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Sample records for 7sk small nuclear

  1. Unraveling the conformational determinants of LARP7 and 7SK small nuclear RNA by theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Kong, Ren; Zhu, Jingyu; Sun, Huiyong; Chang, Shan

    2016-07-19

    LARP7, a member of the La-related proteins (LARPs), shares a conserved La module comprising the La-motif (LAM) and the RNA-recognition motif (RRM1), binding exclusively to the non-coding RNA 7SK. LARP7 is a component of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (7SKsnRNP) required for the stability and function of the RNA, and implicated in the transcription termination and regulation of translation. In the current work, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the recently determined crystal structures of the La module of LARP7 in complexs with a stretch of uridines at the 3'-end of 7SK in the presence and absence of RNA and two different mutants. The structural stabilities of the four systems provided by the simulations are consistent with the experimental data. Principal component analysis (PCA) and free energy landscape (FEL) were used to explore the dominant motions and the functional dynamics between the two ends of the superhelical structures in both RNA-bound and RNA-free systems. The final values of the intramolecular angle formed by the Cα atoms of Arg30, Lys53 and Pro189 are ∼96° and 125° for the RNA-bound and RNA-free systems, highlighting the importance of the binding of the 3'-end of RNA 7SK for system stability. The dynamic cross-correlation maps (DCCM) were utilized to evaluate the conformational changes in different mutants, and small values were found around the residues 29-50 and 100-120 in the F168A system, whereas large values were found around the residues 120-160 and 170-189 in the E130A system. The time evolutions of the hydrogen-bond distances of the terminal uridine U-1 and Asp54 and that of the penultimate residue U-2 and Gln41 were monitored to compare their conformational changes, and the results suggest that the E130A mutant may have an important effect on the RNA binding, which is consistent with site-directed mutagenesis. This study provides some new insights into the understanding of the recognition mechanism

  2. Structural insight into the mechanism of stabilization of the 7SK small nuclear RNA by LARP7

    PubMed Central

    Uchikawa, Emiko; Natchiar, Kundhavai S.; Han, Xiao; Proux, Florence; Roblin, Pierre; Zhang, Elodie; Durand, Alexandre; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The non-coding RNA 7SK is the scaffold for a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (7SKsnRNP) which regulates the function of the positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb in the control of RNA polymerase II elongation in metazoans. The La-related protein LARP7 is a component of the 7SKsnRNP required for stability and function of the RNA. To address the function of LARP7 we determined the crystal structure of its La module, which binds a stretch of uridines at the 3′-end of 7SK. The structure shows that the penultimate uridine is tethered by the two domains, the La-motif and the RNA-recognition motif (RRM1), and reveals that the RRM1 is significantly smaller and more exposed than in the La protein. Sequence analysis suggests that this impacts interaction with 7SK. Binding assays, footprinting and small-angle scattering experiments show that a second RRM domain located at the C-terminus binds the apical loop of the 3′ hairpin of 7SK, while the N-terminal domains bind at its foot. Our results suggest that LARP7 uses both its N- and C-terminal domains to stabilize 7SK in a closed structure, which forms by joining conserved sequences at the 5′-end with the foot of the 3′ hairpin and has thus functional implications. PMID:25753663

  3. 7SK small nuclear RNA directly affects HMGA1 function in transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Eilebrecht, Sebastian; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Wegert, Thomas; Urlaub, Henning; Benecke, Bernd-Joachim; Benecke, Arndt

    2011-01-01

    Non-coding (nc) RNAs are increasingly recognized to play important regulatory roles in eukaryotic gene expression. The highly abundant and essential 7SK ncRNA has been shown to negatively regulate RNA Polymerase II transcription by inactivating the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) in cellular and Tat-dependent HIV transcription. Here, we identify a more general, P-TEFb-independent role of 7SK RNA in directly affecting the function of the architectural transcription factor and chromatin regulator HMGA1. An important regulatory role of 7SK RNA in HMGA1-dependent cell differentiation and proliferation regulation is uncovered with the identification of over 1500 7SK-responsive HMGA1 target genes. Elevated HMGA1 expression is observed in nearly every type of cancer making the use of a 7SK substructure in the inhibition of HMGA1 activity, as pioneered here, potentially useful in therapy. The 7SK-HMGA1 interaction not only adds an essential facet to the comprehension of transcriptional plasticity at the coupling of initiation and elongation, but also might provide a molecular link between HIV reprogramming of cellular gene expression-associated oncogenesis. PMID:21087998

  4. Release of Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) Activates Hexamethylene Bisacetamide-inducible Protein (HEXIM1) Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pingyang; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Nilson, Kyle A.; Price, David H.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2014-01-01

    By phosphorylating negative elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is composed of CycT1 or CycT2 and CDK9, activates eukaryotic transcription elongation. In growing cells, it is found in active and inactive forms. In the former, free P-TEFb is a potent transcriptional coactivator. In the latter, it is inhibited by HEXIM1 or HEXIM2 in the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), which contains, additionally, 7SK snRNA, methyl phosphate-capping enzyme (MePCE), and La-related protein 7 (LARP7). This P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of growth and proliferation of the cell. In this study, the release of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP led to increased synthesis of HEXIM1 but not HEXIM2 in HeLa cells, and this occurred only from an unannotated, proximal promoter. ChIP with sequencing revealed P-TEFb-sensitive poised RNA polymerase II at this proximal but not the previously annotated distal HEXIM1 promoter. Its immediate upstream sequences were fused to luciferase reporters and were found to be responsive to many P-TEFb-releasing compounds. The superelongation complex subunits AF4/FMR2 family member 4 (AFF4) and elongation factor RNA polymerase II 2 (ELL2) were recruited to this proximal promoter after P-TEFb release and were required for its transcriptional effects. Thus, P-TEFb regulates its own equilibrium in cells, most likely to maintain optimal cellular homeostasis. PMID:24515107

  5. 7SK-BAF axis controls pervasive transcription at enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan A.; Do, Brian T.; Rubin, Adam J.; Calo, Eliezer; Lee, Byron; Kuchelmeister, Hannes; Rale, Michael; Chu, Ci; Kool, Eric T.; Wysocka, Joanna; Khavari, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    RNA functions at enhancers remain mysterious. Here we show that the 7SK small nuclear RNA (snRNA) inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating nucleosome position. 7SK occupies enhancers and super enhancers genome-wide in mouse and human cells, and 7SK is required to limit eRNA initiation and synthesis in a manner distinct from promoter pausing. Clustered elements at super enhancers uniquely require 7SK to prevent convergent transcription and DNA damage signaling. 7SK physically interacts with the BAF chromatin remodeling complex, recruit BAF to enhancers, and inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating chromatin structure. In turn, 7SK occupancy at enhancers coincides with Brd4 and is exquisitely sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. Thus, 7SK employs distinct mechanisms to counteract diverse consequences of pervasive transcription that distinguish super enhancers, enhancers, and promoters. PMID:26878240

  6. KAP1 Recruitment of the 7SK snRNP Complex to Promoters Enables Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Ryan P; Reeder, Jonathan E; McMillan, Elizabeth A; Bacon, Curtis W; McCann, Jennifer L; D'Orso, Iván

    2016-01-01

    The transition from transcription initiation to elongation at promoters of primary response genes (PRGs) in metazoan cells is controlled by inducible transcription factors, which utilize P-TEFb to phosphorylate RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in response to stimuli. Prior to stimulation, a fraction of P-TEFb is recruited to promoter-proximal regions in a catalytically inactive state bound to the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complex. However, it remains unclear how and why the 7SK snRNP is assembled at these sites. Here we report that the transcriptional regulator KAP1 continuously tethers the 7SK snRNP to PRG promoters to facilitate P-TEFb recruitment and productive elongation in response to stimulation. Remarkably, besides PRGs, genome-wide studies revealed that KAP1 and 7SK snRNP co-occupy most promoter-proximal regions containing paused Pol II. Collectively, we provide evidence of an unprecedented mechanism controlling 7SK snRNP delivery to promoter-proximal regions to facilitate "on-site" P-TEFb activation and Pol II elongation. PMID:26725010

  7. B2 RNA and 7SK RNA, RNA polymerase III transcripts, have a cap-like structure at their 5' end.

    PubMed Central

    Shumyatsky, G P; Tillib, S V; Kramerov, D A

    1990-01-01

    We found that hydrolysates of poly(A)+ RNA from Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells which were transcribed by RNA polymerase III contained an unusual component designated as X. It was part of B2 RNA representing a transcript of B2 retroposon, typical of rodents. The component X possesses a cap-like structure, xppp5'G, where x has a non-nucleotide structure. About half of all B2 RNAs contained this group at the 5' end. Previously, Epstein et al. (1) detected a similar structure at the 5' end of small nuclear U6 RNA. Later, Singh and Reddy (2) showed methyl to be the blocking group in the component x of U6 RNA. Besides B2 RNA, we found 5' ends containing methyl groups in 7SK RNA. Images PMID:1700854

  8. The Mechanism of Release of P-TEFb and HEXIM1 from the 7SK snRNP by Viral and Cellular Activators Includes a Conformational Change in 7SK

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Brian J.; Varzavand, Katayoun; Cooper, Jeffrey J.; Price, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Background The positive transcription elongation factor, P-TEFb, is required for the production of mRNAs, however the majority of the factor is present in the 7SK snRNP where it is inactivated by HEXIM1. Expression of HIV-1 Tat leads to release of P-TEFb and HEXIM1 from the 7SK snRNP in vivo, but the release mechanisms are unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed an in vitro P-TEFb release assay in which the 7SK snRNP immunoprecipitated from HeLa cell lysates using antibodies to LARP7 was incubated with potential release factors. We found that P-TEFb was directly released from the 7SK snRNP by HIV-1 Tat or the P-TEFb binding region of the cellular activator Brd4. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis was used to demonstrate that the same Brd4 protein transfected into HeLa cells caused the release of P-TEFb and HEXIM1 from the 7SK snRNP in vivo. Although HEXIM1 binds tightly to 7SK RNA in vitro, release of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP is accompanied by the loss of HEXIM1. Using a chemical modification method, we determined that concomitant with the release of HEXIM1, 7SK underwent a major conformational change that blocks re-association of HEXIM1. Conclusions/Significance Given that promoter proximally paused polymerases are present on most human genes, understanding how activators recruit P-TEFb to those genes is critical. Our findings reveal that the two tested activators can extract P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP. Importantly, we found that after P-TEFb is extracted a dramatic conformational change occurred in 7SK concomitant with the ejection of HEXIM1. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that reincorporation of HEXIM1 into the 7SK snRNP is likely the regulated step of reassembly of the 7SK snRNP containing P-TEFb. PMID:20808803

  9. Genome-wide analysis of KAP1, the 7SK snRNP complex, and RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Ryan P.; Guzman, Carlos; Reeder, Jonathan E.; D'Orso, Iván

    2016-01-01

    The transition of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) from transcription initiation into productive elongation in eukaryotic cells is regulated by the P-TEFb kinase, which phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of paused Pol II at promoter-proximal regions. Our recent study found that P-TEFb (in an inhibited state bound to the 7SK snRNP complex) interacts with the KAP1/TRIM28 transcriptional regulator, and that KAP1 and the 7SK snRNP co-occupy most gene promoters containing paused Pol II. Here we provide a detailed experimental description and analysis of the ChIP-seq datasets that have been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GS72622, so that independent groups can replicate and expand upon these findings. We propose these datasets would provide valuable information for researchers studying mechanisms of transcriptional regulation including Pol II pausing and pause release. PMID:26981421

  10. Nuclear threats from small states

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, J.H.

    1994-06-13

    What are the policy implications regarding proliferation and counter proliferation of nuclear weapons among Third World states. How does deterrence operate outside the parameters of superpower confrontation as defined by the cold war elaborate system of constraints enforced by concepts like mutual assured destruction, and counter-value and counter-force targeting. How can US policymakers devise contingencies for dealing with nuclear threats posed by countries like North Korea, Libya, Iraq, Iran, and Syria. These are some of the unsettling but nevertheless important questions addressed by the author in this monograph. In his analysis, Mr. Jerome Kahan examines the likelihood that one or more of these countries will use nuclear weapons before the year 2000. He also offers a framework that policymakers and planners might use in assessing US interests in preempting the use of nuclear weapons or in retaliating for their use. Ironically, with the end of the cold war, it is imperative that defense strategists, policymakers, and military professionals think about the `unthinkable`. In the interest of fostering debate on this important subject, the Strategic Studies Institute commends this insightful monograph.

  11. Nuclear structure functions at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2009-11-15

    I study the nuclear structure function F{sub 2}{sup A} and its logarithmic derivative in the high-energy limit (small-x region) using the color glass condensate formalism. In this limit the structure function F{sub 2} depends on the quark-antiquark dipole-target scattering cross section N{sub F}(x{sub bj},r{sub t},b{sub t}). The same dipole cross section appears in single-hadron and hadron-photon production cross sections in the forward rapidity region in deuteron (proton)-nucleus collisions at high energy, that is, at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). I use a parametrization of the dipole cross section, which has successfully been used to describe the deuteron-gold data at the RHIC, to compute the nuclear structure function F{sub 2}{sup A} and its log Q{sup 2} derivative (which is related to gluon distribution function in the double log limit). I provide a quantitative estimate of the nuclear shadowing of F{sub 2}{sup A} and the gluon distribution function in the kinematic region relevant to a future electron-ion collider.

  12. Effect of 3' terminal adenylic acid residue on the uridylation of human small RNAs in vitro and in frog oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Sinha, K; Perumal, K; Reddy, R

    2000-01-01

    It is known that several small RNAs including human and Xenopus signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA, U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and 7SK RNAs are posttranscriptionally adenylated, whereas U6 snRNA and ribosomal 5S RNA are posttranscriptionally uridylated on their 3' ends. In this study, we provide evidence that a small fraction of U6 snRNA and 5S ribosomal RNA molecules from human as well as Xenopus oocytes contain a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends. These data show that U6 snRNA and 5S rRNAs are posttranscriptionally modified on their 3' ends by both uridylation and adenylation. Although the SRP RNA, 7SK RNA, 5S RNA, and U6 snRNA with the uridylic acid residue on their 3' ends were readily uridylated, all these RNAs with posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends were not uridylated in vitro, or when U6 snRNA with 3' A(OH) was injected into Xenopus oocytes. These results show that the presence of a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on the 3' end of SRP RNA, U6 snRNA, 5S rRNA, or 7SK RNA prevents 3' uridylation. These data also show that adenylation and uridylation are two competing processes that add nucleotides on the 3' end of some small RNAs and suggest that one of the functions of the 3' adenylation may be to negatively affect the 3' uridylation of small RNAs. PMID:10999605

  13. A Natural Product from Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. Et Zucc. Promotes Tat-Dependent HIV Latency Reversal through Triggering P-TEFb's Release from 7SK snRNP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Yang, Shuiyuan; Lu, Huasong; You, Hongchao; Ni, Man; Shan, Wenjun; Lin, Ting; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Haifeng; Zhou, Qiang; Xue, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    The latent reservoirs of HIV represent a major impediment to eradication of HIV/AIDS. To overcome this problem, agents that can activate latent HIV proviruses have been actively sought after, as they can potentially be used in combination with the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to eliminate the latent reservoirs. Although several chemical compounds have been shown to activate latency, they are of limited use due to high toxicity and poor clinical outcomes. In an attempt to identify natural products as effective latency activators from traditional Chinese medicinal herbs that have long been widely used in human population, we have isolated procyanidin C-13,3',3"-tri-O-gallate (named as REJ-C1G3) from Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc., that can activate HIV in latently infected Jurkat T cells. REJ-C1G3 preferentially stimulates HIV transcription in a process that depends on the viral encoded Tat protein and acts synergistically with prostratin (an activator of the NF-κB pathway) or JQ1 (an inhibitor of Brd4) to activate HIV latency. Our mechanistic analyses further show that REJ-C1G3 accomplishes these tasks by inducing the release of P-TEFb, a host cofactor essential for Tat-activation of HIV transcription, from the cellular P-TEFb reservoir 7SK snRNP. PMID:26569506

  14. Small nuclear reactors for power and process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Olds, F.C.

    1984-11-01

    There are a number of small reactor programs around the world, with a sizable variety of designs ranging from 0.2 MWt heat-only units to 440-MWe agro-nuclear complexes. Some are in operation, some are proposed. There are light and heavy water reactors, a liquid metal cooled unit with integral hot reprocessing/refabrication, and an HTGR built with 100-MWe modules. There are several inherently safe designs. Shop fabrication is emphasized for cost and quality control, and close-in siting is practiced here and there. The feasibility of using small reactors differs markedly, depending on type of service and on country-specific factors.

  15. Leading twist nuclear shadowing, nuclear generalized parton distributions and nuclear DVCS at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, Vadim; Goeke, Klaus; Siddikov, Marat

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing and calculate quark and gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of spinless nuclei. We predict very large nuclear shadowing for nuclear GPDs. In the limit of the purely transverse momentum transfer, our nuclear GPDs become impact parameter dependent nuclear parton distributions (PDFs). Nuclear shadowing induces non-trivial correlations between the impact parameter $b$ and the light-cone fraction $x$. We make predictions for the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) amplitude and the DVCS cross section on $^{208}$Pb at high energies. We calculate the cross section of the Bethe-Heitler (BH) process and address the issue of the extraction of the DVCS signal from the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ cross section. We find that the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ differential cross section is dominated by DVCS at the momentum transfer $t$ near the minima of the nuclear form factor. We also find that nuclear shadowing leads

  16. Nuclear Power, Small Nuclear Technology, and the Role of Technical Innovation: An Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, R N; Brown, N W; Smith, C F

    2001-05-18

    An overview of energy-system projections into the new century leads to the conclusion that nuclear power will play a significant role. How significant a role will be determined by the marketplace. Within the range of nuclear-power technologies available, small nuclear-power plants of innovative design appear to fit the needs of a number of developing nations and states. These plants have the potential advantage of modularity, are proliferation-resistant, incorporate passive safety features, minimize waste, and could be cost-competitive with fossil-fuel plants.

  17. Testing of Small Graphite Samples for Nuclear Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Chapman

    2010-11-01

    Accurately determining the mechanical properties of small irradiated samples is crucial to predicting the behavior of the overal irradiated graphite components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. The sample size allowed in a material test reactor, however, is limited, and this poses some difficulties with respect to mechanical testing. In the case of graphite with a larger grain size, a small sample may exhibit characteristics not representative of the bulk material, leading to inaccuracies in the data. A study to determine a potential size effect on the tensile strength was pursued under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. It focuses first on optimizing the tensile testing procedure identified in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard C 781-08. Once the testing procedure was verified, a size effect was assessed by gradually reducing the diameter of the specimens. By monitoring the material response, a size effect was successfully identified.

  18. Enrichment Zoning Options for the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE)

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2010-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. In NASA’s recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study (NASA-SP-2009-566, July 2009), nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option because of its high thrust and high specific impulse (-900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. Past activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center have included development of highly detailed MCNP Monte Carlo transport models of the SNRE and other small engine designs. Preliminary core configurations typically employ fuel elements with fixed fuel composition and fissile material enrichment. Uniform fuel loadings result in undesirable radial power and temperature profiles in the engines. Engine performance can be improved by some combination of propellant flow control at the fuel element level and by varying the fuel composition. Enrichment zoning at the fuel element level with lower enrichments in the higher power elements at the core center and on the core periphery is particularly effective. Power flattening by enrichment zoning typically results in more uniform propellant exit temperatures and improved engine performance. For the SNRE, element enrichment zoning provided very flat radial power profiles with 551 of the 564

  19. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design

    SciTech Connect

    Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the first in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. Also described in this series are the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design driving motivators dictated the final configuration of the Westinghouse SMR to varying degrees, depending on the specific features under consideration. These design drivers include safety, economics, AP1000{sup R} reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR NSSS consists of an integral reactor vessel within a compact containment vessel. The core is located in the bottom of the reactor vessel and is composed of 89 modified Westinghouse 17x17 Robust Fuel Assemblies (RFA). These modified fuel assemblies have an active core length of only 2.4 m (8 ft) long, and the entirety of the core is encompassed by a radial reflector. The Westinghouse SMR core operates on a 24 month fuel cycle. The reactor vessel is approximately 24.4 m (80 ft) long and 3.7 m (12 ft) in diameter in order to facilitate standard rail shipping to the site. The reactor vessel houses hot and cold leg channels to facilitate coolant flow, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), instrumentation and cabling, an intermediate flange to separate flow and instrumentation and facilitate simpler refueling, a pressurizer, a straight tube, recirculating steam

  20. The Small Nuclear Genomes of Selaginella Are Associated with a Low Rate of Genome Size Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baniaga, Anthony E.; Arrigo, Nils; Barker, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The haploid nuclear genome size (1C DNA) of vascular land plants varies over several orders of magnitude. Much of this observed diversity in genome size is due to the proliferation and deletion of transposable elements. To date, all vascular land plant lineages with extremely small nuclear genomes represent recently derived states, having ancestors with much larger genome sizes. The Selaginellaceae represent an ancient lineage with extremely small genomes. It is unclear how small nuclear genomes evolved in Selaginella. We compared the rates of nuclear genome size evolution in Selaginella and major vascular plant clades in a comparative phylogenetic framework. For the analyses, we collected 29 new flow cytometry estimates of haploid genome size in Selaginella to augment publicly available data. Selaginella possess some of the smallest known haploid nuclear genome sizes, as well as the lowest rate of genome size evolution observed across all vascular land plants included in our analyses. Additionally, our analyses provide strong support for a history of haploid nuclear genome size stasis in Selaginella. Our results indicate that Selaginella, similar to other early diverging lineages of vascular land plants, has relatively low rates of genome size evolution. Further, our analyses highlight that a rapid transition to a small genome size is only one route to an extremely small genome. PMID:27189987

  1. The Small Nuclear Genomes of Selaginella Are Associated with a Low Rate of Genome Size Evolution.

    PubMed

    Baniaga, Anthony E; Arrigo, Nils; Barker, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The haploid nuclear genome size (1C DNA) of vascular land plants varies over several orders of magnitude. Much of this observed diversity in genome size is due to the proliferation and deletion of transposable elements. To date, all vascular land plant lineages with extremely small nuclear genomes represent recently derived states, having ancestors with much larger genome sizes. The Selaginellaceae represent an ancient lineage with extremely small genomes. It is unclear how small nuclear genomes evolved in Selaginella We compared the rates of nuclear genome size evolution in Selaginella and major vascular plant clades in a comparative phylogenetic framework. For the analyses, we collected 29 new flow cytometry estimates of haploid genome size in Selaginella to augment publicly available data. Selaginella possess some of the smallest known haploid nuclear genome sizes, as well as the lowest rate of genome size evolution observed across all vascular land plants included in our analyses. Additionally, our analyses provide strong support for a history of haploid nuclear genome size stasis in Selaginella Our results indicate that Selaginella, similar to other early diverging lineages of vascular land plants, has relatively low rates of genome size evolution. Further, our analyses highlight that a rapid transition to a small genome size is only one route to an extremely small genome. PMID:27189987

  2. A Natural Product from Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. Et Zucc. Promotes Tat-Dependent HIV Latency Reversal through Triggering P-TEFb’s Release from 7SK snRNP

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huasong; You, Hongchao; Ni, Man; Shan, Wenjun; Lin, Ting; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Haifeng; Zhou, Qiang; Xue, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    The latent reservoirs of HIV represent a major impediment to eradication of HIV/AIDS. To overcome this problem, agents that can activate latent HIV proviruses have been actively sought after, as they can potentially be used in combination with the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to eliminate the latent reservoirs. Although several chemical compounds have been shown to activate latency, they are of limited use due to high toxicity and poor clinical outcomes. In an attempt to identify natural products as effective latency activators from traditional Chinese medicinal herbs that have long been widely used in human population, we have isolated procyanidin C-13,3',3"-tri-O-gallate (named as REJ-C1G3) from Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc., that can activate HIV in latently infected Jurkat T cells. REJ-C1G3 preferentially stimulates HIV transcription in a process that depends on the viral encoded Tat protein and acts synergistically with prostratin (an activator of the NF-κB pathway) or JQ1 (an inhibitor of Brd4) to activate HIV latency. Our mechanistic analyses further show that REJ-C1G3 accomplishes these tasks by inducing the release of P-TEFb, a host cofactor essential for Tat-activation of HIV transcription, from the cellular P-TEFb reservoir 7SK snRNP. PMID:26569506

  3. Nuclear criticality safety calculational analysis for small-diameter containers

    SciTech Connect

    LeTellier, M.S.; Smallwood, D.J.; Henkel, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents calculations performed to establish a technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of favorable geometry containers, sometimes referred to as 5-inch containers, in use at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A list of containers currently used in the plant is shown in Table 1.0-1. These containers are currently used throughout the plant with no mass limits. The use of containers with geometries or material types other than those addressed in this evaluation must be bounded by this analysis or have an additional analysis performed. The following five basic container geometries were modeled and bound all container geometries in Table 1.0-1: (1) 4.32-inch-diameter by 50-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (2) 5.0-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (3) 5.25-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}F-can{close_quotes}); (4) 5.25-inch-diameter by 15-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}Z-can{close_quotes}); and (5) 5.0-inch-diameter by 9-inch-high polybottle ({open_quotes}CO-4{close_quotes}). Each container type is evaluated using five basic reflection and interaction models that include single containers and multiple containers in normal and in credible abnormal conditions. The uranium materials evaluated are UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O and UF{sub 4}+oil materials at 100% and 10% enrichments and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and H{sub 2}O at 100% enrichment. The design basis safe criticality limit for the Portsmouth facility is k{sub eff} + 2{sigma} < 0.95. The KENO study results may be used as the basis for evaluating general use of these containers in the plant.

  4. Cancer mortality in small areas around nuclear facilities in England and Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Baron, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cancer mortality trends were examined for the small areas around fourteen nuclear and five non-nuclear facilities in England and Wales. Using routine OPCS mortality data, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for these areas were computed for selected causes of death. Changes in the SMRs were then sought by comparing the SMRs for the five years before the facility opened with the period 10 (in some cases 15) years after start-up, and by computing the weighted regression of the SMRs on calendar year. These analyses indicate no overall pattern of increasing cancer SMRs around nuclear facilities. PMID:6498079

  5. Recruitment of phosphorylated small heat shock protein Hsp27 to nuclear speckles without stress

    SciTech Connect

    Bryantsev, A.L.; Chechenova, M.B.; Shelden, E.A. . E-mail: eshelden@wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    During stress, the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp27 enters cell nuclei. The present study examines the requirements for entry of Hsp27 into nuclei of normal rat kidney (NRK) renal epithelial cells, and for its interactions with specific nuclear structures. We find that phosphorylation of Hsp27 is necessary for the efficient entry into nuclei during heat shock but not sufficient for efficient nuclear entry under control conditions. We further report that Hsp27 is recruited to an RNAse sensitive fraction of SC35 positive nuclear speckles, but not other intranuclear structures, in response to heat shock. Intriguingly, Hsp27 phosphorylation, in the absence of stress, is sufficient for recruitment to speckles found in post-anaphase stage mitotic cells. Additionally, pseudophosphorylated Hsp27 fused to a nuclear localization peptide (NLS) is recruited to nuclear speckles in unstressed interphase cells, but wildtype and nonphosphorylatable Hsp27 NLS fusion proteins are not. The expression of NLS-Hsp27 mutants does not enhance colony forming abilities of cells subjected to severe heat shock, but does regulate nuclear speckle morphology. These data demonstrate that phosphorylation, but not stress, mediates Hsp27 recruitment to an RNAse soluble fraction of nuclear speckles and support a site-specific role for Hsp27 within the nucleus.

  6. A small economical rolling mill for producing foils used as nuclear targets

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1996-11-01

    A small, economical rolling mill has found extensive use in the Physics Division Target Development Laboratory for producing foils used in atomic and nuclear physics experiments. This apparatus is quite versatile for its size and enables a large fraction of our target foil requirements to be realized in-house. A description of the rolling mill and some examples of targets produced will be given.

  7. Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

    2012-01-17

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

  8. Nuclear design of small-sized high temperature gas-cooled reactor for developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, M.; Seki, Y.; Inaba, Y.; Ohashi, H.; Sato, H.; Fukaya, Y.; Tachibana, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started a conceptual design of a small-sized HTGR with 50 MW thermal power (HTR50S), which is a first-of-a-kind commercial or demonstration plant of a small-sized HTGR to be deployed in developing countries such as Kazakhstan in the 2020's. The nuclear design of the HTR50S is performed by upgrading the proven technology of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to reduce the cost for the construction. In the HTTR design, twelve kinds of fuel enrichment was used to optimize the power distribution, which is required to make the maximum fuel temperature below the thermal limitation during the burn-up period. However, manufacture of many kinds of fuel enrichment causes increase of the construction cost. To solve this problem, the present study challenges the nuclear design by reducing the number of fuel enrichment to as few as possible. The nuclear calculations were performed with SRAC code system whose validity was proven by the HTTR burn-up data. The calculation results suggested that the optimization of the power distribution was reasonably achieved and the maximum fuel temperature was kept below the limitation by using three kinds of fuel enrichment. (authors)

  9. Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2012-01-01

    well as open loop systems for direct nuclear thermal propulsion. Although a number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion were proposed and designed, none were built. This report summarizes status results of evaluations of small nuclear reactor designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion.

  10. A microstructural comparison of two nuclear-grade martensitic steels using small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, R.; Fiori, F.; Little, E. A.; Magnani, M.

    1997-06-01

    Results are presented of a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) study on two 10-13% Cr martensitic stainless steels of interest for nuclear applications, viz. DIN 1.4914 (MANET specification, for fusion reactors) and AISI 410. The investigation has focussed principally on microstructural effects associated with the differences in chromium content between the two alloys. The size distribution functions determined from nuclear and magnetic SANS components for the two steels given identical heat treatments are in accord with an interpretation based on the presence of ˜ 1 nm size CCr aggregates in the microstructure. Much larger (˜ 10 nm) scattering inhomogeneities with different magnetic contrast are also present and tentatively identified as carbides.

  11. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Kojun; Pflug, James M; Sproul, John S; Dasenko, Mark A; Maddison, David R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  12. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasenko, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  13. Phylogenetic position of Cryothecomonas inferred from nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Kühn, S; Lange, M; Medlin, L K

    2000-12-01

    The systematic position of the genus Cryothecomonas has been determined from an analysis of the nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of Cryothecomonas longipes and two strains of Cryothecomonas aestivalis. Our phylogenetic trees inferred from maximum likelihood, distance and maximum parsimony methods robustly show that the genus Cryothecomonas clusters within the phylum Cercozoa, and is related to the sarcomonad flagellate Heteromita globosa. Morphological data supporting the taxonomic placement of Cryothecomonas near the sarcomonad flagellates has been compiled from the literature. The high number of nucleotide substitutions found between two morphologically indistinguishable strains of Cryothecomonas aestivalis suggests the possibility of cryptic species within Cryothecomonas aestivalis. PMID:11212894

  14. Development concept for a small, split-core, heat-pipe-cooled nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, E.; Breitwieser, R.; Niederauer, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    There have been two main deterrents to the development of semiportable nuclear reactors. One is the high development costs; the other is the inability to satisfy with assurance the questions of operational safety. This report shows how a split-core, heat-pipe cooled reactor could conceptually eliminate these deterrents, and examines and summarizes recent work on split-core, heat-pipe reactors. A concept for a small reactor that could be developed at a comparatively low cost is presented. The concept would extend the technology of subcritical radioisotope thermoelectric generators using 238 PuO2 to the evolution of critical space power reactors using 239 PuO2.

  15. Feasibility study on nuclear core design for soluble boron free small modular reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie Hah, Chang Joo; Ju, Cho Sung

    2015-04-29

    A feasibility study on nuclear core design of soluble boron free (SBF) core for small size (150MWth) small modular reactor (SMR) was investigated. The purpose of this study was to design a once through cycle SMR core, where it can be used to supply electricity to a remote isolated area. PWR fuel assembly design with 17×17 arrangement, with 264 fuel rods per assembly was adopted as the basis design. The computer code CASMO-3/MASTER was used for the search of SBF core and fuel assembly analysis for SMR design. A low critical boron concentration (CBC) below 200 ppm core with 4.7 years once through cycle length was achieved using 57 fuel assemblies having 170 cm of active height. Core reactivity controlled using mainly 512 number of 4 wt% and 960 12 wt% Gd rods.

  16. Feasibility study on nuclear core design for soluble boron free small modular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie; Hah, Chang Joo; Ju, Cho Sung

    2015-04-01

    A feasibility study on nuclear core design of soluble boron free (SBF) core for small size (150MWth) small modular reactor (SMR) was investigated. The purpose of this study was to design a once through cycle SMR core, where it can be used to supply electricity to a remote isolated area. PWR fuel assembly design with 17×17 arrangement, with 264 fuel rods per assembly was adopted as the basis design. The computer code CASMO-3/MASTER was used for the search of SBF core and fuel assembly analysis for SMR design. A low critical boron concentration (CBC) below 200 ppm core with 4.7 years once through cycle length was achieved using 57 fuel assemblies having 170 cm of active height. Core reactivity controlled using mainly 512 number of 4 wt% and 960 12 wt% Gd rods.

  17. Aggregates of Small Nuclear Ribonucleic Acids (snRNAs) in Alzheimer’s Disease’

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Chadwick M.; Dammer, Eric B.; Diner, Ian; Yi, Hong; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Gearing, Marla; Glass, Jonathan D.; Montine, Thomas J.; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.

    2014-01-01

    We recently discovered that protein components of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) spliceosome form cytoplasmic aggregates in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain, resulting in widespread changes in RNA splicing. However, the involvement of small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), also key components of the spliceosome complex, in the pathology of AD remains unknown. Using immunohistochemical staining of post-mortem human brain and spinal cord, we identified cytoplasmic tangle-shaped aggregates of snRNA in both sporadic and familial AD cases but not in aged controls or other neurodegenerative disorders. Immunofluorescence using antibodies reactive with the 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine cap of snRNAs and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated snRNA localization with tau and paired helical filaments, the main component of neurofibrillary tangles. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed U1 snRNA accumulation in the insoluble fraction of AD brains whereas other U snRNAs were not enriched. In combination with our previous results, these findings demonstrate that aggregates of U1 snRNA and U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins represent a new pathological hallmark of AD. PMID:24571648

  18. Aberrant 3' oligoadenylation of spliceosomal U6 small nuclear RNA in poikiloderma with neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Hilcenko, Christine; Simpson, Paul J; Finch, Andrew J; Bowler, Frank R; Churcher, Mark J; Jin, Li; Packman, Len C; Shlien, Adam; Campbell, Peter; Kirwan, Michael; Dokal, Inderjeet; Warren, Alan J

    2013-02-01

    The recessive disorder poikiloderma with neutropenia (PN) is caused by mutations in the C16orf57 gene that encodes the highly conserved USB1 protein. Here, we present the 1.1 Å resolution crystal structure of human USB1, defining it as a member of the LigT-like superfamily of 2H phosphoesterases. We show that human USB1 is a distributive 3'-5' exoribonuclease that posttranscriptionally removes uridine and adenosine nucleosides from the 3' end of spliceosomal U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA), directly catalyzing terminal 2', 3' cyclic phosphate formation. USB1 measures the appropriate length of the U6 oligo(U) tail by reading the position of a key adenine nucleotide (A102) and pausing 5 uridine residues downstream.We show that the 3' ends of U6 snRNA in PN patient lymphoblasts are elongated and unexpectedly carry nontemplated 3' oligo(A) tails that are characteristic of nuclear RNA surveillance targets. Thus, our study reveals a novel quality control pathway in which posttranscriptional 3'-end processing by USB1 protects U6 snRNA from targeting and destruction by the nuclear exosome. Our data implicate aberrant oligoadenylation of U6 snRNA in the pathogenesis of the leukemia predisposition disorder PN. PMID:23190533

  19. Aggregation Properties of the Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein U1-70K in Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Ian; Hales, Chadwick M.; Bishof, Isaac; Rabenold, Lake; Duong, Duc M.; Yi, Hong; Laur, Oskar; Gearing, Marla; Troncoso, Juan; Thambisetty, Madhav; Lah, James J.; Levey, Allan I.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that U1-70K and other U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins are Sarkosyl-insoluble and associate with Tau neurofibrillary tangles selectively in Alzheimer disease (AD). Currently, the mechanisms underlying the conversion of soluble nuclear U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins into insoluble cytoplasmic aggregates remain elusive. Based on the biochemical and subcellular distribution properties of U1-70K in AD, we hypothesized that aggregated U1-70K itself or other biopolymers (e.g. proteins or nucleic acids) interact with and sequester natively folded soluble U1-70K into insoluble aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that total homogenates from AD brain induce soluble U1-70K from control brain or recombinant U1-70K to become Sarkosyl-insoluble. This effect was not dependent on RNA and did not correlate with detergent-insoluble Tau levels as AD homogenates with reduced levels of these components were still capable of inducing U1-70K aggregation. In contrast, proteinase K-treated AD homogenates and Sarkosyl-soluble AD fractions were unable to induce U1-70K aggregation, indicating that aggregated proteins in AD brain are responsible for inducing soluble U1-70K aggregation. It was determined that the C terminus of U1-70K, which harbors two disordered low complexity (LC) domains, is necessary for U1-70K aggregation. Moreover, both LC1 and LC2 domains were sufficient for aggregation. Finally, protein cross-linking and mass spectrometry studies demonstrated that a U1-70K fragment harboring the LC1 domain directly interacts with aggregated U1-70K in AD brain. Our results support a hypothesis that aberrant forms of U1-70K in AD can directly sequester soluble forms of U1-70K into insoluble aggregates. PMID:25355317

  20. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding using normalized elimination of the small component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, K.; Maeda, H.; Kawakubo, T.; Ootani, Y.; Funaki, M.; Fukui, H.

    2006-06-01

    The normalized elimination of the small component (NESC) theory, recently proposed by Filatov and Cremer [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 064104 (2005)], is extended to include magnetic interactions and applied to the calculation of the nuclear magnetic shielding in HX (X =F,Cl,Br,I) systems. The NESC calculations are performed at the levels of the zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) and the second-order regular approximation (SORA). The calculations show that the NESC-ZORA results are very close to the NESC-SORA results, except for the shielding of the I nucleus. Both the NESC-ZORA and NESC-SORA calculations yield very similar results to the previously reported values obtained using the relativistic infinite-order two-component coupled Hartree-Fock method. The difference between NESC-ZORA and NESC-SORA results is significant for the shieldings of iodine.

  1. Mars Sample Return and Flight Test of a Small Bimodal Nuclear Rocket and ISRU Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jeffrey A.; Wolinsky, Jason J.; Bilyeu, Michael B.; Scott, John H.

    2014-01-01

    A combined Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) flight test and Mars Sample Return mission (MSR) is explored as a means of "jump-starting" NTR development. Development of a small-scale engine with relevant fuel and performance could more affordably and quickly "pathfind" the way to larger scale engines. A flight test with subsequent inflight postirradiation evaluation may also be more affordable and expedient compared to ground testing and associated facilities and approvals. Mission trades and a reference scenario based upon a single expendable launch vehicle (ELV) are discussed. A novel "single stack" spacecraft/lander/ascent vehicle concept is described configured around a "top-mounted" downward firing NTR, reusable common tank, and "bottom-mount" bus, payload and landing gear. Requirements for a hypothetical NTR engine are described that would be capable of direct thermal propulsion with either hydrogen or methane propellant, and modest electrical power generation during cruise and Mars surface insitu resource utilization (ISRU) propellant production.

  2. Functional analysis of the sea urchin U7 small nuclear RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmartin, G.M.; Schaufele, F.; Schaffner, G.; Birnstiel, M.L.

    1988-03-01

    U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is an essential component of the RNA-processing machinery which generates the 3' end of mature histone mRNA in the sea urchin. The U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) is classified as a member of the Sm-type U snRNP family by virtue of its recognition by both anti-trimethylguanosine and anti-Sm antibodies. The authors analyzed the function-structure relationship of the U7 snRNP by mutagenesis experiments. These suggested that the U7 snRNP of the sea urchin is composed of three important domains. The fist domain encompasses the 5'-terminal sequence, up to about nucleotides 7, which are accessible to micrococcal nuclease, while the remainder of the RNA is highly protected and hence presumably bound by proteins. This region contains the sequence complementarities between the U7 snRNA and the histone pre-mRNA which have previously been shown to be required for 3' processing. Nucleotides 9 to 20 constitute a second domain which includes sequences for Sm protein binding. The complementarities between the U7 snRNA sequences in this region and the terminal palindrome fo the historne mRNA appear to be fortuitous and play only a secondary, if any, role in 3' processing. The third domain is composed of the terminal palindrome of U7 snRNA, the secondary structure of which must be maintained for the U7 snRNP to function, but its sequence can be drastically altered without any observable effect on snRNP assembly or 3' processing.

  3. Implementing a Nuclear Power Plant Model for Evaluating Load-Following Capability on a Small Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arda, Samet Egemen

    A pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant (NPP) model is introduced into Positive Sequence Load Flow (PSLF) software by General Electric in order to evaluate the load-following capability of NPPs. The nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) consists of a reactor core, hot and cold legs, plenums, and a U-tube steam generator. The physical systems listed above are represented by mathematical models utilizing a state variable lumped parameter approach. A steady-state control program for the reactor, and simple turbine and governor models are also developed. Adequacy of the isolated reactor core, the isolated steam generator, and the complete PWR models are tested in Matlab/Simulink and dynamic responses are compared with the test results obtained from the H. B. Robinson NPP. Test results illustrate that the developed models represents the dynamic features of real-physical systems and are capable of predicting responses due to small perturbations of external reactivity and steam valve opening. Subsequently, the NSSS representation is incorporated into PSLF and coupled with built-in excitation system and generator models. Different simulation cases are run when sudden loss of generation occurs in a small power system which includes hydroelectric and natural gas power plants besides the developed PWR NPP. The conclusion is that the NPP can respond to a disturbance in the power system without exceeding any design and safety limits if appropriate operational conditions, such as achieving the NPP turbine control by adjusting the speed of the steam valve, are met. In other words, the NPP can participate in the control of system frequency and improve the overall power system performance.

  4. Antitumor effect of dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a small molecule inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB, on glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Tsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makiko; Yorita, Kenji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Hideo; Umezawa, Kazuo; Kataoka, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant type of brain tumor. Despite recent advances in therapeutic modalities, the prognosis of glioblastoma remains very poor. Recent studies have indicated that RelA/nuclear factor (NF)-κB is consistently activated in human glioblastoma. In this study, we searched for a new treatment modality for glioblastoma, by examining the effects of dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), a unique small molecule inhibitor of NF-κB. Addition of DHMEQ to cultured human glioblastoma cells inhibited the nuclear translocation of RelA. It also reduced the growth rate of human glioblastoma cells significantly in 6 cell lines and modestly in 3 among 10 cell lines examined. Then, we performed further analyses using 3 sensitive cell lines (U87, U251, and YKG-1). The growth retardation was accompanied by G2/M arrest in vitro. Increased apoptosis was observed in U87 and YKG-1, but not U251 cells after DHMEQ treatment. Then, we tested the efficacy of DHMEQ in chemoprevention through the use of a nude mouse model. Subcutaneous tumors formed by U87 or U251 cells were reduced by ∼40% in size by intraperitoneal administration of DHMEQ started immediately after implantation of the cells. DHMEQ treatment achieved statistically significant improvements in survival curves of mice intracranially implanted with U87 or U251 cells. Histological analysis revealed increased areas of necrosis, increased numbers of collapsed microvessels, decreased nuclear immunoreactivity of RelA, and decreased immunoreactivity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the DHMEQ-treated U87 tumor tissues. These results suggest that the targeting of NF-κB by DHMEQ may serve as a promising treatment modality in glioblastoma. PMID:21968049

  5. Bile acids inhibit duodenal secretin expression via orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP).

    PubMed

    Lam, Ian P Y; Lee, Leo T O; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Alpini, Gianfranco; Chow, Billy K C

    2009-07-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan nuclear receptor in which gene expression can be upregulated by bile acids. It regulates its target genes by repressing the transcriptional activities of other nuclear receptors including NeuroD, which has been shown to regulate secretin gene expression. Here, we evaluated the regulation on duodenal secretin gene expression by SHP and selected bile acids, cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). In vitro treatment of CDCA or fexaramine elevated the SHP transcript level and occupancy on secretin promoter. The increase in the SHP level, induced by bile acid treatment or overexpression, reduced secretin gene expression, whereas this gene inhibitory effect was reversed by silencing of endogenous SHP. In in vivo studies, double-immunofluorescence staining demonstrated the coexpression of secretin and SHP in mouse duodenum. Feeding mice with 1% CA-enriched rodent chow resulted in upregulation of SHP and a concomitant decrease in secretin transcript and protein levels in duodenum compared with the control group fed with normal chow. A diet enriched with 5% cholestyramine led to a decrease in SHP level and a corresponding increase in secretin expression. Overall, this study showed that bile acids via SHP inhibit duodenal secretin gene expression. Because secretin is a key hormone that stimulates bile flow in cholangiocytes, this pathway thus provides a novel means to modulate secretin-stimulated choleresis in response to intraduodenal bile acids. PMID:19372104

  6. Small-scale instrumentation for nuclear magnetic resonance of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Dabrowski, Martin; Danieli, Ernesto; Evertz, Loribeth; Haber, Agnes; Van Landeghem, Maxime; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Olaru, Alexandra; Perlo, Juan; Sucre, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of fluids confined to porous media is the oldest topic of investigation with small-scale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) instruments, as such instruments are mobile and can be moved to the site of the object, such as the borehole of an oil well. While the analysis was originally restricted by the inferior homogeneity of the employed magnets to relaxation measurements, today, portable magnets are available for all types of NMR measurements concerning relaxometry, imaging and spectroscopy in two types of geometries. These geometries refer to closed magnets that surround the sample and open magnets, which are brought close to the object for measurement. The current state of the art of portable, small-scale NMR instruments is reviewed and recent applications of such instruments are featured. These include the porosity analysis and description of diesel particulate filters, the determination of the moisture content in walls from gray concrete, new approaches to analyze the pore space and moisture migration in soil, and the constitutional analysis of the mortar base of ancient wall paintings.

  7. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  8. Design and analysis of a nuclear reactor core for innovative small light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Alexey I.

    In order to address the energy needs of developing countries and remote communities, Oregon State University has proposed the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) design. In order to achieve five years of operation without refueling, use of 8% enriched fuel is necessary. This dissertation is focused on core design issues related with increased fuel enrichment (8.0%) and specific MASLWR operational conditions (such as lower operational pressure and temperature, and increased leakage due to small core). Neutron physics calculations are performed with the commercial nuclear industry tools CASMO-4 and SIMULATE-3, developed by Studsvik Scandpower Inc. The first set of results are generated from infinite lattice level calculations with CASMO-4, and focus on evaluation of the principal differences between standard PWR fuel and MASLWR fuel. Chapter 4-1 covers aspects of fuel isotopic composition changes with burnup, evaluation of kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients. Chapter 4-2 discusses gadolinium self-shielding and shadowing effects, and subsequent impacts on power generation peaking and Reactor Control System shadowing. The second aspect of the research is dedicated to core design issues, such as reflector design (chapter 4-3), burnable absorber distribution and programmed fuel burnup and fuel use strategy (chapter 4-4). This section also includes discussion of the parameters important for safety and evaluation of Reactor Control System options for the proposed core design. An evaluation of the sensitivity of the proposed design to uncertainty in calculated parameters is presented in chapter 4-5. The results presented in this dissertation cover a new area of reactor design and operational parameters, and may be applicable to other small and large pressurized water reactor designs.

  9. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were

  10. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine

  11. Tissue-specific expression and cDNA cloning of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, G.; Amara, S.G.; Lerner, M.R. )

    1988-07-01

    Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases have antibodies against nuclear antigens. An example is anti-Sm sera, which recognize proteins associated with small nuclear RNA molecules (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles). In this paper anti-Sm sera were used to probe immunoblots of various rat tissues. A previously unidentified M{sub r} 28,000 polypeptide was recognized by these anti-Sm sera. This polypeptide, referred to as N, is expressed in a tissue-specific manner, being most abundant in rat brain, less so in heart, and undetectable in the other tissues examined. Immunoprecipitation experiments using antibodies directed against the cap structure of small nuclear RNAs have demonstrated that N is a snRNP-associated polypeptide. Anti-Sm serum was also used to isolate a partial cDNA clone ({lambda}rb91) from a rat brain phage {lambda}gt11 cDNA expression library. A longer cDNA clone was obtained by rescreening the library with {lambda}rb91. In vitro transcription and subsequent translation of this subcloned, longer insert (pGMA2) resulted in a protein product with the same electrophoretic and immunological properties as N, confirming that pGMA2 encodes N. The tissue distribution of N and the involvement of snRNP particles in nuclear pre-mRNA processing may imply a role for N in tissue-specific pre-mRNA splicing.

  12. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements. PMID:23955030

  13. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex and RNA splicing alterations in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Hales, Chadwick M; Chen, Ping-Chung; Gozal, Yair; Dammer, Eric B; Fritz, Jason J; Wang, Xusheng; Xia, Qiangwei; Duong, Duc M; Street, Craig; Cantero, Gloria; Cheng, Dongmei; Jones, Drew R; Wu, Zhiping; Li, Yuxin; Diner, Ian; Heilman, Craig J; Rees, Howard D; Wu, Hao; Lin, Li; Szulwach, Keith E; Gearing, Marla; Mufson, Elliott J; Bennett, David A; Montine, Thomas J; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Wingo, Thomas S; Sun, Yi E; Jin, Peng; Hanfelt, John; Willcock, Donna M; Levey, Allan; Lah, James J; Peng, Junmin

    2013-10-01

    Deposition of insoluble protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. The universal presence of β-amyloid and tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has facilitated advancement of the amyloid cascade and tau hypotheses that have dominated AD pathogenesis research and therapeutic development. However, the underlying etiology of the disease remains to be fully elucidated. Here we report a comprehensive study of the human brain-insoluble proteome in AD by mass spectrometry. We identify 4,216 proteins, among which 36 proteins accumulate in the disease, including U1-70K and other U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) spliceosome components. Similar accumulations in mild cognitive impairment cases indicate that spliceosome changes occur in early stages of AD. Multiple U1 snRNP subunits form cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in AD but not in other examined neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Comparison of RNA from AD and control brains reveals dysregulated RNA processing with accumulation of unspliced RNA species in AD, including myc box-dependent-interacting protein 1, clusterin, and presenilin-1. U1-70K knockdown or antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of U1 snRNP increases the protein level of amyloid precursor protein. Thus, our results demonstrate unique U1 snRNP pathology and implicate abnormal RNA splicing in AD pathogenesis. PMID:24023061

  14. Static Converter for High Energy Utilization, Modular, Small Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P.

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents and analyzes the performance of high efficiency, high total energy utilization, static converters, which could be used in conjunction with small nuclear reactor plants in remote locations and in undersea applications, requiring little or no maintenance. The converters consist of a top cycle of Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion (AMTEC) units and PbTe thermoelectric (TE) bottom cycle. In addition to converting the reactor thermal power to electricity at 1150 K or less, at a thermodynamic efficiency in the low to mid thirties, the heat rejection from the TE bottom cycle could be used for space heating, industrial processing, or sea water desalination. The results indicated that for space heating applications, where the rejected thermal power from the TE bottom cycle is removed by natural convection of ambient air, a total utilization of the reactor thermal power of > 80% is possible. When operated at 1030 K, potassium AMTEC/TE converters are not only more efficient than the sodium AMTEC/TE converters but produce more electrical power. The present analysis showed that a single converter could be sized to produce up to 100 kWe and 70 kWe, for the Na-AMTEC/TE units when operating at 1150 K and the K-AMTEC/TE units when operating at 1030 K, respectively. Such modularity is an added advantage to the high-energy utilization of the present AMTEC/TE converters. (authors)

  15. The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner mediates male infertility induced by diethylstilbestrol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Volle, David H.; Decourteix, Mélanie; Garo, Erwan; McNeilly, Judy; Fenichel, Patrick; Auwerx, Johan; McNeilly, Alan S.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Benahmed, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Studies in rodents have shown that male sexual function can be disrupted by fetal or neonatal administration of compounds that alter endocrine homeostasis, such as the synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES). Although the molecular basis for this effect remains unknown, estrogen receptors likely play a critical role in mediating DES-induced infertility. Recently, we showed that the orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (Nr0b2), which is both a target gene and a transcriptional repressor of estrogen receptors, controls testicular function by regulating germ cell entry into meiosis and testosterone synthesis. We therefore hypothesized that some of the harmful effects of DES on testes could be mediated through Nr0b2. Here, we present data demonstrating that Nr0b2 deficiency protected mice against the negative effects of DES on testis development and function. During postnatal development, Nr0b2-null mice were resistant to DES-mediated inhibition of germ cell differentiation, which may be the result of interference by Nr0b2 with retinoid signals that control meiosis. Adult Nr0b2-null male mice were also protected against the effects of DES; however, we suggest that this phenomenon was due to the removal of the repressive effects of Nr0b2 on steroidogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that Nr0b2 plays a critical role in the pathophysiological changes induced by DES in the mouse testis. PMID:19884658

  16. A novel mechanism for regulating the activity of proliferating cell nuclear antigen by a small protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Yopp, Daniel C.; Hileman, Travis H.; Santangelo, Thomas J.; Hurwitz, Jerard; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that associates with and influences the activity of many proteins participating in DNA metabolic processes and cell cycle progression. Previously, an uncharacterized small protein, encoded by TK0808 in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis, was shown to stably interact with PCNA in vivo. Here, we show that this protein, designated Thermococcales inhibitor of PCNA (TIP), binds to PCNA in vitro and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities likely by preventing PCNA trimerization. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, the interacting regions of PCNA and TIP were identified. Most proteins bind to PCNA via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that interacts with the inter domain connecting loop (IDCL) on PCNA. TIP, however, lacks any known PCNA-interacting motif, suggesting a new mechanism for PCNA binding and regulation of PCNA-dependent activities, which may support the development of a new subclass of therapeutic biomolecules for inhibiting PCNA. PMID:24728986

  17. Host miRNA degradation by Herpesvirus saimiri small nuclear RNA requires an unstructured interacting region.

    PubMed

    Pawlica, Paulina; Moss, Walter N; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-08-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri, an oncogenic herpesvirus, during latency produces seven small nuclear RNAs, called the Herpesvirus saimiri U RNAs (HSUR1-7). HSUR1 mediates degradation of the host microRNA, miR-27, via a process that requires imperfect base-pairing. The decreased levels of miR-27 lead to prolonged T-cell activation and likely contribute to oncogenesis. To gain insight into HSUR1-mediated degradation of miR-27, we probed the in vivo secondary structure of HSUR1 and coupled this with bioinformatic structural analyses. The results suggest that HSUR1 adopts a conformation different than previously believed and that the region complementary to miR-27 lacks stable structure. To determine whether HSUR1 structural flexibility is important for its ability to mediate miR-27 degradation, we performed structurally informative mutagenic analyses of HSUR1. HSUR1 mutants in which the miR-27 binding site sequence is preserved, but sequestered in predicted helices, lose their ability to decrease miR-27 levels. These results indicate that the HSUR1 miR27-binding region must be available in a conformationally flexible segment for noncoding RNA function. PMID:27335146

  18. Efficient expression of protein coding genes from the murine U1 small nuclear RNA promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J S; Sethna, M; Ramamurthy, L; Gowen, S A; Samulski, R J; Marzluff, W F

    1996-01-01

    Few promoters are active at high levels in all cells. Of these, the majority encode structural RNAs transcribed by RNA polymerases I or III and are not accessible for the expression of proteins. An exception are the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Although snRNA biosynthesis is unique and thought not to be compatible with synthesis of functional mRNA, we have tested these promoters for their ability to express functional mRNAs. We have used the murine U1a and U1b snRNA gene promoters to express the Escherichia coli lacZ gene and the human alpha-globin gene from either episomal or integrated templates by transfection, or infection into a variety of mammalian cell types. Equivalent expression of beta-galactosidase was obtained from < 250 nucleotides of 5'-flanking sequence containing the complete promoter of either U1 snRNA gene or from the 750-nt cytomegalovirus promoter and enhancer regions. The mRNA was accurately initiated at the U1 start site, efficiently spliced and polyadenylylated, and localized to polyribosomes. Recombinant adenovirus containing the U1b-lacZ chimeric gene transduced and expressed beta-galactosidase efficiently in human 293 cells and airway epithelial cells in culture. Viral vectors containing U1 snRNA promoters may be an attractive alternative to vectors containing viral promoters for persistent high-level expression of therapeutic genes or proteins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8799116

  19. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography and nuclear imaging system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, I.-Chih; Lu, Yujie; Darne, Chinmay; Rasmussen, John C.; Zhu, Banghe; Azhdarinia, Ali; Yan, Shikui; Smith, Anne M.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence is an alternative modality for molecular imaging that has been demonstrated in animals and recently in humans. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography (FEOT) using continuous wave or frequency domain photon migration techniques could be used to provide quantitative molecular imaging in vivo if it could be validated against "gold-standard," nuclear imaging modalities, using dual-labeled imaging agents. Unfortunately, developed FEOT systems are not suitable for incorporation with CT/PET/SPECT scanners because they utilize benchtop devices and require a large footprint. In this work, we developed a miniaturized fluorescence imaging system installed in the gantry of the Siemens Inveon PET/CT scanner to enable NIR transillumination measurements. The system consists of a CCD camera equipped with NIR sensitive intensifier, a diode laser controlled by a single board compact controller, a 2-axis galvanometer, and RF circuit modules for homodyne detection of the phase and amplitude of fluorescence signals. The performance of the FEOT system was tested and characterized. A mouse-shaped solid phantom of uniform optical properties with a fluorescent inclusion was scanned using CT, and NIR fluorescence images at several projections were collected. The method of high-order approximation to the radioactive transfer equation was then used to reconstruct the optical images. Dual-labeled agents were also used on a tumor bearing mouse to validate the results of the FEOT against PET/CT image. The results showed that the location of the fluorophore obtained from the FEOT matches the location of tumor obtained from the PET/CT images. Besides validation of FEOT, this hybrid system could allow multimodal molecular imaging (FEOT/PET/CT) for small animal imaging.

  20. U1 small nuclear RNA variants differentially form ribonucleoprotein particles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Somarelli, Jason A; Mesa, Annia; Rodriguez, Carol E; Sharma, Shalini; Herrera, Rene J

    2014-04-25

    The U1 small nuclear (sn)RNA participates in splicing of pre-mRNAs by recognizing and binding to 5' splice sites at exon/intron boundaries. U1 snRNAs associate with 5' splice sites in the form of ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) that are comprised of the U1 snRNA and 10 core components, including U1A, U1-70K, U1C and the 'Smith antigen', or Sm, heptamer. The U1 snRNA is highly conserved across a wide range of taxa; however, a number of reports have identified the presence of expressed U1-like snRNAs in multiple species, including humans. While numerous U1-like molecules have been shown to be expressed, it is unclear whether these variant snRNAs have the capacity to form snRNPs and participate in splicing. The purpose of the present study was to further characterize biochemically the ability of previously identified human U1-like variants to form snRNPs and bind to U1 snRNP proteins. A bioinformatics analysis provided support for the existence of multiple expressed variants. In vitro gel shift assays, competition assays, and immunoprecipitations (IPs) revealed that the variants formed high molecular weight assemblies to varying degrees and associated with core U1 snRNP proteins to a lesser extent than the canonical U1 snRNA. Together, these data suggest that the human U1 snRNA variants analyzed here are unable to efficiently bind U1 snRNP proteins. The current work provides additional biochemical insights into the ability of the variants to assemble into snRNPs. PMID:24583175

  1. Structural and functional analysis of chicken U4 small nuclear RNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, M L; Korf, G M; McNamara, K J; Stumph, W E

    1986-01-01

    Two distinct chicken U4 RNA genes have been cloned and characterized. They are closely linked within 465 base pairs of each other and have the same transcriptional orientation. The downstream U4 homology is a true gene, based on the criteria that it is colinear with chicken U4B RNA and is expressed when injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes. The upstream U4 homology, however, contains seven base substitutions relative to U4B RNA. This sequence may be a nonexpressed pseudogene, but the pattern of base substitutions suggests that it more probably encodes a variant yet functional U4 RNA product not yet characterized at the RNA level. In support of this, the two U4 genes have regions of homology with each other in their 5'-flanking DNA at two positions known to be essential for the efficient expression of vertebrate U1 and U2 small nuclear RNA genes. In the case of U1 and U2 RNA genes, the more distal region (located near position-200 with respect to the RNA cap site) is known to function as a transcriptional enhancer. Although this region is highly conserved in overall structure and sequence among U1 and U2 RNA genes, it is much less conserved in the chicken U4 RNA genes reported here. Interestingly, short sequence elements present in the -200 region of the U4 RNA genes are inverted (i.e., on the complementary strand) relative to their usual orientation upstream of U1 and U2 RNA genes. Thus, the -200 region of the U4 RNA genes may represent a natural evolutionary occurrence of an enhancer sequence inversion. Images PMID:3025618

  2. The behavior of ANGRA 2 nuclear power plant core for a small break LOCA simulated with RELAP5 code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabundjian, Gaianê; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Belchior, Antonio, Jr.; da Silva Rocha, Marcelo; Conti, Thadeu N.; Torres, Walmir M.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Mesquita, Roberto N.; Masotti, Paulo H. F.; de Souza Lima, Ana Cecília

    2013-05-01

    This work discusses the behavior of Angra 2 nuclear power plant core, for a postulate Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the primary circuit for Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). A pipe break of the hot leg Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) was simulated with RELAP 5 code. The considered rupture area is 380 cm2, which represents 100% of the ECCS pipe flow area. Results showed that the cooling is enough to guarantee the integrity of the reactor core.

  3. Small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 is involved in hepatocellular carcinoma progression via mediating p65 nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Tao, Xiaofang; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Peng; Sha, Manqi; Ma, Yong; Geng, Xiaoping; Feng, Lijie; Shen, Yujun; Yu, Yifan; Wang, Siying; Fang, Shengyun; Shen, Yuxian

    2016-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins participate in a post-translational modification called SUMOylation and regulate a variety of intracellular processes, such as targeting proteins for nuclear import. The nuclear transport of p65 results in the activation of NF-κB, and p65 contains several SUMO interacting motifs (SIMs). However, the relationship between p65 and SUMO1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the potential roles of SUMO1 in HCC via the regulation of p65 subcellular localization. We found that either SUMO1- or p65-positive immunoreactivity was remarkably increased in the nuclei of tumor tissues in HCC patients compared with non-tumor tissues, and further analysis suggested a correlation between SUMO1- and nuclear p65-positive immunoreactivities (R = 0.851, P = 0.002). We also verified the interaction between p65 and SUMO1 in HCC by co-immunoprecipitation. TNF-α and hypoxia increased SUMO1 protein levels and enhanced SUMO1-modified p65 SUMOylation. Moreover, the knockdown of SUMO1 decreased p65 nuclear translocation and inhibited NF-κB transcriptional activity. Further the results of this study revealed that the knockdown of SUMO1 suppressed the proliferation and migration of hepatoma cells. These results suggest that SUMO1 contributes to HCC progression by promoting p65 nuclear translocation and regulating NF-κB activity. PMID:26993772

  4. Another Inconvenient Truth: Even a Small Nuclear War Could be Much Worse Than you Think

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, O. B.

    2008-05-01

    The number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986. However, the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races, and for a significant expansion in the number of nuclear weapons states. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build weapons if they so desire. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in "megacities", which are ideal targets for nuclear weapons. Based upon observations of the damage caused by nuclear explosions in World War II and in nuclear tests, a group of researchers has estimated the area that might be consumed in firestorms following a regional war between the smallest current nuclear states involving 100, 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal). Based upon observations of large forest fires these firestorms should inject smoke into the upper troposphere. Using estimates of the mass of flammable material in the areas that would burn we find that 5x1012 g of elemental carbon could be injected into the upper troposphere in a regional nuclear war. A suite of numerical models show that this upper tropospheric soot will be transported due to solar heating into the stratosphere and will rise to altitudes above 40 km. The elemental carbon will absorb sunlight, heating the stratosphere and cooling the ground. The heating of the stratosphere could cause column ozone losses in excess of 20% globally, 25-45% at mid-latitudes, and 50- 70% at northern high latitudes persisting for 5 years, with substantial losses continuing for 5 additional years. Column ozone amounts would remain near or below 220 Dobson units at all latitudes even after three years, constituting an extra-tropical "ozone hole". The cooling at the ground would reduce precipitation globally by about 10%, create lower

  5. Pressuromodulation at the cell membrane as the basis for small molecule hormone and peptide regulation of cellular and nuclear function.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Building on recent knowledge that the specificity of the biological interactions of small molecule hydrophiles and lipophiles across microvascular and epithelial barriers, and with cells, can be predicted on the basis of their conserved biophysical properties, and the knowledge that biological peptides are cell membrane impermeant, it has been further discussed herein that cellular, and thus, nuclear function, are primarily regulated by small molecule hormone and peptide/factor interactions at the cell membrane (CM) receptors. The means of regulating cellular, and thus, nuclear function, are the various forms of CM Pressuromodulation that exist, which include Direct CM Receptor-Mediated Stabilizing Pressuromodulation, sub-classified as Direct CM Receptor-Mediated Stabilizing Shift Pressuromodulation (Single, Dual or Tri) or Direct CM Receptor-Mediated Stabilizing Shift Pressuromodulation (Single, Dual or Tri) cum External Cationomodulation (≥3+ → 1+); which are with respect to acute CM receptor-stabilizing effects of small biomolecule hormones, growth factors or cytokines, and also include Indirect CM- or CM Receptor-Mediated Pressuromodulation, sub-classified as Indirect 1ary CM-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Perturbomodulation), Indirect 2ary CM Receptor-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Tri or Quad Receptor Internal Pseudo-Cationomodulation: SS 1+), Indirect 3ary CM Receptor-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Single or Dual Receptor Endocytic External Cationomodulation: 2+) or Indirect (Pseudo) 3ary CM Receptor-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Receptor Endocytic Hydroxylocarbonyloetheroylomodulation: 0), which are with respect to sub-acute CM receptor-stabilizing effects of small biomolecules, growth factors or cytokines. As a generalization, all forms of CM pressuromodulation decrease CM and nuclear membrane (NM) compliance (whole cell compliance), due to pressuromodulation of the intracellular microtubule network and increases the exocytosis of pre

  6. Coiled bodies contain U7 small nuclear RNA and associate with specific DNA sequences in interphase human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, M R; Matera, A G

    1995-01-01

    Coiled bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles whose structures appear to be highly conserved in evolution. In rapidly cycling cells, they are typically located in the nucleoplasm but are often found in contact with the nucleolus. The CBs in human cells contain a unique protein, called p80-coilin. Studies on amphibian oocyte nuclei have revealed a protein within the "sphere" organelle that shares significant structural similarity to p80-coilin. Spheres and CBs are also highly enriched in small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and other RNA-processing components. We present evidence that, like spheres, CBs contain U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and associate with specific chromosomal loci. Using biotinylated 2'-O-methyl oligonucleotides complementary to the 5' end of U7 snRNA and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we show that U7 is distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, excluding nucleoli, and is concentrated in CBs. Interestingly, we found that CBs often associate with subsets of the histone, U1, and U2 snRNA gene loci in interphase HeLa-ATCC and HEp-2 monolayer cells. However, in a strain of suspension-grown HeLa cells, called HeLa-JS1000, we found a much lower rate of association between CBs and snRNA genes. Possible roles for CBs in the metabolism of these various histone and snRNAs are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7597053

  7. Management of the pediatric nuclear medicine patient (or children are not small adults)

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, C.T.; Suto, P.A.

    1983-03-01

    The first of a four-part continuing education series on pediatric nuclear medicine is presented. Included are: (1) clinical indications for performing nuclear medicine studies in children; (2) comparison of nuclear medicine procedures for adult and pedicatric patients; (3) appropriate radiopharmaceuticals for performing pediatric studies; (4) radiation protection techniques (5) the principles of pediatric radiopharmaceutical dose calculation and common calculation methods; (6) possible injection sites and administration methods (7) radiopharmaceutical clearance times and imaging times in adults and children; (8) the collimators of choice for most procedures performed in children; (9) certain behaviors exhibited by children according to their stage of emotional development and children's response to the hospital setting; and (10) patient immobilization techniques and advantages of physical restraint over sedation. (JMT)

  8. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Vegh, Viktor; Reutens, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Object We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability. Materials and Methods The finite element method (COMSOL®) was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field. Results A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20–50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres. Conclusions A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably. PMID:27271886

  9. A 48-month extended fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Erighin, M. A.

    2012-07-01

    The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small, rail-shippable pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and an electric power output of 150 MW, which is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height, but otherwise standard, PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array on a 21.5 cm inter-assembly pitch. The B and W mPower core design and cycle management plan, which were performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, follow the pattern of a typical nuclear reactor fuel cycle design and analysis performed by most nuclear fuel management organizations, such as fuel vendors and utilities. However, B and W is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for four years of continuous power operations without refueling and without the hurdles of chemical shim. (authors)

  10. Aligned breakup of heavy nuclear systems as a new type of deep inelastic collisions at small impact parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczynski, J.; Swiderski, L.; Pagano, A.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; La Guidara, E.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Cavallaro, S.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Maiolino, C.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Auditore, L.

    2010-06-15

    An interesting process of violent reseparation of a heavy nuclear system into three or four fragments of comparable size was recently observed in {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au collisions at 15 MeV/nucleon. Combined analysis of the binary deep inelastic events and the ternary and quaternary breakup events demonstrates that the newly observed ternary and quaternary reactions belong to the same wide class of deep inelastic collisions as the conventional (binary) damped reactions. It is shown that the ternary and quaternary breakup reactions occur at extremely inelastic collisions corresponding to small impact parameters, while more peripheral collisions lead to well-known binary deep inelastic reactions.

  11. Study on neutronic of very small Pb - Bi cooled no-onsite refueling nuclear power reactor (VSPINNOR)

    SciTech Connect

    Arianto, Fajar; Su'ud, Zaki; Zuhair

    2014-09-30

    A conceptual design study on Very Small Pb-Bi No-Onsite Refueling Cooled Nuclear Reactor (VSPINNOR) with Uranium nitride fuel using MCNPX program has been performed. In this design the reactor core is divided into three regions with different enrichment. At the center of the core is laid fuel without enrichment (internal blanket). While for the outer region using fuel enrichment variations. VSPINNOR fast reactor was operated for 10 years without refueling. Neutronic analysis shows optimized result of VSPINNOR has a core of 50 cm radius and 100 cm height with 300 MWth thermal power output at 60% fuel fraction that can be operated 18 years without refueling or fuel shuffling.

  12. The behavior of ANGRA 2 nuclear power plant core for a small break LOCA simulated with RELAP5 code

    SciTech Connect

    Sabundjian, Gaiane; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Belchior, Antonio Jr.; Silva Rocha, Marcelo da; Conti, Thadeu N.; Torres, Walmir M.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Mesquita, Roberto N.; Masotti, Paulo H. F.; Souza Lima, Ana Cecilia de

    2013-05-06

    This work discusses the behavior of Angra 2 nuclear power plant core, for a postulate Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the primary circuit for Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). A pipe break of the hot leg Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) was simulated with RELAP 5 code. The considered rupture area is 380 cm{sup 2}, which represents 100% of the ECCS pipe flow area. Results showed that the cooling is enough to guarantee the integrity of the reactor core.

  13. Nuclear localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonucleotide reductase small subunit requires a karyopherin and a WD40 repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; An, Xiuxiang; Yang, Kui; Perlstein, Deborah L.; Hicks, Leslie; Kelleher, Neil; Stubbe, JoAnne; Huang, Mingxia

    2006-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides and is an essential enzyme for DNA replication and repair. Cells have evolved intricate mechanisms to regulate RNR activity to ensure high fidelity of DNA replication during normal cell-cycle progression and of DNA repair upon genotoxic stress. The RNR holoenzyme is composed of a large subunit R1 (α, oligomeric state unknown) and a small subunit R2 (β2). R1 binds substrates and allosteric effectors; R2 contains a diferric-tyrosyl radical [(Fe)2-Y·] cofactor that is required for catalysis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, R1 is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, whereas R2, which is a heterodimer (ββ′), is predominantly in the nucleus. When cells encounter DNA damage or stress during replication, ββ′ is redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in a checkpoint-dependent manner, resulting in the colocalization of R1 and R2. We have identified two proteins that have an important role in ββ′ nuclear localization: the importin β homolog Kap122 and the WD40 repeat protein Wtm1. Deletion of either WTM1 or KAP122 leads to loss of ββ′ nuclear localization. Wtm1 and its paralog Wtm2 are both nuclear proteins that are in the same protein complex with ββ′. Wtm1 also interacts with Kap122 in vivo and requires Kap122 for its nuclear localization. Our results suggest that Wtm1 acts either as an adaptor to facilitate nuclear import of ββ′ by Kap122 or as an anchor to retain ββ′ in the nucleus. PMID:16432237

  14. A full-configuration-interaction nuclear orbital approach and application for small doped He clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lara-Castells, M. P.; Aguirre, N. F.; Delgado-Barrio, G.; Villarreal, P.; Mitrushchenkov, A. O.

    2015-01-01

    An efficient full-configuration-interaction "nuclear orbital" treatment was developed as a benchmark quantum-chemistry-like method to calculate, ground and excited, fermionic "solvent" wave-functions and applied to 3HeN clusters with atomic or molecular impurities [J. Chem. Phys. (Communication) 125, 221101 (2006)]. The main difficulty in handling doped 3HeN clusters lies in the Fermi-Dirac nuclear statistics, the wide amplitudes of the He-dopant and He-He motions, and the hard-core He-He interaction at short distances. This paper overviews the theoretical approach and its recent applications to energetic, structural and spectroscopic aspects of different dopant-3HeN clusters. Preliminary results by using the latest version of the FCI-NO computational implementation, to bosonic Cl2(X)-(4He )N clusters, are also shown.

  15. A full-configuration-interaction nuclear orbital approach and application for small doped He clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Castells, M. P. de Aguirre, N. F. Delgado-Barrio, G. Villarreal, P.; Mitrushchenkov, A. O.

    2015-01-22

    An efficient full-configuration-interaction 'nuclear orbital' treatment was developed as a benchmark quantum-chemistry-like method to calculate, ground and excited, fermionic 'solvent' wave-functions and applied to {sup 3}He{sub N} clusters with atomic or molecular impurities [J. Chem. Phys. (Communication) 125, 221101 (2006)]. The main difficulty in handling doped {sup 3}He{sub N} clusters lies in the Fermi-Dirac nuclear statistics, the wide amplitudes of the He-dopant and He-He motions, and the hard-core He-He interaction at short distances. This paper overviews the theoretical approach and its recent applications to energetic, structural and spectroscopic aspects of different dopant-{sup 3}He{sub N} clusters. Preliminary results by using the latest version of the FCI-NO computational implementation, to bosonic Cl{sub 2}(X)-({sup 4}He){sub N} clusters, are also shown.

  16. Simulated Verification of Fuel Element Inventory in a Small Reactor Core Using the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, Brandon R; Mihalczo, John T

    2009-01-01

    The International Panel on Climate Change projects that by 2050 the world energy demand may double. Although the primary focus for new nuclear power plants in industrialized nations is on large plants in the 1000-1600 MWe range, there is an increasing demand for small and medium reactors (SMRs). About half of the innovative SMR concepts are for small (<300 MWe) reactors with a 5-30 year life without on-site refueling. This type of reactor is also known as a battery-type reactor. These reactors are particularly attractive to countries with small power grids and for non-electrical purposes such as heating, hydrogen production, and seawater desalination. Traditionally, this type of reactor has been used in a nautical propulsion role. This type of reactor is designed as a permanently sealed unit to prevent the diversion of the uranium in the core by the user. However, after initial fabrication it will be necessary to verify that the newly fabricated reactor core contains the quantity of uranium that initially entered the fuel fabrication plant. In most instances, traditional inspection techniques can be used to perform this verification, but in certain situations the core design will be considered sensitive. Non-intrusive verification techniques must be utilized in these situations. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with imaging uses active interrogation and a fast time correlation processor to characterize fissile material. The MCNP-PoliMi computer code was used to simulate NMIS measurements of a small, sealed reactor core. Because most battery-type reactor designs are still in the early design phase, a more traditional design based on a Russian icebreaker core was used in the simulations. These simulations show how the radiography capabilities of the NMIS could be used to detect the diversion of fissile material by detecting void areas in the assembled core where fuel elements have been removed.

  17. Modeling operator actions during a small break loss-of-coolant accident in a Babcock and Wilcox nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, L.S.; Ortiz, M.G.

    1991-12-31

    A small break loss-of-accident (SBLOCA) in a typical Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) nuclear power plant was modeled using RELAP5/MOD3. This work was performed as part of the United States Regulatory Commission`s (USNRC) Code, Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) study. The break was initiated by severing one high pressure injection (HPI) line at the cold leg. Thus, the small break was further aggravated by reduced HPI flow. Comparisons between scoping runs with minimal operator action, and full operator action, clearly showed that the operator plays a key role in recovering the plant. Operator actions were modeled based on the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) and the Technical Bases Document for the EOPs. The sequence of operator actions modeled here is only one of several possibilities. Different sequences of operator actions are possible for a given accident because of the subjective decisions the operator must make when determining the status of the plant, hence, which branch of the EOP to follow. To assess the credibility of the modeled operator actions, these actions and results of the simulated accident scenario were presented to operator examiners who are familiar with B&W nuclear power plants. They agreed that, in general, the modeled operator actions conform to the requirements set forth in the EOPs and are therefore plausible. This paper presents the method for modeling the operator actions and discusses the simulated accident scenario from the viewpoint of operator actions.

  18. Mitotic Functions for SNAP45, a Subunit of the Small Nuclear RNA-activating Protein Complex SNAPc*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Hernandez, Nouria

    2008-01-01

    The small nuclear RNA-activating protein complex SNAPc is required for transcription of small nuclear RNA genes and binds to a proximal sequence element in their promoters. SNAPc contains five types of subunits stably associated with each other. Here we show that one of these polypeptides, SNAP45, also known as PTF δ, localizes to centrosomes during parts of mitosis, as well as to the spindle midzone during anaphase and the mid-body during telophase. Consistent with localization to these mitotic structures, both down- and up-regulation of SNAP45 lead to a G2/M arrest with cells displaying abnormal mitotic structures. In contrast, down-regulation of SNAP190, another SNAPc subunit, leads to an accumulation of cells with a G0/G1 DNA content. These results are consistent with the proposal that SNAP45 plays two roles in the cell, one as a subunit of the transcription factor SNAPc and another as a factor required for proper mitotic progression. PMID:18356157

  19. Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner inhibits transforming growth factor-beta signaling by repressing SMAD3 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji Ho; Huang, Jiansheng; Park, Yun-Yong; Seong, Hyun-A; Kim, Dongwook; Shong, Minho; Ha, Hyunjung; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Keesook; Wang, Li; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2006-12-22

    Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor superfamily; SHP regulates the nuclear receptor-mediated transcription of target genes but lacks a conventional DNA binding domain. In this study, we demonstrate that SHP represses transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)-induced gene expression through a direct interaction with Smad, a transducer of TGF-beta signaling. Transient transfection studies demonstrate that SHP represses Smad3-induced transcription. In vivo and in vitro protein interaction assays revealed that SHP directly interacts with Smad2 and Smad3 but not with Smad4. Mapping of domains mediating the interaction between SHP and Smad3 showed that the entire N-terminal domain (1-159 amino acids) of SHP and the linker domain of Smad3 are involved in this interaction. In vitro glutathione S-transferase pulldown competition experiments revealed the SHP-mediated repression of Smad3 transactivation through competition with its co-activator p300. SHP also inhibits the activation of endogenous TGF-beta-responsive gene promoters, the p21, Smad7, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoters. Moreover, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of SHP decreases PAI-1 mRNA levels, and down-regulation of SHP by a small interfering RNA increases both the transactivation of Smad3 and the PAI-1 mRNA levels. Finally, the PAI-1 gene is expressed in SHP(-/-) mouse hepatocytes at a higher level than in normal hepatocytes. Taken together, these data indicate that SHP is a novel co-regulator of Smad3, and this study provides new insights into regulation of TGF-beta signaling. PMID:17074765

  20. Electric quadrupole polarizabilities of nuclear magnetic shielding in some small molecules.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, M B; Caputo, M C; Pagola, G I; Lazzeretti, P

    2008-01-28

    Computational procedures, based on (i) the Ramsey common origin approach and (ii) the continuous transformation of the origin of the quantum mechanical current density-diamagnetic zero (CTOCD-DZ), were applied at the Hartree-Fock level to determine electric quadrupole polarizabilities of nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules in the presence of a nonuniform electric field with a uniform gradient. The quadrupole polarizabilities depend on the origin of the coordinate system, but values of the magnetic field induced at a reference nucleus, determined via the CTOCD-DZ approach, are origin independent for any calculations relying on the algebraic approximation, irrespective of size and quality of the (gaugeless) basis set employed. On the other hand, theoretical estimates of the induced magnetic field obtained by single-origin methods are translationally invariant only in the limit of complete basis sets. Calculations of electric quadrupole polarizabilities of nuclear magnetic shielding are reported for H(2), HF, H(2)O, NH(3), and CH(4) molecules. PMID:18247940

  1. Electric quadrupole polarizabilities of nuclear magnetic shielding in some small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, M. B.; Caputo, M. C.; Pagola, G. I.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2008-01-01

    Computational procedures, based on (i) the Ramsey common origin approach and (ii) the continuous transformation of the origin of the quantum mechanical current density-diamagnetic zero (CTOCD-DZ), were applied at the Hartree-Fock level to determine electric quadrupole polarizabilities of nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules in the presence of a nonuniform electric field with a uniform gradient. The quadrupole polarizabilities depend on the origin of the coordinate system, but values of the magnetic field induced at a reference nucleus, determined via the CTOCD-DZ approach, are origin independent for any calculations relying on the algebraic approximation, irrespective of size and quality of the (gaugeless) basis set employed. On the other hand, theoretical estimates of the induced magnetic field obtained by single-origin methods are translationally invariant only in the limit of complete basis sets. Calculations of electric quadrupole polarizabilities of nuclear magnetic shielding are reported for H2, HF, H2O, NH3, and CH4 molecules.

  2. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike; Jensen, Steffen Grann; Zöllner, Hannah; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Wos, Alexandra; Mayerle, Julia; Munding, Johanna; Kost, Dennis; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Liffers, Sven; Schroers, Roland; Chromik, Ansgar M; Meyer, Helmut E; Uhl, Waldemar; Klein-Scory, Susanne; Weiss, Frank U; Stephan, Christian; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard; Lerch, Markus M; Tannapfel, Andrea; Schmiegel, Wolff; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Hahn, Stephan A

    2013-01-15

    Improved non-invasive strategies for early cancer detection are urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs, have been proposed as biomarkers for non-invasive cancer diagnosis. Analyzing serum derived from nude mice implanted with primary human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we identified 15 diagnostic microRNA candidates. Of those miR-1246 was selected based on its high abundance in serum of tumor carrying mice. Subsequently, we noted a cross reactivity of the established miR-1246 assays with RNA fragments derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (RNU2-1). Importantly, we found that the assay signal discriminating tumor from controls was derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) fragments (RNU2-1f) and not from miR-1246. In addition, we observed a remarkable stability of RNU2-1f in serum and provide experimental evidence that hsa-miR-1246 is likely a pseudo microRNA. In a next step, RNU2-1f was measured by qRT-PCR and normalized to cel-54 in 191 serum/plasma samples from PDAC and colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. In comparison to 129 controls, we were able to classify samples as cancerous with a sensitivity and specificity of 97.7% [95% CI = (87.7, 99.9)] and 90.6% [95% CI = (80.7, 96.5)], respectively [area under the ROC curve 0.972]. Of note, patients with CRC were detected with our assay as early as UICC Stage II with a sensitivity of 81%. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that fragments of U2 snRNA are highly stable in serum and plasma and may serve as novel diagnostic biomarker for PDAC and CRC for future prospective screening studies. PMID:22907602

  3. Small-scale characterisation of irradiated nuclear materials: Part I – Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, P. D.; London, A.; Xu, A.; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Roberts, S. G.

    2014-11-26

    The behaviour of nanometre-scale precipitates in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloys and tungsten-rhenium alloys for nuclear applications has been examined by atom probe tomography (APT). Low Re content tungsten alloys showed no evidence of Re clustering following self-ion irradiation whereas the 25 at.% Re resulted in cluster formation. The size and composition of clusters varied depending on the material form during irradiation (pre-sharpened needle or bulk). Lastly, these results highlight the care that must be taken in interpreting data from ion irradiated pre-sharpened needles due to the presence of free surfaces. Self-ion irradiation of the ODS ferritic alloy resulted in a change in the composition of the clusters, indicating a transition from a near-stoichiometric Y2Ti2O7 composition towards a Ti2YO5.

  4. Production of small uranium dioxide microspheres for cermet nuclear fuel using the internal gelation process

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Robert T; Collins, Jack Lee; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L; Patton, Kaara K; Hickman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a uranium dioxide (UO2)/tungsten cermet fuel for potential use as the nuclear cryogenic propulsion stage (NCPS). The first generation NCPS is expected to be made from dense UO2 microspheres with diameters between 75 and 150 m. Previously, the internal gelation process and a hood-scale apparatus with a vibrating nozzle were used to form gel spheres, which became UO2 kernels with diameters between 350 and 850 m. For the NASA spheres, the vibrating nozzle was replaced with a custom designed, two-fluid nozzle to produce gel spheres in the desired smaller size range. This paper describes the operational methodology used to make 3 kg of uranium oxide microspheres.

  5. Small-scale characterisation of irradiated nuclear materials: Part I – Microstructure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edmondson, P. D.; London, A.; Xu, A.; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Roberts, S. G.

    2014-11-26

    The behaviour of nanometre-scale precipitates in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloys and tungsten-rhenium alloys for nuclear applications has been examined by atom probe tomography (APT). Low Re content tungsten alloys showed no evidence of Re clustering following self-ion irradiation whereas the 25 at.% Re resulted in cluster formation. The size and composition of clusters varied depending on the material form during irradiation (pre-sharpened needle or bulk). Lastly, these results highlight the care that must be taken in interpreting data from ion irradiated pre-sharpened needles due to the presence of free surfaces. Self-ion irradiation of the ODS ferritic alloy resultedmore » in a change in the composition of the clusters, indicating a transition from a near-stoichiometric Y2Ti2O7 composition towards a Ti2YO5.« less

  6. Small-scale characterisation of irradiated nuclear materials: Part I - Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, P. D.; London, A.; Xu, A.; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Roberts, S. G.

    2015-07-01

    The behaviour of nanometre-scale precipitates in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloys and tungsten-rhenium alloys for nuclear applications has been examined by atom probe tomography (APT). Low Re content tungsten alloys showed no evidence of Re clustering following self-ion irradiation whereas the 25 at.% Re resulted in cluster formation. The size and composition of clusters varied depending on the material form during irradiation (pre-sharpened needle or bulk). These results highlight the care that must be taken in interpreting data from ion irradiated pre-sharpened needles due to the presence of free surfaces. Self-ion irradiation of the ODS ferritic alloy resulted in a change in the composition of the clusters, indicating a transition from a near-stoichiometric Y2Ti2O7 composition towards a Ti2YO5.

  7. Measuring the Fr Weak Nuclear Charge by Observing a Linear Stark Shift with Small Atomic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchiat, Marie-Anne

    2008-03-28

    We study the chirality of ground-state alkali atoms in E and B fields, dressed with a circularly-polarized beam near-detuned (< or approx. )1 GHz) from an E-field-assisted forbidden transition such as 7S-8S in Fr. We predict parity violating energy shifts of their sublevels, linear in E and the weak nuclear charge Q{sub W}. A dressing beam of 10 kW/cm{sup 2} at 506 nm produces a shift of {approx}100 {mu}Hz at E=100 V/cm, B > or approx. 50 mG which should be observable with {approx}10{sup 4} Fr atoms confined in an optical dipole trap. We discuss optimal conditions, parameter reversals, and a calibration procedure to measure Q{sub W}.

  8. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Loflin, Leonard; McRimmon, Beth

    2014-12-18

    This report summarizes a project by EPRI to include requirements for small modular light water reactors (smLWR) into the EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) for Advanced Light Water Reactors. The project was jointly funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report covers the scope and content of the URD, the process used to revise the URD to include smLWR requirements, a summary of the major changes to the URD to include smLWR, and how to use the URD as revised to achieve value on new plant projects.

  9. All Adjunct Galilean Satellite Orbiter Concept Using a Small Nuclear Power Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randolph, James E.; Abelson, Robert D.; Alkalai, Leon; Collins, David H.; Moore, William V.

    2005-02-01

    An adjunct spacecraft concept known as the Galilean Satellite Orbiter (GSO) could gather and return significant science data using a payload consisting of plasma science and other instruments in orbit around each of three Galilean satellites using many advanced technology elements. The key to the viability of this concept is the existence of a small Radioisotope Power System (RPS) (single GPHS) and a mother spacecraft that could deliver the GSO to its final orbit and act as a relay communications path back to the Earth. Thus, the GSO would be dependant at Jupiter on the proposed Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) or similar spacecraft for orbit insertion, propulsion to its target, and communications while at its target. Because of this highly capable supporting vehicle, the energy requirements for daily operations of GSO could be easily met with a small RPS system, which is now being studied by NASA and DOE, joined with a secondary battery system. The science payload would consist of a plasma instrument set (magnetometer, plasma spectrometer, plasma wave detector, and high energy particle detector), a wide angle camera, and a Doppler extractor for gravity field measurements. A small RPS now under study that would have a cylindrical shape and reject its internal heat through an end of the cylinder could enable this concept. This topology lends itself to a unique configuration concept for the GSO spacecraft using a long cylinder as the heat rejection (radiator) system for the RPS. This long cylinder has another application - it creates a long thin configuration that would enable gravity gradient attitude control of the spacecraft. This architecture would place the instruments at one end of the spacecraft and the RPS at the other allowing the maximum separation between them. Another technology element used in this design would be the Low Cost Adjunct Microspacecraft (LCAM), originally intended as a free-flying Earth orbiting inspector spacecraft. The LCAM is configured

  10. Cronin effect and high-p⊥ suppression in the nuclear gluon distribution at small x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancu, E.; Itakura, K.; Triantafyllopoulos, D. N.

    2004-09-01

    We present a systematic, and fully analytic, study of the ratio R between the gluon distribution in a nucleus and that in a proton scaled up by the atomic number A. We consider initial conditions of the McLerran-Venugopalan type, and quantum evolution in the Color Glass Condensate, with both fixed and running coupling. We perform an analytic study of the Cronin effect in the initial conditions and point out an interesting difference between saturating effects and twist effects in the nuclear gluon distribution. We show that the distribution of the gluons which make up the condensate in the initial conditions is localized at low momenta, but this particular feature does not survive after the quantum evolution. We demonstrate that the rapid suppression of the ratio R in the early stages of the evolution is due to the DGLAP-like evolution of the proton, whose gluon distribution grows much faster than that in the nucleus because of the large separation between the respective saturation momenta. The flattening of the Cronin peak, on the other hand, is due to the evolution of the nucleus. We show that the running coupling effects slow down the evolution, but eventually lead to a stronger suppression in R at sufficiently large energies.

  11. Autoimmune response to U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) associated with cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, M M; van Venrooij, W J; Marshall, G S

    2001-01-01

    The induction of autoantibodies to U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) complexes is not well understood. We present evidence that healthy individuals with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection have an increased frequency and quantity of antibodies to ribonucleoprotein, directed primarily against the U1-70k protein. A significant association between the presence of antibodies to CMV and antibodies to the total RNP targeted by the immune response to the spliceosome (to both the Sm and RNP; Sm/RNP) was found for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but not those with mixed connective-tissue disease. CMV thus may play a role in inducing autoimmune responses in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:11438044

  12. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Activators of Nuclear Factor-κB With Neuroprotective Action Via High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Manuvakhova, Marina S.; Johnson, Guyla G.; White, Misti C.; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Sosa, Melinda; Maddox, Clinton; McKellip, Sara; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; Hobrath, Judith V.; White, E. Lucile; Maddry, Joseph A.; Grimaldi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal noncytokine-dependent p50/p65 nuclear factor-κB (the primary NF-κB complex in the brain) activation has been shown to exert neuroprotective actions. Thus neuronal activation of NF-κB could represent a viable neuroprotective target. We have developed a cell-based assay able to detect NF-κB expression enhancement, and through its use we have identified small molecules able to up-regulate NF-κB expression and hence trigger its activation in neurons. We have successfully screened approximately 300,000 compounds and identified 1,647 active compounds. Cluster analysis of the structures within the hit population yielded 14 enriched chemical scaffolds. One high-potency and chemically attractive representative of each of these 14 scaffolds and four singleton structures were selected for follow-up. The experiments described here highlighted that seven compounds caused noncanonical long-lasting NF-κB activation in primary astrocytes. Molecular NF-κB docking experiments indicate that compounds could be modulating NF-κB-induced NF-κB expression via enhancement of NF-κB binding to its own promoter. Prototype compounds increased p65 expression in neurons and caused its nuclear translocation without affecting the inhibitor of NF-κB (I-κB). One of the prototypical compounds caused a large reduction of glutamate-induced neuronal death. In conclusion, we have provided evidence that we can use small molecules to activate p65 NF-κB expression in neurons in a cytokine receptor-independent manner, which results in both long-lasting p65 NF-κB translocation/activation and decreased glutamate neurotoxicity. PMID:21046675

  13. NMR nuclear magnetic shielding anisotropy of linear molecules within the linear response within the elimination of the small component approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C.; Giribet, Claudia G.; Melo, Juan I.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the spin-Zeeman (SZ) operator in the evaluation of the spin-orbit effect on the nuclear magnetic shielding tensor in the context of the linear response within the elimination of the small component approach is critically discussed. It is shown that such term yields no contribution to the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constant, but it may be of great importance in the determination of individual tensor components, and particularly of the tensor anisotropy. In particular, an interesting relation between the SZ and orbital Zeeman contributions to the spin-orbit effect for the case of linear molecules is shown to hold. Numerical examples for the BrH, IH, and XeF2 molecules are presented which show that, provided the SZ term is taken into account, results of the individual shielding tensor components and the tensor anisotropy are in good agreement with those obtained by other theoretical methods, and particularly by the Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach.

  14. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein immune complexes induce type I interferon in plasmacytoid dendritic cells through TLR7.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Emina; Chae, Ohk-wha; Trowitzsch, Simon; Weber, Gert; Kastner, Berthold; Akira, Shizuo; Wagner, Hermann; Schmid, Roland M; Bauer, Stefan; Krug, Anne

    2006-04-15

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs), which produce IFN-alpha in response to autoimmune complexes containing nuclear antigens, are thought to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). One of the immunostimulatory components of SLE immune complexes (SLE-ICs) is self DNA, which is recognized through Tlr9 in PDCs and B cells. Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) are another major component of SLE-ICs in 30% to 40% of patients. In this study, we show that murine PDCs are activated by purified U1snRNP/anti-Sm ICs to produce IFN-alpha and proinflammatory cytokines and to up-regulate costimulatory molecules. The induction of IFN-alpha and IL-6 by U1snRNPs in murine bone marrow-derived PDCs required the presence of intact U1RNA and was largely dependent on Tlr7 but independent of Tlr3. Intracellularly delivered isolated U1snRNA and oligoribonucleotides derived from the stem loop regions and the Sm-binding site of U1snRNA efficiently induced IFN-alpha and IL-6 in Flt3L-cultured DCs in a Tlr7-dependent manner. The U1snRNA component of U1snRNP immune complexes, found in patients with SLE, acts as an endogenous "self" ligand for Tlr7 and triggers IFN-alpha and IL-6 production in PDCs. PMID:16368889

  15. 3'-end-dependent formation of U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Terns, M P; Lund, E; Dahlberg, J E

    1992-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a U6 small nuclear (sn) ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) present in the nuclei of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The structure of this U6 snRNP was investigated by native gel shift analysis and a combination of RNA-protein UV cross-linking, RNase T1 fingerprinting, and immunoprecipitation assays. These analyses demonstrate that certain forms of U6 snRNA associate with the 50-kDa nuclear antigen La both in vivo and in vitro. The La protein binds the stretch of uridylates at the 3' hydroxyl end of newly synthesized U6 snRNA. La does not bind to mature U6 snRNAs that have 2',3'-cyclic phosphate (greater than p) groups at their 3' ends (E. Lund and J. E. Dahlberg, Science 255:327-330, 1992) or to U6 snRNAs in anti-Sm-precipitable U4/U6 snRNPs. We propose that 3'-end modification, including posttranscriptional UMP addition, modulates the binding of La protein to U6 snRNA which, in turn, may affect the function of this RNA. Images PMID:1535684

  16. SU-E-P-34: Dose Perturbation Caused by Sun Nuclear QED Diode When Used for Very Small Electron Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Klash, S; Steinman, J; Stanley, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diodes are utilized by radiotherapy departments to help verify that treatment fields are being delivered correctly to the patient. Some treatment fields utilize electron beams along with a cerrobend cutout to shape the beam to the area to be treated. Cerrobend cutouts can sometimes be very small < 2×2-cm2. Some published work has addressed diode perturbation for cutout sizes down to 1.5-cm, this work addresses the diode perturbation of the Sun Nuclear QEDTM diode for cutouts as small as 0.5-cm in diameter. Methods: Measurements were taken with an A16 Exradin micro-chamber in Solid Water to 100-cm SSD. Dmax was determined for each cutout using various amounts of Solid Water in 1–2 mm increments to account for the dmax shifting in small fields. The diode was placed on top of the solid water to 100-cm SSD in the center of the cutout. Measurements were taken with no diode for comparison. The cutouts ranged in diameter from 0.5-cm to 5.0-cm and included the open 6×6 insert. Measurements were made for energies 6, 9, 12, 15,&18 MeV. Results: For 6 MeV, the percent dose reduction from the diode in the cutout field compared to the field without the diode ranged from 35% to 25% as a function of cutout size. For higher energies, this percentage decreased and generally was 25% to 15%. It was observed that dmax shifts significantly upstream for very small cutouts (<2-cm diameter) to less than 1 cm for all energies. Conclusion: The presence of diodes in small electron fields is enough to cause significant dose perturbation to the target volume. It is recommended that diodes for very small electron fields be used sparingly or possibly with a dose correction per treatment fraction(s), if the total projected delivered dose is going to be significantly different from that prescribed by the physician.

  17. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT), which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:26556480

  18. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kenji K.

    2015-01-01

    Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an “archaeal” RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT), which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:26556480

  19. Accurate and efficient 3' processing of U2 small nuclear RNA precursor in a fractionated cytoplasmic extract.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt, A M; Pederson, T

    1987-01-01

    The small nuclear RNAs U1, U2, U4, and U5 are cofactors in mRNA splicing and, like the pre-mRNAs with which they interact, are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Also like mRNAs, mature U1 and U2 RNAs are generated by 3' processing of their primary transcripts. In this study we have investigated the in vitro processing of an SP6-transcribed human U2 RNA precursor, the 3' end of which matches that of authentic human U2 RNA precursor molecules. Although the SP6-U2 RNA precursor was efficiently processed in an ammonium sulfate-fractionated HeLa cytoplasmic S100 extract, the product RNA was unstable. Further purification of the processing activity on glycerol gradients resolved a 7S activity that nonspecifically cleaved all RNAs tested and a 15S activity that efficiently processed the 3' end of pre-U2 RNA. The 15S activity did not process the 3' end of a tRNA precursor molecule. As demonstrated by RNase protection, the processed 3' end of the SP6-U2 RNA maps to the same nucleotides as does mature HeLa U2 RNA. Images PMID:3670307

  20. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D.

    2013-01-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-57Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4]= and 10%-57Fe and 90%-54Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4]= has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3–4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements. PMID:23955030

  1. Cloning of the cDNA for U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Czernik, A. J.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a plant cDNA that encodes U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) 70K protein. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein cDNA is not full length and lacks the coding region for 68 amino acids in the amino-terminal region as compared to human U1 snRNP 70K protein. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the plant U1 snRNP 70K protein with the amino acid sequence of animal and yeast U1 snRNP 70K protein showed a high degree of homology. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein is more closely related to the human counter part than to the yeast 70K protein. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but, like the vertebrate 70K proteins, is rich in charged amino acids. Northern analysis with the RNA isolated from different parts of the plant indicates that the snRNP 70K gene is expressed in all of the parts tested. Southern blotting of genomic DNA using the cDNA indicates that the U1 snRNP 70K protein is coded by a single gene.

  2. Oestrogen receptors and small nuclear ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) in malignant ovarian germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Jonna; Butzow, Ralf; Palvimo, Jorma J; Heikinheimo, Markku; Heikinheimo, Oskari

    2009-08-13

    The peak incidence of malignant ovarian germ cell tumours occurs soon after puberty. Thus, gonadal steroids may play a role in their development. Oestrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) and their co-regulators, including small nuclear ring finger protein 4 (SNURF/RNF4) mediate oestrogen actions. While ERbeta and SNURF are down-regulated in testicular germ cell tumours, their role in the ovarian germ cell tumours remains unknown. We herein studied the different subtypes of malignant ovarian germ cell tumours, and found that they all express ERalpha, ERbeta, and SNURF. Stimulation with oestradiol (E2), ERalpha, ERbeta and SNURF significantly up-regulated mRNA expression in the human germinoma derived NCC-IT cells. Further, the effects of E2 were counteracted by an anti-oestrogen (ICI 182,780). Neither E2 nor ICI 182,780 had an effect on the proliferation of NCC-IT cells as assessed by flow cytometric analysis. Our results suggest that oestrogen signalling has a role in malignant ovarian germ cell tumours. PMID:19524139

  3. Repression of the nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner by steatotic drugs and in advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Benet, Marta; Guzmán, Carla; Pisonero-Vaquero, Sandra; García-Mediavilla, M Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Martínez-Chantar, M Luz; Donato, M Teresa; Castell, José Vicente; Jover, Ramiro

    2015-04-01

    The small heterodimer partner (SHP) (NR0B2) is an atypical nuclear receptor that lacks a DNA-binding domain. It interacts with and inhibits many transcription factors, affecting key metabolic processes, including bile acid, cholesterol, fatty acid, and drug metabolism. Our aim was to determine the influence of steatotic drugs and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) on SHP expression and investigate the potential mechanisms. SHP was found to be repressed by steatotic drugs (valproate, doxycycline, tetracycline, and cyclosporin A) in cultured hepatic cells and the livers of different animal models of NAFLD: iatrogenic (tetracycline-treated rats), genetic (glycine N-methyltransferase-deficient mice), and nutritional (mice fed a methionine- and choline-deficient diet). Among the different transcription factors investigated, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) showed the strongest dominant-repressive effect on SHP expression in HepG2 and human hepatocytes. Reporter assays revealed that the inhibitory effect of C/EBPα and steatotic drugs colocalize between -340 and -509 base pair of the SHP promoter, and mutation of a predicted C/EBPα response element at -473 base pair abolished SHP repression by both C/EBPα and drugs. Moreover, inhibition of major stress signaling pathways demonstrated that the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 pathway activates, while the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase pathway represses SHP in a C/EBP-dependent manner. We conclude that SHP is downregulated by several steatotic drugs and in advanced NAFLD. These conditions can activate signals that target C/EBPα and consequently repress SHP, thus favoring the progression and severity of NAFLD. PMID:25576488

  4. Nuclear reactions with 14 MeV neutrons and bremsstrahlungs in giant dipole resonance (GDR) region using small accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiep, Tran Duc; Van Do, Nguyen; An, Truong Thi; Son, Nguyen Ngoc

    2003-07-01

    In 1974 an accelerator of deterium, namely neutron generator NA-3-C was put into operation and in 1982 another accelerator of electron Microtron MT-17 started its work in the Institute of Physics. Though very modest these accelerators are useful for developing countries as Vietnam in both Nuclear Physics Research and Training. In this report we present some results obtained in studies on Nuclear Data, Nuclear Reactions as well as nuclear activation analysis methods. We also would like to discuss about the possibilities of collaboration in the future.

  5. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaya, S.; Maeda, H.; Funaki, M.; Fukui, H.

    2008-12-01

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Δσ =σ∥-σ⊥, for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator σ⃗ṡπ⃗U/2c, in which π⃗=p⃗+A⃗, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c ≅137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A⃗ (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c-2 and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c-4. It is shown that the small Δσ for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  6. A small molecule induces integrin β4 nuclear translocation and apoptosis selectively in cancer cells with high expression of integrin β4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, ShuYan; Ge, Di; Chen, LiNa; Zhao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhang, ShangLi; Miao, JunYing; Zhao, BaoXiang

    2016-01-01

    Increased integrin β4 (ITGB4) level is accompanied by malignant progression of multiple carcinomas. However, selective therapeutic strategies against cancer cells expressing a high level of ITGB4 have not been reported. Here, for the first time, we report that a chiral small molecule, SEC, selectively promotes apoptosis in cancer cells expressing a high level of ITGB4 by inducing ITGB4 nuclear translocation. Nuclear ITGB4 can bind to the ATF3 promoter region and activate the expression of ATF3, then upregulate the downstream pro-apoptosis genes. Furthermore, SEC promoted the binding of annexin A7 (ANXA7) to ITGB4 and increased ANXA7 GTPase activity. Activated ANXA7 promoted ITGB4 nuclear translocation by triggering ITGB4 phosphorylation at Y1494. SEC also inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors in the avian embryo model. We identified a small molecule, SEC, with selective pro-apoptosis effects on cancer cells with high expression of ITGB4, both in vitro and in vivo, by triggering the binding of ITGB4 and ANXA7, ITGB4 nuclear trafficking, and pro-apoptosis gene expression. PMID:26918348

  7. Application of laboratory data from small-scale simulators to human performance issues in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Spettell, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory analogs of nuclear power plant tasks were simulated on personal computers in two experimental studies. Human performance data were collected during each experimental study. The goal of the first experiment was to validate a quantitative model of dependence among human errors during testing, calibration, and maintenance activities. This model, the Multiple Sequential Failure (MSF) model (NUREG/CR-2211) has been used to quantify dependent human error failure probabilities for human reliability analyses in Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs). The goal of the second experiment was to examine the relationship among psychological and behavioral characteristics of individuals and their performance at controlling a simulated nuclear power plant. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of the experimental psychology approach for validating models of human performance at nuclear power plant tasks.

  8. Amifostine alleviates radiation-induced lethal small bowel damage via promotion of 14-3-3σ-mediated nuclear p53 accumulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Min; Chen, Yi-Fan; Wang, Chung-Chi; Lin, I-Hui; Huang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Kuender D

    2014-10-30

    Amifostine (AM) is a radioprotector that scavenges free radicals and is used in patients undergoing radiotherapy. p53 has long been implicated in cell cycle arrest for cellular repair after radiation exposure. We therefore investigated the protective p53-dependent mechanism of AM on small bowel damage after lethal whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI). AM increased both the survival rate of rats and crypt survival following lethal 18 Gy WAI. The p53 inhibitor PFT-α compromised AM-mediated effects when administered prior to AM administration. AM significantly increased clonogenic survival in IEC-6 cells expressing wild type p53 but not in p53 knockdown cells. AM significantly increased p53 nuclear accumulation and p53 tetramer expression before irradiation through the inhibition of p53 degradation. AM inhibited p53 interactions with MDM2 but enhanced p53 interactions with 14-3-3σ. Knockdown of 14-3-3σ also compromised the effect of AM on clonogenic survival and p53 nuclear accumulation in IEC-6 cells. For the first time, our data reveal that AM alleviates lethal small bowel damage through the induction of 14-3-3σ and subsequent accumulation of p53. Enhancement of the p53/14-3-3σ interaction results in p53 tetramerization in the nucleus that rescues lethal small bowel damage. PMID:25230151

  9. Modeling the effect in of criticality from changes in key parameters for small High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (U-BatteryTM) using MCNP4C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    The neutron transport code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) which was wellkown as the gold standard in predicting nuclear reaction was used to model the small nuclear reactor core called "U-batteryTM", which was develop by the University of Manchester and Delft Institute of Technology. The paper introduces on the concept of modeling the small reactor core, a high temperature reactor (HTR) type with small coated TRISO fuel particle in graphite matrix using the MCNPv4C software. The criticality of the core were calculated using the software and analysed by changing key parameters such coolant type, fuel type and enrichment levels, cladding materials, and control rod type. The criticality results from the simulation were validated using the SCALE 5.1 software by [1] M Ding and J L Kloosterman, 2010. The data produced from these analyses would be used as part of the process of proposing initial core layout and a provisional list of materials for newly design reactor core. In the future, the criticality study would be continued with different core configurations and geometries.

  10. Structural and functional characterization of mouse U7 small nuclear RNA active in 3' processing of histone pre-mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Soldati, D.; Schumperli, D.

    1988-04-01

    Oligonucleotides derived from the spacer element of the histone RNA 3' processing signal were used to characterize mouse U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA), i.e., the snRNA component active in 3' processing of histone pre-mRNA. Under RNase H conditions, such oligonucleotides inhibited the processing reaction, indicating the formation of a DNA-RNA hybrid with a functional ribonucleoprotein component. Moreover, these oligonucleotides hybridized to a single nuclear RNA species of approximately 65 nucleotides. The sequence of this RNA was determined by primer extension experiments and was found to bear several structural similarities with sea urchin U7 snRNA. The comparison of mouse and sea urchin U7 snRNA structure yields some further insight into the mechanism of histone RNA 3' processing.

  11. [The number and biodiversity of the parasites from small mammals in the evacuation area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station].

    PubMed

    Labetskaia, A G; Kireenko, K M; Baĭdakova, I V; Tishechkina, I M

    1997-01-01

    The study of the micromammalian parasite complexes in the Belorussian part of the evacuation zone of the Chernobyl nuclear station revealed 13 species of Coccidia and 30 species of ectoparasitic Arthropoda. Total increase of abundance and biodiversity of both parasites and their hosts was observed. The part of ectoparasites being epidemically hazardous was significantly increased. An analysis of a long-term dynamics of parasite abundance reveals their adaptation to new conditions in the Belorussia. PMID:9479383

  12. PRP38 encodes a yeast protein required for pre-mRNA splicing and maintenance of stable U6 small nuclear RNA levels.

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, S; Srinivasan, A; Rymond, B C

    1992-01-01

    An essential pre-mRNA splicing factor, the product of the PRP38 gene, has been genetically identified in a screen of temperature-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Shifting temperature-sensitive prp38 cultures from 23 to 37 degrees C prevents the first cleavage-ligation event in the excision of introns from mRNA precursors. In vitro splicing inactivation and complementation studies suggest that the PRP38-encoded factor functions, at least in part, after stable splicing complex formation. The PRP38 locus contains a 726-bp open reading frame coding for an acidic 28-kDa polypeptide (PRP38). While PRP38 lacks obvious structural similarity to previously defined splicing factors, heat inactivation of PRP38, PRP19, or any of the known U6 (or U4/U6) small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associating proteins (i.e., PRP3, PRP4, PRP6, and PRP24) leads to a common, unexpected consequence: intracellular U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) levels decrease as splicing activity is lost. Curiously, U4 snRNA, normally extensively base paired with U6 snRNA, persists in the virtual absence of U6 snRNA. Images PMID:1508195

  13. Small Molecule Antagonists of the Nuclear Androgen Receptor for the Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James K; Skoda, Erin M; Zhou, Jianhua; Parrinello, Erica; Wang, Dan; O'Malley, Katherine; Eyer, Benjamin R; Kazancioglu, Mustafa; Eisermann, Kurtis; Johnston, Paul A; Nelson, Joel B; Wang, Zhou; Wipf, Peter

    2016-08-11

    After a high-throughput screening campaign identified thioether 1 as an antagonist of the nuclear androgen receptor, a zone model was developed for structure-activity relationship (SAR) purposes and analogues were synthesized and evaluated in a cell-based luciferase assay. A novel thioether isostere, cyclopropane (1S,2R)-27, showed the desired increased potency and structural properties (stereospecific SAR response, absence of a readily oxidized sulfur atom, low molecular weight, reduced number of flexible bonds and polar surface area, and drug-likeness score) in the prostate-specific antigen luciferase assay in C4-2-PSA-rl cells to qualify as a new lead structure for prostate cancer drug development. PMID:27563404

  14. Very high efficiency small nuclear gas turbine power plant concept (HTGR-GT/BC) for special applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Cavallaro, L.; Kapich, D.; Medwid, W.A.

    1984-06-01

    To meet the energy needs of special terrestrial defense installations, where a premium is placed on high plant efficiency, conceptual studies have been performed on an advanced closed-cycle gas turbine system with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as the heat source. Emphasis has been placed on system compactness and plant simplicity. A goal of plant operation for extended periods with no environmental contact had a strong influence on the design features. To realize a high plant efficiency (over 50%) for this mode of operation, a combined cycle was investigated. A primary helium Brayton power conversion system coupled with a Freon bottoming cycle was selected. Details are presented of the reactor arrangement, power conversion system, major components, installation, and performance for a compact nuclear power plant currently in a very early stage of concept definition.

  15. Risks of nuclear waste disposal in space. III - Long-term orbital evolution of small particle distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, A. L.; Wells, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    A study of long term risks is presented that treats an additional pathway that could result in earth reentry, namely, small radioactive particles released in solar orbit due to payload fragmentation by accidental explosion or meteoroid impact. A characterization of such an event and of the initial mass size distribution of particles is given for two extremes of waste form strength. Attention is given to numerical results showing the mass-time distribution of material and the fraction of initial mass intercepted by earth. It is concluded that it appears that program planners need not be to concerned about the risks of this particular failure mechanism and return pathway.

  16. Small effect of fragmentation on the genetic diversity of Dalbergia monticola, an endangered tree species of the eastern forest of Madagascar, detected by chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Andrianoelina, O.; Favreau, B.; Ramamonjisoa, L.; Bouvet, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The oriental forest ecosystem in Madagascar has been seriously impacted by fragmentation. The pattern of genetic diversity was analysed on a tree species, Dalbergia monticola, which plays an important economic role in Madagascar and is one of the many endangered tree species in the eastern forest. Methods Leaves from 546 individuals belonging to 18 small populations affected by different levels of fragmentation were genotyped using eight nuclear (nuc) and three chloroplast (cp) microsatellite markers. Key Results For nuclear microsatellites, allelic richness (R) and heterozygosity (He,nuc) differed between types of forest: R = 7·36 and R = 9·55, He,nuc = 0·64 and He,nuc = 0·80 in fragmented and non-fragmented forest, respectively, but the differences were not significant. Only the mean number of alleles (Na,nuc) and the fixation index FIS differed significantly: Na,nuc = 9·41 and Na,nuc = 13·18, FIS = 0·06 and FIS = 0·15 in fragmented and non-fragmented forests, respectively. For chloroplast microsatellites, estimated genetic diversity was higher in non-fragmented forest, but the difference was not significant. No recent bottleneck effect was detected for either population. Overall differentiation was low for nuclear microsatellites (FST,nuc = 0·08) and moderate for chloroplast microsatellites (FST,cp = 0·49). A clear relationship was observed between genetic and geographic distance (r = 0·42 P < 0·01 and r = 0·42 P = 0·03 for nuclear and chloroplast microsatellites, respectively), suggesting a pattern of isolation by distance. Analysis of population structure using the neighbor-joining method or Bayesian models separated southern populations from central and northern populations with nuclear microsatellites, and grouped the population according to regions with chloroplast microsatellites, but did not separate the fragmented populations. Conclusions Residual diversity and genetic structure of populations of D. monticola in

  17. (Nuclear genes from nicotiana encoding the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Two pea nuclear genes encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcS) were isolated and completely sequenced. These sequence studies include approximately 1 kb of 5' noncoding region and several hundred nucleotides of 3' noncoding sequences. The two genes are tightly linked being separated by 10 kb of DNA and they are oriented with their 3' ends towards one another. The two genes (ss3.6 and ss8.0) correspond to two of five EcoRI fragments of pea DNA that hybridize to a rbcS hybridization probe. The two genes ss3.6 and ss8.0 are quite divergent at their 5' and their 3' ends and in the first of the two intervening sequences. In direct contrast the second of the two intervening sequences is total conserved between the two genes. This conservation of sequence identity could result directly from evolutionary forces selecting against any sequence change. Such selection would presumably reflect a very sequence-dependent function for these introns. A role in splicing is one possibility and a transcriptional regulatory element is another possibility. 9 refs.

  18. The nuclear receptor NOR-1 regulates the small muscle protein, X-linked (SMPX) and myotube differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferrán, Beatriz; Martí-Pàmies, Ingrid; Alonso, Judith; Rodríguez-Calvo, Ricardo; Aguiló, Silvia; Vidal, Francisco; Rodríguez, Cristina; Martínez-González, José

    2016-01-01

    Recent works have highlighted the role of NOR-1 in both smooth and skeletal muscle, and have proposed this nuclear receptor as a nexus that coordinates muscle performance and metabolic capacity. However, no muscle specific genes regulated by NOR-1 have been identified so far. To identify NOR-1 target genes, we over-expressed NOR-1 in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). These cells subjected to sustained over-expression of supraphysiological levels of NOR-1 experienced marked phenotypic changes and up-regulated the skeletal muscle protein X-linked (SMPX), a protein typically expressed in striated muscle and associated to cell shape. By transcriptional studies and DNA-protein binding assays, we identified a non-consensus NBRE site in human SMPX promoter, critical for NOR-1 responsiveness. The expression of SMPX was higher in human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMM) than in human VSMC, and further increased in HSMM differentiated to myotubes. NOR-1 silencing prevented SMPX expression in HSMM, as well as their differentiation to myotubes, but the up-regulation of SMPX was dispensable for HSMM differentiation. Our results indicate that NOR-1 regulate SMPX in human muscle cells and acts as a muscle regulatory factor, but further studies are required to unravel its role in muscle differentiation and hypertrophy. PMID:27181368

  19. The nuclear receptor NOR-1 regulates the small muscle protein, X-linked (SMPX) and myotube differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrán, Beatriz; Martí-Pàmies, Ingrid; Alonso, Judith; Rodríguez-Calvo, Ricardo; Aguiló, Silvia; Vidal, Francisco; Rodríguez, Cristina; Martínez-González, José

    2016-01-01

    Recent works have highlighted the role of NOR-1 in both smooth and skeletal muscle, and have proposed this nuclear receptor as a nexus that coordinates muscle performance and metabolic capacity. However, no muscle specific genes regulated by NOR-1 have been identified so far. To identify NOR-1 target genes, we over-expressed NOR-1 in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). These cells subjected to sustained over-expression of supraphysiological levels of NOR-1 experienced marked phenotypic changes and up-regulated the skeletal muscle protein X-linked (SMPX), a protein typically expressed in striated muscle and associated to cell shape. By transcriptional studies and DNA-protein binding assays, we identified a non-consensus NBRE site in human SMPX promoter, critical for NOR-1 responsiveness. The expression of SMPX was higher in human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMM) than in human VSMC, and further increased in HSMM differentiated to myotubes. NOR-1 silencing prevented SMPX expression in HSMM, as well as their differentiation to myotubes, but the up-regulation of SMPX was dispensable for HSMM differentiation. Our results indicate that NOR-1 regulate SMPX in human muscle cells and acts as a muscle regulatory factor, but further studies are required to unravel its role in muscle differentiation and hypertrophy. PMID:27181368

  20. A systematic study of nuclear interactome of C-terminal domain small phosphatase-like 2 using inducible expression system and shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kang, NaNa; Koo, JaeHyung; Wang, Sen; Hur, Sun Jin; Bahk, Young Yil

    2016-06-01

    RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatases are newly emerging family of phosphatases that contain FCPH domain with Mg+2-binding DXDX(T/V) signature motif. Its subfamily includes small CTD phosphatases (SCPs). Recently, we identified several interacting partners of human SCP1 with appearance of dephosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation. In this study, using an established cell line with inducible CTDSPL2 protein (a member of the new phosphatase family), proteomic screening was conducted to identify binding partners of CTDSPL2 in nuclear extract through immunoprecipitation of CTDSPL2 with its associated. This approach led to the identification of several interacting partners of CTDSPL2. This will provide a better understanding on CTDSPL2. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 319-324]. PMID:26674342

  1. Design study of lead- and lead-bismuth-cooled small long-life nuclear power reactors using metallic and nitride fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Su`ud, Zaki

    1995-03-01

    A conceptual design study of small long-life nuclear power reactors used for a remote or isolated area has been performed. Lead as well as lead-bismuth is employed as the coolant, and both metallic and nitride fuels are investigated. There are some severe requirements on these reactors for operability, maintainability, safety, and proliferation resistance. Some important characteristics of the proposed designs [150 MW (thermal)] are the following: transportability between reactor factory and operation site; capability of long-life operation (12 yr) without refueling or fuel shuffling while maintaining burnup reactivity swing less than 0.1% {Delta}k; negative total core coolant void coefficient of reactivity over all the burnup period; omission of intermediate heat exchanger; and a relatively large contribution of natural circulation.

  2. 'CATT' A project on Co-operation and Technology Transfer on Long-Term Radioactive Waste Management for EU Member States with Small Nuclear Programmes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieson, J.; Lindberg, C.

    2006-07-01

    Many of the European Union's (EU) 25 countries have considerable inventories of long-lived radioactive waste that will remain potentially hazardous for many thousands of years. Of these, several have advanced concepts and programmes for the treatment and disposal (and other long - term management options) for spent fuel and long-lived radioactive waste. Collectively, these Member States have spent the equivalent of many billions of euros in developing such concepts and some have further developed the concepts into proposed operational facilities. Member States with small nuclear programmes, face the expensive and daunting prospect o f developing their own concepts for dealing with their spent fuel and high level waste. One answer would be to seek solutions which could take advantage of the investment costs in the technology and underpinning science already incurred in the more established programmes. Thus technology transfer between Member States in areas of high level waste and spent fuel encapsulation, repository development etc. would allow the establishment of disposal facilities within any Member State for it to deal with its own wastes. The national waste management organisations of the UK (Mirex), Sweden (SKB), German y (DBE), Lithuania (RATA), Bulgaria (DPRAO) and Slovenia (ARAO), together with JRC of the Netherlands, are to undertake a project under the auspices of the EU's 6. R and D Framework Programme (FP6). The 18 month project will examine the technical, intellectual property, legal, financial and societal implications of the idea. It goes by the acronym 'CATT' - 'Cooperation and technology transfer on long term radioactive waste management for Member States with small nuclear programmes'. This paper describes the CATT project which will look at technology transfer methodologies by which Member States could co-operate. It covers the potential issues which may arise and ho w these may be addressed. (authors)

  3. Small interfering RNA targeting of Recepteur d'Origine Nantais induces apoptosis via modulation of nuclear factor-kappaB and Bcl-2 family in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Sun; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Soong; Joo, Young Eun; Jung, Young Do

    2010-09-01

    The abnormal accumulation and activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase, Recepteur d'Origine Nantais (RON), has been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis in epithelial tumors including gastric cancer. This study examined whether the sequence-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppression of the RON expression could induce apoptotic cell death, and investigated the involved molecular mechanisms. Sequence-specific siRNA effectively suppressed the RON expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Silencing of the RON expression significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by the ladder-patterned DNA fragmentation, the presence of cleaved and condensed nuclear chromatin and the increased number of annexin V-positive cells. RON-targeted siRNA effectively inhibited the constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation as revealed by an altered electrophoretic mobility shift. In agreement with this, silencing of the RON expression resulted in a decrease in the nuclear level of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. The transfection of siRNA, which blocked the RON expression, also caused a change in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in a manner that favored apoptosis. The siRNA silencing of RON induced cytochrome c release and the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9. These results indicate that RON-targeted siRNA could be therapeutically efficacious by inducing cell apoptosis through the modulation of the NF-kappaB and Bcl-2 family in gastric cancer cells. PMID:20664977

  4. Intense Resistance Exercise Promotes the Acute and Transient Nuclear Translocation of Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier (SUMO)-1 in Human Myofibres.

    PubMed

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Klinz, Franz Josef; Willkomm, Lena; Schiffer, Thorsten; Suhr, Frank; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Protein sumoylation is a posttranslational modification triggered by cellular stress. Because general information concerning the role of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins in adult skeletal muscle is sparse, we investigated whether SUMO-1 proteins will be subjected to time-dependent changes in their subcellular localization in sarcoplasmic and nuclear compartments of human type I and II skeletal muscle fibers in response to acute stimulation by resistance exercise (RE). Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken at baseline (PRE), 15, 30, 60, 240 min and 24 h post RE from 6 male subjects subjected to a single bout of one-legged knee extensions. SUMO-1 localization was determined via immunohistochemistry and confocal laser microscopy. At baseline SUMO-1 was localized in perinuclear regions of myonuclei. Within 15 and up to 60 min post exercise, nuclear SUMO-1 localization was significantly increased (p < 0.01), declining towards baseline levels within 240 min post exercise. Sarcoplasmic SUMO-1 localization was increased at 15 min post exercise in type I and up to 30 min post RE in type II myofibres. The changing localization of SUMO-1 proteins acutely after intense muscle contractions points to a role for SUMO proteins in the acute regulation of the skeletal muscle proteome after exercise. PMID:27136539

  5. Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

    2013-05-01

    The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

  6. Morphological changes and nuclear translocation of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein precede apoptosis in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Baozhu Jefferson, Amy M.; Millecchia, Lyndell; Popescu, Nicholas C.; Reynolds, Steven H.

    2007-11-01

    We have previously shown that reactivation of DLC1, a RhoGAP containing tumor suppressor gene, inhibits tumorigenicity of human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (NSCLC). After transfection of NSCLC cells with wild type (WT) DLC1, changes in cell morphology were observed. To determine whether such changes have functional implications, we generated several DLC1 mutants and examined their effects on cell morphology, proliferation, migration and apoptosis in a DLC1 deficient NSCLC cell line. We show that WT DLC1 caused actin cytoskeleton-based morphological alterations manifested as cytoplasmic extensions and membrane blebbings in most cells. Subsequently, a fraction of cells exhibiting DLC1 protein nuclear translocation (PNT) underwent caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. We also show that the RhoGAP domain is essential for the occurrence of morphological alterations, PNT and apoptosis, and the inhibition of cell migration. DLC1 PNT is dependent on a bipartite nuclear localizing sequence and most likely is regulated by a serine-rich domain at N-terminal part of the DLC1 protein. Also, we found that DLC1 functions in the cytoplasm as an inhibitor of tumor cell proliferation and migration, but in the nucleus as an inducer of apoptosis. Our analyses provide evidence for a possible link between morphological alterations, PNT and proapoptotic and anti-oncogenic activities of DLC1 in lung cancer.

  7. Morphological changes and nuclear translocation of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein precede apoptosis in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bao-Zhu; Jefferson, Amy M; Millecchia, Lyndell; Popescu, Nicholas C; Reynolds, Steven H

    2007-11-01

    We have previously shown that reactivation of DLC1, a RhoGAP containing tumor suppressor gene, inhibits tumorigenicity of human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (NSCLC). After transfection of NSCLC cells with wild type (WT) DLC1, changes in cell morphology were observed. To determine whether such changes have functional implications, we generated several DLC1 mutants and examined their effects on cell morphology, proliferation, migration and apoptosis in a DLC1 deficient NSCLC cell line. We show that WT DLC1 caused actin cytoskeleton-based morphological alterations manifested as cytoplasmic extensions and membrane blebbings in most cells. Subsequently, a fraction of cells exhibiting DLC1 protein nuclear translocation (PNT) underwent caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. We also show that the RhoGAP domain is essential for the occurrence of morphological alterations, PNT and apoptosis, and the inhibition of cell migration. DLC1 PNT is dependent on a bipartite nuclear localizing sequence and most likely is regulated by a serine-rich domain at N-terminal part of the DLC1 protein. Also, we found that DLC1 functions in the cytoplasm as an inhibitor of tumor cell proliferation and migration, but in the nucleus as an inducer of apoptosis. Our analyses provide evidence for a possible link between morphological alterations, PNT and proapoptotic and anti-oncogenic activities of DLC1 in lung cancer. PMID:17888903

  8. Intense Resistance Exercise Promotes the Acute and Transient Nuclear Translocation of Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier (SUMO)-1 in Human Myofibres

    PubMed Central

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Klinz, Franz Josef; Willkomm, Lena; Schiffer, Thorsten; Suhr, Frank; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Protein sumoylation is a posttranslational modification triggered by cellular stress. Because general information concerning the role of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins in adult skeletal muscle is sparse, we investigated whether SUMO-1 proteins will be subjected to time-dependent changes in their subcellular localization in sarcoplasmic and nuclear compartments of human type I and II skeletal muscle fibers in response to acute stimulation by resistance exercise (RE). Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken at baseline (PRE), 15, 30, 60, 240 min and 24 h post RE from 6 male subjects subjected to a single bout of one-legged knee extensions. SUMO-1 localization was determined via immunohistochemistry and confocal laser microscopy. At baseline SUMO-1 was localized in perinuclear regions of myonuclei. Within 15 and up to 60 min post exercise, nuclear SUMO-1 localization was significantly increased (p < 0.01), declining towards baseline levels within 240 min post exercise. Sarcoplasmic SUMO-1 localization was increased at 15 min post exercise in type I and up to 30 min post RE in type II myofibres. The changing localization of SUMO-1 proteins acutely after intense muscle contractions points to a role for SUMO proteins in the acute regulation of the skeletal muscle proteome after exercise. PMID:27136539

  9. MicroRNA-194 restrains the cell progression of non-small cell lung cancer by targeting human nuclear distribution protein C.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lirong; Di, Qingguo; Sun, Baohua; Wang, Xiaosheng; Li, Min; Shi, Jian

    2016-06-01

    NSCLC accounts for over 80% of all lung cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Human nuclear distribution C (hNUDC) was predicted to be the target gene of microRNA-194 (miR-194). The present study was designed to demonstrate the mechanism of miR-194 in the regulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) via targeting the hNUDC. The hNUDC expression was found to strongly be increased while the miR-194 decreased significantly in the NSCLC cell lines when compared with the healthy controls. Moreover, the luciferase report confirmed the targeting reaction between miR-194 and hNUDC. After transfection with miR-194 mimic into NSCLC cells, we found that the miR-194 overexpression resulted in abnormal nuclear division, decreased cell proliferation and inhibited the expression of hNUDC and Mpl/ERK pathway proteins. Furthermore, the hNUDC overexpression affected the suppression effect of miR-194 in 95D cells, indicating that miR-194 suppresses tumor cell process by inhibiting the hNUDC expression. In brief, the present study suggests that the upregulation of miR-194 affects the hNUDC expression, leading to a downregulated expression of Mpl/ERK pathway proteins, and suppresses the mitosis and proliferation of NSCLC cells. These results offer a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27035759

  10. Promoter-associated small double-stranded RNA interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 to induce transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Chen, Zhong; Xia, Ding; Wu, Jia; Xu, Hua; Ye, Zhang-Qun

    2012-11-01

    Several recent reports have demonstrated that small activating dsRNA [double-stranded RNA; saRNA (small activating dsRNA)] complementary to promoter regions can up-regulate gene expression in mammalian cells, a phenomenon termed RNAa (RNA activation). However, the mechanism of RNAa remains obscure with regard to what is the target molecule for promoter-targeted saRNA and what are the proteins involved in this process. p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21) [CDKN1A (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A)], an important tumour suppressor gene, is among the genes that can be activated by RNAa in tumour cells. In the present study, we provide direct evidence that p21 promoter-targeted saRNA interact with its intended target on the p21 promoter to activate p21 expression. This process is associated with recruitment of RNA polymerase II and AGO2 (argonaute 2) protein to the saRNA-target site. Additionally, we found that several hnRNPs (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins) (A1, A2/B1 and C1/C2) are associated with saRNA. Further studies show that hnRNPA2/B1 interacts with the saRNA in vivo and in vitro and is required for RNAa activity. These findings indicate that RNAa results from specific targeting of promoters and reveals additional mechanistic details of RNAa. PMID:23035981

  11. An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Scarangella, M. J.

    2012-07-01

    The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

  12. Accurate and efficient N-6-adenosine methylation in spliceosomal U6 small nuclear RNA by HeLa cell extract in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shimba, S; Bokar, J A; Rottman, F; Reddy, R

    1995-07-11

    Human U6 small nuclear RNA (U6 snRNA), an abundant snRNA required for splicing of pre-mRNAs, contains several post-transcriptional modifications including a single m6A (N-6-methyladenosine) at position 43. This A-43 residue is critical for the function of U6 snRNA in splicing of pre-mRNAs. Yeast and plant U6 snRNAs also contain m6A in the corresponding position showing that this modification is evolutionarily conserved. In this study, we show that upon incubation of an unmodified U6 RNA with HeLa cell extract, A-43 residue in human U6 snRNA was rapidly converted to m6A-43. This conversion was detectable as early as 3 min after incubation and was nearly complete in 60 min; no other A residue in U6 snRNA was converted to m6A. Deletion studies showed that the stem-loop structure near the 5' end of U6 snRNA is dispensable for m6A formation; however, the integrity of the 3' stem-loop was necessary for efficient m6A formation. These data show that a short stretch of primary sequence flanking the methylation site is not sufficient for U6 m6A methyltransferase recognition and the enzyme probably recognizes secondary and/or tertiary structural features in U6 snRNA. The enzyme that catalyzes m6A formation in U6 snRNA appears to be distinct from the prolactin mRNA methyltransferase which is also present in HeLa nuclear extracts. PMID:7630720

  13. The near boiling reactor: Conceptual design of a small inherently safe nuclear reactor to extend the operational capability of the Victoria Class submarine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Christopher J. P.

    Nuclear power has several unique advantages over other air independent energy sources for nuclear combat submarines. An inherently safe, small nuclear reactor, capable of supply the hotel load of the Victoria Class submarines, has been conceptually developed. The reactor is designed to complement the existing diesel electric power generation plant presently onboard the submarine. The reactor, rated at greater than 1 MW thermal, will supply electricity to the submarine's batteries through an organic Rankine cycle energy conversion plant at 200 kW. This load will increase the operational envelope of the submarine by providing up to 28 continuous days submerged, allowing for an enhanced indiscretion ratio (ratio of time spent on the surface versus time submerged) and a limited under ice capability. The power plant can be fitted into the existing submarine by inserting a 6 m hull plug. With its simplistic design and inherent safety features, the reactor plant will require a minimal addition to the crew. The reactor employs TRISO fuel particles for increased safety. The light water coolant remains at atmospheric pressure, exiting the core at 96°C. Burn-up control and limiting excess reactivity is achieved through movable reflector plates. Shut down and regulatory control is achieved through the thirteen hafnium control rods. Inherent safety is achieved through the negative prompt and delayed temperature coefficients, as well as the negative void coefficient. During a transient, the boiling of the moderator results in a sudden drop in reactivity, essentially shutting down the reactor. It is this characteristic after which the reactor has been named. The design of the reactor was achieved through modelling using computer codes such as MCNP5, WIMS-AECL, FEMLAB, and MicroShield5, in addition to specially written software for kinetics, heat transfer and fission product poisoning calculations. The work has covered a broad area of research and has highlighted additional areas

  14. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  15. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) aggregate in Alzheimer’s disease due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently identified U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) tangle-like aggregates and RNA splicing abnormalities in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However little is known about snRNP biology in early onset AD due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations or trisomy 21 in Down syndrome. Therefore we investigated snRNP biochemical and pathologic features in these disorders. Findings We performed quantitative proteomics and immunohistochemistry in postmortem brain from genetic AD cases. Electron microscopy was used to characterize ultrastructural features of pathologic aggregates. U1-70k and other snRNPs were biochemically enriched in the insoluble fraction of human brain from subjects with presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations. Aggregates of U1 snRNP-immunoreactivity formed cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in cortex of AD subjects with PS1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations as well as trisomy 21. Ultrastructural analysis with electron microscopy in an APP mutation case demonstrated snRNP immunogold labeling of paired helical filaments (PHF). Conclusions These studies identify U1 snRNP pathologic changes in brain of early onset genetic forms of AD. Since dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21 result in dysfunctional amyloid processing, the findings suggest that aberrant β-amyloid processing may influence U1 snRNP aggregate formation. PMID:24773620

  16. Relativistically corrected nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts calculated with the normalized elimination of the small component using an effective potential-NMR chemical shifts of molybdenum and tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2003-07-01

    A new method for relativistically corrected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts is developed by combining the individual gauge for the localized orbital approach for density functional theory with the normalized elimination of a small component using an effective potential. The new method is used for the calculation of the NMR chemical shifts of 95Mo and 183W in various molybdenum and tungsten compounds. It is shown that quasirelativistic corrections lead to an average improvement of calculated NMR chemical shift values by 300 and 120 ppm in the case of 95Mo and 183W, respectively, which is mainly due to improvements in the paramagnetic contributions. The relationship between electronic structure of a molecule and the relativistic paramagnetic corrections is discussed. Relativistic effects for the diamagnetic part of the magnetic shielding caused by a relativistic contraction of the s,p orbitals in the core region concern only the shielding values, however, have little consequence for the shift values because of the large independence from electronic structure and a cancellation of these effects in the shift values. It is shown that the relativistic corrections can be improved by level shift operators and a B3LYP hybrid functional, for which Hartree-Fock exchange is reduced to 15%.

  17. Sequences more than 500 base pairs upstream of the human U3 small nuclear RNA gene stimulate the synthesis of U3 RNA in frog oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, D.; Reddy, R. ); Wright, D. )

    1991-06-04

    Small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes contain strong promoters capable of initiating transcription once every 4 s. Studies on the human U1 snRNA gene, carried out in other laboratories, showed that sequences within 400 bp of the 5' flanking region are sufficient for maximal levels of transcription both in vivo and in frog oocytes (reviewed in Dahlberg and Lund (1988)). The authors studied the expression of a human U3 snRNA gene by injecting 5' deletion mutants into frog oocytes. The results show that sequences more than 500 bp upstream of the U3 snRNA gene have a 2-3-fold stimulatory effect on the U3 snRNA synthesis. These results indicate that the human U3 snRNA gene is different from human U1 snRNA gene in containing regulatory elements more than 500 bp upstream. The U3 snRNA gene upstream sequences contain an AluI homologous sequence in the {minus}1,200 region; these AluI sequences were transcribed in vitro and in frog oocytes but were not detectable in Hela cells.

  18. The small phytoplasma virulence effector SAP11 contains distinct domains required for nuclear targeting and CIN-TCP binding and destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Sugio, Akiko; MacLean, Allyson M; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are insect-transmitted bacterial phytopathogens that secrete virulence effectors and induce changes in the architecture and defense response of their plant hosts. We previously demonstrated that the small (± 10 kDa) virulence effector SAP11 of Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches’ Broom (AY-WB) binds and destabilizes Arabidopsis CIN (CINCINNATA) TCP (TEOSINTE-BRANCHED, CYCLOIDEA, PROLIFERATION FACTOR 1 AND 2) transcription factors, resulting in dramatic changes in leaf morphogenesis and increased susceptibility to phytoplasma insect vectors. SAP11 contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) that targets this effector to plant cell nuclei.To further understand how SAP11 functions, we assessed the involvement of SAP11 regions in TCP binding and destabilization using a series of mutants.SAP11 mutants lacking the entire N-terminal domain, including the NLS, interacted with TCPs but did not destabilize them. SAP11 mutants lacking the C-terminal domain were impaired in both binding and destabilization of TCPs. These SAP11 mutants did not alter leaf morphogenesis. A SAP11 mutant that did not accumulate in plant nuclei (SAP11ΔNLS-NES) was able to bind and destabilize TCP transcription factors, but instigated weaker changes in leaf morphogenesis than wild-type SAP11.Overall the results suggest that phytoplasma effector SAP11 has a modular organization in which at least three domains are required for efficient CIN-TCP destabilization in plants. PMID:24552625

  19. Topical Anti-Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Small Interfering RNA with Functional Peptides Containing Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Shizawa, Yuki; Takeuchi, Mayu; Tamano, Kuniko; Ibaraki, Hisako; Seta, Yasuo; Takashima, Yuuki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The small interfering RNA (siRNA) is suggested to offer a novel means of treating atopic dermatitis (AD) because it allows the specific silencing of genes related to AD pathogenesis. In our previous study, we found that siRNA targeted against RelA, an important nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) subdomain, with functional peptides, showed therapeutic effects in a mouse model of AD. In the present study, to develop a topical skin application against AD, we prepared a hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA and functional peptides and determined the intradermal permeation and the anti-AD effects in an AD mouse model. We selected the silk protein, sericin (SC), which is a versatile biocompatible biomaterial to prepare hydrogel as an aqueous gel base. We found that the siRNA was more widely delivered to the site of application in AD-induced ear skin of mice after topical application via the hydrogel containing functional peptides than via the preparation without functional peptides. In addition, the ear thickness and clinical skin severity of the AD-induced mice treated with hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA with functional peptides improved more than that of mice treated with the preparation formulated with negative siRNA. PMID:26371030

  20. Topical Anti-Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Small Interfering RNA with Functional Peptides Containing Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Shizawa, Yuki; Takeuchi, Mayu; Tamano, Kuniko; Ibaraki, Hisako; Seta, Yasuo; Takashima, Yuki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The small interfering RNA (siRNA) is suggested to offer a novel means of treating atopic dermatitis (AD) because it allows the specific silencing of genes related to AD pathogenesis. In our previous study, we found that siRNA targeted against RelA, an important nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) subdomain, with functional peptides, showed therapeutic effects in a mouse model of AD. In the present study, to develop a topical skin application against AD, we prepared a hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA and functional peptides and determined the intradermal permeation and the anti-AD effects in an AD mouse model. We selected the silk protein, sericin (SC), which is a versatile biocompatible biomaterial to prepare hydrogel as an aqueous gel base. We found that the siRNA was more widely delivered to the site of application in AD-induced ear skin of mice after topical application via the hydrogel containing functional peptides than via the preparation without functional peptides. In addition, the ear thickness and clinical skin severity of the AD-induced mice treated with hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA with functional peptides improved more than that of mice treated with the preparation formulated with negative siRNA. PMID:26371030

  1. The small phytoplasma virulence effector SAP11 contains distinct domains required for nuclear targeting and CIN-TCP binding and destabilization.

    PubMed

    Sugio, Akiko; MacLean, Allyson M; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2014-05-01

    Phytoplasmas are insect-transmitted bacterial phytopathogens that secrete virulence effectors and induce changes in the architecture and defense response of their plant hosts. We previously demonstrated that the small (± 10 kDa) virulence effector SAP11 of Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom (AY-WB) binds and destabilizes Arabidopsis CIN (CINCINNATA) TCP (TEOSINTE-BRANCHED, CYCLOIDEA, PROLIFERATION FACTOR 1 AND 2) transcription factors, resulting in dramatic changes in leaf morphogenesis and increased susceptibility to phytoplasma insect vectors. SAP11 contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) that targets this effector to plant cell nuclei. To further understand how SAP11 functions, we assessed the involvement of SAP11 regions in TCP binding and destabilization using a series of mutants. SAP11 mutants lacking the entire N-terminal domain, including the NLS, interacted with TCPs but did not destabilize them. SAP11 mutants lacking the C-terminal domain were impaired in both binding and destabilization of TCPs. These SAP11 mutants did not alter leaf morphogenesis. A SAP11 mutant that did not accumulate in plant nuclei (SAP11ΔNLS-NES) was able to bind and destabilize TCP transcription factors, but instigated weaker changes in leaf morphogenesis than wild-type SAP11. Overall the results suggest that phytoplasma effector SAP11 has a modular organization in which at least three domains are required for efficient CIN-TCP destabilization in plants. PMID:24552625

  2. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A1 and A2 modulate expression of Tid1 isoforms and EGFR signaling in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi-Yuan; Jan, Chia-Ing; Pi, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Wen-Lung; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wang, Tong-Hong; Karni, Rotem; Wang, Tzu-Chien V.

    2016-01-01

    The Tid1 protein is a DnaJ co-chaperone that has two alternative splicing isoforms: Tid1 long form (Tid1-L) and Tid1 short form (Tid1-S). Recent studies have shown that Tid1-L functions as a tumor suppressor by decreasing EGFR signaling in various cancers, including head and neck cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the molecular mechanism responsible for regulating the alternative splicing of Tid1 is not yet known. Two splicing factors, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) A1 and A2, participate in alternative splicing and are known to be overexpressed in lung cancers. In this work, we examined if hnRNP A1 and A2 could regulate the alternative splicing of Tid1 to modulate tumorigenesis in NSCLC. We report that RNAi-mediated depletion of both hnRNP A1/A2 (but not single depletion of either) increased Tid1-L expression, inhibited cell proliferation and attenuated EGFR signaling. Analyses of the expression levels of hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, EGFR and Tid1-L in NSCLC tissues revealed that hnRNP A1 and A2 are positively correlated with EGFR, but negatively correlated with Tid1-L. NSCLC patients with high-level expression of hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2 and EGFR combined with low-level expression of Tid1-L were associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, our results suggest that hnRNP A1 or A2 are both capable of facilitating the alternative splicing of exon 11 in the Tid1 pre-mRNA, thereby suppressing the expression of Tid1-L and allowing EGFR-related signaling to facilitate NSCLC tumorigenesis. PMID:26919236

  3. Inhibiting expression of specific genes in mammalian cells with 5′ end-mutated U1 small nuclear RNAs targeted to terminal exons of pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Puri; Cuevas, Yolanda; Guan, Fei; Liu, Peng; Pentlicky, Sara; Jung, Stephen P.; Martínez-Chantar, Maria L.; Prieto, Jesús; Rowe, David; Gunderson, Samuel I.

    2003-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating expression of a given gene is likely to require multiple methods to ensure coverage of all of the genes in a given mammalian cell. We and others [Furth, P. A., Choe, W. T., Rex, J. H., Byrne, J. C., and Baker, C. C. (1994) Mol. Cell. Biol. 14, 5278–5289] have previously shown that U1 small nuclear (sn) RNA, both natural or with 5′ end mutations, can specifically inhibit reporter gene expression in mammalian cells. This inhibition occurs when the U1 snRNA 5′ end base pairs near the polyadenylation signal of the reporter gene's pre-mRNA. This base pairing inhibits poly(A) tail addition, a key, nearly universal step in mRNA biosynthesis, resulting in degradation of the mRNA. Here we demonstrate that expression of endogenous mammalian genes can be efficiently inhibited by transiently or stably expressed 5′ end-mutated U1 snRNA. Also, we determine the inhibitory mechanism and establish a set of rules to use this technique and to improve the efficiency of inhibition. Two U1 snRNAs base paired to a single pre-mRNA act synergistically, resulting in up to 700-fold inhibition of the expression of specific reporter genes and 25-fold inhibition of endogenous genes. Surprisingly, distance from the U1 snRNA binding site to the poly(A) signal is not critical for inhibition, instead the U1 snRNA must be targeted to the terminal exon of the pre-mRNA. This could reflect a disruption by the 5′ end-mutated U1 snRNA of the definition of the terminal exon as described by the exon definition model. PMID:12826613

  4. Expression of U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein 70K antisense transcript using APETALA3 promoter suppresses the development of sepals and petals.

    PubMed

    Golovkin, Maxim; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2003-08-01

    U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP)-70K (U1-70K), a U1 snRNP-specific protein, is involved in the early stages of spliceosome formation. In non-plant systems, it is involved in constitutive and alternative splicing. It has been shown that U1snRNP is dispensable for in vitro splicing of some animal pre-mRNAs, and inactivation of U1-70K in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is not lethal. As in yeast and humans (Homo sapiens), plant U1-70K is coded by a single gene. In this study, we blocked the expression of Arabidopsis U1-70K in petals and stamens by expressing U1-70K antisense transcript using the AP3 (APETALA3) promoter specific to these floral organs. Flowers of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing U1-70K antisense transcript showed partially developed stamens and petals that are arrested at different stages of development. In some transgenic lines, flowers have rudimentary petals and stamens and are male sterile. The severity of the phenotype is correlated with the level of the antisense transcript. Molecular analysis of transgenic plants has confirmed that the observed phenotype is not due to disruption of whorl-specific homeotic genes, AP3 or PISTILLATA, responsible for petal and stamen development. The AP3 transcript was not detected in transgenic flowers with severe phenotype. Flowers of Arabidopsis plants transformed with a reporter gene driven by the same promoter showed no abnormalities. These results show that U1-70K is necessary for the development of sepals and petals and is an essential gene in plants. PMID:12913145

  5. Modulation of expression of the nuclear receptor NR0B2 (small heterodimer partner 1) and its impact on proliferation of renal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Prestin, Katharina; Olbert, Maria; Hussner, Janine; Isenegger, Tamara L; Gliesche, Daniel G; Böttcher, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Uwe; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription factors regulating the expression of target genes that play an important role in drug metabolism, transport, and cellular signaling pathways. The orphan and structurally unique receptor small heterodimer partner 1 (syn NR0B2) is not only known for its modulation of drug response, but has also been reported to be involved in hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Indeed, previous studies show that NR0B2 is downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that NR0B2 acts as a tumor suppressor via inhibition of cellular growth and activation of apoptosis in this tumor entity. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether NR0B2 may also play a role in other tumor entities. Comparing NR0B2 expression in renal cell carcinoma and adjacent nonmalignant transformed tissue revealed significant downregulation in vivo. Additionally, the impact of heterologous expression of NR0B2 on cell cycle progression and proliferation in cells of renal origin was characterized. Monitoring fluorescence intensity of resazurin turnover in RCC-EW cells revealed no significant differences in metabolic activity in the presence of NR0B2. However, there was a significant decrease of cellular proliferation in cells overexpressing this NR, and NR0B2 was more efficient than currently used antiproliferative agents. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that heterologous overexpression of NR0B2 significantly reduced the amount of cells passing the G1 phase, while on the other hand, more cells in S/G2 phase were detected. Taken together, our data suggest that downregulation of NR0B2 may also play a role in renal cell carcinoma development and progression. PMID:27540300

  6. Modulation of expression of the nuclear receptor NR0B2 (small heterodimer partner 1) and its impact on proliferation of renal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Prestin, Katharina; Olbert, Maria; Hussner, Janine; Isenegger, Tamara L; Gliesche, Daniel G; Böttcher, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Uwe; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription factors regulating the expression of target genes that play an important role in drug metabolism, transport, and cellular signaling pathways. The orphan and structurally unique receptor small heterodimer partner 1 (syn NR0B2) is not only known for its modulation of drug response, but has also been reported to be involved in hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Indeed, previous studies show that NR0B2 is downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that NR0B2 acts as a tumor suppressor via inhibition of cellular growth and activation of apoptosis in this tumor entity. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether NR0B2 may also play a role in other tumor entities. Comparing NR0B2 expression in renal cell carcinoma and adjacent nonmalignant transformed tissue revealed significant downregulation in vivo. Additionally, the impact of heterologous expression of NR0B2 on cell cycle progression and proliferation in cells of renal origin was characterized. Monitoring fluorescence intensity of resazurin turnover in RCC-EW cells revealed no significant differences in metabolic activity in the presence of NR0B2. However, there was a significant decrease of cellular proliferation in cells overexpressing this NR, and NR0B2 was more efficient than currently used antiproliferative agents. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that heterologous overexpression of NR0B2 significantly reduced the amount of cells passing the G1 phase, while on the other hand, more cells in S/G2 phase were detected. Taken together, our data suggest that downregulation of NR0B2 may also play a role in renal cell carcinoma development and progression. PMID:27540300

  7. Ginsenoside Rg3 sensitizes human non-small cell lung cancer cells to γ-radiation by targeting the nuclear factor-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Li, Xiankui; Song, Yi-Min; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Fu-Rui; Yang, Rui; Wang, Hua-Qi; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-07-01

    At present, it is elusive how non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) develops resistance to γ-radiation; however, the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and NF-κB-regulated gene products have been proposed as mediators. Ginsenoside Rg3 is a steroidal saponin, which was isolated from Panax ginseng. Ginsenoside Rg3 possesses high pharmacological activity and has previously been shown to suppress NF-κB activation in various types of tumor cell. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine whether Rg3 could suppress NF-κB activation in NSCLC cells and sensitize NSCLC to γ-radiation, using an NSCLC cell line and NSCLC xenograft. A clone formation assay and lung tumor xenograft experiment were used to assess the radiosensitizing effects of ginsenoside Rg3. NF-κB/inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) modulation was ascertained using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and western blot analysis. NF-κB-regulated gene products were monitored by western blot analysis. The present study demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg3 was able to sensitize A549 and H1299 lung carcinoma cells to γ-radiation and significantly enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy in C57BL/6 mice bearing a Lewis lung carcinoma cell xenograft tumor. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rg3 suppressed NF-κB activation, phosphorylation of IκB protein and expression of NF-κB-regulated gene products (cyclin D1, c-myc, B-cell lymphoma 2, cyclooxygenase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor), a number of which were induced by radiation therapy and mediate radioresistance. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that ginsenoside Rg3 may potentiate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy in NSCLC by suppressing NF-κB activity and NF-κB-regulated gene products, leading to the inhibition of tumor progression. PMID:25738799

  8. Sequence variation in nuclear ribosomal small subunit, internal transcribed spacer and large subunit regions of Rhizophagus irregularis and Gigaspora margarita is high and isolate-dependent.

    PubMed

    Thiéry, Odile; Vasar, Martti; Jairus, Teele; Davison, John; Roux, Christophe; Kivistik, Paula-Ann; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Saks, Ülle; Moora, Mari; Zobel, Martin; Öpik, Maarja

    2016-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are known to exhibit high intra-organism genetic variation. However, information about intra- vs. interspecific variation among the genes commonly used in diversity surveys is limited. Here, the nuclear small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene portions were sequenced from 3 to 5 individual spores from each of two isolates of Rhizophagus irregularis and Gigaspora margarita. A total of 1482 Sanger sequences (0.5 Mb) from 239 clones were obtained, spanning ~4370 bp of the ribosomal operon when concatenated. Intrasporal and intra-isolate sequence variation was high for all three regions even though variant numbers were not exhausted by sequencing 12-40 clones per isolate. Intra-isolate nucleotide variation levels followed the expected order of ITS > LSU > SSU, but the values were strongly dependent on isolate identity. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) densities over 4 SNP/kb in the ribosomal operon were detected in all four isolates. Automated operational taxonomic unit picking within the sequence set of known identity overestimated species richness with almost all cut-off levels, markers and isolates. Average intraspecific sequence similarity values were 99%, 96% and 94% for amplicons in SSU, LSU and ITS, respectively. The suitability of the central part of the SSU as a marker for AM fungal community surveys was further supported by its level of nucleotide variation, which is similar to that of the ITS region; its alignability across the entire phylum; its appropriate length for next-generation sequencing; and its ease of amplification in single-step PCR. PMID:27092961

  9. In vitro evaluation of inhibitory effect of nuclear factor-kappaB activity by small interfering RNA on pro-tumor characteristics of M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yusuke; Kawakami, Shigeru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype (M2) and promote cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) is one of the master regulators of macrophage polarization. Here, we investigated the effect of inhibition of NF-κB activity by small interfering RNA (siRNA) on the pro-tumor response of macrophages located in the tumor microenvironment in vitro. We used mouse peritoneal macrophages cultured in conditioned medium from colon-26 cancer cells as an in vitro TAM model (M2-like macrophages). Transfection of NF-κB (p50) siRNA into M2-like macrophages resulted in a significant decrease in the secretion of interleukin (IL)-10 (a T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine) and a significant increase of T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine production (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-6). Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor production and matrix metalloproteinase-9 mRNA expression in M2-like macrophages were suppressed by inhibition of NF-κB expression with NF-κB (p50) siRNA. In addition, there was a reduction of arginase mRNA expression and increase in nitric oxide production. The cytokine secretion profiles of macrophages cultured in conditioned medium from either B16BL6 or PAN-02 cancer cells were also converted from M2 to classically activated (M1) macrophages by transfection of NF-κB (p50) siRNA. These results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB activity in M2-like macrophages alters their phenotype toward M1. PMID:24141263

  10. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A1 and A2 modulate expression of Tid1 isoforms and EGFR signaling in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Yuan; Jan, Chia-Ing; Pi, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Wen-Lung; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wang, Tong-Hong; Karni, Rotem; Wang, Tzu-Chien V

    2016-03-29

    The Tid1 protein is a DnaJ co-chaperone that has two alternative splicing isoforms: Tid1 long form (Tid1-L) and Tid1 short form (Tid1-S). Recent studies have shown that Tid1-L functions as a tumor suppressor by decreasing EGFR signaling in various cancers, including head and neck cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the molecular mechanism responsible for regulating the alternative splicing of Tid1 is not yet known. Two splicing factors, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) A1 and A2, participate in alternative splicing and are known to be overexpressed in lung cancers. In this work, we examined if hnRNP A1 and A2 could regulate the alternative splicing of Tid1 to modulate tumorigenesis in NSCLC. We report that RNAi-mediated depletion of both hnRNP A1/A2 (but not single depletion of either) increased Tid1-L expression, inhibited cell proliferation and attenuated EGFR signaling. Analyses of the expression levels of hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, EGFR and Tid1-L in NSCLC tissues revealed that hnRNP A1 and A2 are positively correlated with EGFR, but negatively correlated with Tid1-L. NSCLC patients with high-level expression of hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2 and EGFR combined with low-level expression of Tid1-L were associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, our results suggest that hnRNP A1 or A2 are both capable of facilitating the alternative splicing of exon 11 in the Tid1 pre-mRNA, thereby suppressing the expression of Tid1-L and allowing EGFR-related signaling to facilitate NSCLC tumorigenesis. PMID:26919236

  11. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  12. Assessing the odd secondary structural properties of nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences (18S) of the twisted-wing parasites (Insecta: Strepsiptera).

    PubMed

    Gillespie, J J; McKenna, C H; Yoder, M J; Gutell, R R; Johnston, J S; Kathirithamby, J; Cognato, A I

    2005-12-01

    We report the entire sequence (2864 nts) and secondary structure of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene (18S) from the twisted-wing parasite Caenocholax fenyesi texensis Kathirithamby & Johnston (Strepsiptera: Myrmecolacidae). The majority of the base pairings in this structural model map on to the SSU rRNA secondary and tertiary helices that were previously predicted with comparative analysis. These regions of the core rRNA were unambiguously aligned across all Arthropoda. In contrast, many of the variable regions, as previously characterized in other insect taxa, had very large insertions in C. f. texensis. The helical base pairs in these regions were predicted with a comparative analysis of a multiple sequence alignment (that contains C. f. texensis and 174 published arthropod 18S rRNA sequences, including eleven strepsipterans) and thermodynamic-based algorithms. Analysis of our structural alignment revealed four unusual insertions in the core rRNA structure that are unique to animal 18S rRNA and in general agreement with previously proposed insertion sites for strepsipterans. One curious result is the presence of a large insertion within a hairpin loop of a highly conserved pseudoknot helix in variable region 4. Despite the extraordinary variability in sequence length and composition, this insertion contains the conserved sequences 5'-AUUGGCUUAAA-3' and 5'-GAC-3' that immediately flank a putative helix at the 5'- and 3'-ends, respectively. The longer sequence has the potential to form a nine base pair helix with a sequence in the variable region 2, consistent with a recent study proposing this tertiary interaction. Our analysis of a larger set of arthropod 18S rRNA sequences has revealed possible errors in some of the previously published strepsipteran 18S rRNA sequences. Thus we find no support for the previously recovered heterogeneity in the 18S molecules of strepsipterans. Our findings lend insight to the evolution of RNA structure and

  13. The long-term impact of a man-made disaster: An examination of a small town in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Reactor Accident.

    PubMed

    Goldsteen, R; Schorr, J K

    1982-03-01

    This paper explores the long-term effects of a nuclear accident on residents' perceptions of their physical and mental health, their trust of public officials, and their attitudes toward the future risks of nuclear power generation In their community. We find that in the period after the accident at Three Mile Island that there are constant or Increasing levels of distress reported by community residents. We conclude that the effects of a technological disaster may often be more enduring than those natural disaster and that greater research efforts should be made to Investigate the long-term consequences of man-made catastrophies of all types. PMID:20958512

  14. Deletion of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) in Prader-Willi syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Two sibs with the typical phenotype without a cytogenetic deletion in chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kibe, Tetsuya; Wada, Yoshiro

    1996-04-24

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene is regarded as one of the candidates for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We describe two sibs with typical PWS presenting deletion of SNRPN detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Neither a cytogenetically detectable 15q12 deletion nor a deletion for the D15S11, D15S10, and GABRB3 cosmid probes were found in either patient. This implies a smaller deletion limited to the PWS critical region. FISH with a SNRPN probe will permit analysis of PWS patients with limited deletions not detectable with other probes. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  15. In vitro transcription of a Drosophila U1 small nuclear RNA gene requires TATA box-binding protein and two proximal cis-acting elements with stringent spacing requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Zamrod, Z; Tyree, C M; Song, Y; Stumph, W E

    1993-01-01

    Transcription of a Drosophila U1 small nuclear RNA gene was functionally analyzed in cell extracts derived from 0- to 12-h embryos. Two promoter elements essential for efficient initiation of transcription in vitro by RNA polymerase II were identified. The first, termed PSEA, is located between positions -41 and -61 relative to the transcription start site, is crucial for promoter activity, and is the dominant element for specifying the transcription initiation site. PSEA thus appears to be functionally homologous to the proximal sequence element of vertebrate small nuclear RNA genes. The second element, termed PSEB, is located at positions -25 to -32 and is required for an efficient level of transcription initiation because mutation of PSEB, or alteration of the spacing between PSEA and PSEB, severely reduced transcriptional activity relative to that of the wild-type promoter. Although the PSEB sequence does not have any obvious sequence similarity to a TATA box, conversion of PSEB to the canonical TATA sequence dramatically increased the efficiency of the U1 promoter and simultaneously relieved the requirement for the upstream PSEA. Despite these effects, introduction of the TATA sequence into the U1 promoter had no effect on the choice of start site or on the RNA polymerase II specificity of the promoter. Finally, evidence is presented that the TATA box-binding protein is required for transcription from the wild-type U1 promoter as well as from the TATA-containing U1 promoter. Images PMID:8355718

  16. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  17. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. II. Consideration of perturbations in the metric operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, H.; Ootani, Y.; Fukui, H.

    2007-05-01

    A previous relativistic shielding calculation theory based on the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component approach is improved by the inclusion of the magnetic interaction term contained in the metric operator. In order to consider effects of the metric perturbation, the self-consistent perturbation theory is used for the case of perturbation-dependent overlap integrals. The calculation results show that the second-order regular approximation results obtained for the isotropic shielding constants of halogen nuclei are well improved by the inclusion of the metric perturbation to reproduce the fully relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock results. However, it is shown that the metric perturbation hardly or does not affect the anisotropy of the halogen shielding tensors and the proton magnetic shieldings.

  18. Small noncleaved B cell Burkitt-like lymphoma with chromosome t(8;14) translocation and Epstein-Barr virus nuclear-associated antigen in a homosexual man with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J M; Tubbs, R R; Savage, R A; Calabrese, L C; Proffitt, M R; Manolova, Y; Manolov, G; Shumaker, A; Tatsumi, E; McClain, K

    1985-01-01

    This case report describes new manifestations of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in a promiscuous homosexual man. Investigation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the patient lead to discovery of a high-grade, small, noncleaved cell (Burkitt-like) gastroduodenal lymphoma with visceral and extralymphatic extension. Specific phenotyping of the lymphoma revealed that it was a monoclonal B cell lymphoma of mu kappa isotype. An in vitro cell line was established that was Epstein-Barr virus nuclear-associated antigen-positive. The lymphoma cells displayed a t(8;14) translocation similar to endemic African Burkitt lymphoma. Epstein-Barr virus genomes were identified in the lymphoma and an axillary lymph node biopsy specimen by molecular hybridization. These data strongly suggest that Epstein-Barr virus actively infected this patient. However, he showed normal Epstein-Barr virus-specific serologic responses, indicating an immune defect against the virus. PMID:2981469

  19. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Skiba, James M.; Scherer, Carolynn P.

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  20. Development and implementation of a finite element solution of the coupled neutron transport and thermoelastic equations governing the behavior of small nuclear assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen Christian

    Small, highly enriched reactors designed for weapons effects simulations undergo extreme thermal transients during pulsed operations. The primary shutdown mechanism of these reactors---thermal expansion of fuel material---experiences an inertial delay resulting in a different value for the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity during pulse operation as compared to the value appropriate for steady-state operation. The value appropriate for pulsed operation may further vary as a function of initial reactivity addition. Here we design and implement a finite element numerical method to predict the pulse operation behavior of Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) II, SPR III, and a hypothetical spherical assembly with identical fuel properties without using operationally observed data in our model. These numerical results are compared to available SPR II and SPR III operational data. The numerical methods employed herein may be modified and expanded in functionality to provide both accurate characterization of the behavior of fast burst reactors of any common geometry or isotropic fuel material in the design phase, as well as a computational tool for general coupled thermomechanical-neutronics behavior in the solid state for any reactor type.

  1. Development of Technologies on Innovative Simplified Nuclear Power Plant Using High-Efficiency Steam Injectors (10) Application to a Small District-Heating Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tadashi Narabayashi; Yoichiro Shimadu; Toshiiro Murase; Masatoshi Nagai; Michitsugu Mori; Shuichi Ohmori

    2006-07-01

    A steam injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact compact heater. This provides SI with capability to use as a passive ECCS pump and also as a direct-contact feedwater heater that heats up feedwater by using extracted steam from the turbine. In order to develop a high reliability passive ECCS pump and a compact feedwater heater, it is necessary to quantify the characteristics between physical properties of the flow field. We carried out experiments to observe the internal behavior of the water jet as well as measure the velocity of steam jet using a laser Doppler velocimetry. Its performance depends on the phenomena of steam condensation onto the water jet surface and heat transfer in the water jet due to turbulence on to the phase-interface. The analysis was also conducted by using a CFD code with the separate two-phase flow models. With regard to the simplified feed-water system, size of four-stage SI system is almost the same as the model SI that had done the steam and water test that pressures were same as that of current ABWR. The authors also conducted the hot water supply system test in the snow for a district heating. With regard to the SI core cooling system, the performance tests results showed that the low-pressure SI core cooling system will decrease the PCT to almost the same as the saturation temperature of the steam pressure in a pressure vessel. As it is compact equipment, SI is expected to bring about great simplification and materials-saving effects, while its simple structure ensures high reliability of its operation, thereby greatly contributing to the simplification of the power plant for not only an ABWR power plant but also a small PWR/ BWR for district heating system. (authors)

  2. Efficiency gains in tracer identification for nuclear imaging: can in vivo LC-MS/MS evaluation of small molecules screen for successful PET tracers?

    PubMed

    Joshi, Elizabeth M; Need, Anne; Schaus, John; Chen, Zhaogen; Benesh, Dana; Mitch, Charles; Morton, Stuart; Raub, Thomas J; Phebus, Lee; Barth, Vanessa

    2014-12-17

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has become a useful noninvasive technique to explore molecular biology within living systems; however, the utility of this method is limited by the availability of suitable radiotracers to probe specific targets and disease biology. Methods to identify potential areas of improvement in the ability to predict small molecule performance as tracers prior to radiolabeling would speed the discovery of novel tracers. In this retrospective analysis, we characterized the brain penetration or peak SUV (standardized uptake value), binding potential (BP), and brain exposure kinetics across a series of known, nonradiolabeled PET ligands using in vivo LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry) and correlated these parameters with the reported PET ligand performance in nonhuman primates and humans available in the literature. The PET tracers studied included those reported to label G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), intracellular enzymes, and transporters. Additionally, data for each tracer was obtained from a mouse brain uptake assay (MBUA), previously published, where blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration and clearance parameters were assessed and compared against similar data collected on a broad compound set of central nervous system (CNS) therapeutic compounds. The BP and SUV identified via nonradiolabeled LC-MS/MS, while different from the published values observed in the literature PET tracer data, allowed for an identification of initial criteria values we sought to facilitate increased potential for success from our early discovery screening paradigm. Our analysis showed that successful, as well as novel, clinical PET tracers exhibited BP of greater than 1.5 and peak SUVs greater than approximately 150% at 5 min post dose in rodents. The brain kinetics appeared similar between both techniques despite differences in tracer dose, suggesting linearity across these dose ranges. The assessment of tracers in a

  3. Vented nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Leonard N.; Kaznoff, Alexis I.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

  4. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  5. Small Wins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhatigan, James J.; Schuh, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how it easy for people to overlook small successes when they are overwhelmed by and preoccupied with large projects and goals. Explores the concept of "small wins" in organizational theory, which have the potential to become a prominent part of institutional culture and impact organizational behavior and change. (GCP)

  6. Coiled Bodies Preferentially Associate with U4, U11, and U12 Small Nuclear RNA Genes in Interphase HeLa Cells but Not with U6 and U7 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Erica Y.; Frey, Mark R.; Wu, Wei; Ingledue, Thomas C.; Gebuhr, Thomas C.; Gao, Liming; Marzluff, William F.; Matera, A. Gregory

    1999-01-01

    Coiled bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles involved in the metabolism of small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) and histone messages. Their structural morphology and molecular composition have been conserved from plants to animals. CBs preferentially and specifically associate with genes that encode U1, U2, and U3 snRNAs as well as the cell cycle–regulated histone loci. A common link among these previously identified CB-associated genes is that they are either clustered or tandemly repeated in the human genome. In an effort to identify additional loci that associate with CBs, we have isolated and mapped the chromosomal locations of genomic clones corresponding to bona fide U4, U6, U7, U11, and U12 snRNA loci. Unlike the clustered U1 and U2 genes, each of these loci encode a single gene, with the exception of the U4 clone, which contains two genes. We next examined the association of these snRNA genes with CBs and found that they colocalized less frequently than their multicopy counterparts. To differentiate a lower level of preferential association from random colocalization, we developed a theoretical model of random colocalization, which yielded expected values for χ2 tests against the experimental data. Certain single-copy snRNA genes (U4, U11, and U12) but not controls were found to significantly (p < 0.000001) associate with CBs. Recent evidence indicates that the interactions between CBs and genes are mediated by nascent transcripts. Taken together, these new results suggest that CB association may be substantially augmented by the increased transcriptional capacity of clustered genes. Possible functional roles for the observed interactions of CBs with snRNA genes are discussed. PMID:10233169

  7. In situ small-angle x-ray and nuclear resonant scattering study of the evolution of structural and magnetic properties of an Fe thin film on MgO (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gagan; Gupta, Ajay; Gupta, Mukul; Schlage, Kai; Wille, H.-C.

    2015-12-01

    Growth of magnetron sputtered Fe films on clean single crystalline MgO (001) substrate has been studied using in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence nuclear resonant scattering (GINRS) measurements. While GISAXS provides information about morphological changes, GINRS provides information about structural and magnetic properties, thus making it possible to correlate the evolution of magnetic properties with that of morphology and structure of the film. The film exhibits a Volmer-Weber type growth, with percolation transition occurring around 2 nm film thickness. Presence of a finite quadrupole splitting, as seen in GINRS measurements, suggests a significant distortion from cubic symmetry up to a film thickness of 3.5 nm, which can be attributed to hybridization between Fe 3 d and O 2 p orbitals at the interface as well as in-plane tensile strain induced as a result of coalescence of islands. Initially Fe islands exhibit superparamagnetic relaxation, while finite magnetic moment appears upon formation of macroscopic percolation islands. The film exhibits a weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), which vanishes concurrently with disappearance of structural distortion, suggesting that the observed PMA at least partly originates from inherent strain in the film. No presence of any known oxide of Fe was detected at the interface. More precise information about topological and magnetic structure of the interfaces between Fe and MgO layers is obtained using combined x-ray reflectivity and nuclear resonance reflectivity measurements on a 57Fe/MgO multilayer. Measurements show that about two monolayers of Fe at the interface have a reduced hyperfine field, providing evidence for hybridization with O atoms, as predicted by theory.

  8. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.

    1963-01-01

    This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

  10. Small GTPase Rho signaling is involved in {beta}1 integrin-mediated up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand on osteoblasts and osteoclast maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Fumihiko; Nakayamada, Shingo; Okada, Yosuke; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Kurose, Hitoshi; Mogami, Akira; Tanaka, Yoshiya . E-mail: tanaka@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-27

    We assessed the characteristics of human osteoblasts, focusing on small GTPase Rho signaling. {beta}1 Integrin were highly expressed on osteoblasts. Engagement of {beta}1 integrins by type I collagen augmented expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) on osteoblasts. Rho was activated by {beta}1 stimulation in osteoblasts. {beta}1 Integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL was inhibited by transfection with adenoviruses encoding C3 transferase or pretreated with Y-27632, specific Rho and Rho-kinase inhibitors. Engagement of {beta}1 integrin on osteoblasts induced formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cells (MNC) in a coculture system of osteoblasts and peripheral monocytes, but this action was completely abrogated by transfection of C3 transferase. Our results indicate the direct involvement of Rho-mediated signaling in {beta}1 integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL and RANKL-dependent osteoclast maturation. Thus, Rho-mediated signaling in osteoblasts seems to introduce major biases to bone resorption.

  11. Relativistic effects on nuclear magnetic shielding constants in HX and CH3X (X=Br,I) based on the linear response within the elimination of small component approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, J. I.; Ruiz de Azua, M. C.; Giribet, C. G.; Aucar, G. A.; Provasi, P. F.

    2004-10-01

    Numerical calculations of relativistic effects on nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ corresponding to all one-body operators obtained within a formalism developed in previous work [J. I. Melo et al., J. Chem. Phys. 118, 471 (2003)] were carried out. In this formalism, the elimination of small component scheme is applied to evaluate all quantities entering a four-component RSPT(2) expression of magnetic molecular properties. HX and CH3X (X=Br,I) were taken as model compounds. Calculations were carried out at the Hartree-Fock level for first-order quantities, and at the random-phase approximation (RPA) level for second- and third-order ones. It was found that values of σ(X) are largely affected by several relativistic corrections not previously considered in the bibliography. σ values of the H nucleus are in close agreement with four-component RPA ones. Overall relativistic effects on the shift of σ(X) from HX to CH3X are smaller than the nonrelativistic shifts.

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  13. Small ethics.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, ethics in the professions has focused on big problems that could be found on other peoples' back porches. Small, habitual, frequent, and personal lapses get little attention. In this essay, the literature on opportunism is applied to dentistry with a view toward bringing matters of "near ethics" within reach. Examples of small lapses are discussed under the headings of shirking, free riding, shrinkage, pressing, adverse selection, moral hazard, and risk shifting. The conditions that support opportunism include relationships with small numbers of transactions and uneven access to information. Practical limits on understanding all the consequences of agreements and the costs of supervising others and enforcing corrections of breaches are inescapable aspects of opportunism. Opportunism may not be accepted by all as the subject matter of ethical, but curbing it is a worthy goal and understanding the causes and management of opportunism casts some light on the ethical enterprise. Four suggestions are offered for addressing issue of opportunism. PMID:17691498

  14. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

  15. Small Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhnke, Falko; Musmann, Gunter; Glassmeier, K. H.; Tsurutani, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Small, lightweight, low-power magnetometer measures three-dimensional magnetic field. Includes three toroidal cores - one for each dimension. Exhibits high sensitivity, low zero-point drift, and low noise. Magnetometer circuit includes driver circuit and three analog signal-processing circuits. Output of analog signal-processing circuit proportional to one of components of external magnetic field.

  16. Binding of the N-terminal domain of the lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 CI repressor to its target DNA: a crystallography, small angle scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Kristian H; Rasmussen, Kim K; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Hammer, Karin; Pedersen, Margit; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Arleth, Lise; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2013-10-01

    In most temperate bacteriophages, regulation of the choice of lysogenic or lytic life cycle is controlled by a CI repressor protein. Inhibition of transcription is dependent on a helix-turn-helix motif, often located in the N-terminal domain (NTD), which binds to specific DNA sequences (operator sites). Here the crystal structure of the NTD of the CI repressor from phage TP901-1 has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution, and at 2.6 Å resolution in complex with a 9 bp double-stranded DNA fragment that constitutes a half-site of the OL operator. This N-terminal construct, comprising residues 2-74 of the CI repressor, is monomeric in solution as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), small angle X-ray scattering, and gel filtration and is monomeric in the crystal structures. The binding interface between the NTD and the half-site in the crystal is very similar to the interface that can be mapped by NMR in solution with a full palindromic site. The interactions seen in the complexes (in the crystal and in solution) explain the observed affinity for the OR site that is lower than that for the OL site and the specificity for the recognized DNA sequence in comparison to that for other repressors. Compared with many well-studied phage repressor systems, the NTD from TP901-1 CI has a longer extended scaffolding helix that, interestingly, is strongly conserved in putative repressors of Gram-positive pathogens. On the basis of sequence comparisons, we suggest that these bacteria also possess repressor/antirepressor systems similar to that found in phage TP901-1. PMID:24047404

  17. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  18. Small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Dermott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Satellites smaller than Mimas (r = 195 km) are distinguished by irregular overall shapes and by rough limb topography. Material properties and impact cratering dominate the shaping of these objects. Long fragmentation histories can produce a variety of internal structures, but so far there is no direct evidence that any small satellite is an equilibrium ellipsoid made up of noncohesive gravitationally bound rubble. One many bodies that orbit close to their primary the tidal and rotational components of surface gravity strongly affect the directions of local g and thereby affect the redistribution of regolith by mass wasting. Downslope movement of regolith is extensive on Deimos, and is probably effective on many other small satellites. It is shown that in some cases observed patterns of downslope mass wasting cold produce useful constraints on the satellite's mean density. The diversity of features seen in the few high-resolution images of small satellites currently available suggests that these objects have undergone complex histories of cratering, fragmentation, and regolith evolution.

  19. Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Deborah J.

    2014-10-28

    These slides will be presented at the training course “International Training Course on Implementing State Systems of Accounting for and Control (SSAC) of Nuclear Material for States with Small Quantity Protocols (SQP),” on November 3-7, 2014 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The slides provide a basic overview of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. This is a joint training course provided by NNSA and IAEA.

  20. Regulation of CDK9 activity by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Nekhai, Sergei; Petukhov, Michael; Breuer, Denitra

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is regulated by CDK9/cyclin T1, which, unlike a typical cell cycle-dependent kinase, is regulated by associating with 7SK small nuclear ribonuclear protein complex (snRNP). While the protein components of this complex are well studied, the mechanism of the complex formation is still not fully understood. The association of CDK9/cyclin T1 with 7SK snRNP is, in part, regulated by a reversible CDK9 phosphorylation. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the kinases and phosphatases involved in CDK9 phosphorylation and discuss their role in regulation of HIV-1 replication and potential for being targeted for drug development. We propose a novel pathway of HIV-1 transcription regulation via CDK9 Ser-90 phosphorylation by CDK2 and CDK9 Ser-175 dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase-1. PMID:24524087

  1. Small Reactor for Deep Space Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-11-29

    This is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965, and an experiment demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and then harvest the heat to power a Stirling engine at the Nevada National Security Site's Device Assembly Facility confirms basic nuclear reactor physics and heat transfer for a simple, reliable space power system.

  2. Small Reactor for Deep Space Exploration

    ScienceCinema

    none,

    2014-05-30

    This is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965, and an experiment demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and then harvest the heat to power a Stirling engine at the Nevada National Security Site's Device Assembly Facility confirms basic nuclear reactor physics and heat transfer for a simple, reliable space power system.

  3. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  4. Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hideo

    2009-05-04

    Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed, mainly focusing on neutron capture reactions. It is stressed that the highest-precision frontier research in nuclear data measurements should be a key to satisfy the target accuracies on the nuclear data requested for realizing the nuclear transmutation.

  5. The ``Nuclear Renaissance'' and the Spread of Nuclear Weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, Edwin S.

    2007-05-01

    As interest grows around the world in nuclear power as an energy source that could help control greenhouse gas emissions, some have proclaimed the arrival of a ``nuclear renaissance.'' But can the increased risks of more nuclear power be managed? The political crisis surrounding Iran's pursuit of uranium enrichment has exposed weaknesses in the nuclear nonproliferation regime. Also, al Qaeda's declared interest in weapons of mass destruction raises the concern that terrorists could acquire nuclear weapons by stealing materials from poorly secured facilities. Growth of nuclear energy would require the construction of many additional uranium enrichment plants. And the generation of more spent nuclear fuel without a credible waste disposal strategy would increase political support for reprocessing, which separates large quantities of weapon-usable plutonium from spent fuel. There is little evidence that the various institutional arrangements and technical schemes proposed to mitigate the security risks of a major nuclear expansion would be effective. This talk will focus on the measures necessary to allow large-scale global growth of nuclear power without resulting in an unacceptably high risk of nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism, and will discuss the feasibility of such measures. <small>To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.OSS07.E1.2small>

  6. Fantasy physics for nuclear testers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2014-09-01

    In November a group of scientists will scour a small patch of the Middle East for signs that a nuclear explosion has taken place. Edwin Cartlidge describes their delicate mission and the sophisticated gadgetry they will rely on.

  7. Universal nuclear dependence in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jian-Wei

    2007-02-01

    In this talk, I present a systematic calculation of process independent nuclear dependence to nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFS). In terms of the collinear QCD factorization approach, we calculate the leading-pole contributions to DGLAP evolution equations of nPDFs, and we evaluate both real and virtual Feynman diagrams without using the AGK cutting rule. Our result has an advantage for studying nuclear dependence in a region where active parton momentum fraction x is not too small.

  8. Nuclear weapons and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, C.; McCally, M.; Abraham, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the potential radiation hazards and environmental impacts of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include medical responsibility and thermonuclear war, the threat of nuclear war, nuclear weaponry, biological effects, radiation injury, decontamination, long-term effects, ecological effects, psychological aspects, the economic implications of nuclear weapons and war, ethics, civil defense, arms control, nuclear winter, and long-term biological consequences of nuclear war.

  9. Nuclear Medicine Scans for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the possible complications? For the most part, nuclear scans are safe tests. The doses of radiation are very small, and the radionuclides have a ... else should I know about these tests? The radiation exposure from a nuclear scan comes from the radionuclides used – the scanner ...

  10. Targeting Nuclear Envelope Repair.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Migrating cancer cells undergo repeated rupture of the protective nuclear envelope as they squeeze through small spaces in the surrounding tissue, compromising genomic integrity. Inhibiting both general DNA repair and the mechanism that seals these tears may enhance cell death and curb metastasis. PMID:27130435

  11. Small Business Innovations (Robotic Wrist)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Under a Langley Research Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. Minneapolis, MN, developed the Omni-Wrist actuator, which has a 25-pound capacity, 180 degrees of pitch/yaw, and 360 degrees of roll. Company literature calls it "the first successful singularity-free high-precision (robotic) wrist." Applications include spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, welding and a variety of nuclear industry, aerospace and military uses.

  12. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  13. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  14. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  15. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  16. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  17. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, John Howard; Allen, Todd Randall; Hildebrandt, Philip Clay; Baker, Suzanne Hobbs

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  18. High-content screening identifies small molecules that remove nuclear foci, affect MBNL distribution and CELF1 protein levels via a PKC-independent pathway in myotonic dystrophy cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ketley, Ami; Chen, Catherine Z; Li, Xin; Arya, Sukrat; Robinson, Thelma E; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Udosen, Inyang; Morris, Glenn E; Holt, Ian; Furling, Denis; Chaouch, Soraya; Haworth, Ben; Southall, Noel; Shinn, Paul; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P; Hayes, Christopher J; Brook, J David

    2014-03-15

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a multi-system neuromuscular disorder for which there is no treatment. We have developed a medium throughput phenotypic assay, based on the identification of nuclear foci in DM patient cell lines using in situ hybridization and high-content imaging to screen for potentially useful therapeutic compounds. A series of further assays based on molecular features of DM have also been employed. Two compounds that reduce and/or remove nuclear foci have been identified, Ro 31-8220 and chromomycin A3. Ro 31-8220 is a PKC inhibitor, previously shown to affect the hyperphosphorylation of CELF1 and ameliorate the cardiac phenotype in a DM1 mouse model. We show that the same compound eliminates nuclear foci, reduces MBNL1 protein in the nucleus, affects ATP2A1 alternative splicing and reduces steady-state levels of CELF1 protein. We demonstrate that this effect is independent of PKC activity and conclude that this compound may be acting on alternative kinase targets within DM pathophysiology. Understanding the activity profile for this compound is key for the development of targeted therapeutics in the treatment of DM. PMID:24179176

  19. Small reactor power system for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirbacheh, M.

    1987-01-01

    A development history and comparative performance capability evaluation is presented for spacecraft nuclear powerplant Small Reactor Power System alternatives. The choice of power conversion technology depends on the reactor's operating temperature; thermionic, thermoelectric, organic Rankine, and Alkali metal thermoelectric conversion are the primary power conversion subsystem technology alternatives. A tabulation is presented for such spacecraft nuclear reactor test histories as those of SNAP-10A, SP-100, and NERVA.

  20. Superpower nuclear minimalism

    SciTech Connect

    Graben, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    During the Cold War, the United States and the Soviet Union competed in building weapons -- now it seems like America and Russia are competing to get rid of them the fastest. The lengthy process of formal arms control has been replaced by exchanges of unilateral force reductions and proposals for reciprocal reductions not necessarily codified by treaty. Should superpower nuclear strategies change along with force postures President Bush has yet to make a formal pronouncement on post-Cold War American nuclear strategy, and it is uncertain if the Soviet/Russian doctrine of reasonable sufficiency formulated in the Gorbachev era actually heralds a change in strategy. Some of the provisions in the most recent round of unilateral proposals put forth by Presidents Bush and Yeltsin in January 1992 are compatible with a change in strategy. Whether such a change has actually occurred remains to be seen. With the end of the Cold War and the breakup of the Soviet Union, the strategic environment has fundamentally changed, so it would seem logical to reexamine strategy as well. There are two main schools of nuclear strategic thought: a maximalist school, mutual assured destruction (MAD) which emphasizes counterforce superiority and nuclear war- fighting capability, and a MAD-plus school, which emphasizes survivability of an assured destruction capability along with the ability to deliver small, limited nuclear attacks in the event that conflict occurs. The MAD-plus strategy is based on an attempt to conventionalize nuclear weapons which is unrealistic.

  1. Small Active Radiation Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    2004-01-01

    A device, named small active radiation monitor, allows on-orbit evaluations during periods of increased radiation, after extravehicular activities, or at predesignated times for crews on such long-duration space missions as on the International Space Station. It also permits direct evaluation of biological doses, a task now performed using a combination of measurements and potentially inaccurate simulations. Indeed the new monitor can measure a full array of radiation levels, from soft x-rays to hard galactic cosmic-ray particles. With refinement, it will benefit commercial (nuclear power-plant workers, airline pilots, medical technicians, physicians/dentists, and others) and military personnel as well as the astronauts for whom thermoluminescent dosimeters are inadequate. Civilian and military personnel have long since graduated from film badges to thermoluminescent dosimeters. Once used, most dosimeters must be returned to a central facility for processing, a step that can take days or even weeks. While this suffices for radiation workers for whom exposure levels are typically very low and of brief duration, it does not work for astronauts. Even in emergencies and using express mail, the results can often be delayed by as much as 24 hours. Electronic dosimeters, which are the size of electronic oral thermometers, and tattlers, small electronic dosimeters that sound an alarm when the dose/dose rate exceeds preset values, are also used but suffer disadvantages similar to those of thermoluminescent dosimeters. None of these devices fully answers the need of rapid monitoring during the space missions. Instead, radiation is monitored by passive detectors, which are read out after the missions. Unfortunately, these detectors measure only the absorbed dose and not the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The new monitor provides a real-time readout, a time history of radiation exposures (both absorbed dose and biologically relevant dose equivalent), and a count of the

  2. [Nuclear receptors PPARalpha].

    PubMed

    Soska, V

    2006-06-01

    Mechanism of the fibrates action is mediated by nuclear PPARalpha receptors (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor). These receptors regulate a number of genes that are involved both in lipids and lipoproteins metabolism and other mediators (e.g. inflammatory mediatores). Due to PPARalpha activation by fibrates, triglycerides and small dense LDL concentration is decreased, HDL cholesterol is increased and both inflammation and prothrombotic status are reduced. These effects are very important in patients with metabolic syndrom. PMID:16871768

  3. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  4. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  5. Nuclear APC.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Kristi L

    2009-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli) is thought to be an initiating step in the progression of the vast majority ofcolorectal cancers. Attempts to understand APC function have revealed more than a dozen binding partners as well as several subcellular localizations including at cell-cell junctions, associated with microtubules at the leading edge of migrating cells, at the apical membrane, in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. The present chapter focuses on APC localization and functions in the nucleus. APC contains two classical nuclear localization signals, with a third domain that can enhance nuclear import. Along with two sets of nuclear export signals, the nuclear localization signals enable the large APC protein to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear APC can oppose beta-catenin-mediated transcription. This down-regulation of nuclear beta-catenin activity by APC most likely involves nuclear sequestration of beta-catenin from the transcription complex as well as interaction of APC with transcription corepressor CtBP. Additional nuclear binding partners for APC include transcription factor activator protein AP-2alpha, nuclear export factor Crm1, protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL and perhaps DNA itself. Interaction of APC with polymerase beta and PCNA, suggests a role for APC in DNA repair. The observation that increases in the cytoplasmic distribution of APC correlate with colon cancer progression suggests that disruption of these nuclear functions of APC plays an important role in cancer progression. APC prevalence in the cytoplasm of quiescent cells points to a potential function for nuclear APC in control of cell proliferation. Clear definition of APC's nuclear function(s) will expand the possibilities for early colorectal cancer diagnostics and therapeutics targeted to APC. PMID:19928349

  6. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Babka

    2002-10-31

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR ) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objective was to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility.

  7. Climatic Consequences of Nuclear Conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.

    2011-12-01

    A nuclear war between Russia and the United States could still produce nuclear winter, even using the reduced arsenals of about 4000 total nuclear weapons that will result by 2017 in response to the New START treaty. A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history. This scenario, using much less than 1% of the explosive power of the current global nuclear arsenal, would produce so much smoke from the resulting fires that it would plunge the planet to temperatures colder than those of the Little Ice Age of the 16th to 19th centuries, shortening the growing season around the world and threatening the global food supply. Crop model studies of agriculture in the U.S. and China show massive crop losses, even for this regional nuclear war scenario. Furthermore, there would be massive ozone depletion with enhanced ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface. These surprising conclusions are the result of recent research (see URL) by a team of scientists including those who produced the pioneering work on nuclear winter in the 1980s, using the NASA GISS ModelE and NCAR WACCM GCMs. The soot is self-lofted into the stratosphere, and the effects of regional and global nuclear war would last for more than a decade, much longer than previously thought. Nuclear proliferation continues, with nine nuclear states now, and more working to develop or acquire nuclear weapons. The continued environmental threat of the use of even a small number of nuclear weapons must be considered in nuclear policy deliberations in Russia, the U.S., and the rest of the world.

  8. Apparatus for blending small particles

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, R.A.; Reese, C.R.; Sease, J.D.

    1975-08-26

    An apparatus is described for blending small particles and uniformly loading the blended particles in a receptacle. Measured volumes of various particles are simultaneously fed into a funnel to accomplish radial blending and then directed onto the apex of a conical splitter which collects the blended particles in a multiplicity of equal subvolumes. Thereafter the apparatus sequentially discharges the subvolumes for loading in a receptacle. A system for blending nuclear fuel particles and loading them into fuel rod molds is described in a preferred embodiment. (auth)

  9. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  10. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  11. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  12. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  13. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  14. Nuclear stress test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  15. Nuclear deterrence in South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerty, D.T.

    1995-12-31

    Did India and Pakistan nearly fight a nuclear war in 1990? In a provocative 1993 article, Seymour M. Hersh claims that they did. During a crisis with India over the rapidly escalating insurgency in Kashmir, Pakistan openly deployed its main armored tank units along the Indian border and, in secret, placed its nuclear-weapons arsenal on alert. As a result, the Bush Administration became convinced that the world was on the edge of a nuclear exchange between Pakistan and India. Universe of cases is admittedly small, but my argument is supported by recent research indicating that preemptive attacks of any kind have been historically rarer than conventionally believed. The nuclear era has seen two instances of preventive attacks against nuclear facilities-the 1981 Israeli bombing of Iraq`s Osirak nuclear facility and the allied coalition`s 1991 air war against Iraq-but both of these actions were taken without fear of nuclear reprisal. In situations where nuclear retaliation has been a possibility, no leader of nuclear weapon state has chosen to launch a preemptive first strike. 97 refs.

  16. Helping nuclear power help us

    SciTech Connect

    Schecker, Jay A

    2009-01-01

    After a prolonged absence, the word 'nuclear' has returned to the lexicon of sustainable domestic energy resources. Due in no small part to its demonstrated reliability, nuclear power is poised to playa greater role in the nation's energy future, producing clean, carbon-neutral electricity and contributing even more to our energy security. To nuclear scientists, the resurgence presents an opportunity to inject new technologies into the industry to maximize the benefits that nuclear energy can provide. 'By developing new options for waste management and exploiting new materials to make key technological advances, we can significantly impact the use of nuclear energy in our future energy mix,' says Chris Stanek, a materials scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stanek approaches the big technology challenges by thinking way small, all the way down to the atoms. He and his colleagues are using cutting edge atomic-scale simulations to address a difficult aspect of nuclear waste -- predicting its behavior far into the future. Their research is part of a broader, coordinated effort on the part of the Laboratory to use its considerable experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities to explore advanced materials central to not only waste issues, but to nuclear fuels as well.

  17. Uranium-mediated activation of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L

    2011-08-28

    Molecular complexes of uranium are capable of activating a range of industrially and economically important small molecules such as CO, CO(2), and N(2); new and often unexpected reactions provide insight into an element that needs to be well-understood if future clean-energy solutions are to involve nuclear power. PMID:21614341

  18. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  19. (Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

  20. Nuclear winter: implications for US and Soviet nuclear strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, P.J.

    1984-12-01

    In November 1983 Dr. Carl Sagan and his colleagues reported to press on the results of their study of the atmospheric consequences of nuclear war. The TTAPS study found that for a wide range of possible U.S. -Soviet nuclear exchanges, including relatively small ones, the fires from nuclear detonations would inject into the stratosphere quantities of dust and soot that would obscure sunlight for months. Under the cloud, which would spread over most of the Northern Hemisphere, temperatures might drop scores of degrees, well below the freezing point of water; thus, nuclear winter. The TTAPS team's findings suggested that the consequences of a nuclear war might be even more gruesome than previously supposed, and the long-term climatic and biological results might be nearly as severe for a war of 100 megatons as for 5,000. From the point of view of informing policymakers and the public concerning the consequences of wars involving nuclear weapons, the politicization of the nuclear winter issue is unfortunate. We can hope that in the next few years the criticism and defense of the initial TTAPS work will give rise to significant additional analyses, to illuminate the question. Realistically, further study will probably include both confirmations and contradictions of the original findings, without necessarily resolving the issue. Sadly, the surrounding political atmosphere may obstruct sober consideration of the policy implications of the possibility of nuclear winter.

  1. Adamantyl-Substituted Retinoid-Derived Molecules That Interact with the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Small Heterodimer Partner: Effects of Replacing the 1-Adamantyl or Hydroxyl Group on Inhibition of Cancer Cell Growth, Induction of Cancer Cell Apoptosis, and Inhibition of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin; Jiang, Tao; Ye, Mao; Fontana, Joseph A.; Farhana, Lulu; Patel, Bhaumik; Xue, Li Ping; Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Pellicciari, Roberto; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Nuti, Roberto; Zhang, Xiao-Kun; Han, Young-Hoon; Tautz, Lutz; Hobbs, Peter D.; Jong, Ling; Waleh, Nahid; Chao, Wan-ru; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Pang, Yuhong; Su, Ying

    2014-01-01

    (E)-4-[3-(1-Adamantyl)-4′-hydroxyphenyl]-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3-Cl-AHPC) induces the cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia and cancer cells. Studies demonstrated that 3-Cl-AHPC bound to the atypical orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP). Although missing a DNA-binding domain, SHP heterodimerizes with the ligand-binding domains of other nuclear receptors to repress their abilities to induce or inhibit gene expression. 3-Cl-AHPC analogues having the 1-adamantyl and phenolic hydroxyl pharmacophoric elements replaced with isosteric groups were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibition of proliferation and induction of human cancer cell apoptosis. Structure–anticancer activity relationship studies indicated the importance of both groups to apoptotic activity. Docking of 3-Cl-AHPC and its analogues to an SHP computational model that was based on the crystal structure of ultraspiracle complexed with 1-stearoyl-2-palmitoylglycero-3-phosphoethanolamine suggested why these 3-Cl-AHPC groups could influence SHP activity. Inhibitory activity against Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) was also assessed. The most active Shp-2 inhibitor was found to be the 3′-(3,3-dimethylbutynyl) analogue of 3-Cl-AHPC. PMID:18759424

  2. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect

    Machleidt, R.

    2013-06-10

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  4. Nuclear battlefields

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, W.M.; Fieldhouse, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides complete data on the nuclear operations and research facilities in the U.S.A., the U.S.S.R., France, China and the U.K. It describes detailed estimates on the U.S.S.R.'s nuclear stockpile for over 500 locations. It shows how non-nuclear countries cooperate with the world-wide war machine. And it maps the U.S. nuclear facilities from Little America, WY, and Charleston, SC, to the battleships patroling the world's oceans and subs stalking under the sea. The data were gathered from unclassified sources through the Freedom of Information Act, from data supplied to military installations, and from weapons source books. It provides guidance for policymakers, government and corporate officials.

  5. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  6. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  7. Nuclear lipid droplets: a novel nuclear domain.

    PubMed

    Layerenza, J P; González, P; García de Bravo, M M; Polo, M P; Sisti, M S; Ves-Losada, A

    2013-02-01

    We investigated nuclear neutral-lipid (NL) composition and organization, as NL may represent an alternative source for providing fatty acids and cholesterol (C) to membranes, signaling paths, and transcription factors in the nucleus. We show here that nuclear NL were organized into nonpolar domains in the form of nuclear-lipid droplets (nLD). By fluorescent confocal microscopy, representative nLD were observed in situ within the nuclei of rat hepatocytes in vivo and HepG2 cells, maintained under standard conditions in culture, and within nuclei isolated from rat liver. nLD were resistant to Triton X-100 and became stained with Sudan Red, OsO4, and BODIPY493/503. nLD and control cytosolic-lipid droplets (cLD) were isolated from rat-liver nuclei and from homogenates, respectively, by sucrose-gradient sedimentation. Lipids were extracted, separated by thin-layer chromatography, and quantified. nLD were composed of 37% lipids and 63% proteins. The nLD lipid composition was as follows: 19% triacylglycerols (TAG), 39% cholesteryl esters, 27% C, and 15% polar lipids; whereas the cLD composition contained different proportions of these same lipid classes, in particular 91% TAG. The TAG fatty acids from both lipid droplets were enriched in oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acids. The TAG from the nLD corresponded to a small pool, whereas the TAG from the cLD constituted the main cellular pool (at about 100% yield from the total homogenate). In conclusion, nLD are a domain within the nucleus where NL are stored and organized and may be involved in nuclear lipid homeostasis. PMID:23098923

  8. Hadrons in the Nuclear Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Misak Sargsian; G.A. Miller; John Arrington; William Bertozzi; Werner Boeglin; Carl Carlson; Donal Day; Leonid Frankfurt; Kim Egiyan; Rolf Ent; Shalev Gilad; Keith Griffioen; Douglas Higinbotham; Sebastian Kuhn; Wally Melnitchouk; Eliezer Piasetzky; Stepan Stepanyan; Mark Strikman; Lawrence Weinstein

    2002-10-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics, the microscopic theory of strong interactions, has not yet been applied to the calculation of nuclear wave functions. However, it certainly provokes a number of specific questions and suggests the existence of novel phenomena in nuclear physics which are not part of the traditional framework of the meson-nucleon description of nuclei. Many of these phenomena are related to high nuclear densities and the role of color in nucleonic interactions. Quantum fluctuations in the spatial separation between nucleons may lead to local high density configurations of cold nuclear matter in nuclei, up to four times larger than typical nuclear densities. We argue here that experiments utilizing the higher energies available upon completion of the Jefferson Laboratory energy upgrade will be able to probe the quark-gluon structure of such high density configurations and therefore elucidate the fundamental nature of nuclear matter. We review three key experimental programs: quasi-elastic electro-disintegration of light nuclei, deep inelastic scattering from nuclei at x>1, and the measurement of tagged structure functions. These interrelated programs are all aimed at the exploration of the quark structure of high density nuclear configurations. The study of the QCD dynamics of elementary hard processes is another important research direction and nuclei provide a unique avenue to explore these dynamics. We argue that the use of nuclear targets and large values of momentum transfer at would allow us to determine whether the physics of the nucleon form factors is dominated by spatially small configurations of three quarks.

  9. Radiochemistry and nuclear methods of analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.; Vance, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison with other aspects of physical science, nuclear and radiochemistry are small contributors to the overall scheme of things. Nuclear science is, however, an important player in various aspects of medicine, life sciences, industrial technology, physical sciences, archeometry and art, and theoretical/computational sciences. This new book fills the need for a contemporary text with a good mix of simple introductory theory, experimental methodology, and instrumentation for beginning students of nuclear science.

  10. A Genome-wide Small Interfering RNA (siRNA) Screen Reveals Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB)-independent Regulators of NOD2-induced Interleukin-8 (IL-8) Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Neil; Burberry, Aaron; Pliakas, Maria; McDonald, Christine; Núñez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    NOD2 encodes an intracellular multidomain pattern recognition receptor that is the strongest known genetic risk factor in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease (CD), a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract. NOD2 functions as a sensor for bacterial cell wall components and activates proinflammatory and antimicrobial signaling pathways. Here, using a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen, we identify numerous genes that regulate secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 in response to NOD2 activation. Moreover, many of the identified IL-8 regulators are linked by protein-protein interactions, revealing subnetworks of highly connected IL-8 regulators implicated in processes such as vesicle formation, mRNA stability, and protein ubiquitination and trafficking. A TNFα counterscreen to induce IL-8 secretion in an NOD2-independent manner reveals that the majority of the identified regulators affect IL-8 secretion irrespective of the initiating stimuli. Using immortalized macrophages, we validate the ubiquitin protease, USP8, and the endosomal sorting protein, VPS28, as negative regulators of NOD2-induced cytokine secretion. Interestingly, several genes that affect NOD2-induced IL-8 secretion are present in loci associated with CD risk by genome-wide association studies, supporting a role for the NOD2/IL-8 pathway, and not just NOD2, in the pathogenesis of CD. Overall, this screen provides a valuable resource in the advancement of our understanding of the genes that regulate the secretion of IL-8. PMID:25170077

  11. A genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen reveals nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-independent regulators of NOD2-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion.

    PubMed

    Warner, Neil; Burberry, Aaron; Pliakas, Maria; McDonald, Christine; Núñez, Gabriel

    2014-10-10

    NOD2 encodes an intracellular multidomain pattern recognition receptor that is the strongest known genetic risk factor in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease (CD), a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract. NOD2 functions as a sensor for bacterial cell wall components and activates proinflammatory and antimicrobial signaling pathways. Here, using a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen, we identify numerous genes that regulate secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 in response to NOD2 activation. Moreover, many of the identified IL-8 regulators are linked by protein-protein interactions, revealing subnetworks of highly connected IL-8 regulators implicated in processes such as vesicle formation, mRNA stability, and protein ubiquitination and trafficking. A TNFα counterscreen to induce IL-8 secretion in an NOD2-independent manner reveals that the majority of the identified regulators affect IL-8 secretion irrespective of the initiating stimuli. Using immortalized macrophages, we validate the ubiquitin protease, USP8, and the endosomal sorting protein, VPS28, as negative regulators of NOD2-induced cytokine secretion. Interestingly, several genes that affect NOD2-induced IL-8 secretion are present in loci associated with CD risk by genome-wide association studies, supporting a role for the NOD2/IL-8 pathway, and not just NOD2, in the pathogenesis of CD. Overall, this screen provides a valuable resource in the advancement of our understanding of the genes that regulate the secretion of IL-8. PMID:25170077

  12. Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) is located in Zarechny, approximately 60 km east of Ekaterinberg along the Trans-Siberian Highway. Zarechny, a small city of approximately 30,000 residents, was built to support BNPP operations. It is a closed city to unescorted visitors. Residents must show identification for entry. BNPP is one of the first and oldest commercial nuclear power plants in Russia and began operations in 1964. As for most nuclear power plants in the Russian Federation, BNPP is operated by Rosenergoatom, which is subordinated to the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation (Minatom). BNPP is the site of three nuclear reactors, Units 1, 2, and 3. Units 1 and 2, which have been shut-down and defueled, were graphite moderated reactors. The units were shut-down in 1981 and 1989. Unit 3, a BN-600 reactor, is a 600 MW(electric) sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. Unit 3 went on-line in April 1980 and produces electric power which is fed into a distribution grid and thermal power which provides heat to Zarechny. The paper also discusses the SF NIKIET, the Sverdiovsk Branch of NIKIET, Moscow, which is the research and development branch of the parent NIKEIT and is primarily a design institute responsible for reactor design. Central to its operations is a 15 megawatt IVV research reactor. The paper discusses general security and fissile material control and accountability at these two facilities.

  13. Nuclear spin circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-04-07

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in magneto-optic spectroscopy techniques that use nuclear magnetization as the source of the magnetic field. Here we present a formulation of magnetic circular dichroism (CD) due to magnetically polarized nuclei, nuclear spin-induced CD (NSCD), in molecules. The NSCD ellipticity and nuclear spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) angle correspond to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of (complex) quadratic response functions involving the dynamic second-order interaction of the electron system with the linearly polarized light beam, as well as the static magnetic hyperfine interaction. Using the complex polarization propagator framework, NSCD and NSOR signals are obtained at frequencies in the vicinity of optical excitations. Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory calculations on relatively small model systems, ethene, benzene, and 1,4-benzoquinone, demonstrate the feasibility of the method for obtaining relatively strong nuclear spin-induced ellipticity and optical rotation signals. Comparison of the proton and carbon-13 signals of ethanol reveals that these resonant phenomena facilitate chemical resolution between non-equivalent nuclei in magneto-optic spectra.

  14. Restructuring nuclear regulations.

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, Kenneth L

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear regulations are a subset of social regulations (laws to control activities that may negatively impact the environment, health, and safety) that concern control of ionizing radiation from radiation-producing equipment and from radioactive materials. The impressive safety record among nuclear technologies is due, in no small part, to the work of radiation safety professionals and to a protection system that has kept pace with the rapid technologic advancements in electric power generation, engineering, and medicine. The price of success, however, has led to a regulatory organization and philosophy characterized by complexity, confusion, public fear, and increasing economic costs. Over the past 20 years, regulatory costs in the nuclear sector have increased more than 250% in constant 1995 U.S. dollars. Costs of regulatory compliance can be reduced sharply, particularly when health and environmental benefits of risk reduction are questionable. Three key regulatory areas should be closely examined and modified to improve regulatory effectiveness and efficiency: a) radiation protection should be changed from a risk-based to dose-based system; b) the U.S. government should adopt the modern metric system (International System of Units), and radiation quantities and units should be simplified to facilitate international communication and public understanding; and c) a single, independent office is needed to coordinate nuclear regulations established by U.S. federal agencies and departments. PMID:12515683

  15. Learning Nuclear Science with Marbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constan, Zach

    2010-01-01

    Nuclei are "small": if an atom was the size of a football field, the nucleus would be an apple sitting on the 50-yd line. At the same time, nuclei are "dense": the Earth, compressed to nuclear density, could fit inside four Sears Towers. The subatomic level is strange and exotic. For that reason, it's not hard to get young minds excited about…

  16. A Monte Carlo approach to small-scale dosimetry of solid tumour microvasculature for nuclear medicine therapies with (223)Ra-, (131)I-, (177)Lu- and (111)In-labelled radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Leotta, Salvatore; Italiano, Antonio; Baldari, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    The small-scale dosimetry of radionuclides in solid-tumours is directly related to the intra-tumoral distribution of the administered radiopharmaceutical, which is affected by its egress from the vasculature and dispersion within the tumour. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the combined dosimetric effects of radiopharmaceutical distribution and range of the emitted radiation in a model of tumour microvasculature. We developed a computational model of solid-tumour microenvironment around a blood capillary vessel, and we simulated the transport of radiation emitted by (223)Ra, (111)In, (131)I and (177)Lu using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo. For each nuclide, several models of radiopharmaceutical dispersion throughout the capillary vessel were considered. Radial dose profiles around the capillary vessel, the Initial Radioactivity (IR) necessary to deposit 100 Gy of dose at the edge of the viable tumour-cell region, the Endothelial Cell Mean Dose (ECMD) and the Tumour Edge Mean Dose (TEMD), i.e. the mean dose imparted at the 250-μm layer of tissue, were computed. The results for beta and Auger emitters demonstrate that the photon dose is about three to four orders of magnitude lower than that deposited by electrons. For (223)Ra, the beta emissions of its progeny deliver a dose about three orders of magnitude lower than that delivered by the alpha emissions. Such results may help to characterize the dose inhomogeneities in solid tumour therapies with radiopharmaceuticals, taking into account the interplay between drug distribution from vasculature and range of ionizing radiations. PMID:25979209

  17. Nuclear risk

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, M.

    1989-01-01

    The title of our session, Nuclear Risk Versus Other Power Options, is provocative. It is also a title with different meanings to different people. To the utility chief executive officer, nuclear power is a high-risk financial undertaking because of political and economic barriers to cost recovery. To the utility dispatcher, it is a high-risk future power source since plant completion and start-up dates can be delayed for very long times due to uncertain legal and political issues. To the environmentalist, concerned about global effects such as greenhouse and acid rain, nuclear power is a relatively low risk energy source. To the financial people, nuclear power is a cash cow turned sour because of uncertainties as to what new plants will cost and whether they will even be allowed to operate. The statistics on risk are known and the results of probability risk assessment calculations of risks are known. The challenge is not to make nuclear power safer, it is already one of the safest, if not the safest, source of power currently available. The challenge is to find a way to communicate this to the public.

  18. Nuclear Scattering from Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, Ajit; McKeough, James; Valerio, Mario; Cathey, Tommy

    2016-03-01

    In view of the continued interest in the scattering of light projectiles by metallic nuclei, we present a computational study of the interactions between different nuclear species of atoms such as H through F (Z <= 9) and the nuclei of Silver, Palladium and other metals. Recent work has shown that neutron scattering can be used to record holographic images of materials. We have developed a FORTRAN computer program to compute stopping cross sections and scattering angles in Ag and other metals for the small nuclear projectiles, using Monte Carlo calculation. This code allows for different angles of incidence. Next, simulations were done in the energy interval from 50 to 210 keV. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant experimental data. The data are further analyzed to identify periodic trends in terms of the atomic number of the projectile. Such studies also have potential applications in nuclear physics and in nuclear medicine. Funding from National Science Foundation.

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is currently in phase 4 of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. The micro-NMRG technology is pushing the boundaries of size, weight, power, and performance allowing new small platform applications of navigation grade Inertial Navigation System (INS) technology. Information on the historical development of the technology, basics of operation, task performance goals, application opportunities, and a phase 2 sample of earth rate measurement data will be presented. Funding Provided by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle costs

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

    1982-02-01

    The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

  1. Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2010-08-01

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) was declared by the 62nd General Assembly of the United Nations and was also endorsed by UNESCO. Investigations in the realms of particle and nuclear physicsmake a large contribution in the development of our ideas of the properties of the Universe. The present article discusses some problems of the evolution of the Universe, nucleosyntheses, and cosmochronology from the point of view of nuclear and particle physics. Processes occurring in the Universe are compared with the mechanisms of the production and decay of nuclei, as well as with the mechanisms of their interaction at high energies. Examples that demonstrate the potential of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and the properties of the Universe are given. The results that come from investigations into nuclear reactions induced by beams of radioactive nuclei and which make it possible to take a fresh look at the nucleosynthesis scenario in the range at light nuclei are presented.

  2. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  3. Chairing a Small Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Lee H.; Lynch, David M.

    Ten management problems for chairs of small departments in small colleges are discussed, along with problem-solving strategies for these administrators. Serious disagreements within a small and intimate department may create a country club culture in which differences are smoothed over and the personal idiosyncrasies of individual members are…

  4. Small Colleges, Big Missions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, W. A., Jr., Ed.

    This monograph by the members of the American Association of Community Colleges' Commission on Small and/or Rural Community Colleges shares small and rural community college experiences. In "Leaders through Community Service," Jacqueline D. Taylor provides a model for how small and rural community colleges can be involved in building leaders…

  5. Small Business Pedagogic Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen; Hernon-Tinning, Barnie; Ehrich, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Understanding how learning for small businesses should best proceed constitutes a worthwhile, yet challenging, pedagogic project. In order to maintain their viability, small businesses need to be able to respond to new practices and tasks. Yet small businesses seem neither attracted to nor to value the kinds of taught courses that are the standard…

  6. Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors with nuclear inclusion.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Saori; Tsuta, Koji; Sekine, Shigeki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Sasaki, Naoshi; Shibuki, Yasuo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Asamura, Hisao; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear inclusion or pseudoinclusion is a peculiar cytological feature, and its recognition in appropriate clinicopathological settings can aid in the diagnosis of several disease entities. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 case of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor (NET) with nuclear pseudoinclusion has been reported. A review of 227 patients who had undergone surgical resection for pulmonary NETs revealed 2 tumors with different mechanisms of nuclear inclusion. To explore the cause of nuclear inclusion, NET with nuclear inclusion was characterized immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally. Nuclear inclusions were observed in 2 of the 227 (0.9%) patients with pulmonary NETs. The first patient was a 46-year-old woman with small cell carcinoma. Tumor cells with nuclear inclusions were distributed focally. Ultrastructural analysis showed that these inclusions were pseudoinclusions. The second patient was a 62-year-old man with large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Nuclear inclusions were observed in the focal area of the tumor. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the intra-nuclear materials consisted of biotin and aberrant cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. Mutational analysis revealed a CTNNB1 gene mutation. Although very rare, diagnostic errors may be observed in cases of pulmonary NETs with nuclear inclusions. The mechanisms of nuclear inclusion differed, with one due to herniation of the cytoplasm into the nucleus (pseudoinclusion) and the other due to accumulation of biotin resulting from a CTNNB1 gene mutation. PMID:23896262

  7. 77 FR 39442 - Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... July 18, 2008 (73 FR 41237), to account for inflation. DATES: Submit comments by August 2, 2012...; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 2 and 171 RIN 3150-AJ14 Receipts-Based, Small Business Size... licensee as a ``small entity'' under the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980, as amended. The NRC...

  8. 10 CFR 40.22 - Small quantities of source material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Small quantities of source material. 40.22 Section 40.22 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL General Licenses § 40.22 Small quantities of source material. (a) A general license is hereby issued authorizing commercial and...

  9. 10 CFR 40.22 - Small quantities of source material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small quantities of source material. 40.22 Section 40.22 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL General Licenses § 40.22 Small quantities of source material. (a) A general license is hereby issued authorizing commercial and...

  10. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  11. Nuclear power: Fourth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes the basics of nuclear power generation, explaining both the benefits and the real and imagined risks of nuclear power. It includes a discussion of the Three Mile Island accident and its effects. Nuclear Power has been used in the public information programs of more than 100 utilities. The contents discussed are: Nuclear Power and People; Why Nuclear Power. Electricity produced by coal; Electricity produced by nuclear fuel; Nuclear plant sites in the United States; Short History of Commercial Nuclear Power; U.S. nuclear submarines, Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants; Licensing process, Nuclear Power Plant Operator Training; Nuclear power plant simulator, Are Nuclear Plants Safe.; Containment structure, Nuclear Power Plant Insurance; Is Radiation Dangerous.; Man-made radiation, What is Nuclear Fuel.; Fuel cycle for commercial nuclear power plants; Warm Water Discharge; Cooling tower; Protection of Radioactive Materials; Plutonium and Proliferation; Disposal of Radioactive Wastes; Are Alternate Energy Sources Available.; Nuclear Opposition; and Nuclear Power in the Future.

  12. Are nuclear shipments really safe?

    PubMed

    Brobst, W A

    1975-01-01

    The transportation of nuclear materials is on the increase. Although nuclear shipments are only a very small fraction of the Nation's hazardous materials shipments, they attract a great deal of public attention. Shipments of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear wastes are a particular concern. One of the many fears that people have about nuclear energy is the possibility that a nuclear shipment might somehow go awry and cause a serious public hazard. Primarily, they are worried that a shipment of spent reactor fuel or highly radioactive waste could be involved in serious rail or highway accident and dump its contents all over the countryside. Is that really possible? How safe are those shipments? How many are there? What do they look like? Are the packages tested? These and other questions are answered in this paper. Since public risk is the product of the consequences of an accident and its probability, both aspects are presented so that each of us can make up his own mind whether the risk from nuclear shipments is acceptable. PMID:1193025

  13. Nuclear Terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2001-01-01

    As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

  14. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  15. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    The technical principles and practices of the civil nuclear industry are described with particular reference to fission and its products, natural and artificial radioactivity elements principally concerned and their relationships, main types of reactor, safety issues, the fuel cycle, waste management, issues related to weapon proliferation, environmental considerations and possible future developments. PMID:21180342

  16. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  17. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  18. Effusion cytomorphology of small round cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Katsuhide; Tsuta, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are a group of tumors composed of small, round, and uniform cells with high nuclear/cytoplasmic (N/C) ratios. The appearance of SRCT neoplastic cells in the effusion fluid is very rare. We reported the cytomorphological findings of SRCTs in effusion cytology, and performed statistical and mathematical analyses for a purpose to distinguish SRCTs. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the cytologic findings of effusion samples from 40 SRCT cases and measured the lengths of the nuclei, cytoplasms, and the cell cluster areas. The SRCT cases included 14 Ewing sarcoma (EWS)/primitive neuroectodermal tumor cases, 5 synovial sarcoma cases, 6 rhabdomyosarcoma cases, 9 small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cases, and 6 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) cases. Results: Morphologically, there were no significant differences in the nuclear and cytoplasmic lengths in cases of EWS, synovial sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. The cytoplasmic lengths in cases of SCLC and DLBL were smaller than those of EWS, synovial sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. The nuclear density of the cluster in SCLC was higher than that in other SRCTs, and cases of DLBL showed a lack of anisokaryosis and anisocytosis. Conclusion: We believe that it might be possible to diagnose DLBL and SCLC from cytologic analysis of effusion samples but it is very difficult to use this method to distinguish EWS, synovial sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. Statistical and mathematical analyses indicated that nuclear density and dispersion of nuclear and cytoplasmic sizes are useful adjuncts to conventional cytologic diagnostic criteria, which are acquired from experience. PMID:27279684

  19. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  20. Small turbines, big unknown

    SciTech Connect

    Gipe, P.

    1995-07-01

    While financial markets focus on the wheeling and dealing of the big wind companies, the small wind turbine industry quietly keeps churning out its smaller but effective machines. Some, the micro turbines, are so small they can be carried by hand. Though worldwide sales of small wind turbines fall far short of even one large windpower plant, figures reach $8 million to $10 million annually and could be as much as twice that if batteries and engineering services are included.

  1. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  2. Small bowel radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Antes, G.; Eggemann, F.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals mainly with technique, experiences and results of the biphasic small bowel enema (enteroclysis) with barium and methyl cellulose. The method allows the evaluation of both morphology and function of the small bowel. The introduction describes the examination technique, basic patterns, interpretation and indications, while the atlas shows a broad spectrum of small bowel diseases (Crohn's disease, other inflammatory diseases, tumors, motility disorders, obstructions and malformations). The possibilities of small bowel radiology are demonstrated with reference to clinical findings and differential diagnoses.

  3. Small Modular Reactors (468th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Robert

    2011-04-20

    With good reason, much more media attention has focused on nuclear power plants than solar farms, wind farms, or hydroelectric plants during the past month and a half. But as nations around the world demand more energy to power everything from cell phone batteries to drinking water pumps to foundries, nuclear plants are the only non-greenhouse-gas producing option that can be built to operate almost anywhere, and can continue to generate power during droughts, after the sun sets, and when winds die down. To supply this demand for power, designers around the world are competing to develop more affordable nuclear reactors of the future: small modular reactors. Brookhaven Lab is working with DOE to ensure that these reactors are designed to be safe for workers, members of surrounding communities, and the environment and to ensure that the radioactive materials and technology will only be used for peaceful purposes, not weapons. In his talk, Bari will discuss the advantages and challenges of small modular reactors and what drives both international and domestic interest in them. He will also explain how Brookhaven Lab and DOE are working to address the challenges and provide a framework for small modular reactors to be commercialized.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  5. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  6. Railgun launch of small bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Drobyshevski, E.M.; Zhukov, B.G.; Sakharov, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The small body launching using gas or plasma faces the fundamental problem caused by excess energy loss due to great wall surface/volume of the barrel ratio. That is why the efficiency of the plasma armature (PA) railgun acceleration is maximum for 8--10 mm-size bodies and drops as their size decreases. For the nuclear fusion applications, where {number_sign}1--2 mm-size pellets at 5--10 km/s velocity are desirable, one is forced to search for compromise between the body size (3--4 mm) and its velocity (3 km/s). Under these conditions, EM launchers did not demonstrate an advantage over the light-gas guns. When elaborating the {number_sign}1 mm railgun, the authors made use of the ideology of the body launching at constant acceleration close to the body strength or the electrode skin-layer explosion limits. That shortened the barrel length sufficiently. The system becomes highly compact thus permitting rapid test of new operation modes and different modifications of the design including the magnetic field augmentation. As a result of these refinements, the difficulties caused by the catastrophic supply of mass ablated from the electrodes were overcome and regimes of {number_sign}1 mm body non-sabot speed-up to 4.5 km/s were found. Potentialities of the small system created are far from being exhausted.

  7. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Radioactive waste is mounting at U.S. nuclear power plants at a rate of more than 2,000 metric tons a year. Pursuant to statute and anticipating that a geologic repository would be available in 1998, the Department of Energy (DOE) entered into disposal contracts with nuclear utilities. Now, however, DOE does not expect the repository to be ready before 2010. For this reason, DOE does not want to develop a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) by 1998. This book is concerned about how best to store the waste until a repository is available, congressional requesters asked GAO to review the alternatives of continued storage at utilities' reactor sites or transferring waste to an MRS facility, GAO assessed the likelihood of an MRSA facility operating by 1998, legal implications if DOE is not able to take delivery of wastes in 1998, propriety of using the Nuclear Waste Fund-from which DOE's waste program costs are paid-to pay utilities for on-site storage capacity added after 1998, ability of utilities to store their waste on-site until a repository is operating, and relative costs and safety of the two storage alternatives.

  8. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  9. Effective citizen advocacy of beneficial nuclear technologies

    SciTech Connect

    McKibben, J. Malvyn; Wood, Susan

    2007-07-01

    In 1991, a small group of citizens from communities near the Savannah River Site (SRS) formed a pro-nuclear education and advocacy group, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness (CNTA). Their purpose was to: (1) counter nuclear misinformation that dominated the nation's news outlets, (2) provide education on nuclear subjects to area citizens, students, elected officials, and (3) provide informed citizen support for potential new missions for SRS when needed. To effectively accomplish these objectives it is also essential to establish and maintain good relations with community leaders and reporters that cover energy and nuclear subjects. The organization has grown considerably since its inception and has expanded its sphere of influence. We believe that our experiences over these fifteen years are a good model for effectively communicating nuclear subjects with the public. This paper describes the structure, operation and some of the results of CNTA. (authors)

  10. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  11. Small Schools, Big Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsey, R. John

    2011-01-01

    Historically, small schools have played a very important role in the provision of schooling in Australia. Numerically, using an enrollment of 200 or less, small schools represent approximately 45% of the schools in Australia. Population growth and the consequences of this, in particular for food production, water and energy, mean that the…

  12. Small Mammal Intrigue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cristol, Daniel A.

    1985-01-01

    Gives introductory information about the study of small mammals including the selection and use of harmless live-traps, handling and identification, techniques for observation and trapping in the wild, and safety measures. Suggests useful references for teachers wishing to develop a small mammal study program for their students. (JHZ)

  13. Small College, Big Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markin, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    When scientists at small colleges and universities seek research grants, they often run into challenges not faced by their colleagues at major institutions. It is, nonetheless, possible to maintain a research program at a small institution, says the writer, if people have a great deal of passion and a little ingenuity. Issues to consider at…

  14. Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Dennis W.; Fong, Stephen

    This small animal care course guide is designed for students who will be seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, grooming shops, pet shops, and small-animal laboratories. The guide begins with an introductory section that gives the educational philosophy of the course, job categories and opportunities, units of instruction required…

  15. Industrial Education. "Small Engines".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides the student with information and manipulative experiences on small gasoline engines. Included are sections on shop adjustment, safety, small engines, internal combustion, engine construction, four stroke engines, two stroke engines,…

  16. Sensitive Small Area Photometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, M. D.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a simple photometer capable of measuring small light intensities over small areas. The inexpensive, easy-to- construct instrument is intended for use in a student laboratory to measure the light intensities in a diffraction experiment from single or multiple slits. Typical experimental results are presented along with the theoretical…

  17. Small Wind Information (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative maintains a website section devoted to information about small wind turbines for homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource.

  18. Big Project, Small Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Jennifer A.; Eitel, Karla B.; Bingaman, Deirdre; Miller, Brant G.; Rittenburg, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Donnelly, Idaho, is a small town surrounded by private ranches and Forest Service property. Through the center of Donnelly runs Boulder Creek, a small tributary feeding into Cascade Lake Reservoir. Boulder Creek originates from a mountain lake north of Donnelly. Since 1994 it has been listed as "impaired" by the Environmental Protection…

  19. Technology for small spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report gives the results of a study by the National Research Council's Panel on Small Spacecraft Technology that reviewed NASA's technology development program for small spacecraft and assessed technology within the U.S. government and industry that is applicable to small spacecraft. The panel found that there is a considerable body of advanced technology currently available for application by NASA and the small spacecraft industry that could provide substantial improvement in capability and cost over those technologies used for current NASA small spacecraft. These technologies are the result of developments by commercial companies, Department of Defense agencies, and to a lesser degree NASA. The panel also found that additional technologies are being developed by these same entities that could provide additional substantial improvement if development is successfully completed. Recommendations for future technology development efforts by NASA across a broad technological spectrum are made.

  20. Curved Waveguide Based Nuclear Fission for Small, Lightweight Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Putnam, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the presented work is on the creation of a system of grazing incidence, supermirror waveguides for the capture and reuse of fission sourced neutrons. Within research reactors, neutron guides are a well known tool for directing neutrons from the confined and hazardous central core to a more accessible testing or measurement location. Typical neutron guides have rectangular, hollow cross sections, which are crafted as thin, mirrored waveguides plated with metal (commonly nickel). Under glancing angles with incoming neutrons, these waveguides can achieve nearly lossless transport of neutrons to distant instruments. Furthermore, recent developments have created supermirror surfaces which can accommodate neutron grazing angles up to four times as steep as nickel. A completed system will form an enclosing ring or spherical resonator system to a coupled neutron source for the purpose of capturing and reusing free neutrons to sustain and/or accelerate fission. While grazing incidence mirrors are a known method of directing and safely using neutrons, no method has been disclosed for capture and reuse of neutrons or sustainment of fission using a circular waveguide structure. The presented work is in the process of fabricating a functional, highly curved, neutron supermirror using known methods of Ni-Ti layering capable of achieving incident reflection angles up to four times steeper than nickel alone. Parallel work is analytically investigating future geometries, mirror compositions, and sources for enabling sustained fission with applicability to the propulsion and energy goals of NASA and other agencies. Should research into this concept prove feasible, it would lead to development of a high energy density, low mass power source potentially capable of sustaining fission with a fraction of the standard critical mass for a given material and a broadening of feasible materials due to reduced rates of release, absorption, and non-fission for neutrons. This advance could be applied to direct propulsion through guided fission products or as a secondary energy source for high impulse electric propulsion. It would help meet national needs for highly efficient energy sources with limited dependence on fossil fuels or conflict materials, and it would improve the use of low grade fissile materials which would help reduce national stockpiles and waste.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of human small nuclear RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jawdekar, Gauri W.; Henry, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The products of human snRNA genes have been frequently described as performing housekeeping functions and their synthesis refractory to regulation. However, recent studies have emphasized that snRNA and other related non-coding RNA molecules control multiple facets of the central dogma, and their regulated expression is critical to cellular homeostasis during normal growth and in response to stress. Human snRNA genes contain compact and yet powerful promoters that are recognized by increasingly well-characterized transcription factors, thus providing a premier model system to study gene regulation. This review summarizes many recent advances deciphering the mechanism by which the transcription of human snRNA and related genes are regulated. PMID:18442490

  2. Shielding analysis of a small compact space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Lee L., Jr.

    1987-08-01

    The SP-100 reactor, currently in its developmental stage, has a layered tungsten-lithium hydride shield. Studies indicate that this shield configuration is the lightest weight shield. This configuration and three other shielding concepts were analyzed to determine the lightest shield and to determine the shield configuration with the smallest volume. The other concepts were a boron carbide-beryllium layered shield, and a lithium hydride-beryllium shield. FEMP2D and FEMP1D codes were used in this analysis. These codes were developed at Sandia National Laboatory (SNL), using the input from another code, RFCC, which produced enery dependent dose conversion factors, and determined the shields' ability to attenuate the neutron and gamma radiation to permissible dose limits. The results of this analysis show that the lithium hydribe-tungsten layered shield was indeed the lightest weight shield. Volume, not weight, may be the driving factor in determining the shield configuration.

  3. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine ... Embolus: Blood clots can block one of the arteries supplying the intestine. People who have had a ...

  4. The Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Explains problems enforcing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) of 1968. Provides factual charts and details concerning the production of nuclear energy and arms, the processing and disposal of waste products, and outlines the nuclear fuel cycle. Discusses safeguards, the risk of nuclear terrorism, and ways to deal with these problems. (NL)

  5. The Nuclear Power/Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Sam; Totten, Martha Wescoat

    1985-01-01

    Once they have nuclear power, most countries will divert nuclear materials from commercial to military programs. In excerpts from the book "Facing the Danger" (by Totten, S. and M. W., Crossing Press, 1984), five anti-nuclear activists explain how and why they have been addressing the nuclear connection. (RM)

  6. Nuclear gastroenterology

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: Scintigraphy of the oesopohagus; Gastric emptying; Bile dynamics; Scintigraphy in diffuse liver disease; Scintigraphic diagnosis of liver tumors; Acute cholecystitis; Radiolabelled white cells in inflammatory disease; Scintigraphy in gastrointestinal bleeding; Radiolabelled antibodies for imaging of gastrointestinal tumors; Assessment of the small intestine; and Gastrointestinal scintigraphy in pediatrics.

  7. Nuclear chiral dynamics and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jeremy W.; Kaiser, Norbert; Weise, Wolfram

    2013-11-01

    This presentation reviews an approach to nuclear many-body systems based on the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of low-energy QCD. In the low-energy limit, for energies and momenta small compared to a characteristic symmetry breaking scale of order 1 GeV, QCD is realized as an effective field theory of Goldstone bosons (pions) coupled to heavy fermionic sources (nucleons). Nuclear forces at long and intermediate distance scales result from a systematic hierarchy of one- and two-pion exchange processes in combination with Pauli blocking effects in the nuclear medium. Short distance dynamics, not resolved at the wavelengths corresponding to typical nuclear Fermi momenta, are introduced as contact interactions between nucleons. Apart from a set of low-energy constants associated with these contact terms, the parameters of this theory are entirely determined by pion properties and low-energy pion-nucleon scattering observables. This framework (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) can provide a realistic description of both isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter, with emphasis on the isospin-dependence determined by the underlying chiral NN interaction. The importance of three-body forces is emphasized, and the role of explicit Δ(1232)-isobar degrees of freedom is investigated in detail. Nuclear chiral thermodynamics is developed and a calculation of the nuclear phase diagram is performed. This includes a successful description of the first-order phase transition from a nuclear Fermi liquid to an interacting Fermi gas and the coexistence of these phases below a critical temperature Tc. Density functional methods for finite nuclei based on this approach are also discussed. Effective interactions, their density dependence and connections to Landau Fermi liquid theory are outlined. Finally, the density and temperature dependences of the chiral (quark) condensate are investigated.

  8. Special nuclear material simulation device

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John H.; DeMint, Amy; Gooch, Jack; Hawk, Todd; Pickett, Chris A.; Blessinger, Chris; York, Robbie L.

    2014-08-12

    An apparatus for simulating special nuclear material is provided. The apparatus typically contains a small quantity of special nuclear material (SNM) in a configuration that simulates a much larger quantity of SNM. Generally the apparatus includes a spherical shell that is formed from an alloy containing a small quantity of highly enriched uranium. Also typically provided is a core of depleted uranium. A spacer, typically aluminum, may be used to separate the depleted uranium from the shell of uranium alloy. A cladding, typically made of titanium, is provided to seal the source. Methods are provided to simulate SNM for testing radiation monitoring portals. Typically the methods use at least one primary SNM spectral line and exclude at least one secondary SNM spectral line.

  9. Expression Profile of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Serum of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Massimo; Nociti, Viviana; Lucchini, Matteo; De Fino, Chiara; Losavio, Francesco Antonio; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2016-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that leads to severe neurological disability. There is an interest in potential biomarkers that could provide information predicting disease activity and progression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of various human disorders, such as oncologic, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases. No studies have so far explored a potential link between lncRNAs and MS pathology. We screened 84 lncRNAs, involved in autoimmunity and human inflammatory response, in the serum of relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) patients (n = 12), age-matched controls (n = 12), and in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) (n = 12). We used the following criteria for lncRNAs analysis: fold change >2 and p < 0.05. According to these criteria, by real-time PCR, we identified three lncRNAs up-regulated in RR-MS patients respectively to controls: nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1), taurine up-regulated 1 (TUG1), and 7SK small nuclear (RN7SK RNA). Literature data showed that NEAT1, TUG1, and RN7SK RNA play an important role in neurodegenerative processes. Our results indicate that these lncRNAs may be involved in MS pathogenesis. Additional experimental data are needed to clarify the molecular mechanisms through which lncRNAs up-regulation may have a role in MS. PMID:27034068

  10. Learning Nuclear Science with Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constan, Zach

    2010-02-01

    Nuclei are small: if an atom was the size of a football field, the nucleus would be an apple sitting on the 50-yd line. At the same time, nuclei are dense: the Earth, compressed to nuclear density, could fit inside four Sears Towers. The subatomic level is strange and exotic. For that reason, it's not hard to get young minds excited about nuclear science. But how does one move beyond analogies like those above and offer a better understanding of the extraordinary world of the nucleus? This is the challenge faced by the outreach program at Michigan State University's National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), a National Science Foundation-supported facility specializing in the creation and study of rare isotopes. It was necessary to devise a model of the nucleus that students could interact with and even use to approximate the nuclear reactions that create exotic nuclei. The solution was to use magnetic marbles.

  11. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  12. SmallSat Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  13. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened. PMID:20873683

  14. Nuclear security

    SciTech Connect

    Dingell, J.D.

    1991-02-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, located in Livermore, California, generates and controls large numbers of classified documents associated with the research and testing of nuclear weapons. Concern has been raised about the potential for espionage at the laboratory and the national security implications of classified documents being stolen. This paper determines the extent of missing classified documents at the laboratory and assesses the adequacy of accountability over classified documents in the laboratory's custody. Audit coverage was limited to the approximately 600,000 secret documents in the laboratory's custody. The adequacy of DOE's oversight of the laboratory's secret document control program was also assessed.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  16. Photodetectors for Nuclear Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Moses, William W.

    2009-01-01

    There have been a number of recent advances in photodetector technology, notably in photomultiplier tubes with high quantum efficiency (up to ~50%), hybrid photodetectors, and silicon-based Geiger-mode photodetectors. This paper looks at the potential benefits that these technologies can bring to nuclear medicine, notably SPECT and PET. We find that while the potential benefits to SPECT are relatively small, they can bring performance improvements in many areas for PET. PMID:20161403

  17. Phase transitions in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1984-11-01

    The rather general circumstances under which a phase transition in hadronic matter at finite temperature to an abnormal phase in which baryon effective masses become small and in which copious baryon-antibaryon pairs appear is emphasized. A preview is also given of a soliton model of dense matter, in which at a density of about seven times nuclear density, matter ceases to be a color insulator and becomes increasingly color conducting. 22 references.

  18. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Levine, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optimal treatment regimen remains elusive. Recently there has been renewed interest in SIBO and its putative association with irritable bowel syndrome. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of SIBO. PMID:21960820

  19. Small satellites - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. K.

    The present review of small satellites examines spacecraft activities in the U.K. and compiles a checklist of advantages and applications for the class. These advantages are illustrated with references to recent small satellite missions and technologies developed to facilitate such launches and projects. Specific programs examined include AMPTE-UKS, Viking, and the UoSAT program, and information is given regarding the Small Explorer program, the RAE Space Technology Research Vehicle, the AEA Argos Program, and space research programs in both Japan and India. Low-cost launches are shown to be available in the form of the Ariane Structure for Auxiliary Payloads, the Pegasus and Delta vehicles, and with the Shuttle Free-flying Getaway Special. Small-satellite technologies that play key roles in their effective implementation are: structure/thermal advances, attitude control systems, on-board communications, and power and data-handling systems.

  20. CASC: Small Is Beautiful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, William

    1976-01-01

    The rise of the Council for the Advancement of Small Colleges (CASC) to a position of national leadership within the higher education community is described. Its success in fund-raising, college services, and intercollegiate relations is reported. (LBH)

  1. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine ... Unlike the large intestine, the small intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. When there are too many bacteria in the ...

  2. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Symptoms The most common symptoms are: Abdominal ...

  3. Small islands adrift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Anna

    2015-07-01

    With the charismatic former president of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, behind bars on a widely derided terrorism charge, Anna Petherick asks whether small island states can really make themselves heard in Paris.

  4. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause inflammation include regional ileitis , regional enteritis , and Crohn disease . Cancer Carcinoid tumor Injuries to the small intestine ... you have a chronic condition, such as cancer, Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis, you may need ongoing medical ...

  5. Closed Small Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Closed Small Cell Clouds in the South Pacific     ... the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). Closed cell clouds are formed under conditions of widespread sinking of the air above. ...

  6. Hybrid energy systems (HESs) using small modular reactors (SMRs)

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bragg-Sitton

    2014-10-01

    Large-scale nuclear reactors are traditionally operated for a singular purpose: steady-state production of dispatchable baseload electricity that is distributed broadly on the electric grid. While this implementation is key to a sustainable, reliable energy grid, small modular reactors (SMRs) offer new opportunities for increased use of clean nuclear energy for both electric and thermal ap plications in more locations – while still accommodating the desire to support renewable production sources.

  7. Small infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Stuart B.; Lohrmann, Dieter; Miller, James E.; McCormack, Kent; Newsome, Gwendolyn W.; Brown, James C.; Campbell, James, Jr.; Perconti, Philip; Klager, Gene A.

    2001-09-01

    Small, low cost, low poer infrared imaging sensors are relatively recent innovation, employing the most advanced MEMS processing techniques, integrated circuit design, optical materials, and focal plane array packaging. We will review the rationale behind the development of low cost, small IR cameras, discuss several of the medium performance applications for these sensors via a modeling analysis, discuss the goals and status of our applied research uncooled focal plane array technology programs, and discuss the future of uncooled focal plane arrays.

  8. Small-x physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.H.

    1997-06-01

    After a brief review of the kinematics of deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering, the parton model is described. Small-x behavior coming from DGLAP evolution and from BFKL evolution is discussed, and the two types of evolution are contrasted and compared. Then a more detailed discussion of BFKL dynamics is given. The phenomenology of small-x physics is discussed with an emphasis on ways in which BFKL dynamics may be discussed and measured. 45 refs., 12 figs.

  9. How Small are Small Stars Really?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    VLT Interferometer Measures the Size of Proxima Centauri and Other Nearby Stars [1] Summary At a distance of only 4.2 light-years, Proxima Centauri is the nearest star to the Sun currently known [2]. It is visible as an 11-magnitude object in the southern constellation of Centaurus and is the faintest member of a triple system, together with Alpha Centauri , the brightest (double) star in this constellation. Proxima Centauri is a very-low-mass star, in fact barely massive enough to burn hydrogen to helium in its interior. It is about seven times smaller than the Sun, and the surface temperature is "only" about 3000 degrees, about half of that of our own star. Consequently, it is also much fainter - the intrinsic brightness is only 1/150th of that of our Sun. Low-mass stars are very interesting objects , also because the physical conditions in their interiors have much in common with those of giant planets, like Jupiter in our solar system. A determination of the sizes of the smallest stars has been impossible until now because of their general faintness and lack of adequate instrumentation. However, astronomers have long been keen to move forward in this direction, since such measurements would provide indirect, crucial information about the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions. When the first observations with the VLT Interferometer (VLTI), combining the light from two of the 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescopes (ANTU and MELIPAL), were made one year ago ( ESO PR 23/01 ), interferometric measurements were also obtained of Proxima Centauri . They formed part of the VLTI commissioning and the data were soon released to the ESO community, cf. the special website. Now, an international team of astronomers from Switzerland, France and ESO/Chile has successfully analysed these observations by means of newly developed, advanced software. For the first time ever, they obtained a highly accurate measurement of the size of such a small star . Three other small stars were also

  10. Nuclear "waffles"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and inside neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases, often referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. Purpose: To characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function (RDF) g (r ) and the structure factor S (q ) , for systems with proton fractions Yp=0.10 ,0.20 ,0.30 , and 0.40 at about one-third of nuclear saturation density, n =0.050 fm-3 , and temperatures near k T =1 MeV . Methods: We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with 51 200 and 409 600 nucleons. From the output of the MD simulations we obtain the two desired observables. Results: We compute and discuss the differences in topology and observables for each simulation. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, Yp=0.10 and 0.20 , equilibrate quickly and form liquidlike structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, Yp=0.30 and 0.40 , take a longer time to equilibrate and organize themselves in solidlike periodic structures. Furthermore, the Yp=0.40 system is made up of slabs, lasagna phase, interconnected by defects while the Yp=0.30 systems consist of a stack of perforated plates, the nuclear waffle phase. Conclusions: The periodic configurations observed in our MD simulations for proton fractions Yp≥0.30 have important consequences for the structure factors S (q ) of protons and neutrons, which relate to many transport properties of supernovae and neutron star crust. A detailed study of the waffle phase and how its structure depends on temperature, size of the simulation, and the screening length showed that finite-size effects appear to be under control and, also, that the plates in the waffle phase merge at temperatures slightly above 1.0 MeV and

  11. Theoretical nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.D.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains small papers on the following topics: ground state correlations of nuclei in relativistic random phase approximation; instability of infinite nuclear matter in the relativistic hartree approximation; charge density differences for nuclei near {sup 208}Pb in relativistic models; meson exchange current corrections to magnetic moments in quantum hadro-dynamics; analysis of the O{sup +} {yields} O{sup {minus}} reaction at intermediate energies; contributions of reaction channels to the {sup 6}Li(p,{gamma}){sup 7}Be Reaction; deformed chiral nucleons; vacuum polarization in a finite system; second order processes in the (e,e{prime}d) reaction; sea contributions in Dirac RPA for finite nuclei; and momentum cutoffs in the sea.

  12. Objections to nuclear defence

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, N.; Pole, K.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear deterrence. Topics considered include nuclear warfare, nuclear deterrence and the use of the just war doctrine, political aspects, human survival, moral aspects, the nuclear arms race, the ideology of nuclear deterrence, arms control, proliferation, and public opinion.

  13. Trends in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatz, Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is a vibrant field at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics that encompasses research in nuclear physics, astrophysics, astronomy, and computational science. This paper is not a review. It is intended to provide an incomplete personal perspective on current trends in nuclear astrophysics and the specific role of nuclear physics in this field.

  14. Concerted evolution of the tandemly repeated genes encoding primate U2 small nuclear RNA (the RNU2 locus) does not prevent rapid diversification of the (CT){sub n} {center_dot} (GA){sub n} microsatellite embedded within the U2 repeat unit

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.; Weiner, A.M.

    1995-12-10

    The RNU2 locus encoding human U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is organized as a nearly perfect tandem array containing 5 to 22 copies of a 5.8-kb repeat unit. Just downstream of the U2 snRNA gene in each 5.8-kb repeat unit lies a large (CT){sub n}{center_dot}(GA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat (n {approx} 70). This form of genomic organization, in which one repeat is embedded within another, provides an unusual opportunity to study the balance of forces maintaining the homogeneity of both kinds of repeats. Using a combination of field inversion gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction, we have been able to study the CT microsatellites within individual U2 tandem arrays. We find that the CT microsatellites within an RNU2 allele exhibit significant length polymorphism, despite the remarkable homogeneity of the surrounding U2 repeat units. Length polymorphism is due primarily to loss or gain of CT dinucleotide repeats, but other types of deletions, insertions, and substitutions are also frequent. Polymorphism is greatly reduced in regions where pure (CT){sub n} tracts are interrupted by occasional G residues, suggesting that irregularities stabilize both the length and the sequence of the dinucleotide repeat. We further show that the RNU2 loci of other catarrhine primates (gorilla, chimpanzee, ogangutan, and baboon) contain orthologous CT microsatellites; these also exhibit length polymorphism, but are highly divergent from each other. Thus, although the CT microsatellite is evolving far more rapidly than the rest of the U2 repeat unit, it has persisted through multiple speciation events spanning >35 Myr. The persistence of the CT microsatellite, despite polymorphism and rapid evolution, suggests that it might play a functional role in concerted evolution of the RNU2 loci, perhaps as an initiation site for recombination and/or gene conversion. 70 refs., 5 figs.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  18. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Development Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tony

    2015-01-01

    There are clear advantages of development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) for a crewed mission to Mars. NTP for in-space propulsion enables more ambitious space missions by providing high thrust at high specific impulse ((is) approximately 900 sec) that is 2 times the best theoretical performance possible for chemical rockets. Missions can be optimized for maximum payload capability to take more payload with reduced total mass to orbit; saving cost on reduction of the number of launch vehicles needed. Or missions can be optimized to minimize trip time significantly to reduce the deep space radiation exposure to the crew. NTR propulsion technology is a game changer for space exploration to Mars and beyond. However, 'NUCLEAR' is a word that is feared and vilified by some groups and the hostility towards development of any nuclear systems can meet great opposition by the public as well as from national leaders and people in authority. The public often associates the 'nuclear' word with weapons of mass destruction. The development NTP is at risk due to unwarranted public fears and clear honest communication of nuclear safety will be critical to the success of the development of the NTP technology. Reducing cost to NTP development is critical to its acceptance and funding. In the past, highly inflated cost estimates of a full-scale development nuclear engine due to Category I nuclear security requirements and costly regulatory requirements have put the NTP technology as a low priority. Innovative approaches utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU). Even though NTP can be a small source of radiation to the crew, NTP can facilitate significant reduction of crew exposure to solar and cosmic radiation by reducing trip times by 3-4 months. Current Human Mars Mission (HMM) trajectories with conventional propulsion systems and fuel-efficient transfer orbits exceed astronaut radiation exposure limits. Utilizing extra propellant from one additional SLS launch and available

  19. Multinational underground nuclear parks

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C.W.; Giraud, K.M.

    2013-07-01

    Newcomer countries expected to develop new nuclear power programs by 2030 are being encouraged by the International Atomic Energy Agency to explore the use of shared facilities for spent fuel storage and geologic disposal. Multinational underground nuclear parks (M-UNPs) are an option for sharing such facilities. Newcomer countries with suitable bedrock conditions could volunteer to host M-UNPs. M-UNPs would include back-end fuel cycle facilities, in open or closed fuel cycle configurations, with sufficient capacity to enable M-UNP host countries to provide for-fee waste management services to partner countries, and to manage waste from the M-UNP power reactors. M-UNP potential advantages include: the option for decades of spent fuel storage; fuel-cycle policy flexibility; increased proliferation resistance; high margin of physical security against attack; and high margin of containment capability in the event of beyond-design-basis accidents, thereby reducing the risk of Fukushima-like radiological contamination of surface lands. A hypothetical M-UNP in crystalline rock with facilities for small modular reactors, spent fuel storage, reprocessing, and geologic disposal is described using a room-and-pillar reference-design cavern. Underground construction cost is judged tractable through use of modern excavation technology and careful site selection. (authors)

  20. 10 CFR 1.37 - Office of Small Business and Civil Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Office of Small Business and Civil Rights. 1.37 Section 1.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Staff Offices § 1.37 Office of Small Business and Civil Rights. The Office of Small Business...

  1. 10 CFR 1.37 - Office of Small Business and Civil Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Small Business and Civil Rights. 1.37 Section 1.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Staff Offices § 1.37 Office of Small Business and Civil Rights. The Office of Small Business...

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Tikare, Veena; Bartel, Timothy; Besmann, Theodore M; Stan, Marius; Van Uffelen, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We review the state of modeling and simulation of nuclear fuels with emphasis on the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2. The hierarchical scheme presented represents a science-based approach to modeling nuclear fuels by progressively passing information in several stages from ab initio to continuum levels. Such an approach is essential to overcome the challenges posed by radioactive materials handling, experimental limitations in modeling extreme conditions and accident scenarios and small time and distance scales of fundamental defect processes. When used in conjunction with experimental validation, this multiscale modeling scheme can provide valuable guidance to development of fuel for advanced reactors to meet rising global energy demand.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Chartier, Alan; Gueneau, Christine; Mattsson, Ann E.; Tikare, Veena; Bartel, Timothy; Besmann, T. M.; Stan, Marius; Van Uffelen, Paul

    2010-10-01

    We review the state of modeling and simulation of nuclear fuels with emphasis on the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2. The hierarchical scheme presented represents a science-based approach to modeling nuclear fuels by progressively passing information in several stages from ab initio to continuum levels. Such an approach is essential to overcome the challenges posed by radioactive materials handling, experimental limitations in modeling extreme conditions and accident scenarios, and the small time and distance scales of fundamental defect processes. When used in conjunction with experimental validation, this multiscale modeling scheme can provide valuable guidance to development of fuel for advanced reactors to meet rising global energy demand.

  4. Nuclear propulsion in the United States.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    The achievements of the Nuclear Propulsion Program over the past 15 years are reviewed. It is shown that the effort in basic and applied research and technological development resulted in a state of technology of nuclear rocket engines based on solid core reactors, which is suitable for the development of a space propulsion system. Current efforts aimed at achieving specific impulses on the order of 975 sec (3400 K) are noted. The characteristics of SNRE (Small Nuclear Rocket Engine), the ALPHA, BETA, and GAMMA engines are discussed. Attention is given to the design and principles of operation of the Rotating Fluidized Dust Bed Reactor.

  5. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  6. Nuclear war: Opposing viewpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Szumski, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents opposing viewpoints on nuclear war. Topics discussed include: how nuclear would begin; would humanity survive; would civil defense work; will an arms agreement work; and can space weapons reduce the risk of nuclear war.

  7. MINERVA: Small Planets from Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Johnson, John Asher; Wright, Jason; McCrady, Nate; Swift, Jonathan; Bottom, Michael; Plavchan, Peter; Riddle, Reed; Muirhead, Philip S.; Herzig, Erich; Myles, Justin; Blake, Cullen H.; Eastman, Jason; Beatty, Thomas G.; Lin, Brian; Zhao, Ming; Gardner, Paul; Falco, Emilio; Criswell, Stephen; Nava, Chantanelle; Robinson, Connor; Hedrick, Richard; Ivarsen, Kevin; Hjelstrom, Annie; Vera, Jon De; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The Kepler mission has shown that small planets are extremely common. It is likely that nearly every star in the sky hosts at least one rocky planet. We just need to look hard enough-but this requires vast amounts of telescope time. MINERVA (MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array) is a dedicated exoplanet observatory with the primary goal of discovering rocky, Earth-like planets orbiting in the habitable zone of bright, nearby stars. The MINERVA team is a collaboration among UNSW Australia, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Penn State University, University of Montana, and the California Institute of Technology. The four-telescope MINERVA array will be sited at the F.L. Whipple Observatory on Mt Hopkins in Arizona, USA. Full science operations will begin in mid-2015 with all four telescopes and a stabilised spectrograph capable of high-precision Doppler velocity measurements. We will observe ~100 of the nearest, brightest, Sun-like stars every night for at least five years. Detailed simulations of the target list and survey strategy lead us to expect new low-mass planets.

  8. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  9. [Small-Bowel Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Yuka; Sakamoto, Hirotsugu; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis of small-bowel cancer has become easier thanks to the development of both balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. Balloon-assisted endoscopy allows not only for observation of the deep intestine but also for biopsies and for establishing a histological diagnosis. Although endoscopic diagnosis is reported to improve the prognosis of small-bowel cancer by early detection, it is still difficult and the prognosis in general is poor. Surgery and chemotherapy protocols for this disease are similar to those for colon cancer. At present, the response rate to chemotherapy for small-bowel cancer is low. There is an urgent need in this patient population to establish a new diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm using balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. PMID:27210079

  10. A Small as Possible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, Scott

    2003-01-01

    This story begins with a bit of serendipity: I was on a trip to see a Shuttle launch and I happened to sit next to a guy who was in charge of batteries for Space Systems/Loral. He told me that they needed to create a new battery bypass switch, the device that takes a battery out of commission if it goes bad. After discussing the conversation back at my company, we decided that we could create the switch. We contacted the folks at Loral and they said, 'Okay, let s see what you can come up with. We need it as small as possible.' We asked, 'How small?' They said, 'We need it as small as you can possibly make it.'

  11. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections. PMID:27168147

  12. Nuclear thermal/nuclear electric hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, B. D.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of the nuclear thermal and nuclear electric hybrid. The specifications are described along with its mission performance. Next, the technical status, development requirements, and some cost estimates are provided.

  13. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  14. Nucleon sigma term and quark condensate in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    K. Tsushima; K. Saito; A. W. Thomas; A. Valcarce

    2007-03-01

    We study the bound nucleon sigma term and its effect on the quark condensate in nuclear matter. In the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model it is shown that the nuclear correction to the sigma term is small and negative. Thus, the correction decelerates the decrease of the quark condensate in nuclear matter. However, the quark condensate in nuclear matter is controlled primarily by the scalar-isoscalar sigma field of the model. It appreciably moderates the decrease relative to the leading term at densities around and larger than the normal nuclear matter density.

  15. Small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strogatz, Steven

    Everyone is familiar with the small-world phenomenon: soon after meeting a stranger, we are often suprised to discover that we have a mutual friend, or that we are somehow linked by a short chain of friends. In this talk, I'll present evidence that the small-world phenomenon is more than a curiosity of social networks — it is actually a general property of large, sparse networks whose topology is neither completely regular nor completely random. To check this idea, Duncan Watts and I have analyzed three networks of scientific interest: the neural network of the nematode worm C. elegans, the electrical power grid of the western United States, and the collaboration graph of actors in feature films. All three are small worlds, in the sense that the average number of "handshakes" separating any two members is extremely small (close to the theoretical lower limit set by a random graph). Yet at the same time, all three networks exhibit much more local clustering than a random net, demonstrating that they are not random. I'll also discuss a class of model networks that interpolate between regular lattices and random graphs. Previous theoretical research on complex systems in a wide range of disciplines has focused almost exclusively on networks that are either regular or random. Real networks often lie somewhere in between. Our mathematical model shows that networks in this middle ground tend to exhibit the small-world phenomenon, thanks to the presence of a few long-range edges that link parts of the graph that would otherwise be far apart. Furthermore, we find that when various dynamical systems are coupled in a small-world fashion, they exhibit much greater propagation speed, computational power, and synchronizability than their locally connected, regular counterparts. We explore the implications of these results for simple models of disease spreading, global computation in cellular automata, and collective locking of biological oscillators.

  16. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  17. Programming in the small.

    PubMed

    Gersten, David B; Langer, Steve G

    2011-02-01

    Academic medical centers, in general, and radiation oncology research, in particular, rely heavily on custom software tools and applications. The code development is typically the responsibility of a single individual or at most a small team. Often these individuals are not professional programmers but physicists, students, and physicians. While they possess domain expertise and algorithm knowledge, they often are not fully aware of general "safe coding" practices--nor do they need the full complexity familiar in large commercial software projects to succeed. Rather, some simple guidelines we refer to as "programming in the small" can be used. PMID:20162440

  18. Local magnitudes of small contained explosions.

    SciTech Connect

    Chael, Eric Paul

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between explosive yield and seismic magnitude has been extensively studied for underground nuclear tests larger than about 1 kt. For monitoring smaller tests over local ranges (within 200 km), we need to know whether the available formulas can be extrapolated to much lower yields. Here, we review published information on amplitude decay with distance, and on the seismic magnitudes of industrial blasts and refraction explosions in the western U. S. Next we measure the magnitudes of some similar shots in the northeast. We find that local magnitudes ML of small, contained explosions are reasonably consistent with the magnitude-yield formulas developed for nuclear tests. These results are useful for estimating the detection performance of proposed local seismic networks.

  19. Small Technology Business Incubation Needs

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-31

    This report contains a summary of typical business incubation needs of small technology companies. This document will serve as a guide in the design and implementation of services offered by the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI), an incubator program being designed and developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes a brief description of the methodology used to perform the needs assessment and services proposed to meet the needs of client companies. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. The NSTI will focus on serving businesses with national security technology applications by nurturing them through critical stages of early development. The vision of the NSTI is to be a successful incubator of technologies and private enterprise that assist the NNSA in meeting new challenges in national safety, security, and protection of the homeland.

  20. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  1. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  2. Focused technology: Nuclear propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    Five viewgraphs are presented that outline the objectives and elements of the Nuclear Propulsion Program, mission considerations, propulsion technologies, and the logic flow path for nuclear propulsion development.

  3. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Nucleolar Small RNAs: Bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Bai, Baoyan; Laiho, Marikki

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (size 20-30 nt) of various types have been actively investigated in recent years, and their subcellular compartmentalization and relative concentrations are likely to be of importance to their cellular and physiological functions. Comprehensive data on this subset of the transcriptome can only be obtained by application of high-throughput sequencing, which yields data that are inherently complex and multidimensional, as sequence composition, length, and abundance will all inform to the small RNA function. Subsequent data analysis, hypothesis testing, and presentation/visualization of the results are correspondingly challenging. We have constructed small RNA libraries derived from different cellular compartments, including the nucleolus, and asked whether small RNAs exist in the nucleolus and whether they are distinct from cytoplasmic and nuclear small RNAs, the miRNAs. Here, we present a workflow for analysis of small RNA sequencing data generated by the Ion Torrent PGM sequencer from samples derived from different cellular compartments. PMID:27576724

  4. Small Public Library Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlmutter, Jane; Nelson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Anyone at the helm of a small public library knows that every little detail counts. But juggling the responsibilities that are part and parcel of the job is far from easy. Finally, here's a handbook that includes everything administrators need to keep a handle on library operations, freeing them up to streamline and improve how the organization…

  5. Small Schools Reform Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Beth M.; Berghoff, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This study explored complicated personal narratives of school reform generated by participants in response to a particular small schools reform initiative. Narrative data was dialogically generated in interviews with nine past participants of an urban high school conversion project planned and implemented over a span of five years toward the goal…

  6. Small Rural School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgett, James

    Low cost or no cost ideas for programs in smaller rural schools are listed. Areas covered include public relations, special programs and curriculum. Based on the experience of a small school district in Elizabeth, Illinois, these ideas include the school's relationship to students, faculty and the community; extracurricular activities relating to…

  7. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  8. Small satellite radiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    A critical need for the Mission to Planet Earth is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, flexible radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated data and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). 12 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Automating Small Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, James

    1996-01-01

    Presents a four-phase plan for small libraries strategizing for automation: inventory and weeding, data conversion, implementation, and enhancements. Other topics include selecting a system, MARC records, compatibility, ease of use, industry standards, searching capabilities, support services, system security, screen displays, circulation modules,…

  10. DOE Small Hydropower Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, W.W.; McLaughlin, T.B.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of work and activities of the Department of Energy's National Small Hydropower Program are discussed. Each portion of the program is discussed to provide an overall view of the program's depth. The three major subprograms are the Demonstration Projects subprogram, the Engineering Development subprogram, and the Loan subprogram. Program results are presented by graphic illustrations where applicable.

  11. Small Wonders Close Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniseley, MacGregor; Capraro, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces students to the world of digital microscopy. Looking at small objects through a digital microscope is like traveling through a foreign country for the first time. The experience is new, engaging, and exciting. A handheld digital microscope is an essential tool in a 21st century teacher's toolkit and the perfect tool to…

  12. Small Hive Beetles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small hive beetles (SHB) have become serious pests of honey bees, especially in the southeastern region of the United States. Both adults and larvae cause serious feeding damages and their fecal matters contaminate harvestable honey. At present, Coumaphos (used as an in-hive treatment) and Gardstar ...

  13. Small Gas Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    Instructional materials are provided for a small gas engine course. A list of objectives appears first, followed by a list of internal parts and skills/competencies related to those parts for engine work, ignition and electrical systems, fuel system, crankcase lubrication system, arc welding skills, and gas welding skills. Outlines are provided…

  14. Small Can Be Beautiful.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Patten, Betsy

    1984-01-01

    Grant proposals are most likely to succeed when they are based on solid, well-conceived ideas. Long-range planning is the best way to come up with workable ideas that will convince small foundations of a project's merits. Planning helps identify an institution's top priorities and achieve a consensus. (MLW)

  15. Small Is Beautiful.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Bethany

    This paper presents research findings and the testimony of educators, students, and researchers demonstrating that small schools meet the essential conditions for providing high-quality education to all students. These essential conditions are: (1) students are known well by their teachers; (2) students are actively engaged in learning and in…

  16. Deburring small intersecting holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  17. Small Town Renewal Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Peter

    Over the last 2 decades, the loss of population and businesses in many small, inland, and remote Australian rural communities has intensified, largely because of the stress and uncertainty of volatile world commodity markets. This manual presents a range of survival and revival strategies that some communities have used to build resilient…

  18. Libraries for Small Museums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Linda M.

    Presented are the very basic requirements for establishing a small special library operating under a limited budget. Physical plant organization, cataloging, book processing, circulation procedures, book selection and ordering and instructions for typists are covered. Although the practices discussed were established for a museum library, what is…

  19. Computers in Small Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumberger, Russell W.; Levin, Henry M.

    A survey was administered to a sample of about 10,000 members of the National Federation of Independent Business in 1985 to ascertain a variety of information about the use of computers in the nation's small businesses, including the extent of their use, training needs of users, and impacts and benefits. Major findings summarized from the 2,813…

  20. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine cancer include unexplained weight loss and abdominal pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... doctor if you have any of the following: Pain or cramps in the middle of the abdomen. Weight loss with no known reason. A lump ...

  1. Pancreatic small cell cancer.

    PubMed

    El Rassy, Elie; Tabchi, Samer; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Assi, Tarek; Chebib, Ralph; Farhat, Fadi; Kattan, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) is most commonly associated with lung cancer. Extra-pulmonary SCC can originate in virtually any organ system, with the gastrointestinal tract being the most common site of involvement. We review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, imaging modalities and optimal therapeutic management of PSCC in light of available evidence. PMID:26566245

  2. Small Group Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  3. Small Remote Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Damien

    1997-01-01

    Examines the provision of two small government schools in Australia's Northern Territory in response to the aboriginal movement from central Australia to their homeland in the outer territories. A profile of the community is provided and the learning center development are discussed. (GR)

  4. Small Scale Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural Development Detwork Bulletin, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Innovative programs for the promotion of small-scale enterprise are being conducted by a variety of organizations, including universities, government agencies, international research institutes, and voluntary assistance agencies. Their activities encompass basic extension services, management of cooperatives, community action programs, and…

  5. Small Modular Biomass Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-01

    This fact sheet provides information about modular biomass systems. Small modular biomass systems can help supply electricity to rural areas, businesses, and the billions of people who live without power worldwide. These systems use locally available biomass fuels such as wood, crop waste, animal manures, and landfill gas.

  6. Small Business Development Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for an elective course for 11th- or 12th-grade students in small business development. It is intended to meet three times each week for 18 weeks. Introductory materials include instructor objectives; anticipated student outcomes; and correlations with Connecticut's common core of learning. Each of the eight…

  7. Small School Distributive Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bill

    Information on an atypical 1966-67 Distributive Education pilot program in New Mexico was given. The program was unique since one instructor conducted this program in two schools which were in separate rural districts (Dexter and Hagerman). Since both communities were primarily agricultural, with small student populations, the cost of such a…

  8. Small Business Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wendell, Ed.

    Intended as a resource for both experienced businesspeople and those new to business, this annotated bibliography provides a list of books, pamphlets, periodicals, and videotapes of value in solving specific business problems. The bibliography begins with a list of resources recommended for the library of every small business and a survey of…

  9. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under an Army Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Symbiotics, Inc. developed a software system that permits users to upgrade products from standalone applications so they can communicate in a distributed computing environment. Under a subsequent NASA SBIR grant, Symbiotics added additional tools to the SOCIAL product to enable NASA to coordinate conventional systems for planning Shuttle launch support operations. Using SOCIAL, data may be shared among applications in a computer network even when the applications are written in different programming languages. The product was introduced to the commercial market in 1993 and is used to monitor and control equipment for operation support and to integrate financial networks. The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry. InQuisiX is a reuse library providing high performance classification, cataloging, searching, browsing, retrieval and synthesis capabilities. These form the foundation for software reuse, producing higher quality software at lower cost and in less time. Software Productivity Solutions, Inc. developed the technology under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects funded by NASA and the Army and is marketing InQuisiX in conjunction with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry.

  10. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  11. Nuclear security

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports that despite an Executive Order limiting the authority to make original classification decisions to government officials, DOE has delegated this authority to a number of contractor employees. Although the number of original classification decisions made by these contractors is small, this neither negates nor diminishes the significance of the improper delegation of authority. If misclassification were to occur, particularly at the Top Secret level, U.S. national security interests could potentially be seriously affected and threatened. DOE's argument that the delegation of such authority is a long-standing policy and done on a selective basis does not legitimize the practice and does not relieve DOE of its responsibility to meet the requirements of the Executive Order. DOE needs to independently assess all original classification determinations made by contractors; otherwise, it cannot be sure that U.S. national security interests have been or are being adequately protected.

  12. The Arabidopsis Nuclear Pore and Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Iris; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane structure that separates the eukaryotic cytoplasm from the nucleoplasm. The nuclear pores embedded in the nuclear envelope are the sole gateways for macromolecular trafficking in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear pore complexes assembled at the nuclear pores are large protein conglomerates composed of multiple units of about 30 different nucleoporins. Proteins and RNAs traffic through the nuclear pore complexes, enabled by the interacting activities of nuclear transport receptors, nucleoporins, and elements of the Ran GTPase cycle. In addition to directional and possibly selective protein and RNA nuclear import and export, the nuclear pore gains increasing prominence as a spatial organizer of cellular processes, such as sumoylation and desumoylation. Individual nucleoporins and whole nuclear pore subcomplexes traffic to specific mitotic locations and have mitotic functions, for example at the kinetochores, in spindle assembly, and in conjunction with the checkpoints. Mutants of nucleoporin genes and genes of nuclear transport components lead to a wide array of defects from human diseases to compromised plant defense responses. The nuclear envelope acts as a repository of calcium, and its inner membrane is populated by functionally unique proteins connected to both chromatin and—through the nuclear envelope lumen—the cytoplasmic cytoskeleton. Plant nuclear pore and nuclear envelope research—predominantly focusing on Arabidopsis as a model—is discovering both similarities and surprisingly unique aspects compared to the more mature model systems. This chapter gives an overview of our current knowledge in the field and of exciting areas awaiting further exploration. PMID:22303264

  13. Nuclear Power in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun

    2012-02-01

    In response to the Fukushima accident, China is strengthening its nuclear safety at reactors in operation, under construction and in preparation, including efforts to improve nuclear safety regulations and guidelines based on lessons learned from the accident. Although China is one of the major contributors in the global nuclear expansion, China's nuclear power industry is relatively young. Its nuclear safety regulators are less experienced compared to those in other major nuclear power countries. To realize China's resolute commitment to rapid growth of safe nuclear energy, detailed analyses of its nuclear safety regulatory system are required. This talk explains China's nuclear energy program and policy at first. It also explores China's governmental activities and future nuclear development after Fukushima accidents. At last, an overview of China's nuclear safety regulations and practices are provided. Issues and challenges are also identified for police makers, regulators, and industry professionals.

  14. Practical small-scale explosive seam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Joining principles and variables, types of joints, capabilities, and current and potential applications are described for an explosive seam welding process developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Variable small quantities of RDX explosive in a ribbon configuration are used to create narrow (less than 0.5 inch), long length, uniform, hermetrically sealed joints that exhibit parent metal properties in a wide variety of metals, alloys, and combinations. The first major all application of the process is the repair of four nuclear reactors in Canada. Potential applications include pipelines, sealing of vessels, and assembly of large space structures.

  15. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division

    PubMed Central

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I.

    2013-01-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells. PMID:24265858

  16. Practical small-scale explosive seam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A small-scale explosive seam welding process has been developed that can significantly contribute to remote metal joining operations under hazardous or inaccessible conditions, such as nuclear reactor repair and assembly of structure in space. This paper describes this explosive seam welding process in terms of joining principles, variables, types of joints created, capabilities, and applications. Very small quantities of explosive in a ribbon configuration are used to create narrow (less than 0.5 inch), long-length, uniform, hermetically sealed joints that exhibit parent metal properties in a wide variety of metals, alloys, and combinations. The practicality of this process has been demonstrated by its current acceptance, as well as its capabilities that are superior in many applications to the universally accepted joining processes, such as mechanical fasteners, fusion and resistance welding, and adhesives.

  17. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  18. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  19. PREFACE: XXXVII Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, R.; Lerma, S.; Lizcano, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Symposium on Nuclear Physics is an international meeting organized every year since 1978 by the Division of Nuclear Physics of the Mexican Physical Society. The 37th edition was held at the Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc in the state of Morelos, Mexico, from 6-9 January, 2014. The symposium is intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in different areas of nuclear physics (nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, neutrino physics, hadron physics and nuclear reactions among others). Both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists gathered in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. The symposium was organized in plenary sessions with invited talks and a poster session. In this edition the program consisted of 26 invited talks and 19 posters, whose subjects reflected the active areas and interests of the mexican nuclear physics community. The organization encouraged the participation of young scientist as speakers in the plenary sessions. Seven of the 26 invited talks were given by postdoctoral and doctoral students working in different institutions from Mexico, USA and Europe. The proceedings collect a total of 16 manuscripts from the invited speakers.

  20. Nuclear data for criticality safety - current issues

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Jordan, W.C.; Wright, R.Q.

    1995-06-01

    Traditionally, nuclear data evaluations have been performed in support of the analysis and design of thermal and fast reactors. In general, the neutron spectra characteristic of the thermal and fast systems used for data testing are predominantly in the low- and high-energy range with a relatively small influence from the intermediate-energy range. In the area of nuclear criticality safety, nuclear systems arising from applications involving fissionable materials outside reactors can lead to situations very different from those most commonly found in reactor analysis and design. These systems are not limited to thermal or fast and may have significant influence from the intermediate energy range. The extension of the range of applicability of the nuclear data evaluation beyond thermal and fast systems is therefore needed to cover problems found in nuclear criticality safety. Before criticality safety calculations are performed, the bias and uncertainties of the codes and cross sections that are used must be determined. The most common sources of uncertainties, in general, are the calculational methodologies and the uncertainties related to the nuclear data, such as the microscopic cross sections, entering into the calculational procedure. The aim here is to focus on the evaluated nuclear data pertaining to applications in nuclear criticality safety.

  1. Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E

    2007-09-17

    Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R&D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

  2. Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, Larry

    2007-10-26

    Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241 Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R and D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

  3. Xenon monitoring and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Theodore Ted W.

    2014-05-01

    How do you monitor (verify) a CTBT? It is a difficult challenge to monitor the entire world for nuclear tests, regardless of size. Nuclear tests "normally" occur underground, above ground or underwater. Setting aside very small tests (let's limit our thinking to 1 kiloton or more), nuclear tests shake the ground, emit large amounts of radioactivity, and make loud noises if in the atmosphere (or hydroacoustic waves if underwater).

  4. Xenon monitoring and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, Theodore W.

    2014-05-09

    How do you monitor (verify) a CTBT? It is a difficult challenge to monitor the entire world for nuclear tests, regardless of size. Nuclear tests 'normally' occur underground, above ground or underwater. Setting aside very small tests (let's limit our thinking to 1 kiloton or more), nuclear tests shake the ground, emit large amounts of radioactivity, and make loud noises if in the atmosphere (or hydroacoustic waves if underwater)

  5. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    PubMed

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  6. Nuclear medicine annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are reviewed in this work: nuclear physicians role in planning for and handling radiation accidents; the role of nuclear medicine in evaluating the hypertensive patient; studies of the heart with radionuclides; role of radionuclide imaging in the patient undergoing chemotherapy; hematologic nuclear medicine; the role of nuclear medicine in sports related injuries; radionuclide evaluation of hepatic function with emphasis on cholestatis.

  7. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Nuclear air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

  9. Terrorists and Nuclear Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, David

    1975-01-01

    This essay explores the ways terrorist groups may gain possession of nuclear materials; the way in which they may use nuclear weapons and other nuclear technologies to their benefit; and various courses of action designed to minimize the possibilities of terrorists utilizing nuclear technology to their benefit and society's detriment. (BT)

  10. Nuclear energy and security

    SciTech Connect

    BLEJWAS,THOMAS E.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; EAGAN,ROBERT J.; BAKER,ARNOLD B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity.

  11. Frontiers of Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    Current developments in nuclear structure at the `limits` are discussed. The studies of nuclear behavior at extreme conditions provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk frontiers of nuclear structure are briefly reviewed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  12. The New Nuclear Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the issue of nuclear proliferation, noting that the countries with nuclear capability now include Israel, South Africa, India, and Pakistan. Describes the role and problems of the United States in halting nuclearization. Supplies charts, maps, and information concerning the state of nuclear capability in each country. (NL)

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    2009-06-01

    Author's preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Basic theory; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Measurement of nuclear properties and general physical applications; 5. Nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and gases; 6. Nuclear magnetic resonance in non-metallic solids; 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in metals; 8. Quadrupole effects; Appendices 1-6; Glossary of symbols; Bibliography and author index; Subject index.

  14. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of QASE RT is to enable system analysts and software engineers to evaluate performance and reliability implications of design alternatives. The program resulted from two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects. After receiving a description of the system architecture and workload from the user, QASE RT translates the system description into simulation models and executes them. Simulation provides detailed performance evaluation. The results of the evaluations are service and response times, offered load and device utilizations and functional availability.

  15. Small Business Innovations (Photodetector)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Epitaxx, Inc. of Princeton, NJ, developed the Epitaxx Near Infrared Room Temperature Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs) Photodetector based on their Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract work to develop a linear detector array for satellite imaging applications using InGaAs alloys that didn't need to be cooled to (difficult and expensive) cryogenic temperatures. The photodetectors can be used for remote sensing, fiber optic and laser position-sensing applications.

  16. Small Business Innovations (MISER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Lightwave Electronics Corporation, Mountain View, CA, developed the Series 120 and 122 non-planner diode pumped ring lasers based on a low noise ring laser with voltage tuning that they delivered to Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The voltage tuning feature allows "phase-locking" the lasers, making them "electronic," similar to radio and microwave electronic oscillators. The Series 120 and 122 can be applied to fiber sensing, coherent communications and laser radar.

  17. Small-dam rehabs

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article examines the economics of maintenance, rehabilitation and improvement for small, aging, high-hazard dams. The topics of the article include raising the height of the spillway and repairing deteriorated concrete in the spillway of Fellows Lake Dam, emergency repair of the outlet conduit and replacement of riprap on the upstream slope of Storrie Lake Dam, and extensive rehabilitation of Reeves Lake Dam.

  18. The small turbine revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.

    1995-07-01

    Until the mid-1960s, improvements in technology and economies of scale made each new generating unit installed less expensive than the previous one. Later, bigger was still better. Larger units cost less per kilowatt than smaller units. Today, that may be changing. In some situations, distributed generation -the use of small, dispersed units (usually gas turbines) in the place of large central stations- can be the most attractive option.

  19. Advanced Small Rechargeable Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Lithium-based units offer highest performance. Paper reviews status of advanced, small rechargeable batteries. Covers aqueous systems including lead/lead dioxide, cadmium/nickel oxide, hydrogen/nickel oxide, and zinc/nickel oxide, as well as nonaqueous systems. All based on lithium anodes, nonaqueous systems include solid-cathode cells (lithium/molybdenum disulfide, lithium/titanium disulfide, and lithium/vanadium oxide); liquid-cathode cells (lithium/sulfur dioxide cells); and new category, lithium/polymer cells.

  20. Small animal disease surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Fernando; Jones, Philip H; Menacere, Tarek; Heayns, Bethaney; Wardeh, Maya; Newman, Jenny; Radford, Alan D; Dawson, Susan; Gaskell, Rosalind; Noble, Peter J M; Everitt, Sally; Day, Michael J; McConnell, Katie

    2015-12-12

    This is the first UK small animal disease surveillance report from SAVSNET. Future reports will expand to other syndromes and diseases. As data are collected for longer, the estimates of changes in disease burden will become more refined, allowing more targeted local and perhaps national interventions. Anonymised data can be accessed for research purposes by contacting the authors. SAVSNET welcomes feedback on this report. PMID:26667432

  1. Small arms ammunition

    DOEpatents

    Huerta, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    An elongate projectile for small arms use has a single unitary mass with a hollow nose cavity defined by a sharp rigid cutting edge adapted to make initial contact with the target surface and cut therethrough. The projectile then enters the target mass in an unstable flight mode. The projectile base is substantially solid such that the nose cavity, while relatively deep, does not extend entirely through the base and the projectile center of gravity is aft of its geometric center.

  2. HOSPITAL PHYSICS: Nuclear medicine: diagnosis and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon-Brown, Ann; Soper, Nigel D. W.

    1996-03-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a small but unique speciality, and any physics student who already enjoys computing, image processing, human biology and physiology as well as physics and chemistry, will be fascinated by this medical speciality. Those who enter, whether they be clinical or scientific, rarely leave and remain under its spell for life.

  3. Heat transfer in a nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Konyukhov, G.V.; Petrov, A.I.

    1995-02-01

    Special features of heat transfer in the reactor of a nuclear rocket engine (NRE) are dealt with. It is shown that the design of the cooling system of the NRE reactor is governed by its stability to small deviations of the parameters from the corresponding calculated values and the possibility of compensating for effects due to nonuniformities and distrubances of various types and scales.

  4. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract resulted in a series of commercially available lasers, which have application in fiber optic communications, difference frequency generation, fiber optic sensing and general laboratory use. Developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Phase Doppler Particles Analyzer is a non-disruptive, highly accurate laser-based method of determining particle size, number density, trajectory, turbulence and other information about particles passing through a measurement probe volume. The system consists of an optical transmitter and receiver, signal processor and computer with data acquisition and analysis software. A variety of systems are offered for applications including spray characterization for paint, and agricultural and other sprays. The Microsizer, a related product, is used in medical equipment manufacturing and analysis of contained flows. High frequency components and subsystems produced by Millitech Corporation are marketed for both research and commercial use. These systems, which operate in the upper portion of the millimeter wave, resulted from a number of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects. By developing very high performance mixers and multipliers, the company has advanced the state of the art in sensitive receiver technology. Components are used in receivers and transceivers for monitoring chlorine monoxides, ozone, in plasma characterization and in material properties characterization.

  5. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  6. Manned space flight nuclear system safety. Volume 1: Executive summary. Part 2: Space shuttle nuclear system safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The nuclear safety integration and operational aspects of transporting nuclear payloads to and from an earth orbiting space base by space shuttle are discussed. The representative payloads considered were: (1) zirconium hydride-Brayton power module, (2) isotope-Brayton power module, and (3) small isotope power systems or heat sources. Areas of investigation also include nuclear safety related integration and packaging as well as operational requirements for the shuttle and payload systems for all phases of the mission.

  7. [Chilean nuclear policy].

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, E

    1996-06-01

    This official document is statement of the President of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, Dr. Eduardo Bobadilla, about the nuclear policy of the Chilean State, Thanks to the international policy adopted by presidents Aylwin (1990-1994) and his successor Frei Ruiz Tagle (1994-), a nuclear development plan, protected by the Chilean entrance to the nuclear weapons non proliferation treaty and Tlatelolco Denuclearization treaty, has started. Chile will be able to develop without interference, an autonomous nuclear electrical system and other pacific uses of nuclear energy. Chile also supports a new international treaty to ban nuclear weapon tests. PMID:9041734

  8. Nucleoporin 153 Arrests the Nuclear Import of Hepatitis B Virus Capsids in the Nuclear Basket

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Michael; Zhou, Lixin; Rabe, Birgit; Hoellenriegel, Julia; Stoeber, Miriam; Panté, Nelly; Kann, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all DNA viruses including hepatitis B viruses (HBV) replicate their genome inside the nucleus. In non-dividing cells, the genome has to pass through the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) by the aid of nuclear transport receptors as e.g. importin β (karyopherin). Most viruses release their genome in the cytoplasm or at the cytosolic face of the NPC, as the diameter of their capsids exceeds the size of the NPC. The DNA genome of HBV is derived from reverse transcription of an RNA pregenome. Genome maturation occurs in cytosolic capsids and progeny capsids can deliver the genome into the nucleus causing nuclear genome amplification. The karyophilic capsids are small enough to pass the NPC, but nuclear entry of capsids with an immature genome is halted in the nuclear basket on the nuclear side of the NPC, and the genome remains encapsidated. In contrast, capsids with a mature genome enter the basket and consequently liberate the genome. Investigating the difference between immature and mature capsids, we found that mature capsids had to disintegrate in order to leave the nuclear basket. The arrest of a karyophilic cargo at the nuclear pore is a rare phenomenon, which has been described for only very few cellular proteins participating in nuclear entry. We analyzed the interactions causing HBV capsid retention. By pull-down assays and partial siRNA depletion, we showed that HBV capsids directly interact with nucleoporin 153 (Nup153), an essential protein of the nuclear basket which participates in nuclear transport via importin β. The binding sites of importin β and capsids were shown to overlap but capsid binding was 150-fold stronger. In cellulo experiments using digitonin-permeabilized cells confirmed the interference between capsid binding and nuclear import by importin β. Collectively, our findings describe a unique nuclear import strategy not only for viruses but for all karyophilic cargos. PMID:20126445

  9. Nuclear Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lucki, Natasha C.; Sewer, Marion B.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear lipid metabolism is implicated in various processes, including transcription, splicing, and DNA repair. Sphingolipids play roles in numerous cellular functions, and an emerging body of literature has identified roles for these lipid mediators in distinct nuclear processes. Different sphingolipid species are localized in various subnuclear domains, including chromatin, the nuclear matrix, and the nuclear envelope, where sphingolipids exert specific regulatory and structural functions. Sphingomyelin, the most abundant nuclear sphingolipid, plays both structural and regulatory roles in chromatin assembly and dynamics in addition to being an integral component of the nuclear matrix. Sphingosine-1-phosphate modulates histone acetylation, sphingosine is a ligand for steroidogenic factor 1, and nuclear accumulation of ceramide has been implicated in apoptosis. Finally, nuclear membrane–associated ganglioside GM1 plays a pivotal role in Ca2+ homeostasis. This review highlights research on the factors that control nuclear sphingolipid metabolism and summarizes the roles of these lipids in various nuclear processes. PMID:21888508

  10. Inhomogeneous dynamic nuclear polarization and suppression of electron polarization decay in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Na; Ding, Wenkui; Shi, Anqi; Zhang, Wenxian

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization in a quantum dot. Due to the suppression of direct dipolar and indirect electron-mediated nuclear spin interactions by frequently injected electron spins, our analytical results under independent spin approximation agree well with quantum numerical simulations for a small number of nuclear spins. We find that the acquired nuclear polarization is highly inhomogeneous, proportional to the square of the local electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction constant. Starting from the inhomogeneously polarized nuclear spins, we further show that the electron polarization decay time can be extended 100 times even at a relatively low nuclear polarization.

  11. Pairing effects in nuclear dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Denis; Scamps, Guillaume; Tanimura, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made to account for super-fluidity in time-dependent mean-field description of nuclear dynamic [1-5]. Inclusion of pairing is important to achieve a realistic description of static properties of nuclei. Here,we show that pairing can also affect the nuclear motion. State of the art TDHF approach can describe from small to large amplitude collective motion as well as the collision between nuclei. Very recently, this microscopic approach has been improved to include pairing either in the BCS or HFB framework. Recent applications of the 3D TDHF + BCS (TDHF+BCS) model introduced in [4] will be presented. The role of super-fluidity on collective motion [6, 7], on one- and two-particle transfer [8] and on fission [9, 10] will be illustrated.

  12. Nuclear-pumped flashlamp sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Prelas, Mark A.

    2000-08-01

    Due to pump source restrictions, Nuclear-Pumped Lasers (NPLs) typically have relatively long (micro- to milli-second) pulse lengths with only modest peak powers but with very high total energy. These pump power restraints seriously limit the choice of laser media. One way to avoid this problem is to employ a Nuclear Driven Flashlamp (NDF) for the primary pumped element in the system. The fluorescence from this NDF can then be used for pumping a laser or for other high intensity light applications. The first experimental example of this approach was a 3He-XeBr2 NDF employed by Williams and Miley (1993) to pump a small iodine laser. The present paper discusses issues involved in scaling such an NDF up to high power levels. Possible optimum configurations include use of microsphere or fiber pump elements dispersed in the NPF media. Analysis of such possibilities is presented along with consideration of special reflecting surface designs.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  14. 77 FR 70847 - Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian Point Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit No. 2, Request for Action AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Request for...

  15. Intergenerational issues regarding nuclear power, nuclear waste, and nuclear weapons.

    PubMed

    Ahearne, J F

    2000-12-01

    Nuclear power, nuclear waste, and nuclear weapons raise substantial public concern in many countries. While new support for nuclear power can be found in arguments concerning greenhouse gases and global warming, the long-term existence of radioactive waste has led to requirements for 10,000-year isolation. Some of the support for such requirements is based on intergenerational equity arguments. This, however, places a very high value on lives far in the future. An alternative is to use discounting, as is applied to other resource applications. Nuclear weapons, even though being dismantled by the major nations, are growing in number due to the increase in the number of countries possessing these weapons of mass destruction. This is an unfortunate legacy for future generations. PMID:11314726

  16. Countering the Nuclear Terrorist Threat

    SciTech Connect

    Vantine, H C

    2002-10-04

    The nuclear/radioactive threat to homeland security posed by terrorists can be broken into four categories. Of highest concern is the use of an improvised nuclear device (IND). An IND, as its name implies, is a nuclear explosive device. It produces nuclear yield, and this nuclear yield has catastrophic effects. An IND is the ultimate terrorist weapon, and terrorist groups are actively attempting to acquire nuclear weapons. Detonation of an IND could dwarf the devastation of the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center. Dealing with the aftermath of an IND would be horrific. Rescue efforts and cleanup would be hazardous and difficult. Workers would have to wear full protection suits and self-contained breathing apparatus. Because of the residual radioactivity, in certain locations they could only work short times before acquiring their ''lifetime'' dose. As with the Chernobyl event, some rescue workers might well expose themselves to lethal doses of radiation, adding to the casualty toll. Enormous volumes of contaminated debris would have to be removed and disposed. If a terrorist group decides not to pursue an actual nuclear device, it might well turn to Radiological Dispersal Devices (RDDs) or ''dirty bombs'' as they are often called. RDDs spread radioactivity but they do not generate nuclear yield. The fabrication of an RDD requires radioactive material and a dispersal mechanism. Radioactive materials are used all over the world for medical, industrial, and research applications. Standards for safe handling and accountability of radioactive material vary around the world. Stories in the press suggest inadequate controls on radiological materials in parts of the world. The effects of an RDD vary widely, and are measured in terms of contamination area, health effects to the exposed population, and economic consequences. Even a negligible, but measurable, exposure would exploit the general public's fear of things radioactive and would have significant

  17. Human Reliability Considerations for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, H.; DAgostino, A.; Erasmia, L.

    2012-01-27

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) are a promising approach to meeting future energy needs. Although the electrical output of an individual SMR is relatively small compared to that of typical commercial nuclear plants, they can be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands. Furthermore, SMRs can be used for other purposes, such as producing hydrogen and generating process heat. The design characteristics of many SMRs differ from those of current conventional plants and may require a distinct concept of operations. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted research to examine the human factors engineering and the operational aspects of SMRs. The research identified thirty potential human-performance issues that should be considered in the NRC's reviews of SMR designs and in future research activities. The purpose of this report is to illustrate how the issues can support SMR probabilistic risk analyses and their review by identifying potential human failure events for a subset of the issues. As part of addressing the human contribution to plant risk, human reliability analysis practitioners identify and quantify the human failure events that can negatively impact normal or emergency plant operations. The results illustrated here can be generalized to identify additional human failure events for the issues discussed and can be applied to those issues not discussed in this report.

  18. Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R.; Xing, J.; DAgostino, A.

    2010-11-07

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

  19. Small Heterodimer Partner and Innate Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyo Sun

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily consists of the steroid and non-steroid hormone receptors and the orphan nuclear receptors. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan family nuclear receptor that plays an essential role in the regulation of glucose and cholesterol metabolism. Recent studies reported a previously unidentified role for SHP in the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation. The innate immune system has a critical function in the initial response against a variety of microbial and danger signals. Activation of the innate immune response results in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines to promote anti-microbial effects. An excessive or uncontrolled inflammatory response is potentially harmful to the host, and can cause tissue damage or pathological threat. Therefore, the innate immune response should be tightly regulated to enhance host defense while preventing unwanted immune pathologic responses. In this review, we discuss recent studies showing that SHP is involved in the negative regulation of toll-like receptor-induced and NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3)-mediated inflammatory responses in innate immune cells. Understanding the function of SHP in innate immune cells will allow us to prevent or modulate acute and chronic inflammation processes in cases where dysregulated innate immune activation results in damage to normal tissues. PMID:26754583

  20. Small Heterodimer Partner and Innate Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Jae Min; Jin, Hyo Sun; Jo, Eun Kyeong

    2016-03-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily consists of the steroid and non-steroid hormone receptors and the orphan nuclear receptors. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan family nuclear receptor that plays an essential role in the regulation of glucose and cholesterol metabolism. Recent studies reported a previously unidentified role for SHP in the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation. The innate immune system has a critical function in the initial response against a variety of microbial and danger signals. Activation of the innate immune response results in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines to promote anti-microbial effects. An excessive or uncontrolled inflammatory response is potentially harmful to the host, and can cause tissue damage or pathological threat. Therefore, the innate immune response should be tightly regulated to enhance host defense while preventing unwanted immune pathologic responses. In this review, we discuss recent studies showing that SHP is involved in the negative regulation of toll-like receptor-induced and NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3)-mediated inflammatory responses in innate immune cells. Understanding the function of SHP in innate immune cells will allow us to prevent or modulate acute and chronic inflammation processes in cases where dysregulated innate immune activation results in damage to normal tissues. PMID:26754583

  1. Eccentricity of small exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Albrecht, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Solar system planets move on almost circular orbits. In strong contrast, many massive gas giant exoplanets travel on highly elliptical orbits, whereas the shape of the orbits of smaller, more terrestrial, exoplanets remained largely elusive. This is because the stellar radial velocity caused by these small planets is extremely challenging to measure. Knowing the eccentricity distribution in systems of small planets would be important as it holds information about the planet's formation and evolution. Furthermore the location of the habitable zone depends on eccentricity, and eccentricity also influences occurrence rates inferred for these planets because planets on circular orbits are less likely to transit. We make these eccentricity measurements of small planets using photometry from the Kepler satellite and utilizing a method relying on Kepler's second law, which relates the duration of a planetary transit to its orbital eccentricity, if the stellar density is known.I present a sample of 28 multi-planet systems with precise asteroseismic density measurements, which host 74 planets with an average radius of 2.6 R_earth. We find that the eccentricity of planets in these systems is low and can be described by a Rayleigh distribution with sigma = 0.049 +- 0.013. This is in full agreement with solar system eccentricities, but in contrast to the eccentricity distributions previously derived for exoplanets from radial velocity studies. I further report the first results on the eccentricities of over 50 Kepler single-planet systems, and compare them with the multi-planet systems. I close the talk by showing how transit durations help distinguish between false positives and true planets, and present six new planets.

  2. Small Landslide in Kasei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    21 February 2004 The finger-shaped lobe just right of center in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is the deposit of a small landslide that came down a dark, layered slope. Landslides are common on Mars in areas of steep topography; this one is located in the Kasei Valles region near 23.9oN, 67.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left; the picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  3. Small Business Innovations (Helicopters)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The amount of engine power required for a helicopter to hover is an important, but difficult, consideration in helicopter design. The EHPIC program model produces converged, freely distorted wake geometries that generate accurate analysis of wake-induced downwash, allowing good predictions of rotor thrust and power requirements. Continuum Dynamics, Inc., the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) company that developed EHPIC, also produces RotorCRAFT, a program for analysis of aerodynamic loading of helicopter blades in forward flight. Both helicopter codes have been licensed to commercial manufacturers.

  4. Small Business Innovations (Cryostat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    General Pneumatics Corporation, Scottsdale, AZ, developed an anti- clogging cryostat that liquifies gases by expansion for high pressure through a nozzle to produce cryorefrigeration based on their Kennedy Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) work to develop a Joule-Thomson (JT) expansion valve that is less susceptible to clogging by particles or condensed contaminants in the flow than a non-contaminating compressor in a closed cycle Linde-Hampson cryocooler used to generate cryogenic cooling for infrared sensors, super conductors, supercooled electronics and cryosurgery.

  5. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The PER-Force Handcontroller was originally developed for the International Space Station under a Johnson Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. Produced by Cybernet Systems Corporation, the unit is a force-reflecting system that manipulates robots or objects by "feel." The Handcontroller moves in six degrees of freedom, with real and virtual reality forces simulated by a 3-D molecular modeling software package. It is used in molecular modeling in metallurgy applications, satellite docking research, and in research on military unmanned ground vehicles.

  6. Small satellite space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, Keith

    1994-01-01

    CTA Space Systems has played a premier role in the development of the 'lightsat' programs of the 80's and 90's. The high costs and development times associated with conventional LEO satellite design, fabrication, launch, and operations continue to motivate the development of new methodologies, techniques, and generally low cost and less stringently regulated satellites. These spacecraft employ low power 'lightsat' communications (versus TDRSS for NASA's LEO's) and typically fly missions with payload/experiment suites that can succeed, for example, without heavily redundant backup systems and large infrastructures of personnel and ground support systems. Such small yet adaptable satellites are also typified by their very short contract-to-launch times (often one to two years). This paper reflects several of the methodologies and perspectives of our successful involvement in these innovative programs and suggests how they might relieve NASA's mounting pressures to reduce the cost of both the spacecraft and their companion mission operations. It focuses on the use of adaptable, sufficiently powerful yet inexpensive PC-based ground systems for wide ranging user terminal (UT) applications and master control facilities for mission operations. These systems proved themselves in successfully controlling more than two dozen USAF, USN, and ARPA satellites at CTA/SS. UT versions have linked with both GEO and LEO satellites and functioned autonomously in relay roles often in remote parts of the world. LEO applications particularly illustrate the efficacy of these concepts since a user can easily mount a lightweight antenna, usually an omni or helix with light duty rotors and PC-based drivers. A few feet of coax connected to a small transceiver module (the size of a small PC) and a serial line to an associated PC establishes a communications link and together with the PC constitute a viable ground station. Applications included geomagnetic mapping; spaceborne solid state

  7. Small modulation ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ducharme, Stephen P. (Inventor); El Hajj, Hassanayn M. (Inventor); Johs, Blaine D. (Inventor); Woollam, John A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In an ellipsometer, a phase-modulated, polarized light beam is applied to a sample, electrical signals are obtained representing the orthogonal planes of polarization of the light after it has interacted with the sample and the constants of the sample are calculated from the two resulting electrical signals. The phase modulation is sufficiently small so that the calibration errors are negligible. For this purpose, the phase modulator phase modulates the light within a range of no more than ten degrees modulations peak to peak. The two electrical signals are expanded by Fourier analysis and the coefficients thereof utilized to calculate psi and delta.

  8. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  9. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  10. Small circuits for cryptography.

    SciTech Connect

    Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Draelos, Timothy John; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Miller, Russell D.; Anderson, William Erik

    2005-10-01

    This report examines a number of hardware circuit design issues associated with implementing certain functions in FPGA and ASIC technologies. Here we show circuit designs for AES and SHA-1 that have an extremely small hardware footprint, yet show reasonably good performance characteristics as compared to the state of the art designs found in the literature. Our AES performance numbers are fueled by an optimized composite field S-box design for the Stratix chipset. Our SHA-1 designs use register packing and feedback functionalities of the Stratix LE, which reduce the logic element usage by as much as 72% as compared to other SHA-1 designs.

  11. Small obstacle avoidance sensor.

    PubMed

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a laser ranging sensor that is suitable for applications like small unmanned aerial vehicles. The hardware consists of a diode emitter array and line-scan charge coupled devices. A structured-light technique measures ranges up to 30 meters for 64 field angles in a 90 degree field of view. Operation is eye safe, and the laser wavelength is not visible to night vision goggles. This paper describes a specific sensor design in order to illustrate performance for a given package size. PMID:23878527

  12. NIF small mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T

    1999-07-01

    A number of small mirror mounts have been identified that meet the stringent stability, wave front, and cleanliness standards of the NIF. These requirements are similar to those required in other performance critical optical design applications. Future design teams would conserve time and effort if recognized standards were established for mirror mount design and performance characteristics. Standards for stability, physical features, wave front distortion, and cleanliness would simplify the qualification process considerably. At this point such standards are not difficult to define, as the technical support work has been performed repeatedly by mirror mount consumers and suppliers.

  13. Computational Study of Low Energy Nuclear Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Justin; Hira, Ajit; Brownrigg, Clifton; Pacheco, Jose

    2013-04-01

    We continue our interest in the interactions between different nuclear species with a computational study of the scattering of the low-energy nuclei of H through F atoms ( Z<=9 ) from Palladium and other metals. First, a FORTRAN computer program was developed to compute stopping cross sections and scattering angles in Pd and other metals for the small nuclear projectiles, using Monte Carlo calculation. This code allows for different angles of incidence. Next, simulations were done in the energy interval from 10 to 140kev. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant experimental data. The data are further analyzed to identify periodic trends in terms of the atomic number of the projectile. Such studies have potential applications in nuclear physics and in nuclear medicine.

  14. Small engine technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    Small engine technology programs being conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described. Small gas turbine research is aimed at general aviation, commutercraft, rotorcraft, and cruise missile applications. The Rotary Engine Program is aimed at supplying fuel flexible, fuel efficient technology to the general aviation industry, but also has applications to other missions. There is a strong element of synergism between the various programs in several respects. All of the programs are aimed towards highly efficient engine cycles, very efficient components, and the use of high temperature structural ceramics. This research tends to be generic in nature and has broad applications. The Heavy Duty Diesel Transport (HDTT), rotary technology, and the compound cycle programs are all examining approached to minimum heat rejection, or adiabatic systems employing advanced materials. The Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT) program is also directed towards ceramics application to gas turbine hot section components. Turbomachinery advances in the gas turbines will benefit advanced turbochargers and turbocompounders for the intermittent combustion systems, and the fundamental understandings and analytical codes developed in the research and technology programs will be directly applicable to the system projects.

  15. Small engine technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Described here is the small engine technology program being sponsored at the Lewis Research Center. Small gas turbine research is aimed at general aviation, commuter aircraft, rotorcraft, and cruise missile applications. The Rotary Engine program is aimed at supplying fuel flexible, fuel efficient technology to the general aviation industry, but also has applications to other missions. The Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT) and Heavy-Duty Diesel Transport Technology (HDTT) programs are sponsored by DOE. The Compound Cycle Engine program is sponsored by the Army. All of the programs are aimed towards highly efficient engine cycles, very efficient components, and the use of high temperature structural ceramics. This research tends to be generic in nature and has broad applications. The HDTT, rotary technology, and the compound cycle programs are all examining approaches to minimum heat rejection, or 'adiabatic' systems employing advanced materials. The AGT program is also directed towards ceramics application to gas turbine hot section components. Turbomachinery advances in the gas turbine programs will benefit advanced turbochargers and turbocompounders for the intermittent combustion systems, and the fundamental understandings and analytical codes developed in the research and technology programs will be directly applicable to the system projects.

  16. Spontaneous Concern about Nuclear War by College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    The results of this study show that college students from small towns in the Rocky Mountain states are very concerned about nuclear war. One hundred eighty-six undergraduates from a small college in the Pacific Northwest were asked to respond to five presentations each of two incomplete sentences: "I worry about...," and "My greatest fear…

  17. Evolution of nuclear spectroscopy at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, P.

    2001-07-01

    Experimental studies of nuclear excitations have been an important subject from the earliest days when the institute was established. The construction of 4 MeV proton cyclotron was mainly aimed to achieve this goal. Early experiments in nuclear spectroscopy were done with radioactive nuclei with the help of beta and gamma ray spectrometers. Small NaI(Tl) detectors were used for gamma--gamma coincidence, angular correlation and life time measurements. The excited states nuclear magnetic moments were measured in perturbed gamma--gamma angular correlation experiments. A high transmission magnetic beta ray spectrometer was used to measure internal conversion coefficients and beta--gamma coincidence studies. A large number of significant contributions were made during 1950--59 using these facilities. Proton beam in the cyclotron was made available in the late 1950's and together with 14 MeV neutrons obtained from a C-W generator a large number of short-lived nuclei were investigated during 1960's and 1970's. The introduction of high resolution Ge gamma detectors and the improved electronics helped to extend the spectroscopic work which include on-line (p,p'g) and (p,n g) reaction studies. Nuclear spectroscopic studies entered a new phase in the 1980's with the availability of 40--80 MeV alpha beam from the variable energy cyclotron at VECC, Calcutta. A number of experimental groups were formed in the institute to study nuclear level schemes with (a,xn g) reactions. Initially only two unsuppressed Ge detectors were used for coincidence studies. Later in 1989 five Ge detectors with a large six segmented NaI(Tl) multiplicity-sum detector system were successfully used to select various channels in (a ,xn g) reactions. From 1990 to date a variety of medium energy heavy ions were made available from the BARC-TIFR Pelletron and the Nuclear Science Centre Pelletron. The state of the art gamma detector arrays in these centres enabled the Saha Institute groups to undertake more

  18. Nuclear Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Meyer, Philip D.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-01-12

    Nuclear wastes are by-products of nuclear weapons production and nuclear power generation, plus residuals of radioactive materials used by industry, medicine, agriculture, and academia. Their distinctive nature and potential hazard make nuclear wastes not only the most dangerous waste ever created by mankind, but also one of the most controversial and regulated with respect to disposal. Nuclear waste issues, related to uncertainties in geologic disposal and long-term protection, combined with potential misuse by terrorist groups, have created uneasiness and fear in the general public and remain stumbling blocks for further development of a nuclear industry in a world that may soon be facing a global energy crisis.

  19. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the data collection work performed for an advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) economics analysis activity at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The methodology development and analytical results are described in separate, stand-alone documents as listed in the references. The economics analysis effort for the AdvSMR program combines the technical and fuel cycle aspects of advanced (non-light water reactor [LWR]) reactors with the market and production aspects of SMRs. This requires the collection, analysis, and synthesis of multiple unrelated and potentially high-uncertainty data sets from a wide range of data sources. Further, the nature of both economic and nuclear technology analysis requires at least a minor attempt at prediction and prognostication, and the far-term horizon for deployment of advanced nuclear systems introduces more uncertainty. Energy market uncertainty, especially the electricity market, is the result of the integration of commodity prices, demand fluctuation, and generation competition, as easily seen in deregulated markets. Depending on current or projected values for any of these factors, the economic attractiveness of any power plant construction project can change yearly or quarterly. For long-lead construction projects such as nuclear power plants, this uncertainty generates an implied and inherent risk for potential nuclear power plant owners and operators. The uncertainty in nuclear reactor and fuel cycle costs is in some respects better understood and quantified than the energy market uncertainty. The LWR-based fuel cycle has a long commercial history to use as its basis for cost estimation, and the current activities in LWR construction provide a reliable baseline for estimates for similar efforts. However, for advanced systems, the estimates and their associated uncertainties are based on forward-looking assumptions for performance after the system has been built and has achieved commercial operation

  20. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to Kennedy Space Center, EIC Laboratories invented a Raman Spectrograph with fiber optic sampling for space applications such as sensing hazardous fuel vapors and making on-board rapid analyses of chemicals and minerals. Raman spectroscopy is a laser-based measurement technique that provides through a unique vibrational spectrum a molecular 'fingerprint,' and can function in aqueous environments. EIC combined optical fiber technology with Raman methods to develop sensors that can be operated at a distance from the spectrographic analysis instruments and the laser excitation source. EIC refined and commercialized the technology to create the Fiber Optic Raman Spectrograph and the RamanProbe. Commercial applications range from process control to monitoring hazardous materials.

  1. Small Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    22 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small impact crater with a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern. The butterfly pattern results from an oblique impact. Not all oblique impacts result in an elliptical crater, but they can result in a non-radial pattern of ejecta distribution. The two-toned nature of the ejecta -- with dark material near the crater and brighter material further away -- might indicate the nature of subsurface materials. Below the surface, there may be a layer of lighter-toned material, underlain by a layer of darker material. The impact throws these materials out in a pattern that reflects the nature of the underlying layers.

    Location near: 3.7oN, 348.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  2. Using small glass catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesar, John C.

    2000-07-01

    Changes in glass catalogs from the major manufacturers, Schott, Ohara, Hoya, Corning, and Summita, are a future certainty. The ongoing efforts of these companies to eliminate arsenic, lead, and other environmentally unfriendly materials may well have an additional effect on the size of their catalogs also. We should not assume a zero-sum game, however. Environmental concerns may not lead to permanently smaller catalogs, though many have speculated that in the near term this might be so. However, from the designer's perspective, very small, abbreviated class catalogs, constructed for special purposes, can speed the glass selection process. Several examples will be discussed, based on derivative libraries suggested by Zhang, Shannon, and Walker. Streamlined libraries tailored for special purposes can be used effectively in the latest lens design software. Future software tools may speed this selection process by the use of algorithms that treat the problem as a `black box' using logic tools derived from probability studies of the patent literature.

  3. Small transport aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  4. Emerging small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Staels, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidaemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Pharmacological lowering of LDL-C levels using statins reduces cardiovascular risk. However, a substantial residual risk persists especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Because of the inverse association observed in epidemiological studies of HDL-C with the risk for cardiovascular diseases, novel therapeutic strategies to raise HDL-C levels or improve HDL functionality are developed as complementary therapy for cardiovascular diseases. However, until now most therapies targeting HDL-C levels failed in clinical trials because of side effects or absence of clinical benefits. This chapter will highlight the emerging small molecules currently developed and tested in clinical trials to pharmacologically modulate HDL-C and functionality including new CETP inhibitors (anacetrapib, evacetrapib), novel PPAR agonists (K-877, CER-002, DSP-8658, INT131 and GFT505), LXR agonists (ATI-111, LXR-623, XL-652) and RVX-208. PMID:25523004

  5. Friction at small displacement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. E.; Aronstein, J.

    1972-01-01

    Low contact resistance between metal surfaces is often observed in spite of interposed lubricant and/or oxide films. To study this effect an apparatus is used with which normal force and tangential microdisplacement are applied between a small lead rider and a gold flat with various surface film conditions. Under nonoxidized and nonlubricated conditions, and with either oxide or stearic acid lubricant film alone, friction is high and contact resistance is low. With oxide and lubricant together, friction is much lower and slide is smooth, but contact resistance remains low and Ohm's law is obeyed. The results are consistent with Greenwood's theory of contact resistance for a cluster of minute metallic contact spots within the load-supporting area. The contact resistance of such a cluster is indistinguishable, for practical purposes, from that given by complete metallic contact.

  6. Small caliber guided projectile

    DOEpatents

    Jones, James F.; Kast, Brian A.; Kniskern, Marc W.; Rose, Scott E.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Woods, James W.; Greene, Ronald W.

    2010-08-24

    A non-spinning projectile that is self-guided to a laser designated target and is configured to be fired from a small caliber smooth bore gun barrel has an optical sensor mounted in the nose of the projectile, a counterbalancing mass portion near the fore end of the projectile and a hollow tapered body mounted aft of the counterbalancing mass. Stabilizing strakes are mounted to and extend outward from the tapered body with control fins located at the aft end of the strakes. Guidance and control electronics and electromagnetic actuators for operating the control fins are located within the tapered body section. Output from the optical sensor is processed by the guidance and control electronics to produce command signals for the electromagnetic actuators. A guidance control algorithm incorporating non-proportional, "bang-bang" control is used to steer the projectile to the target.

  7. Modular small hydro configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Smaller sites (those under 750 kilowatts) which previously were not attractive to develop using equipment intended for application at larger scale sites, were the focal point in the conception of a system which utilizes standard industrial components which are generally available within short procurement times. Such components were integrated into a development scheme for sites having 20 feet to 150 feet of head. The modular small hydro configuration maximizes the use of available components and minimizes modification of existing civil works. A key aspect of the development concept is the use of a vertical turbine multistage pump, used in the reverse mode as a hydraulic turbine. The configuration allows for automated operation and control of the hydroelectric facilities with sufficient flexibility for inclusion of potential hydroelectric sites into dispersed storage and generation (DSG) utility grid systems.

  8. Superpower nuclear minimalism in the post-Cold War era

    SciTech Connect

    Graben, E.K.

    1992-07-01

    With the end of the Cold War and the breakup of the Soviet Union, the strategic environment has fundamentally changed, so it would seem logical to reexamine strategy as well. There are two main schools of nuclear strategic thought: a maximalist school, which emphasizes counterforce superiority and nuclear war-fighting capability, and a MAD-plus school, which emphasizes survivability of an assured destruction capability along with the ability to deliver small, limited nuclear attacks in the event that conflict occurs. The MAD-plus strategy is the more logical of the two strategies, because the maximalist strategy is based on an attempt to conventionalize nuclear weapons which is unrealistic.

  9. Small-crack test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, James M.; Allison, John E.

    This book contains chapters on fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks, monitoring small-crack growth by the replication method, measurement of small cracks by photomicroscopy (experiments and analysis), and experimental mechanics of microcracks. Other topics discussed are the real-time measurement of small-crack-opening behavior using an interferometric strain/displacement gage; direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks; an ultrasonic method for the measurement of the size and opening behavior of small fatigue cracks; and the simulation of short crack and other low closure loading conditions, utilizing constant K(max) Delta-K-decreasing fatigue crack growth procedures.

  10. Very Small Interstellar Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Mason A.

    2007-02-01

    This paper considers lower limits of length scale in spacecraft: interstellar vehicles consisting of little more material than found in a typical integrated-circuit chip. Some fundamental scaling principles are introduced to show how the dynamics of the very small can be used to realize interstellar travel with minimal advancements in technology. Our recent study for the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts provides an example: the use of the Lorentz force that acts on electrically charged spacecraft traveling through planetary and stellar magnetospheres. Schaffer and Burns, among others, have used Cassini and Voyager imagery to show that this interaction is responsible for some of the resonances in the orbital dynamics of dust in Jupiter's and Saturn's rings. The Lorentz force turns out to vary in inverse proportion to the square of this characteristic length scale, making it a more effective means of propelling tiny spacecraft than solar sailing. Performance estimates, some insight into plasma interactions, and some hardware concepts are offered. The mission architectures considered here involve the use of these propellantless propulsion techniques for acceleration within our solar system and deceleration near the destination. Performance estimates, some insight into plasma interactions, and some hardware concepts are offered. The mission architectures considered here involve the use of these propellantless propulsion techniques for acceleration within our solar system and deceleration near the destination. We might envision a large number of such satellites with intermittent, bursty communications set up as a one-dimensional network to relay signals across great distances using only the power likely from such small spacecraft. Conveying imagery in this fashion may require a long time because of limited power, but the prospect of imaging another star system close-up ought to be worth the wait.

  11. Assessment of nuclear reactor concepts for low power space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Andrew C.; Gedeon, Stephen R.; Morey, Dennis C.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a preliminary small reactor concepts feasibility and safety evaluation designed to provide a first order validation of the nuclear feasibility and safety of six small reactor concepts are given. These small reactor concepts have potential space applications for missions in the 1 to 20 kWe power output range. It was concluded that low power concepts are available from the U.S. nuclear industry that have the potential for meeting both the operational and launch safety space mission requirements. However, each design has its uncertainties, and further work is required. The reactor concepts must be mated to a power conversion technology that can offer safe and reliable operation.

  12. Global warming and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    Nuclear fission power reactors represent a potential solution to many aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high-grade heat for large-scale electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-energizing around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates; importantly, electricity production costs from the best nuclear plants presently are closely comparable with those of the best fossil-fired plants. However, a substantial number of issues currently stand between nuclear power and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems. These include perceptual ones regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps most seriously- readily quantifiable concerns regarding long-term fuel supply and total unit electrical energy cost. We sketch a road-map for proceeding from the present situation toward a nuclear power-intensive world, addressing along the way each of the concerns which presently impede widespread nuclear substitution for fossil fuels, particularly for coal in the most populous and rapidly developing portions of the world, e.g., China and India. This `design to societal specifications` approach to large-scale nuclear fission power systems may lead to energy sources meeting essentially all stationary demands for high-temperature heat. Such advanced options offer a human population of ten billion the electricity supply levels currently enjoyed by Americans for 10,000 years. Nuclear power systems tailored to local needs-and-interests and having a common advanced technology base could reduce present-day world-wide C0{sub 2} emissions by two-fold, if universally employed. By application to small mobile demands, a second two

  13. The Case for Small Universities--"Is Small Beautiful?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birt, L. M.; Stewart, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Options available to small universities in Australia in order to maximize their efficiency in lean times are discussed: staying small with better funding; staying small with standard funding; federation with another institution or institutions but with internal differentiation; merger; and closing. (MSE)

  14. Going Small: Progress & Challenges of Philadelphia's Small High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, Tracey; Reumann-Moore, Rebecca; Evans, Shani Adia; Haxton, Clarisse; Maluk, Holly; Neild, Ruth Curran

    2009-01-01

    Between 2003 and 2007, and without significant outside funding, the School District of Philadelphia created 25 new small high schools. This study, begun by Research for Action in 2006, follows the start-up and early implementation of these small high schools in Philadelphia. The study found that parents and students are interested in small high…

  15. Nuclear materials in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    The incident at Fukushima Daiichi brought materials in the nuclear industry into the spotlight. Nature Materials talks to Tatsuo Shikama, Director of the International Research Centre for Nuclear Materials, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, about the current situation.

  16. Nuclear fear revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2010-10-01

    In 1988 the science historian Spencer Weart published a groundbreaking book called Nuclear Fear: A History of Images, which examined visions of radiation damage and nuclear disaster in newspapers, television, film, literature, advertisements and popular culture.

  17. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP)

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's history with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) technology goes back to the earliest days of the Agency. The Manned Lunar Rover Vehicle and the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications p...

  18. Clinical nuclear medicine. [Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Matin, P.

    1981-01-01

    ''Clinical Nuclear Medicine'' is an update to the author's ''Handbook of Clinical Nuclear Medicine.'' Sections on placental imaging, bone marrow imaging, biliary tract imaging and scintigraphy are included in the volume. (JMT)

  19. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

  20. Fundamentals in Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis, Rich, James, Spiro, Michael

    This course on nuclear physics leads the reader to the exploration of the field from nuclei to astrophysical issues. Much nuclear phenomenology can be understood from simple arguments such as those based on the Pauli principle and the Coulomb barrier. This book is concerned with extrapolating from such arguments and illustrating nuclear systematics with experimental data. Starting with the basic concepts in nuclear physics, nuclear models, and reactions, the book covers nuclear decays and the fundamental electro-weak interactions, radioactivity, and nuclear energy. After the discussions of fission and fusion leading into nuclear astrophysics, there is a presentation of the latest ideas about cosmology. As a primer this course will lay the foundations for more specialized subjects. This book emerged from a series of topical courses the authors delivered at the Ecole Polytechnique and will be useful for graduate students and for scientists in a variety of fields.

  1. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  2. Nuclear disarmament verification

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-12-31

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

  3. Mechanisms and Developmental Roles of Promoter-proximal Pausing of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christine; Lowe, Matthew; Schwartz, Amanda; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II) temporarily stops transcription after synthesizing 30–50 bases, and resumes elongation only after stimulations by various signaling molecules and developmental cues. This phenomenon, called promoter-proximal pausing, is observed in 10–50% of the entire genes from Drosophila embryos to human cells. Release of paused Pol II is primarily mediated by the activated form of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) initially sequestered in the inhibitory 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (7SK snRNP) complex. Many proteins and RNAs have been discovered and studied in detail to explain the process of the pausing and release of Pol II in relation to P-TEFb. At the functional level, promoter-proximal pausing regulates genes involved in stimulus-response and development in Drosophila. In mammalian stem cell biology, pausing is important for proliferation and signaling in embryonic stem cells and the formation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Other than this, however, little is known about the biological significance of pausing in mammalian cell differentiation. Further study on pausing mechanisms as well as its functions will contribute to the development of stem cell biology and its clinical applications. PMID:27158559

  4. Atmospheric effects and societal consequences of regional scale nuclear conflicts and acts of individual nuclear terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2007-04-01

    We assess the potential damage and smoke production associated with the detonation of small nuclear weapons in modern megacities. While the number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986, the number of nuclear weapons states is increasing and the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build substantial arsenals of low-yield (Hiroshima-sized) explosives. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in megacities, which might be targeted in a nuclear conflict. We find that low yield weapons, which new nuclear powers are likely to construct, can produce 100 times as many fatalities and 100 times as much smoke from fires per kt yield as previously estimated in analyses for full scale nuclear wars using high-yield weapons, if the small weapons are targeted at city centers. A single "small" nuclear detonation in an urban center could lead to more fatalities, in some cases by orders of magnitude, than have occurred in the major historical conflicts of many countries. We analyze the likely outcome of a regional nuclear exchange involving 100 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal). We find that such an exchange could produce direct fatalities comparable to all of those worldwide in World War II, or to those once estimated for a "counterforce" nuclear war between the superpowers. Megacities exposed to atmospheric fallout of long-lived radionuclides would likely be abandoned indefinitely, with severe national and international implications. Our analysis shows that smoke from urban firestorms in a regional war would rise into the upper troposphere due to pyro-convection. Robock et al. (2007) show that the smoke would subsequently rise deep into the stratosphere due

  5. Nuclear Stress Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scan Diagnostic Tests and Procedures Echocardiography Electrocardiogram Electrophysiology Studies Exercise Stress Test Holter Monitoring Intravascular Ultrasound Nuclear Ventriculography Optical ...

  6. Nuclear power browning out

    SciTech Connect

    Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

    1996-05-01

    When the sad history of nuclear power is written, April 26, 1986, will be recorded as the day the dream died. The explosion at the Chernobyl plant was a terrible human tragedy- and it delivered a stark verdict on the hope that nuclear power will one day replace fossil fuel-based energy systems. Nuclear advocates may soldier on, but a decade after Chernobyl it is clear that nuclear power is no longer a viable energy option for the twenty-first century.

  7. Nuclear air cushion vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper serves several functions. It identifies the 'state-of-the-art' of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant. Using mission studies and cost estimates, the report describes some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles. The paper also summarizes the technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies that have been performed at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  8. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  9. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  10. Small for gestational age (SGA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002302.htm Small for gestational age (SGA) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small for gestational age means that a fetus or an infant is ...

  11. Basic Nuclear Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic concepts of nuclear structures, radiation, nuclear reactions, and health physics are presented in this text, prepared for naval officers. Applications to the area of nuclear power are described in connection with pressurized water reactors, experimental boiling water reactors, homogeneous reactor experiments, and experimental breeder…

  12. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  13. Effects of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    von Hippel, F.

    1983-01-01

    The author reviews the subject rising the following topics and subtopics: I. Nuclear explosions: heat, nuclear radiation, and radioactive fallout; II. Effects: radiation sickness, burns, blast injuries, and equivalent areas of death; III. Nuclear war: battlefield, regional, intercontinental - counterforce, and intercontinental - counter-city and industry. There are two appendices. 34 references, 32 figures.

  14. Nuclear energy technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  15. Teaching Nuclear History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holl, Jack M.; Convis, Sheila C.

    1991-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of the teaching about nuclear history at U.S. colleges and universities. Reports the existence of a well-established and extensive literature, a focus on nuclear weapons or warfare, and a concentration on nuclear citizenship, therapy, or eschatology for courses outside of history departments. Discusses individual…

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  17. Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    This report covers the general issues involved in nuclear safety research and points out the areas needing detailed consideration. Topics included are: (1) "Principles of Nuclear Safety Research" (examining who should fund, who should conduct, and who should set the agenda for nuclear safety research); (2) "Elements of a Future Agenda for Nuclear…

  18. Small cell mesothelioma: A rare entity and diagnostic pitfall mimicking small cell lung carcinoma on fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Afify, Alaa; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F; Bishop, John W; Huang, Eric C

    2016-06-01

    Small cell mesothelioma (SCM) is an extremely rare variant of epithelioid mesothelioma that can be mistaken for other forms of small round blue cell tumors, particularly small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Here, we describe a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) from a pleural lesion in a 75-year-old man with a history of known asbestos exposure. The FNA revealed cohesive clusters of uniform small round blue cells with high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio, finely powdery chromatin, small inconspicuous nucleoli, and scant amount of cytoplasm. Mitoses were infrequent and nuclear molding was absent. Immunochemical profile supported a mesothelial origin, which was later confirmed by pleurectomy with a diagnosis of SCM. This report demonstrates the difficulties in cytologic evaluation of lung FNAs in differentiating SCM from SCLC or other small round blue cell tumors. As therapy differs for SCM, early recognition of the cytologic features is essential in making the correct diagnosis needed for appropriate clinical management. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:526-529. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26952387

  19. PREFACE: XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof

    2011-10-01

    In the present volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the 'XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics', which was held from 4-7 January 2011 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings consist of 19 contributions that were presented as invited talks at the meeting. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. From the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium has been organized every year without interruption, which makes the present Symposium the 34th in a row. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks and 17 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear physics, ranging from the traditional fields of nuclear structure (Draayer, Pittel, Van Isacker, Fraser, Lerma, Cejnar, Hirsch, Stránský and Rath) and nuclear reactions (Aguilera, Gómez-Camacho, Scheid, Navrátil and Yennello) to radioactive beams (Padilla-Rodal and Galindo-Uribarri), nuclear astrophysics (Aprahamian, Civitarese and Escher), hadronic physics (Bijker, Valcarce and Hess), fundamental symmetries (Liu, Barrón-Palos and Baessler) and LHC physics (Menchaca-Rocha and Paic). The high quality of the talks, the prestige of the speakers and the broad spectrum of subjects covered in the meeting, shows that nuclear physics is a very active area at the frontier of scientific research which establishes bridges between many different disciplines. Libertad Barr

  20. Small rover exploration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salotti, Jean-Marc; Laithier, Corentin; Machut, Benoit; Marie, Aurélien; Bruneau, Audrey; Grömer, Gernot; Foing, Bernard H.

    2015-05-01

    For a human mission to the Moon or Mars, an important question is to determine the best strategy for the choice of surface vehicles. Recent studies suggest that the first missions to Mars will be strongly constrained and that only small unpressurized vehicles will be available. We analyze the exploration capabilities and limitations of small surface vehicles from the user perspective. Following the “human centered design” paradigm, the team focused on human systems interactions and conducted the following experiments: - Another member of our team participated in the ILEWG EuroMoonMars 2013 simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah during the same period of time. Although the possible traverses were restricted, a similar study with analog space suits and quads has been carried out. - Other experiments have been conducted in an old rock quarry close to Bordeaux, France. An expert in the use of quads for all types of terrains performed a demonstration and helped us to characterize the difficulties, the risks and advantages and drawbacks of different vehicles and tools. The vehicles that will be used on the surface of Mars have not been defined yet. Nevertheless, the results of our project already show that using a light and unpressurized vehicle (in the order of 150 kg) for the mobility on the Martian surface can be a true advantage. Part of the study was dedicated to the search for appropriate tools that could be used to make

  1. Nuclear receptors: the evolution of diversity.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, John W R; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2004-01-27

    Nuclear receptors are an ancient family of transcription factors. Some receptors are regulated by small lipophilic ligands, whereas others are constitutive transcriptional activators or repressors. The evolution of this diversity is poorly understood, and it remains an open question as to whether or not the ancestral receptor was ligand-regulated. The recent cloning, from a snail, of an estrogen receptor that does not bind estrogen not only suggests that the steroid receptors are much more ancient than previous thought, but also points toward a mechanism through which nuclear receptors can lose the ability to be ligand regulated. PMID:14747695

  2. Quality and the Small School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Edwin P., Ed.

    The 1965-1968 progress report of the Western States Small Schools Project focuses on the problem and challenge posed by small schools, which have thus far lacked the depth of resources compared to urban schools. The goals of the project are to assist small schools to: (1) provide individualized programs of career selection education; (2) develop…

  3. All Shops Great and Small.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Bernard R.

    1994-01-01

    The functions of public relations offices are described for four small colleges and one small private school: Spelman College (Georgia); North Harris County College (Texas); Scripps College (California); Lafayette College (Pennsylvania); and Maumee Valley Country Day School (Ohio). Focus is on creative and effective use of a small staff and…

  4. Introduction to Small Group Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millar, Dan Pyle

    To bring educational research into focus with tested classroom practice, this booklet provides an introduction to small group discussion. The theory and research section discusses the importance of small group discussion, characteristics of small group discussions, group attraction based on Maslow's hierarchy of basic human needs, group decision…

  5. Small Business Management. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide, which is designed to assist teachers in providing instruction and technical support to small business owners and managers, contains 17 competency-based units of instruction on the following areas that both small business instructors and small business owners have deemed critical to the success of any business:…

  6. Fuel Cycle Performance of Thermal Spectrum Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Worrall, Andrew; Todosow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Small modular reactors may offer potential benefits, such as enhanced operational flexibility. However, it is vital to understand the holistic impact of small modular reactors on the nuclear fuel cycle and fuel cycle performance. The focus of this paper is on the fuel cycle impacts of light water small modular reactors in a once-through fuel cycle with low-enriched uranium fuel. A key objective of this paper is to describe preliminary reactor core physics and fuel cycle analyses conducted in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Options Campaign. Challenges with small modular reactors include: increased neutron leakage, fewer assemblies in the core (and therefore fewer degrees of freedom in the core design), complex enrichment and burnable absorber loadings, full power operation with inserted control rods, the potential for frequent load-following operation, and shortened core height. Each of these will impact the achievable discharge burn-up in the reactor and the fuel cycle performance. This paper summarizes the results of an expert elicitation focused on developing a list of the factors relevant to small modular reactor fuel, core, and operation that will impact fuel cycle performance. Preliminary scoping analyses were performed using a regulatory-grade reactor core simulator. The hypothetical light water small modular reactor considered in these preliminary scoping studies is a cartridge type one-batch core with 4.9% enrichment. Some core parameters, such as the size of the reactor and general assembly layout, are similar to an example small modular reactor concept from industry. The high-level issues identified and preliminary scoping calculations in this paper are intended to inform on potential fuel cycle impacts of one-batch thermal spectrum SMRs. In particular, this paper highlights the impact of increased neutron leakage and reduced number of batches on the achievable burn-up of the reactor. Fuel cycle performance

  7. A brief history of design studies on innovative nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-30

    In a short period after the success of CP1, many types of nuclear reactors were proposed and investigated. However, soon only a small number of reactors were selected for practical use. Around 1970, only LWRs with small number of CANDUs were operated in the western world, and FBRs were under development. It was about the time when Apollo moon landing was accomplished. However, at the same time, the future of human being was widely considered pessimistic and Limits to Growth was published. In the end of 1970’s the TMI accident occurred and many nuclear reactor contracts were cancelled in USA and any more contracts had not been concluded until recent years. From the reflection of this accident, many Inherent Safe Reactors (ISRs) were proposed, though none of them were constructed. A common idea of ISRs is smallness of their size. Tokyo Institute of Technology (TokyoTech) held a symposium on small reactors, SR/TIT, in 1991, where many types of small ISRs were presented. Recently small reactors attract interest again. The most ideas employed in these reactors were the same discussed in SR/TIT. In 1980’s the radioactive wastes from fuel cycle became a severe problem around the world. In TokyoTech, this issue was discussed mainly from the viewpoint of nuclear transmutations. The neutron economy became inevitable for these innovative nuclear reactors especially small long-life reactors and transmutation reactors.

  8. Small Stirling Cycle Convertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penswick, L. Barry; Schreiber, Jeffery

    2005-02-01

    The Stirling convertor concept continues to be a viable potential candidate for various space power applications at electrical power levels ranging from greater than 100 KW to on the order of 10+watts. Various development efforts, both in the past and currently underway, have clearly demonstrated the potential for long operating life of this concept, its high efficiency in comparison to alternative power systems (>50% of Carnot based on electric power out to heat in), and its excellent specific power characteristics. A truly unique attribute of the Stirling convertor is the ability to maintain many of these same advantages at significantly lower electrical power levels (on the order of 1 watt and below). This provides the opportunity for a wider range of potential space power applications and the use of alternative heat sources operating at dramatically lower hot-end temperatures (about 250 °C vs. current values of about 650 °C). An overview of low-power Stirling convertors and related Stirling cooler technology is provided with an emphasis on assessing the technical maturity of this concept's key components at the low power level of interest. A conceptual design of a small, 1-watt (electrical output) Stirling convertor utilizing multiple Low Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit heat sources will be described. Key technical issues in the development of this power level Stirling convertor are discussed.

  9. Small scale membrane mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Benjamini, Ayelet; Agrawal, Ashutosh; Smit, Berend; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Large scale changes to lipid bilayer shapes are well represented by the Helfrich model. However, there are membrane processes that take place at smaller length scales that this model cannot address. In this work, we present a one-dimensional continuum model that captures the mechanics of the lipid bilayer membrane at the length scale of the lipids themselves. The model is developed using the Cosserat theory of surfaces with lipid orientation, or ‘tilt’, as the fundamental degree of freedom. The Helfrich model can be recovered as a special case when the curvatures are small and the lipid tilt is everywhere zero. We use the tilt model to study local membrane deformations in response to a protein inclusion. Parameter estimates and boundary conditions are obtained from a coarse-grained molecular model using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to capture the same phenomenon. The continuum model is able to reproduce the membrane bending, stretch and lipid tilt as seen in the DPD model. The lipid tilt angle relaxes to the bulk tilt angle within 5–6 nm from the protein inclusion. Importantly, for large tilt gradients induced by the proteins, the tilt energy contribution is larger than the bending energy contribution. Thus, the continuum model of tilt accurately captures behaviors at length scales shorter than the membrane thickness. PMID:24081650

  10. Small Modular Reactors: Institutional Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Perkowski, Ph.D.

    2012-06-01

    ? Objectives include, among others, a description of the basic development status of “small modular reactors” (SMRs) focused primarily on domestic activity; investigation of the domestic market appeal of modular reactors from the viewpoints of both key energy sector customers and also key stakeholders in the financial community; and consideration of how to proceed further with a pro-active "core group" of stakeholders substantially interested in modular nuclear deployment in order to provide the basis to expedite design/construction activity and regulatory approval. ? Information gathering was via available resources, both published and personal communications with key individual stakeholders; published information is limited to that already in public domain (no confidentiality); viewpoints from interviews are incorporated within. Discussions at both government-hosted and private-hosted SMR meetings are reflected herein. INL itself maintains a neutral view on all issues described. Note: as per prior discussion between INL and CAP, individual and highly knowledgeable senior-level stakeholders provided the bulk of insights herein, and the results of those interviews are the main source of the observations of this report. ? Attachment A is the list of individual stakeholders consulted to date, including some who provided significant earlier assessments of SMR institutional feasibility. ? Attachments B, C, and D are included to provide substantial context on the international status of SMR development; they are not intended to be comprehensive and are individualized due to the separate nature of the source materials. Attachment E is a summary of the DOE requirements for winning teams regarding the current SMR solicitation. Attachment F deserves separate consideration due to the relative maturity of the SMART SMR program underway in Korea. Attachment G provides illustrative SMR design features and is intended for background. Attachment H is included for overview

  11. Affordable Development and Demonstration of a Small NTR Engine and Stage: How Small is Big Enough?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Sefcik, Robert J.; Fittje, James E.; McCurdy, David R.; Qualls, Arthur L.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Werner, James E.; Weitzberg (Abraham); Joyner, Claude R.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) derives its energy from fission of uranium-235 atoms contained within fuel elements that comprise the engine's reactor core. It generates high thrust and has a specific impulse potential of approximately 900 seconds - a 100% increase over today's best chemical rockets. The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) project, funded by NASA's AES program, includes five key task activities: (1) Recapture, demonstration, and validation of heritage graphite composite (GC) fuel (selected as the "Lead Fuel" option); (2) Engine Conceptual Design; (3) Operating Requirements Definition; (4) Identification of Affordable Options for Ground Testing; and (5) Formulation of an Affordable Development Strategy. During FY'14, a preliminary DDT&E plan and schedule for NTP development was outlined by GRC, DOE and industry that involved significant system-level demonstration projects that included GTD tests at the NNSS, followed by a FTD mission. To reduce cost for the GTD tests and FTD mission, small NTR engines, in either the 7.5 or 16.5 klbf thrust class, were considered. Both engine options used GC fuel and a "common" fuel element (FE) design. The small approximately 7.5 klbf "criticality-limited" engine produces approximately 157 megawatts of thermal power (MWt) and its core is configured with parallel rows of hexagonal-shaped FEs and tie tubes (TTs) with a FE to TT ratio of approximately 1:1. The larger approximately 16.5 klbf Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE), developed by LANL at the end of the Rover program, produces approximately 367 MWt and has a FE to TT ratio of approximately 2:1. Although both engines use a common 35 inch (approximately 89 cm) long FE, the SNRE's larger diameter core contains approximately 300 more FEs needed to produce an additional 210 MWt of power. To reduce the cost of the FTD mission, a simple "1-burn" lunar flyby mission was considered to reduce the LH2 propellant loading, the stage size and complexity. Use of existing and

  12. NMR of small solutes in liquid crystals and molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylihautala, Mika Petri

    The present thesis deals with the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of small solutes applied to the studies of liquid crystals and molecular sieves. In this method, changes induced by the investigated environment to the static spectral parameters (i.e. nuclear shielding, indirect and direct spin-spin coupling and quadrupole coupling) of the solute are measured. The nuclear shielding of dissolved noble gases is utilized for the studies of thermotropic liquid crystals. The relation between the symmetry properties of mesophases and the nuclear shielding is described. The different interaction mechanisms perturbing the observed noble gas nuclear shielding are discussed, particularly, the role of long-range attractive van der Waals interactions is brought out. The suitability of the noble gas NMR spectroscopy to the studies of Iyotropic liquid crystals is investigated in terms of nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling interactions. In molecular sieve systems, the effect of inter- and intracrystalline motions of solutes on their NMR spectra is discussed. A novel method for the measurement of the intracrystalline motions is developed. The distinctions in the 13C shielding of methane adsorbed in AlPO4-11 and SAPO-11, two structurally similar molecular sieves differing in composition, are indicated.

  13. Need the U.S. resume nuclear weapons testing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Benn

    2005-04-01

    The United States has not tested a nuclear weapon since 1992. Nuclear weapons are very complicated devices and have many possible failure modes. The U.S. has invested many hundreds of millions of dollars and many thousands of man-years in ensuring the safety and security of the stockpile. Are these efforts sufficient? Do we understand how nuclear weapons work---and decay---sufficiently well to preclude the need for further testing? This presentation will examine how nuclear weapons work, describe possible failure modes, and explore various technologies and techniques used for certifying nuclear weapons. The presentation will also explore what, if any, useful information would likely be gained from a nuclear weapon test. Finally, the presentation will examine the statistics of small numbers to determine how many tests would likely be needed to reveal complicated problems with the arsenal.

  14. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  15. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  16. History of Nuclear India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Ram

    2000-04-01

    India emerged as a free and democratic country in 1947, and entered into the nuclear age in 1948 by establishing the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), with Homi Bhabha as the chairman. Later on the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) was created under the Office of the Prime Minister Jawahar Lal Nehru. Initially the AEC and DAE received international cooperation, and by 1963 India had two research reactors and four nuclear power reactors. In spite of the humiliating defeat in the border war by China in 1962 and China's nuclear testing in 1964, India continued to adhere to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. On May 18, 1974 India performed a 15 kt Peaceful Nuclear Explosion (PNE). The western powers considered it nuclear weapons proliferation and cut off all financial and technical help, even for the production of nuclear power. However, India used existing infrastructure to build nuclear power reactors and exploded both fission and fusion devices on May 11 and 13, 1998. The international community viewed the later activity as a serious road block for the Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; both deemed essential to stop the spread of nuclear weapons. India considers these treaties favoring nuclear states and is prepared to sign if genuine nuclear disarmament is included as an integral part of these treaties.

  17. Overview of nuclear data

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2003-06-30

    For many years, nuclear structure and decay data have been compiled and disseminated by an International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) evaluators under the auspices of the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In this lecture I will discuss the kinds of data that are available and describe various ways to obtain this information. We will learn about some of the publications that are available and Internet sources of nuclear data. You will be introduced to Isotope Explorer software for retrieving and displaying nuclear structure and radioactive decay data. The on-line resources Table of Radioactive Isotopes, PGAA Database Viewer, Nuclear Science Reference Search, Table of Isotopes Educational Website, and other information sources will be discussed. Exercises will be provided to increase your ability to understand, access, and use nuclear data.

  18. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  19. Small Thermophotovoltaic Prototype Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durisch, Wilhelm; Bitnar, Bernd; von Roth, Fritz; Palfinger, Günther

    2003-01-01

    In an earlier paper [1], we reported on a small grid-connected thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system consisting of an ytterbia mantle emitter and silicon solar cells with 16 % efficiency (under solar irradiance at Standard Test Conditions, STC). The emitter was heated up using a butane burner with a rated thermal power of 1.35 kW (referring to the lower heating value). This system produced an electrical output of 15 W, which corresponds to a thermal to electric (direct current) conversion efficiency of 1.1 %. In the interim, further progress has been made, and significantly higher efficiencies have been achieved. The most important development steps are: 1) The infrared radiation-absorbing water filter between emitter and silicon cells (to protect the cells against overheating and against contact with flue gasses) has been replaced by a suitable glass tube. By doing this, it has been possible to prevent losses of convertible radiation in water. 2) Cell cooling has been significantly improved, in order to reduce cell temperature, and therefore increase conversion efficiency. 3) The shape of the emitter has been changed from spherical to a quasi-cylindrical geometry, in order to obtain a more homogeneous irradiation of the cells. 4) The metallic burner tube, on which the ytterbia emitter was fixed in the initial prototypes, has been replaced by a heat-resistant metallic rod, carrying ceramic discs as emitter holders. This has prevented the oxidation and clogging of the perforated burner tube. 5) Larger reflectors have been used to reduce losses in useful infrared radiation. 6) Smaller cells have been used, to reduce electrical series resistance losses. Applying all these improvements to the basic 1.35 kW prototype, we attained a system efficiency of 1.5 %. By using preheated air for combustion (at approximately 370 °C), 1.8 % was achieved. In a subsequent step, a photocell generator was constructed, consisting of high-efficiency silicon cells (21% STC efficiency). In this

  20. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013