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Sample records for 7sl rna gene

  1. The secondary structure of the 7SL RNA in the signal recognition particle: functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Zwieb, C

    1985-01-01

    The secondary structure of the 7SL RNA in the signal recognition particle was determined by applying both a theoretical and an experimental approach. The compensatory base change approach was taken comparing the published sequences of human, Drosophila and Xenopus 7SL RNA's. The deduced secondary structure was confirmed by post-labeling of an RNase V1-nicked dog SRP with P32-pCp and RNA-ligase and analysis of the labeled RNA-fragments by non-denaturing/denaturing 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two interesting features in the secondary structure were revealed: Firstly, bases at positions 122 to 127 of the human 7SL RNA are not only able to pair with bases at positions 167 to 170, but also with a single-stranded region of the bases at positions 223 to 228, suggesting an alternative base pairing scheme for the 7SL RNA in all three organisms. In agreement with this finding, four different conformations were identified after transcription of the 7SL RNA from the genomic human clone. The involvement of the particular basepairing interaction postulated was confirmed by the analysis of a 7SL RNA deletion mutant (Sma1-409). Secondly, a significant sequence homology of the paired bases at positions 236 to 255 and 104 to 109 in 7SL RNA with bases in 5S ribosomal RNA at the positions 84 to 110 was noticed, suggesting that 5S ribosomal and 7SL RNA interact with the same target during protein biosynthesis. These findings are summarized by proposing a mechanism for the translational arrest of protein synthesis by the signal recognition particle using specific sequences and an alternative configuration in the 7SL RNA. Images PMID:2413423

  2. Tumor FOXP3 represses the expression of long noncoding RNA 7SL.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanhui; Cheng, Jingli; Ren, Huizhu; Zhao, Hui; Gong, Wei; Shan, Chunyan

    2016-04-01

    The long noncoding RNA 7SL was over-expressed in tumor cells to promote cell growth through repressing translation of P53. However, the regulatory mechanism of 7SL remains to be defined. FOXP3 was identified as a suppressor in several tumors in addition to be a marker of regulatory T cells. In this study, we detected that over-expression of FOXP3 repressed the transcription of 7SL RNA and contributed to inhibiting tumor growth. Knock down of FOXP3 in MCF-10A normal mammary breast cells up-regulated the transcription of 7SL RNA. Chromatin Immuno-precipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that FOXP3 directly bound to the Forkhead/HNF-3 domain DNA binding sites (-789 to -795) relative to the transcription start site. Meanwhile, Luciferase analysis showed that FOXP3 repressed the full-length 7SL promoter activity, but this suppressive effect was reversed after mutation of the FOXP3 binding site. Further studies showed that FOXP3 promoted the expression of P53 at translational levels through repressing 7SL RNA. In conclusion, this study suggests that 7SL RNA is a direct target of FOXP3 and may be involved in the formation of FOXP3/P53 feedback loop. PMID:26718402

  3. Rapid Diagnosis of Old World Leishmaniasis by High-Resolution Melting Analysis of the 7SL RNA Gene▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Jaffe, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution melt analysis PCR (HRM PCR) for diagnosis of Old World Leishmania was developed using the 7SL RNA gene. Cutaneous leishmaniasis samples were analyzed. Sensitivity and specificity of HRM PCR were significantly better (P < 0.001) than those of internal transcribed spacer 1 PCR and similar to those of kinetoplast DNA PCR. PMID:20392923

  4. Identification of an essential Schizosaccharomyces pombe RNA homologous to the 7SL component of signal recognition particle.

    PubMed Central

    Brennwald, P; Liao, X; Holm, K; Porter, G; Wise, J A

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned the gene encoding a novel small cytoplasmic RNA from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Four lines of evidence support the idea that this RNA is a homolog of the 7SL RNA component of mammalian signal recognition particle (SRP), which targets presecretory proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. First, it shares limited but significant primary sequence homology with previously identified 7SL RNAs and can be folded into a similar secondary structure. Second, it possesses the 5' triphosphate characteristic of unprocessed RNA polymerase III transcripts, and moreover, it is the only fission yeast RNA in this size range with such a terminus. Third, its behavior in cell fractionation experiments suggests that it is part of a small ribonucleoprotein which forms salt-labile contacts with larger structures. Fourth, the particle containing S. pombe 7SL RNA resembles mammalian SRP in both size (11S) and affinity for DEAE-Sepharose. Disruption of the single-copy gene, designated slr1+, reveals that the RNA is indispensable for growth in fission yeast. This result is not surprising, since secretion is an essential cellular process. Images PMID:2837648

  5. Identification of an essential Schizosaccharomyces pombe RNA homologous to the 7SL component of signal recognition particle

    SciTech Connect

    Brennwald, P.; Liao, X.; Holm, K.; Porter, G.; Wise, J.A.

    1988-04-01

    The authors have cloned the gene encoding a novel small cytoplasmic RNA from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Four lines of evidence support the idea that this RNA is a homolog of the 7SL RNA component of mammalian signal recognition particle (SRP), which targets presecretory proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. First, it shares limited but significant primary sequence homology with previously identified 7SL RNAs and can be folded into a similar secondary structure. Second, it possesses the 5' triphosphate characteristic of unprocessed RNA polymerase III transcripts, and moreover, it is the only fission yeast RNA in this size range with such a terminus. Third, its behavior in cell fractionation experiments suggests that it is part of a small ribonucleoprotein which forms salt-labile contacts with larger structures. Fourth, the particle containing S.pombe 7SLRNA resembles mammalian SRP in both size (11S) and affinity for DEAE-Sepharose. Disruption of the single-copy gene, designated slrl/sup +/, reveals that the RNA is indispensable for growth in fission yeast. This result is not surprising, since secretion is an essential cellular process.

  6. The Solanum lycopersicum auxin response factor 7 (SlARF7) regulates auxin signaling during tomato fruit set and development.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Feron, Richard; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H

    2009-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) are encoded by a gene family of transcription factors that specifically control auxin-dependent developmental processes. A tomato ARF gene, homologous to Arabidopsis NPH4/ARF7 and therefore designated as Solanum lycopersicum ARF7 (SlARF7), was found to be expressed at a high level in unpollinated mature ovaries. More detailed analysis of tomato ovaries showed that the level of SlARF7 transcript increases during flower development, remains at a constant high level in mature flowers, and is down-regulated within 48 h after pollination. Transgenic plants with decreased SlARF7 mRNA levels formed seedless (parthenocarpic) fruits. These fruits were heart-shaped and had a rather thick pericarp due to increased cell expansion, compared with the pericarp of wild-type fruits. The expression analysis, together with the parthenocarpic fruit phenotype of the transgenic lines, suggests that, in tomato, SlARF7 acts as a negative regulator of fruit set until pollination and fertilization have taken place, and moderates the auxin response during fruit growth. PMID:18778404

  7. A New Class of SINEs with snRNA Gene-Derived Heads.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kenji K

    2015-06-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are colonized by various transposons including short interspersed elements (SINEs). The 5' region (head) of the majority of SINEs is derived from one of the three types of RNA genes--7SL RNA, transfer RNA (tRNA), or 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)--and the internal promoter inside the head promotes the transcription of the entire SINEs. Here I report a new group of SINEs whose heads originate from either the U1 or U2 small nuclear RNA gene. These SINEs, named SINEU, are distributed among crocodilians and classified into three families. The structures of the SINEU-1 subfamilies indicate the recurrent addition of a U1- or U2-derived sequence onto the 5' end of SINEU-1 elements. SINEU-1 and SINEU-3 are ancient and shared among alligators, crocodiles, and gharials, while SINEU-2 is absent in the alligator genome. SINEU-2 is the only SINE family that was active after the split of crocodiles and gharials. All SINEU families, especially SINEU-3, are preferentially inserted into a family of Mariner DNA transposon, Mariner-N4_AMi. A group of Tx1 non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons designated Tx1-Mar also show target preference for Mariner-N4_AMi, indicating that SINEU was mobilized by Tx1-Mar. PMID:26019167

  8. A New Class of SINEs with snRNA Gene-Derived Heads

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kenji K.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are colonized by various transposons including short interspersed elements (SINEs). The 5′ region (head) of the majority of SINEs is derived from one of the three types of RNA genes—7SL RNA, transfer RNA (tRNA), or 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)—and the internal promoter inside the head promotes the transcription of the entire SINEs. Here I report a new group of SINEs whose heads originate from either the U1 or U2 small nuclear RNA gene. These SINEs, named SINEU, are distributed among crocodilians and classified into three families. The structures of the SINEU-1 subfamilies indicate the recurrent addition of a U1- or U2-derived sequence onto the 5′ end of SINEU-1 elements. SINEU-1 and SINEU-3 are ancient and shared among alligators, crocodiles, and gharials, while SINEU-2 is absent in the alligator genome. SINEU-2 is the only SINE family that was active after the split of crocodiles and gharials. All SINEU families, especially SINEU-3, are preferentially inserted into a family of Mariner DNA transposon, Mariner-N4_AMi. A group of Tx1 non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons designated Tx1-Mar also show target preference for Mariner-N4_AMi, indicating that SINEU was mobilized by Tx1-Mar. PMID:26019167

  9. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  10. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  11. Epstein-Barr virus induces cellular transcription factors to allow active expression of EBER genes by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Felton-Edkins, Zoë A; Kondrashov, Alexander; Karali, Dimitra; Fairley, Jennifer A; Dawson, Christopher W; Arrand, John R; Young, Lawrence S; White, Robert J

    2006-11-10

    The EBER genes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are transcribed by RNA polymerase (pol) III to produce untranslated RNAs that are implicated in oncogenesis. These EBER transcripts are the most highly expressed viral gene products in EBV-transformed cells. We have identified changes to the cellular transcription machinery that may contribute to the high levels of EBER RNA. These include phosphorylation of ATF2, which interacts with EBER promoters. A second is induction of TFIIIC, a pol III-specific factor that activates EBER genes; all five subunits of TFIIIC are overexpressed in EBV-positive cells. In addition, EBV induces BDP1, a subunit of the pol III-specific factor TFIIIB. Although BDP1 is the only TFIIIB subunit induced by EBV, its induction is sufficient to stimulate EBER expression in vivo, implying a limiting function. The elevated levels of BDP1 and TFIIIC in EBV-positive cells stimulate production of tRNA, 7SL, and 5S rRNA. Abnormally high expression of these cellular pol III products may contribute to the ability of EBV to enhance growth potential. PMID:16956891

  12. MicroRNA: Mechanism of Gene Regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA (miR) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts through activation of a specific cellular pathway. The small RNA classified as miR are short sequences of 18-26 nucleotide long, encoded by nuclear genes with distinctive...

  13. RNA Interference for Wheat Functional Gene Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to a common mechanism of RNA-based post-transcriptional gene silencing in eukaryotic cells. In model plant species such as Arabidopsis and rice, RNAi has been routinely used to characterize gene function and to engineer novel phenotypes. In polyploid species, this appr...

  14. Computational prediction of microRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Jana; Langenberger, David; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The computational identification of novel microRNA (miRNA) genes is a challenging task in bioinformatics. Massive amounts of data describing unknown functional RNA transcripts have to be analyzed for putative miRNA candidates with automated computational pipelines. Beyond those miRNAs that meet the classical definition, high-throughput sequencing techniques have revealed additional miRNA-like molecules that are derived by alternative biogenesis pathways. Exhaustive bioinformatics analyses on such data involve statistical issues as well as precise sequence and structure inspection not only of the functional mature part but also of the whole precursor sequence of the putative miRNA. Apart from a considerable amount of species-specific miRNAs, the majority of all those genes are conserved at least among closely related organisms. Some miRNAs, however, can be traced back to very early points in the evolution of eukaryotic species. Thus, the investigation of the conservation of newly found miRNA candidates comprises an important step in the computational annotation of miRNAs.Topics covered in this chapter include a review on the obvious problem of miRNA annotation and family definition, recommended pipelines of computational miRNA annotation or detection, and an overview of current computer tools for the prediction of miRNAs and their limitations. The chapter closes discussing how those bioinformatic approaches address the problem of faithful miRNA prediction and correct annotation. PMID:24639171

  15. Posttranscriptional gene regulation by long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells transcribe a vast number of noncoding RNA species. Among them, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been widely implicated in the regulation of gene transcription. However, examples of posttranscriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs are emerging. Through extended base-pairing, lncRNAs can stabilize or promote the translation of target mRNAs, while partial base-pairing facilitates mRNA decay or inhibits target mRNA translation. In the absence of complementarity, lncRNAs can suppress precursor mRNA splicing and translation by acting as decoys of RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs and can compete for microRNA-mediated inhibition leading to increased expression of the mRNA. Through these regulatory mechanisms, lncRNAs can elicit differentiation, proliferation, and cytoprotective programs, underscoring the rising recognition of lncRNA roles in human disease. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of posttranscriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs identified until now. PMID:23178169

  16. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  17. Disrupted tRNA Genes and tRNA Fragments: A Perspective on tRNA Gene Evolution.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs with lengths of approximately 70-100 nt. They are directly involved in protein synthesis by carrying amino acids to the ribosome. In this sense, tRNAs are key molecules that connect the RNA world and the protein world. Thus, study of the evolution of tRNA molecules may reveal the processes that led to the establishment of the central dogma: genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to protein. Thanks to the development of DNA sequencers in this century, we have determined a huge number of nucleotide sequences from complete genomes as well as from transcriptomes in many species. Recent analyses of these large data sets have shown that particular tRNA genes, especially in Archaea, are disrupted in unique ways: some tRNA genes contain multiple introns and some are split genes. Even tRNA molecules themselves are fragmented post-transcriptionally in many species. These fragmented small RNAs are known as tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs). In this review, I summarize the progress of research into the disrupted tRNA genes and the tRFs, and propose a possible model for the molecular evolution of tRNAs based on the concept of the combination of fragmented tRNA halves. PMID:25629271

  18. Mouse Oocytes Transcribe Injected Xenopus 5S RNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Brinster, Ralph L.; Chen, Howard Y.; Trumbauer, Myrna E.

    2016-01-01

    Transcripts produced after injection of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene into oocyte germinal vesicles of mice migrate electrophoretically with the 5S RNA marker, an indication that the gene is transcribed and processed with considerable accuracy, Approximately two 5S RNA molecules are transcribed per gene per hour. This system may be useful in studying DNA processing and gene regulation by the mammalian ovum and might be modified to allow permanent incorporation of specific genes into mice. PMID:7194505

  19. Variable rRNA gene copies in extreme halobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, J.L.; Marin, I.; Ramirez, L.; Amils, R. ); Abad, J.P.; Smith, C.L. )

    1988-08-25

    Using PFG electrophoresis techniques, the authors have examined the organization of rRNA gene in halobacterium species. The results show that the organization of rRNA genes among closely related halobacteria is quite heterogeneous. This contrasts with the high degree of conservation of rRNA sequence. The possible mechanism of such rRNA gene amplification and its evolutionary implications are discussed.

  20. Drosha Regulates Gene Expression Independently of RNA Cleavage Function

    PubMed Central

    Gromak, Natalia; Dienstbier, Martin; Macias, Sara; Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo; Cáceres, Javier F.; Proudfoot, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription-dependent manner. This binding is not associated with miRNA production or RNA cleavage. Drosha knockdown in HeLa cells downregulated nascent gene transcription, resulting in a reduction of polyadenylated mRNA produced from these gene regions. Furthermore, we show that this function of Drosha is dependent on its N-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression. PMID:24360955

  1. The B-WICH chromatin-remodelling complex regulates RNA polymerase III transcription by promoting Max-dependent c-Myc binding.

    PubMed

    Sadeghifar, Fatemeh; Böhm, Stefanie; Vintermist, Anna; Östlund Farrants, Ann-Kristin

    2015-05-19

    The chromatin-remodelling complex B-WICH, comprised of William syndrome transcription factor, the ATPase SNF2h and nuclear myosin, specifically activates RNA polymerase III transcription of the 5S rRNA and 7SL genes. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Using high-resolution MN walking we demonstrate here that B-WICH changes the chromatin structure in the vicinity of the 5S rRNA and 7SL RNA genes during RNA polymerase III transcription. The action of B-WICH is required for the binding of the RNA polymerase machinery and the regulatory factors c-Myc at the 5S rRNA and 7SL RNA genes. In addition to the c-Myc binding site at the 5S genes, we have revealed a novel c-Myc and Max binding site in the intergenic spacer of the 5S rDNA. This region also contains a region remodelled by B-WICH. We demonstrate that c-Myc binds to both sites in a Max-dependent way, and thereby activate transcription by acetylating histone H3. The novel binding patterns of c-Myc and Max link transcription of 5S rRNA to the Myc/Max/Mxd network. Since B-WICH acts prior to c-Myc and other factors, we propose a model in which the B-WICH complex is required to maintain an open chromatin structure at these RNA polymerase III genes. This is a prerequisite for the binding of additional regulatory factors. PMID:25883140

  2. Architecture of a yeast U6 RNA gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Eschenlauer, J B; Kaiser, M W; Gerlach, V L; Brow, D A

    1993-01-01

    The promoters of vertebrate and yeast U6 small nuclear RNA genes are structurally dissimilar, although both are recognized by RNA polymerase III. Vertebrate U6 RNA genes have exclusively upstream promoters, while the U6 RNA gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SNR6) has internal and downstream promoter elements that match the tRNA gene intragenic A- and B-block elements, respectively. Substitution of the SNR6 A or B block greatly diminished U6 RNA accumulation in vivo, and a subcellular extract competent for RNA polymerase III transcription generated nearly identical DNase I protection patterns over the SNR6 downstream B block and a tRNA gene intragenic B block. We conclude that the SNR6 promoter is functionally similar to tRNA gene promoters, although the effects of extragenic deletion mutations suggest that the downstream location of the SNR6 B block imposes unique positional constraints on its function. Both vertebrate and yeast U6 RNA genes have an upstream TATA box element not normally found in tRNA genes. Substitution of the SNR6 TATA box altered the site of transcription initiation in vivo, while substitution of sequences further upstream had no effect on SNR6 transcription. We present a model for the SNR6 transcription complex that explains these results in terms of their effects on the binding of transcription initiation factor TFIIIB. Images PMID:8474459

  3. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators. PMID:27279737

  4. The centrality of RNA for engineering gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, James; Takahashi, Melissa K; Meyer, Sarai; Loughrey, David; Watters, Kyle E; Lucks, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology holds promise as both a framework for rationally engineering biological systems and a way to revolutionize how we fundamentally understand them. Essential to realizing this promise is the development of strategies and tools to reliably and predictably control and characterize sophisticated patterns of gene expression. Here we review the role that RNA can play towards this goal and make a case for why this versatile, designable, and increasingly characterizable molecule is one of the most powerful substrates for engineering gene expression at our disposal. We discuss current natural and synthetic RNA regulators of gene expression acting at key points of control – transcription, mRNA degradation, and translation. We also consider RNA structural probing and computational RNA structure predication tools as a way to study RNA structure and ultimately function. Finally, we discuss how next-generation sequencing methods are being applied to the study of RNA and to the characterization of RNA's many properties throughout the cell. PMID:24124015

  5. Nucleotide sequence of a human tRNA gene heterocluster

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.N.; Pirtle, I.L.; Pirtle, R.M.

    1986-05-01

    Leucine tRNA from bovine liver was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human gene library harbored in Charon-4A of bacteriophage lambda. The human DNA inserts from plaque-pure clones were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping and Southern hybridization techniques, using both (3'-/sup 32/P)-labeled bovine liver leucine tRNA and total tRNA as hybridization probes. An 8-kb Hind III fragment of one of these ..gamma..-clones was subcloned into the Hind III site of pBR322. Subsequent fine restriction mapping and DNA sequence analysis of this plasmid DNA indicated the presence of four tRNA genes within the 8-kb DNA fragment. A leucine tRNA gene with an anticodon of AAG and a proline tRNA gene with an anticodon of AGG are in a 1.6-kb subfragment. A threonine tRNA gene with an anticodon of UGU and an as yet unidentified tRNA gene are located in a 1.1-kb subfragment. These two different subfragments are separated by 2.8 kb. The coding regions of the three sequenced genes contain characteristic internal split promoter sequences and do not have intervening sequences. The 3'-flanking region of these three genes have typical RNA polymerase III termination sites of at least four consecutive T residues.

  6. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  7. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Sigova, Alla A.; Abraham, Brian J.; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M.; Eric Guo, Yang; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Young, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and distal DNA elements in order to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA-binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF YY1 binds to both gene regulatory elements and also to their associated RNA species genome-wide. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  8. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  9. RNA Quality Control as a Key to Suppressing RNA Silencing of Endogenous Genes in Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-06-01

    RNA quality control of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of eukaryotic gene expression and often relies on exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional transcripts. In parallel, exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs are degraded through RNA silencing, which is a genome defense mechanism used by many eukaryotes. In plants, RNA silencing is triggered by the production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASEs (RDRs) and proceeds through small interfering (si) RNA-directed, ARGONAUTE (AGO)-mediated cleavage of homologous transcripts. Many studies revealed that plants avert inappropriate posttranscriptional gene silencing of endogenous coding genes by using RNA surveillance mechanisms as a safeguard to protect their transcriptome profiles. The tug of war between RNA surveillance and RNA silencing ensures the appropriate partitioning of endogenous RNA substrates among these degradation pathways. Here we review recent advances on RNA quality control and its role in the suppression of RNA silencing at endogenous genes and discuss the mechanisms underlying the crosstalk among these pathways. PMID:27045817

  10. Genetic variants in microRNA genes: impact on microRNA expression, function, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cammaerts, Sophia; Strazisar, Mojca; De Rijk, Peter; Del Favero, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression and like any other gene, their coding sequences are subject to genetic variation. Variants in miRNA genes can have profound effects on miRNA functionality at all levels, including miRNA transcription, maturation, and target specificity, and as such they can also contribute to disease. The impact of variants in miRNA genes is the focus of the present review. To put these effects into context, we first discuss the requirements of miRNA transcripts for maturation. In the last part an overview of available databases and tools and experimental approaches to investigate miRNA variants related to human disease is presented. PMID:26052338

  11. RNA-mediated RNA degradation in transgene- and virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Metzlaff, Michael

    2002-10-01

    In the 'RNA world' hypothesis it is postulated that RNA was the first genetic molecule. Recent discoveries in gene silencing research on plants, fungi and animals show that RNA indeed plays a key role not only in controlling invading nucleic acids, like viruses and transposable elements, but also in regulating the expression of transgenes and endogenous genes. Double-stranded RNAs were identified to be the triggering structures for the induction of a specific and highly efficient RNA silencing system, in which enzyme complexes, like Dicer and RISC, facilitate as 'molecular machines' the processing of dsRNA into characteristic small RNA species. RNA silencing can be transmitted rapidly from silenced to non-silenced cells by short and long distance signaling. There is evidence that at least one component of the signal is a specific, degradation-resistant RNA. PMID:12452426

  12. Chloroplast-like transfer RNA genes expressed in wheat mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, P B; Gray, M W

    1989-01-01

    In the course of a systematic survey of wheat mitochondrial tRNA genes, we have sequenced chloroplast-like serine (trnS-GGA), phenylalanine (trnF-GAA) and cysteine (trnC-GCA) tRNA genes and their flanking regions. These genes are remnants of 'promiscuous' chloroplast DNA that has been incorporated into wheat mtDNA in the course of its evolution. Each gene differs by one or a few nucleotides from the authentic chloroplast homolog previously characterized in wheat or other plants, and each could potentially encode a functional tRNA whose secondary structure shows no deviations from the generalized model. To determine whether these chloroplast-like tRNA genes are actually expressed, wheat mitochondrial tRNAs were resolved by a series of polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses, after being specifically end-labeled in vitro by 3'-CCA addition mediated by wheat tRNA nucleotidyltransferase. Subsequent direct RNA sequence analysis identified prominent tRNA species corresponding to the mitochondrial and not the chloroplast trnS, trnF and trnC genes. This analysis also revealed chloroplast-like elongator methionine, asparagine and tryptophan tRNAs. Our results suggest that at least some chloroplast-like tRNA genes in wheat mtDNA are transcribed, with transcripts undergoing processing, post-transcriptional modification and 3'-CCA addition, to produce mature tRNAs that may participate in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Images PMID:2762145

  13. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. However, accumulated evidences revealed that siRNA could downregulate unintended genes with partial complementarities mainly to the seven-nucleotide seed region of siRNA. This phenomenon is referred to as off-target effect. We have revealed that the capability to induce off-target effect is strongly correlated to the thermodynamic stability in siRNA seed-target duplex. For understanding accurate target gene function and successful therapeutic application, it may be critical to select a target gene-specific siRNA with minimized off-target effect. Here we present our siRNA design software for a target-specific RNAi. In addition, we also introduce the software programs open to the public for designing functional siRNAs. PMID:22701467

  14. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. However, accumulated evidences revealed that siRNA could downregulate unintended genes with partial complementarities mainly to the seven-nucleotide seed region of siRNA. This phenomenon is referred to as off-target effect. We have revealed that the capability to induce off-target effect is strongly correlated to the thermodynamic stability in siRNA seed-target duplex. For understanding accurate target gene function and successful therapeutic application, it may be critical to select a target gene-specific siRNA with minimized off-target effect. Here we present our siRNA design software for a target-specific RNAi. In addition, we also introduce the software programs open to the public for designing functional siRNAs. PMID:22701467

  15. Self-assembled Messenger RNA Nanoparticles (mRNA-NPs) for Efficient Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Lee, Jong Bum

    2015-01-01

    Although mRNA has several advantages over plasmid DNA when delivered into cells for gene expression, mRNA transfection is a very rare occurrence in gene delivery. This is mainly because of the labile nature of RNA, resulting in a low expression level of the desired protein. In this study, self-assembled mRNA nanoparticles (mRNA-NPs) packed with multiple repeats of mRNA were synthesized to achieve efficient gene expression. This approach required only a one-step process to synthesize particles with a minimal amount of plasmid DNA to produce the RNA transcripts via rolling circle transcription. Moreover, there are no concerns for cytotoxicity which can be caused by chemical condensates because mRNA-NPs are made entirely of mRNA. An examination of the cells transfected with the mRNA-NPs encoding the green fluorescence protein (GFP) confirmed that the mRNA-NPs can be used as a novel platform for effective gene delivery. PMID:26235529

  16. Investigation of factors affecting RNA-seq gene expression calls

    PubMed Central

    Harati, Sahar; Phan, John H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-seq enables quantification of the human transcriptome. Estimation of gene expression is a fundamental issue in the analysis of RNA-seq data. However, there is an inherent ambiguity in distinguishing between genes with very low expression and experimental or transcriptional noise. We conducted an exploratory investigation of some factors that may affect gene expression calls. We observed that the distribution of reads that map to exonic, intronic, and intergenic regions are distinct. These distributions may provide useful insights into the behavior of gene expression noise. Moreover, we observed that these distributions are qualitatively similar between two sequence mapping algorithms. Finally, we examined the relationship between gene length and gene expression calls, and observed that they are correlated. This preliminary investigation is important for RNA-seq gene expression analysis because it may lead to more effective algorithms for distinguishing between true gene expression and experimental or transcriptional noise. PMID:25571173

  17. Complete sequence and gene organization of the Nosema spodopterae rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shu-Jen; Huang, Wei-Fone; Wang, Chung-Hsiung

    2005-01-01

    By sequencing the entire ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of Nosema spodopterae, we show here that its gene organization follows a pattern similar to the Nosema type species, Nosema bombycis, i.e. 5'-large subunit rRNA (2,497 bp)-internal transcribed spacer (185 bp)-small subunit rRNA (1,232 bp)-intergenic spacer (277 bp)-5S rRNA (114 bp)-3'. Gene sequences and the secondary structures of large subunit rRNA, small subunit rRNA, and 5S rRNA are compared with the known corresponding sequences and structures of closely related microsporidia. The results suggest that the Nosema genus may be heterogeneous and that the rRNA gene organization may be a useful characteristic for determining which species are closely related to the type species. PMID:15702980

  18. Transcriptional regulation of human small nuclear RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jawdekar, Gauri W.; Henry, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The products of human snRNA genes have been frequently described as performing housekeeping functions and their synthesis refractory to regulation. However, recent studies have emphasized that snRNA and other related non-coding RNA molecules control multiple facets of the central dogma, and their regulated expression is critical to cellular homeostasis during normal growth and in response to stress. Human snRNA genes contain compact and yet powerful promoters that are recognized by increasingly well-characterized transcription factors, thus providing a premier model system to study gene regulation. This review summarizes many recent advances deciphering the mechanism by which the transcription of human snRNA and related genes are regulated. PMID:18442490

  19. Non-functional genes repaired at the RNA level.

    PubMed

    Burger, Gertraud

    2016-01-01

    Genomes and genes continuously evolve. Gene sequences undergo substitutions, deletions or nucleotide insertions; mobile genetic elements invade genomes and interleave in genes; chromosomes break, even within genes, and pieces reseal in reshuffled order. To maintain functional gene products and assure an organism's survival, two principal strategies are used - either repair of the gene itself or of its product. I will introduce common types of gene aberrations and how gene function is restored secondarily, and then focus on systematically fragmented genes found in a poorly studied protist group, the diplonemids. Expression of their broken genes involves restitching of pieces at the RNA-level, and substantial RNA editing, to compensate for point mutations. I will conclude with thoughts on how such a grotesquely unorthodox system may have evolved, and why this group of organisms persists and thrives since tens of millions of years. PMID:27180109

  20. RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulation: the coding and noncoding players.

    PubMed

    Guil, Sonia; Esteller, Manel

    2015-05-01

    The past few years have witnessed an exciting increase in the richness and complexity of RNA-mediated regulatory circuitries, including new types of RNA-RNA interaction that underlie key steps in gene expression control in an organized and probably hierarchic system to dictate final protein output. Both small (especially miRNAs) and long coding (lc) and noncoding (nc) RNAs contain structural domains that can sense and bind other RNAs via complementary base pairing. The versatility of the interaction confers multiple roles to RNA-RNA hybrids, from control of RNA biogenesis to competition for common targets. Here, we focus on the emerging evidence around RNA networks and their impact on gene expression regulation in light of recent breakthroughs around the crosstalk between coding RNAs and ncRNAs. PMID:25818326

  1. The nucleotide sequence of the large ribosomal RNA gene and the adjacent tRNA genes from rat mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, C; Cantatore, P; Gadaleta, G; Gallerani, R; Lanave, C; Pepe, G; Kroon, A M

    1981-01-01

    We have sequenced the Eco R(1) fragment D from rat mitochondrial DNA. It contains one third of the tRNA (Val) gene (the remaining part has been sequenced from the 3' end of the Eco R(1) fragment A) the complete gene for the large mt 16S rRNA, the tRNA (Leu) gene and the 5' end of an unidentified reading frame. The mt gene for the large rRNA from rat has been aligned with the homologous genes from mouse and human using graphic computer programs. Hypervariable regions at the center of the molecule and highly conserved regions toward the 3' end have been detected. The mt gene for tRNA Leu is of the conventional type and its primary structure is highly conserved among mammals. The mt gene for tRNA(Val) shows characteristics similar to those of other mt tRNA genes but the degree of homology is lower. Comparative studies confirm that AGA and AGG are read as stop codons in mammalian mitochondria. PMID:6913863

  2. Kinetic models of the interference of gene transcription to ncRNA and mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-06-01

    The experiments indicate that the transcription of genes into ncRNA can positively or negatively interfere with transcription into mRNA. We propose two kinetic models describing this effect. The first model is focused on the ncRNA-induced chromatin modification facilitating the transcription of the downstream gene into mRNA. The second model includes the competition between the transcription into ncRNA and the binding of activator to a regulatory site of the downstream gene transcribed into mRNA. Our analysis based on the mean-field kinetic equations and Monte Carlo simulations shows the likely dependences of the transcription rate on RNA polymerase concentration in situations with different rate-limiting steps. Our models can also be used to scrutinize the dependence of the transcription rate on other kinetic parameters. Our kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that the first model predicts stochastic bursts in the mRNA formation provided that the transcription into ncRNA is slow, while the second model predicts in addition anti-phase stochastic bursts in the mRNA and ncRNA formation provided that that the protein attachment to and detachment from a regulatory site is slow.

  3. Spliced synthetic genes as internal controls in RNA sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Simon A; Chen, Wendy Y; Wong, Ted; Deveson, Ira W; Blackburn, James; Andersen, Stacey B; Nielsen, Lars K; Mattick, John S; Mercer, Tim R

    2016-09-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) can be used to assemble spliced isoforms, quantify expressed genes and provide a global profile of the transcriptome. However, the size and diversity of the transcriptome, the wide dynamic range in gene expression and inherent technical biases confound RNA-seq analysis. We have developed a set of spike-in RNA standards, termed 'sequins' (sequencing spike-ins), that represent full-length spliced mRNA isoforms. Sequins have an entirely artificial sequence with no homology to natural reference genomes, but they align to gene loci encoded on an artificial in silico chromosome. The combination of multiple sequins across a range of concentrations emulates alternative splicing and differential gene expression, and it provides scaling factors for normalization between samples. We demonstrate the use of sequins in RNA-seq experiments to measure sample-specific biases and determine the limits of reliable transcript assembly and quantification in accompanying human RNA samples. In addition, we have designed a complementary set of sequins that represent fusion genes arising from rearrangements of the in silico chromosome to aid in cancer diagnosis. RNA sequins provide a qualitative and quantitative reference with which to navigate the complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:27502218

  4. Upregulating endogenous genes by an RNA-programmable artificial transactivator

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    To promote expression of endogenous genes ad libitum, we developed a novel, programmable transcription factor prototype. Kept together via an MS2 coat protein/RNA interface, it includes a fixed, polypeptidic transactivating domain and a variable RNA domain that recognizes the desired gene. Thanks to this device, we specifically upregulated five genes, in cell lines and primary cultures of murine pallial precursors. Gene upregulation was small, however sufficient to robustly inhibit neuronal differentiation. The transactivator interacted with target gene chromatin via its RNA cofactor. Its activity was restricted to cells in which the target gene is normally transcribed. Our device might be useful for specific applications. However for this purpose, it will require an improvement of its transactivation power as well as a better characterization of its target specificity and mechanism of action. PMID:26152305

  5. Gene regulation by structured mRNA elements.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The precise temporal and spatial coordination of gene activity, based on the integration of internal and external signals, is crucial for the accurate functioning of all biological processes. Although the basic principles of gene expression were established some 60 years ago, recent research has revealed a surprising complexity in the control of gene activity. Many of these gene regulatory mechanisms occur at the level of the mRNA, including sophisticated gene control tasks mediated by structured mRNA elements. We now know that mRNA folds can serve as highly specific receptors for various types of molecules, as exemplified by metabolite-binding riboswitches, and interfere with pro- and eukaryotic gene expression at the level of transcription, translation, and RNA processing. Gene regulation by structured mRNA elements comprises versatile strategies including self-cleaving ribozymes, RNA-folding-mediated occlusion or presentation of cis-regulatory sequences, and sequestration of trans-acting factors including other RNAs and proteins. PMID:24780087

  6. Birth and expression evolution of mammalian microRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Julien; Lemoine, Frédéric; Soumillon, Magali; Liechti, Angélica; Weier, Manuela; Guschanski, Katerina; Hu, Haiyang; Khaitovich, Philipp; Kaessmann, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are major post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, yet their origins and functional evolution in mammals remain little understood due to the lack of appropriate comparative data. Using RNA sequencing, we have generated extensive and comparable miRNA data for five organs in six species that represent all main mammalian lineages and birds (the evolutionary outgroup) with the aim to unravel the evolution of mammalian miRNAs. Our analyses reveal an overall expansion of miRNA repertoires in mammals, with threefold accelerated birth rates of miRNA families in placentals and marsupials, facilitated by the de novo emergence of miRNAs in host gene introns. Generally, our analyses suggest a high rate of miRNA family turnover in mammals with many newly emerged miRNA families being lost soon after their formation. Selectively preserved mammalian miRNA families gradually evolved higher expression levels, as well as altered mature sequences and target gene repertoires, and were apparently mainly recruited to exert regulatory functions in nervous tissues. However, miRNAs that originated on the X chromosome evolved high expression levels and potentially diverse functions during spermatogenesis, including meiosis, through selectively driven duplication-divergence processes. Overall, our study thus provides detailed insights into the birth and evolution of mammalian miRNA genes and the associated selective forces. PMID:23034410

  7. Integrated gene set analysis for microRNA studies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Panadero, Joaquin; Dopazo, Joaquin; Montaner, David

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Functional interpretation of miRNA expression data is currently done in a three step procedure: select differentially expressed miRNAs, find their target genes, and carry out gene set overrepresentation analysis. Nevertheless, major limitations of this approach have already been described at the gene level, while some newer arise in the miRNA scenario. Here, we propose an enhanced methodology that builds on the well-established gene set analysis paradigm. Evidence for differential expression at the miRNA level is transferred to a gene differential inhibition score which is easily interpretable in terms of gene sets or pathways. Such transferred indexes account for the additive effect of several miRNAs targeting the same gene, and also incorporate cancellation effects between cases and controls. Together, these two desirable characteristics allow for more accurate modeling of regulatory processes. Results: We analyze high-throughput sequencing data from 20 different cancer types and provide exhaustive reports of gene and Gene Ontology-term deregulation by miRNA action. Availability and Implementation: The proposed methodology was implemented in the Bioconductor library mdgsa. http://bioconductor.org/packages/mdgsa. For the purpose of reproducibility all of the scripts are available at https://github.com/dmontaner-papers/gsa4mirna Contact: david.montaner@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27324197

  8. Cloning and physical mapping of RNA polymerase genes from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and comparison of homologies and gene orders with those of RNA polymerase genes from other methanogenic archaebacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schallenberg, J.; Moes, M.; Truss, M.; Reiser, W.; Thomm, M.; Stetter, K.O.; Klein, A.

    1988-05-01

    The structural genes encoding the four largest subunits of RNA polymerase, A, B', B'', and C, were physically mapped in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Winter. The genes formed a cluster in the order B'', B', A, C and had a common orientation. DNA hybridization experiments yielded different degrees of homology between RNA polymerase gene sequences of different species of Methanobacterium and Methanococcus voltae. No homology was detectable between Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Methanosarcina barkeri. From Southern hybridization experiments in which probes of the four genes from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Winter and restriction digests of the genomic DNAs of the different methanogens were used, a common gene order of the RNA polymerase genes could be deduced.

  9. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  10. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  11. Establishment of a system for conditional gene expression using an inducible tRNA suppressor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dingermann, T; Werner, H; Schütz, A; Zündorf, I; Nerke, K; Knecht, D; Marschalek, R

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the use of the prokaryotic tetracycline operator-repressor system as a regulatory device to control the expression of Dictyostelium discoideum tRNA genes. The tetO1 operator fragment was inserted at three different positions in front of a tRNA(Glu) (Am) suppressor gene from D. discoideum, and the tetracycline repressor gene was expressed under the control of a constitutive actin 6 promoter. The effectiveness of this approach was determined by monitoring the expression of a beta-galactosidase gene engineered to contain a stop codon that could be suppressed by the tRNA. When these constructs were introduced into Dictyostelium cells, the repressor bound to the operator in front of the tRNA gene and prevented expression of the suppressor tRNA. Addition of tetracycline (30 micrograms/ml) to the growth medium prevented repressor binding, allowed expression of the suppressor tRNA, and resulted in beta-galactosidase synthesis. The operator-repressor complex interfered with tRNA gene transcription when the operator was inserted immediately upstream (position +1 or -7) of the mature tRNA coding region. Expression of a tRNA gene carrying the operator at position -46 did not respond to repressor binding. This system could be used to control the synthesis of any protein, provided the gene contained a translational stop signal. Images PMID:1508201

  12. mRNA modifications: Dynamic regulators of gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of a gene is a tightly regulated process and is exerted by a myriad of different mechanisms. Recently, RNA modifications located in coding sequences of mRNAs, have been identified as potential regulators of gene expression. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C), pseudouridine (Ψ) and N1-methyladenosine (m1A) have been found within open reading frames of mRNAs. The presence of these mRNA modifications has been implicated to modulate the fate of an mRNA, ranging from maturation to its translation and even degradation. However, many aspects concerning the biological functions of mRNA modifications remain elusive. Recently, systematic in vitro studies allowed a first glimpse of the direct interplay of mRNA modifications and the efficiency and fidelity of ribosomal translation. It thereby became evident that the effects of mRNA modifications were, astonishingly versatile, depending on the type, position or sequence context. The incorporation of a single modification could either prematurely terminate protein synthesis, reduce the peptide yield or alter the amino acid sequence identity. These results implicate that mRNA modifications are a powerful mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. PMID:27351916

  13. Methylation of microRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development in andromonoecious poplar

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Ci, Dong; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed sex-specific DNA methylation and expression of candidate genes in bisexual flowers of andromonoecious poplar, but the regulatory relationship between methylation and microRNAs (miRNAs) remains unclear. To investigate whether the methylation of miRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development, the methylome, microRNA, and transcriptome were examined in female and male flowers of andromonoecious poplar. 27 636 methylated coding genes and 113 methylated miRNA genes were identified. In the coding genes, 64.5% of the methylated reads mapped to the gene body region; by contrast, 60.7% of methylated reads in miRNA genes mainly mapped in the 5′ and 3′ flanking regions. CHH methylation showed the highest methylation levels and CHG showed the lowest methylation levels. Correlation analysis showed a significant, negative, strand-specific correlation of methylation and miRNA gene expression (r=0.79, P <0.05). The methylated miRNA genes included eight long miRNAs (lmiRNAs) of 24 nucleotides and 11 miRNAs related to flower development. miRNA172b might play an important role in the regulation of bisexual flower development-related gene expression in andromonoecious poplar, via modification of methylation. Gynomonoecious, female, and male poplars were used to validate the methylation patterns of the miRNA172b gene, implying that hyper-methylation in andromonoecious and gynomonoecious poplar might function as an important regulator in bisexual flower development. Our data provide a useful resource for the study of flower development in poplar and improve our understanding of the effect of epigenetic regulation on genes other than protein-coding genes. PMID:25617468

  14. Short Hairpin RNA (shRNA): Design, Delivery, and Assessment of Gene Knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Chris B.; Guthrie, Elizabeth H.; Huang, Max Tze-Han; Taxman, Debra J.

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after the cellular mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi) was first described, scientists began using this powerful technique to study gene function. This included designing better methods for the successful delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) into mammalian cells. While the simplest method for RNAi is the cytosolic delivery of siRNA oligonucleotides, this technique is limited to cells capable of transfection and is primarily utilized during transient in vitro studies. The introduction of shRNA into mammalian cells through infection with viral vectors allows for stable integration of shRNA and long-term knockdown of the targeted gene; however, several challenges exist with the implementation of this technology. Here we describe some well-tested protocols which should increase the chances of successful design, delivery, and assessment of gene knockdown by shRNA. We provide suggestions for designing shRNA targets and controls, a protocol for sequencing through the secondary structure of the shRNA hairpin structure, and protocols for packaging and delivery of shRNA lentiviral particles. Using real-time PCR and functional assays we demonstrate the successful knockdown of ASC, an inflammatory adaptor molecule. These studies demonstrate the practicality of including two shRNAs with different efficacies of knockdown to provide an additional level of control and to verify dose dependency of functional effects. Along with the methods described here, as new techniques and algorithms are designed in the future, shRNA is likely to include further promising application and continue to be a critical component of gene discovery. PMID:20387148

  15. Target Gene Abundance Contributes to the Efficiency of siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sun Woo; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Kim, Soyoun; Li, Chiang J.

    2014-01-01

    The gene-silencing activity of a small interfering RNA (siRNA) is determined by various factors. Considering that RNA interference (RNAi) is an unparalleled technology in both basic research and therapeutic applications, thorough understanding of the factors determining RNAi activity is critical. This report presents observations that siRNAs targeting KRT7 show cell-line-dependent activity, which correlates with the expression level of KRT7 mRNA. By modulating the target mRNA level, it was confirmed that highly expressed genes are more susceptible to siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Finally, several genes that show different expression levels in a cell-line dependent manner were tested, which verified the expression-level-dependent siRNA activities. These results strongly suggest that the abundance of target mRNA is a critical factor that determines the efficiency of the siRNA-mediated gene silencing in a given cellular context. This report should provide practical guidelines for designing RNAi experiments and for selecting targetable genes in RNAi therapeutics studies. PMID:24527979

  16. In silico analysis of miRNA-mediated gene regulation in OCA and OA genes.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-12-01

    Albinism is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder due to low secretion of melanin. The oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and ocular albinism (OA) genes are responsible for melanin production and also act as a potential targets for miRNAs. The role of miRNA is to inhibit the protein synthesis partially or completely by binding with the 3'UTR of the mRNA thus regulating gene expression. In this analysis, we predicted the genetic variation that occurred in 3'UTR of the transcript which can be a reason for low melanin production thus causing albinism. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3'UTR cause more new binding sites for miRNA which binds with mRNA which leads to inhibit the translation process either partially or completely. The SNPs in the mRNA of OCA and OA genes can create new binding sites for miRNA which may control the gene expression and lead to hypopigmentation. We have developed a computational procedure to determine the SNPs in the 3'UTR region of mRNA of OCA (TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2) and OA (GPR143) genes which will be a potential cause for albinism. We identified 37 SNPs in five genes that are predicted to create 87 new binding sites on mRNA, which may lead to abrogation of the translation process. Expression analysis confirms that these genes are highly expressed in skin and eye regions. It is well supported by enrichment analysis that these genes are mainly involved in eye pigmentation and melanin biosynthesis process. The network analysis also shows how the genes are interacting and expressing in a complex network. This insight provides clue to wet-lab researches to understand the expression pattern of OCA and OA genes and binding phenomenon of mRNA and miRNA upon mutation, which is responsible for inhibition of translation process at genomic levels. PMID:25060099

  17. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  18. Estimating RNA-quality using GeneChip microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microarrays are a powerful tool for transcriptome analysis. Best results are obtained using high-quality RNA samples for preparation and hybridization. Issues with RNA integrity can lead to low data quality and failure of the microarray experiment. Results Microarray intensity data contains information to estimate the RNA quality of the sample. We here study the interplay of the characteristics of RNA surface hybridization with the effects of partly truncated transcripts on probe intensity. The 3′/5′ intensity gradient, the basis of microarray RNA quality measures, is shown to depend on the degree of competitive binding of specific and of non-specific targets to a particular probe, on the degree of saturation of the probes with bound transcripts and on the distance of the probe from the 3′-end of the transcript. Increasing degrees of non-specific hybridization or of saturation reduce the 3′/5′ intensity gradient and if not taken into account, this leads to biased results in common quality measures for GeneChip arrays such as affyslope or the control probe intensity ratio. We also found that short probe sets near the 3′-end of the transcripts are prone to non-specific hybridization presumable because of inaccurate positional assignment and the existence of transcript isoforms with variable 3′ UTRs. Poor RNA quality is associated with a decreased amount of RNA material hybridized on the array paralleled by a decreased total signal level. Additionally, it causes a gene-specific loss of signal due to the positional bias of transcript abundance which requires an individual, gene-specific correction. We propose a new RNA quality measure that considers the hybridization mode. Graphical characteristics are introduced allowing assessment of RNA quality of each single array (‘tongs plot’ and ‘degradation hook’). Furthermore, we suggest a method to correct for effects of RNA degradation on microarray intensities. Conclusions The presented RNA

  19. Bistability in a stochastic RNA-mediated gene network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Ribeiro, Andre S.

    2013-09-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (srRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A common motif containing srRNA is a bistable two-gene motif where one gene codes for a transcription factor (TF) which represses the transcription of the second gene, whose transcript is a srRNA which targets the first gene's transcript. Here, we investigate the properties of this motif in a stochastic model which takes the low copy numbers of the RNA components into account. First, we examine the conditions for stability of the two “noisy attractors.” We find that for realistic low copy numbers, extreme, but within realistic intervals, mutual repression strengths are required to compensate for the variability of the RNA numbers and thus, achieve long-term bistability. Second, the promoter initiation kinetics is found to strongly influence the bistability of the switch. Super-Poissonian RNA production disrupts the ability of the srRNA to silence its target, though sub-Poissonian RNA production does not rule out the need for strong mutual repression. Finally, we show that asymmetry between the two interactions forming the switch allows an external input to induce the transition from “high srRNA” to “‘high TF” more easily (i.e., with a shorter input) than in the opposite direction. We hypothesize that this asymmetric switching property allows these circuits to be more sensitive to one external input, without sacrificing the stability of one of the noisy attractors.

  20. The fitness landscape of a tRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Qian, Wenfeng; Maclean, Calum J; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-05-13

    Fitness landscapes describe the genotype-fitness relationship and represent major determinants of evolutionary trajectories. However, the vast genotype space, coupled with the difficulty of measuring fitness, has hindered the empirical determination of fitness landscapes. Combining precise gene replacement and next-generation sequencing, we quantified Darwinian fitness under a high-temperature challenge for more than 65,000 yeast strains, each carrying a unique variant of the single-copy tRNA(CCU)(Arg) gene at its native genomic location. Approximately 1% of single point mutations in the gene were beneficial and 42% were deleterious. Almost half of all mutation pairs exhibited statistically significant epistasis, which had a strong negative bias, except when the mutations occurred at Watson-Crick paired sites. Fitness was broadly correlated with the predicted fraction of correctly folded transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, thereby revealing a biophysical basis of the fitness landscape. PMID:27080104

  1. PLMItRNA, a database for higher plant mitochondrial tRNAs and tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, L R; Volpicella, M; Liuni, S; Volpetti, V; Licciulli, F; Gallerani, R

    1999-01-01

    The PLMItRNA database contains information and multialignments of tRNA genes and molecules detected in higher plant mitochondria. It has been developed from a previous compilation of higher plant mitochondrial tRNA genes [Sagliano,A., Volpicella,M., Gallerani,R. and Ceci,L.R. (1998) Nucleic Acids Res., 26, 154-155] and implemented with data and sequences of tRNA molecules retrieved from the literature. The current version of the database reports information on 171 genes and 16 tRNA molecules from 24 plants. PLMItRNA is accessible via WWW at http://bio-www.ba.cnr.it:8000/srs/ PMID:9847164

  2. Complete sequence and gene organization of the Nosema heliothidis ribosomal RNA gene region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shinan; Shen, Zhongyuan; Zhu, Feng; Tang, Xudong; Xu, Li

    2011-01-01

    By sequencing the entire ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene region of Nosema heliothidis isolated from cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), we showed that its gene organization is similar to the type species, Nosema bombycis: the 5'-large subunit rRNA (2,490 bp)-internal transcribed spacer (192 bp)-small subunit rRNA (1,232 bp)-intergenic spacer (274 bp)-5S rRNA (115 bp)-3'. We constructed two phylogenetic trees, analyzed phylogenetic relationships, examined rRNA organization of microsporidia, and compared the secondary structure of small subunit rRNA with closely related microsporidia. The latter two features may provide important information for the classification and phylogenetic analysis of microsporidia. PMID:21895841

  3. siRNA Versus miRNA as Therapeutics for Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jenny K W; Chow, Michael Y T; Zhang, Yu; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-01-01

    Discovered a little over two decades ago, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs with important roles in gene regulation. They have recently been investigated as novel classes of therapeutic agents for the treatment of a wide range of disorders including cancers and infections. Clinical trials of siRNA- and miRNA-based drugs have already been initiated. siRNAs and miRNAs share many similarities, both are short duplex RNA molecules that exert gene silencing effects at the post-transcriptional level by targeting messenger RNA (mRNA), yet their mechanisms of action and clinical applications are distinct. The major difference between siRNAs and miRNAs is that the former are highly specific with only one mRNA target, whereas the latter have multiple targets. The therapeutic approaches of siRNAs and miRNAs are therefore very different. Hence, this review provides a comparison between therapeutic siRNAs and miRNAs in terms of their mechanisms of action, physicochemical properties, delivery, and clinical applications. Moreover, the challenges in developing both classes of RNA as therapeutics are also discussed. PMID:26372022

  4. Cross Talk Between MicroRNA and Coding Cancer Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kunej, T; Godnic, I; Horvat, S; Zorc, M; Calin, GA

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and post-transcriptional gene regulators shown to be involved in pathogenesis of all types of human cancers. Their aberrant expression as tumor suppressors can lead to cancerogenesis by inhibiting malignant potential, or when acting as oncogenes, by activating malignant potential. Differential expression of miRNA genes in tumorous tissues can occur due to several factors including positional effects when mapping to cancer-associated genomic regions, epigenetic mechanisms and malfunctioning of the miRNA processing machinery, all of which can contribute to a complex miRNA-mediated gene network misregulation. They may increase or decrease expression of protein-coding genes, can target 3’-UTR or other genic regions (5'-UTR, promoter, coding sequences), and can function in various subcellular compartments, developmental and metabolic processes. Because expanding research on miRNA-cancer associations has already produced large amounts of data, our main objective here was to summarize main findings and critically examine the intricate network connecting the miRNAs and coding genes in regulatory mechanisms, their function and phenotypic consequences for cancer. By examining such interactions we aimed to gain insights for development of new diagnostic markers as well as identify potential venues for more selective tumor therapy. To enable efficient examination of the main past and current miRNA discoveries, we developed a web based miRNA timeline tool that will be regularly updated (http://www.integratomics-time.com/miRNA_timeline). Further development of this tool will be directed at providing additional analyses to clarify complex network interactions between miRNAs, other classes of ncRNAs and protein coding genes and their involvement in development of diseases including cancer. This tool therefore provides curated relevant information about the miRNA basic research and therapeutic application all at hand on

  5. MicroRNA-Offset RNA Alters Gene Expression and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin; Schnitzler, Gavin R.; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Aronovitz, Mark J.; Baur, Wendy E.; Karas, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-offset RNAs (moRs) were first identified in simple chordates and subsequently in mouse and human cells by deep sequencing of short RNAs. MoRs are derived from sequences located immediately adjacent to microRNAs (miRs) in the primary miR (pri-miR). Currently moRs are considered to be simply a by-product of miR biosynthesis that lack biological activity. Here we show for the first time that a moR is biologically active. We demonstrate that endogenous or over-expressed moR-21 significantly alters gene expression and inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In addition, we find that miR-21 and moR-21 may regulate different genes in a given pathway and can oppose each other in regulating certain genes. We report that there is a “seed region” of moR-21 as well as a “seed match region” in the target gene 3’UTR that are indispensable for moR-21-mediated gene down-regulation. We further demonstrate that moR-21-mediated gene repression is Argonaute 2 (Ago2) dependent. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence that microRNA offset RNA alters gene expression and is biologically active. PMID:27276022

  6. Two control regions for eukaryotic tRNA gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    DeFranco, D; Schmidt, O; Söll, D

    1980-01-01

    Two Drosophila tRNALys genes with identical coding sequences were shown to transcribe with very different efficiences in nuclear extracts from Xenopus oocytes. The use of recombinant plasmids in which the 5'-flanking sequences of these genes were either "switched" or replaced by defined pBR322 sequences revealed two control regions for tRNA gene transcription. An internal control region comprising the mature tRNA coding sequence (and possibly its 3'-flanking sequences) is sufficient for transcription initiation, and an external control region comprising the 5'-flanking sequences represses this transcription. All transcripts have short leader sequences. Altered precursor tRNAs transcribed from truncated tRNALys genes (missing a single base pair in the acceptor stem) are not processed well in vitro. Images PMID:6774336

  7. An efficient RNA interference screening strategy for gene functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is commonly applied in genome-scale gene functional screens. However, a one-on-one RNAi analysis that targets each gene is cost-ineffective and laborious. Previous studies have indicated that siRNAs can also affect RNAs that are near-perfectly complementary, and this phenomenon has been termed an off-target effect. This phenomenon implies that it is possible to silence several genes simultaneously with a carefully designed siRNA. Results We propose a strategy that is combined with a heuristic algorithm to design suitable siRNAs that can target multiple genes and a group testing method that would reduce the number of required RNAi experiments in a large-scale RNAi analysis. To verify the efficacy of our strategy, we used the Orchid expressed sequence tag data as a case study to screen the putative transcription factors that are involved in plant disease responses. According to our computation, 94 qualified siRNAs were sufficient to examine all of the predicated 229 transcription factors. In addition, among the 94 computer-designed siRNAs, an siRNA that targets both TF15 (a previously identified transcription factor that is involved in the plant disease-response pathway) and TF21 was introduced into orchids. The experimental results showed that this siRNA can simultaneously silence TF15 and TF21, and application of our strategy successfully confirmed that TF15 is involved in plant defense responses. Interestingly, our second-round analysis, which used an siRNA specific to TF21, indicated that TF21 is a previously unidentified transcription factor that is related to plant defense responses. Conclusions Our computational results showed that it is possible to screen all genes with fewer experiments than would be required for the traditional one-on-one RNAi screening. We also verified that our strategy is capable of identifying genes that are involved in a specific phenotype. PMID:22988976

  8. Epigeneitc silencing of ribosomal RNA genes by Mybbp1a

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transcription of the ribosomal RNA gene repeats by Pol I occurs in the nucleolus and is a fundamental step in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. Due to tight coordination between ribosome biogenesis and cell proliferation, transcription of rRNA and stable maintenance of rDNA clusters are thought to be under intricate control by intercalated mechanisms, particularly at the epigenetic level. Methods and Results Here we identify the nucleolar protein Myb-binding protein 1a (Mybbp1a) as a novel negative regulator of rRNA expression. Suppression of rDNA transcription by Mybbp1a was linked to promoter regulation as illustrated by its binding to the chromatin around the hypermethylated, inactive rDNA gene promoters. Our data further showed that downregulation of Mybbp1a abrogated the local DNA methylation levels and histone marks associated with gene silencing, and altered the promoter occupancy of various factors such UBF and HDACs, consequently leading to elevated rRNA expression. Mechanistically, we propose that Mybbp1a maintains rDNA repeats in a silenced state while in association with the negative epigenetic modifiers HDAC1/2. Conclusions Results from our present work reveal a previously unrecognized co-repressor role of Mybbp1a in rRNA expression. They are further consistent with the scenario that Mybbp1a is an integral constituent of the rDNA epigenetic regulation that underlies the balanced state of rDNA clusters. PMID:22686419

  9. Characterization of recombinant bacteriophages containing mosquito ribosomal RNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.

    1988-01-01

    A family of nine recombinant bacteriophages containing rRNA genes from cultured cells of the mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has been isolated by screening two different genomic DNA libraries - Charon 30 and EMBL 3 using {sup 32}P-labeled 18S and 28S rRNA as probes. These nine recombinant bacteriophages were characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and S1 nuclease analysis. The 18S rRNA coding region contains an evolutionarily conserved EcoRI site near the 3{prime}-end, and measures 1800 bp. The 28S rRNA genes were divided into {alpha} and {beta} coding regions measuring 1750 bp and 2000 bp, respectively. The gap between these two regions measures about 340 bp. No insertion sequences were found in the rRNA coding regions. The entire rDNA repeat unit had a minimum length of 15.6 kb, including a nontranscribed spacer region. The non-transcribed spacer region of cloned A. albopictus rDNA contained a common series of seven PvuI sites within a 1250 bp region upstream of the 18S rRNA coding region, and a proportion of this region also showed heterogeneity both in the length and in the restriction sites.

  10. Effects of mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA14, RNA15, and PAP1 genes on polyadenylation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Mandart, E; Parker, R

    1995-01-01

    The RNA14 and RNA15 gene products have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes. Mutations in these genes lead to faster decay of some mRNAs and yield extracts that are deficient in cleavage and polyadenylation in vitro. These results suggest that the RNA14 and RNA15 gene products may be involved in both adenylation and deadenylation in vivo. To explore the roles of these gene products in vivo, we examined the site of adenylation and the rate of deadenylation for individual mRNAs in rna14 and rna15 mutant strains. We observed that the rates of deadenylation are not affected by lesions in either the RNA14 or the RNA15 gene. This result suggests that the proteins encoded by these genes are not involved in regulation of the deadenylation rate. In contrast, we observed that the site of adenylation for the ACT1 transcript can be altered in these mutants. Interestingly, we also observed that mutation of the poly(A) polymerase gene altered the site of ACT1 polyadenylation. These observations suggest that the RNA14, RNA15, and PAP1 proteins are involved in poly(A) site choice. This alteration in poly(A) site choice in the rna14 mutant can be corrected by the ssm4 suppressor, indicating that this suppression acts at the level of polyadenylation and not by slowing mRNA degradation. PMID:8524265

  11. Subcellular distribution of small interfering RNA: directed delivery through RNA polymerase III expression cassettes and localization by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Paul, Cynthia P

    2005-01-01

    Reduction in the expression of specific genes through small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is dependent on the colocalization of siRNAs with other components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathways within the cell. The expression of siRNAs within cells from cassettes that are derived from genes transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III) and provide for selective subcellular distribution of their products can be used to direct siRNAs to the cellular pathways. Expression from the human U6 promoter, resulting in siRNA accumulation in the nucleus, is effective in reducing gene expression, whereas cytoplasmic and nucleolar localization of the siRNA when expressed from the 5S or 7 SL promoters is not effective. The distribution of siRNA within the cell is determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Although the long uninterrupted duplex of siRNA makes it difficult to detect with DNA oligonucleotide probes, labeled oligonucleotide probes with 2'-O-methyl RNA backbones provide the stability needed for a strong signal. These methods contribute to studies of the interconnected cellular RNAi pathways and are useful in adapting RNAi as a tool to determine gene function and develop RNA-based therapeutics. PMID:15644179

  12. LncRNA2Target: a database for differentially expressed genes after lncRNA knockdown or overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qinghua; Wang, Jixuan; Wu, Xiaoliang; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Tianjiao; Jin, Shuilin; Han, Zhijie; Tan, Renjie; Peng, Jiajie; Liu, Guiyou; Li, Yu; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of genes at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, yet what genes are regulated by a specific lncRNA remains to be characterized. To assess the effects of the lncRNA on gene expression, an increasing number of researchers profiled the genome-wide or individual gene expression level change after knocking down or overexpressing the lncRNA. Herein, we describe a curated database named LncRNA2Target, which stores lncRNA-to-target genes and is publicly accessible at http://www.lncrna2target.org. A gene was considered as a target of a lncRNA if it is differentially expressed after the lncRNA knockdown or overexpression. LncRNA2Target provides a web interface through which its users can search for the targets of a particular lncRNA or for the lncRNAs that target a particular gene. Both search types are performed either by browsing a provided catalog of lncRNA names or by inserting lncRNA/target gene IDs/names in a search box. PMID:25399422

  13. Genome-wide characterization of maize miRNA genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play essential roles in plant growth and development. We conducted a genome-wide survey of maize miRNA genes, characterizing their structure, expression, and evolution. Computational approaches based on homology and secondary structure modeling ident...

  14. The role of antisense long noncoding RNA in small RNA-triggered gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xizhe; Li, Haitang; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to regulate neighboring protein-coding genes by directing chromatin remodeling complexes, imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. In this study, we explore the function of lncRNAs in small RNA-triggered transcriptional gene activation (TGA), a process in which microRNAs (miRNAs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with Argonaute (Ago) proteins induce chromatin remodeling and gene activation at promoters with sequence complementarity. We designed a model system with different lncRNA and chromatin environments to elucidate the molecular mechanisms required for mammalian TGA. Using RNA-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR, we demonstrated that small RNA-triggered TGA occurs at sites where antisense lncRNAs are transcribed through the reporter gene and promoter. Small RNA-induced TGA coincided with the enrichment of Ago2 at the promoter region, but Ago2-mediated cleavage of antisense lncRNAs was not observed. Moreover, we examined the allele-specific effects of lncRNAs through a Cre-induced inversion of a poly(A) sequence that was designed to block the transcription of antisense lncRNAs through the reporter gene region in an inducible and reversible manner. Termination of nascent antisense lncRNAs abrogated gene activation triggered by small RNAs, and only allele-specific cis-acting antisense lncRNAs, but not trans-acting lncRNAs, were capable of rescuing TGA. Hence, this model revealed that antisense lncRNAs can mediate TGA in cis and not in trans, serving as a molecular scaffold for a small RNA–Ago2 complex and chromatin remodeling. PMID:25344398

  15. Interaction of nucleolin with ribosomal RNA genes and its role in RNA polymerase I transcription

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Rong; Das, Sadhan; Ugrinova, Iva; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mongelard, Fabien; Wong, Jiemin; Bouvet, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Nucleolin is a multi-functional nucleolar protein that is required for ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA) transcription in vivo, but the mechanism by which nucleolin modulates RNA polymerase I (RNAPI) transcription is not well understood. Nucleolin depletion results in an increase in the heterochromatin mark H3K9me2 and a decrease in H4K12Ac and H3K4me3 euchromatin histone marks in rRNA genes. ChIP-seq experiments identified an enrichment of nucleolin in the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) coding and promoter region. Nucleolin is preferentially associated with unmethylated rRNA genes and its depletion leads to the accumulation of RNAPI at the beginning of the transcription unit and a decrease in UBF along the coding and promoter regions. Nucleolin is able to affect the binding of transcription termination factor-1 on the promoter-proximal terminator T0, thus inhibiting the recruitment of TIP5 and HDAC1 and the establishment of a repressive heterochromatin state. These results reveal the importance of nucleolin for the maintenance of the euchromatin state and transcription elongation of rDNA. PMID:22859736

  16. Serum stress responsive gene EhslncRNA of Entamoeba histolytica is a novel long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Arpita; Bhattacharya, Sudha; Bhattacharya, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Non coding RNAs are known to play important roles in regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels in metazoans. There is very little information available about non coding RNAs in protists such as Entamoeba histolytica. Antisense and micro RNAs have been reported in E. histolytica, however no long non coding RNAs has been reported yet. Here, we report our findings on an in vitro serum stress-inducible gene EhslncRNA, a member of B1 transmembrane kinase family of E. histolytica. EhslncRNA encodes a transcript of 2.6 kb and sequence analysis revealed that there is no ORF >150 bp within this transcript. The transcript was found to be polyadenylated and mainly associated with monosomes in the cytoplasm under serum starvation. In normal proliferating cells this RNA is mainly present in the nucleus. The promoter element was mapped between 437 to 346 nucleotides upstream of transcriptional start site and has both positive and negative regulatory elements. Deletion of the negative element converted the promoter to serum inducible type. Oxygen and heat stress also increased expression levels of EhslncRNA. These observations suggest that EhslncRNA may be a long non coding RNA and likely to help cells withstand stressful conditions in the host. PMID:27273618

  17. Serum stress responsive gene EhslncRNA of Entamoeba histolytica is a novel long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Saha, Arpita; Bhattacharya, Sudha; Bhattacharya, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Non coding RNAs are known to play important roles in regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels in metazoans. There is very little information available about non coding RNAs in protists such as Entamoeba histolytica. Antisense and micro RNAs have been reported in E. histolytica, however no long non coding RNAs has been reported yet. Here, we report our findings on an in vitro serum stress-inducible gene EhslncRNA, a member of B1 transmembrane kinase family of E. histolytica. EhslncRNA encodes a transcript of 2.6 kb and sequence analysis revealed that there is no ORF >150 bp within this transcript. The transcript was found to be polyadenylated and mainly associated with monosomes in the cytoplasm under serum starvation. In normal proliferating cells this RNA is mainly present in the nucleus. The promoter element was mapped between 437 to 346 nucleotides upstream of transcriptional start site and has both positive and negative regulatory elements. Deletion of the negative element converted the promoter to serum inducible type. Oxygen and heat stress also increased expression levels of EhslncRNA. These observations suggest that EhslncRNA may be a long non coding RNA and likely to help cells withstand stressful conditions in the host. PMID:27273618

  18. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-05-20

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3' UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  19. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3’ untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3’ UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  20. Riboswitch-Mediated Gene Regulation: Novel RNA Architectures Dictate Gene Expression Responses.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Anna V; Henkin, Tina M

    2016-09-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that act on the mRNA with which they are cotranscribed to modulate expression of that mRNA. These elements are widely found in bacteria, where they have a broad impact on gene expression. The defining feature of riboswitches is that they directly recognize a physiological signal, and the resulting shift in RNA structure affects gene regulation. The majority of riboswitches respond to cellular metabolites, often in a feedback loop to repress synthesis of the enzymes used to produce the metabolite. Related elements respond to the aminoacylation status of a specific tRNA or to a physical parameter, such as temperature or pH. Recent studies have identified new classes of riboswitches and have revealed new insights into the molecular mechanisms of signal recognition and gene regulation. Application of structural and biophysical approaches has complemented previous genetic and biochemical studies, yielding new information about how different riboswitches operate. PMID:27607554

  1. The use of artificial microRNA technology to control gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Eamens, Andrew L; McHale, Marcus; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an effective trigger of RNA silencing, and several classes of endogenous small RNA (sRNA), processed from dsRNA substrates by DICER-like (DCL) endonucleases, are essential in controlling gene expression. One such sRNA class, the microRNAs (miRNAs) control the expression of closely related genes to regulate all aspects of plant development, including the determination of leaf shape, leaf polarity, flowering time, and floral identity. A single miRNA sRNA silencing signal is processed from a long precursor transcript of nonprotein-coding RNA, termed the primary miRNA (pri-miRNA). A region of the pri-miRNA is partially self-complementary allowing the transcript to fold back onto itself to form a stem-loop structure of imperfectly dsRNA. Artificial miRNA (amiRNA) technology uses endogenous pri-miRNAs, in which the miRNA and miRNA* (passenger strand of the miRNA duplex) sequences have been replaced with corresponding amiRNA/amiRNA* sequences that direct highly efficient RNA silencing of the targeted gene. Here, we describe the rules for amiRNA design, as well as outline the PCR and bacterial cloning procedures involved in the construction of an amiRNA plant expression vector to control target gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24057368

  2. Roles of Prolyl Isomerases in RNA-Mediated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases) that include immunophilins (cyclophilins and FKBPs) and parvulins (Pin1, Par14, Par17) participate in cell signaling, transcription, pre-mRNA processing and mRNA decay. The human genome encodes 19 cyclophilins, 18 FKBPs and three parvulins. Immunophilins are receptors for the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A, FK506, and rapamycin that are used in organ transplantation. Pin1 has also been targeted in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, asthma, and a number of cancers. While these PPIases are characterized as molecular chaperones, they also act in a nonchaperone manner to promote protein-protein interactions using surfaces outside their active sites. The immunosuppressive drugs act by a gain-of-function mechanism by promoting protein-protein interactions in vivo. Several immunophilins have been identified as components of the spliceosome and are essential for alternative splicing. Pin1 plays roles in transcription and RNA processing by catalyzing conformational changes in the RNA Pol II C-terminal domain. Pin1 also binds several RNA binding proteins such as AUF1, KSRP, HuR, and SLBP that regulate mRNA decay by remodeling mRNP complexes. The functions of ribonucleoprotein associated PPIases are largely unknown. This review highlights PPIases that play roles in RNA-mediated gene expression, providing insight into their structures, functions and mechanisms of action in mRNP remodeling in vivo. PMID:25992900

  3. Development of a Universal RNA Beacon for Exogenous Gene Detection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanjian; Lu, Zhongju; Cohen, Ira Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy requires a nontoxic and high-throughput method to achieve a pure cell population to prevent teratomas that can occur if even one cell in the implant has not been transformed. A promising method to detect and separate cells expressing a particular gene is RNA beacon technology. However, developing a successful, specific beacon to a particular transfected gene can take months to develop and in some cases is impossible. Here, we report on an off-the-shelf universal beacon that decreases the time and cost of applying beacon technology to select any living cell population transfected with an exogenous gene. PMID:25769653

  4. Transcription of Inflammatory Genes: Long Noncoding RNA and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system must coordinate elaborate signaling pathways to turn on expression of hundreds of genes to provide protection against pathogens and resolve acute inflammation. Multiple genes within distinct functional categories are coordinately and temporally regulated by transcriptional on and off switches in response to distinct external stimuli. Three classes of transcription factors act together with transcriptional coregulators and chromatin-modifying complexes to control these programs. In addition, newer studies implicate long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) as additional regulators of these responses. LncRNAs promote, fine-tune, and restrain the inflammatory program. In this study, we provide an overview of gene regulation and the emerging importance of lncRNAs in the immune system. PMID:25250698

  5. dsRNA interference on expression of a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhong-Hua; Gao, Kun; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Wu, Ping; Qin, Guang-Xing; Geng, Tao; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) is one of the major viral pathogens in silkworm. Its infection often results in significant losses to sericulture. Studies have demonstrated that RNAi is one of the important anti-viral mechanisms in organisms. In this study, three dsRNAs targeting the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) gene of BmCPV were designed and synthesized with 2'-F modification to explore their interference effects on BmCPV replication in silkworm larvae. The results showed that injecting dsRNA in the dosage of 4-6 ng per mg body weight into the 5th instar larvae can interfere with the BmCPV-RDRP expression by 93% after virus infection and by 99.9% before virus infection. In addition, the expression of two viral structural protein genes (genome RNA segments 1 and 5) was also decreased with the decrease of RDRP expression, suggesting that RNAi interference of BmCPV-RDRP expression could affect viral replication. The study provides an effective method for investigating virus replication as well as the virus-host interactions in the silkworm larvae using dsRNA. PMID:25839934

  6. microRNA and gene networks in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minghui; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Kunhao; Wang, Ning; Li, Yang

    2013-10-01

    To date, scientists have obtained a substantial amount of knowledge with regard to genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in pancreatic cancer (PC). However, deciphering the regulatory mechanism of these genes and miRNAs remains difficult. In the present study, three regulatory networks consisting of a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network, were constructed in order to identify the mechanisms and certain key miRNA and gene pathways in PC. The interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes and an miRNA and its host gene were investigated. The present study compared and analyzed the similarities and differences between the three networks in order to distinguish the key pathways. Certain pathways involving the differentially-expressed genes and miRNAs demonstrated specific features. TP53 and hsa-miR-125b were observed to form a self-adaptation association. A further 16 significant differentially-expressed miRNAs were obtained and it was observed that an miRNA and its host gene exhibit specific features in PC, for example, hsa-miR-196a-1 and its host gene, HOXB7, form a self-adaptation association. The differentially-expressed network partially illuminated the mechanism of PC. The present study provides comprehensive data that is associated with PC and may aid future studies in obtaining pertinent data results with regards to PC. In the future, an improved understanding of PC may be obtained through an increased knowledge of the occurrence, mechanism, improvement, metastasis and treatment of the disease. PMID:24137477

  7. Regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana 5S rRNA Genes.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Isabelle; Tutois, Sylvie; Cuvillier, Claudine; Schubert, Ingo; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2007-05-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome comprises around 1,000 copies of 5S rRNA genes encoding both major and minor 5S rRNAs. In mature wild-type leaves, the minor 5S rRNA genes are silent. Using different mutants of DNA methyltransferases (met1, cmt3 and met1 cmt3), components of the RNAi pathway (ago4) or post-translational histone modifier (hda6/sil1), we show that the corresponding proteins are needed to maintain proper methylation patterns at heterochromatic 5S rDNA repeats. Using reverse transcription-PCR and cytological analyses, we report that a decrease of 5S rDNA methylation at CG or CNG sites in these mutants leads to the release of 5S rRNA gene silencing which occurred without detectable changes of the 5S rDNA chromatin structure. In spite of severely reduced DNA methylation, the met1 cmt3 double mutant revealed no increase in minor 5S rRNA transcripts. Furthermore, the release of silencing of minor 5S rDNAs can be achieved without increased formation of euchromatic loops by 5S rDNA, and is independent from the global heterochromatin content. Additionally, fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric 180 bp repeats confirmed that these highly repetitive sequences, in spite of their elevated transcriptional activity in the DNA methyltransferase mutants (met1, cmt3 and met1 cmt3), remain within chromocenters of the mutant nuclei. PMID:17412735

  8. Reproducible, Scalable Fusion Gene Detection from RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Arsenijevic, Vladan; Davis-Dusenbery, Brandi N

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements resulting in the creation of novel gene products, termed fusion genes, have been identified as driving events in the development of multiple types of cancer. As these gene products typically do not exist in normal cells, they represent valuable prognostic and therapeutic targets. Advances in next-generation sequencing and computational approaches have greatly improved our ability to detect and identify fusion genes. Nevertheless, these approaches require significant computational resources. Here we describe an approach which leverages cloud computing technologies to perform fusion gene detection from RNA sequencing data at any scale. We additionally highlight methods to enhance reproducibility of bioinformatics analyses which may be applied to any next-generation sequencing experiment. PMID:26667464

  9. GeneTack database: genes with frameshifts in prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Antonov, Ivan; Baranov, Pavel; Borodovsky, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Database annotations of prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences pay relatively low attention to frame transitions that disrupt protein-coding genes. Frame transitions (frameshifts) could be caused by sequencing errors or indel mutations inside protein-coding regions. Other observed frameshifts are related to recoding events (that evolved to control expression of some genes). Earlier, we have developed an algorithm and software program GeneTack for ab initio frameshift finding in intronless genes. Here, we describe a database (freely available at http://topaz.gatech.edu/GeneTack/db.html) containing genes with frameshifts (fs-genes) predicted by GeneTack. The database includes 206 991 fs-genes from 1106 complete prokaryotic genomes and 45 295 frameshifts predicted in mRNA sequences from 100 eukaryotic genomes. The whole set of fs-genes was grouped into clusters based on sequence similarity between fs-proteins (conceptually translated fs-genes), conservation of the frameshift position and frameshift direction (-1, +1). The fs-genes can be retrieved by similarity search to a given query sequence via a web interface, by fs-gene cluster browsing, etc. Clusters of fs-genes are characterized with respect to their likely origin, such as pseudogenization, phase variation, etc. The largest clusters contain fs-genes with programed frameshifts (related to recoding events). PMID:23161689

  10. Compilation of 5S rRNA and 5S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Thomas; Wolters, Jörn; Erdmann, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    The BERLIN RNA DATABANK as of Dezember 31, 1989, contains a total of 667 sequences of 5S rRNAs or their genes, which is an increase of 114 new sequence entries over the last compilation (1). It covers sequences from 44 archaebacteria, 267 eubacteria, 20 plastids, 6 mitochondria, 319 eukaryotes and 11 eukaryotic pseudogenes. The hardcopy shows only the list (Table 1) of those organisms whose sequences have been determined. The BERLIN RNA DATABANK uses the format of the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Data Library complemented by a Sequence Alignment (SA) field including secondary structure information. PMID:1692116

  11. RNA editing by G-nucleotide insertion in mumps virus P-gene mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Lamb, R A

    1990-01-01

    A guanine nucleotide insertion event has been shown to occur at a specific site within mumps virus P-gene mRNA transcripts. The region of the mRNA containing the site expected to be used for RNA editing and the complementary portion of the genomic RNA were cloned, and their nucleotide sequences were obtained. The genomic RNA was found to possess six C residues at the insertion site, whereas 63% of the P-gene-specific mRNA transcripts were found to have from two to five G residues inserted at this position in the RNA. An unedited mRNA was shown to encode the mumps virus cysteine-rich protein V, and mRNA transcripts containing two and four inserted G residues were translated to yield the mumps virus P and I proteins, respectively. Images PMID:2166809

  12. RNA recognition by Roquin in posttranscriptional gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Schlundt, Andreas; Niessing, Dierk; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Sattler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression plays a central role in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses. This is exemplified by the protein Roquin, which has attracted great interest during the past decade owing to its ability to prevent autoimmunity. Roquin controls T-cell activation and T helper cell differentiation by limiting the induced expression of costimulatory receptors on the surface of T cells. It does so by recognizing cis regulatory RNA-hairpin elements in the 3' UTR of target transcripts via its ROQ domain-a novel RNA-binding fold-and triggering their degradation through recruitment of factors that mediate deadenylation and decapping. Recent structural studies have revealed molecular details of the recognition of RNA hairpin structures by the ROQ domain. Surprisingly, it was found that Roquin mainly relies on shape-specific recognition of the RNA. This observation implies that a much broader range of RNA motifs could interact with the protein, but it also complicates systematic searches for novel mRNA targets of Roquin. Thus, large-scale approaches, such as crosslinking and immunoprecipitation or systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment experiments coupled with next-generation sequencing, will be required to identify the complete spectrum of its target RNAs. Together with structural analyses of their binding modes, this will enable us to unravel the intricate complexity of 3' UTR regulation by Roquin and other trans-acting factors. Here, we review our current understanding of Roquin-RNA interactions and their role for Roquin function. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:455-469. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1333 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26844532

  13. Dinucleotide controlled null models for comparative RNA gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Tanja; Washietl, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparative prediction of RNA structures can be used to identify functional noncoding RNAs in genomic screens. It was shown recently by Babak et al. [BMC Bioinformatics. 8:33] that RNA gene prediction programs can be biased by the genomic dinucleotide content, in particular those programs using a thermodynamic folding model including stacking energies. As a consequence, there is need for dinucleotide-preserving control strategies to assess the significance of such predictions. While there have been randomization algorithms for single sequences for many years, the problem has remained challenging for multiple alignments and there is currently no algorithm available. Results We present a program called SISSIz that simulates multiple alignments of a given average dinucleotide content. Meeting additional requirements of an accurate null model, the randomized alignments are on average of the same sequence diversity and preserve local conservation and gap patterns. We make use of a phylogenetic substitution model that includes overlapping dependencies and site-specific rates. Using fast heuristics and a distance based approach, a tree is estimated under this model which is used to guide the simulations. The new algorithm is tested on vertebrate genomic alignments and the effect on RNA structure predictions is studied. In addition, we directly combined the new null model with the RNAalifold consensus folding algorithm giving a new variant of a thermodynamic structure based RNA gene finding program that is not biased by the dinucleotide content. Conclusion SISSIz implements an efficient algorithm to randomize multiple alignments preserving dinucleotide content. It can be used to get more accurate estimates of false positive rates of existing programs, to produce negative controls for the training of machine learning based programs, or as standalone RNA gene finding program. Other applications in comparative genomics that require randomization of multiple

  14. Silk gland-specific tRNA(Ala) genes interact more weakly than constitutive tRNA(Ala) genes with silkworm TFIIIB and polymerase III fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, H S; Young, L S; White, C N; Sprague, K U

    1994-01-01

    Constitutive and silk gland-specific tRNA(Ala) genes from silkworms have very different transcriptional properties in vitro. Typically, the constitutive type, which encodes tRNA(AlaC), directs transcription much more efficiently than does the silk gland-specific type, which encodes tRNA(AlaSG). We think that the inefficiency of the tRNA(AlaCG) gene underlies its capacity to be turned off in non-silk gland cells. An economical model is that the tRNA(AlaSG) promoter interacts poorly, relative to the tRNA(AlaC) promoter, with one or more components of the basal transcription machinery. As a consequence, the tRNA(AlaSG) gene directs the formation of fewer transcription complexes or of complexes with reduced cycling ability. Here we show that the difference in the number of active transcription complexes accounts for the difference in tRNA(AlaC) and tRNA(AlaSG) transcription rates. To determine whether a particular component of the silkworm transcription machinery is responsible for reduced complex formation on the tRNA(AlaSG) gene, we measured competition by templates for defined fractions of this machinery. We find that the tRNA(AlaSG) gene is greatly impaired, in comparison with the tRNA(AlaC) gene, in competition for either TFIIIB or RNA polymerase III. Competition for each of these fractions is also strongly influenced by the nature of the 5' flanking sequence, the promoter element responsible for the distinctive transcriptional properties of tRNA(AlaSG) and tRNA(AlaC) genes. These results suggest that differential interaction with TFIIIB or RNA polymerase III is a critical functional distinction between these genes. Images PMID:8114713

  15. Knockdown of Midgut Genes by dsRNA-Transgenic Plant-Mediated RNA Interference in the Hemipteran Insect Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Wenjun; Peng, Xinxin; Chen, Rongzhi; Du, Bo; Zhu, Lili; He, Guangcun

    2011-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful technique for functional genomics research in insects. Transgenic plants producing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directed against insect genes have been reported for lepidopteran and coleopteran insects, showing potential for field-level control of insect pests, but this has not been reported for other insect orders. Methodology/Principal Findings The Hemipteran insect brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens Stål) is a typical phloem sap feeder specific to rice (Oryza sativa L.). To analyze the potential of exploiting RNAi-mediated effects in this insect, we identified genes (Nlsid-1 and Nlaub) encoding proteins that might be involved in the RNAi pathway in N. lugens. Both genes are expressed ubiquitously in nymphs and adult insects. Three genes (the hexose transporter gene NlHT1, the carboxypeptidase gene Nlcar and the trypsin-like serine protease gene Nltry) that are highly expressed in the N. lugens midgut were isolated and used to develop dsRNA constructs for transforming rice. RNA blot analysis showed that the dsRNAs were transcribed and some of them were processed to siRNAs in the transgenic lines. When nymphs were fed on rice plants expressing dsRNA, levels of transcripts of the targeted genes in the midgut were reduced; however, lethal phenotypic effects after dsRNA feeding were not observed. Conclusions Our study shows that genes for the RNAi pathway (Nlsid-1 and Nlaub) are present in N. lugens. When insects were fed on rice plant materials expressing dsRNAs, RNA interference was triggered and the target genes transcript levels were suppressed. The gene knockdown technique described here may prove to be a valuable tool for further investigations in N. lugens. The results demonstrate the potential of dsRNA-mediated RNAi for field-level control of planthoppers, but appropriate target genes must be selected when designing the dsRNA-transgenic plants. PMID:21655219

  16. Structural alterations of the ribosomal RNA genes in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I A

    1992-01-01

    Cloned 6.7 kb EcoR1 fragment of mice rDNA was used as a hybridization probe for rDNA structure analysis in mice, rat and calf haemopoietic tumor and normal cells. EcoR1, BglII and Pst1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was found in neoplastic rDNA and was not revealed in normal ones. The rRNA gene rearrangements were observed not only in spacer region but in coding sequences of the genes. Leukemic cells reveal also rDNA amplification. A role of genetic rearrangements of rDNA for mechanisms of carcinogenesis is suggested. PMID:1342066

  17. RNA-Seq Analysis with NextGENe Software

    PubMed Central

    You, Y.; Liu, C.; McGuigan, J.

    2011-01-01

    RNA sequencing is a powerful tool for interrogating the entire transcriptome at once. It allows identification of novel isoforms including gene fusions and alternative splicing- and expression level analysis across several orders of magnitude. NextGENe's new RNA-seq application can be used to analyze data from any of the three main 2nd generation sequencing systems including Roche GS FLX™ and FLX Titanium, Illumina Genome Analyzers, and Applied Biosystems SOLiD™ Systems. Variant detection, expression level analysis, and isoform identification are all performed in one analysis. The tool employs a hybrid approach, combining the use of an exon junction reference sequence with the de novo detection of exons. This allows discovery of previously un-annotated genes in addition to highly accurate alignment to known transcripts. All detected transcripts are reported in addition to the information provided by NextGENe's variant and expression reports. Results are shown in the NextGENe Viewer which provides a high level of visualization for review and editing.

  18. Cloning of the RNA8 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, detection of the RNA8 protein, and demonstration that it is essential for nuclear pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S P; Lossky, M; Beggs, J D

    1988-01-01

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that bear the temperature-sensitive mutation rna8-1 are defective in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing at the restrictive temperature (36 degrees C), suggesting that the RNA8 gene encodes a component of the splicing machinery. The RNA8 gene was cloned by complementation of the temperature-sensitive growth defect of an rna8-1 mutant strain. Integrative transformation and gene disruption experiments confirmed the identity of the cloned DNA and demonstrated that the RNA8 gene encodes an essential function. The RNA8 gene was shown to be represented once per S. cerevisiae haploid genome and to encode a low-abundance transcript of approximately 7.4 kilobases. By using antisera raised against beta-galactosidase-RNA8 fusion proteins, the RNA8 gene product was identified in S. cerevisiae cell extracts as a low-abundance protein of approximately 260 kilodaltons. Immunodepletion of the RNA8 protein specifically abolished the activity of S. cerevisiae in vitro splicing extracts, confirming that RNA8 plays an essential role in splicing. Images PMID:2835658

  19. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides WCFur3 partial 16S rRNA gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used a partial 535 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence to identify a bacterial isolate. Fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of this bacterium. The isolate was obtained from a compost bin in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The 16S rRNA gene sequen...

  20. PLMItRNA, a database for mitochondrial tRNA genes and tRNAs in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Fabrizio; Gallerani, Raffaele; Liuni, Sabino; Licciulli, Flavio; Ceci, Luigi R.

    2001-01-01

    The PLMItRNA database for mitochondrial tRNA molecules and genes in Viridiplantae (green plants) [Volpetti,V., Gallerani,R., DeBenedetto,C., Liuni,S., Licciulli,F. and Ceci,L.R. (2000) Nucleic Acids Res., 28, 159–162] has been enlarged to include algae. The database now contains 436 genes and 16 tRNA entries relative to 25 higher plants, eight green algae, four red algae (Rhodophytae) and two Stramenopiles. The PLMItRNA database is accessible via the WWW at http://bio-www.ba.cnr.it:8000/PLMItRNA. PMID:11125079

  1. DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide for highly efficient gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Kazutaka; Piao, Wenying; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Sujino, Yumiko; Nishina, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Keiko; Yoshioka, Kotaro; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Baba, Takeshi; Ono, Fumiko; Miyata, Kanjiro; Miyake, Koichi; Seth, Punit P; Low, Audrey; Yoshida, Masayuki; Bennett, C Frank; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Obika, Satoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are recognized therapeutic agents for the modulation of specific genes at the post-transcriptional level. Similar to any medical drugs, there are opportunities to improve their efficacy and safety. Here we develop a short DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide (HDO) with a structure different from double-stranded RNA used for short interfering RNA and single-stranded DNA used for ASO. A DNA/locked nucleotide acid gapmer duplex with an α-tocopherol-conjugated complementary RNA (Toc-HDO) is significantly more potent at reducing the expression of the targeted mRNA in liver compared with the parent single-stranded gapmer ASO. Toc-HDO also improves the phenotype in disease models more effectively. In addition, the high potency of Toc-HDO results in a reduction of liver dysfunction observed in the parent ASO at a similar silencing effect. HDO technology offers a novel concept of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and the development of this molecular design opens a new therapeutic field. PMID:26258894

  2. mRNA Composition and Control of Bacterial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liang, S.-T.; Xu, Y.-C.; Dennis, P.; Bremer, H.

    2000-01-01

    The expression of any given bacterial protein is predicted to depend on (i) the transcriptional regulation of the promoter and the translational regulation of its mRNA and (ii) the synthesis and translation of total (bulk) mRNA. This is because total mRNA acts as a competitor to the specific mRNA for the binding of initiation-ready free ribosomes. To characterize the effects of mRNA competition on gene expression, the specific activity of β-galactosidase expressed from three different promoter-lacZ fusions (Pspc-lacZ, PRNAI-lacZ, and PRNAII-lacZ) was measured (i) in a relA+ background during exponential growth at different rates and (ii) in relA+ and ΔrelA derivatives of Escherichia coli B/r after induction of a mild stringent or a relaxed response to raise or lower, respectively, the level of ppGpp. Expression from all three promoters was stimulated during slow exponential growth or at elevated levels of ppGpp and was reduced during fast exponential growth or at lower levels of ppGpp. From these observations and from other considerations, we propose (i) that the concentration of free, initiation-ready ribosomes is approximately constant and independent of the growth rate and (ii) that bulk mRNA made during slow growth and at elevated levels of ppGpp is less efficiently translated than bulk mRNA made during fast growth and at reduced levels of ppGpp. These features lead to an indirect enhancement in the expression of LacZ (or of any other protein) during growth in media of poor nutritional quality and at increased levels of ppGpp. PMID:10809680

  3. Integrated microRNA-gene analysis of coronary artery disease based on miRNA and gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    XU, XIANGDONG; LI, HONGSONG

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the key genes and microRNAs (miRNA/miRs) associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) progression. The gene expression profile of GSE20680 and GSE12288, and the miRNA expression profile of GSE28858 were downloaded from the gene expression omnibus database. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in GSE20680 and GSE12288, and the differentially expressed miRNAs in GSE28858 were screened using the limma package in R software. Common DEGs between GSE20680 and GSE12288 were selected. Functions and pathways of DEGs and miRNAs were enriched using the DAVID tool from the GO and KEGG databases. The regulatory network of miRNA and selected CAD-associated DEGs was constructed. A total of 270 DEGs (167 upregulated and 103 downregulated) based on the GSE20680 dataset, and 2,268 DEGs (534 upregulated and 1,734 downregulated) based on the GSE12288 dataset, were screened. For the differentially expressed miRNAs, 214 were identified (102 upregulated and 112 downregulated) in CAD samples and were screened. Interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) and cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector b (CIDEB), which are regulated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and myc-associated factor X, were identified as common DEGs for CAD. miR-455-5p, miR-455-3p and miR-1257, which are involved in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)protein assembly pathway and peptide antigen assembly with MHC class I protein complex pathway, may regulate various miRNAs and target genes, including pro-opiomelancortin (POMC), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), interleukin 10 (IL10), activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and calreticulin (CALR). The current study identified IRF2 and CIDEB as crucial genes, and miRNA-455-5p, miRNA-455-3p and miR-1257 along with their target genes POMC, TLR4 and CALR, as miRNAs involved in CAD progression. Thus, the present study may provide a basis for future research into the progression mechanism of CAD. PMID:26936111

  4. Sequence analysis of a cluster of twenty-one tRNA genes in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Green, C J; Vold, B S

    1983-01-01

    The DNA sequence of a cluster of twenty-one tRNA genes distal to a rRNA gene set in B. subtilis was determined. None of the tRNA genes are repeated in the sequence. The only classes of tRNAs that are not represented are those for cysteine, glutamine, tryptophan, and tyrosine. Three of the tRNA genes in this cluster do not have the 3'-CCA sequence encoded in the gene. There is no RNA polymerase terminator sequence in the region between the 5S gene and the first tRNA gene or within the tRNA gene cluster. A terminator sequence was found directly after the last tRNA gene. This rRNA and tRNA gene cluster probably represents one transcriptional unit. However, there may be an RNA polymerase promoter site within this sequence, which raises some interesting questions concerning the regulation of transcription for these tRNA genes. PMID:6310512

  5. Evidence for Related Functions of the RNA Genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Last, Robert L.; Maddock, Janine R.; Woolford, John L.

    1987-01-01

    The yeast genes RNA2-RNA11 are necessary for splicing of nuclear intron-containing pre-mRNAs. We investigated the relationships among these genes by asking whether increased expression of one RNA gene leads to suppression of the temperature-sensitive lethality of a mutation in any other RNA gene. The presence of extra plasmid-borne copies of the RNA3 gene relieves the lethality of temperature-sensitive rna4 mutations. A region of the yeast genome (SRN2) is described that suppresses temperature-sensitive rna2 mutations when it is present on either medium or high-copy number plasmids. Neither suppression occurs via a bypass of RNA gene function since null alleles of rna2 and rna4 are not suppressed by elevated dosage of SRN2 and RNA3, respectively. These results suggest that the SRN2 and RNA2 gene products have related functions, as do the RNA3 and RNA4 gene products. PMID:3322934

  6. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  7. The fitness landscape of a tRNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Qian, Wenfeng; Maclean, Calum J.; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Fitness landscapes describe the genotype-fitness relationship and represent major determinants of evolutionary trajectories. However, the vast genotype space, coupled with the difficulty of measuring fitness, has hindered the empirical determination of fitness landscapes. Combining precise gene replacement and next-generation sequencing, we quantify Darwinian fitness under a high-temperature challenge for over 65,000 yeast strains each carrying a unique variant of the single-copy tRNACCUArg gene at its native genomic location. Approximately 1% of single point mutations in the gene are beneficial, while 42% are deleterious. Almost half of all mutation pairs exhibit significant epistasis, which has a strong negative bias except when the mutations occur at Watson-Crick paired sites. Fitness is broadly correlated with the predicted fraction of correctly folded tRNA molecules, revealing a biophysical basis of the fitness landscape. PMID:27080104

  8. Accurate transcription of homologous 5S rRNA and tRNA genes and splicing of tRNA in vitro by soluble extracts of Neurospora.

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, B M; Giles, N H

    1984-01-01

    We have developed soluble extracts from Neurospora crassa capable of accurately and efficiently transcribing homologous 5S rRNA and tRNA genes. The extracts also appear to quantitatively end-process and splice the primary tRNA transcripts. Although the extracts could not transcribe a heterologous (yeast) 5S rRNA gene, they did transcribe a yeast tRNALeu gene and slowly process the transcripts. In addition, we have developed a novel strategy for rapidly sequencing uniformly labelled RNAs using base-specific ribonucleases. We have used this procedure to verify the identity of the in vitro transcripts and processing products. Images PMID:6235482

  9. A single Argonaute gene is required for induction of RNA silencing antiviral defense and promotes viral RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qihong; Choi, Gil H; Nuss, Donald L

    2009-10-20

    Dicer gene dcl2, required for the RNA silencing antiviral defense response in the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica, is inducible upon mycovirus infection and promotes viral RNA recombination. We now report that the antiviral defense response requires only one of the four C. parasitica Argonaute-like protein genes, agl2. The agl2 gene is required for the virus-induced increase in dcl2 transcript accumulation. Agl2 and dcl2 transcripts accumulated to much higher levels in response to hairpin RNA production or infection by a mutant CHV1-EP713 hypovirus lacking the suppressor of RNA silencing p29 than to wild-type CHV1-EP713. Similar results were obtained for an agl2-promoter/EGFP-reporter construct, indicating that p29-mediated repression of agl2 transcript accumulation is promoter-dependent. Significantly, the agl2 deletion mutant exhibited stable maintenance of non-viral sequences in recombinant hypovirus RNA virus vectors and the absence of hypovirus-defective interfering (DI) RNA production. These results establish a key role for an Argonaute gene in the induction of an RNA silencing antiviral defense response and the promotion of viral RNA recombination. They also provide evidence for a mechanism by which a virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressor represses the transcriptional induction of an RNA silencing component. PMID:19822766

  10. An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene in bat genomes derived from an ancient negative-strand RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Fujino, Kan; Akasaka, Takumi; Kohl, Claudia; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Kurth, Andreas; Müller, Marcel A.; Corman, Victor M.; Gillich, Nadine; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Schwemmle, Martin; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous bornavirus-like L (EBLL) elements are inheritable sequences derived from ancient bornavirus L genes that encode a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) in many eukaryotic genomes. Here, we demonstrate that bats of the genus Eptesicus have preserved for more than 11.8 million years an EBLL element named eEBLL-1, which has an intact open reading frame of 1,718 codons. The eEBLL-1 coding sequence revealed that functional motifs essential for mononegaviral RdRp activity are well conserved in the EBLL-1 genes. Genetic analyses showed that natural selection operated on eEBLL-1 during the evolution of Eptesicus. Notably, we detected efficient transcription of eEBLL-1 in tissues from Eptesicus bats. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report showing that the eukaryotic genome has gained a riboviral polymerase gene from an ancient virus that has the potential to encode a functional RdRp. PMID:27174689

  11. An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene in bat genomes derived from an ancient negative-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Fujino, Kan; Akasaka, Takumi; Kohl, Claudia; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Kurth, Andreas; Müller, Marcel A; Corman, Victor M; Gillich, Nadine; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Schwemmle, Martin; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous bornavirus-like L (EBLL) elements are inheritable sequences derived from ancient bornavirus L genes that encode a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) in many eukaryotic genomes. Here, we demonstrate that bats of the genus Eptesicus have preserved for more than 11.8 million years an EBLL element named eEBLL-1, which has an intact open reading frame of 1,718 codons. The eEBLL-1 coding sequence revealed that functional motifs essential for mononegaviral RdRp activity are well conserved in the EBLL-1 genes. Genetic analyses showed that natural selection operated on eEBLL-1 during the evolution of Eptesicus. Notably, we detected efficient transcription of eEBLL-1 in tissues from Eptesicus bats. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report showing that the eukaryotic genome has gained a riboviral polymerase gene from an ancient virus that has the potential to encode a functional RdRp. PMID:27174689

  12. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Alternative RNA structures (ARSs), or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s) into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions. PMID:25551597

  13. Organization of the noncontiguous promoter components of adenovirus VAI RNA gene is strikingly similar to that of eucaryotic tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, R A; Metz, B; Thimmappaya, B

    1983-01-01

    The intragenic transcriptional control region (internal promoter) of the adenovirus type 2 VAI RNA gene was mutated by deletion, insertion, and substitution of DNA sequences at the plasmid level. The mutant plasmids were assayed for in vitro transcriptional activity by using HeLa cell extracts. The mutant clones with substitution or insertion of DNA sequences or both between nucleotides +18 and +53 of the VAI RNA gene were all transcriptionally active, although to various extents. Substitution of unrelated DNA sequences up to +26 or between +54 and +61 abolished the transcriptional activity completely. Based on these results, the intragenic promoter sequences of the VAI RNA gene can be subdivided into two components: element A, +10 to +18; and element B, +54 to +69. The distance between the A and B components could be enlarged from its normal 35 base pairs to 75 base pairs without destroying the transcriptional activity. However, a deletion of 4 or 6 base pairs in the DNA segment separating the A and B components (segment C) reduced the transcriptional activity of the genes to less than 2% of that of the wild type. When the VAI RNA gene with its element A or B was substituted for the corresponding element A or B of the Xenopus laevis tRNAMet gene, the hybrid genes transcribed close to the level of the wild-type VAI RNA gene and about 10- to 20-fold more efficiently than the tRNAMet gene. Thus, the organization of DNA sequences in the internal promoter of the VAI RNA gene appears to be very similar to that of eucaryotic tRNA genes. This similarity suggests an evolutionary relationship of the VAI RNA gene to tRNA genes. Images PMID:6656762

  14. Dimeric tRNA gene arrangement in Schizosaccharomyces pombe allows increased expression of the downstream gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hottinger-Werlen, A; Schaack, J; Lapointe, J; Mao, J; Nichols, M; Söll, D

    1985-01-01

    Three Schizosaccharomyces pombe dimeric tRNA genes, consisting of a tRNASer gene encoding a minor species with an intervening sequence followed by a tRNAMeti gene, have been described [Mao et al. (1980) Cell 21, 509-516; Hottinger et al. (1982) Mol. Gen. Genet. 188, 219-224; Willis et al. (1984) EMBO J. 3, 1573-1580]. We have examined the reason for the dimeric structure by comparing the transcriptional efficiencies and competitive abilities of the genes subcloned from the dimeric arrangement. Both of the subcloned genes are active in vivo in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but only the tRNASer gene is efficiently transcribed in vitro. The tRNASer gene competes efficiently for transcription factors, while the tRNAMeti gene does so only weakly. Thus, it appears that the dimeric arrangement is required to support expression of the tRNAMeti gene. S. pombe genes encoding major species of tRNASer are transcribed considerably less efficiently than are the minor genes from the dimers, so coupling of the tRNAMeti gene to the minor species genes should lead to efficient production of tRNAMeti. Images PMID:3936021

  15. The rolB gene activates the expression of genes encoding microRNA processing machinery.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Victor P; Veremeichik, Galina N; Shkryl, Yuri N

    2015-04-01

    The rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes renders cells more tolerant of environmental stresses and increases their defense potential. However, these effects, coupled with the developmental abnormalities caused by rolB, have not yet been explained. In rolB-transformed Arabidopsis thaliana cells, we detected a 2.2 to 7-fold increase in the expression of genes encoding core and accessory proteins (DCL1, SE, HYL1, AGO1, TGH, DDL, HEN1, AGO4 and RDR2) of the microRNA processing machinery. However, the rolB gene did not affect the expression of DCL2, DCL3 and HST. The diverse and complex effects of rolB on transformed plant cells may be attributable to changes caused by this gene in particular RNA silencing pathways. PMID:25491479

  16. Intronic regions of plant genes potentially encode RDR (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase)-dependent small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jingping; Ma, Xiaoxia; Yi, Zili; Tang, Zhonghai; Meng, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has linked the non-coding intronic regions of plant genes to the production of small RNAs (sRNAs). Certain introns, called ‘mirtrons’ and ‘sirtrons’, could serve as the single-stranded RNA precursors for the generation of microRNA and small interfering RNA, respectively. However, whether the intronic regions could serve as the template for double-stranded RNA synthesis and then for sRNA biogenesis through an RDR (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase)-dependent pathway remains unclear. In this study, a genome-wide search was made for the RDR-dependent sRNA loci within the intronic regions of the Arabidopsis genes. Hundreds of intronic regions encoding three or more RDR-dependent sRNAs were found to be covered by dsRNA-seq (double-stranded RNA sequencing) reads, indicating that the intron-derived sRNAs were indeed generated from long double-stranded RNA precursors. More interestingly, phase-distributed sRNAs were discovered on some of the dsRNA-seq read-covered intronic regions, and those sRNAs were largely 24 nt in length. Based on these results, the opinion is put forward that the intronic regions might serve as the genomic origins for the RDR-dependent sRNAs. This opinion might add a novel layer to the current biogenesis model of the intron-derived sRNAs. PMID:25609829

  17. Horizontal gene transfer of a Chlamydial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase gene to eukaryotic microbes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sam; Harman, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    tRNA-guanine transglycosylases are found in all domains of life and mediate the base exchange of guanine with queuine in the anticodon loop of tRNAs. They can also regulate virulence in bacteria such as Shigella flexneri, which has prompted the development of drugs that inhibit the function of these enzymes. Here we report a group of tRNA-guanine transglycosylases in eukaryotic microbes (algae and protozoa) which are more similar to their bacterial counterparts than previously characterized eukaryotic tRNA-guanine transglycosylases. We provide evidence demonstrating that the genes encoding these enzymes were acquired by these eukaryotic lineages via horizontal gene transfer from the Chlamydiae group of bacteria. Given that the S. flexneri tRNA-guanine transglycosylase can be targeted by drugs, we propose that the bacterial-like tRNA-guanine transglycosylases could potentially be targeted in a similar fashion in pathogenic amoebae that possess these enzymes such as Acanthamoeba castellanii. This work also presents ancient prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer events as an untapped resource of potential drug target identification in pathogenic eukaryotes. PMID:26435002

  18. Ribosomal RNA genes of Trypanosoma brucei. Cloning of a rRNA gene containing a mobile element.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, G; Turner, M J; Cordingley, J S

    1982-01-01

    An ordered restriction map of the ribosomal RNA genes of Trypanosoma brucei brucei is presented. Bgl II fragments of T.b.brucei genomic DNA were cloned into pAT 153, and the clones containing rDNA identified. Restriction maps were established and the sense strands identified. One clone was shown by heteroduplex mapping to contain a 1.1 kb inserted sequence which was demonstrated to be widely distributed throughout the genomes of members of the subgenus Trypanozoon. However, in two other subgenera of Trypanosoma, Nannomonas and Schizotrypanum, the sequence is far less abundant. Analysis of the genomic DNA from two serodemes of T.b.brucei showed that the sequence was present in the rRNA of only one of them, implying that the sequence is a mobile element and that its appearance in rDNA is a comparitively recent occurrence. Images PMID:6294613

  19. Crucial microRNAs and genes of human primary breast cancer explored by microRNA-mRNA integrated analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Xing, Yiqiao; Liang, Chaoqun; Hu, Liya; Xu, Fei; Chen, Yuan

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to screen potential microRNAs (miRNAs) and genes related to human primary breast cancer. The gene and miRNA expression profile data of GSE19783 was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. The matched messenger RNA (mRNA) and miRNA expression profiles of 100 human primary breast cancer samples were chosen for further analysis. The miRNA-gene regulatory modules were screened via iterative multiplicative updating algorithm. The potential functions of genes in modules were predicted by functional and pathway enrichment analysis; meanwhile, the potential functions of miRNAs were predicted by functional enrichment analysis. Furthermore, miRNA-miRNA functional synergistic network and miRNA-miRNA co-regulatory network were constructed. Totally, 16 miRNA-gene modules were screened, containing 222 miRNA-gene interactions. The genes in these modules were mainly related to breast cancer. Genes in module 6 (e.g., SFRP1) were enriched in cell junction assembly; genes in module 8 and 12 (e.g., ESR1 and ERBB4) were significantly implicated in mammary gland alveolus and lobule development. Meanwhile, genes in module 12 (e.g., ERBB4) were enriched in the pathway of endocytosis. Besides, several miRNAs (e.g., miR-375) were enriched in inflammatory cell apoptotic process; some other miRNAs (e.g., miR-139-5p and miR-9) were enriched in response to vitamin D. Additionally, miR-139-5p with several other miRNAs (e.g., miR-9) co-regulated SFRP1; miR-375, miR-592, and miR-135a co-regulated ESR1 and ERBB4. Some miRNAs (e.g., miR-139-5p and miR-9) and their target gene SFRP1, as well as several other miRNAs (e.g., miR-375, miR-592, and miR-135a) and their target genes (e.g., ESR1 and ERBB4), might be crucial in the pathogenesis of primary breast cancer. PMID:25680412

  20. Genomic architecture and inheritance of human ribosomal RNA gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Stults, Dawn M.; Killen, Michael W.; Pierce, Heather H.; Pierce, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    The finishing of the Human Genome Project largely completed the detailing of human euchromatic sequences; however, the most highly repetitive regions of the genome still could not be assembled. The 12 gene clusters producing the structural RNA components of the ribosome are critically important for cellular viability, yet fall into this unassembled region of the Human Genome Project. To determine the extent of human variation in ribosomal RNA gene content (rDNA) and patterns of rDNA cluster inheritance, we have determined the physical lengths of the rDNA clusters in peripheral blood white cells of healthy human volunteers. The cluster lengths exhibit striking variability between and within human individuals, ranging from 50 kb to >6 Mb, manifest essentially complete heterozygosity, and provide each person with their own unique rDNA electrophoretic karyotype. Analysis of these rDNA fingerprints in multigenerational human families demonstrates that the rDNA clusters are subject to meiotic rearrangement at a frequency >10% per cluster, per meiosis. With this high intrinsic recombinational instability, the rDNA clusters may serve as a unique paradigm of potential human genomic plasticity. PMID:18025267

  1. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  2. Subnuclear partitioning of rRNA genes between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm reflects alternative epiallelic states

    PubMed Central

    Pontvianne, Frederic; Blevins, Todd; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Mozgová, Iva; Hassel, Christiane; Pontes, Olga M.F.; Tucker, Sarah; Mokroš, Petr; Muchová, Veronika; Fajkus, Jiří; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotes can have thousands of 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, many of which are silenced during development. Using fluorescence-activated sorting techniques, we show that active rRNA genes in Arabidopsis thaliana are present within sorted nucleoli, whereas silenced rRNA genes are excluded. DNA methyltransferase (met1), histone deacetylase (hda6), or chromatin assembly (caf1) mutants that disrupt silencing abrogate this nucleoplasmic–nucleolar partitioning. Bisulfite sequencing data indicate that active nucleolar rRNA genes are nearly completely demethylated at promoter CGs, whereas silenced genes are nearly fully methylated. Collectively, the data reveal that rRNA genes occupy distinct but changeable nuclear territories according to their epigenetic state. PMID:23873938

  3. Quantitative Detection of Double-Stranded RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing of Parasitism Genes in Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into an organism to induce sequence-specific RNA interference (RNAi) of a target transcript has become a powerful technique to investigate gene function in nematodes and many organisms. Data provided here indicate that the inclusion of 1-2 mM spermid...

  4. Identification of microRNA-regulated gene networks by expression analysis of target genes.

    PubMed

    Gennarino, Vincenzo Alessandro; D'Angelo, Giovanni; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Fernandez, Serena; Russolillo, Giorgio; Sanges, Remo; Mutarelli, Margherita; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Ballabio, Andrea; Verde, Pasquale; Sardiello, Marco; Banfi, Sandro

    2012-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors control eukaryotic cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism through their specific gene regulatory networks. However, differently from transcription factors, our understanding of the processes regulated by miRNAs is currently limited. Here, we introduce gene network analysis as a new means for gaining insight into miRNA biology. A systematic analysis of all human miRNAs based on Co-expression Meta-analysis of miRNA Targets (CoMeTa) assigns high-resolution biological functions to miRNAs and provides a comprehensive, genome-scale analysis of human miRNA regulatory networks. Moreover, gene cotargeting analyses show that miRNAs synergistically regulate cohorts of genes that participate in similar processes. We experimentally validate the CoMeTa procedure through focusing on three poorly characterized miRNAs, miR-519d/190/340, which CoMeTa predicts to be associated with the TGFβ pathway. Using lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells as a model system, we show that miR-519d and miR-190 inhibit, while miR-340 enhances TGFβ signaling and its effects on cell proliferation, morphology, and scattering. Based on these findings, we formalize and propose co-expression analysis as a general paradigm for second-generation procedures to recognize bona fide targets and infer biological roles and network communities of miRNAs. PMID:22345618

  5. Identification of microRNA-regulated gene networks by expression analysis of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Gennarino, Vincenzo Alessandro; D'Angelo, Giovanni; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Fernandez, Serena; Russolillo, Giorgio; Sanges, Remo; Mutarelli, Margherita; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Ballabio, Andrea; Verde, Pasquale; Sardiello, Marco; Banfi, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors control eukaryotic cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism through their specific gene regulatory networks. However, differently from transcription factors, our understanding of the processes regulated by miRNAs is currently limited. Here, we introduce gene network analysis as a new means for gaining insight into miRNA biology. A systematic analysis of all human miRNAs based on Co-expression Meta-analysis of miRNA Targets (CoMeTa) assigns high-resolution biological functions to miRNAs and provides a comprehensive, genome-scale analysis of human miRNA regulatory networks. Moreover, gene cotargeting analyses show that miRNAs synergistically regulate cohorts of genes that participate in similar processes. We experimentally validate the CoMeTa procedure through focusing on three poorly characterized miRNAs, miR-519d/190/340, which CoMeTa predicts to be associated with the TGFβ pathway. Using lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells as a model system, we show that miR-519d and miR-190 inhibit, while miR-340 enhances TGFβ signaling and its effects on cell proliferation, morphology, and scattering. Based on these findings, we formalize and propose co-expression analysis as a general paradigm for second-generation procedures to recognize bona fide targets and infer biological roles and network communities of miRNAs. PMID:22345618

  6. Specific interactions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins with a promoter region of eukaryotic tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Klemenz, R; Stillman, D J; Geiduschek, E P

    1982-01-01

    The specific binding of one or several Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins to a segment of genes that code for different yeast tRNAs has been demonstrated with the use of the DNase I-protection "footprint" assay of Galas and Schmitz. The analyzed binding occurs near the 3' ends of the genes and is centered on an 11-base-pair DNA sequence that has been well conserved among eukaryotic tRNA genes. Others have shown the involvement of this sequence in initiating the transcription of tRNA genes by RNA polymerase III. The adenovirus gene that codes for VAI RNA also contains this conserved sequence element, and we detect binding of yeast protein(s) to this gene. Competition experiments show that a common set of proteins binds to different tRNA genes. The DNA-protein complex is quite stable at 20 degrees C and low ionic strength. Images PMID:6755466

  7. Structural and functional analysis of chicken U4 small nuclear RNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, M L; Korf, G M; McNamara, K J; Stumph, W E

    1986-01-01

    Two distinct chicken U4 RNA genes have been cloned and characterized. They are closely linked within 465 base pairs of each other and have the same transcriptional orientation. The downstream U4 homology is a true gene, based on the criteria that it is colinear with chicken U4B RNA and is expressed when injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes. The upstream U4 homology, however, contains seven base substitutions relative to U4B RNA. This sequence may be a nonexpressed pseudogene, but the pattern of base substitutions suggests that it more probably encodes a variant yet functional U4 RNA product not yet characterized at the RNA level. In support of this, the two U4 genes have regions of homology with each other in their 5'-flanking DNA at two positions known to be essential for the efficient expression of vertebrate U1 and U2 small nuclear RNA genes. In the case of U1 and U2 RNA genes, the more distal region (located near position-200 with respect to the RNA cap site) is known to function as a transcriptional enhancer. Although this region is highly conserved in overall structure and sequence among U1 and U2 RNA genes, it is much less conserved in the chicken U4 RNA genes reported here. Interestingly, short sequence elements present in the -200 region of the U4 RNA genes are inverted (i.e., on the complementary strand) relative to their usual orientation upstream of U1 and U2 RNA genes. Thus, the -200 region of the U4 RNA genes may represent a natural evolutionary occurrence of an enhancer sequence inversion. Images PMID:3025618

  8. PLMItRNA, a database for tRNAs and tRNA genes in plant mitochondria: enlargement and updating

    PubMed Central

    Volpetti, Vito; Gallerani, Raffaele; De Benedetto, Caterina; Liuni, Sabino; Licciulli, Flavio; Ceci, Luigi R.

    2000-01-01

    The current version of PLMItRNA has been realized to constitute a database for tRNA molecules and genes identified in the mitochondria of all green plants (Viridiplantae). It is the enlargement of a previous database originally restricted to seed plants [Ceci,L.R., Volpicella,M., Liuni,S., Volpetti,V., Licciulli,F. and Gallerani,R. (1999) Nucleic Acids Res., 27, 156–157]. PLMItRNA reports information and multialignments on 254 genes and 16 tRNA molecules detected in 25 higher plants (one bryophyta and 24 vascular plants) and seven green algae. PLMItRNA is accessible via the WWW at http://bio-WWW.ba.cnr.it:8000/srs6/ PMID:10592210

  9. Altered Gene Expression Associated with microRNA Binding Site Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Võsa, Urmo; Esko, Tõnu; Kasela, Silva; Annilo, Tarmo

    2015-01-01

    Allele-specific gene expression associated with genetic variation in regulatory regions can play an important role in the development of complex traits. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in microRNA (miRNA) response elements (MRE-SNPs) that either disrupt a miRNA binding site or create a new miRNA binding site can affect the allele-specific expression of target genes. By integrating public expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data, miRNA binding site predictions, small RNA sequencing, and Argonaute crosslinking immunoprecipitation (AGO-CLIP) datasets, we identified genetic variants that can affect gene expression by modulating miRNA binding efficiency. We also identified MRE-SNPs located in regions associated with complex traits, indicating possible causative mechanisms associated with these loci. The results of this study expand the current understanding of gene expression regulation and help to interpret the mechanisms underlying eQTL effects. PMID:26496489

  10. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Davanloo, P.; Rosenberg, A.H.; Moffatt, B.A.; Dunn, J.J.

    1999-02-09

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells. 10 figs.

  11. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Davanloo, Parichehre; Rosenberg, Alan H.; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Dunn, John J.

    1990-01-01

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the T7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells.

  12. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Davanloo, P.; Rosenberg, A.H.; Moffatt, B.A.; Dunn, J.J.

    1997-12-02

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells. 10 figs.

  13. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Davanloo, Parichehre; Rosenberg, Alan H.; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Dunn, John J.

    1997-12-02

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells.

  14. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Davanloo, Parichehre; Rosenberg, Alan H.; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Dunn, John J.

    1999-02-09

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells.

  15. DNA homologies of ribosomal RNA genes of Neurospora species

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Mimiko, R.; Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs) of Neurospora crassa contain DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs, in addition to internal and external spacers. As has been reported for many eukaryotes, the DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs in Neurospora species are probably conserved while the internal and external spacer regions are probably variable sequences. Extensive electron microscopic studies of 45S precursor rRNA of several cold and warm blooded animals confirm that spacer regions vary extensively from species to species. It was desirable to know whether such differences in rDNA sequences exist between Neurospora species. Any such difference should be detectable using standard procedures for DNA homology studies rDNA sequences were isolated from N. crassa mycelial cells using the procedure described previously. The purified rDNA was /sup 3/H-labeled (by nick translation) and reassociated with total DNA isolated from the heterothallic species N. crassa and from three homothalliospecies: N. dodgei, N. lineolata, and N. africana. In addition, /sup 32/P-labeled total DNA of N. crassa was reannealed with unlabeled bulk DNA from N. crassa, N. dodgei, and N. lineolata.

  16. Identification of microRNA Genes in Three Opisthorchiids

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Vladimir Y.; Afonnikov, Dmitry A.; Vasiliev, Gennady V.; Kashina, Elena V.; Sripa, Banchob; Mordvinov, Viacheslav A.; Katokhin, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Opisthorchis felineus, O. viverrini, and Clonorchis sinensis (family Opisthorchiidae) are parasitic flatworms that pose a serious threat to humans in some countries and cause opisthorchiasis/clonorchiasis. Chronic disease may lead to a risk of carcinogenesis in the biliary ducts. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that control gene expression at post-transcriptional level and are implicated in the regulation of various cellular processes during the parasite- host interplay. However, to date, the miRNAs of opisthorchiid flukes, in particular those essential for maintaining their complex biology and parasitic mode of existence, have not been satisfactorily described. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a SOLiD deep sequencing-bioinformatic approach, we identified 43 novel and 18 conserved miRNAs for O. felineus (miracidia, metacercariae and adult worms), 20 novel and 16 conserved miRNAs for O. viverrini (adult worms), and 33 novel and 18 conserved miRNAs for C. sinensis (adult worms). The analysis of the data revealed differences in the expression level of conserved miRNAs among the three species and among three the developmental stages of O. felineus. Analysis of miRNA genes revealed two gene clusters, one cluster-like region and one intronic miRNA in the genome. The presence and structure of the two gene clusters were validated using a PCR-based approach in the three flukes. Conclusions This study represents a comprehensive description of miRNAs in three members of the family Opistorchiidae, significantly expands our knowledge of miRNAs in multicellular parasites and provides a basis for understanding the structural and functional evolution of miRNAs in these metazoan parasites. Results of this study also provides novel resources for deeper understanding the complex parasite biology, for further research on the pathogenesis and molecular events of disease induced by the liver flukes. The present data may also facilitate the development of novel

  17. Regulation of Gene Expression in Plants through miRNA Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanji; Ziegler, Todd E.; Roberts, James K.; Heck, Gregory R.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms possess a complex RNA-directed gene expression regulatory network allowing the production of unique gene expression patterns. A recent addition to the repertoire of RNA-based gene regulation is miRNA target decoys, endogenous RNA that can negatively regulate miRNA activity. miRNA decoys have been shown to be a valuable tool for understanding the function of several miRNA families in plants and invertebrates. Engineering and precise manipulation of an endogenous RNA regulatory network through modification of miRNA activity also affords a significant opportunity to achieve a desired outcome of enhanced plant development or response to environmental stresses. Here we report that expression of miRNA decoys as single or heteromeric non-cleavable microRNA (miRNA) sites embedded in either non-protein-coding or within the 3′ untranslated region of protein-coding transcripts can regulate the expression of one or more miRNA targets. By altering the sequence of the miRNA decoy sites, we were able to attenuate miRNA inactivation, which allowed for fine regulation of native miRNA targets and the production of a desirable range of plant phenotypes. Thus, our results demonstrate miRNA decoys are a flexible and robust tool, not only for studying miRNA function, but also for targeted engineering of gene expression in plants. Computational analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome revealed a number of potential miRNA decoys, suggesting that endogenous decoys may have an important role in natural modulation of expression in plants. PMID:21731706

  18. Targeted RNA Sequencing Assay to Characterize Gene Expression and Genomic Alterations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dorrelyn P; Miya, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a versatile method that can be utilized to detect and characterize gene expression, mutations, gene fusions, and noncoding RNAs. Standard RNAseq requires 30 - 100 million sequencing reads and can include multiple RNA products such as mRNA and noncoding RNAs. We demonstrate how targeted RNAseq (capture) permits a focused study on selected RNA products using a desktop sequencer. RNAseq capture can characterize unannotated, low, or transiently expressed transcripts that may otherwise be missed using traditional RNAseq methods. Here we describe the extraction of RNA from cell lines, ribosomal RNA depletion, cDNA synthesis, preparation of barcoded libraries, hybridization and capture of targeted transcripts and multiplex sequencing on a desktop sequencer. We also outline the computational analysis pipeline, which includes quality control assessment, alignment, fusion detection, gene expression quantification and identification of single nucleotide variants. This assay allows for targeted transcript sequencing to characterize gene expression, gene fusions, and mutations. PMID:27585245

  19. Evaluation of Normalization Methods for RNA-Seq Gene Expression Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Po-Yen; Phan, John H.; Zhou, Fengfeng; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Statistical inferences on RNA-Seq data, e.g., detecting differential gene expression, are meaningful only after proper normalization. However, there is no consensus for choosing a normalization procedure from among the many existing procedures. We evaluated several RNA-Seq normalization procedures by (1) correlating estimated RNA-Seq expression values to those of microarrays, (2) examining the concordance of stable and differential gene detection between the platforms, and (3) applying the procedures to simulated RNA-Seq data. Results suggested that RNA-Seq normalization procedures have little effect on both inter-platform gene expression correlation as well as inter-platform concordance of genes detected as stably or differentially expressed. However, the results of simulated analysis suggested that some normalization procedures are more robust to changes in distribution of differentially expressed genes. These results may provide guidance for selecting RNA-Seq normalization procedures.

  20. BayMiR: inferring evidence for endogenous miRNA-induced gene repression from mRNA expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Popular miRNA target prediction techniques use sequence features to determine the functional miRNA target sites. These techniques commonly ignore the cellular conditions in which miRNAs interact with their targets in vivo. Gene expression data are rich resources that can complement sequence features to take into account the context dependency of miRNAs. Results We introduce BayMiR, a new computational method, that predicts the functionality of potential miRNA target sites using the activity level of the miRNAs inferred from genome-wide mRNA expression profiles. We also found that mRNA expression variation can be used as another predictor of functional miRNA targets. We benchmarked BayMiR, the expression variation, Cometa, and the TargetScan “context scores” on two tasks: predicting independently validated miRNA targets and predicting the decrease in mRNA abundance in miRNA overexpression assays. BayMiR performed better than all other methods in both benchmarks and, surprisingly, the variation index performed better than Cometa and some individual determinants of the TargetScan context scores. Furthermore, BayMiR predicted miRNA target sets are more consistently annotated with GO and KEGG terms than similar sized random subsets of genes with conserved miRNA seed regions. BayMiR gives higher scores to target sites residing near the poly(A) tail which strongly favors mRNA degradation using poly(A) shortening. Our work also suggests that modeling multiplicative interactions among miRNAs is important to predict endogenous mRNA targets. Conclusions We develop a new computational method for predicting the target mRNAs of miRNAs. BayMiR applies a large number of mRNA expression profiles and successfully identifies the mRNA targets and miRNA activities without using miRNA expression data. The BayMiR package is publicly available and can be readily applied to any mRNA expression data sets. PMID:24001276

  1. Intrinsic noise in post-transcriptional gene regulation by small non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ya; Liu, Wangheng; Li, Anbang; Yang, Lijian; Zhan, Xuan

    2009-07-01

    Small non-coding RNA (sRNA) plays very important role in the post transcriptional regulation in various organisms. In complex regulatory networks, highly significant relative fluctuations in RNAs copy numbers can not be neglected due to very small copy number of individual RNA molecules. Here we consider two simple regulation schemes, where one is single target gene regulated by a sRNA and the other is two target mRNAs (mRNA(R) and mRNA(T)) regulated by one sRNA. The Fano factor (a measure of the relative size of the internal fluctuations) formulae of RNA molecules in the post transcriptional regulation are theoretically derived by using of the Langevin theory. For single target gene regulated by a sRNA, it is shown that the intrinsic noise of both mRNA and sRNA approaches the bare Poissonian limit in the regimen of both target RNA silencing and surviving. However, the strong anti-correlation between the fluctuations of two components result in a large intrinsic fluctuations in the level of RNA molecules in the regimen of crossover. For two target mRNAs regulated by one sRNA, in the regimen of crossover, it is found that, with the increasing of transcription rate of target mRNA(T), the maximal intrinsic fluctuation of RNA molecules is shifted from sRNA to target mRNA(R), and then to target mRNA(T). The intrinsic noise intensity of target mRNA(R) is determined by both the transcriptional rate of itself and that of sRNA, and independent of the transcriptional rate of the other target mRNA(T). PMID:19403234

  2. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentally-dynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ∼50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclear-localized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. We conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease. PMID:26531823

  3. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2015-11-03

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentallydynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ~50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclearlocalized. Splicemore » site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. Finally, we conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease.« less

  4. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2015-11-03

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentallydynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ~50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclearlocalized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. Finally, we conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease.

  5. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G

    2016-01-29

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentally-dynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ∼50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclear-localized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. We conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease. PMID:26531823

  6. Effect of low-expression gene filtering on detection of differentially expressed genes in RNA-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Ying; Phan, John H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    We compare methods for filtering RNA-seq lowexpression genes and investigate the effect of filtering on detection of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Although RNA-seq technology has improved the dynamic range of gene expression quantification, low-expression genes may be indistinguishable from sampling noise. The presence of noisy, low-expression genes can decrease the sensitivity of detecting DEGs. Thus, identification and filtering of these low-expression genes may improve DEG detection sensitivity. Using the SEQC benchmark dataset, we investigate the effect of different filtering methods on DEG detection sensitivity. Moreover, we investigate the effect of RNA-seq pipelines on optimal filtering thresholds. Results indicate that the filtering threshold that maximizes the total number of DEGs closely corresponds to the threshold that maximizes DEG detection sensitivity. Transcriptome reference annotation, expression quantification method, and DEG detection method are statistically significant RNA-seq pipeline factors that affect the optimal filtering threshold. PMID:26737772

  7. Mechanisms of miRNA-Mediated Gene Regulation from Common Downregulation to mRNA-Specific Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Bavili, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Discovered in 1993, micoRNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as one of the major regulatory gene families in eukaryotes. To date, 24521 microRNAs have been discovered and there are certainly more to come. It was primarily acknowledged that miRNAs result in gene expression repression at both the level of mRNA stability by conducting mRNA degradation and the level of translation (at initiation and after initiation) by inhibiting protein translation or degrading the polypeptides through binding complementarily to 3′UTR of the target mRNAs. Nevertheless, some studies revealed that miRNAs have the capability of activating gene expression directly or indirectly in respond to different cell types and conditions and in the presence of distinct cofactors. This reversibility in their posttranslational gene regulatory natures enables the bearing cells to rapidly response to different cell conditions and consequently block unnecessary energy wastage or maintain the cell state. This paper provides an overview of the current understandings of the miRNA characteristics including their genes and biogenesis, as well as their mediated downregulation. We also review up-to-date knowledge of miRNA-mediated gene upregulation through highlighting some notable examples and discuss the emerging concepts of their associations with other posttranscriptional gene regulation processes. PMID:25180174

  8. tRNAfeature: An algorithm for tRNA features to identify tRNA genes in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Chuang, Li-Yeh

    2016-09-01

    The identification of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) is critical for a detailed understanding of the evolution of biological organisms and viruses. However, some tRNAs are difficult to recognize due to their unusual sub-structures and may result in the detection of the wrong anticodon. Therefore, the detection of unusual sub-structures of tRNA genes remains an important challenge. In this study, we propose a method to identify tRNA genes based on tRNA features. tRNAfeature attempts to refold the sequence with single-stranded regions longer than those found in the canonical and conventional structural models for tRNA. We predicted a set of 53926 archaeal, eubacterial and eukaryotic tRNA genes annotated in tRNADB-CE and scanned the tRNA genes in whole genome sequencing. The results indicate that tRNAfeature is more powerful than other existing methods for identifying tRNAs. PMID:27291467

  9. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-03-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes. PMID:25644246

  10. Expression and function of a human initiator tRNA gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, M A; Rajbhandary, U L

    1990-01-01

    We showed previously that the human initiator tRNA gene, in the context of its own 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences, was not expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we show that switching its 5'-flanking sequence with that of a yeast arginine tRNA gene allows its functional expression in yeast cells. The human initiator tRNA coding sequence was either cloned downstream of the yeast arginine tRNA gene, with various lengths of intergenic spacer separating them, or linked directly to the 5'-flanking sequence of the yeast arginine tRNA coding sequence. The human initiator tRNA made in yeast cells can be aminoacylated with methionine, and it was clearly separated from the yeast initiator and elongator methionine tRNAs by RPC-5 column chromatography. It was also functional in yeast cells. Expression of the human initiator tRNA in transformants of a slow-growing mutant yeast strain, in which three of the four endogenous initiator tRNA genes had been inactivated by gene disruption, resulted in enhancement of the growth rate. The degree of growth rate enhancement correlated with the steady-state levels of human tRNA in the transformants. Besides providing a possible assay for in vivo function of mutant human initiator tRNAs, this work represents the only example of the functional expression of a vertebrate RNA polymerase III-transcribed gene in yeast cells. Images PMID:2201892

  11. An RNA-Seq Transcriptome Analysis of Histone Modifiers and RNA Silencing Genes in Soybean during Floral Initiation Process

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Lim Chee; Singh, Mohan B.; Bhalla, Prem L.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics has been recognised to play vital roles in many plant developmental processes, including floral initiation through the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The histone modifying proteins that mediate these modifications involve the SET domain-containing histone methyltransferases, JmjC domain-containing demethylase, acetylases and deacetylases. In addition, RNA interference (RNAi)-associated genes are also involved in epigenetic regulation via RNA-directed DNA methylation and post-transcriptional gene silencing. Soybean, a major crop legume, requires a short day to induce flowering. How histone modifications regulate the plant response to external cues that initiate flowering is still largely unknown. Here, we used RNA-seq to address the dynamics of transcripts that are potentially involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi mediated gene silencing during the floral initiation of soybean. Soybean is a paleopolyploid that has been subjected to at least two rounds of whole genome duplication events. We report that the expanded genomic repertoire of histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes in soybean includes 14 histone acetyltransferases, 24 histone deacetylases, 47 histone methyltransferases, 15 protein arginine methyltransferases, 24 JmjC domain-containing demethylases and 47 RNAi-associated genes. To investigate the role of these histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes during floral initiation, we compared the transcriptional dynamics of the leaf and shoot apical meristem at different time points after a short-day treatment. Our data reveal that the extensive activation of genes that are usually involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi gene silencing in the soybean shoot apical meristem are reprogrammed for floral development following an exposure to inductive conditions. PMID:24147010

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of oryx species using partial sequences of mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Farhan, A H; Al Homaidan, A A

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a comparative evaluation of 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes of the mitochondrial genome for molecular differentiation among three oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) with respect to two closely related outgroups, addax and roan. Our findings showed the failure of 12S rRNA gene to differentiate between the genus Oryx and addax, whereas a 342-bp partial sequence of 16S rRNA accurately grouped all five taxa studied, suggesting the utility of 16S rRNA segment for molecular phylogeny of oryx at the genus and possibly species levels. PMID:19048493

  13. Dynamic signal processing by ribozyme-mediated RNA circuits to control gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shensi; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Majer, Eszter; Landrain, Thomas E; Kirov, Boris; Daròs, José-Antonio; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2015-05-26

    Organisms have different circuitries that allow converting signal molecule levels to changes in gene expression. An important challenge in synthetic biology involves the de novo design of RNA modules enabling dynamic signal processing in live cells. This requires a scalable methodology for sensing, transmission, and actuation, which could be assembled into larger signaling networks. Here, we present a biochemical strategy to design RNA-mediated signal transduction cascades able to sense small molecules and small RNAs. We design switchable functional RNA domains by using strand-displacement techniques. We experimentally characterize the molecular mechanism underlying our synthetic RNA signaling cascades, show the ability to regulate gene expression with transduced RNA signals, and describe the signal processing response of our systems to periodic forcing in single live cells. The engineered systems integrate RNA-RNA interaction with available ribozyme and aptamer elements, providing new ways to engineer arbitrary complex gene circuits. PMID:25916845

  14. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Davanloo, P.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1984-03-30

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the T7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties.

  15. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  16. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangquan; Li, Wenqi; Zhu, Jinyan; Fan, Fangjun; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Weigong; Wang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Zhou, Tong; Lan, Ying; Zhou, Yijun; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA). By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species. PMID:27187354

  17. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangquan; Li, Wenqi; Zhu, Jinyan; Fan, Fangjun; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Weigong; Wang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Zhou, Tong; Lan, Ying; Zhou, Yijun; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21-24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA). By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species. PMID:27187354

  18. Transposable Element Insertions in Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sivakumar; Chernikova, Diana; Rogozin, Igor B.; Poliakov, Eugenia; Managadze, David; Koonin, Eugene V.; Milanesi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences (TES), followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TES in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the repeat insertion domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and, in particular, fast functional diversification, of lincRNA genes. PMID:26106594

  19. Differential annotation of tRNA genes with anticodon CAT in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco J.; Belda, Eugeni; Talens, Santiago E.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed three strategies to discriminate among the three types of tRNA genes with anticodon CAT (tRNAIle, elongator tRNAMet and initiator tRNAfMet) in bacterial genomes. With these strategies, we have classified the tRNA genes from 234 bacterial and several organellar genomes. These sequences, in an aligned or unaligned format, may be used for the identification and annotation of tRNA (CAT) genes in other genomes. The first strategy is based on the position of the problem sequences in a phenogram (a tree-like network), the second on the minimum average number of differences against the tRNA sequences of the three types and the third on the search for the highest score value against the profiles of the three types of tRNA genes. The species with the maximum number of tRNAfMet and tRNAMet was Photobacterium profundum, whereas the genome of one Escherichia coli strain presented the maximum number of tRNAIle (CAT) genes. This last tRNA gene and tilS, encoding an RNA-modifying enzyme, are not essential in bacteria. The acquisition of a tRNAIle (TAT) gene by Mycoplasma mobile has led to the loss of both the tRNAIle (CAT) and the tilS genes. The new tRNA has appropriated the function of decoding AUA codons. PMID:17071718

  20. Tetrathiobacter kashmirensis Strain CA-1 16S rRNA gene complete sequence.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used 1326 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence methods to confirm the identification of a bacterium as Tetrathiobacter kashmirensis. Morphological, biochemical characteristics, and fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of the bacterium. The isolate...

  1. MicroRNA: mechanism of gene regulation and application to livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA (miR) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts through activation of a specific cellular pathway. The small RNA classified as miR are short sequences of 18-26 nucleotide long, encoded by nuclear genes with distinctive...

  2. Induction of gene silencing in Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks through immersion in double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Galay, Remil Linggatong; Hernandez, Emmanuel Pacia; Talactac, Melbourne Rio; Maeda, Hiroki; Kusakisako, Kodai; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Mochizuki, Masami; Fujisaki, Kozo; Tanaka, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    The continuous emergence of tick-borne diseases and chemical acaricide-resistant tick strains necessitates the development of new and more effective control strategies. RNA interference through the injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) has been a very useful tool in tick research for evaluating gene function. However, this technique can be sophisticated due to the required equipment and technique. Here we studied the feasibility of an immersion technique to induce gene silencing in Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks. We targeted the Hlfer1 gene, previously shown to be crucial in successful blood feeding and reproduction. Larval, nymphal, and adult female H. longicornis ticks were immersed in Hlfer1 or Luciferase dsRNA for control. The dsRNA dissolving medium, incubation temperature and time were varied to establish the optimum conditions. RT-PCR was performed to confirm gene silencing. It was found that immersing the ticks in dsRNA dissolved in nuclease-free water at 15°C for 12h resulted in clear gene silencing. The phenotypes of adult ticks immersed in dsRNA were then compared with those of adult ticks injected with dsRNA. Similar to dsRNA injection, the post-blood meal weight of ticks immersed in Hlfer1 dsRNA was significantly lower than the control group. Moreover, high post-blood meal mortality and low egg output was observed both from ticks injected with and immersed in Hlfer1 dsRNA. Our results here suggest that immersion in dsRNA can effectively induce gene silencing and not only offers an alternative method to dsRNA injection but also opens the possibility of applying dsRNA for tick control. PMID:27062446

  3. The multiple functions of RNA helicases as drivers and regulators of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Cyril F; Mortreux, Franck; Auboeuf, Didier

    2016-07-01

    RNA helicases comprise the largest family of enzymes involved in the metabolism of mRNAs, the processing and fate of which rely on their packaging into messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs). In this Review, we describe how the capacity of some RNA helicases to either remodel or lock the composition of mRNP complexes underlies their pleiotropic functions at different steps of the gene expression process. We illustrate the roles of RNA helicases in coordinating gene expression steps and programmes, and propose that RNA helicases function as molecular drivers and guides of the progression of their mRNA substrates from one RNA-processing factory to another, to a productive mRNA pool that leads to protein synthesis or to unproductive mRNA pools that are stored or degraded. PMID:27251421

  4. Assignment of the cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase gene (CARS) to 11p15. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Cruzen, M.E.; Bengtsson, U.; McMahon, J.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Arfin, S.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The attachment of each of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids to their cognate tRNA isoaccepting families is catalyzed by a specific aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. The structural genes encoding 10 of these enzymes have been assigned to specific human chromosomes. The HARS, LARS, RARS, and TARS genes, encoding histidyl-, leucyl-, arginyl-, and threonyl-tRNA synthetases, respectively, are all located on chromosome 5( 1, 5, 7, 9, 14). The MARS (methionyl-tRNA synthetase), NARS (asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase), VARS (valyl-tRNA synthetase), and WARS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase) genes have been assigned to chromosomes 12, 18, 6, and 14, respectively (3, 4, 6, 8). A gene originally identified as encoding glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase was mapped to chromosome 1q32-q42 (10). However, a recent study suggests that the product of this gene is, in fact, a multifunctional enzyme with both glutamyl- and prolyl-tRNA synthetase activities (2). The fact that 4 of the 10 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes already mapped are located on chromosome 5 may be fortuitous but might also indicate an evolutionary or regulatory relatedness. It is therefore, of interest to map genes encoding other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to determine if additional examples of synteny exist. The recent isolation of cDNA and genomic DNA clones for human cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase has now enabled us to map the CARS gene to segment p15.5 on chromosome 11 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  5. MEG3 long noncoding RNA regulates the TGF-β pathway genes through formation of RNA-DNA triplex structures.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Subhash, Santhilal; Vaid, Roshan; Enroth, Stefan; Uday, Sireesha; Reinius, Björn; Mitra, Sanhita; Mohammed, Arif; James, Alva Rani; Hoberg, Emily; Moustakas, Aristidis; Gyllensten, Ulf; Jones, Steven J M; Gustafsson, Claes M; Sims, Andrew H; Westerlund, Fredrik; Gorab, Eduardo; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate gene expression by association with chromatin, but how they target chromatin remains poorly understood. We have used chromatin RNA immunoprecipitation-coupled high-throughput sequencing to identify 276 lncRNAs enriched in repressive chromatin from breast cancer cells. Using one of the chromatin-interacting lncRNAs, MEG3, we explore the mechanisms by which lncRNAs target chromatin. Here we show that MEG3 and EZH2 share common target genes, including the TGF-β pathway genes. Genome-wide mapping of MEG3 binding sites reveals that MEG3 modulates the activity of TGF-β genes by binding to distal regulatory elements. MEG3 binding sites have GA-rich sequences, which guide MEG3 to the chromatin through RNA-DNA triplex formation. We have found that RNA-DNA triplex structures are widespread and are present over the MEG3 binding sites associated with the TGF-β pathway genes. Our findings suggest that RNA-DNA triplex formation could be a general characteristic of target gene recognition by the chromatin-interacting lncRNAs. PMID:26205790

  6. tRNA gene diversity in the three domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Kanai, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is widely known for its key role in decoding mRNA into protein. Despite their necessity and relatively short nucleotide sequences, a large diversity of gene structures and RNA secondary structures of pre-tRNAs and mature tRNAs have recently been discovered in the three domains of life. Growing evidences of disrupted tRNA genes in the genomes of Archaea reveals unique gene structures such as, intron-containing tRNA, split tRNA, and permuted tRNA. Coding sequence for these tRNAs are either separated with introns, fragmented, or permuted at the genome level. Although evolutionary scenario behind the tRNA gene disruption is still unclear, diversity of tRNA structure seems to be co-evolved with their processing enzyme, so-called RNA splicing endonuclease. Metazoan mitochondrial tRNAs (mtRNAs) are known for their unique lack of either one or two arms from the typical tRNA cloverleaf structure, while still maintaining functionality. Recently identified nematode-specific V-arm containing tRNAs (nev-tRNAs) possess long variable arms that are specific to eukaryotic class II tRNASer and tRNALeu but also decode class I tRNA codons. Moreover, many tRNA-like sequences have been found in the genomes of different organisms and viruses. Thus, this review is aimed to cover the latest knowledge on tRNA gene diversity and further recapitulate the evolutionary and biological aspects that caused such uniqueness. PMID:24904642

  7. Simple gene silencing using the trans-acting siRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Thomas B; Lawler, Noah J; LaFayette, Peter R; Vodkin, Lila O; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    In plants, particular micro-RNAs (miRNAs) induce the production of a class of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) called trans-acting siRNA (ta-siRNA) that lead to gene silencing. A single miRNA target is sufficient for the production of ta-siRNAs, which target can be incorporated into a vector to induce the production of siRNAs, and ultimately gene silencing. The term miRNA-induced gene silencing (MIGS) has been used to describe such vector systems in Arabidopsis. Several ta-siRNA loci have been identified in soybean, but, prior to this work, few of the inducing miRNAs have been experimentally validated, much less used to silence genes. Nine ta-siRNA loci and their respective miRNA targets were identified, and the abundance of the inducing miRNAs varies dramatically in different tissues. The miRNA targets were experimentally verified by silencing a transgenic GFP gene and two endogenous genes in hairy roots and transgenic plants. Small RNAs were produced in patterns consistent with the utilization of the ta-siRNA pathway. A side-by-side experiment demonstrated that MIGS is as effective at inducing gene silencing as traditional hairpin vectors in soybean hairy roots. Soybean plants transformed with MIGS vectors produced siRNAs and silencing was observed in the T1 generation. These results complement previous reports in Arabidopsis by demonstrating that MIGS is an efficient way to produce siRNAs and induce gene silencing in other species, as shown with soybean. The miRNA targets identified here are simple to incorporate into silencing vectors and offer an effective and efficient alternative to other gene silencing strategies. PMID:25816689

  8. Fast degrading polyesters as siRNA nano-carriers for pulmonary gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Juliane; Steele, Terry W J; Merkel, Olivia; Reul, Regina; Kissel, Thomas

    2008-12-18

    A potential siRNA carrier for pulmonary gene delivery was assessed by encapsulating siRNA into biodegradable polyester nanoparticles consisting of tertiary-amine-modified polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) backbones grafted to poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). The resulting siRNA nanoparticles were prepared using a solvent displacement method that offers the advantage of forming small nanoparticles without using shear forces. The nanoparticles were characterized with regard to particle size, zeta-potential, and degradation at pH 7.4 using dynamic and static light scattering. SiRNA release studies were performed and correlated to the nanoparticle degradation. In vitro knockdown of firefly luciferase reporter gene was used to assess the potential of the nanoparticles as siRNA carriers in a human lung epithelial cell line, H1299 luc. The amine-modified-PVA-PLGA/siRNA nanoparticles form 150-200 nm particles with zeta-potentials of +15-+20 mV in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Break down of the nanoparticles was seen within 4 h in PBS with sustained release of siRNA. These nanoparticles have achieved 80-90% knockdown of a luciferase reporter gene with only 5 pmol anti-luc siRNA, even after nebulization. Hence we conclude that amine-modified-PVA-PLGA/siRNA nanoparticles could be a promising siRNA carrier for pulmonary gene delivery due to their fast degradation and potent gene knockdown profile. PMID:18619502

  9. A pathogenic non-coding RNA induces changes in dynamic DNA methylation of ribosomal RNA genes in host plants.

    PubMed

    Martinez, German; Castellano, Mayte; Tortosa, Maria; Pallas, Vicente; Gomez, Gustavo

    2014-02-01

    Viroids are plant-pathogenic non-coding RNAs able to interfere with as yet poorly known host-regulatory pathways and to cause alterations recognized as diseases. The way in which these RNAs coerce the host to express symptoms remains to be totally deciphered. In recent years, diverse studies have proposed a close interplay between viroid-induced pathogenesis and RNA silencing, supporting the belief that viroid-derived small RNAs mediate the post-transcriptional cleavage of endogenous mRNAs by acting as elicitors of symptoms expression. Although the evidence supporting the role of viroid-derived small RNAs in pathogenesis is robust, the possibility that this phenomenon can be a more complex process, also involving viroid-induced alterations in plant gene expression at transcriptional levels, has been considered. Here we show that plants infected with the 'Hop stunt viroid' accumulate high levels of sRNAs derived from ribosomal transcripts. This effect was correlated with an increase in the transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursors during infection. We observed that the transcriptional reactivation of rRNA genes correlates with a modification of DNA methylation in their promoter region and revealed that some rRNA genes are demethylated and transcriptionally reactivated during infection. This study reports a previously unknown mechanism associated with viroid (or any other pathogenic RNA) infection in plants providing new insights into aspects of host alterations induced by the viroid infectious cycle. PMID:24178032

  10. RNA-Seq defines novel genes, RNA processing patterns and enhancer maps for the early stages of nephrogenesis: Hox supergenes.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven

    2012-08-01

    During kidney development the cap mesenchyme progenitor cells both self renew and differentiate into nephrons. The balance between renewal and differentiation determines the final nephron count, which is of considerable medical importance. An important goal is to create a precise genetic definition of the early differentiation of cap mesenchyme progenitors. We used RNA-Seq to transcriptional profile the cap mesenchyme progenitors and their first epithelial derivative, the renal vesicles. The results provide a global view of the changing gene expression program during this key period, defining expression levels for all transcription factors, growth factors, and receptors. The RNA-Seq was performed using two different biochemistries, with one examining only polyadenylated RNA and the other total RNA. This allowed the analysis of noncanonical transcripts, which for many genes were more abundant than standard exonic RNAs. Since a large fraction of enhancers are now known to be transcribed the results also provide global maps of potential enhancers. Further, the RNA-Seq data defined hundreds of novel splice patterns and large numbers of new genes. Particularly striking was the extensive sense/antisense transcription and changing RNA processing complexities of the Hox clusters. PMID:22664176

  11. RNA-Seq defines novel genes, RNA processing patterns and enhancer maps for the early stages of nephrogenesis: Hox supergenes

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S. Steven

    2012-01-01

    During kidney development the cap mesenchyme progenitor cells both self renew and differentiate into nephrons. The balance between renewal and differentiation determines the final nephron count, which is of considerable medical importance. An important goal is to create a precise genetic definition of the early differentiation of cap mesenchyme progenitors. We used RNA-Seq to transcriptional profile the cap mesenchyme progenitors and their first epithelial derivative, the renal vesicles. The results provide a global view of the changing gene expression program during this key period, defining expression levels for all transcription factors, growth factors, and receptors. The RNA-Seq was performed using two different biochemistries, with one examining only polyadenylated RNA and the other total RNA. This allowed the analysis of noncanonical transcripts, which for many genes were more abundant than standard exonic RNAs. Since a large fraction of enhancers are now known to be transcribed the results also provide global maps of potential enhancers. Further, the RNA-Seq data defined hundreds of novel splice patterns and large numbers of new genes. Particularly striking was the extensive sense/antisense transcription and changing RNA processing complexities of the Hox clusters. PMID:22664176

  12. Understanding microRNA-mediated gene regulatory networks through mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xin; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-07-27

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) has added a new player to the regulation of gene expression. With the increasing number of molecular species involved in gene regulatory networks, it is hard to obtain an intuitive understanding of network dynamics. Mathematical modelling can help dissecting the role of miRNAs in gene regulatory networks, and we shall here review the most recent developments that utilise different mathematical modelling approaches to provide quantitative insights into the function of miRNAs in the regulation of gene expression. Key miRNA regulation features that have been elucidated via modelling include: (i) the role of miRNA-mediated feedback and feedforward loops in fine-tuning of gene expression; (ii) the miRNA-target interaction properties determining the effectiveness of miRNA-mediated gene repression; and (iii) the competition for shared miRNAs leading to the cross-regulation of genes. However, there is still lack of mechanistic understanding of many other properties of miRNA regulation like unconventional miRNA-target interactions, miRNA regulation at different sub-cellular locations and functional miRNA variant, which will need future modelling efforts to deal with. This review provides an overview of recent developments and challenges in this field. PMID:27317695

  13. MicroRNA-421 Gene Polymorphism in Gastric Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Yu, Nong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND As a common malignant tumor, gastric carcinoma requires early diagnosis to improve treatment efficacy. MicroRNA (miR) molecules have highly conserved nucleotide sequences and can negatively regulate target gene expression at the translational level. miR-421 has been suggested to be related with gastric cancer occurrence. The gene polymorphism of miR-421, however, has not been reported. This study thus investigated the G/C polymorphism of miR-421 and its role in progression and prognosis of gastric cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 96 gastric cancer patients were recruited in this study and tumor samples were collected from surgical resection. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of miR-421 was determined by DNA sequencing for analyzing the correlation between lymph node metastasis and miR-421 genotypes. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between genotype and risk factors of gastric cancer. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was also performed to compare GG and GC carriers. RESULTS Differential expression patterns existed between gastric cancer tissues and normal gastric mucosa. Logistic regression analysis showed GC and GG genotypes were risk factors for gastric cancer. Patients with lymph node metastasis had higher GG genotype frequency compared to those without metastasis. In survival analysis, GG carriers had shorter survival time than GC carriers. Furthermore, GG genotype was correlated with tumor prognosis (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS G allele of miR-421 is a risk factor for gastric cancer. GG genotype is correlated with lymph node metastasis and prognosis, indicating it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. PMID:27133200

  14. RNA silencing as a tool to uncover gene function and engineer novel traits in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Megumi; Kanazawa, Akira

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing refers collectively to diverse RNA-mediated pathways of nucleotide-sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression. It has been used to analyze gene function and engineer novel traits in various organisms. Here, we review the application of RNA silencing in soybean. To produce soybean lines, in which a particular gene is stably silenced, researchers have frequently used a transgene that transcribes inverted repeats of a target gene segment. Suppression of gene expression in developing soybean embryos has been one of the main focuses of metabolic engineering using transgene-induced silencing. Plants that have enhanced resistance against diseases caused by viruses or cyst nematode have also been produced. Meanwhile, Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation has been used to induce RNA silencing in roots, which enabled analysis of the roles of gene products in nodulation or disease resistance. RNA silencing has also been induced using viral vectors, which is particularly useful for gene function analysis. So far, three viral vectors for virus-induced gene silencing have been developed for soybean. One of the features of the soybean genome is the presence of a large number of duplicated genes. Potential use of RNA silencing technology in combination with forward genetic approaches for analyzing duplicated genes is discussed. PMID:23136487

  15. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by microRNA in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    HU, PENG; FENG, BO; WANG, GUANGLIN; NING, BIN; JIA, TANGHONG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of the development of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) by bioinformatics based on microarray datasets. GSE 19943 and GSE 34095 datasets downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus data were used to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in IDD. The correlation between microRNAs and target genes was investigated using different algorithms. The underlying molecular mechanisms of the target genes were then explored using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway and Gene Ontology function enrichment analysis. A total of 9 differentially expressed microRNAs, including 3 down- and 6 upregulated microRNAs and 850 DEGs were identified in tissue from patients with IDD. Two regulation networks of the target genes by microRNAs were constructed, including 33 upregulated microRNA-target gene pairs and 4 downregulated microRNA-target gene pairs. Certain target genes had been demonstrated to be involved in IDD progression via various pathways, including in the cell cycle and pathways in cancer. In addition, two important microRNAs (microRNA-222 and microRNA-589) were identified that were pivotal for the development of IDD, and their target genes, CDKNAB and SMAD4. In conclusion, a comprehensive miRNA-target gene regulatory network was constructed, which was found to be important in IDD progression. PMID:26134418

  16. miRNA and miRNA target genes in copy number variations occurring in individuals with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of short, non-coding RNAs modulating expression of human protein coding genes (miRNA target genes). Their dysfunction is associated with many human diseases, including neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been recently shown that genomic copy number variations (CNVs) can cause aberrant expression of integral miRNAs and their target genes, and contribute to intellectual disability (ID). Results To better understand the CNV-miRNA relationship in ID, we investigated the prevalence and function of miRNAs and miRNA target genes in five groups of CNVs. Three groups of CNVs were from 213 probands with ID (24 de novo CNVs, 46 familial and 216 common CNVs), one group of CNVs was from a cohort of 32 cognitively normal subjects (67 CNVs) and one group of CNVs represented 40 ID related syndromic regions listed in DECIPHER (30 CNVs) which served as positive controls for CNVs causing or predisposing to ID. Our results show that 1). The number of miRNAs is significantly higher in de novo or DECIPHER CNVs than in familial or common CNV subgroups (P < 0.01). 2). miRNAs with brain related functions are more prevalent in de novo CNV groups compared to common CNV groups. 3). More miRNA target genes are found in de novo, familial and DECIPHER CNVs than in the common CNV subgroup (P < 0.05). 4). The MAPK signaling cascade is found to be enriched among the miRNA target genes from de novo and DECIPHER CNV subgroups. Conclusions Our findings reveal an increase in miRNA and miRNA target gene content in de novo versus common CNVs in subjects with ID. Their expression profile and participation in pathways support a possible role of miRNA copy number change in cognition and/or CNV-mediated developmental delay. Systematic analysis of expression/function of miRNAs in addition to coding genes integral to CNVs could uncover new causes of ID. PMID:23937676

  17. Bioinformatics-Based Identification of MicroRNA-Regulated and Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yi-Jiang; Li, Guiling; He, Jian-Hua; Guo, Yao; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as epigenetic markers and regulate the expression of their target genes, including those characterized as regulators in autoimmune diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases. The potential roles of miRNA-regulated genes in RA pathogenesis have greatly aroused the interest of clinicians and researchers in recent years. In the current study, RA-related miRNAs records were obtained from PubMed through conditional literature retrieval. After analyzing the selected records, miRNA targeted genes were predicted. We identified 14 RA-associated miRNAs, and their sub-analysis in 5 microarray or RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) datasets was performed. The microarray and RNA-seq data of RA were also downloaded from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA), analyzed, and annotated. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified a series of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by comparing studies on RA and the controls. The RA-related gene expression profile was thus obtained and the expression of miRNA-regulated genes was analyzed. After functional annotation analysis, we found GO molecular function (MF) terms significantly enriched in calcium ion binding (GO: 0005509). Moreover, some novel dysregulated target genes were identified in RA through integrated analysis of miRNA/mRNA expression. The result revealed that the expression of a number of genes, including ROR2, ABI3BP, SMOC2, etc., was not only affected by dysregulated miRNAs, but also altered in RA. Our findings indicate that there is a close association between negatively correlated mRNA/miRNA pairs and RA. These findings may be applied to identify genetic markers for RA diagnosis and treatment in the future. PMID:26359667

  18. Phylogenetic Analysis of Ruminant Theileria spp. from China Based on 28S Ribosomal RNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Huitian; Guan, Guiquan; Ma, Miling; Liu, Aihong; Liu, Zhijie; Xu, Zongke; Ren, Qiaoyun; Li, Youquan; Yang, Jifei; Chen, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Species identification using DNA sequences is the basis for DNA taxonomy. In this study, we sequenced the ribosomal large-subunit RNA gene sequences (3,037-3,061 bp) in length of 13 Chinese Theileria stocks that were infective to cattle and sheep. The complete 28S rRNA gene is relatively difficult to amplify and its conserved region is not important for phylogenetic study. Therefore, we selected the D2-D3 region from the complete 28S rRNA sequences for phylogenetic analysis. Our analyses of 28S rRNA gene sequences showed that the 28S rRNA was useful as a phylogenetic marker for analyzing the relationships among Theileria spp. in ruminants. In addition, the D2-D3 region was a short segment that could be used instead of the whole 28S rRNA sequence during the phylogenetic analysis of Theileria, and it may be an ideal DNA barcode. PMID:24327775

  19. Dynamic signal processing by ribozyme-mediated RNA circuits to control gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shensi; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Majer, Eszter; Landrain, Thomas E.; Kirov, Boris; Daròs, José-Antonio; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Organisms have different circuitries that allow converting signal molecule levels to changes in gene expression. An important challenge in synthetic biology involves the de novo design of RNA modules enabling dynamic signal processing in live cells. This requires a scalable methodology for sensing, transmission, and actuation, which could be assembled into larger signaling networks. Here, we present a biochemical strategy to design RNA-mediated signal transduction cascades able to sense small molecules and small RNAs. We design switchable functional RNA domains by using strand-displacement techniques. We experimentally characterize the molecular mechanism underlying our synthetic RNA signaling cascades, show the ability to regulate gene expression with transduced RNA signals, and describe the signal processing response of our systems to periodic forcing in single live cells. The engineered systems integrate RNA–RNA interaction with available ribozyme and aptamer elements, providing new ways to engineer arbitrary complex gene circuits. PMID:25916845

  20. Design of simple synthetic RNA thermometers for temperature-controlled gene expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Neupert, Juliane; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    RNA thermometers are thermosensors that regulate gene expression by temperature-induced changes in RNA conformation. Naturally occurring RNA thermometers exhibit complex secondary structures which are believed to undergo a series of gradual structural changes in response to temperature shifts. Here, we report the de novo design of considerably simpler RNA thermometers that provide useful RNA-only tools to regulate bacterial gene expression by a shift in the growth temperature. We show that a single small stem-loop structure containing the ribosome binding site is sufficient to construct synthetic RNA thermometers that work efficiently at physiological temperatures. Our data suggest that the thermometers function by a simple melting mechanism and thus provide minimum size on/off switches to experimentally induce or repress gene expression by temperature. PMID:18753148

  1. Strain identification and 5S rRNA gene characterization of the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed Central

    Durovic, P; Kutay, U; Schleper, C; Dennis, P P

    1994-01-01

    A commonly used laboratory Sulfolobus strain has been unambiguously identified as Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM639. The 5S rRNA gene from this strain was cloned and sequenced. It differs at 17 of 124 positions from the identical 5S rRNA sequences from Sulfolobus solfataricus and a strain apparently misidentified as S. acidocaldarius. Analysis of the transcripts from the 5S rRNA gene failed to identify any precursor extending a significant distance beyond the 5' or 3' boundary of the 5S rRNA-coding sequence. This result suggests that the primary transcript of the 5S rRNA gene corresponds in length (within 1 or 2 nucleotides) to the mature 5S rRNA sequence found in 50S ribosomal subunits. Images PMID:8288546

  2. Dendrimers as Carriers for siRNA Delivery and Gene Silencing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weizhe; He, Ziying

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) was first literaturally reported in 1998 and has become rapidly a promising tool for therapeutic applications in gene therapy. In a typical RNAi process, small interfering RNAs (siRNA) are used to specifically downregulate the expression of the targeted gene, known as the term “gene silencing.” One key point for successful gene silencing is to employ a safe and efficient siRNA delivery system. In this context, dendrimers are emerging as potential nonviral vectors to deliver siRNA for RNAi purpose. Dendrimers have attracted intense interest since their emanating research in the 1980s and are extensively studied as efficient DNA delivery vectors in gene transfer applications, due to their unique features based on the well-defined and multivalent structures. Knowing that DNA and RNA possess a similar structure in terms of nucleic acid framework and the electronegative nature, one can also use the excellent DNA delivery properties of dendrimers to develop effective siRNA delivery systems. In this review, the development of dendrimer-based siRNA delivery vectors is summarized, focusing on the vector features (siRNA delivery efficiency, cytotoxicity, etc.) of different types of dendrimers and the related investigations on structure-activity relationship to promote safe and efficient siRNA delivery system. PMID:24288498

  3. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C.; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-01-01

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA–asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions. PMID:26837577

  4. Fluorescent in situ sequencing (FISSEQ) of RNA for gene expression profiling in intact cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je Hyuk; Daugharthy, Evan R.; Scheiman, Jonathan; Kalhor, Reza; Ferrante, Thomas C.; Terry, Richard; Turczyk, Brian M.; Yang, Joyce L.; Lee, Ho Suk; Aach, John; Zhang, Kun; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    RNA sequencing measures the quantitative change in gene expression over the whole transcriptome, but it lacks spatial context. On the other hand, in situ hybridization provides the location of gene expression, but only for a small number of genes. Here we detail a protocol for genome-wide profiling of gene expression in situ in fixed cells and tissues, in which RNA is converted into cross-linked cDNA amplicons and sequenced manually on a confocal microscope. Unlike traditional RNA-seq our method enriches for context-specific transcripts over house-keeping and/or structural RNA, and it preserves the tissue architecture for RNA localization studies. Our protocol is written for researchers experienced in cell microscopy with minimal computing skills. Library construction and sequencing can be completed within 14 d, with image analysis requiring an additional 2 d. PMID:25675209

  5. An intron within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1993-01-01

    The 16S rRNA genes of Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Pyrobaculum islandicum were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and the resulting products were sequenced directly. The two organisms are closely related by this measure (over 98% similar). However, they differ in that the (lone) 16S rRNA gene of Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a 713-bp intron not seen in the corresponding gene of Pyrobaculum islandicum. To our knowledge, this is the only intron so far reported in the small subunit rRNA gene of a prokaryote. Upon excision the intron is circularized. A secondary structure model of the intron-containing rRNA suggests a splicing mechanism of the same type as that invoked for the tRNA introns of the Archaea and Eucarya and 23S rRNAs of the Archaea. The intron contains an open reading frame whose protein translation shows no certain homology with any known protein sequence.

  6. Acquired copy number alterations of miRNA genes in acute myeloid leukemia are uncommon

    PubMed Central

    Ramsingh, Giridharan; Jacoby, Meagan A.; Shao, Jin; De Jesus Pizzaro, Rigoberto E.; Shen, Dong; Trissal, Maria; Getz, Angela H.; Ley, Timothy J.; Walter, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Altered microRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently observed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and has been implicated in leukemic transformation. Whether somatic copy number alterations (CNAs) are a frequent cause of altered miRNA gene expression is largely unknown. Herein, we used comparative genomic hybridization with a custom high-resolution miRNA-centric array and/or whole-genome sequence data to identify somatic CNAs involving miRNA genes in 113 cases of AML, including 50 cases of de novo AML, 18 cases of relapsed AML, 15 cases of secondary AML following myelodysplastic syndrome, and 30 cases of therapy-related AML. We identified a total of 48 somatic miRNA gene-containing CNAs that were not identified by routine cytogenetics in 20 patients (18%). All these CNAs also included one or more protein coding genes. We identified a single case with a hemizygous deletion of MIR223, resulting in the complete loss of miR-223 expression. Three other cases of AML were identified with very low to absent miR-223 expression, an miRNA gene known to play a key role in myelopoiesis. However, in these cases, no somatic genetic alteration of MIR223 was identified, suggesting epigenetic silencing. These data show that somatic CNAs specifically targeting miRNA genes are uncommon in AML. PMID:24009227

  7. Structure and sequence of the gene for the largest subunit of trypanosomal RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Köck, J; Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1988-01-01

    As the first step in the analysis of the transcription process in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, we have started to characterise the trypanosomal RNA polymerases. We have previously described the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and found that two almost identical RNA polymerase II genes are encoded within the genome of T. brucei. Here we present the identification, cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase III. This gene contains a single open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a Mr of 170 kD. In total, eight encoding a polypeptide with a Mr of 170 kD. In total, eight highly conserved regions with significant homology to those previously reported in other eukaryotic RNA polymerase largest subunits were identified. Some of these domains contain functional sites, which are conserved among all eukaryotic largest subunit genes analysed thus far. Since these domains make up a large part of each polypeptide, independent of the RNA polymerase class, these data strongly support the hypothesis that these domains provide a major part of the transcription machinery of the RNA polymerase complex. The additional domains which are uniquely present in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I and II, respectively, two large hydrophylic insertions and a C-terminal extension, might be a determining factor in specific transcription of the gene classes. Images PMID:3174432

  8. Whole transcriptome profiling reveals the RNA content of motor axons

    PubMed Central

    Briese, Michael; Saal, Lena; Appenzeller, Silke; Moradi, Mehri; Baluapuri, Apoorva; Sendtner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Most RNAs within polarized cells such as neurons are sorted subcellularly in a coordinated manner. Despite advances in the development of methods for profiling polyadenylated RNAs from small amounts of input RNA, techniques for profiling coding and non-coding RNAs simultaneously are not well established. Here, we optimized a transcriptome profiling method based on double-random priming and applied it to serially diluted total RNA down to 10 pg. Read counts of expressed genes were robustly correlated between replicates, indicating that the method is both reproducible and scalable. Our transcriptome profiling method detected both coding and long non-coding RNAs sized >300 bases. Compared to total RNAseq using a conventional approach our protocol detected 70% more genes due to reduced capture of ribosomal RNAs. We used our method to analyze the RNA composition of compartmentalized motoneurons. The somatodendritic compartment was enriched for transcripts with post-synaptic functions as well as for certain nuclear non-coding RNAs such as 7SK. In axons, transcripts related to translation were enriched including the cytoplasmic non-coding RNA 7SL. Our profiling method can be applied to a wide range of investigations including perturbations of subcellular transcriptomes in neurodegenerative diseases and investigations of microdissected tissue samples such as anatomically defined fiber tracts. PMID:26464439

  9. An Arrayed RNA Interference Genome-Wide Screen Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in the MicroRNA 21 Biogenesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shum, David; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Ramirez, Christina N.; Radu, Constantin; Calder, Paul A.; Beauchamp, Lesslie; Farazi, T.; Landthaler, M.; Tuschi, T.; Magdaleno, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionary conserved noncoding molecules that regulate gene expression. They influence a number of diverse biological functions, such as development and differentiation. However, their dysregulation has been shown to be associated with disease states, such as cancer. Genes and pathways regulating their biogenesis remain unknown and are highly sought after. For this purpose, we have validated a multiplexed high-content assay strategy to screen for such modulators. Here, we describe its implementation that makes use of a cell-based gain-of-function reporter assay monitoring enhanced green fluorescent protein expression under the control of miRNA 21 (miR-21); combined with measures of both cell metabolic activities through the use of Alamar Blue and cell death through imaged Hoechst-stained nuclei. The strategy was validated using a panel of known genes and enabled us to successfully progress to and complete an arrayed genome-wide short interfering RNA (siRNA) screen against the Ambion Silencer Select v4.0 library containing 64,755 siRNA duplexes covering 21,565 genes. We applied a high-stringency hit analysis method, referred to as the Bhinder–Djaballah analysis method, leading to the nomination of 1,273 genes as candidate inhibitors of the miR-21 biogenesis pathway; after several iterations eliminating those genes with only one active duplex and those enriched in seed sequence mediated off-target effects. Biological classifications revealed four major control junctions among them vesicular transport via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Altogether, our screen has uncovered a number of novel candidate regulators that are potentially good druggable targets allowing for the discovery and development of small molecules for regulating miRNA function. PMID:23153064

  10. Controlling mesenchymal stem cell gene expression using polymer-mediated delivery of siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Danielle S.W.; Boutin, Molly E.

    2012-01-01

    siRNA treatment has great promise to specifically control gene expression and select cell behaviors but have delivery challenges limiting their use. Particularly for applications in regenerative medicine, uniform and consistent delivery of siRNA to control gene expression and subsequent stem cell functions, such as differentiation, is paramount. Therefore, a diblock copolymer was examined for its ability to effective delivery siRNA to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The diblock copolymers, which are composed of cationic blocks for siRNA complexation, protection, and uptake and pH-responsive blocks for endosomal escape, were shown to facilitate nearly 100% MSC uptake of siRNA, which is vastly superior to a commercially-available control, DharmaFECT, which resulted in only ~60% siRNA positive MSCs. Moreover, the diblock copolymer, at conditions that result in excellent knockdown (down to ~10% of control gene expression), is cytocompatible, causing no negative effects on MSC survivability. In contrast, DharmaFECT:siRNA treatment results in only ~60% survivability of MSCs. Longitudinal knockdown after siRNA treatment was examined and protein knockdown persists for ~6 days regardless of delivery system (diblock copolymer or DharmaFECT). Finally, MSC phenotype and differentiation capacity was examined after treatment with control siRNA. There is no statistically significant differences on cell surface markers of diblock copolymer:siRNA or DharmaFECT:siRNA treated or cells measured 2 weeks after siRNA delivery compared to untreated cells. Upon differentiation with typical media/culture conditions to adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages and examination of histological staining markers, there is no discernable differences between treated and untreated cells, regardless of delivery mechanism. Thus, diblock copolymers examined herein facilitate uniform siRNA treatment of MSCs, inducing siRNA-specific gene and protein knockdown without adversely affecting MSC

  11. The embryonic RNA helicase gene (ERH): a new member of the DEAD box family of RNA helicases.

    PubMed Central

    Sowden, J; Putt, W; Morrison, K; Beddington, R; Edwards, Y

    1995-01-01

    DEAD box proteins share several highly conserved motifs including the characteristic Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (D-E-A-D in the amino acid single-letter code) motif and have established or putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity. These proteins are implicated in a range of cellular processes that involve regulation of RNA function, including translation initiation, RNA splicing and ribosome assembly. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of an embryonic RNA helicase gene, ERH, which maps to mouse chromosome 1 and encodes a new member of the DEAD box family of proteins. The predicted ERH protein shows high sequence similarity to the testes-specific mouse PL10 and to the maternally acting Xenopus An3 helicase proteins. The ERH expression profile is similar, to that of An3, which localizes to the animal hemisphere of oocytes and is abundantly expressed in the embryo. ERH is expressed in oocytes and is a ubiquitous mRNA in the 9 days-post-conception embryo, and at later stages of development shows a more restricted pattern of expression in brain and kidney. The similarities in sequence and in expression profile suggest that ERH is the murine equivalent of the Xenopus An3 gene, and we propose that ERH plays a role in translational activation of mRNA in the oocyte and early embryo. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8948440

  12. RNA-mediated gene silencing in the phytopathogenic fungus Bipolaris oryzae.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Akihiro; Ueno, Makoto; Arase, Sakae; Kihara, Junichi

    2007-04-01

    The Ascomycetous fungus Bipolaris oryzae is the causal agent of brown leaf spot disease in rice and is a model for studying photomorphogenetic responses by near-UV radiation. Targeted gene disruption (knockout) for functional analysis of photomorphogenesis-related genes in B. oryzae can be achieved by homologous recombination with low efficiency. Here, the applicability of RNA silencing (knockdown) as a tool for targeting endogenous genes in B. oryzae is reported. A polyketide synthase gene (PKS1), involved in fungal DHN melanin biosynthesis pathways, was targeted by gene silencing as a marker. The silencing vector encoding hairpin RNA of the PKS1 fragment was constructed in a two-step PCR-based cloning, and introduced into the B. oryzae genomic DNA. Silencing of the PKS1 gene resulted in albino phenotypes and reduction of PKS1 mRNA expression. These results demonstrate the applicability of targeted gene silencing as a useful reverse-genetics approach in B. oryzae. PMID:17227462

  13. Identification and mapping of tRNA genes on the Helianthus annuus mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Ceci, L R; Veronico, P; Gallerani, R

    1996-01-01

    The physical map for seventeen tRNA genes on the mitochondrial genome of the dicotyledonous plant Helianthus annuus has been established. Eleven are genuine mitochondrial genes, while the other six show a high degree of similarity with the chloroplast counterparts. The genes, with the exception of the genuine trnS(GCT) and of the chloroplast-like trnV and trnP, are expressed. The comparison of the organization of some tRNA genes in the H. annuus mitochondrial genome with that of similar genes detectable in other plants reveals that their association is common to several dicotyledons. PMID:8722570

  14. Stability regulation of mRNA and the control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cheadle, Chris; Fan, Jinshui; Cho-Chung, Yoon S; Werner, Thomas; Ray, Jill; Do, Lana; Gorospe, Myriam; Becker, Kevin G

    2005-11-01

    Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. Standard techniques measure changes in total cellular poly(A) mRNA levels. The assumption that changes in gene expression as measured by these techniques are directly and well correlated with changes in rates of new gene synthesis form the basis of attempts to connect coordinated changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements. Yet systematic attempts at this approach remain difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Recent technical advances have led to the successful scale-up and application of nuclear run-on procedures directly to microarrays. This development has allowed a gene-by-gene comparison between new gene synthesis in the nucleus and measured changes in total cellular polyA mRNA. Results from these studies have begun to challenge the strict interpretation of changes in gene expression measured by conventional microarrays as being closely correlated with changes in mRNA transcription rate, but rather they tend to support the significant expansion of the role played by changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression. Gene expression profiles obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell) and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed) RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in total cellular polyA mRNA in this system. Stability regulation was inferred by the absence of corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for groups of genes strongly regulated at the whole cell level and which were also resistant to inhibition by Actinomycin

  15. Rare Events of Intragenus and Intraspecies Horizontal Transfer of the 16S rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Cao, Hui-Luo; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of operational genes has been widely reported in prokaryotic organisms. However, informational genes such as those involved in transcription and translation processes are very difficult to be horizontally transferred, as described by Woese’s complexity hypothesis. Here, we analyzed all of the completed prokaryotic genome sequences (2,143 genomes) in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database, scanned for genomes with high intragenomic heterogeneity of 16S rRNA gene copies, and explored potential HGT events of ribosomal RNA genes based on the phylogeny, genomic organization, and secondary structures of the ribosomal RNA genes. Our results revealed 28 genomes with relatively high intragenomic heterogeneity of multiple 16S rRNA gene copies (lowest pairwise identity <98.0%), and further analysis revealed HGT events and potential donors of the heterogeneous copies (such as HGT from Chlamydia suis to Chlamydia trachomatis) and mutation events of some heterogeneous copies (such as Streptococcus suis JS14). Interestingly, HGT of the 16S rRNA gene only occurred at intragenus or intraspecies levels, which is quite different from the HGT of operational genes. Our results improve our understanding regarding the exchange of informational genes. PMID:26220935

  16. SoMART, a web server for miRNA, tasiRNA and target gene analysis in Solanaceae plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant micro(mi)RNAs and trans-acting small interfering (tasi)RNAs mediate posttranscriptional silencing of genes and play important roles in a variety of biological processes. Although bioinformatics prediction and small (s)RNA cloning are the key approaches used for identification of miRNAs, tasiRN...

  17. Systemic gene silencing in plants triggered by fluorescent nanoparticle-delivered double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Ding, Lian; He, Bicheng; Shen, Jie; Xu, Zejun; Yin, Meizhen; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2014-09-01

    A cationic fluorescence nanoparticle efficiently enters plants with high transfection efficacy. Applying a mixture of G2/dsRNA to the model plant, Arabidopsis root, leads to significant reduction in the expression of important developmental genes and results in apparent phenotypes. This study reports a non-viral gene nanocarrier which triggers gene silencing in plants and leads to systemic phenotypes. PMID:25068243

  18. Compilation and classification of higher plant mitochondrial tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Veronico, P; Gallerani, R; Ceci, L R

    1996-01-01

    This compilation reports the tRNA genes detected on higher plant mitochondrial genomes subdivided into the widely accepted categories of 'genuine' and 'chloroplast-like' genes. Moreover, it includes a list of pseudo or truncated genes divided in the same way. PMID:8710486

  19. Compilation and classification of higher plant mitochondrial tRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Veronico, P; Gallerani, R; Ceci, L R

    1996-06-15

    This compilation reports the tRNA genes detected on higher plant mitochondrial genomes subdivided into the widely accepted categories of 'genuine' and 'chloroplast-like' genes. Moreover, it includes a list of pseudo or truncated genes divided in the same way. PMID:8710486

  20. MR VIGS: microRNA-based virus-induced gene silencing in plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Zhang, Qi; Kong, Junhua; Hu, Feng; Li, Bin; Wu, Chaoqun; Qin, Cheng; Zhang, Pengcheng; Shi, Nongnong; Hong, Yiguo

    2015-01-01

    In plants, microRNA (miRNA)-based virus-induced gene silencing, dubbed MR VIGS, is a powerful technique to delineate the biological functions of genes. By targeting to a specific sequence, miRNAs can knock down expression of genes with fewer off-target effects. Here, using a modified Cabbage leaf curling virus (CaLCuV) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) as vectors, we describe two virus-based miRNA expression systems to perform MR VIGS for plant functional genomics assays. PMID:25740363

  1. A human haploid gene trap collection to study lncRNAs with unusual RNA biology

    PubMed Central

    Kornienko, Aleksandra E.; Vlatkovic, Irena; Neesen, Jürgen; Barlow, Denise P; Pauler, Florian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many thousand long non-coding (lnc) RNAs are mapped in the human genome. Time consuming studies using reverse genetic approaches by post-transcriptional knock-down or genetic modification of the locus demonstrated diverse biological functions for a few of these transcripts. The Human Gene Trap Mutant Collection in haploid KBM7 cells is a ready-to-use tool for studying protein-coding gene function. As lncRNAs show remarkable differences in RNA biology compared to protein-coding genes, it is unclear if this gene trap collection is useful for functional analysis of lncRNAs. Here we use the uncharacterized LOC100288798 lncRNA as a model to answer this question. Using public RNA-seq data we show that LOC100288798 is ubiquitously expressed, but inefficiently spliced. The minor spliced LOC100288798 isoforms are exported to the cytoplasm, whereas the major unspliced isoform is nuclear localized. This shows that LOC100288798 RNA biology differs markedly from typical mRNAs. De novo assembly from RNA-seq data suggests that LOC100288798 extends 289kb beyond its annotated 3' end and overlaps the downstream SLC38A4 gene. Three cell lines with independent gene trap insertions in LOC100288798 were available from the KBM7 gene trap collection. RT-qPCR and RNA-seq confirmed successful lncRNA truncation and its extended length. Expression analysis from RNA-seq data shows significant deregulation of 41 protein-coding genes upon LOC100288798 truncation. Our data shows that gene trap collections in human haploid cell lines are useful tools to study lncRNAs, and identifies the previously uncharacterized LOC100288798 as a potential gene regulator. PMID:26670263

  2. Transcription termination and RNA processing in the 3'-end spacer of mouse ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, T; Kominami, R; Yoshikura, H; Sudo, K; Muramatsu, M

    1987-01-01

    The 3' termini of ribosomal RNA precursors from mouse FM3A cultured cells are mapped to eight sites within 625 bp downstream from the 3' terminus of 28 S rRNA. Three additional sites are mapped in liver RNA from C3H/He strain mice. Two of them, the sites at 570 bp and 625 bp are assumed to be termination sites in vivo, because they correspond to in vitro termination sites of RNA polymerase I, and 45 S RNAs having these 3' termini decay with kinetics distinct from others. The amount of 45 S RNA having the 3' terminus at other sites is variable among several mouse strains, despite their having the same DNA sequence in these regions. The ability to produce 3' termini in these sites seems to follow Mendel's law of inheritance. Therefore, we postulate that these nine sites are RNA processing sites which are controlled genetically. Images PMID:3031586

  3. Structure/function relationships within the RNA recognition motif family applied to the hermes gene product.

    PubMed

    Thion, Laurent; Erard, Monique

    2002-04-01

    The RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) family of RNA-binding domains comprises distinct structural subclasses which can be equated to various types of cognate RNA(s) in relation to biological functions. By identifying structural templates within the appropriate RRM subclass, we have homology-modelled the three-dimensional structure of the hermes gene-encoded RRM. Our findings lead us to propose potential RNA targets for the corresponding protein and to predict possible functions in RNA metabolism during heart development. PMID:12141909

  4. Extraction of high-quality RNA from pancreatic tissues for gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Augereau, Cécile; Lemaigre, Frédéric P; Jacquemin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Extracting RNA from pancreatic tissue is notoriously challenging because of the organ's high RNase content. Standard methods using TriPure or TRIzol classically yield RNA of sufficient quality for routine gene expression analysis but not for microarray or deep sequencing analysis. Here we developed a simple method to extract high-quality RNA from mouse pancreas. Our method uses an RNase inhibitor and combines different protocols using guanidium thiocyanate-phenol extraction. It enables reproducible isolation of RNA with an RNA integrity number around 9. PMID:26896683

  5. Mod5 protein binds to tRNA gene complexes and affects local transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Pai, Dave A.; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Wozniak, Glenn G.; Good, Paul D.; Miller, Erin L.; McLeod, Ian X.; Yates, John R.; Hopper, Anita K.; Engelke, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The tRNA gene-mediated (tgm) silencing of RNA polymerase II promoters is dependent on subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes, but genetic analysis shows that the silencing requires additional mechanisms. We have identified proteins that bind tRNA gene transcription complexes and are required for tgm silencing but not required for gene clustering. One of the proteins, Mod5, is a tRNA modifying enzyme that adds an N6-isopentenyl adenosine modification at position 37 on a small number of tRNAs in the cytoplasm, although a subpopulation of Mod5 is also found in the nucleus. Recent publications have also shown that Mod5 has tumor suppressor characteristics in humans as well as confers drug resistance through prion-like misfolding in yeast. Here, we show that a subpopulation of Mod5 associates with tRNA gene complexes in the nucleolus. This association occurs and is required for tgm silencing regardless of whether the pre-tRNA transcripts are substrates for Mod5 modification. In addition, Mod5 is bound to nuclear pre-tRNA transcripts, although they are not substrates for the A37 modification. Lastly, we show that truncation of the tRNA transcript to remove the normal tRNA structure also alleviates silencing, suggesting that synthesis of intact pre-tRNAs is required for the silencing mechanism. These results are discussed in light of recent results showing that silencing near tRNA genes also requires chromatin modification. PMID:23898186

  6. Gene regulation with carbon-based siRNA conjugates for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingmin; Zheng, Wenfu; Tang, Rongbing; Wang, Nuoxin; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-10-01

    We report fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) conjugates (C-siRNA) for gene regulation and cancer therapy. The C-siRNA has a core of chitosan-derived FCN and a shell of siRNA, and can down-regulate the expression of polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1), a master regulator of mitosis, via siRNA targeting Plk1 (siPlk1), for cancer therapy. The required amount of the FCNs is only ∼1/30 of that of the gold nanoparticles in delivering equal amount of siRNA. The C-siPlk1 led to ∼80% knockdown of cellular Plk1 mRNA in A375 cells, and induced apoptosis of the A375 cells (31.9%) and MCF-7 cells (20.33%), much higher than those by commercial nonviral gene delivery vectors, such as Lipofectamine 2000 in both cell lines (apoptosis rate < 10%). After the C-siPlk1 was administrated to A375 tumor-bearing mice intravenously, the tumor volume was less than 1/11 of the control groups. The C-siRNA can thus be powerful tools for gene delivery and gene therapy. PMID:27472164

  7. Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera) gut transcriptome analysis: expression of RNA interference-related genes.

    PubMed

    Swevers, L; Huvenne, H; Menschaert, G; Kontogiannatos, D; Kourti, A; Pauchet, Y; ffrench-Constant, R; Smagghe, G

    2013-12-01

    In the search for new methods of pest control, the potential of RNA interference (RNAi) is being explored. Because the gut is the first barrier for the uptake of double-stranded (ds)RNA, pyrosequencing of the gut transcriptome is a powerful tool for obtaining the necessary sequences for specific dsRNA-mediated pest control. In the present study, a dataset representing the gut transcriptome of the Colorado potato beetle (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) was generated and analysed for the presence of RNAi-related genes. Almost all selected genes that were implicated in silencing efficiency at different levels in the RNAi pathway (core machinery, associated intracellular factors, dsRNA uptake, antiviral RNAi, nucleases), which uses different types of small RNA (small interfering RNA, microRNA and piwi-RNA), were expressed in the CPB gut. Although the database is of lower quality, the majority of the RNAi genes are also found to be present in the gut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm [TH; Manduca sexta (19 out of 35 genes analysed)]. The high quality of the CPB transcriptome database will lay the foundation for future gene expression and functional studies regarding the gut and RNAi. PMID:24580832

  8. Cooperative gene regulation by microRNA pairs and their identification using a computational workflow

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Ulf; Lai, Xin; Winter, Felix; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio; Gupta, Shailendra K.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an integral part of gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been shown that pairs of miRNAs can repress the translation of a target mRNA in a cooperative manner, which leads to an enhanced effectiveness and specificity in target repression. However, it remains unclear which miRNA pairs can synergize and which genes are target of cooperative miRNA regulation. In this paper, we present a computational workflow for the prediction and analysis of cooperating miRNAs and their mutual target genes, which we refer to as RNA triplexes. The workflow integrates methods of miRNA target prediction; triplex structure analysis; molecular dynamics simulations and mathematical modeling for a reliable prediction of functional RNA triplexes and target repression efficiency. In a case study we analyzed the human genome and identified several thousand targets of cooperative gene regulation. Our results suggest that miRNA cooperativity is a frequent mechanism for an enhanced target repression by pairs of miRNAs facilitating distinctive and fine-tuned target gene expression patterns. Human RNA triplexes predicted and characterized in this study are organized in a web resource at www.sbi.uni-rostock.de/triplexrna/. PMID:24875477

  9. Development of hybrid baculovirus vectors for artificial MicroRNA delivery and prolonged gene suppression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Ling; Luo, Wen-Yi; Lo, Wen-Hsin; Lin, Kun-Ju; Sung, Li-Yu; Shih, Yung-Shen; Chang, Yu-Han; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2011-12-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) plays essential roles in regulating gene expression, but miRNA delivery remains a hurdle, thus entailing a vector system for efficient transfer. Baculovirus emerges as a promising gene delivery vector but its inherent transient expression restricts its applications in some scenarios. Therefore, this study primarily aimed to develop baculovirus as a miRNA expression vector for prolonged gene suppression. We constructed recombinant baculoviruses carrying artificial egfp-targeting miRNA sequences within the miR155 backbone, which after expression by the cytomegalovirus promoter could knockdown the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. By swapping the mature miRNA sequences, the baculovirus miRNA shuttle effectively repressed the overexpression of endogenous TNF-α in arthritic synoviocytes without inducing apoptosis. To prolong the baculovirus-mediated expression, we further developed a hybrid baculovirus vector that exploited the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon for gene integration and sustained miRNA expression. The hybrid baculovirus vector that combined the miR155 scaffold and SB transposon effectively repressed the transgene expression for a prolonged period of time, hence diversifying the applications of baculovirus to indications necessitating prolonged gene regulation such as arthritis. PMID:21732325

  10. The Regulation of rRNA Gene Transcription during Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Rui; Giles, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that proper cellular control of pluripotency and differentiation is related to the regulation of rRNA synthesis. To further our understanding of the role that the regulation of rRNA synthesis has in pluripotency we monitored rRNA synthesis during the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We discovered that the rRNA synthesis rate is reduced ~50% within 6 hours of ACTIVIN A treatment. This precedes reductions in expression of specific stem cell markers and increases in expression of specific germ layer markers. The reduction in rRNA synthesis is concomitant with dissociation of the Pol I transcription factor, UBTF, from the rRNA gene promoter and precedes any increase to heterochromatin throughout the rRNA gene. To directly investigate the role of rRNA synthesis in pluripotency, hESCs were treated with the Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461. The direct reduction of rRNA synthesis by CX-5461 induces the expression of markers for all three germ layers, reduces the expression of pluripotency markers, and is overall similar to the ACTIVIN A induced changes. This work indicates that the dissociation of UBTF from the rRNA gene, and corresponding reduction in transcription, represent early regulatory events during the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27299313

  11. Chromosome-specific NOR inactivation explains selective rRNA gene silencing and dosage control in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Mohannath, Gireesha; Blevins, Todd; Pontvianne, Frederic; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, scores of excess ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are silenced by repressive chromatin modifications. Given the near sequence identity of rRNA genes within a species, it is unclear how specific rRNA genes are reproducibly chosen for silencing. Using Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype (strain) Col-0, a systematic search identified sequence polymorphisms that differ between active and developmentally silenced rRNA gene subtypes. Recombinant inbred mapping populations derived from three different ecotype crosses were then used to map the chromosomal locations of silenced and active RNA gene subtypes. Importantly, silenced and active rRNA gene subtypes are not intermingled. All silenced rRNA gene subtypes mapped to the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) on chromosome 2 (NOR2). All active rRNA gene subtypes mapped to NOR4. Using an engineered A. thaliana line in which a portion of Col-0 chromosome 4 was replaced by sequences of another ecotype, we show that a major rRNA gene subtype silenced at NOR2 is active when introgressed into the genome at NOR4. Collectively, these results reveal that selective rRNA gene silencing is not regulated gene by gene based on mechanisms dependent on subtle gene sequence variation. Instead, we propose that a subchromosomal silencing mechanism operates on a multimegabase scale to inactivate NOR2. PMID:26744421

  12. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E.; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes. PMID:26407127

  13. Transcription of the Xenopus laevis selenocysteine tRNA(Ser)Sec gene: a system that combines an internal B box and upstream elements also found in U6 snRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, P; Krol, A

    1991-01-01

    The transcription mode of the Xenopus tRNA(Ser)Sec gene by RNA polymerase III was deciphered by injection of mutant templates into Xenopus oocyte nuclei. tRNA(Ser)Sec represents the paradigm of a new class of RNA polymerase III genes combining tRNA and U snRNA gene regulatory elements. Its promoter is tripartite, constituted by two upstream elements, a PSE and a TATA motif that are interchangeable with those of U6 snRNA genes and an internal box B as in other tRNAs. The B box enables the transcription level dependent on the upstream promoter to be increased. Data obtained indicate that U1 snRNA (Pol II) and tRNA(Ser)Sec (Pol III) genes share at least one transcription factor, implying that the border between transcription systems is less tight than expected. Images PMID:2001675

  14. A Caenorhabditis Elegans RNA Polymerase II Gene, Ama-1 Iv, and Nearby Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, T. M.; Riddle, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The amanitin-binding subunit of RNA polymerase II in Caenorhabditis elegans is encoded by the ama-1 gene, located approximately 0.05 map unit to the right of dpy-13 IV. Using the amanitin-resistant ama-1(m118) strain as a parent, we have isolated amanitin-sensitive mutants that carry recessive-lethal ama-1 alleles. Of the six ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants examined, two are arrested late in embryogenesis. One of these is a large deficiency, mDf9, but the second may be a novel point mutation. The four other mutants are hypomorphs, and presumably produce altered RNA polymerase II enzymes with some residual function. Two of these mutants develop into sterile adults at 20° but are arrested as larvae at 25°, and two others are fertile at 20° and sterile at 25°. Temperature-shift experiments performed with the adult sterile mutant, ama-1(m118m238ts), have revealed a temperature-sensitive period that begins late in gonadogenesis and is centered around the initiation of egg-laying. Postembryonic development at 25° is slowed by 30%. By contrast, the amanitin-resistant allele of ama-1 has very little effect on developmental rate or fertility. We have identified 15 essential genes in an interval of 4.5 map units surrounding ama-1, as well as four γ-ray-induced deficiencies and two duplications that include the ama-1 gene. The larger duplication, mDp1, may include the entire left arm of chromosome IV, and it recombines with the normal homologue at a low frequency. The smallest deficiency, mDf10, complements all but three identified genes: let-278, dpy-13 and ama-1, which define an interval of only 0.1 map unit. The terminal phenotype of mDf10 homozygotes is developmental arrest during the first larval stage, suggesting that there is sufficient maternal RNA polymerase II to complete embryonic development. PMID:8608933

  15. GENE SILENCING BY PARENTAL RNA INTERFERENCE IN THE GREEN RICE LEAFHOPPER, Nephotettix cincticeps (HEMIPTERA: CICADELLIDAE).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yukiko; Hattori, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely used for investigating gene function in many nonmodel insect species. Parental RNAi causes gene knockdown in the next generation through the administration of double-strand RNA (dsRNA) to the mother generation. In this study, we demonstrate that parental RNAi mediated gene silencing is effective in determining the gene function of the cuticle and the salivary glands in green rice leafhopper (GRH), Nephotettix cincticeps (Uhler). Injection of dsRNA of NcLac2 (9 ng/female) to female parents caused a strong knockdown of laccase-2 gene of first instar nymphs, which eventually led to high mortality rates and depigmentation of side lines on the body. The effects of parental RNAi on the mortality of the nymphs were maintained through 12-14 days after the injections. We also confirmed the effectiveness of parental RNAi induced silencing on the gene expressed in the salivary gland, the gene product of which is passed from instar to instar. The parental RNAi method can be used to examine gene function by phenotyping many offspring nymphs with injection of dsRNA into a small number of parent females, and may be applicable to high-efficiency determination of gene functions in this species. PMID:26728387

  16. Close association of RNA polymerase II and many transcription factors with Pol III genes.

    PubMed

    Raha, Debasish; Wang, Zhong; Moqtaderi, Zarmik; Wu, Linfeng; Zhong, Guoneng; Gerstein, Mark; Struhl, Kevin; Snyder, Michael

    2010-02-23

    Transcription of the eukaryotic genomes is carried out by three distinct RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whereby each polymerase is thought to independently transcribe a distinct set of genes. To investigate a possible relationship of RNA polymerases II and III, we mapped their in vivo binding sites throughout the human genome by using ChIP-Seq in two different cell lines, GM12878 and K562 cells. Pol III was found to bind near many known genes as well as several previously unidentified target genes. RNA-Seq studies indicate that a majority of the bound genes are expressed, although a subset are not suggestive of stalling by RNA polymerase III. Pol II was found to bind near many known Pol III genes, including tRNA, U6, HVG, hY, 7SK and previously unidentified Pol III target genes. Similarly, in vivo binding studies also reveal that a number of transcription factors normally associated with Pol II transcription, including c-Fos, c-Jun and c-Myc, also tightly associate with most Pol III-transcribed genes. Inhibition of Pol II activity using alpha-amanitin reduced expression of a number of Pol III genes (e.g., U6, hY, HVG), suggesting that Pol II plays an important role in regulating their transcription. These results indicate that, contrary to previous expectations, polymerases can often work with one another to globally coordinate gene expression. PMID:20139302

  17. Methylation of miRNA genes in the response to temperature stress in Populus simonii.

    PubMed

    Ci, Dong; Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation and miRNAs provide crucial regulation of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional responses to abiotic stress. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphisms to identify 1066 sites that were differentially methylated in response to temperature stress in Populus simonii. Among these loci, BLAST searches of miRBase identified seven miRNA genes. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR suggested that the methylation pattern of these miRNA genes probably influences their expression. Annotation of these miRNA genes in the sequenced genome of Populus trichocarpa found three target genes (Potri.007G090400, Potri.014G042200, and Potri.010G176000) for the miRNAs produced from five genes (Ptc-MIR396e and g, Ptc-MIR156i and j, and Ptc-MIR390c) respectively. The products of these target genes function in lipid metabolism to deplete lipid peroxide. We also constructed a network based on the interactions between DNA methylation and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and the products of target genes and the metabolic factors that they affect, including H2O2, malondialdehyde, catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase. Our results suggested that DNA methylation probably regulates the expression of miRNA genes, thus affecting expression of their target genes, likely through the gene-silencing function of miRNAs, to maintain cell survival under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26579167

  18. Methylation of miRNA genes in the response to temperature stress in Populus simonii

    PubMed Central

    Ci, Dong; Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation and miRNAs provide crucial regulation of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional responses to abiotic stress. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphisms to identify 1066 sites that were differentially methylated in response to temperature stress in Populus simonii. Among these loci, BLAST searches of miRBase identified seven miRNA genes. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR suggested that the methylation pattern of these miRNA genes probably influences their expression. Annotation of these miRNA genes in the sequenced genome of Populus trichocarpa found three target genes (Potri.007G090400, Potri.014G042200, and Potri.010G176000) for the miRNAs produced from five genes (Ptc-MIR396e and g, Ptc-MIR156i and j, and Ptc-MIR390c) respectively. The products of these target genes function in lipid metabolism to deplete lipid peroxide. We also constructed a network based on the interactions between DNA methylation and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and the products of target genes and the metabolic factors that they affect, including H2O2, malondialdehyde, catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase. Our results suggested that DNA methylation probably regulates the expression of miRNA genes, thus affecting expression of their target genes, likely through the gene-silencing function of miRNAs, to maintain cell survival under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26579167

  19. Gene Silencing by RNA Interference in the White Rot Fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium▿

    PubMed Central

    Matityahu, Avi; Hadar, Yitzhak; Dosoretz, Carlos G.; Belinky, Paula A.

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of RNA interference (RNAi) is demonstrated in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The manganese-containing superoxide dismutase gene (MnSOD1) was used as the target for RNAi. The plasmid constructed for gene silencing contained a transcriptional unit for hairpin RNA expression. Significantly lower MnSOD expression at both the mRNA and protein activity levels was detected in RNAi transformants. Furthermore, even though P. chrysosporium possesses three copies of the MnSOD gene, this RNAi construct was sufficient to decrease the enzymatic activity by as much as 70% relative to control levels. Implementation of the RNAi technique in P. chrysosporium provides an alternative genetic tool for studies of gene function, particularly of essential genes or gene families. PMID:18606804

  20. Characterization of an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene related to RNA processing: cloning of RNA1 and generation of a new allele with a novel phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, N S; Dunst, R W; Hopper, A K

    1985-01-01

    The RNA1 gene product is believed to be involved in RNA metabolism due to the phenotype of a single conditionally lethal, temperature-sensitive allele, rna1-1. We cloned the RNA1 gene and determined that it produces a 1,400-nucleotide polyadenylated transcript. On a multicopy plasmid, the mutant rna1-1 allele partially complements the rna1-1 temperature-sensitive growth defect. This suggests that the temperature-sensitive nature of the rna1-1 allele results from the synthesis of a product with lowered activity or stability at elevated temperatures or from a decrease in synthesis of the rna1-1 product at the restrictive temperature. A chromosomal disruption of RNA1 behaves as a recessive lethal mutation. Haploids bearing the disruption were isolated by sporulating a diploid heterozygous for the disrupted allele and the rna1-1 allele and possessing an episomal copy of the RNA1 gene. Analysis of the rescued haploids bearing the chromosomal disruption indicated that the recessive lethal phenotype of the RNA1 disruption is not merely due to a block in spore germination. Unexpectedly, diploids heterozygous for the disruption and the rna1-1 alleles become aneuploid for chromosome XIII at a frequency of 2 to 5%. It appears that the disrupted RNA1 allele on a multicopy plasmid also promotes aneuploidy for chromosome XIII. Promotion of aneuploidy seems to be a phenotype of this particular allele of RNA1. Images PMID:3889591

  1. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sha; Yin, Xiaoyan; Spollen, William; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Dong; Schoelz, James; Bilyeu, Kristin; Zhang, Zhanyuan J.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting “hot spots”. The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model. PMID:26061033

  2. Targeted Mutagenesis, Precise Gene Editing, and Site-Specific Gene Insertion in Maize Using Cas9 and Guide RNA.

    PubMed

    Svitashev, Sergei; Young, Joshua K; Schwartz, Christine; Gao, Huirong; Falco, S Carl; Cigan, A Mark

    2015-10-01

    Targeted mutagenesis, editing of endogenous maize (Zea mays) genes, and site-specific insertion of a trait gene using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas)-guide RNA technology are reported in maize. DNA vectors expressing maize codon-optimized Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 endonuclease and single guide RNAs were cointroduced with or without DNA repair templates into maize immature embryos by biolistic transformation targeting five different genomic regions: upstream of the liguleless1 (LIG1) gene, male fertility genes (Ms26 and Ms45), and acetolactate synthase (ALS) genes (ALS1 and ALS2). Mutations were subsequently identified at all sites targeted, and plants containing biallelic multiplex mutations at LIG1, Ms26, and Ms45 were recovered. Biolistic delivery of guide RNAs (as RNA molecules) directly into immature embryo cells containing preintegrated Cas9 also resulted in targeted mutations. Editing the ALS2 gene using either single-stranded oligonucleotides or double-stranded DNA vectors as repair templates yielded chlorsulfuron-resistant plants. Double-strand breaks generated by RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease also stimulated insertion of a trait gene at a site near LIG1 by homology-directed repair. Progeny showed expected Mendelian segregation of mutations, edits, and targeted gene insertions. The examples reported in this study demonstrate the utility of Cas9-guide RNA technology as a plant genome editing tool to enhance plant breeding and crop research needed to meet growing agriculture demands of the future. PMID:26269544

  3. SPERM RNA AMPLIFICATION FOR GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING BY DNA MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sperm RNA Amplification for Gene Expression Profiling by DNA Microarray Technology
    Hongzu Ren, Kary E. Thompson, Judith E. Schmid and David J. Dix, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triang...

  4. Circadian oscillations in period gene mRNA levels are transcriptionally regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, P E; Hall, J C; Rosbash, M

    1992-01-01

    The period (per) gene is involved in regulating circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster. The per gene is expressed in a circadian manner, where fluctuations in per mRNA abundance are influenced by its own translation product, which also cycles in abundance. Since per gene expression is necessary for circadian rhythmicity, we sought to determine how certain features of this feedback loop operate. The results of this study reveal that fluctuations in per mRNA are primarily controlled by fluctuations in per gene transcription, that per mRNA has a relatively short half-life, and that sequences sufficient to drive per mRNA cycling are present in 1.3 kilobases of 5' flanking sequences. These and other results indicate that the per feedback loop has all of the basic properties necessary to be a component of a circadian oscillator. Images PMID:1465387

  5. MicroRNA target prediction by expression analysis of host genes.

    PubMed

    Gennarino, Vincenzo Alessandro; Sardiello, Marco; Avellino, Raffaella; Meola, Nicola; Maselli, Vincenza; Anand, Santosh; Cutillo, Luisa; Ballabio, Andrea; Banfi, Sandro

    2009-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that control gene expression by inducing RNA cleavage or translational inhibition. Most human miRNAs are intragenic and are transcribed as part of their hosting transcription units. We hypothesized that the expression profiles of miRNA host genes and of their targets are inversely correlated and devised a novel procedure, HOCTAR (host gene oppositely correlated targets), which ranks predicted miRNA target genes based on their anti-correlated expression behavior relative to their respective miRNA host genes. HOCTAR is the first tool for systematic miRNA target prediction that utilizes the same set of microarray experiments to monitor the expression of both miRNAs (through their host genes) and candidate targets. We applied the procedure to 178 human intragenic miRNAs and found that it performs better than currently available prediction softwares in pinpointing previously validated miRNA targets. The high-scoring HOCTAR predicted targets were enriched in Gene Ontology categories, which were consistent with previously published data, as in the case of miR-106b and miR-93. By means of overexpression and loss-of-function assays, we also demonstrated that HOCTAR is efficient in predicting novel miRNA targets and we identified, by microarray and qRT-PCR procedures, 34 and 28 novel targets for miR-26b and miR-98, respectively. Overall, we believe that the use of HOCTAR significantly reduces the number of candidate miRNA targets to be tested compared to the procedures based solely on target sequence recognition. Finally, our data further confirm that miRNAs have a significant impact on the mRNA levels of most of their targets. PMID:19088304

  6. miRNA gene counts in chromosomes vary widely in a species and biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on transcription or post-transcriptional processing of coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Ghorai, Atanu; Ghosh, Utpal

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs target specific mRNA(s) to silence its expression and thereby regulate various cellular processes. We have investigated miRNA gene counts in chromosomes for 20 different species and observed wide variation. Certain chromosomes have extremely high number of miRNA gene compared with others in all the species. For example, high number of miRNA gene in X chromosome and the least or absence of miRNA gene in Y chromosome was observed in all species. To search the criteria governing such variation of miRNA gene counts in chromosomes, we have selected three parameters- length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome. We have calculated Pearson's correlation coefficient of miRNA gene counts with length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome for all 20 species. Major number of species showed that number of miRNA gene was not correlated with chromosome length. Eighty five percent of species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r ≥ 0.5) between the numbers of miRNA gene vs. non-coding gene in chromosomes as expected because miRNA is a sub-set of non-coding genes. 55% species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r ≥ 0.5) between numbers of miRNA gene vs. coding gene. We hypothesize biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on coding genes, an evolutionary conserved process. Chromosomes having higher number of miRNA genes will be most likely playing regulatory roles in several cellular processes including different disorders. In humans, cancer and cardiovascular disease associated miRNAs are mostly intergenic and located in Chromosome 19, X, 14, and 1. PMID:24808907

  7. Gene silencing in adult Aedes aegypti mosquitoes through oral delivery of double-stranded RNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The induction of the naturally occurring phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) to study gene function in insects is now common practice. With appropriately chosen targets, the RNAi pathway has also been exploited for insect control, typically through oral delivery of dsRNA. To determine if such an a...

  8. Diverse evolutionary trajectories for small RNA biogenesis genes in the oomycete genus Phytophthora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene regulation by small RNA pathways is ubiquitous among eukaryotes, but little is known about small RNA pathways in the Stramenopile kingdom. Phytophthora, a genus of filamentous oomycetes, contains many devastating plant pathogens, causing multibillion-dollar damage to crops, ornamental plants, ...

  9. Differential accumulation of nif structural gene mRNA in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Jacobson, Marty; Ludwig, Marcus; Boyd, Eric S; Bryant, Donald A; Dean, Dennis R; Peters, John W

    2011-09-01

    Northern analysis was employed to investigate mRNA produced by mutant strains of Azotobacter vinelandii with defined deletions in the nif structural genes and in the intergenic noncoding regions. The results indicate that intergenic RNA secondary structures effect the differential accumulation of transcripts, supporting the high Fe protein-to-MoFe protein ratio required for optimal diazotrophic growth. PMID:21725008

  10. microRNA-29 can regulate expression of the long non-coding RNA gene MEG3 in hepatocellular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, C; Kogure, T; Valeri, N; Huang, N; Nuovo, G; Costinean, S; Negrini, M; Miotto, E; Croce, CM; Patel, T

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is replete with long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), many of which are transcribed and likely to have a functional role. Microarray analysis of > 23 000 lncRNAs revealed downregulation of 712 (~3%) lncRNA in malignant hepatocytes, among which maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) was downregulated by 210-fold relative to expression in non-malignant hepatocytes. MEG3 expression was markedly reduced in four human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) cell lines compared with normal hepatocytes by real-time PCR. RNA in situ hybridization showed intense cytoplasmic expression of MEG3 in non-neoplastic liver with absent or very weak expression in HCC tissues. Enforced expression of MEG3 in HCC cells significantly decreased both anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth, and induced apoptosis. MEG3 promoter hypermethylation was identified by methylation-specific PCR and MEG3 expression was increased with inhibition of methylation with either 5-Aza-2-Deoxycytidine, or siRNA to DNA Methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b in HCC cells. MiRNA-dependent regulation of MEG3 expression was studied by evaluating the involvement of miR-29, which can modulate DNMT 1 and 3. Overexpression of mir-29a increased expression of MEG3. GTL2, the murine homolog of MEG3, was reduced in liver tissues from hepatocyte-specific miR-29a/b1 knock-out mice compared with wild-type controls. These data show that methylation-dependent tissue-specific regulation of the lncRNA MEG3 by miR-29a may contribute to HCC growth and highlight the inter-relationship between two classes of non-coding RNA, miRNAs and lncRNAs, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:21625215

  11. microRNA-29 can regulate expression of the long non-coding RNA gene MEG3 in hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Braconi, C; Kogure, T; Valeri, N; Huang, N; Nuovo, G; Costinean, S; Negrini, M; Miotto, E; Croce, C M; Patel, T

    2011-11-24

    The human genome is replete with long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), many of which are transcribed and likely to have a functional role. Microarray analysis of >23,000 lncRNAs revealed downregulation of 712 (~3%) lncRNA in malignant hepatocytes, among which maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) was downregulated by 210-fold relative to expression in non-malignant hepatocytes. MEG3 expression was markedly reduced in four human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) cell lines compared with normal hepatocytes by real-time PCR. RNA in situ hybridization showed intense cytoplasmic expression of MEG3 in non-neoplastic liver with absent or very weak expression in HCC tissues. Enforced expression of MEG3 in HCC cells significantly decreased both anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth, and induced apoptosis. MEG3 promoter hypermethylation was identified by methylation-specific PCR and MEG3 expression was increased with inhibition of methylation with either 5-Aza-2-Deoxycytidine, or siRNA to DNA Methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b in HCC cells. MiRNA-dependent regulation of MEG3 expression was studied by evaluating the involvement of miR-29, which can modulate DNMT 1 and 3. Overexpression of mir-29a increased expression of MEG3. GTL2, the murine homolog of MEG3, was reduced in liver tissues from hepatocyte-specific miR-29a/b1 knock-out mice compared with wild-type controls. These data show that methylation-dependent tissue-specific regulation of the lncRNA MEG3 by miR-29a may contribute to HCC growth and highlight the inter-relationship between two classes of non-coding RNA, miRNAs and lncRNAs, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:21625215

  12. Gene Profiling of Bone around Orthodontic Mini-Implants by RNA-Sequencing Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Kyung-Yen; Heo, Jung Sun; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Dong-Yeol; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Ahn, Hyo-Won; Kim, Seong-Hun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the genes that were expressed in the healing bones around SLA-treated titanium orthodontic mini-implants in a beagle at early (1-week) and late (4-week) stages with RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq). Samples from sites of surgical defects were used as controls. Total RNA was extracted from the tissue around the implants, and an RNA-Seq analysis was performed with Illumina TruSeq. In the 1-week group, genes in the gene ontology (GO) categories of cell growth and the extracellular matrix (ECM) were upregulated, while genes in the categories of the oxidation-reduction process, intermediate filaments, and structural molecule activity were downregulated. In the 4-week group, the genes upregulated included ECM binding, stem cell fate specification, and intramembranous ossification, while genes in the oxidation-reduction process category were downregulated. GO analysis revealed an upregulation of genes that were related to significant mechanisms, including those with roles in cell proliferation, the ECM, growth factors, and osteogenic-related pathways, which are associated with bone formation. From these results, implant-induced bone formation progressed considerably during the times examined in this study. The upregulation or downregulation of selected genes was confirmed with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The RNA-Seq strategy was useful for defining the biological responses to orthodontic mini-implants and identifying the specific genetic networks for targeted evaluations of successful peri-implant bone remodeling. PMID:25759820

  13. Widespread inference of weighted microRNA-mediated gene regulation in cancer transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hiroshi I.; Mihira, Hajime; Watabe, Tetsuro; Sugimoto, Koichi; Miyazono, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) comprise a gene-regulatory network through sequence complementarity with target mRNAs. Previous studies have shown that mammalian miRNAs decrease many target mRNA levels and reduce protein production predominantly by target mRNA destabilization. However, it has not yet been fully assessed whether this scheme is widely applicable to more realistic conditions with multiple miRNA fluctuations. By combining two analytical frameworks for detecting the enrichment of gene sets, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Functional Assignment of miRNAs via Enrichment (FAME), we developed GSEA–FAME analysis (GFA), which enables the prediction of miRNA activities from mRNA expression data using rank-based enrichment analysis and weighted evaluation of miRNA–mRNA interactions. This cooperative approach delineated a better widespread correlation between miRNA expression levels and predicted miRNA activities in cancer transcriptomes, thereby providing proof-of-concept of the mRNA-destabilization scenario. In an integrative analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) multidimensional data including profiles of both mRNA and miRNA, we also showed that GFA-based inference of miRNA activity could be used for the selection of prognostic miRNAs in the development of cancer survival prediction models. This approach proposes a next-generation strategy for the interpretation of miRNA function and identification of target miRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:23275554

  14. Microprocessor mediates transcriptional termination in long noncoding microRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Ashish; Dhir, Somdutta; Proudfoot, Nick J.; Jopling, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) play a major role in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Mammalian miRNA biogenesis begins with co-transcriptional cleavage of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcripts by the Microprocessor complex. While most miRNA are located within introns of protein coding genes, a substantial minority of miRNA originate from long non coding (lnc) RNA where transcript processing is largely uncharacterized. We show, by detailed characterization of liver-specific lnc-pri-miR-122 and genome-wide analysis in human cell lines, that most lnc-pri-miRNA do not use the canonical cleavage and polyadenylation (CPA) pathway, but instead use Microprocessor cleavage to terminate transcription. This Microprocessor inactivation leads to extensive transcriptional readthrough of lnc-pri-miRNA and transcriptional interference with downstream genes. Consequently we define a novel RNase III-mediated, polyadenylation-independent mechanism of Pol II transcription termination in mammalian cells. PMID:25730776

  15. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  16. Argonaute 2-dependent Regulation of Gene Expression by Single-stranded miRNA Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Masayuki; Prakash, Thazha P; Corey, David R

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding transcripts that regulate gene expression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs can affect development of cancer and other diseases. Synthetic miRNA mimics can modulate gene expression and offer an approach to therapy. Inside cells, mature miRNAs are produced as double-stranded RNAs and miRNA mimics typically retain both strands. This need for two strands has the potential to complicate drug development. Recently, synthetic chemically modified single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNA) have been shown to function through the RNAi pathway to induce gene silencing in cell culture and animals. Here, we test the hypothesis that single-stranded miRNA (ss-miRNA) can also mimic the function of miRNAs. We show that ss-miRNAs can act as miRNA mimics to silence the expression of target genes. Gene silencing requires expression of argonaute 2 (AGO2) protein and involves recruitment of AGO2 to the target transcripts. Chemically modified ss-miRNAs function effectively inside cells through endogenous RNAi pathways and broaden the options for miRNA-based oligonucleotide drug development. PMID:26903376

  17. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  18. Mutational analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in Tunisian patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna . E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Saber; Louhichi, Nacim; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Lahmar, Imed; Driss, Nabil; Drira, Mohamed; Ayadi, Hammadi; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2006-02-24

    We explored the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in 100 Tunisian families affected with NSHL and in 100 control individuals. We identified the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in one out of these 100 families and not in the 100 control individuals. Members of this family harbouring the A1555G mutation showed phenotypic heterogeneity which could be explained by an eventual nuclear-mitochondrial interaction. So, we have screened three nuclear genes: GJB2, GJB3, and GJB6 but we have not found correlation between the phenotypic heterogeneity and variants detected in these genes. We explored also the entire mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes. We detected five novel polymorphisms: T742C, T794A, A813G, C868T, and C954T, and 12 known polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. None of the 100 families or the 100 controls were found to carry mutations in the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} gene. We report here First mutational screening of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in the Tunisian population which describes the second family harbouring the A1555G mutation in Africa and reveals novel polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

  19. Delivery of cationic polymer-siRNA nanoparticles for gene therapies in neural regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yanran; Liu, Zhonglin; Shuai, Xintao; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Jun; Bi, Wei; Wang, Chuanming; Jing, Xiuna; Liu, Yunyun; Tao, Enxiang

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nogo receptor can inhibit growth of injured axons, thus affecting neural regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The delivery of siRNA is crucial to inhibit NgR expression in NSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-viral vector PEG-PEI condensed siRNA targeting NgR into nanoscale particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEG-PEI/siRNA at N/P = 15 displayed high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEG-PEI has great potential in carrying siRNA to diminish the gene expression in NSCs. -- Abstract: The therapeutic applications of neural stem cells (NSCs) have potential to promote recovery in many obstinate diseases in central nervous system. Regulation of certain gene expressions using siRNA may have significant influence on the fate of NSC. To achieve the optimum gene silencing effect of siRNA, non-viral vector polyethylene glycol-polyethyleneimine (PEG-PEI) was investigated in the delivery of siRNA to NSCs. The characteristics of PEG-PEI/siRNA polyplexes were detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of nanoparticles on cell viability were measured via CCK-8 assay. In addition, the transfection efficiency was evaluated by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry, and real-time PCR and Western Blot were employed to detect the gene inhibition effect of siRNA delivered by PEG-PEI. The SEM micrographs showed that PEG-PEI could condense siRNA to form diffuse and spherical nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity of PEG-PEI/siRNA nanocomplexes (N/P = 15) was significantly lower when compared with that of Lipofectamine 2000/siRNA (P < 0.05). Moreover, the highest transfection efficiency of PEG-PEI/siRNA nanoparticles was obtained at an N/P ratio of 15, which was better than that achieved in the transfection using Lipofectamine 2000 (P < 0.05). Finally, the gene knockdown effect of PEG-PEI/siRNA nanoparticles was verified at the levels of mRNA and protein. These results suggest that

  20. Chromosomal localization and sequence variation of 5S rRNA gene in five Capsicum species.

    PubMed

    Park, Y K; Park, K C; Park, C H; Kim, N S

    2000-02-29

    Chromosomal localization and sequence analysis of the 5S rRNA gene were carried out in five Capsicum species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that chromosomal location of the 5S rRNA gene was conserved in a single locus at a chromosome which was assigned to chromosome 1 by the synteny relationship with tomato. In sequence analysis, the repeating units of the 5S rRNA genes in the Capsicum species were variable in size from 278 bp to 300 bp. In sequence comparison of our results to the results with other Solanaceae plants as published by others, the coding region was highly conserved, but the spacer regions varied in size and sequence. T stretch regions, just after the end of the coding sequences, were more prominant in the Capsicum species than in two other plants. High G x C rich regions, which might have similar functions as that of the GC islands in the genes transcribed by RNA PolII, were observed after the T stretch region. Although we could not observe the TATA like sequences, an AT rich segment at -27 to -18 was detected in the 5S rRNA genes of the Capsicum species. Species relationship among the Capsicum species was also studied by the sequence comparison of the 5S rRNA genes. While C. chinense, C. frutescens, and C. annuum formed one lineage, C. baccatum was revealed to be an intermediate species between the former three species and C. pubescens. PMID:10774742

  1. cyp51A gene silencing using RNA interference in azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Bita; Hedayati, Mohammad T; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Guillot, Jacques; Alizadeh, Ahad; Badali, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of reports have described the emergence of acquired resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus to azole compounds. The primary mechanism of resistance in clinical isolates is the mutation of the azole drug target enzyme, which is encoded by the cyp51A gene. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silencing the cyp51A gene in azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates. A 21-nucleotide small-interfering RNA (siRNA) was designed based on the cDNA sequence of the A. fumigatus cyp51A gene. After silencing the cyp51A gene in germinated conidia (15, 20, 25 and 50 nM), azole-resistant A. fumigatus was cultured on broth media and gene expression was analysed by measuring the cyp51A mRNA level using RT-PCR assay. Hyphae were successfully transfected by siRNA and expression of the cyp51A gene was significantly reduced by siRNA at the concentration of 50 nM (P ≤ 0.05). In addition, at this siRNA concentration, the minimum inhibitory concentration of itraconazole for the treated cells was decreased, compared with that for untreated control cells, from 16 to 4 μg/ml. PMID:26448519

  2. NONCODEv4: exploring the world of long non-coding RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chaoyong; Yuan, Jiao; Li, Hui; Li, Ming; Zhao, Guoguang; Bu, Dechao; Zhu, Weimin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Runsheng; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    NONCODE (http://www.bioinfo.org/noncode/) is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been implied in diseases and identified to play important roles in various biological processes. Since NONCODE version 3.0 was released 2 years ago, discovery of novel ncRNAs has been promoted by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). In this update of NONCODE, we expand the ncRNA data set by collection of newly identified ncRNAs from literature published in the last 2 years and integration of the latest version of RefSeq and Ensembl. Particularly, the number of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has increased sharply from 73 327 to 210 831. Owing to similar alternative splicing pattern to mRNAs, the concept of lncRNA genes was put forward to help systematic understanding of lncRNAs. The 56 018 and 46 475 lncRNA genes were generated from 95 135 and 67 628 lncRNAs for human and mouse, respectively. Additionally, we present expression profile of lncRNA genes by graphs based on public RNA-seq data for human and mouse, as well as predict functions of these lncRNA genes. The improvements brought to the database also include an incorporation of an ID conversion tool from RefSeq or Ensembl ID to NONCODE ID and a service of lncRNA identification. NONCODE is also accessible through http://www.noncode.org/. PMID:24285305

  3. The ASRG database: identification and survey of Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing-Bing; Brendel, Volker

    2004-01-01

    A total of 74 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes and 395 genes encoding splicing-related proteins were identified in the Arabidopsis genome by sequence comparison and motif searches, including the previously elusive U4atac snRNA gene. Most of the genes have not been studied experimentally. Classification of these genes and detailed information on gene structure, alternative splicing, gene duplications and phylogenetic relationships are made accessible as a comprehensive database of Arabidopsis Splicing Related Genes (ASRG) on our website. PMID:15575968

  4. Gene Rearrangement Attenuates Expression and Lethality of a Nonsegmented Negative Strand RNA Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams Wertz, Gail; Perepelitsa, Victoria P.; Ball, L. Andrew

    1998-03-01

    The nonsegmented negative strand RNA viruses comprise hundreds of human, animal, insect, and plant pathogens. Gene expression of these viruses is controlled by the highly conserved order of genes relative to the single transcriptional promoter. We utilized this regulatory mechanism to alter gene expression levels of vesicular stomatitis virus by rearranging the gene order. This report documents that gene expression levels and the viral phenotype can be manipulated in a predictable manner. Translocation of the promoter-proximal nucleocapsid protein gene N, whose product is required stoichiometrically for genome replication, to successive positions down the genome reduced N mRNA and protein expression in a stepwise manner. The reduction in N gene expression resulted in a stepwise decrease in genomic RNA replication. Translocation of the N gene also attenuated the viruses to increasing extents for replication in cultured cells and for lethality in mice, without compromising their ability to elicit protective immunity. Because monopartite negative strand RNA viruses have not been reported to undergo homologous recombination, gene rearrangement should be irreversible and may provide a rational strategy for developing stably attenuated live vaccines against this type of virus.

  5. Structure Tuning of Cationic Oligospermine-siRNA Conjugates for Carrier-Free Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Nothisen, Marc; Bagilet, Jérémy; Behr, Jean-Paul; Remy, Jean-Serge; Kotera, Mitsuharu

    2016-08-01

    Oligospermine-siRNA conjugates are able to induce efficient luciferase gene silencing upon carrier-free transfection. These conjugates are readily accessible by a versatile automated chemistry that we developed using a DMT-spermine phosphoramidite reagent. In this article, we used this chemistry to study a wide range of structural modifications of the oligospermine-siRNA conjugates, i.e., variation of conjugate positions and introduction of chemical modifications to increase nuclease resistance. At first we examined gene silencing activity of a series of siRNA-tris(spermine) conjugates with and without chemical modifications in standard carrier assisted conditions. The three spermine units attached at one of the two ends of the sense strand or at the 3'-end of the antisense strand are compatible with gene silencing activity whereas attachment of spermine units at the 5'-end of the antisense strand abolished the activity. 2'-O-Methylated nucleotides introduced in the sense strand are compatible while not in the antisense strand. Thiophosphate links could be used without activity loss at the 3'-end of both strands and at the 5'-end of the sense strand to conjugate oligospermine. Consequently a series of oligospermine-siRNA conjugates containing 15 to 45 spermines units in various configurations were chosen, prepared, and examined in carrier-free conditions. Attachment of 30 spermine units singly at the 5'-end of the sense strand provides the most potent carrier-free siRNA. Longevity of luciferase gene silencing was studied using oligospermine-siRNA conjugates. Five day long efficiency with more than 80% gene expression knockdown was observed upon transfection without vector. Oligospermine-siRNA conjugates targeting cell-constitutive natural lamin A/C gene were prepared. Efficient gene silencing was observed upon carrier-free transfection of siRNA conjugates containing 20 or 30 spermine residues grafted at the 5'-end of the sense strand. PMID:27398779

  6. Sequences more than 500 base pairs upstream of the human U3 small nuclear RNA gene stimulate the synthesis of U3 RNA in frog oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, D.; Reddy, R. ); Wright, D. )

    1991-06-04

    Small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes contain strong promoters capable of initiating transcription once every 4 s. Studies on the human U1 snRNA gene, carried out in other laboratories, showed that sequences within 400 bp of the 5' flanking region are sufficient for maximal levels of transcription both in vivo and in frog oocytes (reviewed in Dahlberg and Lund (1988)). The authors studied the expression of a human U3 snRNA gene by injecting 5' deletion mutants into frog oocytes. The results show that sequences more than 500 bp upstream of the U3 snRNA gene have a 2-3-fold stimulatory effect on the U3 snRNA synthesis. These results indicate that the human U3 snRNA gene is different from human U1 snRNA gene in containing regulatory elements more than 500 bp upstream. The U3 snRNA gene upstream sequences contain an AluI homologous sequence in the {minus}1,200 region; these AluI sequences were transcribed in vitro and in frog oocytes but were not detectable in Hela cells.

  7. The novel organization and complete sequence of the ribosomal RNA gene of Nosema bombycis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Fone; Tsai, Shu-Jen; Lo, Chu-Fang; Soichi, Yamane; Wang, Chung-Hsiung

    2004-05-01

    We present here for the first time the complete DNA sequence data (4301bp) of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the microsporidian type species, Nosema bombycis. Sequences for the large subunit gene (LSUrRNA: 2497bp, GenBank Accession No. ), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS: 179bp, GenBank Accession No. ), the small subunit gene (SSUrRNA: 1232bp), intergenic spacer (IGS: 279bp), and 5S region (114bp) are also given, and the secondary structure of the large subunit is discussed. The organization of the N. bombycis rRNA gene is LSUrRNA-ITS-SSUrRNA-IGS-5S. This novel arrangement, in which the LSU is 5' of the SSU, is the reverse of the organizational sequence (i.e., SSU-ITS-LSU) found in all previously reported microsporidian rRNAs, including Nosema apis. This unique character in the type species may have taxonomic implications for the members of the genus Nosema. PMID:15050536

  8. Differential DNA Methylation of MicroRNA Genes in Temporal Cortex from Alzheimer's Disease Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Villela, Darine; Ramalho, Rodrigo F.; Silva, Aderbal R. T.; Brentani, Helena; Suemoto, Claudia K.; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Grinberg, Lea T.; Krepischi, Ana C. V.; Rosenberg, Carla

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated for the first time the genomewide DNA methylation changes of noncoding RNA genes in the temporal cortex samples from individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The methylome of 10 AD individuals and 10 age-matched controls were obtained using Illumina 450 K methylation array. A total of 2,095 among the 15,258 interrogated noncoding RNA CpG sites presented differential methylation, 161 of which were associated with miRNA genes. In particular, 10 miRNA CpG sites that were found to be hypermethylated in AD compared to control brains represent transcripts that have been previously associated with the disease. This miRNA set is predicted to target 33 coding genes from the neuregulin receptor complex (ErbB) signaling pathway, which is required for the neurons myelination process. For 6 of these miRNA genes (MIR9-1, MIR9-3, MIR181C, MIR124-1, MIR146B, and MIR451), the hypermethylation pattern is in agreement with previous results from literature that shows downregulation of miR-9, miR-181c, miR-124, miR-146b, and miR-451 in the AD brain. Our data implicate dysregulation of miRNA methylation as contributor to the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:27213057

  9. In Vitro Gene Silencing of the Fish Microsporidian Heterosporis saurida by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem; Dkhil, Mohamed A.; El-Matbouli, Mansour; Al-Quraishy, Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Heterosporis saurida, a microsporidian parasite of lizardfish, Saurida undosquamis, causes severe economic losses in marine aquaculture. Among the novel approaches being explored for treatment of parasitic infections in aquaculture is small interfering RNA molecules. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of using siRNA to knock down expression of specific genes of H. saurida in vitro. For this purpose, siRNAs specific for ATP/ADP antiporter 1 and methionine aminopeptidase II genes were designed and tested using a previously developed in vitro cultivation model. Silencing of H. saurida target genes was assessed and the efficacy of using siRNA for inhibition of gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Silencing of ATP/ADP antiporter 1 or methionine aminopeptidase II by siRNA reduced H. saurida infection levels in EK-1 cells 40% and 60%, respectively, as measured by qRT-PCR and spore counts. Combined siRNA treatment of both ATP/ADP antiporter 1 and methionine aminopeptidase II siRNAs was more effective against H. saurida infection as seen by the 16S rRNA level and spore counts. Our study concluded that siRNA could be used to advance development of novel approaches to inhibit H. saurida and provide an alternative approach to combat microsporidia. PMID:27228357

  10. The little elongation complex functions at initiation and elongation phases of snRNA gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Hu, Deqing; Smith, Edwin R; Garruss, Alexander S; Mohaghegh, Nima; Varberg, Joseph M; Lin, Chengqi; Jackson, Jessica; Gao, Xin; Saraf, Anita; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Eissenberg, Joel C; Shilatifard, Ali

    2013-08-22

    The small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes have been widely used as a model system for understanding transcriptional regulation due to the unique aspects of their promoter structure, selectivity for either RNA polymerase (Pol) II or III, and because of their unique mechanism of termination that is tightly linked with the promoter. Recently, we identified the little elongation complex (LEC) in Drosophila that is required for the expression of Pol II-transcribed snRNA genes. Here, using Drosophila and mammalian systems, we provide genetic and molecular evidence that LEC functions in at least two phases of snRNA transcription: an initiation step requiring the ICE1 subunit, and an elongation step requiring ELL. PMID:23932780

  11. The Little Elongation Complex functions at initiation and elongation phases of snRNA gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Deqing; Smith, Edwin R.; Garruss, Alexander S.; Mohaghegh, Nima; Varberg, Joseph M.; Lin, Chengqi; Jackson, Jessica; Gao, Xin; Saraf, Anita; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Shilatifard, Ali

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes have been widely used as a model system for understanding transcriptional regulation due to the unique aspects of their promoter structure, selectivity for either RNA Polymerase (Pol) II or III, and because of their unique mechanism of termination that is tightly linked with the promoter. Recently, we identified the Little Elongation Complex (LEC) in Drosophila that is required for the expression of Pol II-transcribed snRNA genes. Here, using Drosophila and mammalian systems, we provide genetic and molecular evidence that LEC functions in at least two phases of snRNA transcription: an initiation step requiring the ICE1 subunit, and an elongation step requiring ELL. PMID:23932780

  12. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Maroteaux, L

    1986-11-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  13. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michel; Maroteaux, Luc

    1986-01-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  14. An Lnc RNA (GAS5)/SnoRNA-derived piRNA induces activation of TRAIL gene by site-specifically recruiting MLL/COMPASS-like complexes

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Chen, Xinxin; Zhang, Xue; Duan, Xiaobing; Pan, Ting; Hu, Qifei; Zhang, Yijun; Zhong, Fudi; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Hong; Luo, Juan; Wu, Kang; Peng, Gao; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Lehong; Li, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) silences the transposons in germlines or induces epigenetic modifications in the invertebrates. However, its function in the mammalian somatic cells remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that a piRNA derived from Growth Arrest Specific 5, a tumor-suppressive long non-coding RNA, potently upregulates the transcription of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a proapoptotic protein, by inducing H3K4 methylation/H3K27 demethylation. Interestingly, the PIWIL1/4 proteins, which bind with this piRNA, directly interact with WDR5, resulting in a site-specific recruitment of the hCOMPASS-like complexes containing at least MLL3 and UTX (KDM6A). We have indicated a novel pathway for piRNAs to specially activate gene expression. Given that MLL3 or UTX are frequently mutated in various tumors, the piRNA/MLL3/UTX complex mediates the induction of TRAIL, and consequently leads to the inhibition of tumor growth. PMID:25779046

  15. Sigma elements are position-specific for many different yeast tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sandmeyer, S B; Bilanchone, V W; Clark, D J; Morcos, P; Carle, G F; Brodeur, G M

    1988-01-01

    We determined the DNA sequence of seventeen sigma elements and flanking regions in order to investigate the extent of the association between the yeast repetitive element, sigma, and tRNA genes. Fifteen of seventeen sigma elements analyzed begin at position -19 to -16 with respect to the 5' end of a tRNA-coding sequence. This region is close to the initiation point of tRNA gene transcription and contains a sequence which is modestly conserved for a number of tRNA genes. Two pairs of identical sigma elements occur as the long terminal repeats of a sequence which, together with flanking sigma elements, has the structural properties of a retrotransposon; this element has been named Ty3 (manuscript submitted). Hybridization analysis of yeast chromosomal DNA separated by orthogonal field alternation gel electrophoresis (OFAGE) showed that Ty3 and isolated sigma elements are distributed over many chromosomes in the yeast genome. Images PMID:3279393

  16. Diversity of 5S rRNA genes within individual prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Anna; Li, Hongru; Oberdorf, William E; Alekseyenko, Alexander V.; Parsons, Tamasha; Yang, Liying; Gerz, Erika A.; Lee, Peng; Xiang, Charlie; Nossa, Carlos W.; Pei, Zhiheng

    2012-01-01

    We examined intragenomic variation of paralogous 5S rRNA genes to evaluate the concept of ribosomal constraints. In a dataset containing 1168 genomes from 779 unique species, 96 species exhibited >3% diversity. Twenty seven species with >10% diversity contained a total of 421 mismatches between all pairs of the most dissimilar copies of 5S rRNA genes. The large majority (401 of 421) the diversified positions were conserved at the secondary structure level. The high diversity was associated with partial rRNA operon, split operon, or spacer length-related divergence. In total, these findings indicated that there were tight ribosomal constraints on paralogous 5S rRNA genes in a genome despite of the high degree of diversity at the primary structure level. There is supplementary material. PMID:22765222

  17. The SILVA ribosomal RNA gene database project: improved data processing and web-based tools

    PubMed Central

    Quast, Christian; Pruesse, Elmar; Yilmaz, Pelin; Gerken, Jan; Schweer, Timmy; Yarza, Pablo; Peplies, Jörg; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2013-01-01

    SILVA (from Latin silva, forest, http://www.arb-silva.de) is a comprehensive web resource for up to date, quality-controlled databases of aligned ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences from the Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota domains and supplementary online services. The referred database release 111 (July 2012) contains 3 194 778 small subunit and 288 717 large subunit rRNA gene sequences. Since the initial description of the project, substantial new features have been introduced, including advanced quality control procedures, an improved rRNA gene aligner, online tools for probe and primer evaluation and optimized browsing, searching and downloading on the website. Furthermore, the extensively curated SILVA taxonomy and the new non-redundant SILVA datasets provide an ideal reference for high-throughput classification of data from next-generation sequencing approaches. PMID:23193283

  18. hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by stabilizing mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yugami, Masato; Kabe, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are thought to be involved in pre-mRNA processing. hnRNP-U, also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), binds to pre-mRNA and nuclear matrix/scaffold attachment region DNA elements. However, its role in the regulation of gene expression is as yet poorly understood. In the present study, we show that hnRNP-U specifically enhances the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA by increasing its stability, possibly through binding to the 3' untranslated region. We also show that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of several other genes as well, including GADD45A, HEXIM1, HOXA2, IER3, NHLH2, and ZFY, by binding to and stabilizing these mRNAs. These results suggest that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by regulating mRNA stability. PMID:17174306

  19. A tRNA(Val) (GAC) gene of chloroplast origin in sunflower mitochondria is not transcribed.

    PubMed

    Ceci, L R; Saiardi, A; Siculella, L; Quagliariello, C

    1993-11-01

    A tRNA(Val) (GAC) gene is located in opposite orientation 552 nucleotides (nt) down-stream of the cytochrome oxidase subunit III (coxIII) gene in sunflower mitochondria. The comparison with the homologous chloroplast DNA revealed that the tRNA(Val) gene is part of a 417 nucleotides DNA insertion of chloroplast origin in the mitochondrial genome. No tRNA(Val) is encoded in monocot mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas two tRNA(Val) species are coded for by potato mtDNA. The mitochondrial genomes of different plant species thus seem to encode unique sets of tRNAs and must thus be competent in importing the missing differing sets of tRNAs. PMID:8251626

  20. Cloning and characterization of the gene for Escherichia coli seryl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Härtlein, M; Madern, D; Leberman, R

    1987-01-01

    Seryl-tRNA synthetase is the gene product of the serS locus in Escherichia coli. Its gene has been cloned by complementation of a serS temperature sensitive mutant K28 with an E. coli gene bank DNA. The resulting clones overexpress seryl-tRNA synthetase by a factor greater than 50 and more than 6% of the total cellular protein corresponds to the enzyme. The DNA sequence of the complete coding region and the 5'- and 3' untranslated regions was determined. Protein sequence comparison of SerRS with all available aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase sequences revealed some regions of significant homology particularly with the isoleucyl- and phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases from E. coli. Images PMID:3029694

  1. Comparing bioinformatic gene expression profiling methods: microarray and RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Mantione, Kirk J; Kream, Richard M; Kuzelova, Hana; Ptacek, Radek; Raboch, Jiri; Samuel, Joshua M; Stefano, George B

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the control of gene expression is critical for our understanding of the relationship between genotype and phenotype. The need for reliable assessment of transcript abundance in biological samples has driven scientists to develop novel technologies such as DNA microarray and RNA-Seq to meet this demand. This review focuses on comparing the two most useful methods for whole transcriptome gene expression profiling. Microarrays are reliable and more cost effective than RNA-Seq for gene expression profiling in model organisms. RNA-Seq will eventually be used more routinely than microarray, but right now the techniques can be complementary to each other. Microarrays will not become obsolete but might be relegated to only a few uses. RNA-Seq clearly has a bright future in bioinformatic data collection. PMID:25149683

  2. Mmi1 RNA surveillance machinery directs RNAi complex RITS to specific meiotic genes in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hiriart, Edwige; Vavasseur, Aurélia; Touat-Todeschini, Leila; Yamashita, Akira; Gilquin, Benoit; Lambert, Emeline; Perot, Jonathan; Shichino, Yuichi; Nazaret, Nicolas; Boyault, Cyril; Lachuer, Joel; Perazza, Daniel; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Verdel, André

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) silences gene expression by acting both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in a broad range of eukaryotes. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the RNA-Induced Transcriptional Silencing (RITS) RNAi complex mediates heterochromatin formation at non-coding and repetitive DNA. However, the targeting and role of RITS at other genomic regions, including protein-coding genes, remain unknown. Here we show that RITS localizes to specific meiotic genes and mRNAs. Remarkably, RITS is guided to these meiotic targets by the RNA-binding protein Mmi1 and its associated RNA surveillance machinery that together degrade selective meiotic mRNAs during vegetative growth. Upon sexual differentiation, RITS localization to the meiotic genes and mRNAs is lost. Large-scale identification of Mmi1 RNA targets reveals that RITS subunit Chp1 associates with the vast majority of them. In addition, loss of RNAi affects the effective repression of sexual differentiation mediated by the Mmi1 RNA surveillance machinery. These findings uncover a new mechanism for recruiting RNAi to specific meiotic genes and suggest that RNAi participates in the control of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. PMID:22522705

  3. Genetic organization and mRNA expression of enolase genes of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Postlethwait, P; Sundstrom, P

    1995-04-01

    In previous work, we cloned a Candida albicans cDNA for the glycolytic enzyme enolase and found a single, abundant enolase transcript on Northern (RNA) blots and a single protein on immunoblots, using antiserum raised against a recombinant enolase fusion protein. Because C. albicans enolase is abundantly produced during infection and elicits strong host immune responses, the mechanisms regulating enolase production are important for understanding the growth of C. albicans in vivo. To obtain more information on enolase gene expression by C. albicans, we used the enolase cDNA clone to investigate the genetic organization of enolase genes and the steady-state levels of enolase mRNA under several growth conditions. Gene disruption techniques in combination with Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA showed the presence of two enolase gene loci that could be distinguished by the locations of ClaI and Mn/I sites in their 3' flanking regions. Enolase steady-state mRNA levels were greatest during the middle phase of the logarithmic growth curve and were low during stationary phase. Minimal differences in enolase mRNA levels between yeast cells and hyphae were found. Propagation of C. albicans in glucose did not cause increased enolase mRNA levels compared with growth in a nonfermentable carbon source (pyruvate). It was concluded that two gene loci exist for C. albicans enolase and that enolase mRNA is constitutively produced at high levels during active metabolism. PMID:7896700

  4. Transformation of Chloroplast Ribosomal RNA Genes in Chlamydomonas: Molecular and Genetic Characterization of Integration Events

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S. M.; Boynton, J. E.; Gillham, N. W.; Randolph-Anderson, B. L.; Johnson, A. M.; Harris, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of chloroplast ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in Chlamydomonas has been achieved by the biolistic process using cloned chloroplast DNA fragments carrying mutations that confer antibiotic resistance. The sites of exchange employed during the integration of the donor DNA into the recipient genome have been localized using a combination of antibiotic resistance mutations in the 16S and 23S rRNA genes and restriction fragment length polymorphisms that flank these genes. Complete or nearly complete replacement of a region of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cell by the corresponding sequence from the donor plasmid was the most common integration event. Exchange events between the homologous donor and recipient sequences occurred preferentially near the vector:insert junctions. Insertion of the donor rRNA genes and flanking sequences into one inverted repeat of the recipient genome was followed by intramolecular copy correction so that both copies of the inverted repeat acquired identical sequences. Increased frequencies of rRNA gene transformants were achieved by reducing the copy number of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cells and by decreasing the heterology between donor and recipient DNA sequences flanking the selectable markers. In addition to producing bona fide chloroplast rRNA transformants, the biolistic process induced mutants resistant to low levels of streptomycin, typical of nuclear mutations in Chlamydomonas. PMID:1981764

  5. Long-term effect of systemic RNA interference on circadian clock genes in hemimetabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Uryu, Outa; Kamae, Yuichi; Tomioka, Kenji; Yoshii, Taishi

    2013-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) strategy, which enables gene-specific knock-down of transcripts, has been spread across a wide area of insect studies for investigating gene function without regard to model and non-model insects. This technique is of particular benefit to promote molecular studies on non-model insects. However, the optimal conditions for RNAi are still not well understood because of its variable efficiency depending on the species, target genes, and experimental conditions. To apply RNAi technique to long-running experiments such as chronobiological studies, the effects of RNAi have to persist throughout the experiment. In this study, we attempted to determine the optimal concentration of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for systemic RNAi and its effective period in two different insect species, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and the firebrat Thermobia domestica. In both species, higher concentrations of dsRNA principally yielded a more efficient knock-down of mRNA levels of tested clock genes, although the effect depended on the gene and the species. Surprisingly, the effect of the RNAi reached its maximum effect 1-2 weeks and 1 month after the injection of dsRNA in the crickets and the firebrats, respectively, suggesting a slow but long-term effect of RNAi. Our study provides fundamental information for utilizing RNAi technique in any long-running experiment. PMID:23458340

  6. Dynamical analysis of mCAT2 gene models with CTN-RNA nuclear retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-02-01

    As an experimentally well-studied nuclear-retained RNA, CTN-RNA plays a significant role in many aspects of mouse cationic amino acid transporter 2 (mCAT2) gene expression, but relevant dynamical mechanisms have not been completely clarified. Here we first show that CTN-RNA nuclear retention can not only reduce pre-mCAT2 RNA noise but also mediate its coding partner noise. Then, by collecting experimental observations, we conjecture a heterodimer formed by two proteins, p54nrb and PSP1, named p54nrb-PSP1, by which CTN-RNA can positively regulate the expression of nuclear mCAT2 RNA. Therefore, we construct a sequestration model at the molecular level. By analyzing the dynamics of this model system, we demonstrate why most nuclear-retained CTN-RNAs stabilize at the periphery of paraspeckles, how CTN-RNA regulates its protein-coding partner, and how the mCAT2 gene can maintain a stable expression. In particular, we obtain results that can easily explain the experimental phenomena observed in two cases, namely, when cells are stressed and unstressed. Our entire analysis not only reveals that CTN-RNA nuclear retention may play an essential role in indirectly preventing diseases but also lays the foundation for further study of other members of the nuclear-regulatory RNA family with more complicated molecular mechanisms.

  7. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples. PMID:25343859

  8. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae).

    PubMed

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae. PMID:27180804

  9. A T7 RNA polymerase-based toolkit for the concerted expression of clustered genes.

    PubMed

    Arvani, Solmaz; Markert, Annette; Loeschcke, Anita; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Drepper, Thomas

    2012-06-15

    Bacterial genes whose enzymes are either assembled into complex multi-domain proteins or form biosynthetic pathways are frequently organized within large chromosomal clusters. The functional expression of clustered genes, however, remains challenging since it generally requires an expression system that facilitates the coordinated transcription of numerous genes irrespective of their natural promoters and terminators. Here, we report on the development of a novel expression system that is particularly suitable for the homologous expression of multiple genes organized in a contiguous cluster. The new expression toolkit consists of an Ω interposon cassette carrying a T7 RNA polymerase specific promoter which is designed for promoter tagging of clustered genes and a small set of broad-host-range plasmids providing the respective polymerase in different bacteria. The uptake hydrogenase gene locus of the photosynthetic non-sulfur purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus which consists of 16 genes was used as an example to demonstrate functional expression only by T7 RNA polymerase but not by bacterial RNA polymerase. Our findings clearly indicate that due to its unique properties T7 RNA polymerase can be applied for overexpression of large and complex bacterial gene regions. PMID:22285639

  10. RNA interference can be used to disrupt gene function in tardigrades

    PubMed Central

    Tenlen, Jennifer R.; McCaskill, Shaina; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    How morphological diversity arises is a key question in evolutionary developmental biology. As a long-term approach to address this question, we are developing the water bear Hypsibius dujardini (Phylum Tardigrada) as a model system. We expect that using a close relative of two well-studied models, Drosophila (Phylum Arthropoda) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Phylum Nematoda), will facilitate identifying genetic pathways relevant to understanding the evolution of development. Tardigrades are also valuable research subjects for investigating how organisms and biological materials can survive extreme conditions. Methods to disrupt gene activity are essential to each of these efforts, but no such method yet exists for the Phylum Tardigrada. We developed a protocol to disrupt tardigrade gene functions by double-stranded RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). We show that targeting tardigrade homologs of essential developmental genes by RNAi produced embryonic lethality, whereas targeting green fluorescent protein did not. Disruption of gene functions appears to be relatively specific by two criteria: targeting distinct genes resulted in distinct phenotypes that were consistent with predicted gene functions, and by RT-PCR, RNAi reduced the level of a target mRNA and not a control mRNA. These studies represent the first evidence that gene functions can be disrupted by RNAi in the phylum Tardigrada. Our results form a platform for dissecting tardigrade gene functions for understanding the evolution of developmental mechanisms and survival in extreme environments. PMID:23187800

  11. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae. PMID:27180804

  12. Virus-induced gene silencing of RPC5-like subunit of RNA polymerase III caused pleiotropic effects in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase III is highly conserved, contains 17 subunits and transcribes housekeeping genes such as ribosomal 50S rRNA, tRNA and other small RNAs. Functional roles of the RPC5 are poorly characterized in the literature. In this work, we report that virus-induced gene silenci...

  13. Efficient expression of protein coding genes from the murine U1 small nuclear RNA promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J S; Sethna, M; Ramamurthy, L; Gowen, S A; Samulski, R J; Marzluff, W F

    1996-01-01

    Few promoters are active at high levels in all cells. Of these, the majority encode structural RNAs transcribed by RNA polymerases I or III and are not accessible for the expression of proteins. An exception are the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Although snRNA biosynthesis is unique and thought not to be compatible with synthesis of functional mRNA, we have tested these promoters for their ability to express functional mRNAs. We have used the murine U1a and U1b snRNA gene promoters to express the Escherichia coli lacZ gene and the human alpha-globin gene from either episomal or integrated templates by transfection, or infection into a variety of mammalian cell types. Equivalent expression of beta-galactosidase was obtained from < 250 nucleotides of 5'-flanking sequence containing the complete promoter of either U1 snRNA gene or from the 750-nt cytomegalovirus promoter and enhancer regions. The mRNA was accurately initiated at the U1 start site, efficiently spliced and polyadenylylated, and localized to polyribosomes. Recombinant adenovirus containing the U1b-lacZ chimeric gene transduced and expressed beta-galactosidase efficiently in human 293 cells and airway epithelial cells in culture. Viral vectors containing U1 snRNA promoters may be an attractive alternative to vectors containing viral promoters for persistent high-level expression of therapeutic genes or proteins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8799116

  14. Significant impact of miRNA-target gene networks on genetics of human complex traits.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suita, Naomasa; Kanai, Masahiro; Kawakami, Eiryo; Iotchkova, Valentina; Soranzo, Nicole; Inazawa, Johji; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The impact of microRNA (miRNA) on the genetics of human complex traits, especially in the context of miRNA-target gene networks, has not been fully assessed. Here, we developed a novel analytical method, MIGWAS, to comprehensively evaluate enrichment of genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in miRNA-target gene networks. We applied the method to the GWAS results of the 18 human complex traits from >1.75 million subjects, and identified significant enrichment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), kidney function, and adult height (P < 0.05/18 = 0.0028, most significant enrichment in RA with P = 1.7 × 10(-4)). Interestingly, these results were consistent with current literature-based knowledge of the traits on miRNA obtained through the NCBI PubMed database search (adjusted P = 0.024). Our method provided a list of miRNA and target gene pairs with excess genetic association signals, part of which included drug target genes. We identified a miRNA (miR-4728-5p) that downregulates PADI2, a novel RA risk gene considered as a promising therapeutic target (rs761426, adjusted P = 2.3 × 10(-9)). Our study indicated the significant impact of miRNA-target gene networks on the genetics of human complex traits, and provided resources which should contribute to drug discovery and nucleic acid medicine. PMID:26927695

  15. Integrating mRNA and miRNA Weighted Gene Co-Expression Networks with eQTLs in the Nucleus Accumbens of Subjects with Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Mamdani, Mohammed; Williamson, Vernell; McMichael, Gowon O; Blevins, Tana; Aliev, Fazil; Adkins, Amy; Hack, Laura; Bigdeli, Tim; van der Vaart, Andrew D; Web, Bradley Todd; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Kalsi, Gursharan; Kendler, Kenneth S; Miles, Michael F; Dick, Danielle; Riley, Brien P; Dumur, Catherine; Vladimirov, Vladimir I

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is known to lead to gene expression changes in the brain. After performing weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) on genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression in Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) of subjects with alcohol dependence (AD; N = 18) and of matched controls (N = 18), six mRNA and three miRNA modules significantly correlated with AD were identified (Bonferoni-adj. p≤ 0.05). Cell-type-specific transcriptome analyses revealed two of the mRNA modules to be enriched for neuronal specific marker genes and downregulated in AD, whereas the remaining four mRNA modules were enriched for astrocyte and microglial specific marker genes and upregulated in AD. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that neuronal specific modules were enriched for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPK signaling. Glial-specific modules were predominantly enriched for genes involved in processes related to immune functions, i.e. cytokine signaling (all adj. p≤ 0.05). In mRNA and miRNA modules, 461 and 25 candidate hub genes were identified, respectively. In contrast to the expected biological functions of miRNAs, correlation analyses between mRNA and miRNA hub genes revealed a higher number of positive than negative correlations (χ2 test p≤ 0.0001). Integration of hub gene expression with genome-wide genotypic data resulted in 591 mRNA cis-eQTLs and 62 miRNA cis-eQTLs. mRNA cis-eQTLs were significantly enriched for AD diagnosis and AD symptom counts (adj. p = 0.014 and p = 0.024, respectively) in AD GWAS signals in a large, independent genetic sample from the Collaborative Study on Genetics of Alcohol (COGA). In conclusion, our study identified putative gene network hubs coordinating mRNA and miRNA co-expression changes in the NAc of AD subjects, and our genetic (cis-eQTL) analysis provides novel insights into the etiological mechanisms of AD. PMID:26381263

  16. Integrating mRNA and miRNA Weighted Gene Co-Expression Networks with eQTLs in the Nucleus Accumbens of Subjects with Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Tana; Aliev, Fazil; Adkins, Amy; Hack, Laura; Bigdeli, Tim; D. van der Vaart, Andrew; Web, Bradley Todd; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Kalsi, Gursharan; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Miles, Michael F.; Dick, Danielle; Riley, Brien P.; Dumur, Catherine; Vladimirov, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is known to lead to gene expression changes in the brain. After performing weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) on genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression in Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) of subjects with alcohol dependence (AD; N = 18) and of matched controls (N = 18), six mRNA and three miRNA modules significantly correlated with AD were identified (Bonferoni-adj. p≤ 0.05). Cell-type-specific transcriptome analyses revealed two of the mRNA modules to be enriched for neuronal specific marker genes and downregulated in AD, whereas the remaining four mRNA modules were enriched for astrocyte and microglial specific marker genes and upregulated in AD. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that neuronal specific modules were enriched for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPK signaling. Glial-specific modules were predominantly enriched for genes involved in processes related to immune functions, i.e. cytokine signaling (all adj. p≤ 0.05). In mRNA and miRNA modules, 461 and 25 candidate hub genes were identified, respectively. In contrast to the expected biological functions of miRNAs, correlation analyses between mRNA and miRNA hub genes revealed a higher number of positive than negative correlations (χ2 test p≤ 0.0001). Integration of hub gene expression with genome-wide genotypic data resulted in 591 mRNA cis-eQTLs and 62 miRNA cis-eQTLs. mRNA cis-eQTLs were significantly enriched for AD diagnosis and AD symptom counts (adj. p = 0.014 and p = 0.024, respectively) in AD GWAS signals in a large, independent genetic sample from the Collaborative Study on Genetics of Alcohol (COGA). In conclusion, our study identified putative gene network hubs coordinating mRNA and miRNA co-expression changes in the NAc of AD subjects, and our genetic (cis-eQTL) analysis provides novel insights into the etiological mechanisms of AD. PMID:26381263

  17. Integration of mapped RNA-Seq reads into automatic training of eukaryotic gene finding algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lomsadze, Alexandre; Burns, Paul D; Borodovsky, Mark

    2014-09-01

    We present a new approach to automatic training of a eukaryotic ab initio gene finding algorithm. With the advent of Next-Generation Sequencing, automatic training has become paramount, allowing genome annotation pipelines to keep pace with the speed of genome sequencing. Earlier we developed GeneMark-ES, currently the only gene finding algorithm for eukaryotic genomes that performs automatic training in unsupervised ab initio mode. The new algorithm, GeneMark-ET augments GeneMark-ES with a novel method that integrates RNA-Seq read alignments into the self-training procedure. Use of 'assembled' RNA-Seq transcripts is far from trivial; significant error rate of assembly was revealed in recent assessments. We demonstrated in computational experiments that the proposed method of incorporation of 'unassembled' RNA-Seq reads improves the accuracy of gene prediction; particularly, for the 1.3 GB genome of Aedes aegypti the mean value of prediction Sensitivity and Specificity at the gene level increased over GeneMark-ES by 24.5%. In the current surge of genomic data when the need for accurate sequence annotation is higher than ever, GeneMark-ET will be a valuable addition to the narrow arsenal of automatic gene prediction tools. PMID:24990371

  18. Integration of mapped RNA-Seq reads into automatic training of eukaryotic gene finding algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lomsadze, Alexandre; Burns, Paul D.; Borodovsky, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We present a new approach to automatic training of a eukaryotic ab initio gene finding algorithm. With the advent of Next-Generation Sequencing, automatic training has become paramount, allowing genome annotation pipelines to keep pace with the speed of genome sequencing. Earlier we developed GeneMark-ES, currently the only gene finding algorithm for eukaryotic genomes that performs automatic training in unsupervised ab initio mode. The new algorithm, GeneMark-ET augments GeneMark-ES with a novel method that integrates RNA-Seq read alignments into the self-training procedure. Use of ‘assembled’ RNA-Seq transcripts is far from trivial; significant error rate of assembly was revealed in recent assessments. We demonstrated in computational experiments that the proposed method of incorporation of ‘unassembled’ RNA-Seq reads improves the accuracy of gene prediction; particularly, for the 1.3 GB genome of Aedes aegypti the mean value of prediction Sensitivity and Specificity at the gene level increased over GeneMark-ES by 24.5%. In the current surge of genomic data when the need for accurate sequence annotation is higher than ever, GeneMark-ET will be a valuable addition to the narrow arsenal of automatic gene prediction tools. PMID:24990371

  19. RNA-Seq workflow: gene-level exploratory analysis and differential expression

    PubMed Central

    Love, Michael I.; Anders, Simon; Kim, Vladislav; Huber, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Here we walk through an end-to-end gene-level RNA-Seq differential expression workflow using Bioconductor packages. We will start from the FASTQ files, show how these were aligned to the reference genome, and prepare a count matrix which tallies the number of RNA-seq reads/fragments within each gene for each sample. We will perform exploratory data analysis (EDA) for quality assessment and to explore the relationship between samples, perform differential gene expression analysis, and visually explore the results. PMID:26674615

  20. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method. PMID:26808495

  1. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method. PMID:26808495

  2. Functional analysis of the cellulose gene of the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, using RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Ma, H B; Lu, Q; Liang, J; Zhang, X Y

    2011-01-01

    Cellulases are pathogenic substances suspected to be responsible for the development of the early symptoms of nematode disease. The pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Parasitaphelenchidae), is the causal agent of pine wilt disease, which kills millions of pine trees. We used RNA interference (RNAi), a reverse genetic tool, to analyze the function of the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene of B. xylophilus, which causes the most serious forest tree disease in China and the rest of eastern Asia. Silencing of this gene was detected through real-time PCR and cellulase activity assays after soaking for 24 h in dsRNA. The cellulase gene silencing effects differed among various siRNAs. The propagation and dispersal ability of these nematodes decreased when the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene was silenced. It is important to select an effective siRNA before performing an RNAi test. PMID:21948755

  3. Systemic gene silencing in plants triggered by fluorescent nanoparticle-delivered double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Ding, Lian; He, Bicheng; Shen, Jie; Xu, Zejun; Yin, Meizhen; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2014-08-01

    A cationic fluorescence nanoparticle efficiently enters plants with high transfection efficacy. Applying a mixture of G2/dsRNA to the model plant, Arabidopsis root, leads to significant reduction in the expression of important developmental genes and results in apparent phenotypes. This study reports a non-viral gene nanocarrier which triggers gene silencing in plants and leads to systemic phenotypes.A cationic fluorescence nanoparticle efficiently enters plants with high transfection efficacy. Applying a mixture of G2/dsRNA to the model plant, Arabidopsis root, leads to significant reduction in the expression of important developmental genes and results in apparent phenotypes. This study reports a non-viral gene nanocarrier which triggers gene silencing in plants and leads to systemic phenotypes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03481c

  4. Expression profiling of Drosophila mitochondrial genes via deep mRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Tatiana Teixeira; Dolezal, Marlies; Schlötterer, Christian; Ottenwälder, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in several cellular processes. Nevertheless, very little is known about patterns of gene expression of genes encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In this study, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) for transcription profiling of genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome of Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura. The analysis of males and females in both species indicated that the expression pattern was conserved between the two species, but differed significantly between both sexes. Interestingly, mRNA levels were not only different among genes encoded by separate transcription units, but also showed significant differences among genes located in the same transcription unit. Hence, mRNA abundance of genes encoded by mtDNA seems to be heavily modulated by post-transcriptional regulation. Finally, we also identified several transcripts with a noncanonical structure, suggesting that processing of mitochondrial transcripts may be more complex than previously assumed. PMID:19843606

  5. Gene rearrangements and evolution of tRNA pseudogenes in the mitochondrial genome of the parrotfish (Teleostei: Perciformes: Scaridae).

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, Kohji; Miya, Masaki; Satoh, Takashi P; Westneat, Mark W; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2004-09-01

    Genomic size of animal mitochondrial DNA is usually minimized over time. Thus, when regional duplications occur, they are followed by a rapid elimination of redundant material. In contrast to this general view, we report here long-sustained tRNA pseudogenes in the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of teleost fishes of the family Scaridae (parrotfishes). During the course of a molecular phylogenetic study of the suborder Labroidei, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitogenome for a parrotfish, Chlorurus sordidus, and found a gene rearrangement accompanied by a tRNA pseudogene. In the typical gene order of vertebrates, a tRNA-gene cluster between ND1 and ND2 genes includes tRNA(Ile) (I), tRNA(Gln) (Q), and tRNA(Met) (M) genes in this order (IQM). However, in the mitogenome of the parrotfish, the tRNA(Met) gene was inserted between the tRNA(Ile) and the tRNA(Gln) genes, and the tRNA(Gln) gene was followed by a putative tRNA(Met) pseudogene (psiM). Such a tRNA gene rearrangement including a pseudogene (IMQpsiM) was found in all of the 10 examined species, representing 7 of the 10 currently recognized scarid genera. All sister groups examined (20 species of Labridae and a single species of Odacidae) had the typical gene order of vertebrate mitogenomes. Phylogenetic analysis of the tRNA(Met) genes and the resulting pseudogenes demonstrated that the ancestral tRNA(Met) gene was duplicated in a common ancestor of the parrotfish. Based on the fossil record, these results indicate that the pseudogenes have survived at least 14 million years. Most of the vertebrate mitochondrial gene rearrangements involving the IQM region have held the tRNA(Met) gene just upstream of the ND2 gene, and even in a few exceptional cases, including the present ones, the tRNA pseudogenes have been found in that position. In addition, most of these tRNA(Met) pseudogenes maintained clover-leaf secondary structures, with the remainder sustaining the clover-leaf structure in the

  6. Cardiac Gene Expression Knockdown Using Small Inhibitory RNA-Loaded Microbubbles and Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kopechek, Jonathan A; Carson, Andrew R; McTiernan, Charles F; Chen, Xucai; Klein, Edwin C; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has potential therapeutic value for cardiac disease, but targeted delivery of interfering RNA is a challenge. Custom designed microbubbles, in conjunction with ultrasound, can deliver small inhibitory RNA to target tissues in vivo. The efficacy of cardiac RNA interference using a microbubble-ultrasound theranostic platform has not been demonstrated in vivo. Therefore, our objective was to test the hypothesis that custom designed microbubbles and ultrasound can mediate effective delivery of small inhibitory RNA to the heart. Microbubble and ultrasound mediated cardiac RNA interference was tested in transgenic mice displaying cardiac-restricted luciferase expression. Luciferase expression was assayed in select tissues of untreated mice (n = 14). Mice received intravenous infusion of cationic microbubbles bearing small inhibitory RNA directed against luciferase (n = 9) or control RNA (n = 8) during intermittent cardiac-directed ultrasound at mechanical index of 1.6. Simultaneous echocardiography in a separate group of mice (n = 3) confirmed microbubble destruction and replenishment during treatment. Three days post treatment, cardiac luciferase messenger RNA and protein levels were significantly lower in ultrasound-treated mice receiving microbubbles loaded with small inhibitory RNA directed against luciferase compared to mice receiving microbubbles bearing control RNA (23±7% and 33±7% of control mice, p<0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). Passive cavitation detection focused on the heart confirmed that insonification resulted in inertial cavitation. In conclusion, small inhibitory RNA-loaded microbubbles and ultrasound directed at the heart significantly reduced the expression of a reporter gene. Ultrasound-targeted destruction of RNA-loaded microbubbles may be an effective image-guided strategy for therapeutic RNA interference in cardiac disease. PMID:27471848

  7. Cardiac Gene Expression Knockdown Using Small Inhibitory RNA-Loaded Microbubbles and Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    McTiernan, Charles F.; Chen, Xucai; Klein, Edwin C.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has potential therapeutic value for cardiac disease, but targeted delivery of interfering RNA is a challenge. Custom designed microbubbles, in conjunction with ultrasound, can deliver small inhibitory RNA to target tissues in vivo. The efficacy of cardiac RNA interference using a microbubble-ultrasound theranostic platform has not been demonstrated in vivo. Therefore, our objective was to test the hypothesis that custom designed microbubbles and ultrasound can mediate effective delivery of small inhibitory RNA to the heart. Microbubble and ultrasound mediated cardiac RNA interference was tested in transgenic mice displaying cardiac-restricted luciferase expression. Luciferase expression was assayed in select tissues of untreated mice (n = 14). Mice received intravenous infusion of cationic microbubbles bearing small inhibitory RNA directed against luciferase (n = 9) or control RNA (n = 8) during intermittent cardiac-directed ultrasound at mechanical index of 1.6. Simultaneous echocardiography in a separate group of mice (n = 3) confirmed microbubble destruction and replenishment during treatment. Three days post treatment, cardiac luciferase messenger RNA and protein levels were significantly lower in ultrasound-treated mice receiving microbubbles loaded with small inhibitory RNA directed against luciferase compared to mice receiving microbubbles bearing control RNA (23±7% and 33±7% of control mice, p<0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). Passive cavitation detection focused on the heart confirmed that insonification resulted in inertial cavitation. In conclusion, small inhibitory RNA-loaded microbubbles and ultrasound directed at the heart significantly reduced the expression of a reporter gene. Ultrasound-targeted destruction of RNA-loaded microbubbles may be an effective image-guided strategy for therapeutic RNA interference in cardiac disease. PMID:27471848

  8. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of target genes in several brain regions is correlated to both microRNA-targeting-specific promoter methylation and differential microRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Public domain databases nowadays provide multiple layers of genome-wide data e.g., promoter methylation, mRNA expression, and miRNA expression and should enable integrative modeling of the mechanisms of regulation of gene expression. However, researches along this line were not frequently executed. Results Here, the public domain dataset of mRNA expression, microRNA (miRNA) expression and promoter methylation patterns in four regions, the frontal cortex, temporal cortex, pons and cerebellum, of human brain were sourced from the National Center for Biotechnology Informations gene expression omnibus, and reanalyzed computationally. A large number of miRNA-mediated regulation of target genes and miRNA-targeting-specific promoter methylation were identified in the six pairwise comparisons among the four brain regions. The miRNA-mediated regulation of target genes was found to be highly correlated with one or both of miRNA-targeting-specific promoter methylation and differential miRNA expression. Genes enriched for Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways that were related to brain function and/or development were found among the target genes of miRNAs whose differential expression patterns were highly correlated with the miRNA-mediated regulation of their target genes. Conclusions The combinatorial analysis of miRNA-mediated regulation of target genes, miRNA-targeting-specific promoter methylation and differential miRNA expression can help reveal the brain region-specific contributions of miRNAs to brain function and development. PMID:23725297

  9. Characterizing Milk Production Related Genes in Holstein Using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minseok; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Kwondo; Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Jeong, Jin Young; Park, Sungkwon; Oh, Young Kyun; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2016-03-01

    Although the chemical, physical, and nutritional properties of bovine milk have been extensively studied, only a few studies have attempted to characterize milk-synthesizing genes using RNA-seq data. RNA-seq data was collected from 21 Holstein samples, along with group information about milk production ability; milk yield; and protein, fat, and solid contents. Meta-analysis was employed in order to generally characterize genes related to milk production. In addition, we attempted to investigate the relationship between milk related traits, parity, and lactation period. We observed that milk fat is highly correlated with lactation period; this result indicates that this effect should be considered in the model in order to accurately detect milk production related genes. By employing our developed model, 271 genes were significantly (false discovery rate [FDR] adjusted p-value<0.1) detected as milk production related differentially expressed genes. Of these genes, five (albumin, nitric oxide synthase 3, RNA-binding region (RNP1, RRM) containing 3, secreted and transmembrane 1, and serine palmitoyltransferase, small subunit B) were technically validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in order to check the accuracy of RNA-seq analysis. Finally, 83 gene ontology biological processes including several blood vessel and mammary gland development related terms, were significantly detected using DAVID gene-set enrichment analysis. From these results, we observed that detected milk production related genes are highly enriched in the circulation system process and mammary gland related biological functions. In addition, we observed that detected genes including caveolin 1, mammary serum amyloid A3.2, lingual antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin 4 (CATHL4), cathelicidin 6 (CATHL6) have been reported in other species as milk production related gene. For this reason, we concluded that our detected 271 genes would be strong candidates for

  10. Characterizing Milk Production Related Genes in Holstein Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minseok; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Kwondo; Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Jeong, Jin Young; Park, Sungkwon; Oh, Young Kyun; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2016-01-01

    Although the chemical, physical, and nutritional properties of bovine milk have been extensively studied, only a few studies have attempted to characterize milk-synthesizing genes using RNA-seq data. RNA-seq data was collected from 21 Holstein samples, along with group information about milk production ability; milk yield; and protein, fat, and solid contents. Meta-analysis was employed in order to generally characterize genes related to milk production. In addition, we attempted to investigate the relationship between milk related traits, parity, and lactation period. We observed that milk fat is highly correlated with lactation period; this result indicates that this effect should be considered in the model in order to accurately detect milk production related genes. By employing our developed model, 271 genes were significantly (false discovery rate [FDR] adjusted p-value<0.1) detected as milk production related differentially expressed genes. Of these genes, five (albumin, nitric oxide synthase 3, RNA-binding region (RNP1, RRM) containing 3, secreted and transmembrane 1, and serine palmitoyltransferase, small subunit B) were technically validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in order to check the accuracy of RNA-seq analysis. Finally, 83 gene ontology biological processes including several blood vessel and mammary gland development related terms, were significantly detected using DAVID gene-set enrichment analysis. From these results, we observed that detected milk production related genes are highly enriched in the circulation system process and mammary gland related biological functions. In addition, we observed that detected genes including caveolin 1, mammary serum amyloid A3.2, lingual antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin 4 (CATHL4), cathelicidin 6 (CATHL6) have been reported in other species as milk production related gene. For this reason, we concluded that our detected 271 genes would be strong candidates for

  11. Artificial micro RNA (amiRNA) induced gene silencing in alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene silencing is a powerful technique that allows the study of the function of specific genes by selectively reducing their transcription. Several different approaches can be used; however, they all have in common the artificial generation of single-stranded small RNAs that are utilized by the endo...

  12. Islander: A database of precisely mapped genomic islands in tRNA and tmRNA genes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hudson, Corey M.; Lau, Britney Y.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    Genomic islands are mobile DNAs that are major agents of bacterial and archaeal evolution. Integration into prokaryotic chromosomes usually occurs site-specifically at tRNA or tmRNA gene (together, tDNA) targets, catalyzed by tyrosine integrases. This splits the target gene, yet sequences within the island restore the disrupted gene; the regenerated target and its displaced fragment precisely mark the endpoints of the island. We applied this principle to search for islands in genomic DNA sequences. Our algorithm identifies tDNAs, finds fragments of those tDNAs in the same replicon and removes unlikely candidate islands through a series of filters. A search for islandsmore » in 2168 whole prokaryotic genomes produced 3919 candidates. The website Islander (recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/islander/) presents these precisely mapped candidate islands, the gene content and the island sequence. The algorithm further insists that each island encode an integrase, and attachment site sequence identity is carefully noted; therefore, the database also serves in the study of integrase site-specificity and its evolution.« less

  13. Islander: A database of precisely mapped genomic islands in tRNA and tmRNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Corey M.; Lau, Britney Y.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    Genomic islands are mobile DNAs that are major agents of bacterial and archaeal evolution. Integration into prokaryotic chromosomes usually occurs site-specifically at tRNA or tmRNA gene (together, tDNA) targets, catalyzed by tyrosine integrases. This splits the target gene, yet sequences within the island restore the disrupted gene; the regenerated target and its displaced fragment precisely mark the endpoints of the island. We applied this principle to search for islands in genomic DNA sequences. Our algorithm identifies tDNAs, finds fragments of those tDNAs in the same replicon and removes unlikely candidate islands through a series of filters. A search for islands in 2168 whole prokaryotic genomes produced 3919 candidates. The website Islander (recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/islander/) presents these precisely mapped candidate islands, the gene content and the island sequence. The algorithm further insists that each island encode an integrase, and attachment site sequence identity is carefully noted; therefore, the database also serves in the study of integrase site-specificity and its evolution.

  14. PTA1, an essential gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting pre-tRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, J P; Peebles, C L

    1992-01-01

    We have identified an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, PTA1, that affects pre-tRNA processing. PTA1 was initially defined by a UV-induced mutation, pta1-1, that causes the accumulation of all 10 end-trimmed, intron-containing pre-tRNAs and temperature-sensitive but osmotic-remedial growth. pta1-1 does not appear to be an allele of any other known gene affecting pre-tRNA processing. Extracts prepared from pta1-1 strains had normal pre-tRNA splicing endonuclease activity. pta1-1 was suppressed by the ochre suppressor tRNA gene SUP11, indicating that the pta1-1 mutation creates a termination codon within a protein reading frame. The PTA1 gene was isolated from a genomic library by complementation of the pta1-1 growth defect. Episome-borne PTA1 directs recombination to the pta1-1 locus. PTA1 has been mapped to the left arm of chromosome I near CDC24; the gene was sequenced and could encode a protein of 785 amino acids with a molecular weight of 88,417. No other protein sequences similar to that of the predicted PTA1 gene product have been identified within the EMBL or GenBank data base. Disruption of PTA1 near the carboxy terminus of the putative open reading frame was lethal. Possible functions of the PTA1 gene product are discussed. Images PMID:1508188

  15. Tissue- and Time-Specific Expression of Otherwise Identical tRNA Genes.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Dror; Rak, Roni; Gingold, Hila; Adir, Idan; Maayan, Gadi; Dahan, Orna; Broday, Limor; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Rechavi, Oded

    2016-08-01

    Codon usage bias affects protein translation because tRNAs that recognize synonymous codons differ in their abundance. Although the current dogma states that tRNA expression is exclusively regulated by intrinsic control elements (A- and B-box sequences), we revealed, using a reporter that monitors the levels of individual tRNA genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, that eight tryptophan tRNA genes, 100% identical in sequence, are expressed in different tissues and change their expression dynamically. Furthermore, the expression levels of the sup-7 tRNA gene at day 6 were found to predict the animal's lifespan. We discovered that the expression of tRNAs that reside within introns of protein-coding genes is affected by the host gene's promoter. Pairing between specific Pol II genes and the tRNAs that are contained in their introns is most likely adaptive, since a genome-wide analysis revealed that the presence of specific intronic tRNAs within specific orthologous genes is conserved across Caenorhabditis species. PMID:27560950

  16. The Riia Gene of Bacteriophage T4. II. Regulation of Its Messenger RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Daegelen, P.; Brody, E.

    1990-01-01

    When the rII genes are first introduced into cells which had been previously infected by T4 phage deleted for these genes, the kinetics of synthesis of rIIA and rIIB RNA are rapid and identical. We show that this rapid synthesis depends on a functional motA gene for rIIB, but not for rIIA, RNA synthesis. By primer-extension mapping of T4 messenger RNA, we find three promoters close to the rIIA gene. One of them is an early promoter just before the rIIA.1 gene; it is used under all conditions tested. Another is in the coding portion of the rIIA.1 gene; it is weak, primarily because of a 19-bp spacing between the -10 and -35 elements, and its use is stimulated by T4 functions. The third is a motA-dependent (middle) promoter which has an unusual CCCGCTT box at -33. We present results which suggest that none of these promoters is likely to be the site at which the motB and motC gene products exercise their major influence on rIIA RNA synthesis. PMID:2379818

  17. The product of the imprinted H19 gene is an oncofetal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, I.; Ayesh, S.; Perlman, E. J.; Pizov, G.; Tanos, V.; Schneider, T.; Erdmann, V. A.; Podeh, D.; Komitowski, D.; Quasem, A. S.; de Groot, N.; Hochberg, A.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: The H19 gene is an imprinted, maternally expressed gene in humans. It is tightly linked and coregulated with the imprinted, paternally expressed gene of insulin-like growth factor 2. The H19 gene product is not translated into protein and functions as an RNA molecule. Although its role has been investigated for more than a decade, its biological function is still not understood fully. H19 is abundantly expressed in many tissues from early stages of embryogenesis through fetal life, and is down regulated postnatally. It is also expressed in certain childhood and adult tumours. This study was designed to screen the expression of H19 in human cancer and its relation to the expression of H19 in the fetus. METHODS: Using in situ hybridisation with a [35S] labelled probe, H19 mRNA was detected in paraffin wax sections of fetal tissues from the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and of a large array of human adult and childhood tumours arising from these tissues. RESULTS: The H19 gene is expressed in tumours arising from tissues which express this gene in fetal life. Its expression in the fetus and in cancer is closely linked with tissue differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these and previous data, H19 is neither a tumour suppressor gene nor an oncogene. Its product is an oncofetal RNA. The potential use of this RNA as a tumour marker should be evaluated. Images PMID:9208812

  18. Intravaginal gene silencing using biodegradable polymer nanoparticles densely loaded with small-interfering RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Kim A.; Cu, Yen; Booth, Carmen J.; Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Wood, Monica J.; Mark Saltzman, W.

    2009-06-01

    Vaginal instillation of small-interfering RNA (siRNA) using liposomes has led to silencing of endogenous genes in the genital tract and protection against challenge from infectious disease. Although siRNA lipoplexes are easily formulated, several of the most effective transfection agents available commercially may be toxic to the mucosal epithelia and none are able to provide controlled or sustained release. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach using nanoparticles composed entirely of FDA-approved materials. To render these materials effective for gene silencing, we developed novel approaches to load them with high amounts of siRNA. A single dose of siRNA-loaded nanoparticles to the mouse female reproductive tract caused efficient and sustained gene silencing. Knockdown of gene expression was observed proximal (in the vaginal lumen) and distal (in the uterine horns) to the site of topical delivery. In addition, nanoparticles penetrated deep into the epithelial tissue. This is the first report demonstrating that biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are effective delivery vehicles for siRNA to the vaginal mucosa.

  19. NF45 and NF90 Bind HIV-1 RNA and Modulate HIV Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Belshan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A previous proteomic screen in our laboratory identified nuclear factor 45 (NF45) and nuclear factor 90 (NF90) as potential cellular factors involved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Both are RNA binding proteins that regulate gene expression; and NF90 has been shown to regulate the expression of cyclin T1 which is required for Tat-dependent trans-activation of viral gene expression. In this study the roles of NF45 and NF90 in HIV replication were investigated through overexpression studies. Ectopic expression of either factor potentiated HIV infection, gene expression, and virus production. Deletion of the RNA binding domains of NF45 and NF90 diminished the enhancement of HIV infection and gene expression. Both proteins were found to interact with the HIV RNA. RNA decay assays demonstrated that NF90, but not NF45, increased the half-life of the HIV RNA. Overall, these studies indicate that both NF45 and NF90 potentiate HIV infection through their RNA binding domains. PMID:26891316

  20. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states. PMID:24299736

  1. RNA-based, transient modulation of gene expression in human haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Yvonne; Jurk, Marion; Kandil, Britta; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Wild, Stefan; Bissels, Ute; Bosio, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of gene expression is a useful tool to study the biology of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and might also be instrumental to expand these cells for therapeutic approaches. Most of the studies so far have employed stable gene modification by viral vectors that are burdensome when translating protocols into clinical settings. Our study aimed at exploring new ways to transiently modify HSPC gene expression using non-integrating, RNA-based molecules. First, we tested different methods to deliver these molecules into HSPCs. The delivery of siRNAs with chemical transfection methods such as lipofection or cationic polymers did not lead to target knockdown, although we observed more than 90% fluorescent cells using a fluorochrome-coupled siRNA. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that despite extensive washing, siRNA stuck to or in the cell surface, thereby mimicking a transfection event. In contrast, electroporation resulted in efficient, siRNA-mediated protein knockdown. For transient overexpression of proteins, we used optimised mRNA molecules with modified 5′- and 3′-UTRs. Electroporation of mRNA encoding GFP resulted in fast, efficient and persistent protein expression for at least seven days. Our data provide a broad-ranging comparison of transfection methods for hard-to-transfect cells and offer new opportunities for DNA-free, non-integrating gene modulation in HSPCs. PMID:26599627

  2. Predicting miRNA Targets by Integrating Gene Regulatory Knowledge with Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weijia; Le, Thuc Duy; Liu, Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Hua; Li, Jiuyong

    2016-01-01

    Motivation microRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation of both plants and mammals, and dysfunctions of miRNAs are often associated with tumorigenesis and development through the effects on their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Identifying miRNA functions is critical for understanding cancer mechanisms and determining the efficacy of drugs. Computational methods analyzing high-throughput data offer great assistance in understanding the diverse and complex relationships between miRNAs and mRNAs. However, most of the existing methods do not fully utilise the available knowledge in biology to reduce the uncertainty in the modeling process. Therefore it is desirable to develop a method that can seamlessly integrate existing biological knowledge and high-throughput data into the process of discovering miRNA regulation mechanisms. Results In this article we present an integrative framework, CIDER (Causal miRNA target Discovery with Expression profile and Regulatory knowledge), to predict miRNA targets. CIDER is able to utilise a variety of gene regulation knowledge, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional knowledge, and to exploit gene expression data for the discovery of miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships. The benefits of our framework is demonstrated by both simulation study and the analysis of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the breast cancer (BRCA) datasets. Our results reveal that even a limited amount of either Transcription Factor (TF)-miRNA or miRNA-mRNA regulatory knowledge improves the performance of miRNA target prediction, and the combination of the two types of knowledge enhances the improvement further. Another useful property of the framework is that its performance increases monotonically with the increase of regulatory knowledge. PMID:27064982

  3. Differential activation of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes by the polyomavirus enhancer and the adenovirus E1A gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, S L; Folk, W R

    1985-01-01

    We have compared the effect of the polyomavirus cis-acting transcriptional enhancer and the adenovirus trans-acting E1A gene on expression of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes (the adenovirus VAI gene and a bacterial tRNA gene) using DNA transfection and transient expression assays. The polyomavirus enhancer has little effect upon transcription of the VAI gene by RNA polymerase III in any cell type tested (murine, hamster, or human). In contrast, expression of the E1A gene within adenovirus infected cells stimulates transcription of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes from co-transfected DNAs. Human 293 cells, which constitutively produce adenovirus E1A gene products, also express high levels of RNA polymerase III transcripts from transfected DNAs. Images PMID:2987823

  4. Immunochemical isolation of gamma-globulin mRNA and estimation of immunoglobulin gene reiteration.

    PubMed

    Muto, M

    1977-01-01

    The polyribosomes synthesizing gamma-globulin have been isolated by the achievement of specific precipitation using bentonite-treated anti-IgG antibody. The RNA extracted from the immunochemically precipitated polysomes was tested for its ability to direct the synthesis of proteins in a cell-free system. The specific gamma-globulin-synthesizing activity (cpm of gamma-globulin synthesized/microgram RNA) of this RNA was 10-fold greater than that from total polysomes. gamma-globulin mRNA (messenger RNA) isolated by immunoprecipitation was more than 89% pure with respect to contamination by other species of mRNA. The products synthesized by the cell-free system were also analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate(SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This RNA has been hybridized with mouse myeloma DNA. The estimation of immunoglobulin gene reiteration was carried out using hybridization kinetics with consideration given to the DNA/RNA ratio since the estimation from the "half Cot value" is not accurate. The results suggest that in the mouse there are about 20 copies per subgroup of genes coding for the variable region of the H and L chains. PMID:927224

  5. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M.; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E.; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A.; Oneal, Meghan A.; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Steimel, Joseph P.; Crane, Virginia C.; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L.; Howard, Richard J.; Presnail, James K.; Lu, Albert L.; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by “blebbing” of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  6. Bootstrap-based differential gene expression analysis for RNA-Seq data with and without replicates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A major application of RNA-Seq is to perform differential gene expression analysis. Many tools exist to analyze differentially expressed genes in the presence of biological replicates. Frequently, however, RNA-Seq experiments have no or very few biological replicates and development of methods for detecting differentially expressed genes in these scenarios is still an active research area. In this paper we introduce a novel method, called IsoDE, for differential gene expression analysis based on bootstrapping. We compared IsoDE against four existing methods (Fisher's exact test, GFOLD, edgeR and Cuffdiff) on RNA-Seq datasets generated using three different sequencing technologies, both with and without replicates. Experiments on MAQC RNA-Seq datasets without replicates show that IsoDE has consistently high accuracy as defined by the qPCR ground truth, frequently higher than that of the compared methods, particularly for low coverage data and at lower fold change thresholds. In experiments on RNA-Seq datasets with up to 7 replicates, IsoDE has also achieved high accuracy. Furthermore, unlike GFOLD and edgeR, IsoDE accuracy varies smoothly with the number of replicates, and is relatively uniform across the entire range of gene expression levels. The proposed non-parametric method based on bootstrapping has practical running time, and achieves robust performance over a broad range of technologies, number of replicates, sequencing depths, and minimum fold change thresholds. PMID:25435284

  7. Sequence heterogeneity in the two 16S rRNA genes of Phormium yellow leaf phytoplasma.

    PubMed Central

    Liefting, L W; Andersen, M T; Beever, R E; Gardner, R C; Forster, R L

    1996-01-01

    Phormium yellow leaf (PYL) phytoplasma causes a lethal disease of the monocotyledon, New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax). The 16S rRNA genes of PYL phytoplasma were amplified from infected flax by PCR and cloned, and the nucleotide sequences were determined. DNA sequencing and Southern hybridization analysis of genomic DNA indicated the presence of two copies of the 16S rRNA gene. The two 16S rRNA genes exhibited sequence heterogeneity in 4 nucleotide positions and could be distinguished by the restriction enzymes BpmI and BsrI. This is the first record in which sequence heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of a phytoplasma has been determined by sequence analysis. A phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that PYL phytoplasma is most closely related to the stolbur and German grapevine yellows phytoplasmas, which form the stolbur subgroup of the aster yellows group. This phylogenetic position of PYL phytoplasma was supported by 16S/23S spacer region sequence data. PMID:8795200

  8. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A; Oneal, Meghan A; Kernodle, Bliss M; Steimel, Joseph P; Crane, Virginia C; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L; Howard, Richard J; Presnail, James K; Lu, Albert L; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by "blebbing" of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  9. [Characterization of Black and Dichothrix Cyanobacteria Based on the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Maya

    2010-01-01

    My project focuses on characterizing different cyanobacteria in thrombolitic mats found on the island of Highborn Cay, Bahamas. Thrombolites are interesting ecosystems because of the ability of bacteria in these mats to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and mineralize it as calcium carbonate. In the future they may be used as models to develop carbon sequestration technologies, which could be used as part of regenerative life systems in space. These thrombolitic communities are also significant because of their similarities to early communities of life on Earth. I targeted two cyanobacteria in my research, Dichothrix spp. and whatever black is, since they are believed to be important to carbon sequestration in these thrombolitic mats. The goal of my summer research project was to molecularly identify these two cyanobacteria. DNA was isolated from each organism through mat dissections and DNA extractions. I ran Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) to amplify the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in each cyanobacteria. This specific gene is found in almost all bacteria and is highly conserved, meaning any changes in the sequence are most likely due to evolution. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene can be used for bacterial identification of different species based on the sequence of their 16S rRNA gene. Since the exact sequence of the Dichothrix gene was unknown, I designed different primers that flanked the gene based on the known sequences from other taxonomically similar cyanobacteria. Once the 16S rRNA gene was amplified, I cloned the gene into specialized Escherichia coli cells and sent the gene products for sequencing. Once the sequence is obtained, it will be added to a genetic database for future reference to and classification of other Dichothrix sp.

  10. UV light-induced DNA lesions cause dissociation of yeast RNA polymerases-I and establishment of a specialized chromatin structure at rRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Maxime; Charton, Romain; Wittner, Manuel; Levasseur, Geneviève; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Conconi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of UV light-induced DNA lesions results from their interference with transcription and replication. DNA lesions arrest elongating RNA polymerases, an event that triggers transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Since arrested RNA polymerases reduce the accessibility of repair factors to DNA lesions, they might be displaced. The fate of arrested RNA polymerases-II at DNA lesions has been extensively studied, yielding partially contradictory results. Considerably less is known about RNA polymerases-I that transcribe nucleosomes-depleted rRNA genes at very high rate. To investigate the fate of arrested RNA polymerases-I at DNA lesions, chromatin-immunoprecipitation, electron microscopy, transcription run-on, psoralen-cross-linking and chromatin-endogenous cleavage were employed. We found that RNA polymerases-I density increased at the 5′-end of the gene, likely due to continued transcription initiation followed by elongation and pausing/release at the first DNA lesion. Most RNA polymerases-I dissociated downstream of the first DNA lesion, concomitant with chromatin closing that resulted from deposition of nucleosomes. Although nucleosomes were deposited, the high mobility group-box Hmo1 (component of actively transcribed rRNA genes) remained associated. After repair of DNA lesions, Hmo1 containing chromatin might help to restore transcription elongation and reopening of rRNA genes chromatin. PMID:24097442

  11. Regulation of viral and cellular gene expression by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus polyadenylated nuclear RNA.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Cyprian C; Tarrant-Elorza, Margaret; Verma, Subhash; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Pari, Gregory S

    2013-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the cause of Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity lymphoma. In cell culture, KSHV results in a latent infection, and lytic reactivation is usually induced with the expression of K-Rta or by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA) and/or n-butyrate. Lytic infection is marked by the activation of the entire viral genomic transcription cascade and the production of infectious virus. KSHV-infected cells express a highly abundant, long, noncoding transcript referred to as polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA). PAN RNA interacts with specific demethylases and physically binds to the KSHV genome to mediate activation of viral gene expression. A recombinant BACmid lacking the PAN RNA locus fails to express K-Rta and does not produce virus. We now show that the lack of PAN RNA expression results in the failure of the initiation of the entire KSHV transcription program. In addition to previous findings of an interaction with demethylases, we show that PAN RNA binds to protein components of Polycomb repression complex 2 (PRC2). RNA-Seq analysis using cell lines that express PAN RNA shows that transcription involving the expression of proteins involved in cell cycle, immune response, and inflammation is dysregulated. Expression of PAN RNA in various cell types results in an enhanced growth phenotype, higher cell densities, and increased survival compared to control cells. Also, PAN RNA expression mediates a decrease in the production of inflammatory cytokines. These data support a role for PAN RNA as a major global regulator of viral and cellular gene expression. PMID:23468496

  12. Nuclear gene silencing directs reception of long-distance mRNA silencing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, C A; Mitter, N; Christie, M; Smith, N A; Waterhouse, P M; Carroll, B J

    2007-09-11

    In plants, silencing of mRNA can be transmitted from cell to cell and also over longer distances from roots to shoots. To investigate the long-distance mechanism, WT and mutant shoots were grafted onto roots silenced for an mRNA. We show that three genes involved in a chromatin silencing pathway, NRPD1a encoding RNA polymerase IVa, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2), and DICER-like 3 (DCL3), are required for reception of long-distance mRNA silencing in the shoot. A mutant representing a fourth gene in the pathway, argonaute4 (ago4), was also partially compromised in the reception of silencing. This pathway produces 24-nt siRNAs and resulted in decapped RNA, a known substrate for amplification of dsRNA by RDR6. Activation of silencing in grafted shoots depended on RDR6, but no 24-nt siRNAs were detected in mutant rdr6 shoots, indicating that RDR6 also plays a role in initial signal perception. After amplification of decapped transcripts, DCL4 and DCL2 act hierarchically as they do in antiviral resistance to produce 21- and 22-nt siRNAs, respectively, and these guide mRNA degradation. Several dcl genotypes were also tested for their capacity to transmit the mobile silencing signal from the rootstock. dcl1-8 and a dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 triple mutant are compromised in micro-RNA and siRNA biogenesis, respectively, but were unaffected in signal transmission. PMID:17785412

  13. Transcription of eucaryotic tRNA1met and 5SRNA genes by RNA polymerase III is blocked by base mismatches in the intragenic control regions.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M A; Folk, W R

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed duplex DNAs containing single G-T or A-C mismatches in the X. laevis tRNA1met gene. Mismatches within regions of this gene which are bound by transcription factor TFIIIC prevent transcription by RNA polymerase III. Homoduplexes with G-C----A-T mutations at some of the same sites, however, are transcribed efficiently in oocytes. Mismatches outside of the tRNA1met gene have no effect upon transcription. A survey of several point mutants in the Syrian hamster 5SRNA gene indicates that mismatches outside the internal control region somewhat reduce transcription, but a mismatch within the internal control region blocks transcription. Thus, the presence of mismatched bases in the region of DNA which interacts with RNA polymerase III transcription factors blocks transcription, perhaps by interfering with DNA renaturation following transit of the RNA polymerase. Images PMID:3645544

  14. Circular RNA of cattle casein genes are highly expressed in bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ChunLei; Wu, Hui; Wang, YanHong; Zhu, ShiQi; Liu, JunQiang; Fang, XingTang; Chen, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that, in addition to hormones and other protein factors, noncoding RNA molecules play an important regulatory role in milk protein synthesis. Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are universally expressed noncoding RNA species that have been proposed recently to regulate the expression of their parental genes. In the present study, the deep RNA-sequencing technique known as RNA-seq was used to compare expression profiles of circRNAs from 2 pooled RNA samples from cow mammary gland on d 90 and 250 postpartum and to identify the key circRNAs involved in lactation. A total of 4,804 and 4,048 circRNAs were identified in the cow mammary gland on d 90 and 250 postpartum, respectively, of which only 2,231 circRNAs were co-expressed at both lactation stages, suggesting high stage specificity in the circRNAs. The enrichment of some Gene Ontology terms for the circRNA parental genes differed between lactation stages. Among the top 10 enriched Gene Ontology terms, vesicle, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondrial lumen were more common on lactation d 90. All 4 casein-coding genes (CSN1S1, CSN1S2, CSN2, and CSN3) produced circRNAs in the cattle mammary gland. In total, 80 circRNAs were identified from these 4 genes; circRNAs from CSN1S1 had very high abundance, and 3 of them accounted for 36% of all the circRNAs expressed in the mammary gland on lactation d 90. Three circRNAs from CSN1S1, 1 circRNA from CSN1S2, and 1 circRNA from CSN2 were all more highly expressed on lactation d 90 than on lactation d 250, as confirmed by quantitative PCR. These circRNAs had several target sites for the microRNA miR-2284 family and were predicted to target CSN1S1 and CSN2 mRNA, suggesting their potential involvement in regulating expression of the casein genes. PMID:27040791

  15. Basic Mechanisms in RNA Polymerase I Transcription of the Ribosomal RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Sarah J.; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA Polymerase (Pol) I produces ribosomal (r)RNA, an essential component of the cellular protein synthetic machinery that drives cell growth, underlying many fundamental cellular processes. Extensive research into the mechanisms governing transcription by Pol I has revealed an intricate set of control mechanisms impinging upon rRNA production. Pol I-specific transcription factors guide Pol I to the rDNA promoter and contribute to multiple rounds of transcription initiation, promoter escape, elongation and termination. In addition, many accessory factors are now known to assist at each stage of this transcription cycle, some of which allow the integration of transcriptional activity with metabolic demands. The organisation and accessibility of rDNA chromatin also impinge upon Pol I output, and complex mechanisms ensure the appropriate maintenance of the epigenetic state of the nucleolar genome and its effective transcription by Pol I. The following review presents our current understanding of the components of the Pol I transcription machinery, their functions and regulation by associated factors, and the mechanisms operating to ensure the proper transcription of rDNA chromatin. The importance of such stringent control is demonstrated by the fact that deregulated Pol I transcription is a feature of cancer and other disorders characterised by abnormal translational capacity. PMID:23150253

  16. Evolution of MicroRNA Genes in Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana: An Update of the Inverted Duplication Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Jiang, Wen-kai; Gao, Li-zhi

    2011-01-01

    The origin and evolution of microRNA (miRNA) genes, which are of significance in tuning and buffering gene expressions in a number of critical cellular processes, have long attracted evolutionary biologists. However, genome-wide perspectives on their origins, potential mechanisms of their de novo generation and subsequent evolution remain largely unsolved in flowering plants. Here, genome-wide analyses of Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana revealed apparently divergent patterns of miRNA gene origins. A large proportion of miRNA genes in O. sativa were TE-related and MITE-related miRNAs in particular, whereas the fraction of these miRNA genes much decreased in A. thaliana. Our results show that the majority of TE-related and pseudogene-related miRNA genes have originated through inverted duplication instead of segmental or tandem duplication events. Based on the presented findings, we hypothesize and illustrate the four likely molecular mechanisms to de novo generate novel miRNA genes from TEs and pseudogenes. Our rice genome analysis demonstrates that non-MITEs and MITEs mediated inverted duplications have played different roles in de novo generating miRNA genes. It is confirmed that the previously proposed inverted duplication model may give explanations for non-MITEs mediated duplication events. However, many other miRNA genes, known from the earlier proposed model, were rather arisen from MITE transpositions into target genes to yield binding sites. We further investigated evolutionary processes spawned from de novo generated to maturely-formed miRNA genes and their regulatory systems. We found that miRNAs increase the tunability of some gene regulatory systems with low gene copy numbers. The results also suggest that gene balance effects may have largely contributed to the evolution of miRNA regulatory systems. PMID:22194805

  17. Massive Gene Transfer and Extensive RNA Editing of a Symbiotic Dinoflagellate Plastid Genome

    PubMed Central

    Mungpakdee, Sutada; Shinzato, Chuya; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Kawashima, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Ryo; Hisata, Kanako; Tanaka, Makiko; Goto, Hiroki; Fujie, Manabu; Lin, Senjie; Satoh, Nori; Shoguchi, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing of Symbiodinium minutum revealed that 95 of 109 plastid-associated genes have been transferred to the nuclear genome and subsequently expanded by gene duplication. Only 14 genes remain in plastids and occur as DNA minicircles. Each minicircle (1.8–3.3 kb) contains one gene and a conserved noncoding region containing putative promoters and RNA-binding sites. Nine types of RNA editing, including a novel G/U type, were discovered in minicircle transcripts but not in genes transferred to the nucleus. In contrast to DNA editing sites in dinoflagellate mitochondria, which tend to be highly conserved across all taxa, editing sites employed in DNA minicircles are highly variable from species to species. Editing is crucial for core photosystem protein function. It restores evolutionarily conserved amino acids and increases peptidyl hydropathy. It also increases protein plasticity necessary to initiate photosystem complex assembly. PMID:24881086

  18. The impact of RNA-seq aligners on gene expression estimation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Wu, Po-Yen; Tong, Li; Phan, John H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    While numerous RNA-seq data analysis pipelines are available, research has shown that the choice of pipeline influences the results of differentially expressed gene detection and gene expression estimation. Gene expression estimation is a key step in RNA-seq data analysis, since the accuracy of gene expression estimates profoundly affects the subsequent analysis. Generally, gene expression estimation involves sequence alignment and quantification, and accurate gene expression estimation requires accurate alignment. However, the impact of aligners on gene expression estimation remains unclear. We address this need by constructing nine pipelines consisting of nine spliced aligners and one quantifier. We then use simulated data to investigate the impact of aligners on gene expression estimation. To evaluate alignment, we introduce three alignment performance metrics, (1) the percentage of reads aligned, (2) the percentage of reads aligned with zero mismatch (ZeroMismatchPercentage), and (3) the percentage of reads aligned with at most one mismatch (ZeroOneMismatchPercentage). We then evaluate the impact of alignment performance on gene expression estimation using three metrics, (1) gene detection accuracy, (2) the number of genes falsely quantified (FalseExpNum), and (3) the number of genes with falsely estimated fold changes (FalseFcNum). We found that among various pipelines, FalseExpNum and FalseFcNum are correlated. Moreover, FalseExpNum is linearly correlated with the percentage of reads aligned and ZeroMismatchPercentage, and FalseFcNum is linearly correlated with ZeroMismatchPercentage. Because of this correlation, the percentage of reads aligned and ZeroMismatchPercentage may be used to assess the performance of gene expression estimation for all RNA-seq datasets.

  19. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer and RNA silencing technology in neuronal dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2011-02-01

    Lentiviral-mediated gene transfer in vivo or in cultured mammalian neurons can be used to address a wide variety of biological questions, to design animals models for specific neurodegenerative pathologies, or to test potential therapeutic approaches in a variety of brain disorders. Lentiviruses can infect non-dividing cells, thereby allowing stable gene transfer in post-mitotic cells such as mature neurons. An important contribution has been the use of inducible vectors: the same animal can thus be used repeatedly in the doxycycline-on or -off state, providing a powerful mean for assessing the function of a gene candidate in a disorder within a specific neuronal circuit. Furthermore, lentivirus vectors provide a unique tool to integrate siRNA expression constructs with the aim to locally knockdown expression of a specific gene, enabling to assess the function of a gene in a very specific neuronal pathway. Lentiviral vector-mediated delivery of short hairpin RNA results in persistent knockdown of gene expression in the brain. Therefore, the use of lentiviruses for stable expression of siRNA in brain is a powerful aid to probe gene functions in vivo and for gene therapy of diseases of the central nervous system. In this chapter I review the applications of lentivirus-mediated gene transfer in the investigation of specific gene candidates involved in major brain disorders and neurodegenerative processes. Major applications have been in polyglutamine disorders, such as synucleinopathies and Parkinson's disease, or in investigating gene function in Huntington's disease, dystonia, or muscular dystrophy. Recently, lentivirus gene transfer has been an invaluable tool for evaluation of gene function in behavioral disorders such as drug addiction and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or in learning and cognition. PMID:20862616

  20. Tissue- and Time-Specific Expression of Otherwise Identical tRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Adir, Idan; Dahan, Orna; Broday, Limor; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Rechavi, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage bias affects protein translation because tRNAs that recognize synonymous codons differ in their abundance. Although the current dogma states that tRNA expression is exclusively regulated by intrinsic control elements (A- and B-box sequences), we revealed, using a reporter that monitors the levels of individual tRNA genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, that eight tryptophan tRNA genes, 100% identical in sequence, are expressed in different tissues and change their expression dynamically. Furthermore, the expression levels of the sup-7 tRNA gene at day 6 were found to predict the animal’s lifespan. We discovered that the expression of tRNAs that reside within introns of protein-coding genes is affected by the host gene’s promoter. Pairing between specific Pol II genes and the tRNAs that are contained in their introns is most likely adaptive, since a genome-wide analysis revealed that the presence of specific intronic tRNAs within specific orthologous genes is conserved across Caenorhabditis species. PMID:27560950

  1. Quantitative RT-PCR Gene Evaluation and RNA Interference in the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Raman; Mittapelly, Priyanka; Chen, Yuting; Mamidala, Praveen; Zhao, Chaoyang; Michel, Andy

    2016-01-01

    The brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) has emerged as one of the most important invasive insect pests in the United States. Functional genomics in H. halys remains unexplored as molecular resources in this insect have recently been developed. To facilitate functional genomics research, we evaluated ten common insect housekeeping genes (RPS26, EF1A, FAU, UBE4A, ARL2, ARP8, GUS, TBP, TIF6 and RPL9) for their stability across various treatments in H. halys. Our treatments included two biotic factors (tissues and developmental stages) and two stress treatments (RNAi injection and starvation). Reference gene stability was determined using three software algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper) and a web-based tool (RefFinder). The qRT-PCR results indicated ARP8 and UBE4A exhibit the most stable expression across tissues and developmental stages, ARL2 and FAU for dsRNA treatment and TBP and UBE4A for starvation treatment. Following the dsRNA treatment, all genes except GUS showed relatively stable expression. To demonstrate the utility of validated reference genes in accurate gene expression analysis and to explore gene silencing in H. halys, we performed RNAi by administering dsRNA of target gene (catalase) through microinjection. A successful RNAi response with over 90% reduction in expression of target gene was observed. PMID:27144586

  2. Meta-Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Microarray Data Reveals Dysregulation in RNA Splicing Regulatory Genes.

    PubMed

    Paraboschi, Elvezia Maria; Cardamone, Giulia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Gemmati, Donato; Spreafico, Marta; Duga, Stefano; Soldà, Giulia; Asselta, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in RNA metabolism and alternative splicing (AS) are emerging as important players in complex disease phenotypes. In particular, accumulating evidence suggests the existence of pathogenic links between multiple sclerosis (MS) and altered AS, including functional studies showing that an imbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms may contribute to disease etiology. Here, we tested whether the altered expression of AS-related genes represents a MS-specific signature. A comprehensive comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of publicly-available microarray datasets (190 MS cases, 182 controls), followed by gene-ontology enrichment analysis, highlighted a significant enrichment for differentially-expressed genes involved in RNA metabolism/AS. In detail, a total of 17 genes were found to be differentially expressed in MS in multiple datasets, with CELF1 being dysregulated in five out of seven studies. We confirmed CELF1 downregulation in MS (p=0.0015) by real-time RT-PCRs on RNA extracted from blood cells of 30 cases and 30 controls. As a proof of concept, we experimentally verified the unbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms in MS of the NFAT5 gene, a putative CELF1 target. In conclusion, for the first time we provide evidence of a consistent dysregulation of splicing-related genes in MS and we discuss its possible implications in modulating specific AS events in MS susceptibility genes. PMID:26437396

  3. A Concise Protocol for siRNA-Mediated Gene Suppression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Renz, Peter F; Beyer, Tobias A

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells hold great promise for future biomedical applications such as disease modeling and regenerative medicine. However, these cells are notoriously difficult to culture and are refractory to common means of genetic manipulation, thereby limiting their range of applications. In this protocol, we present an easy and robust method of gene repression in human embryonic stem cells using lipofection of small interfering RNA (siRNA). PMID:25724912

  4. Complex organisation and structure of the ghrelin antisense strand gene GHRLOS, a candidate non-coding RNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Seim, Inge; Carter, Shea L; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2008-01-01

    Background The peptide hormone ghrelin has many important physiological and pathophysiological roles, including the stimulation of growth hormone (GH) release, appetite regulation, gut motility and proliferation of cancer cells. We previously identified a gene on the opposite strand of the ghrelin gene, ghrelinOS (GHRLOS), which spans the promoter and untranslated regions of the ghrelin gene (GHRL). Here we further characterise GHRLOS. Results We have described GHRLOS mRNA isoforms that extend over 1.4 kb of the promoter region and 106 nucleotides of exon 4 of the ghrelin gene, GHRL. These GHRLOS transcripts initiate 4.8 kb downstream of the terminal exon 4 of GHRL and are present in the 3' untranslated exon of the adjacent gene TATDN2 (TatD DNase domain containing 2). Interestingly, we have also identified a putative non-coding TATDN2-GHRLOS chimaeric transcript, indicating that GHRLOS RNA biogenesis is extremely complex. Moreover, we have discovered that the 3' region of GHRLOS is also antisense, in a tail-to-tail fashion to a novel terminal exon of the neighbouring SEC13 gene, which is important in protein transport. Sequence analyses revealed that GHRLOS is riddled with stop codons, and that there is little nucleotide and amino-acid sequence conservation of the GHRLOS gene between vertebrates. The gene spans 44 kb on 3p25.3, is extensively spliced and harbours multiple variable exons. We have also investigated the expression of GHRLOS and found evidence of differential tissue expression. It is highly expressed in tissues which are emerging as major sites of non-coding RNA expression (the thymus, brain, and testis), as well as in the ovary and uterus. In contrast, very low levels were found in the stomach where sense, GHRL derived RNAs are highly expressed. Conclusion GHRLOS RNA transcripts display several distinctive features of non-coding (ncRNA) genes, including 5' capping, polyadenylation, extensive splicing and short open reading frames. The gene is also

  5. Exploring systemic RNA interference in insects: a genome-wide survey for RNAi genes in Tribolium

    PubMed Central

    Tomoyasu, Yoshinori; Miller, Sherry C; Tomita, Shuichiro; Schoppmeier, Michael; Grossmann, Daniela; Bucher, Gregor

    2008-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a highly conserved cellular mechanism. In some organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, the RNAi response can be transmitted systemically. Some insects also exhibit a systemic RNAi response. However, Drosophila, the leading insect model organism, does not show a robust systemic RNAi response, necessitating another model system to study the molecular mechanism of systemic RNAi in insects. Results We used Tribolium, which exhibits robust systemic RNAi, as an alternative model system. We have identified the core RNAi genes, as well as genes potentially involved in systemic RNAi, from the Tribolium genome. Both phylogenetic and functional analyses suggest that Tribolium has a somewhat larger inventory of core component genes than Drosophila, perhaps allowing a more sensitive response to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). We also identified three Tribolium homologs of C. elegans sid-1, which encodes a possible dsRNA channel. However, detailed sequence analysis has revealed that these Tribolium homologs share more identity with another C. elegans gene, tag-130. We analyzed tag-130 mutants, and found that this gene does not have a function in systemic RNAi in C. elegans. Likewise, the Tribolium sid-like genes do not seem to be required for systemic RNAi. These results suggest that insect sid-1-like genes have a different function than dsRNA uptake. Moreover, Tribolium lacks homologs of several genes important for RNAi in C. elegans. Conclusion Although both Tribolium and C. elegans show a robust systemic RNAi response, our genome-wide survey reveals significant differences between the RNAi mechanisms of these organisms. Thus, insects may use an alternative mechanism for the systemic RNAi response. Understanding this process would assist with rendering other insects amenable to systemic RNAi, and may influence pest control approaches. PMID:18201385

  6. Structure and regulation of expression of the Bacillus subtilis valyl-tRNA synthetase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, D; Leautey, J; Grunberg-Manago, M; Putzer, H

    1997-01-01

    We have sequenced the valyl-tRNA synthetase gene (valS) of Bacillus subtilis and found an open reading frame coding for a protein of 880 amino acids with a molar mass of 101,749. The predicted amino acid sequence shares strong similarity with the valyl-tRNA synthetases from Bacillus stearothermophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Escherichia coli. Extracts of B. subtilis strains overexpressing the valS gene on a plasmid have increased valyl-tRNA aminoacylation activity. Northern analysis shows that valS is cotranscribed with the folC gene (encoding folyl-polyglutamate synthetase) lying downstream. The 300-bp 5' noncoding region of the gene contains the characteristic regulatory elements, T box, "specifier codon" (GUC), and rho-independant transcription terminator of a gene family in gram-positive bacteria that encodes many aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and some amino acid biosynthetic enzymes and that is regulated by tRNA-mediated antitermination. We have shown that valS expression is induced by valine limitation and that the specificity of induction can be switched to threonine by changing the GUC (Val) specifier triplet to ACC (Thr). Overexpression of valS from a recombinant plasmid leads to autorepression of a valS-lacZ transcriptional fusion. Like induction by valine starvation, autoregulation of valS depends on the presence of the GUC specifier codon. Disruption of the valS gene was not lethal, suggesting the existence of a second gene, as is the case for both the thrS and the tyrS genes. PMID:9098041

  7. mRNA as gene therapeutic: how to control protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Geertrui; Andries, Oliwia; Demeester, Jo; Sanders, Niek N; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Rejman, Joanna

    2011-03-30

    For many years, it was generally accepted that mRNA is too unstable to be efficiently used for gene therapy purposes. In the last decade, however, several research groups faced this challenge and not only proved the feasibility of mRNA-mediated transfection with surprising results regarding transfection efficiency and duration of protein expression, but also were able to demonstrate major advantages over the use of pDNA. These advantages will be the first issue discussed in this review, which first of all addresses the notions that mRNA does not need to cross the nuclear barrier to exert its biological activity and in addition lacks CpG motifs, which reduces its immunogenicity. Secondly, it provides insight in the (in)stability of the mRNA molecule, in how mRNA can be modified to increase its half-life and in the necessities of exogenously produced mRNA to be successfully used in transfection protocols. Furthermore, this review gives an in-depth overview of the different techniques and vehicles for intracellular mRNA delivery exploited by us and other groups, comprising electroporation, gene gun injection, lipo- and polyplexes. Finally, it covers recent literature describing specific applications for mRNA based gene delivery, showing that until now most attention has been paid to vaccination strategies. This review offers a comprehensive overview of current knowledge of the major theoretical as well as practical aspects of mRNA-mediated transfection, showing both its possibilities and its pitfalls and should therefore be useful for a diverse scientific audience. PMID:20970469

  8. Integrative microRNA-gene expression network analysis in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuchao; Qin, Baolong; Hu, Henglong; Zhang, Jiaqiao; Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) influence a variety of biological functions by regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. Aberrant miRNA expression has been associated with many human diseases. Urolithiasis is a common disease, and idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) is an important risk factor for calcium urolithiasis. However, miRNA expression patterns and their biological functions in urolithiasis remain unknown. Methods and Results. A multi-step approach combining microarray miRNA and mRNA expression profile and bioinformatics analysis was adopted to analyze dysregulated miRNAs and genes in genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rat kidneys, using normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as controls. We identified 2418 mRNAs and 19 miRNAs as significantly differentially expressed, over 700 gene ontology (GO) terms and 83 KEGG pathways that were significantly enriched in GHS rats. In addition, we constructed an miRNA-gene network that suggested that rno-miR-674-5p, rno-miR-672-5p, rno-miR-138-5p and rno-miR-21-3p may play important roles in the regulatory network. Furthermore, signal-net analysis suggested that NF-kappa B likely plays a crucial role in hypercalciuria urolithiasis. Conclusions. This study presents a global view of mRNA and miRNA expression in GHS rat kidneys, and suggests that miRNAs may be important in the regulation of hypercalciuria. The data provide valuable insights for future research, which should aim at validating the role of the genes featured here in the pathophysiology of hypercalciuria. PMID:27069814

  9. funRNA: a fungi-centered genomics platform for genes encoding key components of RNAi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is involved in genome defense as well as diverse cellular, developmental, and physiological processes. Key components of RNAi are Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), which have been functionally characterized mainly in model organisms. The key components are believed to exist throughout eukaryotes; however, there is no systematic platform for archiving and dissecting these important gene families. In addition, few fungi have been studied to date, limiting our understanding of RNAi in fungi. Here we present funRNA http://funrna.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/, a fungal kingdom-wide comparative genomics platform for putative genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP. Description To identify and archive genes encoding the abovementioned key components, protein domain profiles were determined from reference sequences obtained from UniProtKB/SwissProt. The domain profiles were searched using fungal, metazoan, and plant genomes, as well as bacterial and archaeal genomes. 1,163, 442, and 678 genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP, respectively, were predicted. Based on the identification results, active site variation of Argonaute, diversification of Dicer, and sequence analysis of RdRP were discussed in a fungus-oriented manner. funRNA provides results from diverse bioinformatics programs and job submission forms for BLAST, BLASTMatrix, and ClustalW. Furthermore, sequence collections created in funRNA are synced with several gene family analysis portals and databases, offering further analysis opportunities. Conclusions funRNA provides identification results from a broad taxonomic range and diverse analysis functions, and could be used in diverse comparative and evolutionary studies. It could serve as a versatile genomics workbench for key components of RNAi. PMID:25522231

  10. Determination of an effective housekeeping gene for the quantification of mRNA for forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lilliana I; Tate, Courtney M; Knott, Erika L; McDaniel, Jade E; Rogers, Stephanie S; Koons, Barbara W; Kavlick, Mark F; Craig, Rhonda L; Robertson, James M

    2012-07-01

    The potential application of mRNA for the identification of biological fluids using molecular techniques has been a recent development in forensic serology. Constitutively expressed housekeeping genes can assess the amount of mRNA recovered from a sample, establish its suitability for downstream applications, and provide a reference point to corroborate the identity of the fluid. qPCR was utilized to compare the expression levels of housekeeping genes from forensic-like body fluid stains to establish the most appropriate assessment of human mRNA quantity prior to profiling. Although variability was observed between fluids and individuals, results indicated that beta-2 microglobulin exhibited the highest expression for all body fluids examined and across donors. A one-way analysis of variance was performed for housekeeping gene variability between donors (at the α, 0.05, significance level), and the results indicated significant differences for semen, vaginal secretions, and menstrual blood. PMID:22309221

  11. Bidirectional expression of long ncRNA/protein-coding gene pairs in cancer.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Anne-Susann; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2016-05-01

    Bidirectional initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II occurs prevalently at active promoters during protein-coding gene (PCG) expression. Upstream, antisense noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) of differing lengths, stabilities and processings are being expressed from these promoters in concert with downstream, processive messenger RNA transcription. Although abundantly detected, the functional role and regulatory capacity of such transcripts have only been determined for individual cases. Long ncRNAs in general are reportedly able to regulate all steps of the gene expression process. Therefore, to get insight into the functionality of long ncRNAs transcribed bidirectionally from cancer-associated PCGs is of interest, as expression changes of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes are prevalent in cancer.Here, we review the sources and characteristics of antisense transcription occurring at PCG loci in the human genome, and focus on the functional impact of bidirectional long ncRNA expression at cancer-associated PCGs. PMID:26578749

  12. Transcription factor IIIB generates extended DNA interactions in RNA polymerase III transcription complexes on tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kassavetis, G A; Riggs, D L; Negri, R; Nguyen, L H; Geiduschek, E P

    1989-01-01

    Transcription complexes that assemble on tRNA genes in a crude Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell extract extend over the entire transcription unit and approximately 40 base pairs of contiguous 5'-flanking DNA. We show here that the interaction with 5'-flanking DNA is due to a protein that copurifies with transcription factor TFIIIB through several steps of purification and shares characteristic properties that are normally ascribed to TFIIIB: dependence on prior binding of TFIIIC and great stability once the TFIIIC-TFIIIB-DNA complex is formed. SUP4 gene (tRNATyr) DNA that was cut within the 5'-flanking sequence (either 31 or 28 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site) was no longer able to stably incorporate TFIIIB into a transcription complex. The TFIIIB-dependent 5'-flanking DNA protein interaction was predominantly not sequence specific. The extension of the transcription complex into this DNA segment does suggest two possible explanations for highly diverse effects of flanking-sequence substitutions on tRNA gene transcription: either (i) proteins that are capable of binding to these upstream DNA segments are also potentially capable of stimulating or interfering with the incorporation of TFIIIB into transcription complexes or (ii) 5'-flanking sequence influences the rate of assembly of TFIIIB into stable transcription complexes. Images PMID:2668737

  13. Expression of a set of synthetic suppressor tRNA(Phe) genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Masson, J M; Meuris, P; Grunstein, M; Abelson, J; Miller, J H

    1987-01-01

    Synthetic ochre and amber tRNA suppressor genes derived from the yeast tRNA(PheGAA) sequence have been constructed. They were efficiently transcribed in vitro and expressed in vivo via a synthetic expression cassette. tRNA(PheUUA) and tRNA(PheUUA) delta IVS (IVS = intervening sequence) are relatively inefficient ochre suppressors. They are toxic to the cell when expressed on a multicopy plasmid, and they do not suppress at all when present as single copies. The intron does not seem to have any effect on suppression. In contrast, the amber suppressor tRNA(PheCUA) delta IVS is efficient when expressed from a single-copy plasmid, while its efficiency is reduced on a multicopy vector. Images PMID:3309948

  14. RNA-seq analysis for detecting quantitative trait-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minseok; Kim, Kwondo; Yoon, Joon; Jeong, Jin Young; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2016-01-01

    Many recent RNA-seq studies were focused mainly on detecting the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two or more conditions. In contrast, only a few attempts have been made to detect genes associated with quantitative traits, such as obesity index and milk yield, on RNA-seq experiment with large number of biological replicates. This study illustrates the linear model application on trait associated genes (TAGs) detection in two real RNA-seq datasets: 89 replicated human obesity related data and 21 replicated Holsteins' milk production related RNA-seq data. Based on these two datasets, the performance between suggesting methods, such as ordinary regression and robust regression, and existing methods: DESeq2 and Voom, were compared. The results indicate that suggesting methods have much lower false discoveries compared to the precedent two group comparisons based approaches in our simulation study and qRT-PCR experiment. In particular, the robust regression outperforms existing DEG finding method as well as ordinary regression in terms of precision. Given the current trend in RNA-seq pricing, we expect our methods to be successfully applied in various RNA-seq studies with numerous biological replicates that handle continuous response traits. PMID:27071914

  15. RNomics and Modomics in the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii: identification of RNA modification genes

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, Henri; Gaspin, Christine; Marck, Christian; Decatur, Wayne A; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2008-01-01

    Background Naturally occurring RNAs contain numerous enzymatically altered nucleosides. Differences in RNA populations (RNomics) and pattern of RNA modifications (Modomics) depends on the organism analyzed and are two of the criteria that distinguish the three kingdoms of life. If the genomic sequences of the RNA molecules can be derived from whole genome sequence information, the modification profile cannot and requires or direct sequencing of the RNAs or predictive methods base on the presence or absence of the modifications genes. Results By employing a comparative genomics approach, we predicted almost all of the genes coding for the t+rRNA modification enzymes in the mesophilic moderate halophile Haloferax volcanii. These encode both guide RNAs and enzymes. Some are orthologous to previously identified genes in Archaea, Bacteria or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but several are original predictions. Conclusion The number of modifications in t+rRNAs in the halophilic archaeon is surprisingly low when compared with other Archaea or Bacteria, particularly the hyperthermophilic organisms. This may result from the specific lifestyle of halophiles that require high intracellular salt concentration for survival. This salt content could allow RNA to maintain its functional structural integrity with fewer modifications. We predict that the few modifications present must be particularly important for decoding, accuracy of translation or are modifications that cannot be functionally replaced by the electrostatic interactions provided by the surrounding salt-ions. This analysis also guides future experimental validation work aiming to complete the understanding of the function of RNA modifications in Archaeal translation. PMID:18844986

  16. RNA-seq analysis for detecting quantitative trait-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minseok; Kim, Kwondo; Yoon, Joon; Jeong, Jin Young; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2016-01-01

    Many recent RNA-seq studies were focused mainly on detecting the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two or more conditions. In contrast, only a few attempts have been made to detect genes associated with quantitative traits, such as obesity index and milk yield, on RNA-seq experiment with large number of biological replicates. This study illustrates the linear model application on trait associated genes (TAGs) detection in two real RNA-seq datasets: 89 replicated human obesity related data and 21 replicated Holsteins’ milk production related RNA-seq data. Based on these two datasets, the performance between suggesting methods, such as ordinary regression and robust regression, and existing methods: DESeq2 and Voom, were compared. The results indicate that suggesting methods have much lower false discoveries compared to the precedent two group comparisons based approaches in our simulation study and qRT-PCR experiment. In particular, the robust regression outperforms existing DEG finding method as well as ordinary regression in terms of precision. Given the current trend in RNA-seq pricing, we expect our methods to be successfully applied in various RNA-seq studies with numerous biological replicates that handle continuous response traits. PMID:27071914

  17. Transient gene and microRNA expression profile changes of confluent human fibroblast cells in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honglu; Story, Michael; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment from the Earth1g, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. Whether non-proliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS), confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days, respectively, for investigations of gene and miRNA expression profile changes in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NFkB and other growth related pathways involving HGF and Vegf along with down regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-proliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples with respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for αa-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on the gene and miRNA expression profiles.

  18. Transient Gene and MicroRNA Expression Profile Changes of Confluent Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Wang, Xiaoyu; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Story, Michael; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment from the Earth1g, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. Whether non-proliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS), confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days, respectively, for investigations of gene and miRNA expression profile changes in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF(kappa)B and other growth related pathways involving HGF and Vegf along with down regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-proliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples with respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for alpha-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on the gene and miRNA expression profiles.

  19. Taxonomic Resolutions Based on 18S rRNA Genes: A Case Study of Subclass Copepoda

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu; Xiong, Jie; Yu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1–9) within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1) 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%); and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2) nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9) of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%); 3) compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%); and 4) V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy. PMID:26107258

  20. RNA Editing of Androgen Receptor Gene Transcripts in Prostate Cancer Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Harryl D.; Jasavala, Rohini J.; Hinkson, Izumi; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Trimmer, James S.; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wright, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway represents a critical step in the growth and survival of androgen-independent (AI) prostate cancer (CaP). In this study we show the DU145 and PC3 AI human CaP cell lines respond to androgens and require AR expression for optimal proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, AR gene transcripts in DU145 and PC3 cells harbored a large number of single base pair nucleotide transitions that resulted in missense mutations in selected AR codons. The most notable lesion detected in AR gene transcripts included the oncogenic codon 877T→A gain-of-function mutation. Surprisingly, AR gene transcript nucleotide transitions were not genome-encoded substitutions, but instead the mutations co-localized to putative A-to-I, U-to-C, C-to-U, and G-to-A RNA editing sites, suggesting the lesions were mediated through RNA editing mechanisms. Higher levels of mRNA encoding the A-to-I RNA editing enzymes ADAR1 and ADARB1 were observed in DU145 and PC3 cells relative to the androgen-responsive LNCaP and 22Rv1 human CaP cell lines, which correlated with higher levels of AR gene transcript A-to-I editing detected in DU145 and PC3 cells. Our results suggest that AR gene transcripts are targeted by different RNA editing enzymes in DU145 and PC3 cells. Thus RNA editing of AR gene transcripts may contribute to the etiology of hormone-refractory phenotypes in advanced stage AI CaP. PMID:18708348

  1. [RNA responsible for conferring a DNase I sensitive structure on albumin gene in assembled chromatin].

    PubMed

    Lv, Zhan-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Fang; Zhai, Yu; Song, Shu-Xia

    2003-01-01

    Although the set of genes is virtually the same in all tissues,differential gene expression is appeared in cells of different kinds. Differentiation and ageing are associated with regulation of gene expression that is a fundamental mechanism in eukaryotic development and survival. The sensitivity to DNase I of actively transcribed genes seems to be a general phenomenon. The purpose of the study is to test whether RNAs obtained from different organs or cells can enhance susceptibility of albumin gene to DNase I digestion in BALB/c mouse brain chromatin assembled.RNAs extracted from rat liver, lung, kidney, brain, tRNA from yeast and synthesized RNAs (23 nt completed with mouse alb gene) were added to a system of chromatin reconstitution that was achieved by dialysis from high ionic strength solution. Assembled chromatin was digested with DNase I (12.5 microg/mL) at 20 degrees for 1 min, then PCR assay was used to detect the level of albumin gene digested. PCR products (1200 bp) were run on a 6% polyacylamide gel and analyzed by silver stain assay. RNAs from different organs and synthesized RNAs all increased the sensitivity of albumin gene to DNase I attack in mouse assembled chromatin. The effect was more obvious in liver and lung RNAs than in kidney and brain ones. tRNA from yeast did not enhance the sensitivity of albumin gene to DNase I digestion. RNA increased albumin gene sensitivity to DNase I in a dose-dependent manner. We report here for the first time that RNAs can enhance susceptibility of albumin gene to DNase I digestion. The effect is associated with RNA sources or sequences. It is generally agreed that the formation of gene sensitivity to DNase I, by unfolding of a tightly packed chromatin fiber, is the first step in gene activation, then RNAs that recognize complementary DNA sequences may be the specific factors that affect DNA supercoiling and determine the sensitivity of gene to DNase I digestion. Here we describes "RNA Population Gene Activating

  2. An siRNA-based method for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Isidor, Marie S; Winther, Sally; Basse, Astrid L; Petersen, M Christine H; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan; Hansen, Jacob B

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is a promising therapeutic target for opposing obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The ability to modulate gene expression in mature brown adipocytes is important to understand brown adipocyte function and delineate novel regulatory mechanisms of non-shivering thermogenesis. The aim of this study was to optimize a lipofection-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection protocol for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes. We determined that a critical parameter was to deliver the siRNA to mature adipocytes by reverse transfection, i.e. transfection of non-adherent cells. Using this protocol, we effectively knocked down both high- and low-abundance transcripts in a model of mature brown adipocytes (WT-1) as well as in primary mature mouse brown adipocytes. A functional consequence of the knockdown was confirmed by an attenuated increase in uncoupled respiration (thermogenesis) in response to β-adrenergic stimulation of mature WT-1 brown adipocytes transfected with uncoupling protein 1 siRNA. Efficient gene silencing was also obtained in various mouse and human white adipocyte models (3T3-L1, primary mouse white adipocytes, hMADS) with the ability to undergo "browning." In summary, we report an easy and versatile reverse siRNA transfection protocol to achieve specific silencing of gene expression in various models of mature brown and browning-competent white adipocytes, including primary cells. PMID:27386153

  3. Overlapping RNA and DNA binding domains of the wt1 tumor suppressor gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Bardeesy, N; Pelletier, J

    1998-01-01

    The Wilms' tumour suppressor gene (wt1) is mutated in a subset of patients with Wilms' tumour and has a critical role in urogenital development. wt1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor which regulates expression of several genes involved in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Although a number of studies have characterized the DNA binding properties of the WT1 protein, recent evidence has suggested that WT1 may also have a role in RNA metabolism. We have used an RNA selection method to identify WT1 binding ligands from a random RNA pool. Three groups of RNA ligands specifically recognized by WT1 were identified. Mutational analysis pinpointed ribonucleotide sequences critical for binding. Analysis of truncated WT1 proteins demonstrated that three of four zinc fingers were necessary for RNA-protein interaction. The naturally occurring WT1 isoforms with insertion of lysine, threonine and serine between zinc fingers three and four were unable to bind the selected RNAs. The selected RNA ligands competed with the cognate WT1 DNA binding site for complex formation with WT1. Our findings suggest potential cellular RNA target sequences for WT1 and provide tools for studying the structural and functional properties of this tumour suppressor protein. PMID:9512553

  4. Nonsense mutations in the human. beta. -globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baserga, S.J.; Benz, E.J. Jr. )

    1988-04-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human {alpha}- and {beta}-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with {beta}{sup 0}-thalassemia have shown that for both the {beta}-17 and the {beta}-39 mutations less than normal levels of {beta}-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human {beta}-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned {beta}-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human {beta}-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation.

  5. Optimal consistency in microRNA expression analysis using reference-gene-based normalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Gardiner, Erin J; Cairns, Murray J

    2015-05-01

    Normalization of high-throughput molecular expression profiles secures differential expression analysis between samples of different phenotypes or biological conditions, and facilitates comparison between experimental batches. While the same general principles apply to microRNA (miRNA) normalization, there is mounting evidence that global shifts in their expression patterns occur in specific circumstances, which pose a challenge for normalizing miRNA expression data. As an alternative to global normalization, which has the propensity to flatten large trends, normalization against constitutively expressed reference genes presents an advantage through their relative independence. Here we investigated the performance of reference-gene-based (RGB) normalization for differential miRNA expression analysis of microarray expression data, and compared the results with other normalization methods, including: quantile, variance stabilization, robust spline, simple scaling, rank invariant, and Loess regression. The comparative analyses were executed using miRNA expression in tissue samples derived from subjects with schizophrenia and non-psychiatric controls. We proposed a consistency criterion for evaluating methods by examining the overlapping of differentially expressed miRNAs detected using different partitions of the whole data. Based on this criterion, we found that RGB normalization generally outperformed global normalization methods. Thus we recommend the application of RGB normalization for miRNA expression data sets, and believe that this will yield a more consistent and useful readout of differentially expressed miRNAs, particularly in biological conditions characterized by large shifts in miRNA expression. PMID:25797570

  6. Establishment of cells to monitor Microprocessor through fusion genes of microRNA and GFP

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, Motomu; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Adachi, Koichi; Miyata, Maiko; Huang, Peng; Ishiguro, Naoki; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Iwamoto, Takashi

    2008-08-08

    Microprocessor, the complex of Drosha and DGCR8, promotes the processing of primary microRNA to precursor microRNA, which is a crucial step for microRNA maturation. So far, no convenient assay systems have been developed for observing this step in vivo. Here we report the establishment of highly sensitive cellular systems where we can visually monitor the function of Microprocessor. During a series of screening of transfectants with fusion genes of the EGFP cDNA and primary microRNA genes, we have obtained certain cell lines where introduction of siRNA against DGCR8 or Drosha strikingly augments GFP signals. In contrast, these cells have not responded to Dicer siRNA; thus they have a unique character that GFP signals should be negatively and specifically correlated to the action of Microprocessor among biogenesis of microRNA. These cell lines can be useful tools for real-time analysis of Microprocessor action in vivo and identifying its novel modulators.

  7. Nucleolin is required for DNA methylation state and the expression of rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Abou-Ellail, Mohamed; Douet, Julien; Comella, Pascale; Matia, Isabel; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Debures, Anne; Blevins, Todd; Cooke, Richard; Medina, Francisco J; Tourmente, Sylvette; Pikaard, Craig S; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2010-11-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1). Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre-rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis. PMID:21124873

  8. Nucleolin Is Required for DNA Methylation State and the Expression of rRNA Gene Variants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Abou-Ellail, Mohamed; Douet, Julien; Comella, Pascale; Matia, Isabel; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; DeBures, Anne; Blevins, Todd; Cooke, Richard; Medina, Francisco J.; Tourmente, Sylvette; Pikaard, Craig S.; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1). Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre–rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis. PMID:21124873

  9. mRNA trans-splicing in gene therapy for genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Maire, Séverine; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Sahel, José-Alain; Hantraye, Philippe; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing, or SMaRT, is a promising strategy to design innovative gene therapy solutions for currently intractable genetic diseases. SMaRT relies on the correction of mutations at the post-transcriptional level by modifying the mRNA sequence. To achieve this, an exogenous RNA is introduced into the target cell, usually by means of gene transfer, to induce a splice event in trans between the exogenous RNA and the target endogenous pre-mRNA. This produces a chimeric mRNA composed partly of exons of the latter, and partly of exons of the former, encoding a sequence free of mutations. The principal challenge of SMaRT technology is to achieve a reaction as complete as possible, i.e., resulting in 100% repairing of the endogenous mRNA target. The proof of concept of SMaRT feasibility has already been established in several models of genetic diseases caused by recessive mutations. In such cases, in fact, the repair of only a portion of the mutant mRNA pool may be sufficient to obtain a significant therapeutic effect. However in the case of dominant mutations, the target cell must be freed from the majority of mutant mRNA copies, requiring a highly efficient trans-splicing reaction. This likely explains why only a few examples of SMaRT approaches targeting dominant mutations are reported in the literature. In this review, we explain in details the mechanism of trans-splicing, review the different strategies that are under evaluation to lead to efficient trans-splicing, and discuss the advantages and limitations of SMaRT. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:487-498. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27018401

  10. TF2LncRNA: Identifying Common Transcription Factors for a List of lncRNA Genes from ChIP-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qinghua; Wang, Jixuan; Wang, Yadong; Ma, Rui; Wu, Xiaoliang; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput genomic technologies like lncRNA microarray and RNA-Seq often generate a set of lncRNAs of interest, yet little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the set of lncRNA genes. Here, based on ChIP-Seq peak lists of transcription factors (TFs) from ENCODE and annotated human lncRNAs from GENCODE, we developed a web-based interface titled “TF2lncRNA,” where TF peaks from each ChIP-Seq experiment are crossed with the genomic coordinates of a set of input lncRNAs, to identify which TFs present a statistically significant number of binding sites (peaks) within the regulatory region of the input lncRNA genes. The input can be a set of coexpressed lncRNA genes or any other cluster of lncRNA genes. Users can thus infer which TFs are likely to be common transcription regulators of the set of lncRNAs. In addition, users can retrieve all lncRNAs potentially regulated by a specific TF in a specific cell line of interest or retrieve all TFs that have one or more binding sites in the regulatory region of a given lncRNA in the specific cell line. TF2LncRNA is an efficient and easy-to-use web-based tool. PMID:24729968

  11. Discovery and characterization of the first non-coding RNA that regulates gene expression, micF RNA: A historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Delihas, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The first evidence that RNA can function as a regulator of gene expression came from experiments with prokaryotes in the 1980s. It was shown that Escherichia coli micF is an independent gene, has its own promoter, and encodes a small non-coding RNA that base pairs with and inhibits translation of a target messenger RNA in response to environmental stress conditions. The micF RNA was isolated, sequenced and shown to be a primary transcript. In vitro experiments showed binding to the target ompF mRNA. Secondary structure probing revealed an imperfect micF RNA/ompF RNA duplex interaction and the presence of a non-canonical base pair. Several transcription factors, including OmpR, regulate micF transcription in response to environmental factors. micF has also been found in other bacterial species, however, recently Gerhart Wagner and Jörg Vogel showed pleiotropic effects and found micF inhibits expression of multiple target mRNAs; importantly, one is the global regulatory gene lrp. In addition, micF RNA was found to interact with its targets in different ways; it either inhibits ribosome binding or induces degradation of the message. Thus the concept and initial experimental evidence that RNA can regulate gene expression was born with prokaryotes. PMID:26629310

  12. MicroRNA-10 modulates Hox genes expression during Nile tilapia embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Juliana; Pinhal, Danillo; Moxon, Simon; Campos, Camila Lovaglio; Münsterberg, Andrea; Martins, Cesar

    2016-05-01

    Hox gene clusters encode a family of transcription factors that govern anterior-posterior axis patterning during embryogenesis in all bilaterian animals. The time and place of Hox gene expression are largely determined by the relative position of each gene within its cluster. Furthermore, Hox genes were shown to have their expression fine-tuned by regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs). However, the mechanisms of miRNA-mediated regulation of these transcription factors during fish early development remain largely unknown. Here we have profiled three highly expressed miR-10 family members of Nile tilapia at early embryonic development, determined their genomic organization as well as performed functional experiments for validation of target genes. Quantitative analysis during developmental stages showed miR-10 family expression negatively correlates with the expression of HoxA3a, HoxB3a and HoxD10a genes, as expected for bona fide miRNA-mRNA interactions. Moreover, luciferase assays demonstrated that HoxB3a and HoxD10a are targeted by miR-10b-5p. Overall, our data indicate that the miR-10 family directly regulates members of the Hox gene family during Nile tilapia embryogenesis. PMID:26980108

  13. Silencing of Aphid Genes by dsRNA Feeding from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Maffei, Massimo E.; Ridout, Christopher J.; Hogenhout, Saskia A.

    2011-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a valuable reverse genetics tool to study gene function in various organisms, including hemipteran insects such as aphids. Previous work has shown that RNAi-mediated knockdown of pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genes can be achieved through direct injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small-interfering RNAs (siRNA) into the pea aphid hemolymph or by feeding these insects on artificial diets containing the small RNAs. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have developed the plant-mediated RNAi technology for aphids to allow for gene silencing in the aphid natural environment and minimize handling of these insects during experiments. The green peach aphid M. persicae was selected because it has a broad plant host range that includes the model plants Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana for which transgenic materials can relatively quickly be generated. We targeted M. persicae Rack1, which is predominantly expressed in the gut, and M. persicae C002 (MpC002), which is predominantly expressed in the salivary glands. The aphids were fed on N. benthamiana leaf disks transiently producing dsRNA corresponding to these genes and on A. thaliana plants stably producing the dsRNAs. MpC002 and Rack-1 expression were knocked down by up to 60% on transgenic N. benthamiana and A. thaliana. Moreover, silenced M. persicae produced less progeny consistent with these genes having essential functions. Conclusions/Significance Similar levels of gene silencing were achieved in our plant-mediated RNAi approach and published silencing methods for aphids. Furthermore, the N. benthamiana leaf disk assay can be developed into a screen to assess which genes are essential for aphid survival on plants. Our results also demonstrate the feasibility of the plant-mediated RNAi approach for aphid control. PMID:21998682

  14. Computational and in vitro Investigation of miRNA-Gene Regulations in Retinoblastoma Pathogenesis: miRNA Mimics Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Nalini; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Retinoblastoma (RB), a primary pediatric intraocular tumor, arises from primitive retinal layers. Several novel molecular strategies are being developed for the clinical management of RB. miRNAs are known to regulate cancer-relevant biological processes. Here, the role of selected miRNAs, namely, miR-532-5p and miR-486-3p, has been analyzed for potential therapeutic targeting in RB. METHODS A comprehensive bioinformatic analysis was performed to predict the posttranscriptional regulators (miRNAs) of the select panel of genes [Group 1: oncogenes (HMGA2, MYCN, SYK, FASN); Group 2: cancer stem cell markers (TACSTD, ABCG2, CD133, CD44, CD24) and Group 3: cell cycle regulatory proteins (p53, MDM2)] using Microcosm, DIANALAB, miRBase v 18, and REFSEQ database, and RNA hybrid. The expressions of five miRNAs, namely, miR-146b-5p, miR-532-5p, miR-142-5p, miR-328, and miR-486-3p, were analyzed by qRT–PCR on primary RB tumor samples (n = 30; including 17 invasive RB tumors and 13 noninvasive RB tumors). Detailed complementary alignment between 5’ seed sequence of differentially expressed miRNAs and the sequence of target genes was determined. Based on minimum energy level and piCTAR scores, the gene targets were selected. Functional roles of these miRNA clusters were studied by using mimics in cultured RB (Y79, Weri Rb-1) cells in vitro. The gene targets (SYK and FASN) of the studied miRNAs were confirmed by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. Cell proliferation and apoptotic studies were performed. RESULTS Nearly 1948 miRNAs were identified in the in silico analysis, From this list, only 9 upregulated miRNAs (miR-146b-5p, miR-305, miR-663b, miR-299, miR-532-5p, miR-892b, miR-501, miR-142-5p, and miR-513b) and 10 downregulated miRNAs (miR-1254, miR-328, miR-133a, miR-1287, miR-1299, miR-375, miR-486-3p, miR-720, miR-98, and miR-122*) were found to be common with the RB serum miRNA profile. Downregulation of five miRNAs (miR-146b-5p, miR-532-5p, miR-142-5p, miR-328

  15. Union Exon Based Approach for RNA-Seq Gene Quantification: To Be or Not to Be?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shanrong; Xi, Li; Zhang, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, RNA-seq is emerging as a powerful technology in estimation of gene and/or transcript expression, and RPKM (Reads Per Kilobase per Million reads) is widely used to represent the relative abundance of mRNAs for a gene. In general, the methods for gene quantification can be largely divided into two categories: transcript-based approach and ‘union exon’-based approach. Transcript-based approach is intrinsically more difficult because different isoforms of the gene typically have a high proportion of genomic overlap. On the other hand, ‘union exon’-based approach method is much simpler and thus widely used in RNA-seq gene quantification. Biologically, a gene is expressed in one or more transcript isoforms. Therefore, transcript-based approach is logistically more meaningful than ‘union exon’-based approach. Despite the fact that gene quantification is a fundamental task in most RNA-seq studies, however, it remains unclear whether ‘union exon’-based approach for RNA-seq gene quantification is a good practice or not. In this paper, we carried out a side-by-side comparison of ‘union exon’-based approach and transcript-based method in RNA-seq gene quantification. It was found that the gene expression levels are significantly underestimated by ‘union exon’-based approach, and the average of RPKM from ‘union exons’-based method is less than 50% of the mean expression obtained from transcript-based approach. The difference between the two approaches is primarily affected by the number of transcripts in a gene. We performed differential analysis at both gene and transcript levels, respectively, and found more insights, such as isoform switches, are gained from isoform differential analysis. The accuracy of isoform quantification would improve if the read coverage pattern and exon-exon spanning reads are taken into account and incorporated into EM (Expectation Maximization) algorithm. Our investigation discourages the use of

  16. Turkey fecal microbial community structure and functional gene diversity revealed by 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingrang; Domingo, Jorge Santo

    2008-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to better understand the microbial composition and functional genetic diversity associated with turkey fecal communities. To achieve this, 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic clone libraries were sequenced from turkey fecal samples. The analysis of 382 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the most abundant bacteria were closely related to Lactobacillales (47%), Bacillales (31%), and Clostridiales (11%). Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, and Bacteroidales sequences were also identified, but represented a smaller part of the community. The analysis of 379 metagenomic sequences showed that most clones were similar to bacterial protein sequences (58%). Bacteriophage (10%) and avian viruses (3%) sequences were also represented. Of all metagenomic clones potentially encoding for bacterial proteins, most were similar to low G+C Gram-positive bacterial proteins, particularly from Lactobacillales (50%), Bacillales (11%), and Clostridiales (8%). Bioinformatic analyses suggested the presence of genes encoding for membrane proteins, lipoproteins, hydrolases, and functional genes associated with the metabolism of nitrogen and sulfur containing compounds. The results from this study further confirmed the predominance of Firmicutes in the avian gut and highlight the value of coupling 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing data analysis to study the microbial composition of avian fecal microbial communities. PMID:18974945

  17. A rapid and scalable system for studying gene function in mice using conditional RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Premsrirut, Prem K.; Dow, Lukas E.; Kim, Sang Yong; Camiolo, Matthew; Malone, Colin D.; Miething, Cornelius; Scuoppo, Claudio; Zuber, Johannes; Dickins, Ross A.; Kogan, Scott C.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Sordella, Raffaella; Hannon, Gregory J.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary RNA interference is a powerful tool for studying gene function, however, the reproducible generation of RNAi transgenic mice remains a significant limitation. By combining optimized fluorescence-coupled miR30-based shRNAs with high efficiency ES cell targeting, we developed a fast, scalable pipeline for the production of shRNA transgenic mice. Using this system, we generated eight tet-regulated shRNA transgenic lines targeting Firefly and Renilla luciferases, Oct4 and tumor suppressors p53, p16INK4a, p19ARF and APC and demonstrate potent gene silencing and GFP-tracked knockdown in a broad range of tissues in vivo. Further, using an shRNA targeting APC, we illustrate how this approach can identify predicted phenotypes and also unknown functions for a well-studied gene. In addition, through regulated gene silencing we validate APC/Wnt and p19ARF as potential therapeutic targets in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma and lung adenocarcinoma, respectively. This system provides a cost-effective and scalable platform for the production of RNAi transgenic mice targeting any mammalian gene. PMID:21458673

  18. Global role for polyadenylation-assisted nuclear RNA degradation in posttranscriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Win; Stevenson, Abigail L; Kearsey, Stephen E; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg

    2008-01-01

    Fission yeast Cid14, a component of the TRAMP (Cid14/Trf4-Air1-Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex, polyadenylates nuclear RNA and stimulates degradation by the exosome for RNA quality control. Here, we analyze patterns of global gene expression in cells lacking the Cid14 or the Dis3/Rpr44 subunit of the nuclear exosome. We found that transcripts from many genes induced during meiosis, including key regulators, accumulated in the absence of Cid14 or Dis3. Moreover, our data suggest that additional substrates include transcripts involved in heterochromatin assembly. Mutant cells lacking Cid14 and/or Dis3 accumulate transcripts corresponding to naturally silenced repeat elements within heterochromatic domains, reflecting defects in centromeric gene silencing and derepression of subtelomeric gene expression. We also uncover roles for Cid14 and Dis3 in maintaining the genomic integrity of ribosomal DNA. Our data indicate that polyadenylation-assisted nuclear RNA turnover functions in eliminating a variety of RNA targets to control diverse processes, such as heterochromatic gene silencing, meiotic differentiation, and maintenance of genomic integrity. PMID:18025105

  19. Dual sgRNA-directed gene knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 technology in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangyang; Xu, Fei; Zhu, Chengming; Ji, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Xufei; Feng, Xuezhu; Guang, Shouhong

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene-targeting system has been successfully used for genome editing in a variety of organisms. Here, we report the use of dual sgRNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to generate knockout mutants of protein coding genes, noncoding genes, and repetitive sequences in C. elegans. Co-injection of C. elegans with dual sgRNAs results in the removal of the interval between two sgRNAs and the loss-of-function phenotype of targeted genes. We sought to determine how large an interval can be eliminated and found that at least a 24 kb chromosome segment can be deleted using this dual sgRNA/Cas9 strategy. The deletion of large chromosome segments facilitates mutant screening by PCR and agarose electrophoresis. Thus, the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in combination with dual sgRNAs provides a powerful platform with which to easily generate gene knockout mutants in C. elegans. Our data also suggest that encoding multiple sgRNA sequences into a single CRISPR array to simultaneously edit several sites within the genome may cause the off-target deletion of chromosome sequences. PMID:25531445

  20. Chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticle mediated gene silencing in disease vector mosquito larvae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Mysore, Keshava; Flannery, Ellen; Michel, Kristin; Severson, David W.; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2015-01-01

    SHORT ABSTRACT Here we describe a procedure for inhibiting gene function in disease vector mosquitoes through the use of chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticles that are ingested by larvae. LONG ABSTRACT Vector mosquitoes inflict more human suffering than any other organism—and kill more than one million people each year. The mosquito genome projects facilitated research in new facets of mosquito biology, including functional genetic studies in the primary African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae and the dengue and yellow fever vector Aedes aegypti. RNA interference- (RNAi-) mediated gene silencing has been used to target genes of interest in both of these disease vector mosquito species. Here, we describe a procedure for preparation of chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticles that are combined with food and ingested by larvae. This technically straightforward, high-throughput, and relatively inexpensive methodology, which is compatible with long double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, has been used for the successful knockdown of a number of different genes in A. gambiae and A. aegypti larvae. Following larval feedings, knockdown, which is verified through qRT-PCR or in situ hybridization, can persist at least through the late pupal stage. This methodology may be applicable to a wide variety of mosquito and other insect species, including agricultural pests, as well as other non-model organisms. In addition to its utility in the research laboratory, in the future, chitosan, an inexpensive, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, could potentially be utilized in the field. PMID:25867635

  1. Oxidative Stress Alters miRNA and Gene Expression Profiles in Villous First Trimester Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Courtney E.; Tolba, Mai F.; Rondelli, Catherine M.; Xu, Meixiang; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and miRNA changes in placenta as a potential mechanism involved in preeclampsia (PE) is not fully elucidated. We investigated the impact of oxidative stress on miRNAs and mRNA expression profiles of genes associated with PE in villous 3A first trimester trophoblast cells exposed to H2O2 at 12 different concentrations (0-1 mM) for 0.5, 4, 24, and 48 h. Cytotoxicity, determined using the SRB assay, was used to calculate the IC50 of H2O2. RNA was extracted after 4 h exposure to H2O2 for miRNA and gene expression profiling. H2O2 exerted a concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on 3A trophoblast cells. Short-term exposure of 3A cells to low concentration of H2O2 (5% of IC50) significantly altered miRNA profile as evidenced by significant changes in 195 out of 595 evaluable miRNAs. Tool for annotations of microRNAs (TAM) analysis indicated that these altered miRNAs fall into 43 clusters and 34 families, with 41 functions identified. Exposure to H2O2 altered mRNA expression of 22 out of 84 key genes involved in dysregulation of placental development. In conclusion, short-term exposure of villous first trimester trophoblasts to low concentrations of H2O2 significantly alters miRNA profile and expression of genes implicated in placental development. PMID:26339600

  2. Probing the Limits to MicroRNA-Mediated Control of Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Araks; Figliuzzi, Matteo; Marinari, Enzo; De Martino, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    According to the 'ceRNA hypothesis', microRNAs (miRNAs) may act as mediators of an effective positive interaction between long coding or non-coding RNA molecules, carrying significant potential implications for a variety of biological processes. Here, inspired by recent work providing a quantitative description of small regulatory elements as information-conveying channels, we characterize the effectiveness of miRNA-mediated regulation in terms of the optimal information flow achievable between modulator (transcription factors) and target nodes (long RNAs). Our findings show that, while a sufficiently large degree of target derepression is needed to activate miRNA-mediated transmission, (a) in case of differential mechanisms of complex processing and/or transcriptional capabilities, regulation by a post-transcriptional miRNA-channel can outperform that achieved through direct transcriptional control; moreover, (b) in the presence of large populations of weakly interacting miRNA molecules the extra noise coming from titration disappears, allowing the miRNA-channel to process information as effectively as the direct channel. These observations establish the limits of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional cross-talk and suggest that, besides providing a degree of noise buffering, this type of control may be effectively employed in cells both as a failsafe mechanism and as a preferential fine tuner of gene expression, pointing to the specific situations in which each of these functionalities is maximized. PMID:26812364

  3. Probing the Limits to MicroRNA-Mediated Control of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Araks; Figliuzzi, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    According to the ‘ceRNA hypothesis’, microRNAs (miRNAs) may act as mediators of an effective positive interaction between long coding or non-coding RNA molecules, carrying significant potential implications for a variety of biological processes. Here, inspired by recent work providing a quantitative description of small regulatory elements as information-conveying channels, we characterize the effectiveness of miRNA-mediated regulation in terms of the optimal information flow achievable between modulator (transcription factors) and target nodes (long RNAs). Our findings show that, while a sufficiently large degree of target derepression is needed to activate miRNA-mediated transmission, (a) in case of differential mechanisms of complex processing and/or transcriptional capabilities, regulation by a post-transcriptional miRNA-channel can outperform that achieved through direct transcriptional control; moreover, (b) in the presence of large populations of weakly interacting miRNA molecules the extra noise coming from titration disappears, allowing the miRNA-channel to process information as effectively as the direct channel. These observations establish the limits of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional cross-talk and suggest that, besides providing a degree of noise buffering, this type of control may be effectively employed in cells both as a failsafe mechanism and as a preferential fine tuner of gene expression, pointing to the specific situations in which each of these functionalities is maximized. PMID:26812364

  4. The Effect of Human Genome Annotation Complexity on RNA-Seq Gene Expression Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Po-Yen; Phan, John H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has brought human genomic research to an unprecedented era. RNA-Seq is a branch of NGS that can be used to quantify gene expression and depends on accurate annotation of the human genome (i.e., the definition of genes and all of their variants or isoforms). Multiple annotations of the human genome exist with varying complexity. However, it is not clear how the choice of genome annotation influences RNA-Seq gene expression quantification. We assess the effect of different genome annotations in terms of (1) mapping quality, (2) quantification variation, (3) quantification accuracy (i.e., by comparing to qRT-PCR data), and (4) the concordance of detecting differentially expressed genes. External validation with qRT-PCR suggests that more complex genome annotations result in higher quantification variation.

  5. The emerging role of RNA in the regulation of gene transcription in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin V.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that particular species of non-coding RNAs can modulate gene transcription in human cells. While such observations were in the past relegated to imprinted genes, it is now becoming apparent that several different genes in differentiated cells may be under some form of RNA based regulatory control. Studies carried out to date have begun to discern the mechanism of action whereby non-coding RNAs modulate gene transcription by the targeted recruitment of epigenetic silencing complexes to homology containing loci in the genome. The results of these studies will be considered in detail as well as the implications that a vast array of non-coding RNA based regulatory networks may be operative in human cells. PMID:21333746

  6. Embedding mRNA Stability in Correlation Analysis of Time-Series Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Lorenzo; De Santis, Alberto; Salvucci, Samanta; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-01-01

    Current methods for the identification of putatively co-regulated genes directly from gene expression time profiles are based on the similarity of the time profile. Such association metrics, despite their central role in gene network inference and machine learning, have largely ignored the impact of dynamics or variation in mRNA stability. Here we introduce a simple, but powerful, new similarity metric called lead-lag R2 that successfully accounts for the properties of gene dynamics, including varying mRNA degradation and delays. Using yeast cell-cycle time-series gene expression data, we demonstrate that the predictive power of lead-lag R2 for the identification of co-regulated genes is significantly higher than that of standard similarity measures, thus allowing the selection of a large number of entirely new putatively co-regulated genes. Furthermore, the lead-lag metric can also be used to uncover the relationship between gene expression time-series and the dynamics of formation of multiple protein complexes. Remarkably, we found a high lead-lag R2 value among genes coding for a transient complex. PMID:18670596

  7. GtRNAdb 2.0: an expanded database of transfer RNA genes identified in complete and draft genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Patricia P.; Lowe, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs represent the largest, most ubiquitous class of non-protein coding RNA genes found in all living organisms. The tRNAscan-SE search tool has become the de facto standard for annotating tRNA genes in genomes, and the Genomic tRNA Database (GtRNAdb) was created as a portal for interactive exploration of these gene predictions. Since its published description in 2009, the GtRNAdb has steadily grown in content, and remains the most commonly cited web-based source of tRNA gene information. In this update, we describe not only a major increase in the number of tRNA predictions (>367000) and genomes analyzed (>4370), but more importantly, the integration of new analytic and functional data to improve the quality and biological context of tRNA gene predictions. New information drawn from other sources includes tRNA modification data, epigenetic data, single nucleotide polymorphisms, gene expression and evolutionary conservation. A richer set of analytic data is also presented, including better tRNA functional prediction, non-canonical features, predicted structural impacts from sequence variants and minimum free energy structural predictions. Views of tRNA genes in genomic context are provided via direct links to the UCSC genome browsers. The database can be searched by sequence or gene features, and is available at http://gtrnadb.ucsc.edu/. PMID:26673694

  8. Transient gene and microRNA expression profile changes of confluent human fibroblast cells in spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Wang, Xiaoyu; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Story, Michael; Wu, Honglu

    2016-06-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment different from the 1 g of the Earth, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies that have been conducted in space or by using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. It has not been specifically addressed whether nonproliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 d, respectively, to investigate changes in gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on d 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67(+) cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF-κB and other growth-related pathways that involve hepatocyte growth factor and VEGF as well as the down-regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On d 14, when the cells were mostly nonproliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profile of the flight sample was indistinguishable from that of the ground sample. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the d 3 samples, with respect to d 14, revealed that most of the changes observed on d 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for α-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between the flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true nondividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on gene and miRNA expression profiles.-Zhang, Y., Lu, T., Wong, M., Wang, X., Stodieck, L., Karouia, F., Story, M., Wu, H. Transient gene and microRNA expression profile changes of

  9. MicroRNA GENE EXPRESSION SIGNATURES IN THE DEVELOPING NEURAL TUBE

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Brock, Guy; Appana, Savitri; Webb, Cynthia; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neurulation requires precise, spatio-temporal expression of numerous genes and coordinated interaction of signal transduction and gene regulatory networks, disruption of which may contribute to the etiology of neural tube (NT) defects. MicroRNAs are key modulators of cell and tissue differentiation. In order to define potential roles of miRNAs in development of the murine NT, miRNA microarray analysis was conducted to establish expression profiles, and identify miRNA target genes and functional gene networks. METHODS miRNA expression profiles in murine embryonic NTs derived from gestational days 8.5, 9.0 and 9.5 were defined and compared utilizing miRXplore™ microarrays from Miltenyi Biotech GmbH. Gene expression changes were verified by TaqMan™ quantitative Real-Time PCR. clValid R package and the UPGMA (hierarchical) clustering method were utilized for cluster analysis of the microarray data. Functional associations among selected miRNAs were examined via Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. RESULTS miRXplore™ chips enabled examination of 609 murine miRNAs. Expression of approximately 12% of these was detected in murine embryonic NTs. Clustering analysis revealed several developmentally regulated expression clusters among these expressed genes. Target analysis of differentially expressed miRNAs enabled identification of numerous target genes associated with cellular processes essential for normal NT development. Utilization of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed interactive biological networks which connected differentially expressed miRNAs with their target genes, and highlighted functional relationships. CONCLUSIONS The present study defined unique gene expression signatures of a range of miRNAs in the developing NT during the critical period of NT morphogenesis. Analysis of miRNA target genes and gene interaction pathways revealed that specific miRNAs may direct expression of numerous genes encoding proteins which have been shown to be indispensable

  10. MicroRNA Gene Polymorphisms and Environmental Factors Increase Patient Susceptibility to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yin-Hung; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Liou, Yi-Sheng; Yang, Chen-Chieh; Yang, Shun-Fa; Kuo, Wu-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Background Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA fragments that naturally exist in the human body. Through various physiological mechanisms, miRNAs can generate different functions for regulating RNA protein levels and balancing abnormalities. Abnormal miRNA expression has been reported to be highly related to several diseases and cancers. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNAs have been reported to increase patient susceptibility and affect patient prognosis and survival. We adopted a case-control research design to verify the relationship between miRNAs and hepatocellular carcinoma. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 525 subjects, including 377 controls and 188 hepatocellular carcinoma patients, were selected. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and real-time PCR were used to analyze miRNA146a (rs2910164), miRNA149 (rs2292832), miRNA196 (rs11614913), and miRNA499 (rs3746444) genetic polymorphisms between the control group and the case group. The results indicate that people who carry the rs3746444 CT or CC genotypes may have a significantly increased susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.88–4.30). In addition, when combined with environmental risk factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption, interaction effects were observed between gene polymorphisms and environmental factors (odds ratio [OR] = 4.69, 95% CI = 2.52–8.70; AOR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.68–6.80). Conclusions These results suggest that a significant association exists between miRNA499 SNPs and hepatocellular carcinoma. Gene-environment interactions of miRNA499 polymorphisms, smoking, and alcohol consumption might alter hepatocellular carcinoma susceptibility. PMID:24587132

  11. Disruption of amylase genes by RNA interference affects reproduction in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Huvet, Arnaud; Béguel, Jean-Philippe; Cavaleiro, Nathalia Pereira; Thomas, Yoann; Quillien, Virgile; Boudry, Pierre; Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; Fabioux, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    Feeding strategies and digestive capacities can have important implications for variation in energetic pathways associated with ecological and economically important traits, such as growth or reproduction in bivalve species. Here, we investigated the role of amylase in the digestive processes of Crassostrea gigas, using in vivo RNA interference. This approach also allowed us to investigate the relationship between energy intake by feeding and gametogenesis in oysters. Double-stranded (ds)RNA designed to target the two α-amylase genes A and B was injected in vivo into the visceral mass of oysters at two doses. These treatments caused significant reductions in mean mRNA levels of the amylase genes: -50.7% and -59% mRNA A, and -71.9% and -70.6% mRNA B in 15 and 75 µg dsRNA-injected oysters, respectively, relative to controls. Interestingly, reproductive knock-down phenotypes were observed for both sexes at 48 days post-injection, with a significant reduction of the gonad area (-22.5% relative to controls) and germ cell under-proliferation revealed by histology. In response to the higher dose of dsRNA, we also observed reductions in amylase activity (-53%) and absorption efficiency (-5%). Based on these data, dynamic energy budget modeling showed that the limitation of energy intake by feeding that was induced by injection of amylase dsRNA was insufficient to affect gonadic development at the level observed in the present study. This finding suggests that other driving mechanisms, such as endogenous hormonal modulation, might significantly change energy allocation to reproduction, and increase the maintenance rate in oysters in response to dsRNA injection. PMID:25883379

  12. Mutational robustness of 16S ribosomal RNA, shown by experimental horizontal gene transfer in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Kei; Yasutake, Yoshiaki; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial ribosome consists of three rRNA molecules and 57 proteins and plays a crucial role in translating mRNA-encoded information into proteins. Because of the ribosome’s structural and mechanistic complexity, it is believed that each ribosomal component coevolves to maintain its function. Unlike 5S rRNA, 16S and 23S rRNAs appear to lack mutational robustness, because they form the structural core of the ribosome. However, using Escherichia coli Δ7 (null mutant of operons) as a host, we have recently shown that an active hybrid ribosome whose 16S rRNA has been specifically substituted with that from non–E. coli bacteria can be reconstituted in vivo. To investigate the mutational robustness of 16S rRNA and the structural basis for its functionality, we used a metagenomic approach to screen for 16S rRNA genes that complement the growth of E. coli Δ7. Various functional genes were obtained from the Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria lineages. Despite the large sequence diversity (80.9–99.0% identity with E. coli 16S rRNA) of the functional 16S rRNA molecules, the doubling times (DTs) of each mutant increased only modestly with decreasing sequence identity (average increase in DT, 4.6 s per mutation). The three-dimensional structure of the 30S ribosome showed that at least 40.7% (628/1,542) of the nucleotides were variable, even at ribosomal protein-binding sites, provided that the secondary structures were properly conserved. Our results clearly demonstrate that 16S rRNA functionality largely depends on the secondary structure but not on the sequence itself. PMID:23112186

  13. Oscope identifies oscillatory genes in unsynchronized single-cell RNA-seq experiments.

    PubMed

    Leng, Ning; Chu, Li-Fang; Barry, Chris; Li, Yuan; Choi, Jeea; Li, Xiaomao; Jiang, Peng; Stewart, Ron M; Thomson, James A; Kendziorski, Christina

    2015-10-01

    Oscillatory gene expression is fundamental to development, but technologies for monitoring expression oscillations are limited. We have developed a statistical approach called Oscope to identify and characterize the transcriptional dynamics of oscillating genes in single-cell RNA-seq data from an unsynchronized cell population. Applying Oscope to a number of data sets, we demonstrated its utility and also identified a potential artifact in the Fluidigm C1 platform. PMID:26301841

  14. Knockdown of RNA Interference Pathway Genes in Western Corn Rootworms (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte) Demonstrates a Possible Mechanism of Resistance to Lethal dsRNA

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Ana María; Khajuria, Chitvan; Wang, Haichuan; Narva, Kenneth E.; Siegfried, Blair D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is being developed as a potential tool for insect pest management. Increased understanding of the RNAi pathway in target insect pests will provide information to use this technology effectively and to inform decisions related to resistant management strategies for RNAi based traits. Dicer 2 (Dcr2), an endonuclease responsible for formation of small interfering RNA’s and Argonaute 2 (Ago2), an essential catalytic component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) have both been associated with the RNAi pathway in a number of different insect species including the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). We identified both genes from a transcriptome library generated from different tissues and developmental stages of the western corn rootworm, an important target pest for transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting essential genes. The expression of these genes was suppressed by more than 90% after injecting gene specific dsRNA into adult rootworms. The injected beetles were then fed vATPase A dsRNA which has previously been demonstrated to cause mortality in western corn rootworm adults. The suppression of both RNAi pathway genes resulted in reduced mortality after subsequent exposure to lethal concentrations of vATPase A dsRNA as well as increased vATPase A expression relative to control treatments. Injections with dsRNA for a non-lethal target sequence (Laccase 2) did not affect mortality or expression caused by vATPase A dsRNA indicating that the results observed with Argo and Dicer dsRNA were not caused by simple competition among different dsRNA’s. These results confirm that both genes play an important role in the RNAi pathway for western corn rootworms and indicate that selection pressures that potentially affect the expression of these genes may provide a basis for future studies to understand potential mechanisms of resistance. PMID:27310918

  15. Contributions of transcription and mRNA decay to gene expression dynamics of fission yeast in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Marguerat, Samuel; Lawler, Katherine; Brazma, Alvis; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels of control to shape gene regulation is only partially understood. Here we show that a combination of two simple and non-invasive genomic techniques, coupled with kinetic mathematical modeling, affords insight into the intricate dynamics of RNA regulation in response to oxidative stress in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study reveals a dominant role of transcriptional regulation in response to stress, but also points to the first minutes after stress induction as a critical time when the coordinated control of mRNA turnover can support the control of transcription for rapid gene regulation. In addition, we uncover specialized gene expression strategies associated with distinct functional gene groups, such as simultaneous transcriptional repression and mRNA destabilization for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, delayed mRNA destabilization with varying contribution of transcription for ribosome biogenesis genes, dominant roles of mRNA stabilization for genes functioning in protein degradation, and adjustment of both transcription and mRNA turnover during the adaptation to stress. We also show that genes regulated independently of the bZIP transcription factor Atf1p are predominantly controlled by mRNA turnover, and identify putative cis-regulatory sequences that are associated with different gene expression strategies during the stress response. This study highlights the intricate and multi-faceted interplay between transcription and RNA turnover during the dynamic regulatory response to stress. PMID:25007214

  16. Characterization and Physical Mapping of Ribosomal RNA Gene Families in Plantago

    PubMed Central

    DHAR, MANOJ K.; FRIEBE, BERND; KAUL, SANJANA; GILL, BIKRAM S.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The organization of rRNA genes in cultivated Plantago ovata Forsk. and several of its wild allies was analysed to gain insight into the phylogenetic relationships of these species in the genus which includes some 200 species. • Methods Specific primers were designed to amplify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions from seven Plantago species and the resulting fragments were cloned and sequenced. Similarly, using specific primers, the 5S rRNA genes from these species were amplified and subsequently cloned. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal RNA genes. • Results The ITS1 region is 19–29 bp longer than the ITS2 in different Plantago species. The 5S rRNA gene-repeating unit varies in length from 289 to 581 bp. Coding regions are highly conserved across species, but the non-transcribed spacers (NTS) do not match any database sequences. The clone from the cultivated species P. ovata was used for physical mapping of these genes by FISH. Four species have one FISH site while three have two FISH sites. In P. lanceolata and P. rhodosperma, the 5S and 45S (18S-5·8S-25S) sites are coupled. • Conclusions Characterization of 5S and 45S rRNA genes has indicated a possible origin of P. ovata, the only cultivated species of the genus and also the only species with x = 4, from a species belonging to subgenus Psyllium. Based on the studies reported here, P. ovata is closest to P. arenaria, although on the basis of other data the two species have been placed in different subgenera. FISH mapping can be used as an efficient tool to help determine phylogenetic relationships in the genus Plantago and show the interrelationship between P. lanceolata and P. lagopus. PMID:16481363

  17. Gene set analysis approaches for RNA-seq data: performance evaluation and application guideline

    PubMed Central

    Rahmatallah, Yasir; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) is gradually replacing microarrays for high-throughput studies of gene expression. The main challenge of analyzing microarray data is not in finding differentially expressed genes, but in gaining insights into the biological processes underlying phenotypic differences. To interpret experimental results from microarrays, gene set analysis (GSA) has become the method of choice, in particular because it incorporates pre-existing biological knowledge (in a form of functionally related gene sets) into the analysis. Here we provide a brief review of several statistically different GSA approaches (competitive and self-contained) that can be adapted from microarrays practice as well as those specifically designed for RNA-seq. We evaluate their performance (in terms of Type I error rate, power, robustness to the sample size and heterogeneity, as well as the sensitivity to different types of selection biases) on simulated and real RNA-seq data. Not surprisingly, the performance of various GSA approaches depends only on the statistical hypothesis they test and does not depend on whether the test was developed for microarrays or RNA-seq data. Interestingly, we found that competitive methods have lower power as well as robustness to the samples heterogeneity than self-contained methods, leading to poor results reproducibility. We also found that the power of unsupervised competitive methods depends on the balance between up- and down-regulated genes in tested gene sets. These properties of competitive methods have been overlooked before. Our evaluation provides a concise guideline for selecting GSA approaches, best performing under particular experimental settings in the context of RNA-seq. PMID:26342128

  18. RNA-seq analyses of gene expression in the microsclerotia of Verticillium dahliae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The soilborne fungus, Verticillium dahliae, causes Verticillium wilt disease in plants. Verticillium wilt is difficult to control since V. dahliae is capable of persisting in the soil for 10 to 15 years as melanized microsclerotia, rendering crop rotation strategies for disease control ineffective. Microsclerotia of V. dahliae overwinter and germinate to produce infectious hyphae that give rise to primary infections. Consequently, microsclerotia formation, maintenance, and germination are critically important processes in the disease cycle of V. dahliae. Results To shed additional light on the molecular processes that contribute to microsclerotia biogenesis and melanin synthesis in V. dahliae, three replicate RNA-seq libraries were prepared from 10 day-old microsclerotia (MS)-producing cultures of V. dahliae, strain VdLs.17 (average = 52.23 million reads), and those not producing microsclerotia (NoMS, average = 50.58 million reads). Analyses of these libraries for differential gene expression revealed over 200 differentially expressed genes, including up-regulation of melanogenesis-associated genes tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase (344-fold increase) and scytalone dehydratase (231-fold increase), and additional genes located in a 48.8 kilobase melanin biosynthetic gene cluster of strain VdLs.17. Nearly 50% of the genes identified as differentially expressed in the MS library encode hypothetical proteins. Additional comparative analyses of gene expression in V. dahliae, under growth conditions that promote or preclude microsclerotial development, were conducted using a microarray approach with RNA derived from V. dahliae strain Dvd-T5, and from the amicrosclerotial vdh1 strain. Differential expression of selected genes observed by RNA-seq or microarray analysis was confirmed using RT-qPCR or Northern hybridizations. Conclusion Collectively, the data acquired from these investigations provide additional insight into gene expression and molecular

  19. Intron gain by tandem genomic duplication: a novel case in a potato gene encoding RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-Yue; Lan, Xin-Ran; Niu, Deng-Ke

    2016-01-01

    The origin and subsequent accumulation of spliceosomal introns are prominent events in the evolution of eukaryotic gene structure. However, the mechanisms underlying intron gain remain unclear because there are few proven cases of recently gained introns. In an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene, we found that a tandem duplication occurred after the divergence of potato and its wild relatives among other Solanum plants. The duplicated sequence crosses the intron-exon boundary of the first intron and the second exon. A new intron was detected at this duplicated region, and it includes a small previously exonic segment of the upstream copy of the duplicated sequence and the intronic segment of the downstream copy of the duplicated sequence. The donor site of this new intron was directly obtained from the small previously exonic segment. Most of the splicing signals were inherited directly from the parental intron/exon structure, including a putative branch site, the polypyrimidine tract, the 3' splicing site, two putative exonic splicing enhancers, and the GC contents differed between the intron and exon. In the widely cited model of intron gain by tandem genomic duplication, the duplication of an AGGT-containing exonic segment provides the GT and AG splicing sites for the new intron. Our results illustrate that the tandem duplication model of intron gain should be diverse in terms of obtaining the proper splicing signals. PMID:27547574

  20. Intron gain by tandem genomic duplication: a novel case in a potato gene encoding RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming-Yue; Lan, Xin-Ran

    2016-01-01

    The origin and subsequent accumulation of spliceosomal introns are prominent events in the evolution of eukaryotic gene structure. However, the mechanisms underlying intron gain remain unclear because there are few proven cases of recently gained introns. In an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene, we found that a tandem duplication occurred after the divergence of potato and its wild relatives among other Solanum plants. The duplicated sequence crosses the intron-exon boundary of the first intron and the second exon. A new intron was detected at this duplicated region, and it includes a small previously exonic segment of the upstream copy of the duplicated sequence and the intronic segment of the downstream copy of the duplicated sequence. The donor site of this new intron was directly obtained from the small previously exonic segment. Most of the splicing signals were inherited directly from the parental intron/exon structure, including a putative branch site, the polypyrimidine tract, the 3′ splicing site, two putative exonic splicing enhancers, and the GC contents differed between the intron and exon. In the widely cited model of intron gain by tandem genomic duplication, the duplication of an AGGT-containing exonic segment provides the GT and AG splicing sites for the new intron. Our results illustrate that the tandem duplication model of intron gain should be diverse in terms of obtaining the proper splicing signals. PMID:27547574

  1. Growth inhibition of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells by sgRNA targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA based on TRUE gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Satoshi; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Nashimoto, Masayuki; Fukuda, Satoshi; Tamura, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exhibits increased expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1). Previous studies have shown a correlation between poor prognosis of HNSCC and cyclin D1 overexpression. tRNase ZL-utilizing efficacious gene silencing (TRUE gene silencing) is one of the RNA-mediated gene expression control technologies that have therapeutic potential. This technology is based on a unique enzymatic property of mammalian tRNase ZL, which is that it can cleave any target RNA at any desired site by recognizing a pre-tRNA-like complex formed between the target RNA and an artificial small guide RNA (sgRNA). In this study, we designed several sgRNAs targeting human cyclin D1 mRNA to examine growth inhibition of HNSCC cells. Transfection of certain sgRNAs decreased levels of cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in HSC-2 and HSC-3 cells, and also inhibited their proliferation. The combination of these sgRNAs and cisplatin showed more than additive inhibition of cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that TRUE gene silencing of cyclin D1 leads to inhibition of the growth of HNSCC cells and suggest that these sgRNAs alone or combined with cisplatin may be a useful new therapy for HNSCCs. PMID:25437003

  2. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  3. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  4. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  5. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the leucyl-tRNA synthetase gene of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Vander Horn, P B; Zahler, S A

    1992-01-01

    The leucyl-tRNA synthetase gene (leuS) of Bacillus subtilis was cloned and sequenced. A mutation in the gene, leuS1, increases the transcription and expression of the ilv-leu operion, permitting monitoring of leuS alleles. The leuS1 mutation was mapped to 270 degrees on the chromosome. Sequence analysis showed that the mutation is a single-base substitution, possibly in a monocistronic operon. The leader mRNA predicted by the sequence would contain a number of possible secondary structures and a T box, a sequence observed upstream of leader mRNA terminators of Bacillus tRNA synthetases and the B. subtilis ilv-leu operon. The DNA of the B. subtilis leuS open reading frame is 48% identical to the leuS gene of Escherichia coli and is predicted to encode a polypeptide with 46% identity to the leucyl-tRNA synthetase of E. coli. PMID:1317842

  6. Mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for forensic identification of crocodile species.

    PubMed

    Naga Jogayya, K; Meganathan, P R; Dubey, Bhawna; Haque, I

    2013-05-01

    All crocodilians are under various threats due to over exploitation and these species have been listed in Appendix I or II of CITES. Lack of molecular techniques for the forensic identification of confiscated samples makes it difficult to enforce the law. Therefore, we herein present a molecular method developed on the basis on 16S rRNA gene of mitochondrial DNA for identification of crocodile species. We have developed a set of 16S rRNA primers for PCR based identification of crocodilian species. These novel primers amplify partial 16S rRNA sequences of six crocodile species which can be later combined to obtain a larger region (1290 bp) of 16S rRNA gene. This 16S rRNA gene could be used as an effective tool for forensic authentication of crocodiles. The described primers hold great promise in forensic identification of crocodile species, which can aid in the effective enforcement of law and conservation of these species. PMID:23622485

  7. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay among coagulation factor genes

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Haemostasis prevents blood loss following vascular injury. It depends on the unique concert of events involving platelets and specific blood proteins, known as coagulation factors. The clotting system requires precise regulation and coordinated reactions to maintain the integrity of the vasculature. Clotting insufficiency mostly occurs due to genetically inherited coagulation factor deficiencies such as hemophilia. Materials and Methods: A relevant literature search of PubMed was performed using the keywords coagulation factors, Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and premature translation termination codons. Search limitations included English language and human-based studies. Results: Mutations that cause premature translation termination codons probably account for one-third of genetically inherited diseases. Transcripts bearing aberrant termination codons are selectively identified and eliminated by an evolutionarily conserved posttranscriptional pathway known as nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). There are many pieces of evidence of decay among coagulation factor genes. However, the hemophilia gene (F8) does not seem to be subjected to NMD. Since the F8 gene is located on the X-chromosome, a connection between X-linked traits and mRNA decay could be assumed. Conclusion: Considering that not all genes go through decay, this review focuses on the basics of the mechanism in coagulation genes. It is interesting to determine whether this translation-coupled surveillance system represents a general rule for the genes encoding components of the same physiological cascade. PMID:27279976

  8. Mitochondrial genomes of praying mantises (Dictyoptera, Mantodea): rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment of tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Lan, Xu-e; Zhu, Wen-bo; You, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) contain a conserved set of 37 genes for an extensive diversity of lineages. Previously reported dictyopteran mitogenomes share this conserved mitochondrial gene arrangement, although surprisingly little is known about the mitogenome of Mantodea. We sequenced eight mantodean mitogenomes including the first representatives of two families: Hymenopodidae and Liturgusidae. Only two of these genomes retain the typical insect gene arrangement. In three Liturgusidae species, the trnM genes have translocated. Four species of mantis (Creobroter gemmata, Mantis religiosa, Statilia sp., and Theopompa sp.-HN) have multiple identical tandem duplication of trnR, and Statilia sp. additionally includes five extra duplicate trnW. These extra trnR and trnW in Statilia sp. are erratically arranged and form another novel gene order. Interestingly, the extra trnW is converted from trnR by the process of point mutation at anticodon, which is the first case of tRNA reassignment for an insect. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed amongst mantodean mitogenomes with variable copies of tRNA according to comparative analysis of codon usage. Combined with phylogenetic analysis, the characteristics of tRNA only possess limited phylogenetic information in this research. Nevertheless, these features of gene rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment provide valuable information toward understanding mitogenome evolution in insects. PMID:27157299

  9. Mitochondrial genomes of praying mantises (Dictyoptera, Mantodea): rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment of tRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Lan, Xu-E; Zhu, Wen-Bo; You, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) contain a conserved set of 37 genes for an extensive diversity of lineages. Previously reported dictyopteran mitogenomes share this conserved mitochondrial gene arrangement, although surprisingly little is known about the mitogenome of Mantodea. We sequenced eight mantodean mitogenomes including the first representatives of two families: Hymenopodidae and Liturgusidae. Only two of these genomes retain the typical insect gene arrangement. In three Liturgusidae species, the trnM genes have translocated. Four species of mantis (Creobroter gemmata, Mantis religiosa, Statilia sp., and Theopompa sp.-HN) have multiple identical tandem duplication of trnR, and Statilia sp. additionally includes five extra duplicate trnW. These extra trnR and trnW in Statilia sp. are erratically arranged and form another novel gene order. Interestingly, the extra trnW is converted from trnR by the process of point mutation at anticodon, which is the first case of tRNA reassignment for an insect. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed amongst mantodean mitogenomes with variable copies of tRNA according to comparative analysis of codon usage. Combined with phylogenetic analysis, the characteristics of tRNA only possess limited phylogenetic information in this research. Nevertheless, these features of gene rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment provide valuable information toward understanding mitogenome evolution in insects. PMID:27157299

  10. MicroRNA-mediated gene regulation: potential applications for plant genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Man; Luo, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Food security is one of the most important issues challenging the world today. Any strategies to solve this problem must include increasing crop yields and quality. MicroRNA-based genetic modification technology (miRNA-based GM tech) can be one of the most promising solutions that contribute to agricultural productivity directly by developing superior crop cultivars with enhanced biotic and abiotic stress tolerance and increased biomass yields. Indirectly, the technology may increase usage of marginal soils and decrease pesticide use, among other benefits. This review highlights the most recent progress of transgenic studies utilizing various miRNAs and their targets for plant trait modifications, and analyzes the potential of miRNA-mediated gene regulation for use in crop improvement. Strategies for manipulating miRNAs and their targets in transgenic plants including constitutive, stress-induced, or tissue-specific expression of miRNAs or their targets, RNA interference, expressing miRNA-resistant target genes, artificial target mimic and artificial miRNAs were discussed. We also discussed potential risks of utilizing miRNA-based GM tech. In general, miRNAs and their targets not only provide an invaluable source of novel transgenes, but also inspire the development of several new GM strategies, allowing advances in breeding novel crop cultivars with agronomically useful characteristics. PMID:23771582

  11. Relationship of serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and haplotypes to mRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Sarah L; Dodelzon, Katerina; Sandhu, Harinder K; Philibert, Robert A

    2005-07-01

    The serotonin transporter (5HTT; chromosomal location 17q12) is an important regulator of serotonergic neurotransmission and is the site of action for a number of antidepressant medications. Sequence variation at a VNTR known as the 5HTTLPR, which is 1.4 kb upstream of the translation start of 5HTT, has been associated in some studies with increased vulnerability to depression, neuroticism, and autism. Support for these clinical observations has included laboratory findings that 5HTTLPR variation is associated with changes in 5HTT gene translation. We re-examined these earlier laboratory findings by directly measuring 5HTT mRNA levels and genotyping four loci spanning the 5HTT gene using RNA and DNA prepared from 85 independent lymphoblast cell lines. Using this data, haplotypes were inferred and the resulting single point and haplotypes data analyzed by univariate and regression analyses. Consistent with the original findings, we found a significant effect of the 5HTTLPR on mRNA production. In contrast to previous reports, the effect on 5HTT mRNA production appeared to be mediated through an additive, not dominant, mechanism. Neither genotype nor haplotype at three other 5HTT loci were associated with alterations in mRNA production, although the small number of samples homozygous for the three most common haplotypes limits these findings. We conclude that further examination of the role of 5HTT sequence variation in regulating 5HTT mRNA production is warranted. PMID:15858822

  12. A third member of the RNA-specific adenosine deaminase gene family, ADAR3, contains both single- and double-stranded RNA binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C X; Cho, D S; Wang, Q; Lai, F; Carter, K C; Nishikura, K

    2000-01-01

    Members of the double-stranded RNA- (dsRNA) specific adenosine deaminase gene family convert adenosine residues into inosines in dsRNA and are involved in A-to-I RNA editing of transcripts of glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits and serotonin receptor subtype 2C (5-HT(2C)R). We have isolated hADAR3, the third member of this class of human enzyme and investigated its editing site selectivity using in vitro RNA editing assay systems. As originally reported for rat ADAR3 or RED2, purified ADAR3 proteins could not edit GluR-B RNA at the "Q/R" site, the "R/G" site, and the intronic "hot spot" site. In addition, ADAR3 did not edit any of five sites discovered recently within the intracellular loop II region of 5-HT(2C)R RNAs, confirming its total lack of editing activity for currently known substrate RNAs. Filter-binding analyses revealed that ADAR3 is capable of binding not only to dsRNA but also to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). Deletion mutagenesis identified a region rich in arginine residues located in the N-terminus that is responsible for binding of ADAR3 to ssRNA. The presence of this ssRNA-binding domain as well as its expression in restricted brain regions and postmitotic neurons make ADAR3 distinct from the other two ADAR gene family members, editing competent ADAR1 and ADAR2. ADAR3 inhibited in vitro the activities of RNA editing enzymes of the ADAR gene family, raising the possibility of a regulatory role in RNA editing. PMID:10836796

  13. Model-driven engineering of gene expression from RNA replicons.

    PubMed

    Beal, Jacob; Wagner, Tyler E; Kitada, Tasuku; Azizgolshani, Odisse; Parker, Jordan Moberg; Densmore, Douglas; Weiss, Ron

    2015-01-16

    RNA replicons are an emerging platform for engineering synthetic biological systems. Replicons self-amplify, can provide persistent high-level expression of proteins even from a small initial dose, and, unlike DNA vectors, pose minimal risk of chromosomal integration. However, no quantitative model sufficient for engineering levels of protein expression from such replicon systems currently exists. Here, we aim to enable the engineering of multigene expression from more than one species of replicon by creating a computational model based on our experimental observations of the expression dynamics in single- and multireplicon systems. To this end, we studied fluorescent protein expression in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells using a replicon derived from Sindbis virus (SINV). We characterized expression dynamics for this platform based on the dose-response of a single species of replicon over 50 h and on a titration of two cotransfected replicons expressing different fluorescent proteins. From this data, we derive a quantitative model of multireplicon expression and validate it by designing a variety of three-replicon systems, with profiles that match desired expression levels. We achieved a mean error of 1.7-fold on a 1000-fold range, thus demonstrating how our model can be applied to precisely control expression levels of each Sindbis replicon species in a system. PMID:24877739

  14. Identification of androgenic gland microRNA and their target genes to discover sex-related microRNA in the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Jin, S B; Fu, H T; Jiang, S F; Xiong, Y W; Qiao, H; Zhang, W Y; Gong, Y S; Wu, Y

    2015-01-01

    The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China. The androgenic gland produces hormones that play crucial roles in the differentiation of crustaceans to the male sex. MicroRNA (miRNA) post-transcriptionally regulates many protein-coding genes, influencing important biological and metabolic processes. However, currently, there is no published data identifying miRNA in M. nipponense. In this study, we identified novel miRNA in the androgenic gland of M. nipponense. Using the high-throughput Illumina Solexa system, 1077 miRNA were identified from small RNA libraries by aligning with the de novo androgenic gland transcriptome of M. nipponense (obtained from RNA-Seq) and the sequences in the miRBase21 database. A total of 8,248, 76,011, and 78,307 target genes were predicted in the EST and SRA sequences provided in the NCBI database, and the androgenic gland transcriptome of M. nipponense, respectively. Some potential sex-related miRNA were identified based on the function of the predicted target genes. The results of our study provide new information regarding the miRNA expression in M. nipponense, which could be the basis for further genetic studies on decapod crustaceans. PMID:26782487

  15. TAP1, a yeast gene that activates the expression of a tRNA gene with a defective internal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Di Segni, G; McConaughy, B L; Shapiro, R A; Aldrich, T L; Hall, B D

    1993-01-01

    We developed a genetic selection system based on nonsense suppression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify mutations in proteins involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase III. A SUP4 tRNA(Tyr) internal promoter mutation (A53T61) that was unable to suppress ochre mutations in vivo and was incapable of binding TFIIIC in vitro was used as the target for selection of trans-acting compensatory mutations. We identified two such mutations in the same gene, which we named TAP1 (for transcription activation protein). The level of the SUP4A53T61 transcript was threefold higher in the tap1-1 mutant than in the wild type. The tap1-1 mutant strain was also temperature sensitive for growth. The thermosensitive character cosegregated with the restorer of suppression activity, as shown by meiotic linkage analysis and coreversion of the two traits. At 1 to 2 h after a shift to the restrictive temperature, RNA synthesis was strongly inhibited in the tap1-1 mutant, preceding any effect upon protein synthesis or growth. A marked decrease in tRNA and 5S rRNA synthesis was seen, and shortly after that, rRNA synthesis was inhibited. By complementation of the ts- growth defect, we cloned the wild-type TAP1 gene. It is essential for yeast growth. We show in the accompanying report (T. L. Aldrich, G. Di Segni, B. L. McConaughy, N. J. Keen, S. Whelen, and B. D. Hall, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:3434-3444, 1993) that TAP1 is identical to RAT1, a yeast gene implicated in poly(A)+ RNA export and that the TAP1/RAT1 gene product has extensive sequence similarity to the protein encoded by another yeast gene (variously named DST2, KEM1, RAR5, SEP1, or XRN1) having exonuclease and DNA strand transfer activity (reviewed by Kearsey and Kipling [Trends Cell Biol. 1:110-112, 1991]). Images PMID:8497259

  16. B chromosomes showing active ribosomal RNA genes contribute insignificant amounts of rRNA in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Badisco, Liesbeth; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Perfectti, Francisco; López-León, María Dolores; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2014-12-01

    The genetic inertness of supernumerary (B) chromosomes has recently been called into question after finding several cases of gene activity on them. The grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans harbors B chromosomes containing large amounts of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, some of which are eventually active, but the amount of rRNA transcripts contributed by B chromosomes, compared to those of the standard (A) chromosomes, is unknown. Here, we address this question by means of quantitative PCR (qPCR) for two different ITS2 amplicons, one coming from rDNA units located in both A and B chromosomes (ITS2(A+B)) and the other being specific to B chromosomes (ITS2(B)). We analyzed six body parts in nine males showing rDNA expression in their B chromosomes in the testis. Amplification of the ITS2(B) amplicon was successful in RNA extracted from all six body parts analyzed, but showed relative quantification (RQ) values four orders of magnitude lower than those obtained for the ITS(A+B) amplicon. RQ values differed significantly between body parts for the two amplicons, with testis, accessory gland and wing muscle showing threefold higher values than head, gastric cecum and hind leg. We conclude that the level of B-specific rDNA expression is extremely low even in individuals where B chromosome rDNA is not completely silenced. Bearing in mind that B chromosomes carry the largest rDNA cluster in the E. plorans genome, we also infer that the relative contribution of B chromosome rRNA genes to ribosome biogenesis is insignificant, at least in the body parts analyzed. PMID:24997085

  17. Phage-mediated Delivery of Targeted sRNA Constructs to Knock Down Gene Expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Ariel B.; Wintermute, Edwin H.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-mediated knockdowns are widely used to control gene expression. This versatile family of techniques makes use of short RNA (sRNA) that can be synthesized with any sequence and designed to complement any gene targeted for silencing. Because sRNA constructs can be introduced to many cell types directly or using a variety of vectors, gene expression can be repressed in living cells without laborious genetic modification. The most common RNA knockdown technology, RNA interference (RNAi), makes use of the endogenous RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to mediate sequence recognition and cleavage of the target mRNA. Applications of this technique are therefore limited to RISC-expressing organisms, primarily eukaryotes. Recently, a new generation of RNA biotechnologists have developed alternative mechanisms for controlling gene expression through RNA, and so made possible RNA-mediated gene knockdowns in bacteria. Here we describe a method for silencing gene expression in E. coli that functionally resembles RNAi. In this system a synthetic phagemid is designed to express sRNA, which may designed to target any sequence. The expression construct is delivered to a population of E. coli cells with non-lytic M13 phage, after which it is able to stably replicate as a plasmid. Antisense recognition and silencing of the target mRNA is mediated by the Hfq protein, endogenous to E. coli. This protocol includes methods for designing the antisense sRNA, constructing the phagemid vector, packaging the phagemid into M13 bacteriophage, preparing a live cell population for infection, and performing the infection itself. The fluorescent protein mKate2 and the antibiotic resistance gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) are targeted to generate representative data and to quantify knockdown effectiveness. PMID:27023729

  18. Short interfering RNA-mediated gene silencing in Globodera pallida and Meloidogyne incognita infective stage juveniles.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Johnathan J; McMaster, Steven; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of gene function through RNA interference (RNAi)-based reverse genetics in plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) remains inexplicably reliant on the use of long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) silencing triggers; a practice inherently disadvantageous due to the introduction of superfluous dsRNA sequence, increasing chances of aberrant or off-target gene silencing through interactions between nascent short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and non-cognate mRNA targets. Recently, we have shown that non-nematode, long dsRNAs have a propensity to elicit profound impacts on the phenotype and migrational abilities of both root knot and cyst nematodes. This study presents, to our knowledge for the first time, gene-specific knockdown of FMRFamide-like peptide (flp) transcripts, using discrete 21bp siRNAs in potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida, and root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita infective (J2) stage juveniles. Both knockdown at the transcript level through quantitative (q)PCR analysis and functional data derived from migration assay, indicate that siRNAs targeting certain areas of the FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP) transcripts are potent and specific in the silencing of gene function. In addition, we present a method of manipulating siRNA activity through the management of strand thermodynamics. Initial evaluation of strand thermodynamics as a determinant of RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) strand selection (inferred from knockdown efficacy) in the siRNAs presented here suggested that the purported influence of 5' stand stability on guide incorporation may be somewhat promiscuous. However, we have found that on strategically incorporating base mismatches in the sense strand of a G. pallida-specific siRNA, we could specifically increase or decrease the knockdown of its target (specific to the antisense strand), presumably through creating more favourable thermodynamic profiles for incorporation of either the sense (non-target-specific) or antisense (target

  19. A TFIIB-like protein is indispensable for spliced leader RNA gene transcription in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Schimanski, Bernd; Brandenburg, Jens; Nguyen, Tu Ngoc; Caimano, Melissa Jo; Günzl, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    The lack of general class II transcription factors was a hallmark of the genomic sequences of the human parasites Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania major. However, the recent identification of TFIIA as part of a protein complex essential for RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription of SLRNA genes, which encode the trans splicing-specific spliced leader RNA, suggests that trypanosomatids assemble a highly divergent set of these factors at the SLRNA promoter. Here we report the identification of a trypanosomatid TFIIB-like (TFIIBlike) protein which has limited overall sequence homology to eukaryotic TFIIB and archaeal TFB but harbors conserved residues within the N-terminal zinc ribbon domain, the B finger and cyclin repeat I. In accordance with the function of TFIIB, T.brucei TFIIBlike is encoded by an essential gene, localizes to the nucleus, specifically binds to the SLRNA promoter, interacts with RNA polymerase II, and is absolutely required for SLRNA transcription. PMID:16554554

  20. ssiRNA Induced Gene Silencing is Transmitted Between Cells From the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tian-Yong; Zou, Shi-Ping; Alimova, Yelena V.; Wang, Guoying; Hauser, Kurt F.; Ghandour, M. Said; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2014-01-01

    Although siRNA induced gene silencing can be transmitted between cells in plants and in C. elegans, this phenomenon has been barely studied in mammalian cells. Both immortalized oligodendrocytes and SNB-19 glioblastoma cells were transfected with siRNA constructs for PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) or Akt (Akt/protein kinase B). Co-cultures were established between silenced cells and non-silenced cells which were hygromycin resistant and/or expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). After fluorescence sorting or hygromycin selection to remove the silenced cells, the expression of PTEN or Akt genes in the originally unsilenced cells was in all cases significantly decreased. Importantly, silencing did not occur in transwell culture studies, suggesting that transmission of the silencing signal requires a close association between cells. These results provide the first direct demonstration that an siRNA induced silencing signal can be transmitted between mammalian central nervous system (CNS) cells. PMID:16923165

  1. Research Techniques Made Simple: Bacterial 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequencing in Cutaneous Research.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jay-Hyun; Kennedy, Elizabeth A; Kong, Heidi H

    2016-03-01

    Skin serves as a protective barrier and also harbors numerous microorganisms collectively comprising the skin microbiome. As a result of recent advances in sequencing (next-generation sequencing), our understanding of microbial communities on skin has advanced substantially. In particular, the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing technique has played an important role in efforts to identify the global communities of bacteria in healthy individuals and patients with various disorders in multiple topographical regions over the skin surface. Here, we describe basic principles, study design, and a workflow of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing methodology, primarily for investigators who are not familiar with this approach. This article will also discuss some applications and challenges of 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing as well as directions for future development. PMID:26902128

  2. Gene structure, chromosomal location, and basis for alternative mRNA splicing of the human VCAM1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cybulsky, M.I.; Fries, J.W.U.; Williams, A.J.; Sultan, P.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Collins, T. ); Eddy, R.; Byers, M.; Shows, T. )

    1991-09-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein adhesive for certain blood leukocytes and tumor cells, which is expressed by activated endothelium in a variety of pathologic conditions including atherosclerosis. Genomic clones encoding the VCAM1 gene were isolated and the organization of the gene was determined. The gene, which is present in a single copy in the human genome, contains 9 exons spanning {approx}25 kilobases of DNA. Exons 2-8 contain C2 or H-type immunoglobulin domains. At least two different VCAM-1 precursors can be generated from the human gene as a result of alternative mRNA splicing events, which include or exclude exon 5. A consensus TATAA element is located upstream of the transcriptional start site. The VCAM1 promoter contains consensus binding sites for NF-{kappa}B, the GATA family of transcription factors, as well as an AP1 site. The VCAM1 gene was assigned to the 1p31-32 region of chromosome 1 based on the analysis of human-mouse hybrid cell lines and in situ hybridization. Structural analysis of the human VCAM1 gene provides the basis for alternative mRNA splicing and an initial approach to elucidating the regulation of VCAM-1 expression.

  3. Molecular phylogeny of Fusarium inferred from partial RNA polymerase II gene sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently there are no robust phylogenetic hypotheses for Fusarium based on large-scale sampling across the breadth of this important group of mycotoxigenic phytopathogens. Nucleotide variation within the second largest RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2) protein-coding gene, however, has clearly demonst...

  4. [Support vector data description for finding non-coding RNA gene].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjie; Wang, Zhengzhi

    2010-08-01

    In the field of computational molecule biology, there is still a challenging question of how to detect non-coding RNA gene in lots of unlabeled sequences. Generally, the methods of machine learning and classification are employed to answer this question. However, only a limited number of positive training samples and unlabeled samples are available. The negative samples are difficult to define appropriately, yet they are necessary for usual learning-then-classification method. The common way for most of the existing non-coding RNA gene finding methods is to produce a number of random sequences as negative samples, which may hold some characteristic of positive sample sequences. Consequently, the contrived uncertain factor was introduced and the performance of methods was not good enough. In this paper, Support Vector Data Description (SVDD) is in use for to learning and classification as well as for detecting non-coding RNA gene in lots of unlabeled sequences, and the k-means clustering algorithm is employed before SVDD training to deal with the high flase positive fault in the result of SVDD. The training samples (target samples) are non-coding RNA genes validated by experiment. Moreover, appropriate features were constructed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The effectiveness and performance of the method are demonstrated by testing the cases in NONCODE databases and E. coli genome. PMID:20842844

  5. Heritable gene knockout in Caenorhabditis elegans by direct injection of Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung Woo; Lee, Jihyun; Carroll, Dana; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Junho

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel method of targeted gene disruption that involves direct injection of recombinant Cas9 protein complexed with guide RNA into the gonad of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Biallelic mutants were recovered among the F1 progeny, demonstrating the high efficiency of this method. PMID:23979576

  6. BosFinder: a novel pre-microRNA gene prediction algorithm in Bos taurus.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, B; Ahmadi, H; Azimzadeh-Jamalkandi, S; Nassiri, M R; Masoudi-Nejad, A

    2014-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression transcriptionally (transcriptional activation or inactivation) and/or post-transcriptionally (translation inhibition or degradation of their target mRNAs). This phenomenon has significant roles in growth and developmental processes in plants and animals. Bos taurus is one of the most important livestock animals, having great importance in food and economical sciences and industries. However, limited information is available on Bos taurus constituent miRNAs because its whole genome assembly has been only recently published. Therefore, computational methods have been essential tools in miRNA gene prediction and discovery. Among these, machine-learning-based approaches are used to characterize genome scale pre-miRNAs from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). In this study, a support vector machine model was used to classify 33 structural and thermodynamic features of pre-miRNA genes. Public bovine EST data were obtained from different tissues in various developmental stages. A new algorithm, called BosFinder, was developed to identify and annotate the whole genome's derived pre-miRNAs. We found 18 776 highly potential pre-miRNA sequences. This is the first genome survey report of Bos taurus based on a machine-learning method for pre-miRNA gene finding. The bosfinder program is freely available at http://lbb.ut.ac.ir/Download/LBBsoft/BosFinder/. PMID:24835488

  7. Functional specialization among insect chitinase family genes revealed by RNA interference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biological functions of individual members of the large family of chitinase-like proteins from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, were examined using gene-specific RNA interference (RNAi). One chitinase, TcCHT5, was found to be required for pupal-adult molting only. A lethal phenotype ...

  8. A Simple Laboratory Practical to Illustrate RNA Mediated Gene Interference Using Drosophila Cell Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buluwela, Laki; Kamalati, Tahereh; Photiou, Andy; Heathcote, Dean A.; Jones, Michael D.; Ali, Simak

    2010-01-01

    RNA mediated gene interference (RNAi) is now a key tool in eukaryotic cell and molecular biology research. This article describes a five session laboratory practical, spread over a seven day period, to introduce and illustrate the technique. During the exercise, students working in small groups purify PCR products that encode "in vitro"…

  9. GENE PROBE FOR PO MESSENGER RNA USED TO INDEX ACRYLAMIDE TOXIC NEUROPATHY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gene probe for the PNS myelin glycoprotein PO (PO-mRNA) was used to monitor acrylamide neuropathy in Sprague Dawley rats prior to, concurrent with, and subsequent to, ultrastructurally and immunocytochemically defined nerve damage. ats were dosed every other day with acrylamide...

  10. Unification of gene expression data applying standard mRNA quantification references for comparable analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High throughput quantitative measurements of gene expression data have problems of reproducibility and comparability due to a lack of standard mRNA quantification references. Efforts have been made to safeguard data fidelity, yet generating quality expression data of inherent value remains a challe...

  11. Next-generation sequencing of the porcine skeletal muscle transcriptome for computational prediction of microRNA gene targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts. Inhibition is exerted through targeting of a microRNA-protein complex by base-pairing of the microRNA sequence to cognate recognition sequences in the 3’ untranslated region (...

  12. Analysis of a 5S rRNA gene cloned from Euplotes eurstomus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, A.E.; Wolffe, A.; Olins, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    The macronucleus of the hypotrichous ciliated protozoan Euplotes eurystomus lends itself to the study of eukaryotic gene and chromatin structure because native macronuclear DNA exists as linear, gene-sized fragments between 400 and 20,000 bp in length. The macronuclear chromatin, while arranged in a typical nucleosomal structure, is freely soluble in low ionic strength buffers without treatment by nucleases. Thus, specific genes may be enriched as native, intact chromatin molecules. The 5S rRNA gene from Euplotes has been cloned to facilitate investigation of 5S gene-chromatin following characterization of the gene at the DNA level. It has been demonstrated that the gene, while in circular or linear form, can be transcribed in vitro by a Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. The transcript generated in vitro is 120 nucleotides in length and is synthesized by RNA polymerase III. Anti-Xenopus TFIIIA antibodies recognize a Euplotes macronuclear chromatin-associated protein which is approx. 80 KD in size. It has been established that the sequence of the telomere flanking the 5S gene in Euplotes eurystomus is the same telomeric sequence published for Euplotes aediculatus.

  13. Pausing of RNA polymerase II Disrupts DNA-specified Nucleosome Organization to Enable Precise Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Santos, Gilberto Dos; Fargo, David C.; Xie, Bin; Gao, Yuan; Li, Leping; Adelman, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Metazoan transcription is controlled either through coordinated recruitment of transcription machinery to the gene promoter, or through regulated pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in early elongation. We report that a striking difference between genes that use these distinct regulatory strategies lies in the “default” chromatin architecture specified by their DNA sequences. Pol II pausing is prominent at highly-regulated genes whose sequences inherently disfavor nucleosome formation within the gene, but favor occlusion of the promoter by nucleosomes. In contrast, housekeeping genes that lack pronounced Pol II pausing show higher nucleosome occupancy downstream, but their promoters are deprived of nucleosomes regardless of polymerase binding. Our results indicate that a key role of paused Pol II is to compete with nucleosomes for occupancy of highly-regulated promoters, thereby preventing the formation of repressive chromatin architecture to facilitate further or future gene activation. PMID:21074046

  14. Identification of a novel miRNA-target gene regulatory network in osteosarcoma by integrating transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunlei; Gao, Hui; Fan, Xiaona; Wang, Maoyuan; Liu, Wuyang; Huang, Weiming; Yang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma remains a leading cause of cancer death in children and young adolescents. Although the introduction of multiagent chemotherapy, survival rates have not improved in two decades. Therefore, it is urgently needed to know the details regarding molecular etiology to driving therapeutic inroads for this disease. In this study we performed an integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression data to explore the dysregulation of miRNA and miRNA-target gene regulatory network underlying OS. 59 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, with 28 up-regulated and 31 down-regulated miRNAs by integrating OS miRNA expression data sets available. Using miRWalk databases prediction, we performed an anticorrelated analysis of miRNA and genes expression identified by a integrated analysis of gene expression data to identify 109 differently expressed miRNA target genes. A novel miRNA-target gene regulatory network was constructed with the miRNA-target gene pairs. miR-19b-3p, miR-20a-5p, miR-124-3p and their common target CCND2, the nodal points of regulatory network, may play important roles in OS. Bioinformatics analysis of biological functions and pathways demonstrated that target genes of miRNAs are highly correlated with carcinogenesis. Our findings may help to understand the molecular mechanisms of OS and identify targets of effective targeted therapies for OS. PMID:26339404

  15. The role of GW182 proteins in miRNA-mediated gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Braun, Joerg E; Huntzinger, Eric; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    GW182 family proteins are essential for microRNA-mediated gene silencing in animal cells. They are recruited to miRNA targets through direct interactions with Argonaute proteins and promote target silencing. They do so by repressing translation and enhancing mRNA turnover. Although the precise mechanism of action of GW182 proteins is not fully understood, these proteins have been shown to interact with the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) and with the PAN2-PAN3 and CCR4-NOT deadenylase complexes. These findings suggest that GW182 proteins function as scaffold proteins for the assembly of the multiprotein complex that silences miRNA targets. PMID:23224969

  16. Opportunities in the design and application of RNA for gene expression control

    PubMed Central

    McKeague, Maureen; Wong, Remus S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade of synthetic biology research has witnessed numerous advances in the development of tools and frameworks for the design and characterization of biological systems. Researchers have focused on the use of RNA for gene expression control due to its versatility in sensing molecular ligands and the relative ease by which RNA can be modeled and designed compared to proteins. We review the recent progress in the field with respect to RNA-based genetic devices that are controlled through small molecule and protein interactions. We discuss new approaches for generating and characterizing these devices and their underlying components. We also highlight immediate challenges, future directions and recent applications of synthetic RNA devices in engineered biological systems. PMID:26969733

  17. Methods for small RNA preparation for digital gene expression profiling by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Linsen, Sam E V; Cuppen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Digital gene expression (DGE) profiling techniques are playing an eminent role in the detection, localization, and differential expression quantification of many small RNA species, including microRNAs (1-3). Procedures in small RNA library preparation techniques typically include adapter ligation by RNA ligase, followed by reverse transcription and amplification by PCR. This chapter describes three protocols that were successfully applied to generate small RNA sequencing SOLiD(TM) libraries. The Ambion SREK(TM)-adopted protocol can be readily used for multiplexing samples; the modban-based protocol is cost-efficient, but biased toward certain microRNAs; the poly(A)-based protocol is less biased, but less precise because of the A-tail that is introduced. In summary, each of these protocols has its advantages and disadvantages with respect to the ease of including barcodes, costs, and outcome. PMID:22144201

  18. Carbon nanotube-mediated siRNA delivery for gene silencing in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tu; Guo, Honglian; Xu, Yaqiong

    2011-10-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is potentially a promising tool in influencing gene expression with a high degree of target specificity. However, its poor intracellular uptake, instability in vivo, and non-specific immune stimulations impeded its effect in clinical applications. In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with two types of phospholipid-polyethylene glycol (PEG) have shown capabilities to stabilize siRNA in cell culture medium during the transfection and efficiently deliver siRNA into neuroblastoma and breast cancer cells. Moreover, the intrinsic optical properties of CNTs have been investigated through absorption and fluorescence measurements. We have found that the directly-functionalized groups play an important role on the fluorescence imaging of functionalized CNTs. The unique fluorescence imaging and high delivery efficiency make CNTs a promising material to deliver drugs and evaluate the treatment effect simultaneously.

  19. Transient Gene and miRNA Expression Profile Changes of Confluent Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity or an altered gravity environment from the static 1 gravitational constant has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of the cells. Whether non-dividing cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted on the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days for investigations of gene and miRNA (microRNA) expression profile changes in these cells. A fibroblast is a type of cell that synthesizes the extracellular matrix and collagen, the structural framework for tissues, and plays a critical role in wound healing and other functions. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly even though they were confluent, as measured by the expression of the protein Ki-67 positive cells, and the cells in space grew slightly faster. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF(sub kappa)B (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) and other growth related pathways involving HGF and VEGF in the flown cells. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-dividing, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples in respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeleton changes by immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for alpha-tubulin showed no difference between the flight and ground samples. Results of our study suggest that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells, microgravity in

  20. Diverse Evolutionary Trajectories for Small RNA Biogenesis Genes in the Oomycete Genus Phytophthora.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Stephanie R; Fang, Yufeng; Press, Caroline M; Tyler, Brett M; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation by small RNA pathways is ubiquitous among eukaryotes, but little is known about small RNA pathways in the Stramenopile kingdom. Phytophthora, a genus of filamentous oomycetes, contains many devastating plant pathogens, causing multibillion-dollar damage to crops, ornamental plants, and natural environments. The genomes of several oomycetes including Phytophthora species such as the soybean pathogen P. sojae, have been sequenced, allowing evolutionary analysis of small RNA-processing enzymes. This study examined the evolutionary origins of the oomycete small RNA-related genes Dicer-like (DCL), and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR) through broad phylogenetic analyses of the key domains. Two Dicer gene homologs, DCL1 and DCL2, and one RDR homolog were cloned and analyzed from P. sojae. Gene expression analysis revealed only minor changes in transcript levels among different life stages. Oomycete DCL1 homologs clustered with animal and plant Dicer homologs in evolutionary trees, whereas oomycete DCL2 homologs clustered basally to the tree along with Drosha homologs. Phylogenetic analysis of the RDR homologs confirmed a previous study that suggested the last common eukaryote ancestor possessed three RDR homologs, which were selectively retained or lost in later lineages. Our analysis clarifies the position of some Unikont and Chromalveolate RDR lineages within the tree, including oomycete homologs. Finally, we analyzed alterations in the domain structure of oomycete Dicer and RDR homologs, specifically focusing on the proposed domain transfer of the DEAD-box helicase domain from Dicer to RDR. Implications of the oomycete domain structure are discussed, and possible roles of the two oomycete Dicer homologs are proposed. PMID:27014308

  1. Diverse Evolutionary Trajectories for Small RNA Biogenesis Genes in the Oomycete Genus Phytophthora

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Fang, Yufeng; Press, Caroline M.; Tyler, Brett M.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation by small RNA pathways is ubiquitous among eukaryotes, but little is known about small RNA pathways in the Stramenopile kingdom. Phytophthora, a genus of filamentous oomycetes, contains many devastating plant pathogens, causing multibillion-dollar damage to crops, ornamental plants, and natural environments. The genomes of several oomycetes including Phytophthora species such as the soybean pathogen P. sojae, have been sequenced, allowing evolutionary analysis of small RNA-processing enzymes. This study examined the evolutionary origins of the oomycete small RNA-related genes Dicer-like (DCL), and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR) through broad phylogenetic analyses of the key domains. Two Dicer gene homologs, DCL1 and DCL2, and one RDR homolog were cloned and analyzed from P. sojae. Gene expression analysis revealed only minor changes in transcript levels among different life stages. Oomycete DCL1 homologs clustered with animal and plant Dicer homologs in evolutionary trees, whereas oomycete DCL2 homologs clustered basally to the tree along with Drosha homologs. Phylogenetic analysis of the RDR homologs confirmed a previous study that suggested the last common eukaryote ancestor possessed three RDR homologs, which were selectively retained or lost in later lineages. Our analysis clarifies the position of some Unikont and Chromalveolate RDR lineages within the tree, including oomycete homologs. Finally, we analyzed alterations in the domain structure of oomycete Dicer and RDR homologs, specifically focusing on the proposed domain transfer of the DEAD-box helicase domain from Dicer to RDR. Implications of the oomycete domain structure are discussed, and possible roles of the two oomycete Dicer homologs are proposed. PMID:27014308

  2. miRNA genes of an invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jinbao; Hu, Wanqi; Wu, Jinya; Zheng, Peiming; Chen, Maoshan; James, Anthony A; Chen, Xiaoguang; Tu, Zhijian

    2013-01-01

    Aedes albopictus, a vector of Dengue and Chikungunya viruses, is a robust invasive species in both tropical and temperate environments. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and biological processes including embryonic development, innate immunity and infection. While a number of miRNAs have been discovered in some mosquitoes, no comprehensive effort has been made to characterize them from different developmental stages from a single species. Systematic analysis of miRNAs in Ae. albopictus will improve our understanding of its basic biology and inform novel strategies to prevent virus transmission. Between 10-14 million Illumina sequencing reads per sample were obtained from embryos, larvae, pupae, adult males, sugar-fed and blood-fed adult females. A total of 119 miRNA genes represented by 215 miRNA or miRNA star (miRNA*) sequences were identified, 15 of which are novel. Eleven, two, and two of the newly-discovered miRNA genes appear specific to Aedes, Culicinae, and Culicidae, respectively. A number of miRNAs accumulate predominantly in one or two developmental stages and the large number that showed differences in abundance following a blood meal likely are important in blood-induced mosquito biology. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the targets of all Ae. albopictus miRNAs provides a useful starting point for the study of their functions in mosquitoes. This study is the first systematic analysis of miRNAs based on deep-sequencing of small RNA samples of all developmental stages of a mosquito species. A number of miRNAs are related to specific physiological states, most notably, pre- and post-blood feeding. The distribution of lineage-specific miRNAs is consistent with mosquito phylogeny and the presence of a number of Aedes-specific miRNAs likely reflects the divergence between the Aedes and Culex genera. PMID:23840875

  3. How Many Genes Are Expressed in a Transcriptome? Estimation and Results for RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    García-Ortega, Luis Fernando; Martínez, Octavio

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq experiments estimate the number of genes expressed in a transcriptome as well as their relative frequencies. However, an undetermined number of genes can remain undetected due to their low expression relative to the sample size (sequence depth). Estimation of the true number of genes expressed in a transcriptome is essential in order to determine which genes are exclusively expressed in specific tissues or under particular conditions. A reliable estimate of the true number of expressed genes is also required to accurately measure transcriptome changes and to predict the sequencing depth needed to increase the proportion of detected genes. This problem is analogous to ecological sampling problems such as estimating the number of species at a given site. Here we present a non-parametric estimator for the number of undetected genes as well as for the extra sample size needed to detect a given proportion of the undetected genes. Our estimators are superior to ones already published by having smaller standard errors and biases. We applied our method to a set of 32 publicly available RNA-seq experiments, including the evaluation of 311 individually sequenced libraries. We found that in the majority of the cases more than one thousand genes are undetected, and that on average approximately 6% of the expressed genes per accession remain undetected. This figure increases to approximately 10% if individual sequencing libraries are analyzed. Our method is also applicable to metagenomic experiments. Using our method, the number of undetected genes as well as the sample size needed to detect them can be calculated, leading to more accurate and complete gene expression studies. PMID:26107654

  4. Molecular phylogeny of pneumocystis based on 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers of rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, ZiHui; Feng, XianMin; Lu, SiQi; Zhang, Fan; Wang, FengYun; Huang, Song

    2008-05-01

    To clarify the phylogenetic relationships and species status of Pneumocystis, the 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS, 1 and 2) of Pneumocystis rRNA derived from rat, gerbil and human were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The genetic distance matrix of six Pneumocystis species compared with other fungi like Taphrina and Saccharomyces indicated that the Pneumocystis genus contained multiple species including Pneumocystis from gerbil. The phylogenetic tree also showed that Pneumocystis from human and monkey formed one group and four rodent Pneumocystis formed another group. Among the four members, Pneumocystis wakefieldiae was most closely related to Pneumocystis murina and Pneumocystis carinii, and was least related to gerbil Pneumocystis. PMID:18785590

  5. RNA Processing Factors Swd2.2 and Sen1 Antagonize RNA Pol III-Dependent Transcription and the Localization of Condensin at Pol III Genes

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Pénélope; Malapert, Amélie; Niinuma, Sho; Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Condensin-mediated chromosome condensation is essential for genome stability upon cell division. Genetic studies have indicated that the association of condensin with chromatin is intimately linked to gene transcription, but what transcription-associated feature(s) direct(s) the accumulation of condensin remains unclear. Here we show in fission yeast that condensin becomes strikingly enriched at RNA Pol III-transcribed genes when Swd2.2 and Sen1, two factors involved in the transcription process, are simultaneously deleted. Sen1 is an ATP-dependent helicase whose orthologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contributes both to terminate transcription of some RNA Pol II transcripts and to antagonize the formation of DNA:RNA hybrids in the genome. Using two independent mapping techniques, we show that DNA:RNA hybrids form in abundance at Pol III-transcribed genes in fission yeast but we demonstrate that they are unlikely to faciliate the recruitment of condensin. Instead, we show that Sen1 forms a stable and abundant complex with RNA Pol III and that Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize both the interaction of RNA Pol III with chromatin and RNA Pol III-dependent transcription. When Swd2.2 and Sen1 are lacking, the increased concentration of RNA Pol III and condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes is accompanied by the accumulation of topoisomerase I and II and by local nucleosome depletion, suggesting that Pol III-transcribed genes suffer topological stress. We provide evidence that this topological stress contributes to recruit and/or stabilize condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes in the absence of Swd2.2 and Sen1. Our data challenge the idea that a processive RNA polymerase hinders the binding of condensin and suggest that transcription-associated topological stress could in some circumstances facilitate the association of condensin. PMID:25392932

  6. Composition and Expression of Conserved MicroRNA Genes in Diploid Cotton (Gossypium) Species

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lei; Kakrana, Atul; Arikit, Siwaret; Meyers, Blake C.; Wendel, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are ubiquitous in plant genomes but vary greatly in their abundance within and conservation among plant lineages. To gain insight into the evolutionary birth/death dynamics of microRNA families, we sequenced small RNA and 5′-end PARE libraries generated from two closely related species of Gossypium. Here, we demonstrate that 33 microRNA families, with similar copy numbers and average evolutionary rates, are conserved in the two congeneric cottons. Analysis of the presence/absence of these microRNA families in other land plants sheds light on their depth of phylogenetic origin and lineage-specific loss/gain. Conserved microRNA families in Gossypium exhibit a striking interspecific asymmetry in expression, potentially connected to relative proximity to neighboring transposable elements. A complex correlated expression pattern of microRNA target genes with their controlling microRNAs indicates that possible functional divergence of conserved microRNA families can also exist even within a single plant genus. PMID:24281048

  7. Precise and efficient siRNA design: a key point in competent gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Fakhr, E; Zare, F; Teimoori-Toolabi, L

    2016-04-01

    RNA interference-related strategies have become appealing methods in various fields of research. Exact sequence design of these small molecules is an essential step in the silencing procedure. Numerous researchers have tried to define some algorithms in order to increase the chance of short interfering RNA's (siRNA's) success. In recent decades, online designing software has aimed at promoting the quality of siRNA designing based on the most cited algorithms. According to our previous experiments, a combination of different criteria would be helpful. That is, siRNAs suggested by a combination of tools seem to be more efficient. Furthermore, different factors such as distance of target region to transcription start site, nucleotide composition, absence of off-target effects and secondary structures in the target site and siRNA and the presence of asymmetry and energy valley within the siRNA will increase the efficiency of siRNAs. Despite application of different online tools and fulfilling the criteria, there is no guarantee for designing an effective siRNA. However, meticulous designing of siRNAs according to the suggested algorithms and scoring systems and using different siRNAs for targeting the same gene would lead to improved silencing outcome. In this review, we focus on common algorithms and online software, and introduce a new scoring system used in our experiments. PMID:26987292

  8. Rhizobium sp. strain BN4 (a selenium oxyanion-reducing bacterium) 16S rRNA gene complete sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used 1482 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence methods in conjunction with other biochemical and morphological studies to confirm the identification of a bacterium (refer to as the BN4 strain) as a Rhizobium sp. The 16S rRNA gene sequence places it with the Rhizobium clade that includes R. d...

  9. Identification and characterization of an intervening sequence within the 23S ribosomal RNA genes of Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of the 23S rRNA gene sequences of Edwardsiella tarda and Edwardsiella ictaluri confirmed a close phylogenetic relationship between these two fish pathogen species and a distant relation with the 'core' members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Analysis of the rrl gene for 23S rRNA in E. i...

  10. Evaluation of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase ß-subunit gene (rpoB) for phytoplasma classification and phylogeny

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoplasmas are classified into 16Sr groups, subgroups, and ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma’ species, largely or entirely based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Yet, distinctions among closely related ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma’ species and strains based on 16S rRNA gene sequences alone has limitation...

  11. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  12. Tiny giants of gene regulation: experimental strategies for microRNA functional studies.

    PubMed

    Steinkraus, Bruno R; Toegel, Markus; Fulga, Tudor A

    2016-01-01

    The discovery over two decades ago of short regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) has led to the inception of a vast biomedical research field dedicated to understanding these powerful orchestrators of gene expression. Here we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the methods and techniques underpinning the experimental pipeline employed for exploratory miRNA studies in animals. Some of the greatest challenges in this field have been uncovering the identity of miRNA-target interactions and deciphering their significance with regard to particular physiological or pathological processes. These endeavors relied almost exclusively on the development of powerful research tools encompassing novel bioinformatics pipelines, high-throughput target identification platforms, and functional target validation methodologies. Thus, in an unparalleled manner, the biomedical technology revolution unceasingly enhanced and refined our ability to dissect miRNA regulatory networks and understand their roles in vivo in the context of cells and organisms. Recurring motifs of target recognition have led to the creation of a large number of multifactorial bioinformatics analysis platforms, which have proved instrumental in guiding experimental miRNA studies. Subsequently, the need for discovery of miRNA-target binding events in vivo drove the emergence of a slew of high-throughput multiplex strategies, which now provide a viable prospect for elucidating genome-wide miRNA-target binding maps in a variety of cell types and tissues. Finally, deciphering the functional relevance of miRNA post-transcriptional gene silencing under physiological conditions, prompted the evolution of a host of technologies enabling systemic manipulation of miRNA homeostasis as well as high-precision interference with their direct, endogenous targets. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26950183

  13. Interactions between the Influenza A Virus RNA Polymerase Components and Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weizhong; Chen, Hongjun; Sutton, Troy; Obadan, Adebimpe

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influenza A virus genome possesses eight negative-strand RNA segments in the form of viral ribonucleoprotein particles (vRNPs) in association with the three viral RNA polymerase subunits (PB2, PB1, and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP). Through interactions with multiple host factors, the RNP subunits play vital roles in replication, host adaptation, interspecies transmission, and pathogenicity. In order to gain insight into the potential roles of RNP subunits in the modulation of the host's innate immune response, the interactions of each RNP subunit with retinoic acid-inducible gene I protein (RIG-I) from mammalian and avian species were investigated. Studies using coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP), bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFc), and colocalization using confocal microscopy provided direct evidence for the RNA-independent binding of PB2, PB1, and PA with RIG-I from various hosts (human, swine, mouse, and duck). In contrast, the binding of NP with RIG-I was found to be RNA dependent. Expression of the viral NS1 protein, which interacts with RIG-I, did not interfere with the association of RNA polymerase subunits with RIG-I. The association of each individual virus polymerase component with RIG-I failed to significantly affect the interferon (IFN) induction elicited by RIG-I and 5′ triphosphate (5′ppp) RNA in reporter assays, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and IRF3 phosphorylation tests. Taken together, these findings indicate that viral RNA polymerase components PB2, PB1, and PA directly target RIG-I, but the exact biological significance of these interactions in the replication and pathogenicity of influenza A virus needs to be further clarified. IMPORTANCE RIG-I is an important RNA sensor to elicit the innate immune response in mammals and some bird species (such as duck) upon influenza A virus infection. Although the 5′-triphosphate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) panhandle structure at the end of viral genome RNA is

  14. Genome wide chromatin occupancy of mrhl RNA and its role in gene regulation in mouse spermatogonial cells

    PubMed Central

    Akhade, Vijay Suresh; Arun, Gayatri; Donakonda, Sainitin; Satyanarayana Rao, Manchanahalli R

    2014-01-01

    Mrhl RNA is a nuclear lncRNA encoded in the mouse genome and negatively regulates Wnt signaling in spermatogonial cells through p68/Ddx5 RNA helicase. Mrhl RNA is present in the chromatin fraction of mouse spermatogonial Gc1-Spg cells and genome wide chromatin occupancy of mrhl RNA by ChOP (Chromatin oligo affinity precipitation) technique identified 1370 statistically significant genomic loci. Among these, genes at 37 genomic loci also showed altered expression pattern upon mrhl RNA down regulation which are referred to as GRPAM (Genes Regulated by Physical Association of Mrhl RNA). p68 interacted with mrhl RNA in chromatin at these GRPAM loci. p68 silencing drastically reduced mrhl RNA occupancy at 27 GRPAM loci and also perturbed the expression of GRPAM suggesting a role for p68 mediated mrhl RNA occupancy in regulating GRPAM expression. Wnt3a ligand treatment of Gc1-Spg cells down regulated mrhl RNA expression and also perturbed expression of these 27 GRPAM genes that included genes regulating Wnt signaling pathway and spermatogenesis, one of them being Sox8, a developmentally important transcription factor. We also identified interacting proteins of mrhl RNA associated chromatin fraction which included Pc4, a chromatin organizer protein and hnRNP A/B and hnRNP A2/B1 which have been shown to be associated with lincRNA-Cox2 function in gene regulation. Our findings in the Gc1-Spg cell line also correlate with the results from analysis of mouse testicular tissue which further highlights the in vivo physiological significance of mrhl RNA in the context of gene regulation during mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:25584904

  15. A bioinformatics tool for linking gene expression profiling results with public databases of microRNA target predictions.

    PubMed

    Creighton, Chad J; Nagaraja, Ankur K; Hanash, Samir M; Matzuk, Martin M; Gunaratne, Preethi H

    2008-11-01

    MicroRNAs are short (approximately 22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs that regulate the stability and translation of mRNA targets. A number of computational algorithms have been developed to help predict which microRNAs are likely to regulate which genes. Gene expression profiling of biological systems where microRNAs might be active can yield hundreds of differentially expressed genes. The commonly used public microRNA target prediction databases facilitate gene-by-gene searches. However, integration of microRNA-mRNA target predictions with gene expression data on a large scale using these databases is currently cumbersome and time consuming for many researchers. We have developed a desktop software application which, for a given target prediction database, retrieves all microRNA:mRNA functional pairs represented by an experimentally derived set of genes. Furthermore, for each microRNA, the software computes an enrichment statistic for overrepresentation of predicted targets within the gene set, which could help to implicate roles for specific microRNAs and microRNA-regulated genes in the system under study. Currently, the software supports searching of results from PicTar, TargetScan, and miRanda algorithms. In addition, the software can accept any user-defined set of gene-to-class associations for searching, which can include the results of other target prediction algorithms, as well as gene annotation or gene-to-pathway associations. A search (using our software) of genes transcriptionally regulated in vitro by estrogen in breast cancer uncovered numerous targeting associations for specific microRNAs-above what could be observed in randomly generated gene lists-suggesting a role for microRNAs in mediating the estrogen response. The software and Excel VBA source code are freely available at http://sigterms.sourceforge.net. PMID:18812437

  16. Evolution of the Division of Labor between Genes and Enzymes in the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Boza, Gergely; Szilágyi, András; Kun, Ádám; Santos, Mauro; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2014-01-01

    The RNA world is a very likely interim stage of the evolution after the first replicators and before the advent of the genetic code and translated proteins. Ribozymes are known to be able to catalyze many reaction types, including cofactor-aided metabolic transformations. In a metabolically complex RNA world, early division of labor between genes and enzymes could have evolved, where the ribozymes would have been transcribed from the genes more often than the other way round, benefiting the encapsulating cells through this dosage effect. Here we show, by computer simulations of protocells harboring unlinked RNA replicators, that the origin of replicational asymmetry producing more ribozymes from a gene template than gene strands from a ribozyme template is feasible and robust. Enzymatic activities of the two modeled ribozymes are in trade-off with their replication rates, and the relative replication rates compared to those of complementary strands are evolvable traits of the ribozymes. The degree of trade-off is shown to have the strongest effect in favor of the division of labor. Although some asymmetry between gene and enzymatic strands could have evolved even in earlier, surface-bound systems, the shown mechanism in protocells seems inevitable and under strong positive selection. This could have preadapted the genetic system for transcription after the subsequent origin of chromosomes and DNA. PMID:25474573

  17. Evolution of the division of labor between genes and enzymes in the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Boza, Gergely; Szilágyi, András; Kun, Ádám; Santos, Mauro; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2014-12-01

    The RNA world is a very likely interim stage of the evolution after the first replicators and before the advent of the genetic code and translated proteins. Ribozymes are known to be able to catalyze many reaction types, including cofactor-aided metabolic transformations. In a metabolically complex RNA world, early division of labor between genes and enzymes could have evolved, where the ribozymes would have been transcribed from the genes more often than the other way round, benefiting the encapsulating cells through this dosage effect. Here we show, by computer simulations of protocells harboring unlinked RNA replicators, that the origin of replicational asymmetry producing more ribozymes from a gene template than gene strands from a ribozyme template is feasible and robust. Enzymatic activities of the two modeled ribozymes are in trade-off with their replication rates, and the relative replication rates compared to those of complementary strands are evolvable traits of the ribozymes. The degree of trade-off is shown to have the strongest effect in favor of the division of labor. Although some asymmetry between gene and enzymatic strands could have evolved even in earlier, surface-bound systems, the shown mechanism in protocells seems inevitable and under strong positive selection. This could have preadapted the genetic system for transcription after the subsequent origin of chromosomes and DNA. PMID:25474573

  18. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  19. Physical Mapping of Hybrid Bacteriophage T7/T3 RNA Polymerase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Thecla; McConnell, David J.

    1982-01-01

    The late regions of the T7 and T3 bacteriophage genomes are transcribed by phage-specified RNA polymerases, the products of gene 1. Although these phage transcriptional systems share many characteristics and are obviously related, they have diverged to such an extent that neither of their respective RNA polymerases utilizes the promotor sites of the other phage at an appreciable rate. However, it is possible to construct viable T7/T3 hybrids which have hybrid gene 1 sequences; the resultant hybrid enzymes exhibit altered transcriptional patterns in that they are capable of transcribing both T7 and T3 DNA to various degrees. The aim of this study was to define more closely the region(s) of the gene 1 sequence which encodes the transcriptional selectivity determinant by correlating the genetic constitution of these hybrid gene 1 sequences with their transcriptional properties. The recombinant sites within the gene 1 regions of several T7/T3 hybrids were mapped by using restriction sites as genetic markers. The results indicated that forcing a crossover event within a particular region often results in the inadvertant selection of additional genetic rearrangements. Several of the hybrid gene 1 sequences were found to have resulted from multiple crossover events, even though only one was directly selected for. In some cases the predicted crossovers were not detected; instead, several hybrids contained recombination sites elsewhere in the gene 1 region. These findings suggest that only certain combinations of T7/T3 gene 1 sequences are compatible; it may be that active hybrid T7/T3 gene 1 sequences rarely result from single genetic rearrangements. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that more than one region of the gene 1 sequence is involved in transcriptional selectivity. More specifically, the region from approximately 25 to 59% (from the left of the gene), together with the carboxyl end, appears to play an important role. Images PMID:6292465

  20. RNA Interference (RNAi) Induced Gene Silencing: A Promising Approach of Hi-Tech Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Adnan; Siddique, Muhammad Irfan; Kim, Chang-Kil; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising gene regulatory approach in functional genomics that has significant impact on crop improvement which permits down-regulation in gene expression with greater precise manner without affecting the expression of other genes. RNAi mechanism is expedited by small molecules of interfering RNA to suppress a gene of interest effectively. RNAi has also been exploited in plants for resistance against pathogens, insect/pest, nematodes, and virus that cause significant economic losses. Keeping beside the significance in the genome integrity maintenance as well as growth and development, RNAi induced gene syntheses are vital in plant stress management. Modifying the genes by the interference of small RNAs is one of the ways through which plants react to the environmental stresses. Hence, investigating the role of small RNAs in regulating gene expression assists the researchers to explore the potentiality of small RNAs in abiotic and biotic stress management. This novel approach opens new avenues for crop improvement by developing disease resistant, abiotic or biotic stress tolerant, and high yielding elite varieties. PMID:25332689

  1. Demonstration of mRNA editing and localization of guide RNA genes in kinetoplast-mitochondria of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    PubMed

    Maslov, D A; Hollar, L; Haghighat, P; Nawathean, P

    1998-06-01

    Maxicircle molecules of kDNA in several isolates of Phytomonas were detected by hybridization with the 12S rRNA gene probe from Leishmania tarentolae. The estimated size of maxicircles is isolate-specific and varies from 27 to 36 kb. Fully edited and polyadenylated mRNA for kinetoplast-encoded ribosomal protein S12 (RPS12) was found in the steady-state kinetoplast RNA isolated from Phytomonas serpens strain 1G. Two minicircles (1.45 kb) from this strain were also sequenced. Each minicircle contains two 120 bp conserved regions positioned 180 degrees apart, a region enriched with G and T bases and a variable region. One minicircle encodes a gRNA for the first block of editing of RPSl2 mRNA, and the other encodes a gRNA with unknown function. A gRNA gene for the second block of RPSl2 was found on a minicircle sequenced previously. On each minicircle, a gRNA gene is located in the variable region in a similar position and orientation with respect to the conserved regions. PMID:9662707

  2. Identification of highly-disrupted tRNA genes in nuclear genome of the red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae 10D

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Akiko; Sugahara, Junichi; Onodera, Akinori; Yachie, Nozomu; Kanai, Akio; Watanabe, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Ohnuma, Mio; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Sekine, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The limited locations of tRNA introns are crucial for eukaryal tRNA-splicing endonuclease recognition. However, our analysis of the nuclear genome of an early-diverged red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, demonstrated the first evidence of nuclear-encoded tRNA genes that contain ectopic and/or multiple introns. Some genes exhibited both intronic and permuted structures in which the 3′-half of the tRNA coding sequence lies upstream of the 5′-half, and an intron is inserted into either half. These highly disrupted tRNA genes, which account for 63% of all nuclear tRNA genes, are expressed via the orderly and sequential processing of bulge-helix-bulge (BHB) motifs at intron-exon junctions and termini of permuted tRNA precursors, probably by a C. merolae tRNA-splicing endonuclease with an unidentified subunit architecture. The results revealed a considerable diversity in eukaryal tRNA intron properties and endonuclease architectures, which will help to elucidate the acquisition mechanism of the BHB-mediated disrupted tRNA genes. PMID:23900518

  3. Mutation analysis of pre-mRNA splicing genes in Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xinyuan; Chen, Xue; Liu, Xiaoxing; Gao, Xiang; Kang, Xiaoli; Xu, Qihua; Chen, Xuejuan; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhang, Xiumei; Chu, Qiaomei; Wang, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Seven genes involved in precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) splicing have been implicated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). We sought to detect mutations in all seven genes in Chinese families with RP, to characterize the relevant phenotypes, and to evaluate the prevalence of mutations in splicing genes in patients with adRP. Methods Six unrelated families from our adRP cohort (42 families) and two additional families with RP with uncertain inheritance mode were clinically characterized in the present study. Targeted sequence capture with next-generation massively parallel sequencing (NGS) was performed to screen mutations in 189 genes including all seven pre-mRNA splicing genes associated with adRP. Variants detected with NGS were filtered with bioinformatics analyses, validated with Sanger sequencing, and prioritized with pathogenicity analysis. Results Mutations in pre-mRNA splicing genes were identified in three individual families including one novel frameshift mutation in PRPF31 (p.Leu366fs*1) and two known mutations in SNRNP200 (p.Arg681His and p.Ser1087Leu). The patients carrying SNRNP200 p.R681H showed rapid disease progression, and the family carrying p.S1087L presented earlier onset ages and more severe phenotypes compared to another previously reported family with p.S1087L. In five other families, we identified mutations in other RP-related genes, including RP1 p. Ser781* (novel), RP2 p.Gln65* (novel) and p.Ile137del (novel), IMPDH1 p.Asp311Asn (recurrent), and RHO p.Pro347Leu (recurrent). Conclusions Mutations in splicing genes identified in the present and our previous study account for 9.5% in our adRP cohort, indicating the important role of pre-mRNA splicing deficiency in the etiology of adRP. Mutations in the same splicing gene, or even the same mutation, could correlate with different phenotypic severities, complicating the genotype–phenotype correlation and clinical prognosis. PMID:24940031

  4. Gene and MicroRNA Expression Responses to Exercise; Relationship with Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Carrie S.; Mielke, Clinton; Cordova, Jeanine M.; Langlais, Paul R.; Bowen, Benjamin; Miranda, Danielle; Coletta, Dawn K.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthy individuals on the lower end of the insulin sensitivity spectrum also have a reduced gene expression response to exercise for specific genes. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between insulin sensitivity and exercise-induced gene expression in an unbiased, global manner. Methods and Findings Euglycemic clamps were used to measure insulin sensitivity and muscle biopsies were done at rest and 30 minutes after a single acute exercise bout in 14 healthy participants. Changes in mRNA expression were assessed using microarrays, and miRNA analysis was performed in a subset of 6 of the participants using sequencing techniques. Following exercise, 215 mRNAs were changed at the probe level (Bonferroni-corrected P<0.00000115). Pathway and Gene Ontology analysis showed enrichment in MAP kinase signaling, transcriptional regulation and DNA binding. Changes in several transcription factor mRNAs were correlated with insulin sensitivity, including MYC, r=0.71; SNF1LK, r=0.69; and ATF3, r= 0.61 (5 corrected for false discovery rate). Enrichment in the 5’-UTRs of exercise-responsive genes suggested regulation by common transcription factors, especially EGR1. miRNA species of interest that changed after exercise included miR-378, which is located in an intron of the PPARGC1B gene. Conclusions These results indicate that transcription factor gene expression responses to exercise depend highly on insulin sensitivity in healthy people. The overall pattern suggests a coordinated cycle by which exercise and insulin sensitivity regulate gene expression in muscle. PMID:25984722

  5. Exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA silences genes linked to severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Siegel, T Nicolai; Martins, Rafael M; Wang, Fei; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi; Cheng, Xiu; Jiang, Lubin; Hon, Chung-Chau; Scheidig-Benatar, Christine; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Turner, Louise; Jensen, Anja T R; Claes, Aurelie; Guizetti, Julien; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Scherf, Artur

    2014-09-18

    Antigenic variation of the Plasmodium falciparum multicopy var gene family enables parasite evasion of immune destruction by host antibodies. Expression of a particular var subgroup, termed upsA, is linked to the obstruction of blood vessels in the brain and to the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria. The mechanism determining upsA activation remains unknown. Here we show that an entirely new type of gene silencing mechanism involving an exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA controls the silencing of genes linked to severe malaria. We identify a novel chromatin-associated exoribonuclease, termed PfRNase II, that controls the silencing of upsA var genes by marking their transcription start site and intron-promoter regions leading to short-lived cryptic RNA. Parasites carrying a deficient PfRNase II gene produce full-length upsA var transcripts and intron-derived antisense long non-coding RNA. The presence of stable upsA var transcripts overcomes monoallelic expression, resulting in the simultaneous expression of both upsA and upsC type PfEMP1 proteins on the surface of individual infected red blood cells. In addition, we observe an inverse relationship between transcript levels of PfRNase II and upsA-type var genes in parasites from severe malaria patients, implying a crucial role of PfRNase II in severe malaria. Our results uncover a previously unknown type of post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism in malaria parasites with repercussions for other organisms. Additionally, the identification of RNase II as a parasite protein controlling the expression of virulence genes involved in pathogenesis in patients with severe malaria may provide new strategies for reducing malaria mortality. PMID:25043062

  6. Cytoskeletal protein filamin A is a nucleolar protein that suppresses ribosomal RNA gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wensheng; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Tang, Jen-Yang; Mendoza-Villanueva, Daniel; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Jackson, Dean A; Shore, Paul

    2012-01-31

    Filamin A (FLNA) is an actin-binding protein with a well-established role in the cytoskeleton, where it determines cell shape and locomotion by cross-linking actin filaments. Mutations in FLNA are associated with a wide range of genetic disorders. Here we demonstrate a unique role for FLNA as a nucleolar protein that associates with the RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription machinery to suppress rRNA gene transcription. We show that depletion of FLNA by siRNAs increased rRNA expression, rDNA promoter activity and cell proliferation. Immunodepletion of FLNA from nuclear extracts resulted in a decrease in rDNA promoter-driven transcription in vitro. FLNA coimmunoprecipitated with the Pol I components actin, TIF-IA, and RPA40, and their occupancy of the rDNA promoter was increased in the absence of FLNA in vivo. The FLNA actin-binding domain is essential for the suppression of rRNA expression and for inhibiting recruitment of the Pol I machinery to the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal an additional role for FLNA as a regulator of rRNA gene expression and have important implications for our understanding of the role of FLNA in human disease. PMID:22307607

  7. Basic mechanisms of RNA polymerase II activity and alteration of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2013-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation. PMID:23022618

  8. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization.

    PubMed

    Anahtar, Melis N; Bowman, Brittany A; Kwon, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  9. Multiple shRNA expressions in a single plasmid vector improve RNAi against the XPA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Akihiro; Zhao, Xia; Takegami, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Matsui, Shinobu; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Ishigaki, Yasuhito

    2008-05-30

    To improve the efficiency of stable knockdown with short hairpin RNA (shRNA), we inserted multiple shRNA expression sequences into a single plasmid vector. In this study, the DNA repair factor XPA was selected as a target gene since it is not essential for cell viability and it is easy to check the functional knockdown of this gene. The efficiency of knockdown was compared among single and triple expression vectors. The single shRNA-expressing vector caused limited knockdown of the target protein in stable transfectants, however, the multiple expression vectors apparently increased the frequency of knockdown transfectants. There were correlations between the knockdown level and marker expression in multiple-expressing transfectants, whereas poorer correlations were observed in single vector transfectants. Multiple-transfectants exhibited reduced efficiency of repair of UV-induced DNA damage and an increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light-irradiation. We propose that multiple shRNA expression vectors might be a useful strategy for establishing knockdown cells.

  10. Dissecting Arabidopsis thaliana DICER function in small RNA processing, gene silencing and DNA methylation patterning.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ian R; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lu, Cheng; Johnson, Lianna; Meyers, Blake C; Green, Pamela J; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2006-06-01

    Small RNAs have several important biological functions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) regulate mRNA stability and translation, and siRNAs cause post-transcriptional gene silencing of transposons, viruses and transgenes and are important in both the establishment and maintenance of cytosine DNA methylation. Here, we study the role of the four Arabidopsis thaliana DICER-LIKE genes (DCL1-DCL4) in these processes. Sequencing of small RNAs from a dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 triple mutant showed markedly reduced tasiRNA and siRNA production and indicated that DCL1, in addition to its role as the major enzyme for processing miRNAs, has a previously unknown role in the production of small RNAs from endogenous inverted repeats. DCL2, DCL3 and DCL4 showed functional redundancy in siRNA and tasiRNA production and in the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation. Our studies also suggest that asymmetric DNA methylation can be maintained by pathways that do not require siRNAs. PMID:16699516

  11. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Anahtar, Melis N.; Bowman, Brittany A.; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  12. Statistical detection of differentially expressed genes based on RNA-seq: from biological to phylogenetic replicates.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xun

    2016-03-01

    RNA-seq has been an increasingly popular high-throughput platform to identify differentially expressed (DE) genes, which is much more reproducible and accurate than the previous microarray technology. Yet, a number of statistical issues remain to be resolved in data analysis, largely due to the high-throughput data volume and over-dispersion of read counts. These problems become more challenging for those biologists who use RNA-seq to measure genome-wide expression profiles in different combinations of sampling resources (species or genotypes) or treatments. In this paper, the author first reviews the statistical methods available for detecting DE genes, which have implemented negative binomial (NB) models and/or quasi-likelihood (QL) approaches to account for the over-dispersion problem in RNA-seq samples. The author then studies how to carry out the DE test in the context of phylogeny, i.e., RNA-seq samples are from a range of species as phylogenetic replicates. The author proposes a computational framework to solve this phylo-DE problem: While an NB model is used to account for data over-dispersion within biological replicates, over-dispersion among phylogenetic replicates is taken into account by QL, plus some special treatments for phylogenetic bias. This work helps to design cost-effective RNA-seq experiments in the field of biodiversity or phenotype plasticity that may involve hundreds of species under a phylogenetic framework. PMID:26108230

  13. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes. PMID:1560539

  14. Analysis of gene repair tracts from Cas9/gRNA double-stranded breaks in the human CFTR gene

    PubMed Central

    Hollywood, Jennifer A.; Lee, Ciaran M.; Scallan, Martina F.; Harrison, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    To maximise the efficiency of template-dependent gene editing, most studies describe programmable and/or RNA-guided endonucleases that make a double-stranded break at, or close to, the target sequence to be modified. The rationale for this design strategy is that most gene repair tracts will be very short. Here, we describe a CRISPR Cas9/gRNA selection-free strategy which uses deep sequencing to characterise repair tracts from a donor plasmid containing seven nucleotide differences across a 216 bp target region in the human CFTR gene. We found that 90% of the template-dependent repair tracts were >100 bp in length with equal numbers of uni-directional and bi-directional repair tracts. The occurrence of long repair tracts suggests that a single gRNA could be used with variants of the same template to create or correct specific mutations within a 200 bp range, the size of ~80% of human exons. The selection-free strategy used here also allowed detection of non-homologous end joining events in many of the homology-directed repair tracts. This indicates a need to modify the donor, possibly by silent changes in the PAM sequence, to prevent creation of a second double-stranded break in an allele that has already been correctly edited by homology-directed repair. PMID:27557525

  15. Analysis of gene repair tracts from Cas9/gRNA double-stranded breaks in the human CFTR gene.

    PubMed

    Hollywood, Jennifer A; Lee, Ciaran M; Scallan, Martina F; Harrison, Patrick T

    2016-01-01

    To maximise the efficiency of template-dependent gene editing, most studies describe programmable and/or RNA-guided endonucleases that make a double-stranded break at, or close to, the target sequence to be modified. The rationale for this design strategy is that most gene repair tracts will be very short. Here, we describe a CRISPR Cas9/gRNA selection-free strategy which uses deep sequencing to characterise repair tracts from a donor plasmid containing seven nucleotide differences across a 216 bp target region in the human CFTR gene. We found that 90% of the template-dependent repair tracts were >100 bp in length with equal numbers of uni-directional and bi-directional repair tracts. The occurrence of long repair tracts suggests that a single gRNA could be used with variants of the same template to create or correct specific mutations within a 200 bp range, the size of ~80% of human exons. The selection-free strategy used here also allowed detection of non-homologous end joining events in many of the homology-directed repair tracts. This indicates a need to modify the donor, possibly by silent changes in the PAM sequence, to prevent creation of a second double-stranded break in an allele that has already been correctly edited by homology-directed repair. PMID:27557525

  16. RNA interference improves myopathic phenotypes in mice over-expressing FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1).

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1(-high) mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1(-high) mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  17. RNA Interference Improves Myopathic Phenotypes in Mice Over-expressing FSHD Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1−high mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1−high mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  18. Mutational analysis of the transcription start site of the yeast tRNA(Leu3) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fruscoloni, P; Zamboni, M; Panetta, G; De Paolis, A; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1995-01-01

    In addition to the well-known internal promoter elements of tRNA genes, 5' flanking sequences can also influence the efficiency of transcription by Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts in vitro. A consensus sequence of yeast tRNA genes in the vicinity of the transcriptional start site can be derived. To determine whether the activity of this region can be attributed to particular sequence features we studied in vitro mutants of the start site region. We found that the start site can be shifted, but only to a limited extent, by moving the conserved sequence element. We found that both a pyrimidine-purine motif (with transcription initiating at the purine) and a small T:A base pair block upstream are important for efficient transcription in vitro. Thus the sequence surrounding the start site of transcription of the yeast tRNA(Leu3) gene does play a role in determining transcription efficiency and fixing the precise site of initiation by RNA polymerase III. Images PMID:7659514

  19. Isolation and characterization of the gene coding for Escherichia coli arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Eriani, G; Dirheimer, G; Gangloff, J

    1989-01-01

    The gene coding for Escherichia coli arginyl-tRNA synthetase (argS) was isolated as a fragment of 2.4 kb after analysis and subcloning of recombinant plasmids from the Clarke and Carbon library. The clone bearing the gene overproduces arginyl-tRNA synthetase by a factor 100. This means that the enzyme represents more than 20% of the cellular total protein content. Sequencing revealed that the fragment contains a unique open reading frame of 1734 bp flanked at its 5' and 3' ends respectively by 247 bp and 397 bp. The length of the corresponding protein (577 aa) is well consistent with earlier Mr determination (about 70 kd). Primer extension analysis of the ArgRS mRNA by reverse transcriptase, located its 5' end respectively at 8 and 30 nucleotides downstream of a TATA and a TTGAC like element (CTGAC) and 60 nucleotides upstream of the unusual translation initiation codon GUG; nuclease S1 analysis located the 3'-end at 48 bp downstream of the translation termination codon. argS has a codon usage pattern typical for highly expressed E. coli genes. With the exception of the presence of a HVGH sequence similar to the HIGH consensus element, ArgRS has no relevant sequence homologies with other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Images PMID:2668891

  20. Efficient in vitro gene therapy with PEG siRNA lipid nanocapsules for passive targeting strategy in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Resnier, Pauline; LeQuinio, Pierre; Lautram, Nolwenn; André, Emilie; Gaillard, Cédric; Bastiat, Guillaume; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Passirani, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene therapy is a promising strategy to temporarily inhibit the expression of proteins implicated in carcinogenesis or chemotherapy resistance. Although intra-tumoral administration can be envisaged, studies currently focus on formulating nanomedicines for intravenous injection to target tumor sites as well as metastases. The development of synthetic nanoparticles and liposomes has advanced greatly during the last decade. The objective of this work consists in formulating and optimizing the encapsulation of siRNA into lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) for efficient gene therapy to target melanoma cells. SiRNA LNCs were prepared from DOTAP/DOPE lipoplexes, and the siRNA amount and lipid/siRNA charge ratio were assayed to improve the stability and the encapsulation yield. Cryo-TEM imaging of the siRNA lipoplexes and LNC morphology revealed specific organization of the siRNA DOTAP/DOPE lipoplexes as well as specific lipid microstructures that can be eliminated by purification. No cytotoxicity of the siRNA LNCs against the melanoma SK-Mel28 cell line was observed at concentrations of up to 500 ng/mL siRNA. In vitro siRNA transfection experiments, compared to Oligofectamine™, demonstrated interesting targeted gene silencing effects. Finally, complement activation assays confirmed the feasibility of the PEGylation of siRNA LNCs as part of a passive targeting strategy for future in vivo melanoma- and metastasis-targeting experiments. PMID:25262914

  1. TNFα signals through specialized factories where responsive coding and miRNA genes are transcribed

    PubMed Central

    Papantonis, Argyris; Kohro, Takahide; Baboo, Sabyasachi; Larkin, Joshua D; Deng, Binwei; Short, Patrick; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Taylor, Stephen; Kanki, Yasuharu; Kobayashi, Mika; Li, Guoliang; Poh, Huay-Mei; Ruan, Xiaoan; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Ruan, Yijun; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Wada, Youichiro; Cook, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a potent cytokine that signals through nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) to activate a subset of human genes. It is usually assumed that this involves RNA polymerases transcribing responsive genes wherever they might be in the nucleus. Using primary human endothelial cells, variants of chromosome conformation capture (including 4C and chromatin interaction analysis with paired-end tag sequencing), and fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect single nascent transcripts, we show that TNFα induces responsive genes to congregate in discrete ‘NFκB factories'. Some factories further specialize in transcribing responsive genes encoding micro-RNAs that target downregulated mRNAs. We expect all signalling pathways to contain this extra leg, where responding genes are transcribed in analogous specialized factories. PMID:23103767

  2. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate-induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of highly conserved, small non-coding RNAs (~22 nucleotides) that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. MicroRNAs are encoded by specific genes in the genome, which are transcribed as primary transcripts called primary miRNA. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) bind to compl...

  3. Divergent RNA Localisation Patterns of Maternal Genes Regulating Embryonic Patterning in the Butterfly Pararge aegeria

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jean-Michel; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J.

    2015-01-01

    The maternal effect genes responsible for patterning the embryo along the antero-posterior (AP) axis are broadly conserved in insects. The precise function of these maternal effect genes is the result of the localisation of their mRNA in the oocyte. The main developmental mechanisms involved have been elucidated in Drosophila melanogaster, but recent studies have shown that other insect orders often diverge in RNA localisation patterns. A recent study has shown that in the butterfly Pararge aegeria the distinction between blastodermal embryonic (i.e. germ band) and extra-embryonic tissue (i.e. serosa) is already specified in the oocyte during oogenesis in the ovariole, long before blastoderm cellularisation. To examine the extent by which a female butterfly specifies and patterns the AP axis within the region fated to be the germ band, and whether she specifies a germ plasm, we performed in situ hybridisation experiments on oocytes in P. aegeria ovarioles and on early embryos. RNA localisation of the following key maternal effect genes were investigated: caudal (cad), orthodenticle (otd), hunchback (hb) and four nanos (nos) paralogs, as well as TDRD7 a gene containing a key functional domain (OST-HTH/LOTUS) shared with oskar. TDRD7 was mainly confined to the follicle cells, whilst hb was exclusively zygotically transcribed. RNA of some of the nos paralogs, otd and cad revealed complex localisation patterns within the cortical region prefiguring the germ band (i.e. germ cortex). Rather interestingly, otd was localised within and outside the anterior of the germ cortex. Transcripts of nos-O formed a distinct granular ring in the middle of the germ cortex possibly prefiguring the region where germline stem cells form. These butterfly RNA localisation patterns are highly divergent with respect to other insects, highlighting the diverse ways in which different insect orders maternally regulate early embryogenesis of their offspring. PMID:26633019