, effecting substantial change in the characteristics of Earth's physical landscapes. The agricultural Midwest of the United States is a region marked by pronounced human influence at the landscape scale. Humans undoubtedly have strongly influenced critical zone processes, including fluvial processes, in intensively managed agricultural landscapes, yet the exact nature of human alteration of these processes is unknown. This study documents historical changes in the extent of the stream channel network and in channel planform within the upper Sangamon River basin - an intensively managed agricultural watershed in Illinois. Results indicate that the modern channel network is nearly three times more extensive than the channel network in the 1820s. Most change in drainage density has occurred in headwater portions of the basin where numerous drainage ditches have been added to the network to drain flat uplands. No detectable change in channel position is evident between 1940 and 2012 along about 60% of the total length of the Sangamon River and its major tributaries. Nearly 30% of the total length exhibits change related to meander dynamics (cutoffs and lateral migration), whereas about 8% has changed as a result of channelization. Channelized sections typically remain straight for decades following human modification, supporting the notion that humans produce long-lasting catastrophic change in channel planform in this region. The findings confirm that humans are effective agents of morphological change in fluvial systems in this intensively managed watershed. Documenting human-induced versus natural changes in fluvial systems is important for evaluating how other critical zone processes in intensively managed landscapes have been affected by these changes. Human-induced changes in channel extent and planform most likely have altered this landscape from one dominated by biogeochemical transformations and storage of water

  13. Passive seismic monitoring of natural and induced earthquakes: case studies, future directions and socio-economic relevance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohnhoff, Marco; Dresen, Georg; Ellsworth, William L.; Ito, Hisao; Cloetingh, Sierd; Negendank, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    An important discovery in crustal mechanics has been that the Earth’s crust is commonly stressed close to failure, even in tectonically quiet areas. As a result, small natural or man-made perturbations to the local stress field may trigger earthquakes. To understand these processes, Passive Seismic Monitoring (PSM) with seismometer arrays is a widely used technique that has been successfully applied to study seismicity at different magnitude levels ranging from acoustic emissions generated in the laboratory under controlled conditions, to seismicity induced by hydraulic stimulations in geological reservoirs, and up to great earthquakes occurring along plate boundaries. In all these environments the appropriate deployment of seismic sensors, i.e., directly on the rock sample, at the earth’s surface or in boreholes close to the seismic sources allows for the detection and location of brittle failure processes at sufficiently low magnitude-detection threshold and with adequate spatial resolution for further analysis. One principal aim is to develop an improved understanding of the physical processes occurring at the seismic source and their relationship to the host geologic environment. In this paper we review selected case studies and future directions of PSM efforts across a wide range of scales and environments. These include induced failure within small rock samples, hydrocarbon reservoirs, and natural seismicity at convergent and transform plate boundaries. Each example represents a milestone with regard to bridging the gap between laboratory-scale experiments under controlled boundary conditions and large-scale field studies. The common motivation for all studies is to refine the understanding of how earthquakes nucleate, how they proceed and how they interact in space and time. This is of special relevance at the larger end of the magnitude scale, i.e., for large devastating earthquakes due to their severe socio-economic impact.

  14. Natural and Human-Induced Variations in Accretion of the Roanoke Bay-head Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalowska, A.; McKee, B. A.; Rodriguez, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Bay-head deltas (BHD), along with their adjacent floodplains serve as storage sites for lithogenic and organic material on millennial time scales and are biogeochemically active sites on daily to decadal time scales, contributing to global nutrient and carbon cycles. BHD host unique, highly diverse ecosystems such as the pristine swamp forest and hardwood bottomlands, of the Lower Roanoke River, NC. The global value of ecosystem services provided by wetlands within natural BHD is 2.5 to 2.8 mln 2007$/km2/year. BHD are very sensitive to changes in sedimentation and to changes in the rate of sea-level rise. Core descriptions, 14C geo-chronologies and grain-size analyses show that the Roanoke BHD in North Carolina, USA experienced two episodes of retreat in late Holocene. The first event occurred around ca 3500 cal. yr. BC and is recognized as a prominent flooding surface separating the delta plain environment, below, from interdistributary bay, above. Across the flooding surface rates of sediment accumulation decreased from 1.8-3.3 mm/year to 0.5-0.6 mm/year. That change was associated with increased sediment accommodation. Sedimentation rates were keeping up with the low rates of sea-level rise until 1600-1700 AD. During that time, the delta started to rapidly accrete and the interdistributary bay was buried with delta plain and prodelta sediment. This occurred in response to the low rates of sea-level rise at that time (-0.1 to 0.47 mm/year) and the release of large quantities of sediments associated with the initiation of agriculture by European settlers in the drainage basin. The second episode of retreat was initiated during the 19th century when the rate of sea-level rose to 2.1 mm/year. During that time, agricultural practices improved, decreasing the amount of sediments delivered to the mouth of the Roanoke River. Under these conditions, the delta started backstepping. Analyses of historical maps, aerial photography, and side-scan sonar data show that between

  15. Naturally occurring and stress induced tubular structures from mammalian cells, a survival mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yonnie; Laughlin, Richard C; Henry, David C; Krueger, Darryl E; Hudson, JoAn S; Kuan, Cheng-Yi; He, Jian; Reppert, Jason; Tomkins, Jeffrey P

    2007-01-01

    dehydration. The disintegrative, mobile, disruptive and ubiquitous nature of straw cells makes this a possible physiological process that may be involved in human health, longevity, and various types of diseases such as cancer. PMID:17705822

  16. The natural product 4,10-aromadendranediol induces neuritogenesis in neuronal cells in vitro through activation of the ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sai; Ruan, Wen-chen; Xu, Ya-zhou; Wang, Yun-jie; Pang, Jie; Zhang, Lu-yong; Liao, Hong; Pang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies focus on promoting neurite outgrowth to remodel the central nervous network after brain injury. Currently, however, there are few drugs treating brain diseases in the clinic by enhancing neurite outgrowth. In this study, we established an NGF-induced PC12 differentiation model to screen novel compounds that have the potential to induce neuronal differentiation, and further characterized 4,10-Aromadendranediol (ARDD) isolated from the dried twigs of the Baccharis gaudichaudiana plant, which exhibited the capability of promoting neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells in vitro. ARDD (1, 10 μmol/L) significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in NGF-treated PC12 cells and N1E115 cells in a time-dependent manner. In cultured primary cortical neurons, ARDD (5, 10 μmol/L) not only significantly increased neurite outgrowth but also increased the number of neurites on the soma and the number of bifurcations. Further analyses showed that ARDD (10 μmol/L) significantly increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and the downstream GSK-3β, subsequently induced β-catenin expression and up-regulated the gene expression of the Wnt ligands Fzd1 and Wnt3a in neuronal cells. The neurite outgrowth-promoting effect of ARDD in neuronal cells was abolished by pretreatment with the specific ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, but was partially reversed by XAV939, an inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. ARDD also increased the expression of BDNF, CREB and GAP-43 in N1E115 cells, which was reversed by pretreatment with PD98059. In N1E115 cells subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), pretreatment with ARDD (1–10 μmol/L) significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and induced neurite outgrowth. These results demonstrated that the natural product ARDD exhibits neurite outgrowth-inducing activity in neurons via activation of the ERK signaling pathway, which may be beneficial to the treatment of brain diseases. PMID:27840407

  17. The natural product 4,10-aromadendranediol induces neuritogenesis in neuronal cells in vitro through activation of the ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sai; Ruan, Wen-Chen; Xu, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Jie; Pang, Jie; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Liao, Hong; Pang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies focus on promoting neurite outgrowth to remodel the central nervous network after brain injury. Currently, however, there are few drugs treating brain diseases in the clinic by enhancing neurite outgrowth. In this study, we established an NGF-induced PC12 differentiation model to screen novel compounds that have the potential to induce neuronal differentiation, and further characterized 4,10-Aromadendranediol (ARDD) isolated from the dried twigs of the Baccharis gaudichaudiana plant, which exhibited the capability of promoting neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells in vitro. ARDD (1, 10 μmol/L) significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in NGF-treated PC12 cells and N1E115 cells in a time-dependent manner. In cultured primary cortical neurons, ARDD (5, 10 μmol/L) not only significantly increased neurite outgrowth but also increased the number of neurites on the soma and the number of bifurcations. Further analyses showed that ARDD (10 μmol/L) significantly increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and the downstream GSK-3β, subsequently induced β-catenin expression and up-regulated the gene expression of the Wnt ligands Fzd1 and Wnt3a in neuronal cells. The neurite outgrowth-promoting effect of ARDD in neuronal cells was abolished by pretreatment with the specific ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, but was partially reversed by XAV939, an inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. ARDD also increased the expression of BDNF, CREB and GAP-43 in N1E115 cells, which was reversed by pretreatment with PD98059. In N1E115 cells subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), pretreatment with ARDD (1-10 μmol/L) significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and induced neurite outgrowth. These results demonstrated that the natural product ARDD exhibits neurite outgrowth-inducing activity in neurons via activation of the ERK signaling pathway, which may be beneficial to the treatment of brain diseases.

  18. Natural isoprenoids inhibit LPS-induced-production of cytokines and nitric oxide in aminobisphosphonate-treated monocytes.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Tommasini, Alberto; Crovella, Sergio; Pontillo, Alessandra

    2010-06-01

    The inhibition of mevalonate pathway through genetic defects (mevalonate kinase deficiency, MKD) or pharmacologic drugs (aminobisphosphonates) causes a shortage of intermediate compounds and, in particular, of geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP) associated to the activation of caspase-1 and IL-1beta release. Geraniol (GOH), farnesol (FOH), geranylgeraniol (GGOH) and menthol (MOH), due to their isoprenoid structure, are supposed to enter the mevalonate pathway and to by-pass the biochemical block, reconstituting the pathway. Considering the already known side effects of aminobisphosphonates, and the lack of a specific treatment for MKD, we evaluated the impact of these natural isoprenoids compounds in a RAW cell lines chemically treated with the aminobisphosphonate alendronate, and in monocytes isolated from 2 patients affected by MKD. GOH, FOH, GGOH and MOH were all capable to diminish inflammatory marker levels induced by LPS. These natural isoprenoids could be proposed as novel therapeutic approach for the still orphan drug MKD, but also considered for the evaluation of possible inflammatory side effects of aminobisphosphonates.

  19. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-06-07

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches.

  20. Efficacy of natural biocide on control of microbial induced corrosion in oil pipelines mediated by Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfovibrio gigas.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Meeta; Sarma, Priyangshu M; Mandal, Ajoy K; Cheema, Simrita; Lal, Banwari

    2011-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of a natural biocide with four chemical tetrakishydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfonate, benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, and formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, to control microbial induced corrosion in oil pipelines. The efficacy of biocides were monitored against Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfovibrio gigas in experimental pipes by measuring cell counts, H2S production, Fe(II) production, production of extracellular polymeric substances and structure of biofilm. The treatment with cow urine had minimum planktonic cell counts of 3 x 10(2) CFU/mL as well as biofilm cell counts of 9 x 10(1) CFU/mL as compared with tetrakishydroxyl methyl phosphonium sulfonate, benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde. Sulfide production was the lowest with cow urine (0.08 mmol/L), followed by tetrakishydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfonate 0.72 mmol/L. On day 90 of treatment, Fe(II) production was also found to be the lowest with cow urine. The scanning electron microscopic studies indicated that the biofilm bacteria were killed by cow urine. These results demonstrate the cow urine mediated control of microbially induced corrosion, and this is indicative of its potential as a viable substitute of toxic biocides. To the best of our knowledge, this seems to be the first report which screens possible biocidal activity by cow urine as compared to the most common biocides which oil industry is currently using.

  1. Natural small molecule FMHM inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response by promoting TRAF6 degradation via K48-linked polyubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Liao, Li-Xi; Lv, Hai-Ning; Song, Fang-Jiao; Yu, Qian; Dong, Xin; Li, Jun; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2015-10-01

    TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is a key hub protein involved in Toll-like receptor-dependent inflammatory signaling pathway, and it recruits additional proteins to form multiprotein complexes capable of activating downstream NF-κB inflammatory signaling pathway. Ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a crucial role in various protein degradations, such as TRAF6, leading to inhibitory effects on inflammatory response and immunologic function. However, whether ubiquitination-dependent TRAF6 degradation can be used as a novel anti-inflammatory drug target still remains to be explored. FMHM, a bioactive natural small molecule compound extracted from Chinese herbal medicine Radix Polygalae, suppressed acute inflammatory response by targeting ubiquitin protein and inducing UPS-dependent TRAF6 degradation mechanism. It was found that FMHM targeted ubiquitin protein via Lys48 site directly induced Lys48 residue-linked polyubiquitination. This promoted Lys48 residue-linked polyubiquitin chain formation on TRAF6, resulting in increased TRAF6 degradation via UPS and inactivation of downstream NF-κB inflammatory pathway. Consequently, FMHM down-regulated inflammatory mediator levels in circulation, protected multiple organs against inflammatory injury in vivo, and prolong the survival of endotoxemia mouse models. Therefore, FMHM can serve as a novel lead compound for the development of TRAF6 scavenging agent via ubiquitination-dependent mode, which represents a promising strategy for treating inflammatory diseases.

  2. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-01-01

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches. PMID:27167001

  3. Naturally Occurring Fc-Dependent Antibody From HIV-Seronegative Individuals Promotes HIV-Induced IFN-α Production

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Thomas; Green, Jon A.

    2016-01-01

    A majority of adults without HIV infection and with a low risk of HIV-exposure have plasma IgG antibodies that enhance the rate and magnitude of HIV-induced interferon alpha (IFN-α) production. Fc-dependent IgG-HIV complexes induce IFN-α rapidly and in high titers in response to HIV concentrations that are too low to otherwise stimulate an effective IFN-α response. IFN-α promoting antibody (IPA) counters HIV-specific inhibition of IFN-α production, and compensates for the inherent delay in IFN-α production common to HIV infection and other viruses. Naturally occurring IPA has the potential to initiate a potent IFN-α response early in the course of HIV mucosal invasion in time to terminate infection prior to the creation of a pool of persistently infected cells. The current study adds IPA as a mediator of an Fc-dependent antiviral state capable of preventing HIV infection. PMID:27881846

  4. R-(-)-{beta}-O-methylsynephrine, a natural product, inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nam Hee; Pham, Ngoc Bich; Quinn, Ronald J.; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} R-(-)-{beta}-O-methylsynephrine (OMe-Syn) is a natural compound isolated from a plant of the Rutaceae family. {yields} OMe-Syn possesses lead-like physicochemical properties, conferring good solubility. {yields} OMe-Syn effectively inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. {yields} OMe-Syn could be a novel basis for a small molecule targeting angiogenesis. -- Abstract: R-(-)-{beta}-O-methylsynephrine (OMe-Syn) is an active compound isolated from a plant of the Rutaceae family. We conducted cell proliferation assays on various cell lines and found that OMe-Syn more strongly inhibited the growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) than that of other normal and cancer cell lines tested. In angiogenesis assays, it inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced invasion and tube formation of HUVECs with no toxicity. The anti-angiogenic activity of OMe-Syn was also validated in vivo using the chorioallantonic membrane (CAM) assay in growing chick embryos. Expression of the growth factors VEGF, hepatocyte growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor was suppressed by OMe-Syn in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that this compound could be a novel basis for a small molecule targeting angiogenesis.

  5. Cytokine-Induced Memory-Like Differentiation Enhances Unlicensed Natural Killer Cell Antileukemia and FcγRIIIa-Triggered Responses.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julia A; Berrien-Elliott, Melissa M; Rosario, Maximillian; Leong, Jeffrey W; Jewell, Brea A; Schappe, Timothy; Abdel-Latif, Sara; Fehniger, Todd A

    2017-03-01

    Cytokine-induced memory-like natural killer (NK) cells differentiate after short-term preactivation with IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 and display enhanced effector function in response to cytokines or tumor targets for weeks after the initial preactivation. Conventional NK cell function depends on a licensing signal, classically delivered by an inhibitory receptor engaging its cognate MHC class I ligand. How licensing status integrates with cytokine-induced memory-like NK cell responses is unknown. We investigated this interaction using killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor- and HLA-genotyped primary human NK cells. Memory-like differentiation resulted in enhanced IFN-γ production triggered by leukemia targets or FcγRIIIa ligation within licensed NK cells, which exhibited the highest functionality of the NK cell subsets interrogated. IFN-γ production by unlicensed memory-like NK cells was also enhanced to a level comparable with that of licensed control NK cells. Mechanistically, differences in responses to FcγRIIIa-based triggering were not explained by alterations in key signaling intermediates, indicating that the underlying biology of memory-like NK cells is distinct from that of adaptive NK cells in human cytomegalovirus-positive individuals. Additionally, memory-like NK cells responded robustly to cytokine receptor restimulation with no impact of licensing status. These results demonstrate that both licensed and unlicensed memory-like NK cell populations have enhanced functionality, which may be translated to improve leukemia immunotherapy.

  6. A Pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine compound inhibits Fyn phosphorylation and induces apoptosis in natural killer cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Laurenzana, Ilaria; Caivano, Antonella; Trino, Stefania; De Luca, Luciana; Rocca, Francesco La; Simeon, Vittorio; Tintori, Cristina; D'Alessio, Francesca; Teramo, Antonella; Zambello, Renato; Traficante, Antonio; Maietti, Maddalena; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Schenone, Silvia; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell neoplasms are characterized by clonal proliferation of cytotoxic NK cells. Since there is no standard treatment to date, new therapeutic options are needed, especially for NK aggressive tumors. Fyn tyrosine kinase has a key role in different biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation, being also involved in the pathogenesis of hematologic malignancies. Our previous studies led us to identify 4c pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine compound capable of inhibiting Fyn activation and inducing apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. Here we investigated the presence of Fyn and the effect of its inhibitor in NK malignant cells. Firstly, we showed Fyn over-expression in NK leukemic cells compared to peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. Subsequently, we demonstrated that 4c treatment reduced cell viability, induced caspase 3-mediate apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in NK cells. Moreover, by inhibiting Fyn phosphorylation, 4c compound reduced Akt and P70 S6 kinase activation and changed the expression of genes involved in cell death and survival in NK cells. Our study demonstrated that Fyn is involved in the pathogenesis of NK leukemia and that it could represent a potential target for this neoplasm. Moreover, we proved that Fyn inhibitor pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine compound, could be a started point to develop new therapeutic agents. PMID:27566560

  7. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-12

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  8. A man-induced landslide in Lower Austria: natural conditions versus man-made causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Roland; Ottner, Franz; Damm, Bodo; Terhorst, Birgit

    2010-05-01

    In many cases, composition and characteristics of hillslope sediments are of particular importance related to landslide research in low mountain areas. The interaction of geologic, geomorphologic, and hydrologic factors determines the susceptibility for mass movements, which is affected by human impact as well. The present study aims to investigate factors that control mass movements and natural and anthropogenic impacts. On March 8th 2009, a landslide of 30.000 to 50.000 m³ occurred that destroyed a large part of a sports ground in the village of Hintersdorf, municipality of St. Andrä-Wördern (Lower Austria). As a result of extensive water supply ground liquefaction was initiated and the slide mass moved in form of a mud flow about 200 m down slope. As a consequence a small forest area and a fishpond were destroyed and an adjacent road was damaged. Closely to the event, first studies started and showed that the Hintersdorf landslide was triggered by extensive water saturation combined with hydrostatic pressure inside the slide mass. Heavy and long-lasting rainfalls and the start of snowmelt caused strong seepage and soil water saturation. Furthermore, insufficient ground drainage and overflow of a small retention pond intensified the unfavourable impact on soil-mechanical stability. Further studies included archive data analyse, field survey, as well as laboratory analyse and showed that high landslide susceptibility at the Hintersdorf landslide site was caused by a bundle of factors that control the process: The sports ground was built nearby the head of a trough valley that collects interflow and surface run-off from the surrounding slopes. The Flysch bedrock is covered extensively by clayey slope deposits. Furthermore, in the area of the valley head a waste deposit was operated up to the 1980's that resulted in a thick waste filling there. The Hintersdorf sports ground was constructed in 1984 on top of the waste body. Preliminary results show that hillslope

  9. Comparative Study of Ultrasonication-Induced and Naturally Self-Assembled Silk Fibroin-Wool Keratin Hydrogel Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Trang; Xue, Ye; Vuong, Trinh; Erbe, Matthew; Bennet, Christopher; Palazzo, Ben; Popielski, Lucas; Rodriguez, Nelson; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the formation of biocompatible hydrogels using protein polymers from natural silk cocoon fibroins and sheep wool keratins. Silk fibroin protein contains β-sheet secondary structures, allowing for the formation of physical cross-linkers in the hydrogels. Comparative studies were performed on two groups of samples. In the first group, ultrasonication was used to induce a quick gelation of a protein aqueous solution, enhancing the ability of Bombyx mori silk fibroin chains to quickly entrap the wool keratin protein molecules homogenously. In the second group, silk/keratin mixtures were left at room temperature for days, resulting in naturally-assembled gelled solutions. It was found that silk/wool blended solutions can form hydrogels at different mixing ratios, with perfectly interconnected gel structure when the wool content was less than 30 weight percent (wt %) for the first group (ultrasonication), and 10 wt % for the second group (natural gel). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature modulated DSC (TMDSC) were used to confirm that the fibroin/keratin hydrogel system was well-blended without phase separation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to investigate the secondary structures of blended protein gels. It was found that intermolecular β-sheet contents significantly increase as the system contains more silk for both groups of samples, resulting in stable crystalline cross-linkers in the blended hydrogel structures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the samples’ characteristic morphology on both micro- and nanoscales, which showed that ultrasonic waves can significantly enhance the cross-linker formation and avoid phase separation between silk and keratin molecules in the blended systems. With the ability to form cross-linkages non-chemically, these silk/wool hydrogels may be economically useful for various biomedical applications, thanks to the

  10. Navigating natural variation in herbivory-induced secondary metabolism in coyote tobacco populations using MS/MS structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Baldwin, Ian T; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2015-07-28

    Natural variation can be extremely useful in unraveling the determinants of phenotypic trait evolution but has rarely been analyzed with unbiased metabolic profiling to understand how its effects are organized at the level of biochemical pathways. Native populations of Nicotiana attenuata, a wild tobacco species, have been shown to be highly genetically diverse for traits important for their interactions with insects. To resolve the chemodiversity existing in these populations, we developed a metabolomics and computational pipeline to annotate leaf metabolic responses to Manduca sexta herbivory. We selected seeds from 43 accessions of different populations from the southwestern United States--including the well-characterized Utah 30th generation inbred accession--and grew 183 plants in the glasshouse for standardized herbivory elicitation. Metabolic profiles were generated from elicited leaves of each plant using a high-throughput ultra HPLC (UHPLC)-quadrupole TOFMS (qTOFMS) method, processed to systematically infer covariation patterns among biochemically related metabolites, as well as unknown ones, and finally assembled to map natural variation. Navigating this map revealed metabolic branch-specific variations that surprisingly only partly overlapped with jasmonate accumulation polymorphisms and deviated from canonical jasmonate signaling. Fragmentation analysis via indiscriminant tandem mass spectrometry (idMS/MS) was conducted with 10 accessions that spanned a large proportion of the variance found in the complete accession dataset, and compound spectra were computationally assembled into spectral similarity networks. The biological information captured by this networking approach facilitates the mining of the mass spectral data of unknowns with high natural variation, as demonstrated by the annotation of a strongly herbivory-inducible phenolic derivative, and can guide pathway analysis.

  11. Polydatin, a natural precursor of resveratrol, induces cell cycle arrest and differentiation of human colorectal Caco-2 cell

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human colon adenocarcinoma cells are resistant to chemotherapeutic agents, such as anthracyclines, that induce death by increasing the reactive oxygen species. A number of studies have been focused on chemo-preventive use of resveratrol as antioxidant against cardiovascular diseases, aging and cancer. While resveratrol cytotoxic action was due to its pro-oxidant properties. In this study, we investigate whether the Resveratrol (trans-3,5,49-trihydroxystilbene) and its natural precursor Polydatin (resveratrol-3-O-b-mono- D-glucoside, the glycoside form of resveratrol) combination, might have a cooperative antitumor effect on either growing or differentiated human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cells. Methods The polydatin and resveratrol pharmacological interaction was evaluated in vitro on growing and differentiated Caco-2 cell lines by median drug effect analysis calculating a combination index with CalcuSyn software. We have selected a synergistic combination and we have evaluated its effect on the biological and molecular mechanisms of cell death. Results Simultaneous exposure to polydatin and resveratrol produced synergistic antiproliferative effects compared with single compound treatment. We demonstrated that polydatin alone or in combination with resveratrol at 3:1 molar ratio synergistically modulated oxidative stress, cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. Worthy of note treatment with polydatin induced a nuclear localization and decreased expression of heat shock protein 27, and vimentin redistributed within the cell. Conclusions From morphological, and biochemical outcome we obtained evidences that polydatin induced a transition from a proliferative morphology to cell-specific differentiated structures and caused human CaCo-2 cell death by induction of apoptosis. Our data suggest the potential use of polydatin in combination chemotherapy for human colon cancer. PMID:24138806

  12. Exploring effects of a natural combination medicine on exercise-induced inflammatory immune response: A double-blind RCT.

    PubMed

    Pilat, C; Frech, T; Wagner, A; Krüger, K; Hillebrecht, A; Pons-Kühnemann, J; Scheibelhut, C; Bödeker, R-H; Mooren, F-C

    2015-08-01

    Traumeel (Tr14) is a natural, combination drug, which has been shown to modulate inflammation at the cytokine level. This study aimed to investigate potential effects of Tr14 on the exercise-induced immune response. In a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial, healthy, untrained male subjects received either Tr14 (n = 40) or placebo (n = 40) for 24 h after a strenuous experimental exercise trial on a bicycle (60 min at 80%VO2 max). A range of antigen-stimulated cytokines (in vitro), white blood cell count, lymphocyte activation and apoptosis markers, and indicators of muscle damage were assessed up to 24 h following exercise. The area under the curve with respect to the increase (AUCI ) was compared between both groups. The Tr14 group showed a reduced exercise-induced leukocytosis and neutrocytosis (P < 0.01 for both), a higher AUCI score of antigen-stimulated IL-1β and IL-1α (absolute and per monocyte, all P < 0.05), a lower AUCI score of antigen-stimulated GM-CSF (P < 0.05) and by trend a lower AUCI score of antigen-stimulated IL-2 and IL-4 as well as a higher AUCI score of antigen-stimulated IL-6 (all P < 0.1). Tr14 might promote differentiated effects on the exercise-induced immune response by (a) decreasing the inflammatory response of the innate immune system; and (b) augmenting the pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

  13. Hyperfiltration-induced fractionation of lithium isotopes in geologic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Hyperfiltration through clay membranes induces isotopic fractionation in which a solute's heavy isotope is depleted on the clay membrane's high-pressure side. It should be thus possible to delineate regions of high and low hydrostatic heads in the subsurface by plotting distributions of elements' isotopic ratios obtained through analyses of samples collected from opposing sides of aquitards. High degrees of hyperfiltration-induced fractionation should result when ions of a low atomic-weight element are hydraulically forced through a highly ideal clay membrane. This study gauges the magnitude of {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li fractionation during hyperfiltration through clay membranes. The results will yield baseline data against which hyperfiltration-induced isotopic fractionation of higher atomic-weight elements should be compared in future hydrogeochemical investigations. The following tasks were accomplished since April 1, 1990: (1) fabrication of the testing apparatus began, with estimated completion by March of 1991; (2) beneficiation of 450 grams of freeze-dried clay; (3) analytical standardization of {sup 7}LiCl and {sup 6}LiCl stock solutions; and (4) an experiment conducted on dialysis tubing testing the isotopic fractionation of Li isotopes during the evolution of an osmotic cell. Analytical measurements of the {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ratios from this experiment have not yet been performed. 2 figs.

  14. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 is a natural chemopreventive agent against carcinogen induced precancerous lesions in mouse mammary gland organ culture

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinjian; Hawthorne, Michael; Vaishnav, Avani; St-Arnaud, René

    2009-01-01

    Despite the role of vitamin D3 endocrine system in prevention of mammary gland transformation in animal models, use of 1,25(OH)2D3 in clinical settings is precluded due to its toxicity in vivo. Therefore much effort has been placed in developing relatively non-toxic vitamin D analogs. Recently, with the discovery of the expression of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) in multiple extrarenal organs, the functional role of prohormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3], has been redefined. Since 25(OH)D3 does not cause hypercalcemia and maintains relative high concentration in serum, it is possible that the prohormone can be converted to active hormone in mammary epithelial cells to provide chemopreventive effects. In the present study, we evaluated its functional significance using mouse mammary organ culture (MMOC) system. We first showed that 25(OH)D3 1α-hydroxylase is extensively expressed in mammary ductal epithelial cells at both protein and mRNA levels, which is a prerequisite for 25(OH)D3 to function in an autocrine/paracrine manner. However, we also observed that clotrimazol (1α-hydroxylase inhibitor) enhanced 25(OH)D3 -induced CYP24 expression in breast cancer cells. In mammary glands derived from 1α-hydroxylase knockout mice, 25(OH)D3 treatment in organ culture significantly induced CYP24 expression, indicating a potential direct effect of 25(OH)D3. In MMOC, 100–250 nM 25(OH)D3 suppressed both ovarian hormone-dependent and -independent mammary precancerous lesions (induced by DMBA) by more than 50%, while the active hormone 1,25(OH)2D3 (positive control) at 100 nM suppressed alveolar lesions by more than 80%. The inactive vitamin D3 (negative control) at 100 nM suppressed alveolar lesions by only 20% (P > 0.05). We found that 25(OH)D3 inhibits DMBA-induced mammary alveolar lesions (MAL) in a stage-specific manner: 25(OH)D3 mainly inhibits the promotion stage of lesion formation. We conclude that 25(OH)D3 could serve as a non-toxic natural

  15. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 is a natural chemopreventive agent against carcinogen induced precancerous lesions in mouse mammary gland organ culture.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinjian; Hawthorne, Michael; Vaishnav, Avani; St-Arnaud, René; Mehta, Rajendra G

    2009-01-01

    Despite the role of vitamin D(3) endocrine system in prevention of mammary gland transformation in animal models, use of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3 )in clinical settings is precluded due to its toxicity in vivo. Therefore much effort has been placed in developing relatively non-toxic vitamin D analogs. Recently, with the discovery of the expression of 25-hydroxy vitamin D(3) 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) in multiple extrarenal organs, the functional role of prohormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) [25(OH)D(3)], has been redefined. Since 25(OH)D(3) does not cause hypercalcemia and maintains relative high concentration in serum, it is possible that the prohormone can be converted to active hormone in mammary epithelial cells to provide chemopreventive effects. In the present study, we evaluated its functional significance using mouse mammary organ culture (MMOC) system. We first showed that 25(OH)D(3) 1alpha-hydroxylase is extensively expressed in mammary ductal epithelial cells at both protein and mRNA levels, which is a prerequisite for 25(OH)D(3) to function in an autocrine/paracrine manner. However, we also observed that clotrimazol (1alpha-hydroxylase inhibitor) enhanced 25(OH)D(3) -induced CYP24 expression in breast cancer cells. In mammary glands derived from 1alpha-hydroxylase knockout mice, 25(OH)D(3) treatment in organ culture significantly induced CYP24 expression, indicating a potential direct effect of 25(OH)D(3). In MMOC, 100-250 nM 25(OH)D(3) suppressed both ovarian hormone-dependent and -independent mammary precancerous lesions (induced by DMBA) by more than 50%, while the active hormone 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) (positive control) at 100 nM suppressed alveolar lesions by more than 80%. The inactive vitamin D(3) (negative control) at 100 nM suppressed alveolar lesions by only 20% (P>0.05). We found that 25(OH)D(3) inhibits DMBA-induced mammary alveolar lesions (MAL) in a stage-specific manner: 25(OH)D(3) mainly inhibits the promotion stage of lesion formation. We conclude that 25

  16. Characterization of moderator assembly dimension for accelerator boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors using {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutrons at proton energy of 2.5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Bengua, Gerard; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2006-06-15

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension are investigated for the usage of {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.5 MeV protons in boron newtron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors in the present study. The indexes checked are treatable protocol depth (TPD), which is the greatest depth of the region satisfying the dose requirements in BNCT protocol, proton current necessary to complete BNCT by 1 h irradiation, and the heat flux deposited in the Li target which should be removed. Assumed materials are D{sub 2}O for moderator, and mixture of polyethylene and LiF with 50 wt % for collimator. Dose distributions have been computed with MCNP 4B and 4C codes. Consequently, realized TPD does not show a monotonical tendency for the Li target diameter. However, the necessary proton current and heat flux in the Li target decreases as the Li target diameter increases, while this trend reverses at around 10 cm of the Li target diameter for the necessary proton current in the condition of this study. As to the moderator diameter, TPD does not exhibit an apparent dependence. On the other hand, necessary proton current and heat flux decrease as the moderator diameter increases, and this tendency saturates at around 60 cm of the moderator diameter in this study. As to the collimator, increase in inner diameter is suitable from the viewpoint of increasing TPD and decreasing necessary proton current and heat flux, while these indexes do not show apparent difference for collimator inner diameters over 14 cm for the parameters treated here. The practical viewpoint in selecting the parameters of moderator assembly dimension is to increase TPD, within the technically possible condition of accelerated proton current and heat removal from the Li target. In this process, the values for which the resultant characteristics mentioned above saturate or reverse would be important factors.

  17. Characterization of high-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron energy spectra and ambient dose equivalents of 80-389 MeV 7Li(p,n) reactions using a time-of-flight method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Satoh, Daiki; Araki, Shouhei; Yashima, Hiroshi; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Masuda, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Nakao, Noriaki; Shima, Tatsushi; Kin, Tadahiro; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    We completed a series of measurements on mono-energetic neutron energy spectra of the 7Li(p,n) reaction with 80-389-MeV protons in the 100-m time-of-flight (TOF) tunnel at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics cyclotron facility. For that purpose, we measured neutron energy spectra of the 80-, 100- and 296-MeV proton incident reactions, which had not been investigated in our previous studies. The neutron peak intensity was 0.9-1.1×1010 neutrons/sr/μC in the incident proton energy region of 80-389 MeV, and it was almost independent of the incident proton energy. The contribution of peak intensity of the spectrum to the total intensity integrated with energies above 3 MeV varied between 0.38 and 0.48 in the incident proton energy range of 80-389 MeV. To consider the correction required to derive a response in the peak region from the measured total responses of neutron monitors in the 100-m TOF tunnel, we proposed the subtraction method using energy spectra between 0° and 25°. The normalizing factor k against 25° neutron fluence to equalize it to 0° neutron fluence in the continuum region ranges from 0.74 to 1.02 depending on the incident proton energy and angle measured. Even without the TOF method, the subtraction method with the k factor almost decreases the response in the continuum region of a neutron spectrum against the total response of neutron monitors.

  18. Soil and geomorphological parameters to characterize natural environmental and human induced changes within the Guadarrama Range (Central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Thomas; Inclán-Cuartas, Rosa M.; Santolaria-Canales, Edmundo; Saa, Antonio; Rodríguez-Rastrero, Manuel; Tanarro-Garcia, Luis M.; Luque, Esperanza; Pelayo, Marta; Ubeda, Jose; Tarquis, Ana; Diaz-Puente, Javier; De Marcos, Javier; Rodriguez-Alonso, Javier; Hernandez, Carlos; Palacios, David; Gallardo-Díaz, Juan; Fidel González-Rouco, J.

    2016-04-01

    Mediterranean mountain ecosystems are often complex and remarkably diverse and are seen as important sources of biological diversity. They play a key role in the water and sediment cycle for lowland regions as well as preventing and mitigating natural hazards especially those related to drought such as fire risk. However, these ecosystems are fragile and vulnerable to changes due to their particular and extreme climatic and biogeographic conditions. Some of the main pressures on mountain biodiversity are caused by changes in land use practices, infrastructure and urban development, unsustainable tourism, overexploitation of natural resources, fragmentation of habitats, particularly when located close to large population centers, as well as by pressures related toclimate change. The objective of this work is to select soil and geomorphological parameters in order to characterize natural environmental and human induced changes within the newly created National Park of the Sierra de Guadarrama in Central Spain, where the presence of the Madrid metropolitan area is the main factor of impact. This is carried out within the framework of the Guadarrama Monitoring Network (GuMNet) of the Campus de ExcelenciaInternacionalMoncloa, where long-term monitoring of the atmosphere, soil and bedrock are priority. This network has a total of ten stations located to the NW of Madrid and in this case, three stations have been selected to represent different ecosystems that include: 1) an alluvial plain in a lowland pasture area (La Herreria at 920 m a.s.l.), 2) mid mountain pine-forested and pasture area (Raso del Pino at 1801 m a.s.l.) and 3) high mountain grassland and rock area (Dos Hermanas at 2225 m a.s.l.). At each station a site geomorphological description, soil profile description and sampling was carried out. In the high mountain area information was obtained for monitoring frost heave activity and downslope soil movement. Basic soil laboratory analyses have been carried out

  19. Final technical report for Phenomic Analysis of Natural and Induced Variation in Brachypodium Distachyon DE-SC0001526

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, John P.

    2014-12-17

    The goal of this project was to apply high-throughput, non-destructive phenotyping (phenomics) to collections of natural variants and induced mutants of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon and characterize a small subset of that material in detail. B. distachyon is well suited to this phenomic approach because its small size and rapid generation time allow researchers to grow many plants under carefully controlled conditions. In addition, the simple diploid genetics, high quality genome sequence and existence of numerous experimental tools available for B. distachyon allow us to rapidly identify genes affecting specific phenotypes. Our phenomic analysis revealed great diversity in biofuel-relevant traits like growth rate, biomass and photosynthetic rate. This clearly demonstrated the feasibility of applying a phenomic approach to the model grass B. distachyon. We also demonstrated the utility of B. distachyon for studying mature root system, something that is virtually impossible to do with biomass crops. We showed tremendous natural variation in root architecture that can potentially be used to design crops with superior nutrient and water harvesting capability. Finally, we demonstrated the speed with which we can link specific genes to specific phenotypes by studying two mutants in detail. Importantly, in both cases, the specific biological lessons learned were grass-specific and could not have been learned from a dicot model system. Furthermore, one of the genes affects cell wall integrity and thus may be a useful target in the context of biomass crop improvement. Ultimately, all this information can be used to accelerate the creation of improved biomass crops.

  20. Beneficial effects of natural Jeju groundwaters on lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-chao; Lu, Jin-miao; Jin, Hui-zi; Ma, Ai-niu; Zhang, Jin-yang; Gong, Nian; Xiao, Qi; Zhu, Bin; Lv, Ying-fang; Yu, Na; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Groundwater is believed to possess many beneficial effects due to its natural source of various minerals. In this study, we examined the effects of natural Jeju groundwater S1 (Samdasoo™), S2 and S3 pumped up from different locations of Jeju Island, Korea, along with local tap water, on body weight gain, serum lipids and lipoproteins, and liver histopathology in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Rats were randomly and equally divided into 6 groups. Different water samples were supplied to the hyperlipidemic rats as their daily drinking water and the widely-used anti-hyperlipidemic drug simvastatin was used as a positive control. Body weight, serum lipids and lipoproteins were measured weekly. Liver weight, liver index and liver histopathology were examined after the execution of the rats. RESULTS After drinking Jeju groundwaters for two months, S2 but not S3 significantly reduced weight growth and serum triglycerides levels and increased high density lipoprotein-C (HDL-C) without affecting total cholesterol or LDL-C. S1 and particularly S2 significantly reduced the severity of liver hypertrophy and steatosis. All Groundwaters had much higher contents of vanadium (S3>S2>S1>>tap water) whereas S1 and S2 but not S3 markedly blocked autoxidation of ferrous ions. CONCLUSION Jeju Groundwater S1 and particularly S2 exhibit protective effects against hyperlipidemia and fatty liver and hypothesize that the beneficial effect of Jeju Groundwaters may be contributed from blockade of autoxidation of ferrous ions rather than their high contents of vanadium. PMID:24741400

  1. Hypothalamic Agouti-Related Peptide mRNA is Elevated During Natural and Stress-Induced Anorexia.

    PubMed

    Dunn, I C; Wilson, P W; D'Eath, R B; Boswell, T

    2015-09-01

    As part of their natural lives, animals can undergo periods of voluntarily reduced food intake and body weight (i.e. animal anorexias) that are beneficial for survival or breeding, such as during territorial behaviour, hibernation, migration and incubation of eggs. For incubation, a change in the defended level of body weight or 'sliding set point' appears to be involved, although the neural mechanisms reponsible for this are unknown. We investigated how neuropeptide gene expression in the arcuate nucleus of the domestic chicken responded to a 60-70% voluntary reduction in food intake measured both after incubation and after an environmental stressor involving transfer to unfamiliar housing. We hypothesised that gene expression would not change in these circumstances because the reduced food intake and body weight represented a defended level in birds with free access to food. Unexpectedly, we observed increased gene expression of the orexigenic peptide agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in both incubating and transferred animals compared to controls. Also pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA was higher in incubating hens and significantly increased 6 days after exposure to the stressor. Conversely expression of neuropeptide Y and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene was unchanged in both experimental situations. We conclude that AgRP expression remains sensitive to the level of energy stores during natural anorexias, which is of adaptive advantage, although its normal orexigenic effects are over-ridden by inhibitory signals. In the case of stress-induced anorexia, increased POMC may contribute to this inhibitory role, whereas, for incubation, reduced feeding may also be associated with increased expression in the hypothalamus of the anorexigenic peptide vasoactive intestinal peptide.

  2. Natural genetic and induced plant resistance, as a control strategy to plant-parasitic nematodes alternative to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Sergio

    2011-03-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are pests of a wide range of economically important crops, causing severe losses to agriculture. Natural genetic resistance of plants is expected to be a valid solution of the many problems nematodes cause all over the world. Progress in resistance applications is particularly important for the less-developed countries of tropical and subtropical regions, since use of resistant cultivars may be the only possible and economically feasible control strategy in those farming systems. Resistance is being considered of particular importance also in modern high-input production systems of developed countries, as the customary reliance on chemical nematicides has been restricted or has come to an end. This review briefly describes the genetic bases of resistance to nematodes in plants and focuses on the chances and problems of its exploitation as a key element in an integrated management program. Much space is dedicated to the major problem of resistance durability, in that the intensive use of resistant cultivars is likely to increasingly induce the selection of virulent populations able to "break" the resistance. Protocols of pest-host suitability are described, as bioassays are being used to evaluate local nematode populations in their potential to be selected on resistant germplasm and endanger resistant crops. The recent progress in using robust and durable resistances against nematodes as an efficient method for growers in vegetable cropping systems is reported, as well as the possible use of chemicals that do not show any unfavorable impact on environment, to induce in plants resistance against plant-parasitic nematodes.

  3. In-vivo quantification of natural incipient caries lesions using the quantitative light-induced fluoroscence method: a reproducibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranaeus, Sofia; Shi, Xie-Qi; Trollsas, Karin; Lindgren, Lars-Erik; Angmar-Mansson, Birgit

    2000-03-01

    A new method for detection and quantification of natural incipient caries lesions, the Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence method (QLF), has recently been developed. The aim of this study was to test the repeatability and reproducibility of the analytical part of the method. In vivo captured images (CCD-video camera, Panasonic WV-KS 152, with an argon ion laser as light source) of 15 different incipient caries lesions on smooth surfaces were analyzed by three analysts. The images were analyzed three times in a randomized order, twice for the first reconstructed area (P1A1 and P1A2), and then once for a second one (P2A1). Three parameters were measured, lesion area (mm2), average change in fluorescence (%), and maximum change in fluorescence (%) in the lesion. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to calculate the intra-, and inter-examiner reliability. Intra-examiner reliability for all three analysts showed an intra-class correlation coefficient, R, between 0.93 and 0.99 (for the analyses with the first patch, P1A1 and P1A2, as well as between the first and the second patch, P1A1 and P2A1). Inter-examiner reliability showed an inter-class correlation coefficient, R, between 0.95 and 0.99 (for analyses P1A1, P1A2 and P2A1). It was concluded that the Quantitative Light- induced fluorescence method showed excellent repeatability and reproducibility concerning the analytical part of the method.

  4. Elaborating the Role of Natural Products-Induced Autophagy in Cancer Treatment: Achievements and Artifacts in the State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic process that is highly conserved across different types of mammalian cells. Autophagy is able to relieve tumor cell from nutrient and oxidative stress during the rapid expansion of cancer. Excessive and sustained autophagy may lead to cell death and tumor shrinkage. It was shown in literature that many anticancer natural compounds and extracts could initiate autophagy in tumor cells. As summarized in this review, the tumor suppressive action of natural products-induced autophagy may lead to cell senescence, provoke apoptosis-independent cell death, and complement apoptotic cell death by robust or target-specific mechanisms. In some cases, natural products-induced autophagy could protect tumor cells from apoptotic death. Technical variations in detecting autophagy affect data quality, and study focus should be made on elaborating the role of autophagy in deciding cell fate. In vivo study monitoring of autophagy in cancer treatment is expected to be the future direction. The clinical-relevant action of autophagy-inducing natural products should be highlighted in future study. As natural products are an important resource in discovery of lead compound of anticancer drug, study on the role of autophagy in tumor suppressive effect of natural products continues to be necessary and emerging. PMID:25821829

  5. Rapid, storm-induced changes in the natural abundance of sup 15 N in a planktonic ecosystem, Chesapeake Bay, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, J.P.; McCarthy, J.J. ); Horrigan, S.G. )

    1991-12-01

    Samples of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), particulate nitrogen (PN), and two species of zooplankton were collected during two north-south transects of the Chesapeake Bay in the autumn of 1984 (27-28 September and 3-5 October). During the first transect, the natural abundance of {sup 15}N ({delta} {sup 15}N) in the major dissolved and planktonic pools of nitrogen suggested that the {delta}{sup 15}N of PN was largely determined by isotopic fractionation during uptake of NH{sub 4}{sup +} by phytoplankton. Averaged over the transect as a whole, the {delta}{sup 15}N of the herbivorous calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa was 4.1% higher than that of the PN, while the {delta}{sup 15}N of the carnivorous ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi was 6.4% higher than that of the PN. In the interval between the two transects, storm-induced mixing of the water column resulted in the injection of NH{sub 4}{sup +} into the surface layer of the bay. In combination with ancillary physical, chemical, and biological data, these changes in {delta}{sup 15}N provided estimates of the isotopic fractionation factor for NH{sub 4}{sup +} uptake by phytoplankton ({alpha} = 1.0065-1.0080) as well as the turnover time of nitrogen in Acartia tonsa (6.0-9.6 days). Despite the changes in {delta}{sup 15}N observed during this cruise, the relative distribution of {sup 15}N between trophic levels was preserved: during the second transect, the difference in {delta}{sup 15}N between Acartia tonsa and PN was 3.6%, and the difference in {delta}{sup 15}N between Mnemiopsis leidyi and PN was 7.3%. These results demonstrate that the natural abundance of {sup 15}N can change dramatically on a time scale of days, and that time-series studies of the natural abundance of {sup 15}N can be a useful complement to studies using tracer additions of {sup 15}N to document nitrogen transformations in planktonic ecosystems.

  6. Synthetic tactile perception induced by transcranial alternating-current stimulation can substitute for natural sensory stimulus in behaving rabbits.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Ammann, Claudia; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Ruffini, Giulio; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M

    2016-01-21

    The use of brain-derived signals for controlling external devices has long attracted the attention from neuroscientists and engineers during last decades. Although much effort has been dedicated to establishing effective brain-to-computer communication, computer-to-brain communication feedback for "closing the loop" is now becoming a major research theme. While intracortical microstimulation of the sensory cortex has already been successfully used for this purpose, its future application in humans partly relies on the use of non-invasive brain stimulation technologies. In the present study, we explore the potential use of transcranial alternating-current stimulation (tACS) for synthetic tactile perception in alert behaving animals. More specifically, we determined the effects of tACS on sensory local field potentials (LFPs) and motor output and tested its capability for inducing tactile perception using classical eyeblink conditioning in the behaving animal. We demonstrated that tACS of the primary somatosensory cortex vibrissa area could indeed substitute natural stimuli during training in the associative learning paradigm.

  7. Synthetic tactile perception induced by transcranial alternating-current stimulation can substitute for natural sensory stimulus in behaving rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Ammann, Claudia; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Ruffini, Giulio; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of brain-derived signals for controlling external devices has long attracted the attention from neuroscientists and engineers during last decades. Although much effort has been dedicated to establishing effective brain-to-computer communication, computer-to-brain communication feedback for “closing the loop” is now becoming a major research theme. While intracortical microstimulation of the sensory cortex has already been successfully used for this purpose, its future application in humans partly relies on the use of non-invasive brain stimulation technologies. In the present study, we explore the potential use of transcranial alternating-current stimulation (tACS) for synthetic tactile perception in alert behaving animals. More specifically, we determined the effects of tACS on sensory local field potentials (LFPs) and motor output and tested its capability for inducing tactile perception using classical eyeblink conditioning in the behaving animal. We demonstrated that tACS of the primary somatosensory cortex vibrissa area could indeed substitute natural stimuli during training in the associative learning paradigm. PMID:26790614

  8. Luminescence sensitivity changes in natural quartz induced by high temperature annealing: a high frequency EPR and OSL study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poolton, N. R. J.; Smith, G. M.; Riedi, P. C.; Bulur, E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A. S.; Adrian, M.

    2000-04-01

    Quartz undergoes very significant luminescence sensitivity changes after high temperature annealing (0-1200 °C), with particular enhancement occurring between the phase transition temperatures 573 and 870 °C. In order to understand why this occurs, high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), operating at 90 GHz, has been used to monitor the structure and population of defects in natural sedimentary quartz, following annealing and icons/Journals/Common/gamma" ALT="gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/> -irradiation. The results are compared with the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data of the same samples. It is shown that: (i) the structure and population of the dominant [AlO4 ]0 recombination centres are largely unaffected by the annealing process; (ii) the oxygen vacancy E´ centres are destroyed when annealed at temperatures between the phase transitions and; (iii) the numbers of both [TiO4 /H+ ]0 and [TiO4 /Li+ ]0 donors increase between 400 and 700 °C. Photo-EPR spectra are presented, providing evidence that both the Ti associated donors and Al acceptors are directly involved in the OSL process. The heat-induced changes in the population of these EPR defects is mirrored in part by the change in the luminescence sensitivity of several OSL components. Evidence is also presented suggesting that E´ may act as non-radiative centres competing in the OSL process.

  9. Collision-induced dissociation fragmentation inside disulfide C-terminal loops of natural non-tryptic peptides.

    PubMed

    Samgina, Tatiana Y; Vorontsov, Egor A; Gorshkov, Vladimir A; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Zubarev, Roman A; Ytterberg, Jimmy A; Lebedev, Albert T

    2013-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of long non-tryptic peptides are usually quite complicated and rather difficult to interpret. Disulfide bond formed by two cysteine residues at C-terminus of frog skin peptides precludes one to determine sequence inside the forming loop. Thereby, chemical modification of S-S bonds is often used in "bottom up" sequencing approach. However, low-energy CID spectra of natural non-tryptic peptides with C-terminal disulfide cycle demonstrate an unusual fragmentation route, which may be used to elucidate the "hidden" C-terminal sequence. Low charge state protonated molecules experience peptide bond cleavage at the N-terminus of C-terminal cysteine. The forming isomeric acyclic ions serve as precursors for a series of b-type ions revealing sequence inside former disulfide cycle. The reaction is preferable for peptides with basic lysine residues inside the cycle. It may also be activated by acidic protons of Asp and Glu residues neighboring the loop. The observed cleavages may be quite competitive, revealing the sequence inside disulfide cycle, although S-S bond rupture does not occur in this case.

  10. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  11. Neutron-induced transmutation reactions in 237Np, 238Pu, and 239Pu at the massive natural uranium spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorka, L.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Caloun, P.; Chilap, V. V.; Furman, W. I.; Kadykov, M. G.; Khushvaktov, J.; Pronskikh, V. S.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Sotnikov, V.; Stegailov, V. I.; Suchopar, M.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.; Voronko, V.; Vrzalova, J.

    2015-04-01

    Transmutation reactions in the 237Np, 238Pu, and 239Pu samples were investigated in the neutron field generated inside a massive (m = 512 kg) natural uranium spallation target. The uranium target assembly QUINTA was irradiated with the deuteron beams of kinetic energy 2, 4, and 8 GeV provided by the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna. The neutron-induced transmutation of the actinide samples was measured off-line by implementing methods of gamma-ray spectrometry with HPGe detectors. Results of measurement are expressed in the form of both the individual reaction rates and average fission transmutation rates. For the purpose of validation of radiation transport programs, the experimental results were compared with simulations of neutron production and distribution performed by the MCNPX 2.7 and MARS15 codes employing the INCL4-ABLA physics models and LAQGSM event generator, respectively. In general, a good agreement between the experimental and calculated reaction rates was found in the whole interval of provided beam energies.

  12. A naturally occurring GIP receptor variant undergoes enhanced agonist-induced desensitization, which impairs GIP control of adipose insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Sameer; Patel, Rajesh T; Bruno, Joanne; Panhwar, Muhammad Siyab; Wen, Jennifer; McGraw, Timothy E

    2014-10-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an incretin hormone secreted from gastrointestinal K cells in response to food intake, has an important role in the control of whole-body metabolism. GIP signals through activation of the GIP receptor (GIPR), a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in the development of metabolic disease. Here we demonstrate that GIPR is constitutively trafficked between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments of both GIP-stimulated and unstimulated adipocytes. GIP induces a downregulation of plasma membrane GIPR by slowing GIPR recycling without affecting internalization kinetics. This transient reduction in the expression of GIPR in the plasma membrane correlates with desensitization to the effects of GIP. A naturally occurring variant of GIPR (E354Q) associated with an increased incidence of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in humans responds to GIP stimulation with an exaggerated downregulation from the plasma membrane and a delayed recovery of GIP sensitivity following cessation of GIP stimulation. This perturbation in the desensitization-resensitization cycle of the GIPR variant, revealed in studies of cultured adipocytes, may contribute to the link of the E354Q variant to metabolic disease.

  13. A Naturally Associated Rhizobacterium of Arabidopsis thaliana Induces a Starvation-Like Transcriptional Response while Promoting Growth

    PubMed Central

    Thormählen, Ina; Bernholz, Carolin; Kunz, Sabine; Brouwer, Stephan; Schwochow, Melanie; Köhl, Karin; van Dongen, Joost T.

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth promotion by rhizobacteria is a known phenomenon but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We searched for plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria that are naturally associated with Arabidopsis thaliana to investigate the molecular mechanisms that are involved in plant growth-promotion. We isolated a Pseudomonas bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. G62) from roots of field-grown Arabidopsis plants that has not been described previously and analyzed its effect on plant growth, gene expression and the level of sugars and amino acids in the host plant. Inoculation with Pseudomonas sp. G62 promoted plant growth under various growth conditions. Microarray analysis revealed rapid changes in transcript levels of genes annotated to energy-, sugar- and cell wall metabolism in plants 6 h after root inoculation with P. sp. G62. The expression of several of these genes remained stable over weeks, but appeared differentially regulated in roots and shoots. The global gene expression profile observed after inoculation with P. sp. G62 showed a striking resemblance with previously described carbohydrate starvation experiments, although plants were not depleted from soluble sugars, and even showed a slight increase of the sucrose level in roots 5 weeks after inoculation. We suggest that the starvation-like transcriptional phenotype - while steady state sucrose levels are not reduced - is induced by a yet unknown signal from the bacterium that simulates sugar starvation. We discuss the potential effects of the sugar starvation signal on plant growth promotion. PMID:22216267

  14. Immunohistochemical study of constitutive neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the central nervous system of goat with natural listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Shin, T; Weinstock, D; Castro, M D; Acland, H; Walter, M; Kim, H Y; Purchase, H G

    2000-12-01

    The expression of both constitutive and inducible forms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was investigated by immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections in normal and Listeria monocytogenes-infected brains of goats. In normal control goats, a small number of neurons showed immunoreactivity of both iNOS and nNOS, and the number of iNOS-positive neurons was higher than the number of nNOS-positive neurons. In natural listeriosis, listeria antigens were easily immunostained in the inflammatory cells of microabscesses. In this lesion, the immunoreactivity of iNOS in neurons was more intense than the control, but nNOS was not. In microabscesses, nNOS was weakly visualized in macrophages and neutrophils, while iNOS was expressed in macrophages, but not in neutrophils. These findings suggest that normal caprine brain cells, including neurons, constitutively express iNOS and nNOS, and the expressions of these molecules is increased in Listeria monocytogenes infections. Furthermore, inflammatory cells, including macrophages, expressing both nNOS and iNOS may play important roles in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningoencephalitis in goat.

  15. The nature of the force-induced conformation transition of dsDNA studied by using single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningning; Bu, Tianjia; Song, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jinjing; Zhang, Wenke; Shen, Jiacong; Li, Hongbin

    2010-06-15

    Single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) interact with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) specifically. Taking advantage of this character, we have employed Bacillus subtilis SSB protein to investigate the nature of force-induced conformation transition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by using AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) technique. Our results show that, when a dsDNA is stretched beyond its contour length, the dsDNA is partially melted, producing some ssDNA segments which can be captured by SSB proteins. We have also systematically investigated the effects of stretching length, waiting time, and salt concentration on the conformation transition of dsDNA and SSB-ssDNA interactions, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of proflavine, a DNA intercalator, on the SSB-DNA interactions has been investigated, and the results indicate that the proflavine-saturated dsDNA can be stabilized to the extent that the dsDNA will no longer melt into ssDNA under the mechanical force even up to 150 pN, and no SSB-DNA interactions are detectable.

  16. Long-term corrosion-induced copper runoff from natural and artificial patina and its environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Bertling, Sofia; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall; Kleja, Dan Berggren; Leygraf, Christofer

    2006-03-01

    The overall objective of this paper is to present an extensive set of data for corrosion-induced copper dispersion and its environmental interaction with solid surfaces in the near vicinity of buildings. Copper dispersion is discussed in terms of total copper flows, copper speciation and bioavailability at the immediate release situation, and its changes during transport from source to recipient. Presented results are based on extensive field exposures (eight years) at an urban site, laboratory investigations of the runoff process, published field data, generated predictive site-specific runoff rate models, and reactivity investigations toward various natural and manmade surfaces, such as those in soil, limestone, and concrete. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of copper-containing runoff water with different soil systems through long-term laboratory column investigations. The fate of copper is discussed in terms of copper retention, copper chemical speciation, breakthrough capacities, and future mobilization based on changes in copper concentrations in the percolate water, computer modeling using the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model, and sequential extractions. The results illustrate that, for scenarios where copper comes in extensive contact with solid surfaces, such as soil and limestone, a large fraction of released copper is retained already in the immediate vicinity of the building. In all, both the total copper concentration in runoff water and its bioavailable part undergo a significant and rapid reduction.

  17. Characterization of IFNγ-producing natural killer cells induced by cytomegalovirus reactivation after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Fengyan; Lin, Hai; Gao, Sujun; Wang, Hengxiang; Yan, Hongmin; Guo, Jinglong; Hu, Zheng; Jin, Chunhui; Wang, Yongqi; Wang, Zhidong; Zhao, Yangzhi; Liu, Yu; Zheng, Xiaoli; Tan, Yehui; Li, Wei; Dai, Yun; Yang, Yanping

    2017-01-01

    During human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after umbilical cord blood or HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), a population of NKG2C-expressing natural killer (NK) cells expand and persist. The expanded NK cells express high levels of inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) specific for self-HLA and potently produce IFNγ. However, it remains unknown whether similar events would occur after haploidentical HSCT (haplo-HSCT). Here, we demonstrated that IFNγ-producing NK cells were expanded in haplo-HSCT patients with CMV reactivation. We then identified these expanded cells as a subset of CD56dim NK cells that expressed higher levels of both NKG2C and KIR, but lower level of NKG2A. Functionally, the subset of NK cells expressing NKG2C and self-KIR in patients with CMV reactivation accounted for IFNγ production in response to K562 cells. However, these phenomena were not observed in patients without CMV reactivation. We therefore characterized a subset of NK cells with the CD56dim, NKG2C+, and self-KIR+ phenotype that expanded and were responsible for IFNγ production during CMV infection after haplo-HSCT. Together, these findings support a notion that CMV reactivation induces expansion of more mature NK cells with memory-like features, which contributes to long-term control of both CMV infection and leukemia relapse after haplo-HSCT. PMID:27980216

  18. Investigating untypical seismicity distribution in Upper Silesia hard coal mine - insight into natural, human-induced and coseismic stress changes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowska, Maria; Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Rudziński, Łukasz; Cielesta, Szymon; Mutke, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    The Upper Silesia Coal Basin (USCB) in southern Poland is the place of intense seismicity accompanying coal mining. The exploitation of three longwall panels in one of USCB coal mines held between 2005 and 2010 was accompanied by seismicity characterized by very unusual time-space distribution. The earthquakes did not follow the depth of mining but exhibited changing depths from great below to close to mined seam. What is more, most of the strongest seismic events with ML>2.2 recorded during exploitation of these longwall panels occurred when exploitation had approached the axis of Bytom syncline, local tectonic structure intersecting several mines in Upper Silesia. Strong event's hypocenters were thus at close epicentral distance to both Bytom syncline axis and active mining front but at the great depth below mined seam. Such rather unusual seismicity pattern provided the unique opportunity to study the possible coupling of natural, human-induced and coseismic stresses in longwall coal mining environment. In present study we focused on distribution of seismicity of one of the longwall panels and in particular on the strongest event which occurred during its exploitation, ML3.7 event. The full moment tensor solution of the event showed that it occurred as almost vertical reverse faulting on a northeast-striking plane consistent with approximate strike of Bytom syncline. To evaluate inducing factor of ongoing and past exploitation we performed geomechanical modelling of its influence on strain and stress in the rock mass at the target depth of ML3.7 event. The estimated mining stress changes exhibited changing vertical stress regime which might have promoted failure on preexisting, almost vertical planes of weakness. Also, the amplitude of vertical displacement along the profile at the earthquake's depth was of similar order as the estimated slip on the fault. The earthquakes' rate variation in time showed no increase in activity right after the occurrence of ML3

  19. Natural vs human-induced changes at the Tauranga Harbour area (New Zealand): a time -series acoustic seabed classification comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capperucci, Ruggero Maria; Bartholomä, Alexander; Renken, Sabrina; De Lange, Willem

    2013-04-01

    The Tauranga Harbour Bay (New Zealand) is a mesotidal estuary system, enclosed by the Matakana barrier island. It hosts the leading export port in New Zealand and the second largest import port by value. Coastal changes are well documented over the last decades, mainly at the southern entrance of the area, between Matakana Island and Mt. Maunganui. It is an extremely dynamic environment, where natural processes are strongly influenced by human activities. In particular, the understanding of the recent evolution of the system is crucial for policymakers. In fact, the cumulative impact due to the maintenance of the port (mainly dredging activities, shipping, facilities construction, but also increasing tourism) and its already approved expansion clashes with the claim of the local Maori communities, which recently leaded to a court action. A hydroacoustic multiple-device survey (Side-scan Sonar SSS, Multibeam Echo-sounder MBES and Single Beam Echo-sounder) coupled with sediment sampling was carried out in March 2011 over an area of 0.8 km2, southern Matakana Island, along the Western Channel. The area is not directly impacted by dredging activities, resulting in an optimal testing site for assessing indirect effects of human disturbance on coastal dynamics. The main goals were: 1. To test the response of different acoustic systems in such a highly dynamic environment; 2. To study the influence of dredging activities on sediment dynamics and habitat changes, by means of comparing the current data with existing ones, in order to distinguish between natural and human induced changes Results demonstrate a good agreement between acoustic classifications from different systems. They seem to be mainly driven by the sediment distribution, with a distinctive fingerprint given by shells and shell fragments. Nevertheless, the presence of relevant topographic features (i.e. large bedform fields) influences swath-looking systems (SSS and MBES). SSS and MBES classifications tend

  20. Ghrelin, a natural GH secretagogue produced by the stomach, induces hyperglycemia and reduces insulin secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Broglio, F; Arvat, E; Benso, A; Gottero, C; Muccioli, G; Papotti, M; van der Lely, A J; Deghenghi, R; Ghigo, E

    2001-10-01

    Ghrelin, a 28 amino acid gastric hormone is a natural ligand of the GH Secretagogue (GHS) receptor (GHS-R) and strongly stimulates GH secretion though, like synthetic GHS, it shows other endocrine and non-endocrine activities. Aim of the present study was to clarify whether ghrelin administration influences insulin and glucose levels in humans. To this goal, we compared the effects of ghrelin, hexarelin, a synthetic GHS, or placebo on insulin and glucose as well as on GH levels in 11 normal young volunteers (age [mean +/- SEM]: 28.5 +/- 3.1 yr; BMI: 22.2 +/- 0.9 Kg/m(2)). Ghrelin induced very marked increase in GH secretion (DeltaAUC(0-180): 5777.1 +/- 812.6 microg/l/h; p < 0.01) which was not modified by placebo. Placebo administration did not modify insulin and glucose levels. On the other hand, ghrelin administration induced a prompt increase in glucose levels (DeltaAUC(0-180): 1343.1 +/- 443.5 mg/dl/h; p < 0.01 vs. saline). Absolute glucose levels at +15' were already higher than those at baseline (93.9 +/- 7.1 mg/dl; p < 0.01) and persisted elevated up to 165' (90.3 +/- 5.8 mg/dl; p < 0.01 vs. 0'). Ghrelin administration was also followed by a decrease in serum insulin levels (DeltaAUC(0-180): -207.1 +/- 70.5 mU/l/h; p < 0.05 vs. saline). Absolute insulin levels were significantly reduced from 30' (11.4 +/- 0.9 mU/l, p < 0.1 vs. 0'), showed the nadir at +45' (10.0 +/- 0.6 mU/l, p < 0.01 vs. 0') and then persisted lower (p < 0.01) than baseline up to +105'. Hexarelin administration did not modify glucose and insulin levels despite its marked GH-releasing effect (DeltaAUC(0-180): 4156.8 +/- 1180.3 microg/l/h; p < 0.01 vs. saline) that was slightly lower (p < 0.05) than that of ghrelin. In conclusion, these findings show that, besides stimulating GH secretion, ghrelin is a gastric hormone possessing metabolic actions such as hyperglycemic effect and lowering effect on insulin secretion in humans, at least after acute administration.

  1. Nature of magnetism and magnetic-field-induced transitions in non-collinear antiferromagnet Er2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, V.; Korakakis, D.; Seehra, M. S.

    2014-11-01

    The nature of magnetism in Er2O3 is investigated by detailed studies of the temperature (2-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the magnetization M of powder sample of Er2O3. The results show paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition occurring at TN=3.3 K. For T>TN the magnetic susceptibility vs. temperature data follows the Curie-Weiss (χ=C/(T-θ)) variation with θ=-10.2 K and magnetic moment μ=6.68 μB/Er ion determined from C. Molecular field model is used to determine the nn (nnn) exchange constants J1(J2)=-0.57 K (-3.38 K). The M vs. H data at 2 K analyzed in terms of dM/dH vs. H variations show two field-induced transitions, the first one at HSF≃15 kOe and the second one at HS≃31 kOe. Arguments and analysis are presented to show that HSF represents the spin-flop transition whereas for H>HS, the system is field-aligned ferromagnetically since the calculated value of HS for ferromagnetic ordering using the above magnitudes of J1 and J2 agrees well with the experimental HS. The temperature dependence of HSF is shown to follow the normalized Brillouin function variation for spin S=1/2 valid for Er2O3. The magnetic field dependence of TN is measured and shown to follow the equation: TN(H)=TN(0)-D1H2, expected for antiferromagnets.

  2. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of canine distemper virus-induced footpad hyperkeratosis (hard Pad disease) in dogs with natural canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, A F; Baumgärtner, W; Tontis, D; Polizopoulou, Z; Saridomichelakis, M N; Lekkas, S

    2004-01-01

    Hard pad disease represents an uncommon manifestation of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection with a still uncertain pathogenesis. To study the pathogenesis of this uncommon, virally induced cutaneous lesion, the footpads of 19 dogs with naturally occurring distemper were investigated for histologic changes and distribution pattern of CDV antigen. All dogs displayed clinical signs of distemper, which had lasted from 10 to 75 days. Overt digital hyperkeratosis was observed in 12 animals (group A), whereas the footpads of the remaining seven dogs appeared normal macroscopically (group B). Orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis (12/12; 100%), irregular acanthosis (11/12; 92%), thickened rete ridges (10/12; 83%), and mild mononuclear perivascular (10/ 12; 83%) and periadnexal (7/12; 58%) dermatitis were the most common findings in dogs with hard pad disease. Surprisingly, orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis (5/7; 71%), irregular acanthosis (5/7; 71%), and thickened rete ridges (4/7; 57%) were also seen in the dogs without clinical evidence of digital hyperkeratosis. CDV-specific inclusion bodies and ballooning degeneration were not observed in the footpad epidermis of the 19 dogs. Immunohis-tochemistry revealed that CDV antigen was most frequently found in the stratum spinosum and granulosum and in the epithelial cells of the eccrine sweat glands and only rarely in the basal layer. Fibroblasts, pericytes, endothelial cells, and hair follicles were also positive in some animals. Despite the obvious difference regarding the macroscopic picture, the microscopic changes were less prominent between the animal groups. The selective infection of keratinocytes in the stratum spinosum might be the key event for the development of hard pad disease in the dog.

  3. Effects of manganese, calcium, magnesium and zinc on nickel-induced suppression of murine natural killer cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Rogers, R.R.; Riddle, M.M.; Luebke, R.W.; Fogelson, L.D.; Rowe, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The effects that divalent metals have on nickel-induced suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity were studied in mice. Male CBA/J mice were given a single intramuscular injection of the following: nickel chloride, 4.5-36 ..mu..g/g; manganese chloride, 20-80 ..mu..g/g; magnesium acetate, 50-200 ..mu..g/g; zinc acetate, 2-8 ..mu..g/g; or calcium acetate, 12.5-50 ..mu..g/g. Twenty-four hours after metal injection, splenic NK cell activity was assessed using a /sup 51/Cr-release assay. Ni significantly suppressed NK activity, while Mn significantly enhanced NK activity. No alteration in NK activity was observed in mice injected with Mg, Ca, or Zn. The injection of Ni and Mn in combination at a single site resulted in the enhancement of NK activity, although this enhancement was at a level below that observed following the injection of Mn alone. Injection of Mg, Zn, or Ca in combination with Ni did not affect NK activity compared to saline controls. In contrast, the injection of Ni in one thigh followed immediately by Mn, Mg, Ca, or Zn into the other thigh resulted in significant suppression of NK activity for all metals compared with saline controls. An interesting finding was that the injection of Ni followed immediately by Mn into the opposite thigh resulted in even greater reduction in NK activity than Ni alone. Suppression of NK activity by Ni and Mn injected at separate sites was not seen when Mn injection preceded Ni injection by 1 h.

  4. Protective effects of a natural product, curcumin, against amyloid β induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catharine; Mitchell, Andrew; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the protective effects of a natural product-'curcumin'- in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neurons. Although much research has been done in AD, very little has been reported on the effects of curcumin on mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, function and synaptic activities. Therefore, the present study investigated the protective effects against amyloid β (Aβ) induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities. Using human neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cells, curcumin and Aβ, we studied the protective effects of curcumin against Aβ. Further, we also studied preventive (curcumin+Aβ) and intervention (Aβ+curcumin) effects of curcumin against Aβ in SHSY5Y cells. Using real time RT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analysis, we measured mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial biogenesis and synaptic genes. We also assessed mitochondrial function by measuring hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome oxidase activity and mitochondrial ATP. Cell viability was studied using the MTT assay. Aβ was found to impair mitochondrial dynamics, reduce mitochondrial biogenesis and decrease synaptic activity and mitochondrial function. In contrast, curcumin enhanced mitochondrial fusion activity and reduced fission machinery, and increased biogenesis and synaptic proteins. Mitochondrial function and cell viability were elevated in curcumin treated cells. Interestingly, curcumin pre- and post-treated cells incubated with Aβ showed reduced mitochondrial dysfunction, and maintained cell viability and mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial biogenesis and synaptic activity. Further, the protective effects of curcumin were stronger in pretreated SHSY5Y cells than in post-treated cells, indicating that curcumin works better in prevention than treatment in AD-like neurons. Our findings suggest that curcumin is a promising drug molecule to treat AD patients.

  5. Grazing-induced effects on soil properties modify plant competitive interactions in semi-natural mountain grasslands.

    PubMed

    Medina-Roldán, Eduardo; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Bardgett, Richard D

    2012-09-01

    Plant-soil feedbacks are widely recognized as playing a significant role in structuring plant communities through their effects on plant-plant interactions. However, the question of whether plant-soil feedbacks can be indirectly driven by other ecological agents, such as large herbivores, which are known to strongly modify plant community structure and soil properties, remains poorly explored. We tested in a glasshouse experiment how changes in soil properties resulting from long-term sheep grazing affect competitive interactions (intra- and inter-specific) of two graminoid species: Nardus stricta, which is typically abundant under high sheep grazing pressure in British mountain grasslands; and Eriophorum vaginatum, whose abundance is typically diminished under grazing. Both species were grown in monocultures and mixtures at different densities in soils taken from adjacent grazed and ungrazed mountain grassland in the Yorkshire Dales, northern England. Nardus stricta performed better (shoot and root biomass) when grown in grazing-conditioned soil, independent of whether or not it grew under inter-specific competition. Eriophorum vaginatum also grew better when planted in soil from the grazed site, but this occurred only when it did not experience inter-specific competition with N. stricta. This indicates that plant-soil feedback for E. vaginatum is dependent on the presence of an inter-specific competitor. A yield density model showed that indirect effects of grazing increased the intensity of intra-specific competition in both species in comparison with ungrazed-conditioned soil. However, indirect effects of grazing on the intensity of inter-specific competition were species-specific favouring N. stricta. We explain these asymmetric grazing-induced effects on competition on the basis of traits of the superior competitor and grazing effects on soil nutrients. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our findings for plant community dynamics in grazed, semi-natural

  6. Protective effects of a natural product, curcumin, against amyloid β induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catharine; Mitchell, Andrew; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the protective effects of a natural product—‘curcumin’— in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neurons. Although much research has been done in AD, very little has been reported on the effects of curcumin on mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, function and synaptic activities. Therefore, the present study investigated the protective effects against amyloid β (Aβ) induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities. Using human neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cells, curcumin and Aβ, we studied the protective effects of curcumin against Aβ. Further, we also studied preventive (curcumin+Aβ) and intervention (Aβ+curcumin) effects of curcumin against Aβ in SHSY5Y cells. Using real time RT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analysis, we measured mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial biogenesis and synaptic genes. We also assessed mitochondrial function by measuring hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome oxidase activity and mitochondrial ATP. Cell viability was studied using the MTT assay. Aβ was found to impair mitochondrial dynamics, reduce mitochondrial biogenesis and decrease synaptic activity and mitochondrial function. In contrast, curcumin enhanced mitochondrial fusion activity and reduced fission machinery, and increased biogenesis and synaptic proteins. Mitochondrial function and cell viability were elevated in curcumin treated cells. Interestingly, curcumin pre- and post-treated cells incubated with Aβ showed reduced mitochondrial dysfunction, and maintained cell viability and mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial biogenesis and synaptic activity. Further, the protective effects of curcumin were stronger in pretreated SHSY5Y cells than in post-treated cells, indicating that curcumin works better in prevention than treatment in AD-like neurons. Our findings suggest that curcumin is a promising drug molecule to treat AD patients. PMID:27521081

  7. A single dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cellular response similar to that induced by a natural infection.

    PubMed

    Melgaço, Juliana Gil; Morgado, Lucas Nóbrega; Santiago, Marta Almeida; Oliveira, Jaqueline Mendes de; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Hasselmann, Bárbara; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Vitral, Claudia Lamarca

    2015-07-31

    Based on current studies on the effects of single dose vaccines on antibody production, Latin American countries have adopted a single dose vaccine program. However, no data are available on the activation of cellular response to a single dose of hepatitis A. Our study investigated the functional reactivity of the memory cell phenotype after hepatitis A virus (HAV) stimulation through administration of the first or second dose of HAV vaccine and compared the response to that of a baseline group to an initial natural infection. Proliferation assays showed that the first vaccine dose induced HAV-specific cellular response; this response was similar to that induced by a second dose or an initial natural infection. Thus, from the first dose to the second dose, increase in the frequencies of classical memory B cells, TCD8 cells, and central memory TCD4 and TCD8 cells were observed. Regarding cytokine production, increased IL-6, IL-10, TNF, and IFNγ levels were observed after vaccination. Our findings suggest that a single dose of HAV vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cell response similar to that induced by a natural infection. The HAV-specific T cell immunity induced by primary vaccination persisted independently of the protective plasma antibody level. In addition, our results suggest that a single dose immunization system could serve as an alternative strategy for the prevention of hepatitis A in developing countries.

  8. Cluster Model for Near-barrier Fusion Induced by Weakly Bound and Halo Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Keeley, N.

    2008-05-12

    The influence on the fusion process of coupling transfer/breakup channels is investigated for the medium weight {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 59}Co systems in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. Coupling effects are discussed within a comparison of predictions of the Continuum Discretized Coupled-Channels model. Applications to {sup 6}He+{sup 59}Co induced by the borromean halo nucleus {sup 6}He are also proposed.

  9. Aromatase inhibitors block natural sex change and induce male function in the protandrous black porgy, Acanthopagrus schlegeli Bleeker: possible mechanism of natural sex change.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yan-Horn; Yueh, Wen-Shiun; Du, Jin-Lien; Sun, Lian-Tien; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2002-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effects of oral administration of aromatase inhibitors on sex change, milt volume, 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), and LH in plasma; aromatase activity in gonad, pituitary, and brain in the protandrous fish, black porgy (Acanthopagus schlegeli Bleeker). Two-year-old functional male black porgy were divided into two groups; one was fed a control diet and the other was fed a diet mixed with aromatase inhibitors (AIs; fadrozole and 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione, each 10 mg/kg feed) for 8.5 mo. A significantly higher gonadosomatic index was observed in the AI group. Fish treated with AIs showed complete suppression of natural sex change. Significantly higher levels of plasma 11-KT, LH, and milt volume were shown in the AI group than the controls. Lower aromatase activity in the gonad, pituitary, forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain in concordance with the suppression of sex change was observed in the AI group. The data show that aromatase is directly involved in the mechanism of natural sex change of protandrous black porgy. AIs also enhanced male function in concordance with the elevated plasma levels of 11-KT and spermiation in milt volume.

  10. Immunological detection of UV induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts in DNA from reference bacteria and natural aquatic populations.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Stephanie; Stephanie, Kraft; Obst, Ursula; Ursula, Obst; Schwartz, Thomas; Thomas, Schwartz

    2011-03-01

    UV light-caused DNA damage is a widespread field of study. As UV light has the biological effect of inactivating or killing bacteria, it is used for water disinfection. Due to this application, it is important to study the DNA damage efficiencies and regeneration capacities in bacteria after UV irradiation. Two monoclonal antibodies, anti-CPD and anti-(6-4) PP, were applied for an immunoassay of UV-induced DNA modifications. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and 6-4 photoproduct (6-4 PP) were detected in the reference bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecium, and in natural water communities. The antibody-mediated detection signals increased with the UV doses from 100-400J/m(2). Here, the CPD-specific signals were stronger than the (6-4) PP-specific signals. These immunological results were in accordance with parallel cultivation experiments. All UV-irradiated bacteria showed a reduction of their growth rate depending on UV application by several orders of magnitudes. The immunoassay was also applied to three types of natural aquatic habitats with different cell densities. Besides artificial UV irradiation, it was possible to visualize natural sunlight effects on these natural bacterial communities. Light-dependent and dark repair processes were distinguished using the established immunological assays. The antibody-mediated analyses presented are fast methods to detect UV-induced DNA lesions and repair capacities in selected bacterial species as well as in entire natural mixed populations.

  11. Spontaneous and induced radiation by electrons/positrons in natural and photonic crystals. Volume free electron lasers (VFELs): From microwave and optical to X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous and induced radiation produced by relativistic particles passing through natural and photonic crystals has enhanced capabilities for achieving the radiation sources operating in different wavelength ranges. Use of a non-one-dimensional distributed feedback, arising through Bragg diffraction in spatially periodic systems (natural and artificial (electromagnetic, photonic) crystals), establishes the foundation for the development of volume free electron lasers/masers (VFELs/VFEMs) as well as high-energy charged particle accelerators. The analysis of basic principles of VFEL theory demonstrates the promising potential of VFELs as the basis for the development of high-power microwave and optical sources.

  12. Application of a pore-scale reactive transport model to a natural analog for reaction-induced pore alterations

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Major, Jonathan; Dewers, Thomas; ...

    2017-01-05

    Dissolved CO2 in the subsurface resulting from geological CO2 storage may react with minerals in fractured rocks, confined aquifers, or faults, resulting in mineral precipitation and dissolution. The overall rate of reaction can be affected by coupled processes including hydrodynamics, transport, and reactions at the (sub) pore-scale. In this work pore-scale modeling of coupled fluid flow, reactive transport, and heterogeneous reactions at the mineral surface is applied to account for permeability alterations caused by precipitation-induced pore-blocking. This paper is motivated by observations of CO2 seeps from a natural CO2 sequestration analog, Crystal Geyser, Utah. Observations along the surface exposure ofmore » the Little Grand Wash fault indicate the lateral migration of CO2 seep sites (i.e., alteration zones) of 10–50 m width with spacing on the order of ~100 m over time. Sandstone permeability in alteration zones is reduced by 3–4 orders of magnitude by carbonate cementation compared to unaltered zones. One granular porous medium and one fracture network systems are used to conceptually represent permeable porous media and locations of conduits controlled by fault-segment intersections and/or topography, respectively. Simulation cases accounted for a range of reaction regimes characterized by the Damköhler (Da) and Peclet (Pe) numbers. Pore-scale simulation results demonstrate that combinations of transport (Pe), geochemical conditions (Da), solution chemistry, and pore and fracture configurations contributed to match key patterns observed in the field of how calcite precipitation alters flow paths by pore plugging. This comparison of simulation results with field observations reveals mechanistic explanations of the lateral migration and enhances our understanding of subsurface processes associated with the CO2 injection. In addition, permeability and porosity relations are constructed from pore-scale simulations which account for a range of

  13. Adaptation mechanisms of bacteria during the degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls in the presence of natural and synthetic terpenes as potential degradation inducers.

    PubMed

    Zorádová-Murínová, Slavomíra; Dudášová, Hana; Lukáčová, Lucia; Certík, Milan; Silharová, Katarína; Vrana, Branislav; Dercová, Katarína

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the presence of natural and synthetic terpenes and biphenyl on biomass production, lipid accumulation, and membrane adaptation mechanisms of two PCB-degrading bacterial strains Pseudomonas stutzeri and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400. According to the results obtained, it could be concluded that natural terpenes, mainly those contained in ivy leaves and pine needles, decreased adaptation responses induced by PCBs in these strains. The adaptation processes under investigation included growth inhibition, lipid accumulation, composition of fatty acids, cis/trans isomerization, and membrane saturation. Growth inhibition effect decreased upon addition of these natural compounds to the medium. The amount of unsaturated fatty acids that can lead to elevated membrane fluidity increased in both strains after the addition of the two natural terpene sources. The cells adaptation changes were more prominent in the presence of carvone, limonene, and biphenyl than in the presence of natural terpenes, as indicated by growth inhibition, lipid accumulation, and cis/trans isomerization. Addition of biphenyl and carvone simultaneously with PCBs increased the trans/cis ratio of fatty acids in membrane fractions probably as a result of fluidizing effects of PCBs. This stimulation is more pronounced in the presence of PCBs as a sole carbon source. This suggests that PCBs alone have a stronger effect on bacterial membrane adaptation mechanisms than when added together with biphenyl or natural or synthetic terpenes.

  14. Analysis of natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments using laser induced breakdown and pulsed Raman spectroscopy, statistical analysis and light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osticioli, I.; Mendes, N. F. C.; Nevin, A.; Gil, Francisco P. S. C.; Becucci, M.; Castellucci, E.

    2009-08-01

    Pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy were performed using a novel laboratory setup employing the same Nd:YAG laser emission at 532 nm for the analysis of five commercially available pigments collectively known as "ultramarine blue", a sodium silicate material of either mineral origin or an artificially produced glass. LIBS and Raman spectroscopy have provided information regarding the elemental and molecular composition of the samples; additionally, an analytical protocol for the differentiation between natural (lapis lazuli) and artificial ultramarine blue pigments is proposed. In particular LIBS analysis has allowed the discrimination between pigments on the basis of peaks ascribed to calcium. The presence of calcite in the natural blue pigments has been confirmed following Raman spectroscopy in specific areas of the samples, and micro-Raman and optical microscopy have further corroborated the presence of calcite inclusions in the samples of natural origin. Finally multivariate analysis of Laser induced breakdown spectra using principal component analysis (PCA) further enhanced the differentiation between natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments.

  15. Analysis of natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments using laser induced breakdown and pulsed Raman spectroscopy, statistical analysis and light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Osticioli, I; Mendes, N F C; Nevin, A; Gil, Francisco P S C; Becucci, M; Castellucci, E

    2009-08-01

    Pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy were performed using a novel laboratory setup employing the same Nd:YAG laser emission at 532 nm for the analysis of five commercially available pigments collectively known as "ultramarine blue", a sodium silicate material of either mineral origin or an artificially produced glass. LIBS and Raman spectroscopy have provided information regarding the elemental and molecular composition of the samples; additionally, an analytical protocol for the differentiation between natural (lapis lazuli) and artificial ultramarine blue pigments is proposed. In particular LIBS analysis has allowed the discrimination between pigments on the basis of peaks ascribed to calcium. The presence of calcite in the natural blue pigments has been confirmed following Raman spectroscopy in specific areas of the samples, and micro-Raman and optical microscopy have further corroborated the presence of calcite inclusions in the samples of natural origin. Finally multivariate analysis of Laser induced breakdown spectra using principal component analysis (PCA) further enhanced the differentiation between natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments.

  16. A modified live PRRSV vaccine and the pathogenic parent strain induce regulatory T cells in pigs naturally infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    LeRoith, T; Hammond, S; Todd, S M; Ni, Y; Cecere, T; Pelzer, K D

    2011-04-15

    The lack of heterologous protection by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccines is currently a major problem in the field. Heterologous protection by PRRS vaccines depends on the ability of the vaccine to induce an interferon gamma (IFN-γ) response. One mechanism by which the virus evades the immune system is by activating regulatory T cells (T(regs)), resulting in induction of interleukin 10 rather than IFN-γ. Our hypothesis that current PRRS vaccines do not differ from pathogenic strains in the ability to induce T(regs) was tested by inoculating three groups of pigs with two pathogenic viruses and an attenuated vaccine strain and evaluating the number of T(regs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Before inoculation, the pigs, although vaccinated became infected naturally with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae before shipment to our research facility. Our results show that the PRRSV vaccine strain and parent strain are equally able to induce T(regs) in pigs naturally infected with M. hyopneumoniae. Pigs in the vaccine and PRRSV groups had higher lung lesion scores than pigs in the control groups. The results suggest that the exacerbation M. hyopneumoniae respiratory disease may be due to the ability of PRRSV vaccination and viral infection to induce regulatory T cells.

  17. Airborne simultaneous spectroscopic detection of laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence from chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The airborne laser-induced spectral emission bands obtained simultaneously from water Raman backscatter and the fluorescence of chlorophyll and other naturally occurring waterborne pigments are reported here for the first time. The importance of this type data lies not only in its single-shot multispectral character but also in the application of the Raman line for correction or calibration of the spatial variation of the laser penetration depth without the need for in situ water attenuation measurements. The entire laser-induced fluorescence and Raman scatter emissions resulting from each separate 532-nm 10-nsec laser pulse are collected and spectrally dispersed in a diffraction grating spectrometer having forty photomultiplier tube detectors. Results from field experiments conducted in the North Sea and the Chesapeake Bay/Potomac River are presented. Difficulties involving the multispectral resolution of the induced emissions are addressed, and feasible solutions are suggested together with new instrument configurations and future research directions.

  18. The natural flavonoid galangin inhibits osteoclastic bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NF-κB in collagen-induced arthritis and bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeong-Eun; Jung, In-Tae; Choi, Junyoung; Baek, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Dong; Park, Dong-Suk; Choi, Do-Young

    2013-01-05

    We investigated the effect of galangin, a natural flavonoid, on osteoclastic bone destruction in collagen-induced arthritis and examined the molecular mechanisms by which galangin affects osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow derived macrophages. In mice with collagen-induced arthritis, administration of galangin significantly reduced the arthritis clinical score, edema and severity of disease without toxicity. Interestingly, galangin treatment during a later stage of collagen-induced arthritis, using mice with a higher clinical arthritis score, still significantly slowed the progression of the disease. Extensive cartilage and bone erosive changes as well as synovial inflammation, synovial hyperplasia and pannus formation were dramatically inhibited in arthritic mice treated with galangin. Furthermore, galangin-treated arthritic mice showed a significant reduction in the concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-17. We found that galangin inhibited osteoclastogenic factors and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived macrophages and osteoblast co-cultured cells, and increased osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels in osteoblasts. Galangin and NF-κB siRNA suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of the c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but not AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Also, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and p38 inhibitor SB203580 reduced RANKL-induced expressions of phospho-c-Jun, c-fos and NFATc1 genes during osteoclast development. In addition, galangin suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB, phospho-IκBα, inflammatory cytokines and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Our data suggest that galangin prevented osteoclastic bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis in osteoclast precursors as well as in collagen-induced arthritis mice without toxicity via attenuation of RANKL-induced activation of JNK, p38 and NF-κB pathways.

  19. PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS OF ATRAZINE-INDUCED EFFECTS UPON GONADAL DIFFERENTIATION IN RIVULUS MARMORATUS, A NATURALLY HERMAPHRODITIC FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The commonly used agricultural herbicide atrazine has been recognized as an endocrine disrupting chemical. In amphibians and reptiles, atrazine has been reported to alter sexual differentiation and induce secondary sexual characteristics that have been attributed to enhanced arom...

  20. Chronic cocaine administration induces long-term impairment in the drive to obtain natural reinforcers in high- but not low-demanding tasks.

    PubMed

    Barnea-Ygael, Noam; Gal, Ram; Zangen, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    Repeated drug exposure induces short- and long-term neuroadaptations in brain reward circuitries that are normally involved in the regulation of motivation. Hence, repeated drug exposure has been suggested to also affect the drive to acquire natural reinforcers. Here, we tested how chronic exposure of rats to cocaine, as well as a subsequent withdrawal period, affects acquisition of natural reinforcers in high- and low-demanding tasks (HD and LD tasks, respectively). We chronically administered cocaine (i.p., 15 mg/kg once daily, or saline in control) for 30 days, followed by a 30-day withdrawal period. We tested the effect of this treatment on the acquisition of two natural appetitive reinforcers, namely self-administering a 10% sucrose solution and mounting a receptive female, under LD and HD conditions. During the cocaine exposure period, behavioral testing took place 18 hours after cocaine injection, namely after the acute pharmacologic effect of the drug dissipated. We show that chronic i.p. cocaine exposure decreased procurement of both reinforcers in HD but not in LD tasks. The effect was observed throughout the administration period with partial recovery after withdrawal. Taken together, we present empirical evidence that chronic exposure to a constant dose of cocaine is sufficient to reduce natural reinforcement, and that this decrease can outlast drug exposure. Importantly, such effects are observed only when high demands are opposing the consumption of the natural reinforcer.

  1. Protective Capacity of Resveratrol, a Natural Polyphenolic Compound, against Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ka-Ho; Wan, Murphy Lam Yim; El-Nezami, Hani; Wang, Mingfu

    2016-05-16

    Contamination of food/feedstuffs by mycotoxins is a serious problem worldwide, causing severe economic losses and serious health problems in animals/humans. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin contaminant and is known to impair intestinal barrier function. Grapes and red wine are rich in polyphenols, such as resveratrol (RES), which has striking antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. RES is a food-derived component; therefore, it may be simultaneously present with DON in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to explore in vitro protective effects of RES against DON-induced intestinal damage. The results showed that RES could protect DON-induced bacteria translocation because of enhanced of intestinal barrier function by restoring the DON-induced decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that RES protects against DON-induced barrier dysfunction by promoting the assembly of claudin-4 in the tight junction complex. This is probably mediated through modulation of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways. Our results imply that RES can protect against DON-induced intestinal damage and that RES may be used as a novel dietary intervention strategy to reduce DON toxicity in animals/humans.

  2. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  3. Naturally occurring CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells are an essential, IL-10-independent part of the immunoregulatory network in Schistosoma mansoni egg-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Martin; Tompkins, Fae; Leng, Jin; Hesse, Matthias

    2006-05-01

    In acute and chronic schistosomiasis, survival of the host requires a carefully balanced immune response against highly immunogenic parasite eggs. We characterized the phenotype, distribution, and functional role of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) naturally occurring regulatory T cells (naTregs) in schistosome egg-induced inflammation. In adoptive transfer experiments and by intracellular staining for Foxp3, we demonstrate significant frequencies of naTregs in hepatic granulomas and draining lymphoid tissues of mice infected with the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. Strikingly, egg-induced inflammation does not change the normal ratio between naTregs and effector CD4(+) T cells at the inflammatory site or in lymphoid organs in acute or chronic disease. However, increasing frequencies of CD103-expressing cells in the naTreg compartment indicate a change in phenotype for naTregs with disease progression. Because CD103 was described recently as an activation marker for naTregs, we speculate that naTregs in chronic schistosomiasis are potentially more suppressive. Furthermore, we found that most naTregs do not contribute to egg-induced IL-4 and IL-10 production. Importantly, depletion of CD25(+) naTregs strongly enhances the frequency of IL-4-producing effector T cells in acute egg-induced inflammation. It does not change clonal expansion of activated CD4(+) T cells. This regulation of egg-induced cytokine production does not require the presence of IL-10. These data demonstrate that naTregs limit egg-induced effector-cytokine production in our model. Our results identify naTregs as an important, IL-10-independent part of the regulatory network in schistosome egg-induced inflammation.

  4. Synthesis of 0.3Li2MnO3·0.7LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials using 3-D urchin-like MnO2 as precursor for high performance lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenhao; Hu, Zhibiao; Zhou, Yunlong; Fang, Shuzhen; Cai, Shaohan

    2015-02-01

    In the paper, we report synthesis of lithium rich layered oxide 0.3Li2MnO3·0.7LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 by using an urchin-like MnO2 as precursor. The influences of calcination temperatures on the structures and electrochemical performances of as-prepared materials are systematically studied. The results show that the obtained sample can partially retain the morphology of urchin-like precursor especially at low temperature, and a higher calcination temperature helps to improve the layered structure and particle size. As lithium ion battery cathodes, the 750 °C sample with the size of 100-200 nm reveals an optimal electrochemical performance. The initial discharge capacity of 234.6 mAh g-1 with high Coulombic efficiency of 84.6 % can be reached at 0.1C within 2.0-4.7 V. After 50 cycles, the capacity retention can reach 90.2 % at 0.5C. Even at high current density of 5C, the sample also shows a stable discharge capacity of 120.5 mAh g-1. Anyways, the urchin-like MnO2 directed route is suitable to prepare 0.3Li2MnO3·0.7LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 as lithium ion battery cathode.

  5. A detailed view of the injection-induced seismicity in a natural gas reservoir in Zigong, southwestern Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xinglin; Ma, Shengli; Chen, Wenkang; Pang, Chunmei; Zeng, Jie; Jiang, Bing

    2013-08-01

    at a gas reservoir located in the relatively stable Sichuan Basin, China, mirrors the injection pressure of unwanted water, suggesting that the seismicity is injection induced. Injection under high pressure on a routine basis began on 9 January 2009 and continued to July 2011. During the injection period, over 120,000 m3 of water was pumped under a wellhead pressure of up to 6.2 MPa into the limestone formation of Permian 2.45 to 2.55 km beneath the surface. The injection induced more than 7000 surface-recorded earthquakes, including 2 M4+ (the largest one was ML4.4), 20 M3+, and more than 100 M2+ events. Data observed by a nearby local seismic network and five temporal stations provide a detailed view of the spatiotemporal distribution of the induced earthquakes. Most events were limited to depths ranging from 2.5 to 4 km, which is consistent with the limestone formation of Permian. In a map view, hypocenters are concentrated in a NNW extended ellipsoidal zone approximately 6 km long and approximately 2 km wide centered approximately at the injection well. Multisources of evidence such as the shear mechanism, pattern of hypocenter distribution, and small elevated pore pressure as compared with the least principal stress in the region show that the induced earthquakes occurred as a result of lowering of the effective normal stress on known or unknown preexisting blind faults which are critically loaded under the regional stress field. Epidemic-type aftershock sequence modeling results indicate that injection inducing and earthquake triggering are both important during earlier periods of injection, while later periods are dominated by forced (injection-induced) seismicity.

  6. Unraveling the nature of electric field- and stress- induced structural transformations in soft PZT by a new powder poling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyani, Ajay Kumar; V, Lalitha K.; James, Ajit R.; Fitch, Andy; Ranjan, Rajeev

    2015-02-01

    A ‘powder-poling’ technique was developed to study electric field induced structural transformations in ferroelectrics exhibiting a morphotropic phase boundary (MPB). The technique was employed on soft PZT exhibiting a large longitudinal piezoelectric response (d33 ˜ 650 pC N-1). It was found that electric poling brings about a considerable degree of irreversible tetragonal to monoclinic transformation. The same transformation was achieved after subjecting the specimen to mechanical stress, which suggests an equivalence of stress and electric field with regard to the structural mechanism in MPB compositions. The electric field induced structural transformation was also found to be accompanied by a decrease in the spatial coherence of polarization.

  7. Unraveling the nature of electric field- and stress- induced structural transformations in soft PZT by a new powder poling technique.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, Ajay Kumar; V, Lalitha K; James, Ajit R; Fitch, Andy; Ranjan, Rajeev

    2015-02-25

    A 'powder-poling' technique was developed to study electric field induced structural transformations in ferroelectrics exhibiting a morphotropic phase boundary (MPB). The technique was employed on soft PZT exhibiting a large longitudinal piezoelectric response (d(33) ∼ 650 pC N(-1)). It was found that electric poling brings about a considerable degree of irreversible tetragonal to monoclinic transformation. The same transformation was achieved after subjecting the specimen to mechanical stress, which suggests an equivalence of stress and electric field with regard to the structural mechanism in MPB compositions. The electric field induced structural transformation was also found to be accompanied by a decrease in the spatial coherence of polarization.

  8. Ankaflavin: a natural novel PPARγ agonist upregulates Nrf2 to attenuate methylglyoxal-induced diabetes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Hong; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Chang, Yu-Ying; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2012-12-01

    Ankaflavin (AK) is an active compound having anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, antiatherosclerotic, and hypolipidemic effects. We have previously reported that AK acts as an antioxidant and antidiabetic drug; however, the mechanism by which AK prevents diabetes remains unknown. Hyperglycemia is associated with protein glycation, which produces advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Methylglyoxal (MG)-a metabolite of carbohydrates-is believed to cause insulin resistance by inducing inflammation and pancreas damage. In this work, diabetes was induced in Wistar rats (4 weeks of age) by treating them with MG (600 mg/kg bw) for 4 weeks. We observed that AK (10mg/kg bw) exerted peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonist activity, thereby enhancing insulin sensitivity (as indicated by hepatic GLUT2 translocation, PTP1B suppression, and glucose uptake) by downregulating blood glucose and upregulating pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 and Maf-A expression and increasing insulin production in MG-induced rats. However, these effects were abolished by the administration of GW9662 (PPARγ antagonist), but the expression of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) was not suppressed in MG-induced rats. Therefore, the nuclear factor erythroid-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activation was investigated. AK did not affect hepatic Nrf2 mRNA or protein expression but significantly increased Nrf2 phosphorylation (serine 40), which was accompanied by increased transcriptional activation of hepatic HO-1 and GCL. These data indicated that AK protected rats from oxidative stress resulting from MG-induced insulin resistance. In contrast, these effects were not detected when the rats were treated with the antidiabetic drug rosiglitazone (10mg/kg bw). Moreover, we found that AK did not inhibit the generation of AGEs in vitro; however, the glutathione (GSH) levels in liver and pancreas of MG-induced rats were elevated in rats administered AK. Therefore

  9. Frequency and nature of specific-locus mutations induced in female mice by radiations and chemicals: a review.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Russell, W L

    1992-12-01

    The inducibility of heritable mutations in female mammals has been measured in the mouse specific-locus test (SLT). For radiation-induced mutations, a large body of data has been accumulated that includes information about biological and physical factors that influence mutation yields. However, relatively few SLT studies in females have been conducted with chemicals to date. A single estimate of the spontaneous mutation rate in oocytes, 6/536,207, has been derived as the most appropriate one to subtract from experimental rates. This rate is highly significantly below the spontaneous mutation rate in males. Mutations recovered from females mutagenized at any time after about the 12th day post-conception are induced in non-dividing cells. In adult females, most oocytes are arrested in small follicles; maturation from this stage to ovulation takes several weeks. High-dose-rate radiations are more mutagenic in mature and maturing oocytes than in spermatogonia of the male; on the other hand, no clearly induced mutations have been recovered from irradiated arrested oocytes. Efficient repair processes have been invoked to explain the latter finding as well as the upward-curving dose-effect relation for acute irradiation, and the fact that dose protraction drastically reduces mutation yield from mature and maturing oocytes. The dose-protraction effect is much greater than that found in spermatogonia. Radiation-induced mutation rates in embryonic, fetal, and newborn females are overall lower than those in the mature and maturing oocytes of adults. A dose-protraction effect has also been demonstrated at an early developmental stage when the nuclear morphology of mouse oocytes most resembles that of the human. Of only 5 chemicals so far explored for their effect in oocytes, 2 (ethylnitrosourea, ENU, and triethylenemelamine, TEM), and possibly a third (procarbazine hydrochloride, PRC), are mutagenic--with at least one of these (ENU) mutagenic in arrested as well as maturing

  10. Climate-driven increase of natural wetland methane emissions offset by human-induced wetland reduction in China over the past three decades

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Liu, Jinxun; Jiang, Hong; Fang, Xiuqin; Chen, Huai; Niu, Zhenguo; Gong, Peng; Lin, Guanghui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Han; Yang, Yanzheng; Chang, Jie; Ge, Ying; Xiang, Wenhua; Deng, Xiangwen; He, Jin-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Both anthropogenic activities and climate change can affect the biogeochemical processes of natural wetland methanogenesis. Quantifying possible impacts of changing climate and wetland area on wetland methane (CH4) emissions in China is important for improving our knowledge on CH4 budgets locally and globally. However, their respective and combined effects are uncertain. We incorporated changes in wetland area derived from remote sensing into a dynamic CH4 model to quantify the human and climate change induced contributions to natural wetland CH4 emissions in China over the past three decades. Here we found that human-induced wetland loss contributed 34.3% to the CH4 emissions reduction (0.92 TgCH4), and climate change contributed 20.4% to the CH4 emissions increase (0.31 TgCH4), suggesting that decreasing CH4 emissions due to human-induced wetland reductions has offset the increasing climate-driven CH4 emissions. With climate change only, temperature was a dominant controlling factor for wetland CH4 emissions in the northeast (high latitude) and Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (high altitude) regions, whereas precipitation had a considerable influence in relative arid north China. The inevitable uncertainties caused by the asynchronous for different regions or periods due to inter-annual or seasonal variations among remote sensing images should be considered in the wetland CH4 emissions estimation. PMID:27892535

  11. Novel PPAR-gamma agonists identified from a natural product library: a virtual screening, induced-fit docking and biological assay study.

    PubMed

    Salam, Noeris K; Huang, Tom H-W; Kota, Bhavani P; Kim, Moon S; Li, Yuhao; Hibbs, David E

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) plays an essential role in lipid and glucose homeostasis. It is recognized as the receptor of the thiazolidinediones-a synthetic class of anti-diabetic drugs-and is the target of many drug discovery efforts because of its role in disease states, such as type II diabetes mellitus. In this study, structure-based virtual screening of the PPAR-gamma ligand binding domain against a natural product library has revealed 29 potential agonists. In vitro testing of this list identified six flavonoids to have stimulated PPAR-gamma transcriptional activity in a transcriptional factor assay. Of these, flavonoid-psi-baptigenin-was classed as the most potent PPAR-gamma agonist, possessing low micromolar affinity (EC(50) = 2.9 microM). Further in vitro testing using quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that psi-baptigenin activated PPAR-gamma mRNA (4.1 +/- 0.2-fold) and protein levels (2.9 +/- 0.4-fold) in THP-1 macrophages. Moreover, psi-baptigenin's-induced PPAR-gamma enhancement was abolished in the presence of a selective PPAR-gamma antagonist, GW9662. Induced-fit docking investigations provide a detailed understanding on the ligands' mechanism of action, suggesting five of the active flavonoids induce significant conformational change in the receptor upon binding. Overall, these results offer insight into various naturally derived flavonoids as leads/templates for development of novel PPAR-gamma ligands.

  12. Climate-driven increase of natural wetland methane emissions offset by human-induced wetland reduction in China over the past three decades.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Liu, Jinxun; Jiang, Hong; Fang, Xiuqin; Chen, Huai; Niu, Zhenguo; Gong, Peng; Lin, Guanghui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Han; Yang, Yanzheng; Chang, Jie; Ge, Ying; Xiang, Wenhua; Deng, Xiangwen; He, Jin-Sheng

    2016-11-28

    Both anthropogenic activities and climate change can affect the biogeochemical processes of natural wetland methanogenesis. Quantifying possible impacts of changing climate and wetland area on wetland methane (CH4) emissions in China is important for improving our knowledge on CH4 budgets locally and globally. However, their respective and combined effects are uncertain. We incorporated changes in wetland area derived from remote sensing into a dynamic CH4 model to quantify the human and climate change induced contributions to natural wetland CH4 emissions in China over the past three decades. Here we found that human-induced wetland loss contributed 34.3% to the CH4 emissions reduction (0.92 TgCH4), and climate change contributed 20.4% to the CH4 emissions increase (0.31 TgCH4), suggesting that decreasing CH4 emissions due to human-induced wetland reductions has offset the increasing climate-driven CH4 emissions. With climate change only, temperature was a dominant controlling factor for wetland CH4 emissions in the northeast (high latitude) and Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (high altitude) regions, whereas precipitation had a considerable influence in relative arid north China. The inevitable uncertainties caused by the asynchronous for different regions or periods due to inter-annual or seasonal variations among remote sensing images should be considered in the wetland CH4 emissions estimation.

  13. An analogue peptide from the Cancer/Testis antigen PASD1 induces CD8+ T cell responses against naturally processed peptide.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Nicola; Buchan, Sarah; Ingram, Wendy; Khan, Ghazala; Vittes, Gisella; Rice, Jason; Pulford, Karen; Mufti, Ghulam; Stevenson, Freda; Guinn, Barbara-ann

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified the novel Cancer/Testis antigen PASD1 by immunoscreening a testis library with pooled acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient sera. To develop a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-inducing vaccine, we have now investigated the carboxy-terminal region, known to contain serological determinants, for MHC class I (HLA-A⋆0201)-binding peptides. Algorithm-selected natural peptides failed to show detectable HLA-A⋆0201 binding in T2 assays. However, anchor-modified analogue peptides showed enhanced binding, with decreased off-rates. Analogue peptide-loaded antigen-presenting cells (APCs) induced IFN-γ production by T cells from normal donors and patients. In addition, peptide-specific T cells could be expanded from cancer patients by stimulation with the PASD1 analogue peptide Pa14. For clinical application, a DNA fusion gene vaccine encoding Pa14 was designed and tested in "humanized" mice. Splenocytes from vaccinated mice showed in vitro cytotoxicity against tumour cells, either exogenously loaded with the corresponding wild-type peptide (Pw8) or expressing endogenously processed PASD1 protein. We show for the first time that a DNA vaccine encoding an altered PASD1 epitope can induce CTLs to target the natural peptide expressed by human tumour cells.

  14. Climate-driven increase of natural wetland methane emissions offset by human-induced wetland reduction in China over the past three decades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Liu, Jinxun; Jiang, Hong; Fang, Xiuqin; Chen, Huai; Niu, Zhichun; Gong, Peng; Lin, Guanghui; Wang, Meng; Yang, Yanzheng; Chang, Jie; Ge, Ying; Xiang, Wenhua; Deng, Xiangwen; He, Jin-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Both anthropogenic activities and climate change can affect the biogeochemical processes of natural wetland methanogenesis. Quantifying possible impacts of changing climate and wetland area on wetland methane (CH4) emissions in China is important for improving our knowledge on CH4 budgets locally and globally. However, their respective and combined effects are uncertain. We incorporated changes in wetland area derived from remote sensing into a dynamic CH4 model to quantify the human and climate change induced contributions to natural wetland CH4 emissions in China over the past three decades. Here we found that human-induced wetland loss contributed 34.3% to the CH4 emissions reduction (0.92 TgCH4), and climate change contributed 20.4% to the CH4 emissions increase (0.31 TgCH4), suggesting that decreasing CH4 emissions due to human-induced wetland reductions has offset the increasing climate-driven CH4 emissions. With climate change only, temperature was a dominant controlling factor for wetland CH4 emissions in the northeast (high latitude) and Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (high altitude) regions, whereas precipitation had a considerable influence in relative arid north China. The inevitable uncertainties caused by the asynchronous for different regions or periods due to inter-annual or seasonal variations among remote sensing images should be considered in the wetland CH4 emissions estimation.

  15. Natural and man-made induced hydrological signals, detected by high resolution tilt observations at the Geodynamic Observatory Moxa/Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, T.; Jentzsch, G.; Weise, A.

    2009-12-01

    It is well known, that high resolution borehole tiltmeters are able to observe deformations, caused by hydrological variations. The quantitative coherence is often unexplained, especially if the sources of deformation can be based on both natural as well as man-made hydrological variations. Since 1999 tilt observations have been taken at the Geodynamic Observatory Moxa in Thuringia/Germany. In two 50 m and one 100 m deep boreholes the ASKANIA tiltmeters are installed. The high quality of the recorded tilt data can be proved by the analysis of well known geodynamic signals like the tides of the solid Earth and the free modes of the Earth. Here we focus on investigations of induced tilt signals caused by pore pressure changes due to precipitation and/or ground water level changes and, in addition, on man-made induced pore pressure variations. The correlation of natural ground water level changes with the observed tilt data can be shown by different events of precipitation and snow melting. However, also the load effect of a big truck yields a small elastic deformation which is clearly detectable in the ground water level recording. The correlated tilt effect is discussed regarding changes of the tilt amplitude and the orientation of the induced pendulum tip movement during the load phase.

  16. Climate-driven increase of natural wetland methane emissions offset by human-induced wetland reduction in China over the past three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Liu, Jinxun; Jiang, Hong; Fang, Xiuqin; Chen, Huai; Niu, Zhenguo; Gong, Peng; Lin, Guanghui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Han; Yang, Yanzheng; Chang, Jie; Ge, Ying; Xiang, Wenhua; Deng, Xiangwen; He, Jin-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Both anthropogenic activities and climate change can affect the biogeochemical processes of natural wetland methanogenesis. Quantifying possible impacts of changing climate and wetland area on wetland methane (CH4) emissions in China is important for improving our knowledge on CH4 budgets locally and globally. However, their respective and combined effects are uncertain. We incorporated changes in wetland area derived from remote sensing into a dynamic CH4 model to quantify the human and climate change induced contributions to natural wetland CH4 emissions in China over the past three decades. Here we found that human-induced wetland loss contributed 34.3% to the CH4 emissions reduction (0.92 TgCH4), and climate change contributed 20.4% to the CH4 emissions increase (0.31 TgCH4), suggesting that decreasing CH4 emissions due to human-induced wetland reductions has offset the increasing climate-driven CH4 emissions. With climate change only, temperature was a dominant controlling factor for wetland CH4 emissions in the northeast (high latitude) and Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (high altitude) regions, whereas precipitation had a considerable influence in relative arid north China. The inevitable uncertainties caused by the asynchronous for different regions or periods due to inter-annual or seasonal variations among remote sensing images should be considered in the wetland CH4 emissions estimation.

  17. Maslinic Acid, a Natural Triterpene, Induces a Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptotic Mechanism in Caco-2 p53-Deficient Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; García-Salguero, Leticia; Peragón, Juan; Medina, Pedro P.; Parra, Andrés; Cascante, Marta; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural triterpene present in high concentrations in the waxy skin of olives. We have previously reported that MA induces apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HT29 colon cancer cells. Here, we show that MA induces apoptosis in Caco-2 colon cancer cells via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in a dose-dependent manner. MA triggered a series of effects associated with apoptosis, including the cleavage of caspases -8 and -3, and increased the levels of t-Bid within a few hours of its addition to the culture medium. MA had no effect on the expression of the Bax protein, release of cytochrome-c or on the mitochondrial membrane potential. This suggests that MA triggered the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in this cell type, as opposed to the intrinsic pathway found in the HT29 colon-cancer cell line. Our results suggest that the apoptotic mechanism induced in Caco-2 may be different from that found in HT29 colon-cancer cells, and that in Caco-2 cells MA seems to work independently of p53. Natural antitumoral agents capable of activating both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways could be of great use in treating colon-cancer of whatever origin. PMID:26751572

  18. Hepatitis C genotype 1 mosaic vaccines are immunogenic in mice and induce stronger T-cell responses than natural strains.

    PubMed

    Yusim, Karina; Dilan, Rebecca; Borducchi, Erica; Stanley, Kelly; Giorgi, Elena; Fischer, William; Theiler, James; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H

    2013-02-01

    Despite improved hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments, vaccines remain an effective and economic option for curtailing the epidemic. Mosaic protein HCV genotype 1 vaccine candidates designed to address HCV diversity were immunogenic in mice. They elicited stronger T-cell responses to NS3-NS4a and E1-E2 proteins than did natural strains, as assessed with vaccine-matched peptides.

  19. The effector independent nature of motor imagery: Evidence from rTMS induced inhibition to the primary motor cortices.

    PubMed

    Kraeutner, Sarah N; Ingram, Tony G J; Boe, Shaun G

    2017-03-01

    Motor imagery (MI), the mental rehearsal of movement, facilitates learning by driving brain activation similar to that of physical practice (PP). However, a growing body of evidence suggests that learning via MI relies more on effector independent as opposed to effector dependent encoding. One approach to probing the nature of MI based learning is to study the primary motor cortex (MC), a brain region known to be critical to effector dependent encoding, but whose involvement in MI is debatable. The current study sought to inform on the nature of MI-based learning by examining the extent to which participants could learn via MI following inhibition of the MC using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Forty-seven participants completed an MI-based implicit sequence learning paradigm after receiving inhibitory TMS to the contralateral or ipsilateral MC (TMS groups), or with the coil angled away from the scalp (Sham). The extent to which participants learned was assessed via reaction time differences (dRT) and effect sizes between repeated and random sequences. Similar dRT values and moderate effect sizes were observed across all groups, providing evidence that inhibition of the MC did not disrupt MI-based learning. As the MC is critical to effector dependent encoding, the current findings suggest that MI-based learning does not rely on effector dependent encoding and unlike PP, is more effector independent in nature. Ultimately, these results inform on the nature of MI-based learning.

  20. Thymol, a naturally occurring monocyclic dietary phenolic compound protects Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts from radiation-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Archana, P R; Nageshwar Rao, B; Ballal, Mamatha; Satish Rao, B S

    2009-01-01

    The effect of thymol (TOH), a dietary compound was investigated for its ability to protect against radiation-induced cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells growing in vitro. Treatment of V79 cells with 25 microg/ml of TOH prior to 10 Gy gamma radiation resulted increase in the cell viability than that of radiation alone as evaluated by MTT assay. Similarly, there was a significant increase in the surviving fraction observed with 25 microg/ml of TOH administered 1h prior to graded doses of gamma radiation. Further, 25 microg/ml TOH treatment before irradiation significantly decreased the percentage of radiation-induced apoptotic cells (sub-G(1) population) analyzed by flow cytometry as well as DNA ladder assay. TOH was found to inhibit various free radicals generated in vitro, viz., DPPH, O(2), ABTS(+) and OH in a concentration dependent manner. TOH also inhibited the radiation-induced decrease in intracellular glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase enzyme levels in V79 cells accompanied by the reduction in lipid peroxides. Our study demonstrated antagonistic potential of TOH against radiation-induced oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation resulting in increased cell viability.

  1. L-stepholidine, a natural dopamine receptor D1 agonist and D2 antagonist, inhibits heroin-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baomiao; Yue, Kai; Chen, Lin; Tian, Xiang; Ru, Qin; Gan, Yongping; Wang, Daisong; Jin, Guozhang; Li, Chaoying

    2014-01-24

    L-Stepholidine (l-SPD), an alkaloid extract of the Chinese herb Stephania intermedia, is the first compound known to exhibit mixed dopamine D1 receptor agonist/D2 antagonist properties and is a potential medication for the treatment of opiate addiction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment with L-SPD on heroin-seeking behavior induced by heroin priming. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to self-administer heroin (0.05mg/kg per infusion) under a fixed ratio 1 schedule for 12 consecutive days and nose-poke responding was extinguished for 12 days, after which reinstatement of drug seeking was induced by heroin priming. Pretreatment with L-SPD (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited the heroin-induced reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior. Importantly, L-SPD did not affect locomotion, indicating that the observed effects of L-SPD on reinstatement are not the result of motor impairments. The present data suggested that l-SPD inhibits heroin-induced reinstatement and its potential for the treatment of heroin relapse.

  2. Efficacy of natural diosgenin on cardiovascular risk, insulin secretion, and beta cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kalailingam, Pazhanichamy; Kannaian, Bhuvaneswari; Tamilmani, Eevera; Kaliaperumal, Rajendran

    2014-09-15

    Costus igneus, has been prescribed for the treatment of diabetic mellitus in India for several years. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of plant derived diosgenin on cardiovascular risk, insulin secretion, and pancreatic composition through electron microscopical studies of normal and diabetic rats. Diosgenin at a dose of 5 or 10mg/kg per body weight (bw) was orally administered as a single dose per day to diabetic induced rats for a period of 30 days. The effect of diosgenin on blood glucose, HbA1c, PT, APTT, Oxy-LDL, serum lipid profile, electron microscopical studies of pancreas, antioxidant enzymes (in liver, kidney, pancreas) and hepatoprotective enzymes in plasma and liver were measured in normal and diabetic rats. The results showed that fasting blood glucose, PT, APTT, Oxy-LDL, TC, TG, LDL, ALT, AST, ALP, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and LPO levels were significantly (p<0.05) increased, whereas HDL, SOD, CAT, GSH and the glycolytic enzyme glucokinase levels were significantly (p<0.05) decreased in the diabetes induced rats and these levels were significantly (p<0.05) reversed back to normal in diabetes induced rats after 30 days of treatment with diosgenin. Electron microscopical studies of the pancreas revealed that the number of beta cells and insulin granules were increased in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats after 30 days of treatment with diosgenin. In conclusion, the data obtained from the present study strongly indicate that diosgenin has potential effects on cardiovascular risk, insulin secretion and beta cell regeneration in STZ induced diabetic rats, these results could be useful for new drug development to fight diabetes and its related cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Natural disaster vulnerability and human-induced pressure assessment in small islands developing states: A case study in the Union of the Comoros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burak, S.; Meddeb, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Comoros Islands are part of the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) located in the Indian Ocean. SIDS are islands and low-lying coastal nations that face common barriers to sustainable development, including limited resources, poor economic resilience, and vulnerability to sea level rise and natural disasters. The Comoros Archipelago is made up of four islands but the present study was conducted on three islands, namely Mwali (Mohéli), Ngazidja (Grande Comore) and Dzwani (Anjouan) that are aligned in the Mozambique Channel and spread over a surface area of 1862 km2. These islands are exposed to natural disaster coupled with human-induced pressure on natural resources. The major natural disaster vulnerability has been identified by the National AdaptationProgramme of Action (NAPA, 2006) as climate change, whose likely adverse impacts on the Comoros Islands are: i) changes in rainfall patterns; ii) increases in temperature; iii) salinization of coastal aquifers as a result of salt water intrusion due to sea level rise; and iv) increased frequency of severe weather conditions (such as tropical cyclones, droughts, heavy rainfall and flooding). In addition, existing practices related to natural resources management (primarily land, forest and water management) are very poor and this failure is increasingly threatening water and food security, resulting in a decline of economic growth and standards of living within the Comoros. Human-induced pressure combined with climate change impact is the inherent vulnerabilities of these islands. The government of the Union of the Comoros is aware of the alarming nature of climate change impact and has put in place several projects aiming at implementing adaptation measures in order to help increase the resilience of the vulnerable population in the face of this threat. These projects involve strengthening institutions, policy and regulations so as to improve the management of natural resources, among other measures. The

  4. Effects of human-induced alteration of groundwater flow on concentrations of naturally-occurring trace elements at water-supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, J.D.; Szabo, Z.; Focazio, M.J.; Eberts, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of human-induced alteration of groundwater flow patterns on concentrations of naturally-occurring trace elements were examined in five hydrologically distinct aquifer systems in the USA. Although naturally occurring, these trace elements can exceed concentrations that are considered harmful to human health. The results show that pumping-induced hydraulic gradient changes and artificial connection of aquifers by well screens can mix chemically distinct groundwater. Chemical reactions between these mixed groundwaters and solid aquifer materials can result in the mobilization of trace elements such as U, As and Ra, with subsequent transport to water-supply wells. For example, in the High Plains aquifer near York, Nebraska, mixing of shallow, oxygenated, lower-pH water from an unconfined aquifer with deeper, confined, anoxic, higher-pH water is facilitated by wells screened across both aquifers. The resulting higher-O2, lower-pH mixed groundwater facilitated the mobilization of U from solid aquifer materials, and dissolved U concentrations were observed to increase significantly in nearby supply wells. Similar instances of trace element mobilization due to human-induced mixing of groundwaters were documented in: (1) the Floridan aquifer system near Tampa, Florida (As and U), (2) Paleozoic sedimentary aquifers in eastern Wisconsin (As), (3) the basin-fill aquifer underlying the California Central Valley near Modesto (U), and (4) Coastal Plain aquifers of New Jersey (Ra). Adverse water-quality impacts attributed to human activities are commonly assumed to be related solely to the release of the various anthropogenic contaminants to the environment. The results show that human activities including various land uses, well drilling, and pumping rates and volumes can adversely impact the quality of water in supply wells, when associated with naturally-occurring trace elements in aquifer materials. This occurs by causing subtle but significant changes in

  5. Development of iPS (induced pluripotent stem cells) using natural product from extract of fish oocyte to provide stem cell for regenerative therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilany, Sofy; Firdausiyah, Qonitha S.; Naroeni, Aroem

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we developed a method to induce pluripotency of adult cells (fibroblast) into stem cells using a natural product, extract of fish oocyte, by comparing the extract concentration, 1 mg/ml and 2 mg/ml. The analyses were done by measuring the Nanog gene expression in cells using qPCR and detecting fibroblast marker anti H2-KK. The results revealed existence of a colony of stem cells in the cell that was induced with 2mg/ml concentration of oocytes. Nanoggene expression was analyzed by qPCR and the results showed expression of Nanog gene compared to the control. Analysis of result of fibroblast using Tali Cytometer and anti H2KK antibody showed loss of expression of Anti H2KK meaning there was transformation from fibroblast type cell to pluripotent cell type.

  6. Natural montmorillonite induced photooxidation of As(III) in aqueous suspensions: roles and sources of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl/superoxide radicals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajie; Xu, Jing; Li, Jinjun; Wu, Feng

    2013-09-15

    Photooxidation of arsenite(As(III)) in a suspension of natural montmorillonite under the irradiation of metal halide lamp (λ ≥ 313 nm)has been investigated. The results showed that the natural montmorillonite induced the photooxidation of As(III) by generating hydroxyl radicals (HO·) and hydroperoxyl/superoxide radicals (HO₂·/O₂⁻·). HO· which was responsible for the As(III) photooxidation. Approximately 38% of HO· was generated by the photolysis of ferric ions, and the formation of the remaining 62% was strongly dependent on the HO₂·/O₂⁻·. The presence of free ironions (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)), made significant contributions to the photogeneration of these reactive oxygen species (ROS). The photooxidation of As(III) in natural montmorillonite suspensions was greatly influenced by the pH values. The photooxidation of As(III) by natural montmorillonite followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation. In addition, the photooxidation of As(III) could be enhanced by the addition of humic acid. This work demonstrates that photooxidation may be an important environmental process for the oxidation of As(III) and may be a way to remove As(III) from acidic surface water containing iron-bearing clay minerals.

  7. Inhibition of progression of erythroleukemia induced by Friend virus in BALB/c mice by natural products--berberine, curcumin and picroliv.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B; Kuttan, Girija; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2008-01-01

    The infection with Friend murine leukemia virus (FMuLv) is being used as a retrovirus infection model for searching the potential anti-viral medicinal preparations or establishing new treatment strategies. In the present study we have evaluated the inhibitory effect of three non-toxic antiviral natural compounds namely berberine, curcumin or picroliv against FMuLv induced erythroleukemia in BALB/c mice. To understand the effect of these compounds in the initiation and progression of leukemia we did a series of analysis, which include hematological and biochemical parameters, histopathological evaluations of the liver and the spleen and expression analysis of selected genes such as Bcl-2, p53, p45NFE2, Raf-1, Erk-1, IFNgamma receptor and erythropoietin in spleen. The treatment with berberine, curcumin or picroliv were found to (a) elevate the life span of leukemia harboring animals by more than 60 days; (b) decreased the anemic condition which was highly prevalent in FMuLv alone treated group; (c) histopathological evaluations showed that the compounds tested here inhibited the massive leukemic cell infiltrations to sinusoidal spaces in spleen; (d) decrease the expression of Bcl-2, Raf-1, Erk-1 IFNgamma receptor and erythropoietin; (e) induce the expression of p53. Overall, our results suggest that berberine, curcumin and picroliv were able to suppress the progression of leukemia induced by FMuLv and further support their chemopreventive potential against virally induced cancers.

  8. Fetal Hemoglobin Inducers from the Natural World: A Novel Approach for Identification of Drugs for the Treatment of β-Thalassemia and Sickle-Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Nicoletta; Zuccato, Cristina; Lampronti, Ilaria; Borgatti, Monica; Gambari, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this review is to present examples of lead compounds identified from biological material (fungi, plant extracts and agro-industry material) and of possible interest in the field of a pharmacological approach to the therapy of β-thalassemia using molecules able to stimulate production of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) in adults. Concerning the employment of HbF inducers as potential drugs for pharmacological treatment of β-thalassemia, the following conclusions can be reached: (i) this therapeutic approach is reasonable, on the basis of the clinical parameters exhibited by hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin patients, (ii) clinical trials (even if still limited) employing HbF inducers were effective in ameliorating the symptoms of β-thalassemia patients, (iii) good correlation of in vivo and in vitro results of HbF synthesis and γ-globin mRNA accumulation indicates that in vitro testing might be predictive of in vivo responses and (iv) combined use of different inducers might be useful to maximize HbF, both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we present three examples of HbF inducers from the natural world: (i) angelicin and linear psoralens, contained in plant extracts from Angelica arcangelica and Aegle marmelos, (ii) resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and several plant extracts and (iii) rapamycin, isolated from Streptomyces hygroscopicus. PMID:18955291

  9. Analysis of the effect of a sunscreen agent on the suppression of natural killer cell activity induced in human subjects by radiation from solarium lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, P.; MacDonald, M.; Burns, C.; Schibeci, S.; Matthews, H.; Wilkinson, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies in rodents have shown that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) may have direct effects on the immune system in the skin and at higher doses may induce systemic suppression of immune responses. We have previously shown that UVR from sun or solarium beds may induce systemic effects in human subjects. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether these systemic effects in human subjects could be prevented by use of commercially available sunscreen agents. Groups of 12 normal subjects were exposed to radiation from solarium lamps after application of a sunscreen agent or the base used in its preparation. Twelve half-hourly exposures induced a depression of natural killer (NK) cell activity against a melanoma and the K562 target cell which was not prevented by use of the sunscreen agent. Changes in functional activity were accompanied by a reduction in NK cell numbers assessed by Leu-11 monoclonal antibodies against the labile Fc receptor. Application of the sunscreen agent also did not protect against effects of solarium exposure on recall antigen skin tests and immunoglobulin production in vitro in pokeweed mitogen-stimulated cultures of B and T cells. These results suggest that further evaluation of the wave-length spectrum of UVR and the effectiveness of sunscreen agents in prevention of UVR-induced effects on the immune system is needed.

  10. Radiation-Induced Defects in Kaolinite as Tracers of Past Occurrence of Radionuclides in a Natural Analogue of High Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, T.; Fourdrin, C.; Calas, G.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the processes controlling migrations of radioelements at the Earth's surface is an important issue for the long-term safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repositories (HLNWR). Evidence of past occurrence and transfer of radionuclides can be found using radiation-induced defects in minerals. Clay minerals are particularly relevant because of their widespread occurrence at the Earth's surface and their finely divided nature which provides high contact area with radioactive fluids. Owing to its sensitivity to radiations, kaolinite can be used as natural, in situ dosimeter. Kaolinite is known to contain radiation-induced defects which are detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. They are differentiated by their nature, their production kinetics and their thermal stability. One of these defects is stable at the scale of geological periods and provides a record of past radionuclide occurrence. Based on artificial irradiations, a methodology has been subsequently proposed to determine paleodose cumulated by kaolinite since its formation. The paleodose can be used to derive equivalent radioelement concentrations, provided that the age of kaolinite formation can be constrained. This allows quantitative reconstruction of past transfers of radioelements in natural systems. An example is given for the Nopal I U-deposit (Chihuahua, Mexico), hosted in hydrothermally altered volcanic tufs and considered as analogue of the Yucca Mountain site. The paleodoses experienced by kaolinites were determined from the concentration of defects and dosimetry parameters of experimental irradiations. Using few geochemical assumption, a equivalent U-content responsible for defects in kaolinite was calculated from the paleodose, a dose rate balance and model ages of kaolinites constrained by tectonic phases. In a former study, the ages were assumptions derived from regional tectonic events. In thepresent study, ages of mineralization events are measured from U

  11. G(AnH)MTetra, a naturally occurring 1,6-anhydro muramyl dipeptide, induces granulocyte colony-stimulating factor expression in human monocytes: a molecular analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Dokter, W H; Dijkstra, A J; Koopmans, S B; Mulder, A B; Stulp, B K; Halie, M R; Keck, W; Vellenga, E

    1994-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosaminyl-1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutam yl-m- diaminopimelyl-D-alanine [G (Anh)MTetra], a naturally occurring breakdown product of peptidoglycan from bacterial cell walls, was studied for its ability to induce granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mRNA and protein expression in human adherent monocytes. Resting monocytes did not express G-CSF mRNA or secrete G-CSF protein. In contrast, monocytes exposed to G(Anh)MTetra showed a dose-dependent increase in G-CSF mRNA accumulation, which correlates with the secretion of G-CSF protein. Maximal levels of G-CSF mRNA were reached within 2 h of activation. Expression of G-CSF was mediated by an increase in the stability of G-CSF transcripts rather than by an increase in the transcription rate of the G-CSF gene. Experiments with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide revealed that G(Anh)MTetra-induced G-CSF mRNA expression was independent of new protein synthesis. Furthermore, it was shown that the effect of G(Anh)MTetra was regulated by a protein kinase C-dependent pathway, whereas protein kinase A and tyrosine kinases were not involved. Finally, it was shown that G(Anh)MTetra also induced G-CSF mRNA expression in human endothelial cells. The data indicate that, besides lipopolysaccharide, other naturally occurring bacterial cell wall components are able to induce G-CSF expression in different hematopoietic cells. Images PMID:7516314

  12. A Lipid Mediator Hepoxilin A3 Is a Natural Inducer of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Douda, David N.; Grasemann, Hartmut; Pace-Asciak, Cecil

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis airways are accompanied by inflammation, neutrophilia, and mucous thickening. Cystic fibrosis sputum contains a large amount of uncleared DNA contributed by neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation from neutrophils. The exact mechanisms of the induction of NETosis in cystic fibrosis airways remain unclear, especially in uninfected lungs of patients with early cystic fibrosis lung disease. Here we show that Hepoxilin A3, a proinflammatory eicosanoid, and the synthetic analog of Hepoxilin B3, PBT-3, directly induce NETosis in human neutrophils. Furthermore, we show that Hepoxilin A3-mediated NETosis is NADPH-oxidase-dependent at lower doses of Hepoxilin A3, while it is NADPH-oxidase-independent at higher doses. Together, these results demonstrate that Hepoxilin A3 is a previously unrecognized inducer of NETosis in cystic fibrosis lungs and may represent a new therapeutic target for treating cystic fibrosis and other inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:25784781

  13. COMPARISON OF LUNG ATTENUATION AND HETEROGENEITY BETWEEN CATS WITH EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED ALLERGIC ASTHMA, NATURALLY OCCURRING ASTHMA AND NORMAL CATS.

    PubMed

    Masseau, Isabelle; Banuelos, Alina; Dodam, John; Cohn, Leah A; Reinero, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a prominent feature of feline allergic asthma but requires biopsy for characterization. Computed tomography (CT) has appeal as a minimally invasive diagnostic test. The purpose of this prospective case-control study was to compare indices of airway remodeling between cats with experimentally induced, spontaneous asthma and healthy unaffected cats using CT. We hypothesized that experimental and spontaneous feline asthma would have similar CT airway remodeling characteristics and that these would be significantly different in healthy cats. Experimentally induced asthmatic research cats (n = 5), spontaneously asthmatic pet cats (n = 6), and healthy research cats (n = 5) were scanned unrestrained using a 64-detector row CT scanner. Inspiratory breath-hold CT scans were also performed in experimentally induced asthmatic and healthy cats. Mean ± extent variation of lung attenuation for each cat was determined using an airway inspector software program and CT images were scored for lung heterogeneity by a board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of cat group status. Groups were compared using one-way ANOVA (unrestrained scans) and the Student's t-test (anesthetized scans) with significance defined as P < 0.10. Experimentally asthmatic and spontaneously asthmatic cats had significantly (P = 0.028 and P = 0.073, respectively) increased lung attenuation compared to healthy cats. Heterogeneity scores were higher in experimentally induced asthmatic cat than in healthy cats. Objective quantification of lung heterogeneity and lung volume did not differ among the three groups (P = 0.311, P = 0.181, respectively). Findings supported our hypothesis. Inspiratory breath-hold anesthetized CT scans facilitated discrimination between asthmatic and healthy cats in comparison to unrestrained CT scans.

  14. Heavy duty piezoresistivity induced strain sensing natural rubber/carbon black nanocomposites reinforced with different carbon nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingliang; Yuan, Tingting; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Shimei; Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Jiurong; Liu, Xinyu; Sun, Luyi; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2014-09-01

    Durable piezoresistive effects of natural rubber nanocomposites have been demonstrated, i.e., with stable and reversible electrical resistance change within the tested 3000 cycles upon applying a small compressive strain (˜16.7%) under a relatively high frequency (0.5 Hz, 2 s/cycle). This unique function was achieved for the first time by combining carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers with natural rubber composites pretreated with carbon black. Even though the combination of different carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheets and carbon nanotubes, can improve the dispersion quality of both the nanostructures in solution or in polymer matrices, this type of synergistic effect between carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers in producing stable and reversible piezoresistive effect has been rarely reported. Besides, the strong reinforcement (compressive stress at a maximum strain of 16.7% was increased from 12.6 for untreated to 18.5 MPa for the natural rubber/carbon black composites treated with a combination of 1.0 wt% carbon nanotubes and 1.0 wt% carbon nanofibers) makes the as-prepared composites promising for heavy duty pressure sensors, i.e., healthy motion monitoring of industrial machinery vibrations.

  15. Silymarin: A Novel Natural Agent to Restore Defective Pancreatic β Cells in Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Amniattalab, Amir; Malekinejad, Hassan; Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Rokhsartalab-Azar, Shirin; Alizade-Fanalou, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potency of silymarin (SMN) and melatonin (MEL) on restoring the pancreatic   cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups, including: control (C), untreated diabetic (D), SMN-treated diabetic (50 mg/Kg, orally), MEL-treated diabetic (10 mg/Kg, i.p.), and SMN plus MEL-treated diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by injection of STZ (50 mg/Kg, i.p.). The blood glucose and insulin levels were measured. After the 28 days treatment period, antioxidant status was analyzed by determination of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the liver and serum. The histopathological changes in the pancreatic islets were examined by histochemical staining and enumeration of   cells. Although none of the test compounds reduced the blood glucose level to normal concentration, however SMN alone and in combination with MEL was able to decline it significantly (P<0.05) after 28 days administration. Both SMN and MEL could recover the diabetes-reduced TAC values. Moreover, the diabetes-induced cellular vacuolation and   cells depletion were improved by the SMN treatment. Our data suggest that the SMN and MEL treatment was able to normalize the antioxidant status, while only SMN administration could restore the  cells of Langerhans islets in diabetic rats. PMID:27980584

  16. Lutein, a Natural Carotenoid, Induces α-1,3-Glucan Accumulation on the Cell Wall Surface of Fungal Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Otaka, Junnosuke; Seo, Shigemi; Nishimura, Marie

    2016-07-28

    α-1,3-Glucan, a component of the fungal cell wall, is a refractory polysaccharide for most plants. Previously, we showed that various fungal plant pathogens masked their cell wall surfaces with α-1,3-glucan to evade plant immunity. This surface accumulation of α-1,3-glucan was infection specific, suggesting that plant factors might induce its production in fungi. Through immunofluorescence observations of fungal cell walls, we found that carrot (Daucus carota) extract induced the accumulation of α-1,3-glucan on germlings in Colletotrichum fioriniae, a polyphagous fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in various dicot plants. Bioassay-guided fractionation of carrot leaf extract successfully identified two active substances that caused α-1,3-glucan accumulation in this fungus: lutein, a carotenoid widely distributed in plants, and stigmasterol, a plant-specific membrane component. Lutein, which had a greater effect on C. fioriniae, also induced α-1,3-glucan accumulation in other Colletotrichum species and in the phylogenetically distant rice pathogen Cochliobolus miyabeanus, but not in the rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae belonging to the same phylogenetic subclass as Colletotrichum. Our results suggested that fungal plant pathogens reorganize their cell wall components in response to specific plant-derived compounds, which these pathogens may encounter during infection.

  17. Anthropogenic changes to seawater buffer capacity combined with natural reef metabolism induce extreme future coral reef CO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Emily C; McNeil, Ben I; Tilbrook, Bronte; Matear, Richard; Bates, Michael L

    2013-05-01

    Ocean acidification, via an anthropogenic increase in seawater carbon dioxide (CO2 ), is potentially a major threat to coral reefs and other marine ecosystems. However, our understanding of how natural short-term diurnal CO2 variability in coral reefs influences longer term anthropogenic ocean acidification remains unclear. Here, we combine observed natural carbonate chemistry variability with future carbonate chemistry predictions for a coral reef flat in the Great Barrier Reef based on the RCP8.5 CO2 emissions scenario. Rather than observing a linear increase in reef flat partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 ) in concert with rising atmospheric concentrations, the inclusion of in situ diurnal variability results in a highly nonlinear threefold amplification of the pCO2 signal by the end of the century. This significant nonlinear amplification of diurnal pCO2 variability occurs as a result of combining natural diurnal biological CO2 metabolism with long-term decreases in seawater buffer capacity, which occurs via increasing anthropogenic CO2 absorption by the ocean. Under the same benthic community composition, the amplification in the variability in pCO2 is likely to lead to exposure to mean maximum daily pCO2 levels of ca. 2100 μatm, with corrosive conditions with respect to aragonite by end-century at our study site. Minimum pCO2 levels will become lower relative to the mean offshore value (ca. threefold increase in the difference between offshore and minimum reef flat pCO2 ) by end-century, leading to a further increase in the pCO2 range that organisms are exposed to. The biological consequences of short-term exposure to these extreme CO2 conditions, coupled with elevated long-term mean CO2 conditions are currently unknown and future laboratory experiments will need to incorporate natural variability to test this. The amplification of pCO2 that we describe here is not unique to our study location, but will occur in all shallow coastal environments where high

  18. Experimentally induced clinical Cystoisospora canis coccidiosis in dogs with prior natural patent Cystoisospora ohioensis-like or C. canis infections.

    PubMed

    Houk, Alice E; O'Connor, Thomas; Pena, Hilda F J; Gennari, Solange Maria; Zajac, Anne M; Lindsay, David S

    2013-10-01

    Diarrhea caused by intestinal coccidia (Cystoisospora species) is a common problem in pet dogs and in dogs in animal shelters. Cystoisospora canis has the largest oocysts of the 4 named species of coccidia infecting dogs. The present study examined an isolate of C. canis obtained from a dog from São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Oocysts sporulated within 2 days at room temperature, and 20 sporulated oocysts were measured at 37.6 by 28.6 μm (range 35-42 by 26-31 μm). Most sporulated oocysts contained 2 sporocysts, each with 4 sporozoites, although a few (<1%) were Caryospora-like and contained 1 sporocyst with 8 sporozoites. Two experiments using a total of 11 female 6-wk-old beagles were conducted to determine the pathogenicity of oral infection with 5 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of this isolate of C. canis. Five of the 11 dogs had natural infections with Cystoisospora ohioensis-like (n = 4) or C. canis (n = 1) species prior to the predicted patent period of 9-10 days. Ten of the dogs developed diarrhea with occasional blood, and 3 dogs were affected to the extent that clinical treatment for coccidiosis using sulfadimethoxine was recommended. Dog CRU had a natural C. canis infection and did not develop clinical disease after oral infection with C. canis oocysts. This dog had a prepatent period of 9 days and a patent period of 3 days, corresponding to experimental infection with the new isolate of C. canis. It excreted fewer C. canis oocysts than did the other dogs. The 4 dogs with natural C. ohioensis-like infection all developed clinical disease, and 1 required treatment. The prepatent period was 9-10 days, and the patent period was 10-11 days in these dogs. All 6 dogs not naturally infected with Cystoisospora developed clinical disease, and 2 required treatment. The prepatent period was 9-10 days, and the patent period was 8-12 days. The present study confirms that C. canis is a primary pathogen for young dogs. It demonstrates that prior infection with C. canis but not C

  19. Synchrotron X-ray Scattering; Sensile Strength and Strain-Induced Crystallization in Carbon Black Filled Natural Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Toki,S.; Minouchi, N.; Sics, I.; Hsiao, B.; Kohjiya, S.

    2008-01-01

    The tensile strength of rubber depends on a combination of contributions, in particular on the finite extensibility of chain segments between network points and on strain-induced crystallization. In order to achieve high tensile strength at high strain at break, we optimized the composition and processing parameters to gain high molecular flexibility by the cure conditions, to acquire high flexibility of sulfur bridges by the accelerator, and to increase the modulus level without losing rubber molecule flexibility by carbon black. As a result, our formula performed a tensile strength of 42.5 MPa at 25 C under ISO-37, as officially measured by the Society of Rubber Industry, Japan, in 2004.

  20. Human CD4(+) T Cell Responses to an Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Parallel Those Induced by Natural Infection in Magnitude, HLA Restriction, and Antigen Specificity.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Michael A; Grifoni, Alba; O'Rourke, Patrick H; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Peters, Bjoern; de Silva, Aruna D; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Diehl, Sean A; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is responsible for growing numbers of infections worldwide and has proven to be a significant challenge for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that CD8(+) T cell responses elicited by a dengue live attenuated virus (DLAV) vaccine resemble those observed after natural infection. In this study, we screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors vaccinated with a tetravalent DLAV vaccine (TV005) with pools of dengue virus-derived predicted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II binding peptides. The definition of CD4(+) T cell responses after live vaccination is important because CD4(+) T cells are known contributors to host immunity, including cytokine production, help for CD8(+) T and B cells, and direct cytotoxicity against infected cells. While responses to all antigens were observed, DENV-specific CD4(+) T cells were focused predominantly on the capsid and nonstructural NS3 and NS5 antigens. Importantly, CD4(+) T cell responses in vaccinees were similar in magnitude and breadth to those after natural infection, recognized the same antigen hierarchy, and had similar profiles of HLA restriction. We conclude that TV005 vaccination has the capacity to elicit CD4(+) cell responses closely mirroring those observed in a population associated with natural immunity.IMPORTANCE The development of effective vaccination strategies against dengue virus infection is of high global public health interest. Here we study the CD4 T cell responses elicited by a tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine and show that they resemble responses seen in humans naturally exposed to dengue virus. This is an important issue, since it is likely that optimal immunity induced by a vaccine requires induction of CD4(+) responses against the same antigens as those recognized as dominant in natural infection. Detailed knowledge of the T cell response may further contribute to the identification of robust correlates of protection against

  1. Experimentally-induced immune activation in natural hosts of SIV induces significant increases in viral replication and CD4+ T cell depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2008-01-01

    Chronically SIVagm-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) have a remarkably stable non-pathogenic disease course, with levels of immune activation in chronic SIVagm infection similar to those observed in uninfected monkeys and stable viral loads (VLs) for long periods of time. In vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (Ontak) to chronically SIVagm-infected AGMs triggered increases in immune activation and subsequently of viral replication and depletion of intestinal CD4{sup +} T cells. Our study indicates that circulating microbial products can increase viral replication by inducing immune activation and increasing the number of viral target cells, thus demonstrating that immune activation and T cell prolifeation are key factors in AIDS pathogenesis.

  2. Human cytomegalovirus-induced NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) natural killer cells are effectors dependent on humoral antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeguang; Sinzger, Christian; Frascaroli, Giada; Reichel, Johanna; Bayer, Carina; Wang, Li; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Mertens, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that expansion of NKG2C-positive natural killer (NK) cells is associated with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV); however, their activity in response to HCMV-infected cells remains unclear. We show that NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) NK cells gated on CD3(neg) CD56(dim) cells can be phenotypically identified as HCMV-induced NK cells that can be activated by HCMV-infected cells. Using HCMV-infected autologous macrophages as targets, we were able to show that these NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) NK cells are highly responsive to HCMV-infected macrophages only in the presence of HCMV-specific antibodies, whereas they are functionally poor effectors of natural cytotoxicity. We further demonstrate that NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) NK cells are intrinsically responsive to signaling through CD16 cross-linking. Our findings show that the activity of pathogen-induced innate immune cells can be enhanced by adaptive humoral immunity. Understanding the activity of NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) NK cells against HCMV-infected cells will be of relevance for the further development of adoptive immunotherapy.

  3. The help of Advanced Satellite Interferometry in assessing the effect of human-induced surface deformation in naturally subsiding areas. Methodological approach and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, Andrea; Giannico, Chiara; Del Conte, Sara; Teatini, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Underground water extraction, natural gas storage either in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or in aquifers, and excavations for civil works (e.g. underground passageways, car parks, etc.) in flat areas are responsible for surface deformation that can damage pre-existing structures and modify drainage pathways. Deformation patterns associated to different underground show in many cases typical patterns. Their recognition can help in disentangling different processes when occurring in areas already affected by natural subsidence, such as coastal areas and inner sedimentary plains. Moreover, assessing the extent of human-induced deformation can help in identifying causes, modelling phenomena, predicting their evolution and adopting proper remedial measures. Advanced Satellite Interferometry provides a synoptic view of surface displacements over large areas and long time-spans and has become a standard in several Italian regions where underground fluid injection and withdrawal is going on. The integration of interferometric measurements with ground (leveling, GPS) and underground (borehole extensometers, piezometers, micro-seismic) monitoring networks can provide an exhaustive framework of the effect induced at surface level by underground human activities at local and regional scale. Documented case studies demonstrating the effectiveness of the above approach will be presented.

  4. Adenovirus Specific Pre-Immunity Induced by Natural Route of Infection Does Not Impair Transduction by Adenoviral Vaccine Vectors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; E. Maduro Bouillet, Leoneide; Dorigo, Natalia A.; Fraefel, Cornel; Bruna-Romero, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAd5V) vectors are gold standards of T-cell immunogenicity as they efficiently induce also humoral responses to exogenous antigens, in particular when used in prime-boost protocols. Some investigators have shown that pre-existing immunity to adenoviruses interferes with transduction by adenoviral vectors, but the actual extent of this interference is not known since it has been mostly studied in mice using unnatural routes of infection and virus doses. Here we studied the effects of HAd5V-specific immune responses induced by intranasal infection on the transduction efficiency of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Of interest, when HAd5V immunity was induced in mice by the natural respiratory route, the pre-existing immunity against HAd5V did not significantly interfere with the B and T-cell immune responses against the transgene products induced after a prime/boost inoculation protocol with a recombinant HAd5V-vector, as measured by ELISA and in vivo cytotoxic T-cell assays, respectively. We also correlated the levels of HAd5V-specific neu