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Sample records for 7th kaist geometric

  1. 7th International Meshing Roundtable '98

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, T.J.

    1998-10-01

    The goal of the 7th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the past, the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation from each of these groups from a wide variety of countries.

  2. Fundamentals of Physics, Extended 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition and the Extended Version, 7th Edition offer a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, helping readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving, in a breezy, easy-to-understand style. A unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications. * Numerous improvements in the text, based on feedback from the many users of the sixth edition (both instructors and students) * Several thousand end-of-chapter problems have been rewritten to streamline both the presentations and answers * 'Chapter Puzzlers' open each chapter with an intriguing application or question that is explained or answered in the chapter * Problem-solving tactics are provided to help beginning Physics students solve problems and avoid common error * The first section in every chapter introduces the subject of the chapter by asking and answering, "What is Physics?" as the question pertains to the chapter * Numerous supplements available to aid teachers and students The extended edition provides coverage of developments in Physics in the last 100 years, including: Einstein and Relativity, Bohr and others and Quantum Theory, and the more recent theoretical developments like String Theory.

  3. Generation of two-column helicon plasma on KAIST-TOKAMAK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, S. J.; Huh, S. W.; Kim, J.; Lee, T. S.; Moon, S. Y.; Choe, W.; Choi, D. I.

    2000-10-01

    Industrial plasma application studies reveal that helicon waves provide high ionization rate even at modest rf input power. This suggests that helicon waves be effectively used for plasma pre-ionization/startup, and plasma heating in a tokamak. The two-column helicon plasma was produced with a Nagoya type ¥2 antenna which was modified for toroidal geometry of KAIST-TOKAMAK. The observed two columns locate at the same major radius and they move outward as toroidal magnetic field increases. In addition to the 2D image captured by a CCD camera, an 8-channel Langmuir probe array is used to measure the density profile. Parallel wave number is measured by magnetic pickup probes and a phase detector in order to study wave generation and propagation inside the plasma.

  4. 7th Annual European Antibody Congress 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 7th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The 2011 version of the EAC was attended by nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The first day focused on advances in understanding structure-function relationships, choosing the best format, glycoengineering biobetter antibodies, improving the efficacy and drugability of mAbs and epitope mapping. On the second day, the discovery of novel targets for mAb therapy, clinical pipeline updates, use of antibody combinations to address resistance, generation and identification of mAbs against new targets and biosimilar mAb development were discussed. Antibody-drug conjugates, domain antibodies and new scaffolds and bispecific antibodies were the topics of the third day. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:22453093

  5. Concept Mapping Improves Metacomprehension Accuracy among 7th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redford, Joshua S.; Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments explored concept map construction as a useful intervention to improve metacomprehension accuracy among 7th grade students. In the first experiment, metacomprehension was marginally better for a concept mapping group than for a rereading group. In the second experiment, metacomprehension accuracy was significantly greater for a…

  6. State prisons are covered by ADA, 7th Circuit rules.

    PubMed

    1997-07-25

    Prison inmate [name removed] sued the Indiana Department of Corrections, claiming it violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by denying him access to education programs, the library, and the dining hall because he is blind. The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the district court's decision to dismiss the case based on the grounds that the ADA does not apply to prison inmates. The court held that the Department of Corrections cannot exclude an inmate with a disability from prison programs unless the accommodation caused an undue burden on the system. PMID:11364516

  7. Fundamentals of Physics, Student Study Guide, Extended 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-06-01

    No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition and the Extended Version, 7th Edition offer a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, helping readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving, in a breezy, easy-to-understand style. A unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications. * Numerous improvements in the text, based on feedback from the many users of the sixth edition (both instructors and students) * Several thousand end-of-chapter problems have been rewritten to streamline both the presentations and answers * 'Chapter Puzzlers' open each chapter with an intriguing application or question that is explained or answered in the chapter * Problem-solving tactics are provided to help beginning Physics students solve problems and avoid common error * The first section in every chapter introduces the subject of the chapter by asking and answering, "What is Physics?" as the question pertains to the chapter * Numerous supplements available to aid teachers and students The extended edition provides coverage of developments in Physics in the last 100 years, including: Einstein and Relativity, Bohr and others and Quantum Theory, and the more recent theoretical developments like String Theory.

  8. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Interlaken Leadership Awards

    PubMed Central

    Dalakas, M C; Löscher, W N

    2014-01-01

    The Interlaken Leadership Awards (ILAs), established in 2010, are monetary grants pledged annually by CSL Behring to fund research into the use of immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy, especially into its use in neurological disorders. Five recipients of the 2011/2012 Awards were invited to present their research at the 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference. Dr Honnorat reports on paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). His multi-centre Phase II trial, currently under way, will assess the efficacy of IVIg therapy in treating PNS in the first 3 months of treatment. Dr Geis shows improved disease scores after IVIg treatment in a mouse model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). It is hoped that these promising results will translate well into human NMO. Dr Schmidt studied IVIg therapy in an mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). He reports that motor function improved and myopathic changes in skeletal muscles and creatine kinase release were decreased. Dr Gamez presents the design and rationale for a Phase II clinical trial investigating the preoperative use of IVIg therapy in myasthenia gravis patients to prevent post-operative myasthenic crisis. Dr Goebel reports results from studies elucidating the immune-mediated pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), the successful IVIg therapy in a proportion of CRPS patients, and the development of a model for predicting which patients are more likely to respond to Ig therapy. PMID:25546789

  9. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Interlaken Leadership Awards.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C; Löscher, W N

    2014-12-01

    The Interlaken Leadership Awards (ILAs), established in 2010, are monetary grants pledged annually by CSL Behring to fund research into the use of immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy, especially into its use in neurological disorders. Five recipients of the 2011/2012 Awards were invited to present their research at the 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference. Dr Honnorat reports on paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). His multi-centre Phase II trial, currently under way, will assess the efficacy of IVIg therapy in treating PNS in the first 3 months of treatment. Dr Geis shows improved disease scores after IVIg treatment in a mouse model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). It is hoped that these promising results will translate well into human NMO. Dr Schmidt studied IVIg therapy in an mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). He reports that motor function improved and myopathic changes in skeletal muscles and creatine kinase release were decreased. Dr Gamez presents the design and rationale for a Phase II clinical trial investigating the preoperative use of IVIg therapy in myasthenia gravis patients to prevent post-operative myasthenic crisis. Dr Goebel reports results from studies elucidating the immune-mediated pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), the successful IVIg therapy in a proportion of CRPS patients, and the development of a model for predicting which patients are more likely to respond to Ig therapy.

  10. 7th IGRSM International Remote Sensing & GIS Conference and Exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Abdul Rashid Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    IGRSM This proceedings consists of the peer-reviewed papers from the 7th IGRSM International Conference and Exhibition on Remote Sensing & GIS (IGRSM 2014), which was held on 21-22 April 2014 at Berjaya Times Square Hotel, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The conference, with the theme Geospatial Innovation for Nation Building was aimed at disseminating knowledge, and sharing expertise and experiences in geospatial sciences in all aspects of applications. It also aimed to build linkages between local and international professionals in this field with industries. Highlights of the conference included: Officiation by Y B Datuk Dr Abu Bakar bin Mohamad Diah, Deputy Minister of Minister of Science, Technology & Innovation Keynote presentations by: Associate Professor Dr Francis Harvey, Chair of the Geographic Information Science Commission at the International Geographical Union (IGU) and Director of U-Spatial, University of Minnesota, US: The Next Age of Discovery and a Future in a Post-GIS World. Professor Dr Naoshi Kondo, Bio-Sensing Engineering, University of Kyoto, Japan: Mobile Fruit Grading Machine for Precision Agriculture. Datuk Ir Hj Ahmad Jamalluddin bin Shaaban, Director-General, National Hydraulic Research Institute of Malaysia (NAHRIM), Malaysia: Remote Sensing & GIS in Climate Change Analyses. Oral and poster presentations from 69 speakers, from both Malaysia (35) and abroad (34), covering areas of water resources management, urban sprawl & social mobility, agriculture, land use/cover mapping, infrastructure planning, disaster management, technology trends, environmental monitoring, atmospheric/temperature monitoring, and space applications for the environment. Post-conference workshops on: Space Applications for Environment (SAFE), which was be organised by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver Evaluation Using GPS Simulation, which was be organised by the Science & Technology Research Institute for Defence

  11. The 7th International Workshop on Chiral Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 7th International Workshop Chiral Dynamics: Theory and Experiment (CD12) took place at Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia, USA, from August 6 to 10, 2012. Following in the tradition of this triennial series of Conferences, it attracted theorists and experimentalists, who were brought together to highlight the recent progress in the field of low energy QCD, and to discuss and explore the direction for future development. The conference consisted of plenary talks and three working groups. We would like to thank the working group organizers for their dedicated effort, namely: Goldstone Bosons: Mario Antonelli, Liping Gan, Jorge Portoles and Urs Wenger; Hadron Structure: Alessandro Bacchetta, Bastian Kubis, Kostas Orginos and Karl Slifer and Few Body Physics: Andreas Nogga, Assumpta Parreno, Michele Viviani and Henry Weller. We would like to express our special thanks to our co-organizers, Patricia Solvignon, Harald Griesshammer, Rocco Schiavilla, Dinko Pocanic, Robert Edwards, and Alexandre Deur for their hard work and advice. Last but not least, we thank the International Advisory Committee for their very useful inputs to the CD12 program. The organizers thank the excellent logistic and administrative support provided by the Jefferson Lab Conference Staff, Ruth Bizot, Cynthia Lockwood, Stephanie Vermeire, Marti Hightower and MeLaina Evans, and the Conference Secretary Mary Fox, which was instrumental for the success of the organization of CD12. We thank Joanna Griffin for the poster design. CD12 was primarily sponsored by Jefferson Lab, along with generous supports from Old Dominion University and the European Physics Journal. The CD12 homepage is located at http://www.jlab.org/conference/CD12 The upcoming Chiral Dynamics Workshop will take place in Pisa, Italy, in 2015. We thank Laura Marcucci and Michele Viviani for graciously taking the baton from us. Jose Goity and Jianping Chen

  12. PREFACE: 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, Roberts

    2013-12-01

    The 7th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2013) was held at Luleå University of Technology on the 21-22 March 2013 in Luleå, SWEDEN. This conference is intended as a meeting place for researchers involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE). This is great opportunity to present their on-going research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering, exchange ideas, strengthen co-operation as well as establish new contacts. More than 60 participants representing six countries attended the meeting, in total 26 oral talks and 19 posters were presented during two days. This issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of articles from EEIGM-7 conference. Following tradition from previous EEIGM conferences, it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering. The papers presented in this issue deal not only with basic research but also with applied problems of materials science. The presented topics include theoretical and experimental investigations on polymer composite materials (synthetic and bio-based), metallic materials and ceramics, as well as nano-materials of different kind. Special thanks should be directed to the senior staff of Division of Materials Science at LTU who agreed to review submitted papers and thus ensured high scientific level of content of this collection of papers. The following colleagues participated in the review process: Professor Lennart Walström, Professor Roberts Joffe, Professor Janis Varna, Associate Professor Marta-Lena Antti, Dr Esa Vuorinen, Professor Aji Mathew, Professor Alexander Soldatov, Dr Andrejs Purpurs, Dr Yvonne Aitomäki, Dr Robert Pederson. Roberts Joffe October 2013, Luleå Conference photograph EEIGM7 conference participants, 22 March 2013 The PDF

  13. PREFACE: 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS '05)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Harald W.; Sauerzopf, Franz M.

    2006-07-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains those contributed papers that were submitted to the Conference Proceedings of the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS '05) on 11 - 15 September 2005. The plenary and invited papers were published in the journal Superconductor Science and Technology 19 2006 (March issue). The scientific aims of EUCAS '05 followed the tradition established at the preceding conferences in Göttingen, Edinburgh, Eindhoven, Sitges (Barcelona), Lyngby (Copenhagen) and finally Sorrento (Napoli). The focus was placed on the interplay between the most recent developments in superconductor research and the positioning of applications of superconductivity in the marketplace. Although initially founded as an exchange forum mainly for European scientists, it has gradually developed into a truly international meeting with significant attendance from the Far East and the United States. The Vienna conference attracted 813 participants in the scientific programme and 90 guests: of the particpants 59% were from Europe, 31% from the Far East, 6% from the United States and Canada and 4% from other nations worldwide. There were 32 plenary and invited lectures highlighting the state-of-the-art in the areas of materials, large-scale and small-scale applications, and 625 papers were contributed (556 of these were posters) demonstrating the broad range of exciting activities in all research areas of our field. A total of 27 companies presented their most recent developments in the field. This volume contains 349 papers, among them 173 on materials (49.6%), 90 on large scale applications (25.8%) and 86 on small scale applications (24.6%). EUCAS '05 generated a feeling of optimism and enthusiasm for this fascinating field of research and for its well established technological potential, especially among the numerous young researchers attending this Conference. We are grateful to all those who participated in the meeting and

  14. 3. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF MASTER PLAN, DETAIL SITE PLAN, 7TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF MASTER PLAN, DETAIL SITE PLAN, 7TH CAVALRY BUILDINGS, DATED SEPTEMBER 10, 1951, SEE ARROW, DRAWING # BM-036, COPY ON FILE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE, FORT BLISS - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  15. 7th International Conference on Mathematical Methods in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Bytsenko, A. A.; Guimarães, M. E. X.; Helayël-Neto, J. A.

    The 7th International Conference on Mathematical Methods in Physics took place in the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF/MCT), Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil, from 16 to 20 April 2012, and was jointly organized by the following Institutions: Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF/MCT), The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP, Italy), Instituto Nacional de Matemática Pura e Aplicada (IMPA, Brazil), The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS, Italy) and The Scuola Internazionale di Studi Avanzati (SISSA,Italy). The Organizing Committees were composed by: E. ABDALLA (USP, Brazil), L. BONORA (SISSA, Italy), H. BURSZTYN (IMPA, Brazil), A. A. BYTSENKO (UEL, Brazil), B. DUBROVIN (SISSA, Italy), M.E.X. GUIMARÃES (UFF, Brazil), J.A. HELAYËL-NETO (CBPF, Brazil). Advisory Committee: A. V. ASHTEKAR (Penn State University, U.S.A.), V. M. BUCHSTABER (Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia), L. D. FADDEEV (St. Petersburg Dept. of Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia), I. M. KRICHEVER (Columbia Univ., U.S.A./ Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, Russia), S. P. NOVIKOV (Univ. of Maryland, U.S.A./Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, Russia), J. PALIS (IMPA, Brazil), A. QADIR (National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan), F. QUEVEDO (ICTP, Italy), S. RANDJBAR-DAEMI (ICTP, Italy), G. THOMPSON (ICTP, Italy), C. VAFA (Harvard University, U.S.A.). The Main Goal: The aim of the Conference was to present the latest advances in Mathematical Methods of Physics to researchers, young scientists and students of Latin America in general, and Brazil in particular, in the areas of High Energy Physics, Cosmology, Mathematical Physics and Applied Mathematics. The main goal was to promote an updating of knowledge and to facilitate the interaction between mathematicians and theoretical physicists, through plenary sessions and seminars. This Conference can be considered as a part of a network activity in a special effort to

  16. 4. General view of streetscape along 7th Street looking east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. General view of streetscape along 7th Street looking east from Columbia Street. Brewery property on north side of street - George Wiedemann Brewery Complex, Sixth & Columbia Streets, Newport, Campbell County, KY

  17. 1. NORTHEAST SIDE, FROM DIRECTLY ACROSS 7TH STREET (OAKLAND), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHEAST SIDE, FROM DIRECTLY ACROSS 7TH STREET (OAKLAND), LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Administrative Offices, On Seventh Street East of Maritime Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  18. Conceptions of Mathematics in Different Ability and Achievement Groups among 7th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepmann, Lea; Afanasjev, Juri

    2005-01-01

    This report deals with 7th grade pupils' conceptions of mathematics, its learning and teaching. The report focuses on the identification and comparison of views expressed by pupil groups of different mathematical ability and achievement. The analysis is based on the results of the ability tests, subject tests and a questionnaire conducted among…

  19. Activities Using The State of the World Atlas, 7th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegelbach, Peter; Haakenson, Dean; Starbird, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to accompany The State of the World Atlas, 7th Edition. The State of the World Atlas and this workbook provide a frame of reference for the changing pattern of world events. Students will become familiar with different statistical representations of the world, from birth rates to HIV/AIDS infections rates; from world…

  20. The Contribution of Morphological Knowledge to 7th Grade Students' Reading Comprehension Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Neel, Joanna; Matatall, Abbey; Richards, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the role of morphology, an important yet largely understudied source of difficulty, in reading ability among 7th grade students in one junior high school in the southwestern United States. We sought to find out how much variance in reading ability is accounted for by these students' morphological knowledge, and whether…

  1. Recommendations from the Workshop: Environment, Ecology and Sustainable Development ICAE 7th World Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viezzer, Moema L.

    2006-01-01

    One of the workshops presented at the 7th International Council for Adult Education (ICAE) Assembly was focused on environment, ecology, and sustainable development. The workshop had participants from Asia, Africa, Europe, South America, North America and the South Pacific. This article presents a list of recommendations from the workshop.

  2. Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on the Molecular Breeding of Forage and Turf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 7th International Symposium on the Molecular Breeding of Forage and Turf, MBFT2012, was held in Salt Lake City, UT, USA, from 4-7 June 2012. One-hundred and fifteen researchers from around the world presented oral and poster formats relating to ten general topics: Genetic mechanisms and applic...

  3. Opinions of 7th Grade Students about Enriched Educational Practices in the Scope of Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idin, Sahin; Aydogdu, Cemil

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the opinions of the students about 7th grade science courses carried out with enriched educational practices. The research was conducted throughout fall semester of 2014-2015 academic year in the scope of Systems within our Body Unit (SBU), Force and Motion Unit (FMU), and Electric within our Lives…

  4. 48. Master plan of 7th floor, building 1, U.S. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Master plan of 7th floor, building 1, U.S. Naval supply activities, New York, Brooklyn, New York, public works department, March 2, 1953. Drawing #BK-S1-7. Scale 1/16=1. - U.S. Navy Fleet Supply Base, Storehouse No. 1, 830 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  5. Assessment of an Engineering Technology Outreach Program for 4th-7th Grade Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell, Elizabeth M.; Christman, Jeanne; Garrick, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a workshop led by female Engineering Technology students, with support from female faculty, to provide an introduction to Engineering Technology to 4th-7th grade girls through a series of interactive laboratory experiments. This outreach program was developed to improve attitudes towards science and engineering in middle…

  6. 7th Annual Symposium on Clinical and Pharmaceutical Solutions through Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi Tee; Wang, Li; Weng, Naidong; Dong, Kelly; Valaskovic, Gary; Lee, Mike

    2016-10-01

    7th Annual Symposium on Clinical & Pharmaceutical Solutions through Analysis, Renaissance Shanghai Pudong Hotel, Shanghai, China, 20-23 April 2016 The 7th Annual Shanghai Symposium on Innovative Approaches to Reduce Attrition and Predict Clinical Outcomes (CPSA Shanghai 2016) was held on 20-23 April 2016 in Renaissance Shanghai Pudong Hotel, Shanghai, China. The meeting was featured with highly interactive events including diversified symposia, round table discussions, workshops, poster sessions and conference awards. There were over 220 participants from more than ten countries, with 61 oral presentations and 29 posters presented. In addition, the meeting included one preconference workshop and three joint sessions held with bioanalytical experts from local communities. PMID:27610924

  7. [Review of WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy 8th report, --comparison to 7th report].

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Shinichi; En, Junichiro; Kitajima, Shiori; Barua, Sumana; Goto, Masamichi

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 the WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy published its 8th report, 14 years after the publication of its 7th report in 1998. This report, the first since the leprosy reduction goal was met in 2000, highlights key points such as improvements in the quality of various services available to patients and the efforts of individuals and societies, in addition to medical progress in diagnosis and treatment. This review will mainly describe the changes made since the 7th report. Some of the main modifications are the deletion of single lesion paucibacillary type, elongated treatment of patients with high bacterial indices, the introduction of promising new drugs, and a shift from reducing the statistical number of patients to a new target for disability prevention.

  8. Geometrical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindlein, Norbert; Leuchs, Gerd

    This chapter shall discuss the basics and the applications of geometrical optical methods in modern optics. Geometrical optics has a long tradition and some ideas are many centuries old. Nevertheless, the invention of modern personal computers which can perform several million floating-point operations in a second also revolutionized the methods of geometrical optics and so several analytical methods lost importance whereas numerical methods such as ray tracing became very important. Therefore, the emphasis in this chapter is also on modern numerical methods such as ray tracing and some other systematic methods such as the paraxial matrix theory.

  9. 16. TWO HEAD GATES ABOUT 500 FEET NORTH OF 7TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. TWO HEAD GATES ABOUT 500 FEET NORTH OF 7TH AVENUE (SECTION 35). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  10. Density evolution of in-falling prominence material from the 7th June 2011 CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlyle, Jack; Williams, David; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Innes, Davina

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the density of in-falling prominence material following the 7 th June 2011 eruption. Both the evolution and the distribution of the density is analysed in five discreet ``blobs'' of material. The density appears to be remarkably uniform, both spatially within the blobs, and temporally over the course of the descent of each, although a slight concentration of material towards the leading edge is noted in some cases. Online material is available at bit.ly/jackblob

  11. EDITORIAL Invited papers from the 7th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism 2010 Invited papers from the 7th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordblad, Per

    2010-12-01

    This cluster issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains a collection of papers based on invited and contributed talks given at the 7th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM) held from 21-24 June, 2010 at the Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University in Sweden. The ICFPM conferences have previously been held in Rome, Italy (1991), Bangor, UK (1996), Barcelona, Spain (1999), Pittsburgh, USA (2002), London, UK (2004) and Rome, Italy (2007); the 8th ICFPM is to be organized in Perpignan, France (2013). The aim of this series of conferences is to bring together experts in the field of fine particle magnetism to discuss recent fundamental experimental and theoretical findings as well as new technological developments and applications. Thus, the conference programme included sessions ranging from basic studies of nanomagnetism to biomedical applications of fine magnetic particles. The local organizers of ICFPM-2010 want to thank the Swedish Research Council (VR), the Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) and LOT-Oriel Group Europe for financial support. We also acknowledge Akademikonferens for effective administration of the conference and Uppsala University for support and for providing the venue. Last but not least, we thank all participants for making the conference scientifically interesting and socially enjoyable.

  12. 7th Japan Bioanalysis Forum symposium: regulated bioanalysis, to a new stage.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takahiro

    2016-10-01

    Tower Hall Funabori, Tokyo, Japan, 9-10 March 2016 At the 7th Japan Bioanalysis Forum symposium, bioanalytical methods and processes were discussed with authorities after the issuing of bioanalytical method validation guidelines (EMA and Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare) and draft guidance (US FDA). Method establishment and bioanalysis of biomarkers were discussed with a focus on scientific validation. Bioanalytical methods for antibody-drug conjugates, the potential of MS imaging and microsampling activity in drug development were introduced. Discussion groups presented and openly discussed their results with about 300 attendees. This manuscript provides an overview of the highlights of the symposium.

  13. Proceedings from the 7th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) conference.

    PubMed

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga L; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Ostergaard, Mikkel; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Gaylis, Norman; Arnold, William; Ben-Artzi, Ami; Ranganath, Veena; Seraphine, Judy L; Peterfy, Charles

    2015-08-01

    The International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) was founded in 2005 with the goal of discussing matters related to imaging in rheumatology, particularly, validation, education, and use in clinical practice and research. Because the field of musculoskeletal (MSK) imaging is rapidly evolving, continuous education in the field is imperative. ISEMIR's international faculty and world-renowned experts presented the newest information as it relates to the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) at the 7th annual ISEMIR meeting which took place on April 12-14, 2014 in Santa Monica, California. Presentations from the meeting can be viewed at www.isemir.org. PMID:25908178

  14. 'HTA for Crisis': sharing experiences during the 7th EBHC Symposium.

    PubMed

    Wladysiuk, Magdalena; Tabor, Anna; Godman, Brian

    2013-02-01

    The Central and Eastern European Society of Technology Assessment in Health Care was founded in Krakow, Poland in 2003. On October 8th and 9th, the 7th symposium took place titled 'HTA for Crisis'. This meeting was attended by over 250 decision makers, evidence-based specialists, healthcare managers, commercial company personnel and experts. The symposium was principally divided into four main themes: insurance in times of crisis; importance of pricing of health services in times of crisis; managing welfare benefits in times of crisis and Health Technology Assessment in crisis-laden countries. The symposium finished by debating potential ways forward for healthcare systems in times of crisis.

  15. Proceedings from the 7th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) conference.

    PubMed

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga L; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Ostergaard, Mikkel; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Gaylis, Norman; Arnold, William; Ben-Artzi, Ami; Ranganath, Veena; Seraphine, Judy L; Peterfy, Charles

    2015-08-01

    The International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) was founded in 2005 with the goal of discussing matters related to imaging in rheumatology, particularly, validation, education, and use in clinical practice and research. Because the field of musculoskeletal (MSK) imaging is rapidly evolving, continuous education in the field is imperative. ISEMIR's international faculty and world-renowned experts presented the newest information as it relates to the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) at the 7th annual ISEMIR meeting which took place on April 12-14, 2014 in Santa Monica, California. Presentations from the meeting can be viewed at www.isemir.org.

  16. 7th Japan Bioanalysis Forum symposium: regulated bioanalysis, to a new stage.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takahiro

    2016-10-01

    Tower Hall Funabori, Tokyo, Japan, 9-10 March 2016 At the 7th Japan Bioanalysis Forum symposium, bioanalytical methods and processes were discussed with authorities after the issuing of bioanalytical method validation guidelines (EMA and Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare) and draft guidance (US FDA). Method establishment and bioanalysis of biomarkers were discussed with a focus on scientific validation. Bioanalytical methods for antibody-drug conjugates, the potential of MS imaging and microsampling activity in drug development were introduced. Discussion groups presented and openly discussed their results with about 300 attendees. This manuscript provides an overview of the highlights of the symposium. PMID:27624277

  17. Alzheimer's disease: a report from the 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Pikkarainen, Maria; Soininen, Hilkka

    2015-10-01

    The 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium was held on 11-13 June, 2015, in Kuopio, Finland and attracted ~250 attendees from 14 different countries around the world. The theme for the symposium in its seventh year was 'From mechanisms to prevention and intervention of Alzheimer's disease'. The 3-day international scientific symposium composed of seven oral sessions and a poster session. The program, spanning from molecular mechanisms to prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, provided a forum for the attendees to share their research, network and to obtain a comprehensive overview of the current status and future directions of research into Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Geometric Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    1999-10-01

    Mechanics for the nonmathematician-a modern approach For physicists, mechanics is quite obviously geometric, yet the classical approach typically emphasizes abstract, mathematical formalism. Setting out to make mechanics both accessible and interesting for nonmathematicians, Richard Talman uses geometric methods to reveal qualitative aspects of the theory. He introduces concepts from differential geometry, differential forms, and tensor analysis, then applies them to areas of classical mechanics as well as other areas of physics, including optics, crystal diffraction, electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. For easy reference, Dr. Talman treats separately Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and Newtonian mechanics-exploring their geometric structure through vector fields, symplectic geometry, and gauge invariance respectively. Practical perturbative methods of approximation are also developed. Geometric Mechanics features illustrative examples and assumes only basic knowledge of Lagrangian mechanics. Of related interest . . . APPLIED DYNAMICS With Applications to Multibody and Mechatronic Systems Francis C. Moon A contemporary look at dynamics at an intermediate level, including nonlinear and chaotic dynamics. 1998 (0-471-13828-2) 504 pp. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS Applied Mathematics for Scientists and Engineers Bruce Kusse and Erik Westwig A comprehensive treatment of the mathematical methods used to solve practical problems in physics and engineering. 1998 (0-471-15431-8) 680 pp.

  19. PREFACE: 7th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Chakraborty, Purushottam; Williams, Jim F.

    2007-09-01

    These proceedings arose from the 7th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP) which was held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras from 4-7 December 2006. The history of the AISAMP has been reviewed by Takayanagi http://www.physics.iitm.ac.in/~aisamp7/history.html. This international seminar/conference series grew out of the Japan-China meetings which were launched in 1985, the fourth of which was held in 1992 and carried a second title: The First Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP), thus providing a formal medium for scientists in this part of the world to report periodically and exchange their scientific thoughts. The founding nations of Japan and China were joined subsequently by Korea, Taiwan, India and Australia. The aims of the symposia included bringing together leading experts and students of atomic and molecular physics, the discussion of important problems, learning and sharing modern techniques and expanding the horizons of modern atomic and molecular physics. The fields of interest ranged from atomic and molecular structure and dynamics to photon, electron and positron scattering, to quantum information processing, the effects of symmetry and many body interactions, laser cooling, cold traps, electric and magnetic fields and to atomic and molecular physics with synchrotron radiation. Particular interest was evident in new techniques and the changes of the physical properties from atomic to condensed matter. Details of the 7th AISAMP, including the topics for the special sessions and the full programme, are available online at the conference website http://www.physics.iitm.ac.in/~aisamp7/. In total, 95 presentations were made at the 7th AISAMP, these included the Invited Talks and Contributed Poster Presentations, of which 52 appear in the present Proceedings after review by expert referees, refereed to the usual standard of the Institute of Physics journal: Journal of Physics B: Atomic

  20. Aspects That Concern Assessing Lower Secondary School Students at the Physics National Contest Exemplification for the 7th Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florian, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In the present article, we aim at analysing the results obtained by the 7th grade students who participated in the 50th edition of the Physics National Contest, which took place in Cluj-Napoca between the 6th and the 11th of April, 2014. Why have we chosen the 7th grade? One of the reasons is represented by the good results obtained by the…

  1. Report of the 7th African Rotavirus Symposium, Cape Town, South Africa, 8th November 2012.

    PubMed

    Seheri, L M; Mwenda, J M; Page, N

    2014-11-12

    The 7th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Cape Town, South Africa, on the 8th November 2012 as a Satellite Symposium at the First International African Vaccinology Conference. Over 150 delegates participated in this symposium including scientists, clinicians, health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers from across Africa. Key topics discussed included rotavirus surveillance, rotavirus vaccine introduction, post rotavirus vaccine impact analysis and intussusception data and surveillance in Africa. The symposium provided early rotavirus vaccine adopter countries in Africa (South Africa, Ghana and Botswana) an opportunity to share up-to-date information on vaccine introduction, and allowed colleagues to share experiences in establishing routine rotavirus surveillance (Tanzania, Niger and Rwanda). Overall, the symposium highlighted the high burden of rotavirus in Africa, and the need to continue to strengthen efforts in preventing rotavirus diarrhoea in Africa.

  2. Mexican American 7th Graders’ Future Work and Family Plans: Associations with Cultural Experiences and Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Cansler, Emily; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Simpkins, Sandra D.

    2011-01-01

    We describe Mexican American 7th graders’ expectations for future work and family roles and investigate links between patterns of future expectations and adolescents’ cultural experiences and adjustment. Adolescents participated in home interviews and a series of seven nightly phone calls. Five unique patterns of adolescents’ future expectations were identified (N = 246): Career Oriented, Independent, Family Oriented, Early, and Inconsistent. Career Oriented adolescents had the highest socioeconomic status and contact with the U.S. (e.g., generation status) whereas Family Oriented adolescents had the lowest. Cultural orientations, values, and involvement also varied across groups. For example, Career Oriented adolescents reported significantly higher familism values compared to Inconsistent adolescents. Clusters also differed on adjustment: Career Oriented and Family Oriented adolescents reported higher parental warmth and less risky behavior compared to Independent and Inconsistent adolescents. Findings underscore the multi-faceted nature of adolescents’ future expectations and the diversity in cultural experiences among Mexican origin youth. PMID:23338812

  3. Mexican American 7(th) Graders' Future Work and Family Plans: Associations with Cultural Experiences and Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Cansler, Emily; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Simpkins, Sandra D

    2012-06-01

    We describe Mexican American 7(th) graders' expectations for future work and family roles and investigate links between patterns of future expectations and adolescents' cultural experiences and adjustment. Adolescents participated in home interviews and a series of seven nightly phone calls. Five unique patterns of adolescents' future expectations were identified (N = 246): Career Oriented, Independent, Family Oriented, Early, and Inconsistent. Career Oriented adolescents had the highest socioeconomic status and contact with the U.S. (e.g., generation status) whereas Family Oriented adolescents had the lowest. Cultural orientations, values, and involvement also varied across groups. For example, Career Oriented adolescents reported significantly higher familism values compared to Inconsistent adolescents. Clusters also differed on adjustment: Career Oriented and Family Oriented adolescents reported higher parental warmth and less risky behavior compared to Independent and Inconsistent adolescents. Findings underscore the multi-faceted nature of adolescents' future expectations and the diversity in cultural experiences among Mexican origin youth.

  4. Student Solutions Manual to accompany Fundamentals of Physics,7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl; Christman, J. Richard

    2004-06-01

    Work more effectively and check solutions as you go along with the text! This Student Solutions Manual that accompanies Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition, provides readers with complete, worked-out solutions to 30% of the end-of-chapter problems. These problems are indicated in the text by an ssm icon. No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style this Seventh Edition offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. This book offers a unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications.

  5. Charge It! Translating Electric Vehicle Research Results to Engage 7th and 8th Grade Girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egbue, Ona; Long, Suzanna; Ng, Ean-Harn

    2015-10-01

    Despite attempts to generate interest in science and technology careers, US students continue to show reduced interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) majors at the collegiate level. If girls are not engaged in STEM learning by the middle school level, studies show that they are even less likely to choose a science- or engineering-related major. This article presents results from a workshop for 7th and 8th grade girls designed to promote knowledge building in the area of sustainability and alternative energy use in transportation and to stimulate greater interest in STEM subjects. The workshop based on research conducted at University X focused on basic concepts of electric vehicles and electric vehicles' batteries. Tests were conducted to evaluate the students' knowledge and perceptions of electric vehicles and to determine the impact of the workshop. Early exposure to meaningful engineering experiences for these young girls may boost interest and the eventual pursuit of engineering and technology education paths.

  6. Geometric verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    Present LANDSAT data formats are reviewed to clarify how the geodetic location and registration capabilities were defined for P-tape products and RBV data. Since there is only one geometric model used in the master data processor, geometric location accuracy of P-tape products depends on the absolute accuracy of the model and registration accuracy is determined by the stability of the model. Due primarily to inaccuracies in data provided by the LANDSAT attitude management system, desired accuracies are obtained only by using ground control points and a correlation process. The verification of system performance with regards to geodetic location requires the capability to determine pixel positions of map points in a P-tape array. Verification of registration performance requires the capability to determine pixel positions of common points (not necessarily map points) in 2 or more P-tape arrays for a given world reference system scene. Techniques for registration verification can be more varied and automated since map data are not required. The verification of LACIE extractions is used as an example.

  7. The result of Venus Orbit Insertion of Akatsuki on December 7th, 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, K. I.; Nakamura, M.; Imamura, T.; Ishii, N.; Abe, T.; Kawakatsu, Y.; Hirose, C.; Satoh, T.; Suzuki, M.; Ueno, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Iwagami, N.; Watanabe, S.; Taguchi, M.; Fukuhara, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Yamada, M.; Imai, M.; Ohtsuki, S.; Uemizu, K.; Hashimoto, G. L.; Takagi, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Ogohara, K.; Sato, N.; Kasaba, Y.; Kouyama, T.; Hirata, N.; Nakamura, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Horinouchi, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Hayashi, Y. Y.; Nakatsuka, J.; Kashimura, H.; Sakanoi, T.; Ando, H.; Murakami, S. Y.; Sato, T.; Takagi, S.; Nakajima, K.; Peralta, J.; Lee, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    Japan launched Venus Climate Orbiter 'Akatsuki' (JAXA's mission code name: PLANET-C) to observe the dynamics of the Venus atmosphere globally and clarify the mechanism of the atmospheric circulation. The launch was on May 21st , 2010 from the Tanegashima Space Center. The cruise to Venus was smooth, however, the first Venus Orbit Insertion (VOI) trial on December 7th, 2010 tuned out to be a failure. Later Akatsuki has been orbiting the sun. Fortunately we keep the spacecraft in a healthy condition and surprisingly we have found another chance to let this spacecraft to meet Venus in 2015. Next VOI trial will be done on December 7th, 2015 and we report the result of this operation at this AGU meeting. This mission is planed to answer the question described below. The radius of the Earth and Venus are almost the same. In addition the radiation from the sun is also almost the same. The climates of these planets, however, are much different. For example, the strong zonal wind is observed on Venus with the period of 4 days, where Venus rotates westward with the period of 243 days. The wind speed is about 100 m s-1. This is called super rotation. We will investigate from data from Akatsuki what attributes to the difference of the climates between Earth and Venus. AKATSUKI was designed for remote sensing from an equatorial, elliptical orbit to tract the atmospheric motion at different altitudes using 5 cameras (3xIR, UV, Visible) and by the radio occultation technique. The first VOI has failed due to a malfunction of the propulsion system. The check valve between the helium tank and the fuel tank was blocked by an unexpected salt formation during the cruising from the Earth to Venus. As a result the main engine (orbital maneuvering engine, OME) became oxidizer-rich and fuel-poor condition, which led to an abnormal combustion in the engine with high temperature, and finally the engine was broken. We decide to use RCS thrusters for Trajectory Control Maneuvers' (TCMs) and

  8. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-07-01

    In June 2006 the LISA International Science Team (LIST) accepted the bid presented by the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) to host the 7th International LISA Symposium. This was during its 11th meeting at the University of Maryland, just before the 6th edition of the Symposium started in NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The 7th International LISA Symposium took place at the city of Barcelona, Spain, from 16-20 June 2008, in the premises of CosmoCaixa, a modern Science Museum located in the hills near Tibidabo. Almost 240 delegates registered for the event, a record breaking figure compared to previous editions of the Symposium. Many of the most renowned world experts in LISA, Gravitational Wave Science, and Astronomy, as well as Engineers, attended LISA 7 and produced state-of-the-art presentations, while everybody benefited from the opportunity to have live discussions during the week in a friendly environment. The programme included 31 invited plenary lectures in the mornings, and 8 parallel sessions in the afternoons. These were classified into 7 major areas of research: LISA Technology, LISA PathFinder, LISA PathFinder Data Analysis, LISA Data Analysis, Gravitational Wave sources, Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with LISA and Other Gravitational Wave Detectors. 138 abstracts for communications were received, of which a selection was made by the session convenors which would fit time constraints. Up to 63 posters completed the scientific programme. More details on the programme, including some of the talks, can be found at the Symposium website: http://www.ice.cat/research/LISA_Symposium. There was however a remarkable add-on: Professor Clifford Will delivered a startling presentation to the general public, who completely filled the Auditori—the main Conference Room, 320 seats—and were invited to ask questions to the speaker who had boldly guided them through the daunting world of Black Holes, Waves of Gravity, and other Warped Ideas of

  9. Highlights from the 7th Cachexia Conference: muscle wasting pathophysiological detection and novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Nicole; Steinbeck, Lisa; Doehner, Wolfram; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    This article highlights preclinical and clinical studies in the field of wasting disorders that were presented at the 7th Cachexia Conference held in Kobe, Japan, in December 2013. This year, the main topics were the development of new methods and new biomarkers in the field of cachexia and wasting disorders with particular focus on inflammatory pathways, growth differentiation factor-15, myostatin, the ubiquitin proteasome-dependent pathway, valosin and the regulation of ubiquitin-specific protease 19 that is involved in the differentiation of myogenin and myosin heavy chain. This article presents highlights from the development of drugs that have shown potential in the treatment of wasting disorders, particularly the ghrelin receptor agonist anamorelin, the myostatin antagonist REGN1033, the selective androgen receptor modulators enobosarm and TEI-E0001, and the anabolic catabolic transforming agent espindolol. In addition, novel data on the prevalence and detection methods of muscle wasting/sarcopenia are presented, including the D3-creatine dilution method and several new biomarkers. PMID:24595460

  10. Impacts of a Discussion-Based Academic Language Program on Classroom Interactions in 4th through 7th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRusso, Maria; Jones, Stephanie M.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Kim, James; Donovan, Suzanne; Snow, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory analysis of treatment-control differences in the quality of classroom interactions in 4th through 7th grade urban classrooms. Word Generation (WG) is a research-based academic language program for middle school students designed to teach novel vocabulary and literacy through language arts, math, science, and…

  11. Publications of Proceedings for the RF 2005 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, Jr, N C

    2006-01-01

    The University of California, Davis hosted the High Energy Density and High Power RF 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF in Kalamata, Greece, 13-17 June, 2005. The Proceedings cost was supported by these funds from the U.S. Department of Energy. The Proceedings was published through the American Institute of Physics.

  12. Primary School English Teachers' Perceptions of the English Language Curriculum of 6th, 7th and 8th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersen Yanik, Asli

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how the teachers who have different background characteristics perceive the goals and content of the English language curriculum implemented at the 6th, 7th and 8th grades of public primary schools. The study was conducted during the 2004-2005 school year with 368 English teachers selected from the seven regions of…

  13. Cultivating Environmental Virtue among 7th and 8th Graders in an Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Bruce; Bright, Alan; Cafaro, Philip; Mittelstaedt, Robin; Bruyere, Brett

    2008-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the development of environmental virtue in 7th and 8th grade students in an Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound school. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, the researchers were interested in introducing a virtue ethics perspective into their teaching of environmental ethics. Second, the researchers were…

  14. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayasu, M.; Watanabe, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Takayasu, H.

    2010-04-01

    This volume contains contributed papers from the 7th international conference on 'Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis (APFA)' held at Tokyo on 1-5 March 2009. The conference was organized jointly by Tokyo Institute of Technology and Hitotsubashi University with support from the Research Institute of Economy, Trade, and Industry (RIETI), Physical Society of Japan, Japanese Economic Association, Information Processing Society of Japan, Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence, and Japan Association for Evolutionary Economics. The first APFA conference (APFA1) was held in 1999 at Dublin, followed by APFA2 at Liege in 2000, APFA3 at London in 2001, APFA4 at Warsaw in 2003, APFA5 at Torino in 2006, and APFA6 at Lisbon in 2007. The 7th APFA conference, which is the first meeting held outside Europe, was attended by 223 researchers in physics and economics from 23 countries world-wide. In keeping with past APFA conferences, we paid special attention to issues in financial markets, which turned out to be very timely. The conference was held in March 2009, in the middle of the global financial crisis that originally started in the US and spread quickly to every corner of the world. The topic of the conference is 'New Approaches to the Analysis of Large Scale Business and Economic data'. The rapid development of information and communication technology has enabled financial/non-financial firms to keep detailed records of their business activities in the form of, for example, tick-by-tick data in financial markets, point-of-sale (POS) data on individual household's purchasing activity, and interfirm network data describing relationships among firms in terms of suppliers/customers transactions and ownerships. This growth in the scope and amount of business data available to researchers has led to a far-reaching expansion in research possibilities. Researchers not only in social sciences but also in physics, mathematics, and information sciences have recently

  15. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies (ICCHT 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The Kyoto protocol has initiated a pledge from almost all developing and developed countries to be committed to reducing CO2 emissions. Development of new renewable energy technologies are also of interest in this conference. Greenhouse gases have contributed to global warming and other man-made disasters. Cooling and Heating communities also have responsibilities towards the commitment of reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, depleting natural resources also act as a threat to the Cooling and Heating industries, causing them to develop highly efficient equipment and innovative technologies. The 1st International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies was held in Hanoi Vietnam (Jan. 2005). Whereas the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th ICCHT conferences were held in Dalian, China (Jul. 2006), Tokyo, Japan (Jul. 2007), Jinhae, Korea (Oct. 2008) and Bandung, Indonesia (Dec. 2010) respectively. The 6th International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies (ICCTH2012) was held in Xi'an in China on November 9-12, 2012. It is our pleasure to welcome you to the 7th International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies (ICCTH2014) on 4th - 6th November 2014 at the Grand Dorsett Subang Hotel, Subang Jaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia The Theme of the Conference is ''Sustainability and Innovation in Heating & Cooling Technologies''. The sub-themes are:- • CO2 Reduction and Low Carbon Technologies • HVAC System and Natural Ventilation • Energy & Alternative Energy • Computational Fluid Dynamics • Low Temperature & Refrigeration Engineering In conjunction with the Conference, an Exhibition will be organized as an integral part of the Conference. Project experiences, product solutions, new applications and state-of-the art information will be highlighted.

  16. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Modern Practice in Stress and Vibration Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu-Barton, J. M.

    2009-07-01

    The proceedings contain the papers presented at the 7th International Conference on Modern Practice in Stress and Vibration Analysis. The collection of papers represents the range of activities that are carried out to understand the functionality of engineering systems and structures through stress/strain based evaluation and dynamic response. The scope is broad and covers theoretical studies, modelling and experimental evaluations. Many of the papers cover integration techniques and approaches to better understanding of system performance and failure. All of the papers have been peer reviewed by at least two experts and represent the state of the art of research in this area. The conference is the seventh in the series, following on from previous conferences in Bath, Glasgow, Nottingham, Dublin, Sheffield and Liverpool. Although based in the British Isles the conference has a truly international flavour with offerings from 22 countries. The conference is organised by the Institute of Physics Applied Mechanics Group (formerly the Stress and Vibration Group). It incorporates activities associated with the British Society for Strain Measurement including the Measurements Lecture, the EMex Exhibition and the Young Stress Analyst Competition. The organising committee is grateful for the support of all of the authors, the scientific committee and keynote speakers who played a significant role in the review process, to John Edwards who was instrumental in managing the paper review and submission process, Dawn Stewart and Claire Garland of the Institute of Physics for organising the conference, social programme and registration and Biana Gale of the British Society for Strain Measurement for organising the Exhibition. The organising committee is also grateful to the sponsors of the conference for their kind support and to the co-sponsors for distributing information on the conference. Professor Janice M Dulieu-Barton Professor of Experimental Mechanics University of

  17. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Modern Practice in Stress and Vibration Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, J.

    2009-07-01

    The proceedings contain the papers presented at the 7th International Conference on Modern Practice in Stress and Vibration Analysis. The collection of papers represents the range of activities that are carried out to understand the functionality of engineering systems and structures through stress/strain based evaluation and dynamic response. The scope is broad and covers theoretical studies, modelling and experimental evaluations. Many of the papers cover integration techniques and approaches to better understanding of system performance and failure. All of the papers have been peer reviewed by at least two experts and represent the state of the art of research in this area. The conference is the seventh in the series, following on from previous conferences in Bath, Glasgow, Nottingham, Dublin, Sheffield and Liverpool. Although based in the British Isles the conference has a truly international flavour with offerings from 22 countries. The conference is organised by the Institute of Physics Applied Mechanics Group (formerly the Stress and Vibration Group). It incorporates activities associated with the British Society for Strain Measurement including the Measurements Lecture, the EMex Exhibition and the Young Stress Analyst Competition. The organising committee is grateful for the support of all of the authors, the scientific committee and keynote speakers who played a significant role in the review process, to John Edwards who was instrumental in managing the paper review and submission process, Dawn Stewart and Claire Garland of the Institute of Physics for organising the conference, social programme and registration and Biana Gale of the British Society for Strain Measurement for organising the Exhibition. The organising committee is also grateful to the sponsors of the conference for their kind support and to the co-sponsors for distributing information on the conference. Professor Janice Barton Professor of Experimental Mechanics University of Southampton

  18. PREFACE: The 7th International Seminar on Geometry, Continua and Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, David A.

    2007-04-01

    It gives me great pleasure to present the proceedings of the 7th International Seminar on Geometry, Continua and Microstructures (GCM 7). The conference took place on 25-27 September 2006 at Lancaster University and the local organisers were Robin Tucker, Tim Walton, myself and Jonathan Gratus of the Lancaster University Mathematical Physics Group. Modern field theories of mechanically and electrically responsive continua have a wealth of interesting applications in physics. Such theories provide effective macroscopic models of complex systems, such as living tissue and material with dynamical defects, that capture macroscopic consequences of microscopic phenomena. GCM is an interdisciplinary conference series, initiated by the Eringen medallist Gérard A Maugin, that brings together physicists and applied mathematicians who have interests in continuum mechanics and differential geometry and who aim to develop new and powerful methods for analysing the behaviour of complex mechanical systems. The earlier conferences in the series were held in Paris, Madrid, Mannheim, Turin, Sinaia and Belgrade. This volume addresses a variety of topics including the physics of saturated porous media, the relationship between growth in living tissue and molecular transport, the mechanics of polymer bonds, the macroscopic properties of damaged elastomers, the mechanics of carbon nanotubes, the geometry of balance systems in Continuum Thermodynamics and wave propagation in the material manifold. I would like to warmly thank the rest of the organising committee and the conference participants for making GCM 7 an enjoyable and rewarding occasion. Photographs may be found at http://www.lancs.ac.uk/depts/spc/conf/gcm7/wss/index.htm David A Burton Editor

  19. 7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

  20. Massartu: The Observation of Astronomical Phenomena in Assyria (7th Century BC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fales, F. M.

    2011-06-01

    The term massartu is well attested in letters in cuneiform to and from the Neo-Assyrian court, written in the main in the 7th century BC. In itself, massartu is a general Akkadian term, meaning "watch, guard", but in the early 1st millennium BC it takes on two interesting semantic specializations, both of which are tied to the practical and political needs of the Assyrian empire. In astrological-astronomical terms, massartu denotes the wake, vigil, or watch for astronomical observations on the part of the court specialists: such a wake was required by the Assyrian king on a nightly basis, for the subsequent consultation of the vast compilation of omens called Enūma Anu Enlil, and the drawing of conclusions relating to the state of the empire and of the royal dynasty. Many interesting texts show us the workings of the massartu in the capital city Nineveh or in other cities of Mesopotamia. But massartu had also a wider meaning, "vigilance", which denoted the requirement, on the part of all the subjects of the king of Assyria, to keep their eyes and ears open, so as to be able to report to the king if anything untoward was taking place, whether in the capital city or in the most remote military outpost of the empire. Thus, in a way, the astrologers were expected to perform no more and no less than the collective duty of "vigilance" on behalf of the king-but with their eyes trained on the heavens, and in await for signs ultimately sent from the gods.

  1. Selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Ellis; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-03-01

    In this special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering are a collection of the best microengineering papers presented at the 7th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2013) which took place in the seaside town of Marina del Rey, California, USA on 10-12 April, 2013. During the 3-day conference, participants enjoyed talks from 6 invited keynote speakers and 125 flash oral/poster presentations. The MMB conference is a biennial meeting with the primary purpose of fostering interactions between biologists and medical researchers, clinicians, chemists, physicists and engineers to enhance and strengthen the potential microtechnologies that will revolutionize the fields of medicine and biological sciences. The conference possesses a unique format where all poster presenters provide a brief 60 s oral presentation highlighting their research. This format was devised to provide training and exposure for young researchers, especially PhD students and postdocs, in the field and stimulate interdisciplinary exchanges. Therefore, MMB provides an intimate intellectual venue the facilitate discussions and collaborations to advance new research tools and technologies for medicine and biological sciences. The MMB conference series was co-founded by Professor David Beebe (University of Wisconsin—Madison) and Professor André Dittmar (University of Lyon) and was the first international meeting to provide a forum focusing on emerging applications of microtechnologies to unmet needs in medicine and biology. The series was held for the first time in 2000, in Lyon, France and followed by Madison, USA (2002), Oahu Island in Hawaii, USA (2005), Okinawa, Japan (2006), Québec City, Canada (2009), Lucerne, Switzerland (2011), and Marina del Rey, USA (2013). The next conference will be held in Seoul, Korea in 2015. This collection of articles highlights recent progress in microtechnologies with medical and biological applications. We are

  2. FOREWORD: 7th Symposium on Vacuum-based Science and Technology (SVBST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbiński, W.

    2014-11-01

    These are the proceedings of the 7th Symposium on Vacuum based Science and Technology organized in Kołobrzeg (PL) on November 19-21, 2013 by the Institute of Technology and Education, Koszalin University of Technology and the Clausius Tower Society under auspices of the Polish Vacuum Society (PTP) and the German Vacuum Society (DVG) and in collaboration with the BalticNet PlasmaTec and the Society of Vacuum Coaters (SVC). It was accompanied by the 12-th Annual Meeting of the German Vacuum Society. The mission of the Symposium is to provide a forum for presentation and exchange of expertise and research results in the field of vacuum and plasma science. After already six successful meetings organized alternately in Poland and Germany our goal is to continue and foster cooperation within the vacuum and plasma science community. This year, the Rudolf-Jaeckel Prize, awarded by the DVG for outstanding achievements in the field of vacuum based sciences, was presented to Dr Ute Bergner, president of the VACOM Vakuum Komponenten & Messtechnik GmbH and a member of our community. The full-day course organized in the framework of the Educational Program by the Society of Vacuum Coaters (SVC) and entitled: An Introduction to Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) Processes was held on November 18, 2013 as a satellite event of the Symposium. The instructor was Prof. Ismat Shah from Delaware University (US). The Clausius Session, already traditionally organized during the Symposium was addressed this year to young generation. We invited our young colleagues to attend a series of educational lectures reporting on achievements in graphene science, scanning probe microscopy and plasma science. Lectures were given by: Prof. Jacek Baranowski from the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology in Warsaw, Prof. Teodor Gotszalk from the Wroclaw University of Technology and Prof. Holger Kersten from the Christian Albrechts University in Kiel. The Symposium was accompanied by an industry

  3. 7th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), May 8–10, 2014, Helsinki, Finland

    PubMed Central

    Mlinac, Anita; Hinzmann, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Abstract International experts in the fields of diabetes, diabetes technology, endocrinology, mobile health, sport science, and regulatory issues gathered for the 7th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG). The aim of this meeting was to facilitate new collaborations and research projects to improve the lives of people with diabetes. The 2014 meeting comprised a comprehensive scientific program, parallel interactive workshops, and two keynote lectures. PMID:25211215

  4. The Relationship between Interest in Teaching as a Career Choice and Perceptions of School/Classroom Environment of 7th and 8th Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ray E.

    This study was conducted to ascertain whether future teachers, particularly students of color. can be identified at the 7th and 8th grade levels, and to determine whether their interest or noninterest in teaching is related to how they feel and think about school. Participants were 7th and 8th grade students (N=646) from eight California schools.…

  5. Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM) (7th, London, United Kingdom, July 4-7, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamper, John, Ed.; Pardos, Zachary, Ed.; Mavrikis, Manolis, Ed.; McLaren, Bruce M., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The 7th International Conference on Education Data Mining held on July 4th-7th, 2014, at the Institute of Education, London, UK is the leading international forum for high-quality research that mines large data sets in order to answer educational research questions that shed light on the learning process. These data sets may come from the traces…

  6. Morphometrical analysis of the human suprarenal gland between the 4th and 7th months of gestation.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dariusz; Góralczyk, Krzysztof; Zurada, Anna; Gielecki, Jerzy

    2007-01-01

    The present study's purpose has been to examine the development of the human suprarenal glands (SGs) during the prenatal period. Special attention was paid to sexual dimorphism and the differences between the parameters of the right and left SGs. Specimens were obtained from 187 human fetuses spontaneously aborted between the 4th and 7th months of gestation. The SGs were dissected from the fetuses after an immersion and preservation period of 3-24 months in 9% formalin solution. The mass and linear dimensions of each isolated SG were obtained, and these data revealed a progressive two-fold increase between the 4th and 7th months of gestation. There was a gradual reduction in the ratio of the SG mass to the overall mass of the fetus with a marked decrease evident between the 4th and 5th months. Statistical analysis of both SGs showed significant differences between sexes in the mass and in the thickness of the left SG during the 5th and 6th months of gestation. Differences in the mass and linear dimensions of the left and right SGs were recorded from the 5th month of gestation to the 7th month. The mass and volume of the left SGs were higher than those on the right side. This allometric analysis provides data from a large sample of human fetuses and will later aid in microscopic and ultrasonographic studies.

  7. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites, David; Baldock, Clive

    2013-06-01

    IC3DDose 2013, the 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012, grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The aim of the first workshop was to bring together individuals, both researchers and users, with an interest in 3D radiation dosimetry techniques, with a mix of presentations from basic science to clinical applications, which has remained an objective for all of the meetings. One rationale of DosGel99 was stated as supporting the increasing clinical implementation of gel dosimetry, as the technique appeared, at that time, to be leaving the laboratories of gel dosimetry enthusiasts and entering clinical practice. Clearly by labelling the first workshop as the 1st, there was a vision of a continuing series, which has been fulfilled. On the other hand, the expectation of widespread clinical use of gel dosimetry has perhaps not been what was hoped for and anticipated. Nevertheless the rapidly increasing demand for advanced high-precision 3D radiotherapy technology and techniques has continued apace. The need for practical and accurate 3D dosimetry methods for development and quality assurance has only increased. By the 6th meeting, held in South Carolina in 2010, the Conference Scientific Committee recognised the wider developments in 3D systems and methods and decided to widen the scope, whilst keeping the same span from basic science to applications. This was signalled by a change of name from 'Dosgel' to 'IC3DDose', a name that has continued to this latest conference. The conference objectives were: to enhance the quality and accuracy of

  8. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th Liquid Matter Conference (Lund, Sweden, 27 June 1 July 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Gerhard; Sciortino, Francesco; Ullner, Magnus

    2008-12-01

    (Utrecht) and to Professor Peter Pusey (Edinburgh) for their seminal studies of colloidal matter. In addition to plenary speeches by the two recipients of the Liquid Matter Prize, the scientific program consisted of ten plenary lectures, 108 symposia talks, 23 of which were keynote lectures, and 458 poster contributions. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains 47 of the oral communications. The conference was held in the buildings of Lund University and the Student Union facing the University Square in the heart of Lund. The organizers gratefully acknowledge the substantial financial support offered by the Nobel Foundation and by the Swedish Research Council. The success of the conference owes a great debt of gratitude to the members of the Local Organizing Committee and all the people who helped them tirelessly (and very efficiently) to make the conference run smoothly and to the members of the International Program Committee, who were deeply involved in the planning of the conference. During the conference dinner our colleague Lennart Piculell gave a singing performance, which included a song dedicated to the two winners of the Liquid Matter Prize, entitled Hard-Breaking Gel, whose lyrics are printed below. Finally, the Board of the Liquids Section of the European Physical Society decided that the 8th Liquid Matter Conference will be held in Vienna (Austria) 6-10 September 2011. Hard-Breaking Gel New lyrics by Lennart Piculell to the melody of Heartbreak Hotel, created in June 2008 for the 7th Liquid Matter Conference, dedicated to Henk Lekkerkerker and Peter Pusey. Well, since my baby left me, I found a new place to be! It's downtown Lund, in a narrow street, Where hundreds of cool people meet! There I don't feel lonely, No, I don't feel lonely - So, if you feel lonely, you should try! It's all about liquid matter: Liquids flow, and soft bodies swell! Your mind is blown, and your blood will boil To a hard-breaking gel. And you won't be lonely

  9. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th Liquid Matter Conference (Lund, Sweden, 27 June 1 July 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Gerhard; Sciortino, Francesco; Ullner, Magnus

    2008-12-01

    (Utrecht) and to Professor Peter Pusey (Edinburgh) for their seminal studies of colloidal matter. In addition to plenary speeches by the two recipients of the Liquid Matter Prize, the scientific program consisted of ten plenary lectures, 108 symposia talks, 23 of which were keynote lectures, and 458 poster contributions. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains 47 of the oral communications. The conference was held in the buildings of Lund University and the Student Union facing the University Square in the heart of Lund. The organizers gratefully acknowledge the substantial financial support offered by the Nobel Foundation and by the Swedish Research Council. The success of the conference owes a great debt of gratitude to the members of the Local Organizing Committee and all the people who helped them tirelessly (and very efficiently) to make the conference run smoothly and to the members of the International Program Committee, who were deeply involved in the planning of the conference. During the conference dinner our colleague Lennart Piculell gave a singing performance, which included a song dedicated to the two winners of the Liquid Matter Prize, entitled Hard-Breaking Gel, whose lyrics are printed below. Finally, the Board of the Liquids Section of the European Physical Society decided that the 8th Liquid Matter Conference will be held in Vienna (Austria) 6-10 September 2011. Hard-Breaking Gel New lyrics by Lennart Piculell to the melody of Heartbreak Hotel, created in June 2008 for the 7th Liquid Matter Conference, dedicated to Henk Lekkerkerker and Peter Pusey. Well, since my baby left me, I found a new place to be! It's downtown Lund, in a narrow street, Where hundreds of cool people meet! There I don't feel lonely, No, I don't feel lonely - So, if you feel lonely, you should try! It's all about liquid matter: Liquids flow, and soft bodies swell! Your mind is blown, and your blood will boil To a hard-breaking gel. And you won't be lonely

  10. Constructing an action agenda for community empowerment at the 7th Global Conference on Health Promotion in Nairobi.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Stephen; Abeykoon, Palitha; Arora, Monika; Dobe, Madhumita; Galloway-Gilliam, Lark; Liburd, Leandris; Munodawafa, Davison

    2010-12-01

    This report describes an action agenda for community empowerment developed by participants at the 7th Global Conference on Health Promotion in Nairobi. It outlines gaps and barriers in enabling community empowerment; including those related to institutional capacity, institutional relationships to the community, and institutional responses to the social structure of the community. The report features nine recommended actions to enhance community control of health promotion initiatives, develop sustainable resources for community health efforts, and support implementation and build evidence for health promotion effectiveness. Implementing these recommended actions can enhance community empowerment and help close the implementation gap in health promotion.

  11. Evaluation of the 7th edition of the TNM classification in patients with resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Nan; Zheng, Qing-Feng; Yan, Shi; Lv, Chao; Li, Shao-Lei; Yang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prognostic factors and tumor stages of the 7th edition TNM classification for esophageal cancer. METHODS: In total, 1033 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) who underwent surgical resection with or without (neo)adjuvant therapy between January 2003 and June 2012 at the Thoracic Surgery Department II of the Beijing Cancer Hospital, Beijing, China were included in this study. The following eligibility criteria were applied: (1) squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction identified by histopathological examination; (2) treatment with esophagectomy plus lymphadenectomy with curative intent; and (3) complete pathologic reports and follow-up data. Patients who underwent non-curative (R1) resection and patients who died in hospital were excluded. Patients who received (neo)adjuvant therapy were also included in this analysis. All patients were restaged using the 7th edition of the Union for International Cancer Control and the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging systems. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the prognostic factors for survival. Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank test was used to evaluate differences between the subgroups. RESULTS: Of the 1033 patients, 273 patients received (neo)adjuvant therapy, and 760 patients were treated with surgery alone. The median follow-up time was 51.6 mo (range: 5-112 mo) and the overall 5-year survival rate was 36.4%. Gender, “pT” and “pN” descriptors, (neo)adjuvant therapy, and the 7th edition TNM stage grouping were independent prognostic factors in the univariate and multivariate analyses. However, neither histologic grade nor cancer location were independent prognostic factors in the univariate and multivariate analyses. The 5-year stage-based survival rates were as follows: IA, 84.9%; IB, 70.9%; IIA, 56.2%; IIB, 43.3%; IIIA, 37.9%; IIIB, 23.3%; IIIC,12.9% and IV, 3

  12. Rapid detection by multiplex PCR of Genomic Islands, prophages and Integrative Conjugative Elements in V. cholerae 7th pandemic variants.

    PubMed

    Spagnoletti, Matteo; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Colombo, Mauro M

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae poses a threat to human health, and new epidemic variants have been reported so far. Seventh pandemic V. cholerae strains are characterized by highly related genomic sequences but can be discriminated by a large set of Genomic Islands, phages and Integrative Conjugative Elements. Classical serotyping and biotyping methods do not easily discriminate among new variants arising worldwide, therefore the establishment of new methods for their identification is required. We developed a multiplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of the major 7th pandemic variants of V. cholerae O1 and O139. Three specific genomic islands (GI-12, GI-14 and GI-15), two phages (Kappa and TLC), Vibrio Seventh Pandemic Island 2 (VSP-II), and the ICEs of the SXT/R391 family were selected as targets of our multiplex PCR based on a comparative genomic approach. The optimization and specificity of the multiplex PCR was assessed on 5 V. cholerae 7th pandemic reference strains, and other 34 V. cholerae strains from various epidemic events were analyzed to validate the reliability of our method. This assay had sufficient specificity to identify twelve different V. cholerae genetic profiles, and therefore has the potential to be used as a rapid screening method.

  13. Multi-MW K-Band 7th Harmonic Multiplier for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Hirschfield, J.L.; Kazakevich, G.M.; LaPointe, M.A.; /Yale U.

    2009-05-01

    A preliminary design and current status are presented for a two-cavity 7th harmonic multiplier, intended as a high-power RF source for use in experiments aimed at developing high-gradient structures for a future collider. The harmonic multiplier is to produce power in K-band using as its RF driver an XK-5 S-band klystron (2.856 GHz). The multiplier is to be built with a TE{sub 111} rotating mode input cavity and interchangeable output cavities, a principal example being a TE{sub 711} rotating mode cavity running at 20 GHz. The design that is described uses a 250 kV, 20 A injected laminar electron beam. With 8.5 MW of S-band drive power, 4.4 MW of 20-GHz output power is predicted. The design uses a gun, magnetic coils, and beam collector from an existing waveguide 7th harmonic multiplier. The gun has been re-conditioned and the desired operating parameters have been achieved.

  14. Comparison of the 7th and proposed 8th editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to compare the 7th and the proposed 8th edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan –Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7th AJCC T categories, the proposed 8th AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7th edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8th edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8th edition compared to the 7th edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8th edition compared to the 7th edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8th AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7th AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery. PMID:27641932

  15. Comparison of the 7(th) and proposed 8(th) editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to compare the 7(th) and the proposed 8(th) edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan -Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7(th) AJCC T categories, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7(th) edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8(th) edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7(th) AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery. PMID:27641932

  16. Overview and research agenda arising from the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Tappuni, A R; Shiboski, C

    2016-04-01

    The Research Agenda generated by the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS (WW7) is delivered in this paper. Panels of international experts presided over nine workshops that constituted the conference held in November 2014 in Hyderabad, India. The main goal of the Workshop was to bring together clinician and scientists interested in the subject to debate with world-wide perspectives current issues related to the oral manifestations in HIV/AIDS. The workshops were structured around three themes; basic science, clinical/translational science and social science and were attended by 135 participants from 31 countries. The research questions debated at the workshops are presented in nine consensus papers published in this issue and are summarised in this paper along with an outline of the identified research needs in the field. PMID:27109289

  17. Overview and research agenda arising from the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Tappuni, A R; Shiboski, C

    2016-04-01

    The Research Agenda generated by the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS (WW7) is delivered in this paper. Panels of international experts presided over nine workshops that constituted the conference held in November 2014 in Hyderabad, India. The main goal of the Workshop was to bring together clinician and scientists interested in the subject to debate with world-wide perspectives current issues related to the oral manifestations in HIV/AIDS. The workshops were structured around three themes; basic science, clinical/translational science and social science and were attended by 135 participants from 31 countries. The research questions debated at the workshops are presented in nine consensus papers published in this issue and are summarised in this paper along with an outline of the identified research needs in the field.

  18. Geometric Algebra for Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Chris; Lasenby, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    Preface; Notation; 1. Introduction; 2. Geometric algebra in two and three dimensions; 3. Classical mechanics; 4. Foundations of geometric algebra; 5. Relativity and spacetime; 6. Geometric calculus; 7. Classical electrodynamics; 8. Quantum theory and spinors; 9. Multiparticle states and quantum entanglement; 10. Geometry; 11. Further topics in calculus and group theory; 12. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian techniques; 13. Symmetry and gauge theory; 14. Gravitation; Bibliography; Index.

  19. Exploring New Geometric Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nirode, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    When students work with a non-Euclidean distance formula, geometric objects such as circles and segment bisectors can look very different from their Euclidean counterparts. Students and even teachers can experience the thrill of creative discovery when investigating these differences among geometric worlds. In this article, the author describes a…

  20. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008 Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-05-01

    In June 2006 the LISA International Science Team (LIST) accepted the bid presented by the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) to host the 7th International LISA Symposium. This was during its 11th meeting at the University of Maryland, just before the 6th edition of the symposium started at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The 7th International LISA Symposium took place in the city of Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June, 2008, in the premises of CosmoCaixa, a modern science museum located in the hills near Tibidabo. Almost 240 delegates registered for the event, a record breaking figure compared to previous editions of the symposium. Many of the most renowned world experts in LISA, gravitational wave science, and astronomy, as well as engineers, attended LISA #7 and produced state of the art presentations, while everybody benefited from the opportunity to have live discussions during the week in a friendly environment. The programme included 31 invited plenary lectures in the mornings, and eight parallel sessions in the afternoons. These were classified into seven major areas of research: LISA Technology, LISA PathFinder, LISA PathFinder Data Analysis, LISA Data Analysis, Gravitational Wave Sources, Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with LISA and Other Gravitational Wave Detectors. Abstracts for 138 communications were received, from which a selection was made by the session convenors which would fit time constraints. Up to 63 posters completed the scientific programme. More details on the programme, including some of the talks, can be found at the symposium website:http://www.ice.cat/research/LISA_Symposium. There was, however, a remarkable add-on: Professor Clifford Will delivered a startling presentation to the general public, who completely filled the Auditori—the main conference room, 320 seats—and were invited to ask questions to the speaker who boldly guided them through the daunting world of Black Holes, Waves of Gravity, and other Warped Ideas

  1. Evaluation of the 7th edition of the UICC-AJCC tumor, node, metastasis classification for esophageal cancer in a Chinese cohort

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Guo, Weigang; Shi, Shiming

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess and evaluate the prognostic value of the 7th edition of the Union for International Cancer Control–American Joint Committee on Cancer (UICC-AJCC) tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) staging system for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer in comparison with the 6th edition. Methods A retrospective review was performed on 766 consecutive esophageal cancer patients treated with esophagectomy between 2008 and 2012. Patients were staged according to the 6th and 7th editions for esophageal cancer respectively. Survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate analysis was performed using Cox regression model. Results Overall 3-year survival rate was 59.5%. There were significant differences in 3-year survival rates among T stages both according to the 6th edition and the 7th edition (P<0.001). According to the 7th edition, the 3-year survival rates of N0 (75.4%), N1 (65.2%), N2 (39.7%) and N3 (27.3%) patients were significant differences (P<0.001). Kaplan-Meier curve revealed a good discriminatory ability from stage I to IV, except for stage IB, IIA and IIB in the 7th edition staging system. Based on the 7th edition, the degree of differentiation, tumor length and tumor location were not independent prognostic factors on multivariate analysis. The multivariate analyses suggested that pT-, pN-, pTNM-category were all the independent prognostic factors based on the 6th and 7th edition staging system. Conclusions The 7th edition of AJCC TNM staging system of esophageal cancer should discriminate pT2–3N0M0 (stage IB, IIA and IIB) better when considering the esophageal squamous cell cancer patients. Therefore, to improve and optimize the AJCC TNM classification for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer, more considerations about the value of tumor grade and tumor location in pT2–3N0M0 esophageal squamous cell cancer should be taken in the next new TNM staging system. PMID:27499956

  2. The USCACA hosted symposiums at the 7th CACA annual meeting and the 15th CSCO annual meeting in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Shi, Michael; Yang, Wancai; Qian, Pascal; Yan, Li

    2012-11-01

    In September 2012, the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) hosted two symposiums in Beijing. The USCACA hosted the first joint session at the 7th annual meetings of the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (CACA), themed on "Collaboration between the US and China in Cancer Research." Six experts from the United States and China presented their latest work on basic and translational cancer research. During this symposium, 5 young Chinese scholars, returnees after their training in the United States, were honored the"AFCR-USCACA Scholarships Award." The USCACA hosted a second symposium during the 15th annual meeting of the Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO), focused on the "US-China Collaboration in Cancer Drug Clinical Development." An international delegation of oncology experts presented the innovative clinical trial strategies and discussed the biomarkers for cancer early detection and clinical trials, targeted therapy, and new drug development. The Oncology Drug Clinical Development and Safety Evaluation Committee was also launched to promote an innovative environment and to provide a collaborative platform for anti-cancer drug development in China.

  3. Adherence and delivery: Implementation quality and program outcomes for the 7th grade keepin’ it REAL program

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Graham, John W.; Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L.; Krieger, Janice L.; Shin, Young Ju

    2014-01-01

    Poor implementation quality (IQ) is known to reduce program effects making it important to consider IQ for evaluation and dissemination of prevention programs. However, less is known about the ways specific implementation variables relate to outcomes. In this study, two versions of the keepin’ it REAL, 7th grade drug prevention intervention were implemented in 78 classrooms in 25 schools in rural districts in Pennsylvania and Ohio. IQ was measured through observational coding of 276 videos. IQ variables included adherence to the curriculum, teacher engagement (attentiveness, enthusiasm, seriousness, clarity, positivity), student engagement (attention, participation), and a global rating of teacher delivery quality. Factor analysis showed that teacher engagement, student engagement, and delivery quality formed one factor, which was labeled delivery. A second factor was adherence to the curriculum. Self-report student surveys measured substance use, norms (beliefs about prevalence and acceptability of use), and efficacy (beliefs about one’s ability to refuse substance offers) at two waves (pretest, immediate posttest). Mixed model regression analysis which accounted for missing data and controlled for pretest levels examined implementation quality’s effects on individual level outcomes, statistically controlling for cluster level effects. Results show that when implemented well, students show positive outcomes compared to students receiving a poorly implemented program. Delivery significantly influenced substance use and norms, but not efficacy. Adherence marginally significantly predicted use and significantly predicted norms, but not efficacy. Findings underscore the importance of comprehensively measuring and accounting for IQ, particularly delivery, when evaluating prevention interventions. PMID:24442403

  4. Determination of the expression of fish antifreeze protein (AFP) in 7th generation transgenic mice tissues and serum.

    PubMed

    Bagis, Haydar; Tas, Arzu; Kankavi, Orhan

    2008-06-01

    In this study, the presence of antifreeze protein (AFP) gene expression through successive generations in transgenic mice carrying the chimeric gene construct of the coding sequence for the AFP protein from ocean pout was investigated. AFP transgenic hemizygote mice were used for AFP gene expression. AFP genome expressions in transgenic mice were analyzed by Western blotting, and tissue location of AFP protein was shown by immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence techniques. Seventh transgenic mice from the established founders demonstrated the expression of AFP in organs such as the skin, oviduct, lung, kidney and liver tissues and serum except for the heart. Our results demonstrate successful expression of AFP gene products in several tissues and serum of transgenic mice, the association of in vivo expressed AFP protein, for the first time. These results indicate that the coding sequence for the AFP protein gene (ocean pout type III AFP gene) could be integrated and stably transcribed and expressed in the 7th generation of transgenic mice. In conclusion transgenic mouse lines would be a good model for the cryostudy of AFP and for the determination of AFP roles in several organs and tissues.

  5. Ethical review of projects involving non-human primates funded under the European Union's 7th Research Framework Programme.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Ursula; Phillips, Barry; Reid, Kirsty; Schmit, Véronique; Jennings, Maggy

    2013-09-01

    Internet searches were performed on projects involving non-human primates ('primates') funded under the European Union (EU) 7th Research Framework Programme (FP7), to determine how project proposals are assessed from an ethical point of view. Due to the incompleteness of the information publicly available, the types and severity of the experiments could not be determined with certainty, although in some projects the level of harm was considered to be 'severe'. Information was scarce regarding the numbers of primates, their sourcing, housing, care and fate, or the application of the Three Rs within projects. Project grant holders and the relevant Commission officer were consulted about their experiences with the FP7 ethics review process. Overall, it was seen as meaningful and beneficial, but some concerns were also noted. Ethical follow-up during project performance and upon completion was recognised as a valuable tool in ensuring that animal welfare requirements were adequately addressed. Based upon the outcome of the survey, recommendations are presented on how to strengthen the ethical review process under the upcoming Framework Programme 'Horizon 2020', while adequately taking into account the specific requirements of Directive 2010/63/EU, with the aim of limiting the harms inflicted on the animals and the numbers used, and ultimately, replacing the use of primates altogether. PMID:24168134

  6. Geometric intrinsic symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, A. Szulerecka, A.; Pedrak, A.

    2013-08-15

    The problem of geometric symmetries in the intrinsic frame of a many-body system (nucleus) is considered. An importance of symmetrization group notion is discussed. Ageneral structure of the intrinsic symmetry group structure is determined.

  7. Use of Jigsaw Technique to Teach the Unit "Science within Time" in Secondary 7th Grade Social Sciences Course and Students' Views on This Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yapici, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to apply the jigsaw technique in Social Sciences teaching and to unroll the effects of this technique on learning. The unit "Science within Time" in the secondary 7th grade Social Sciences text book was chosen for the research. It is aimed to compare the jigsaw technique with the traditional teaching method in…

  8. Influence of Skip Patterns on Item Non-Response in a Substance Use Survey of 7th to 12th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Kele; Olds, R. Scott; Thombs, Dennis L.

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective case study assessed the influence of item non-response error on subsequent response to questionnaire items assessing adolescent alcohol and marijuana use. Post-hoc analyses were conducted on survey results obtained from 4,371 7th to 12th grade students in Ohio in 2005. A skip pattern design in a conventional questionnaire…

  9. E-Learn 2002 World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, & Higher Education. Proceedings (7th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, October 15-19, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Margaret, Ed.; Reeves, Thomas C., Ed.

    The 7th annual E-Learn world conference on e-learning in corporate, government, healthcare, and higher education organized by the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) includes more than 600 papers. Papers from this proceedings come from contributors representing more than 50 countries, sharing their perspectives and…

  10. Studying the Ability of 7th Grade Students to Define the Circle and Its Elements in the Context of Mathematical Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akarsu, Esra; Yilmaz, Süha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to study the mathematical language skills that the 7th grade students use in defining the circle and its elements. In the study, the mathematical language skills of students that they use in defining the circle and its elements in a scenario were compared to the mathematical language skills they use in defining them…

  11. Making the Grade: Do Nebraska Teachers and Administrators Working in Public Schools in 7th-12th Grade Settings Agree about What Constitutes Sound Grading Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the researcher sought to determine whether Nebraska teachers and administrators agreed about what constitutes sound grading practice. The results of this study indicated that Nebraska teachers and administrators working in public schools in 7th-12th grade settings did not always agree about what constituted sound grading practice.…

  12. Investigation of Change in Adolescent Perceptions of Mothers' and Fathers' Contributions to Interparental Discord from 7th to 9th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parra, Gilbert R.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; Kitzmann, Katherine M.; Luebbe, Aaron M.; Olsen, James P.; Davis, Genevieve L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether adolescent perceptions of mothers' and fathers' contributions to interparental discord changed from early to middle adolescence and if the changes were related to adolescent negative mood. Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Adolescents who were in 7th grade…

  13. The Effect of Learning Geometry Topics of 7th Grade in Primary Education with Dynamic Geometer's Sketchpad Geometry Software to Success and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesan, Cenk; Caliskan, Sevdane

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of learning geometry topics of 7th grade in primary education with dynamic geometer's sketchpad geometry software to student's success and retention. The experimental research design with The Posttest-Only Control Group was used in this study. In the experimental group, dynamic geometer's…

  14. Research Examination of the Options to Increase the Education Effectiveness in the Technical Subjects at the 7th Grade of Elementary School Using Hypertext Educational Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Žácok, L'ubomir

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of hypertext educational material is going to be solved in this paper as a source using which the effectiveness of education the technical subjects at the 7th grade of elementary school can be increased. As a comparison between reached results in the control and experimental groups of pupils we used final didactical examination,…

  15. Determining the Effects of Using Different Writing Activities on the Academic Achievements Secondary School 7th Grade Students and Their Attitudes Towards the Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzoglu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the effects of using writing activities with different learning purposes by the secondary school 7th grade students on their academic achievement and attitudes towards the course. The study was carried out in a secondary school located in the centre of Erzurum in 2012-2013 academic year; the study is a…

  16. Descriptive Geometry and Geometric Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. Alan

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiences for engineering students to develop spatial awareness and reasoning capability. Describes geometric modeling, basic geometric concepts, operations, surface modeling, and conclusions. (YP)

  17. Prognostic Impact of the 6th and 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Staging Systems on Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Motoo; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hatooka, Shunzo; Mizota, Ayako; Kondoh, Chihiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Muro, Kei

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is based on pathologic data from esophageal cancers treated by surgery alone. There is no information available on evaluation of the new staging system with regard to prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the new staging system on esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 301 consecutive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with CRT. Comparisons were made of the prognostic impacts of the 6th and 7th staging systems and the prognostic impacts of stage and prognostic groups, which were newly defined in the 7th edition. Results: There were significant differences between Stages I and III (p < 0.01) according to both editions. However, the 7th edition poorly distinguishes the prognoses of Stages III and IV (p = 0.36 by multivariate analysis) in comparison to the 6th edition (p = 0.08 by multivariate analysis), although these differences were not significant. For all patients, T, M, and gender were independent prognostic factors by multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). For the Stage I and II prognostic groups, survival curves showed a stepwise decrease with increase in stage, except for Stage IIA. However, there were no significant differences seen between each prognostic stage. Conclusions: Our study indicates there are several problems with the 7th TNM staging system regarding prognostic factors in patients undergoing CRT.

  18. Can we improve breast cancer mortality in Okinawa? Consensus of the 7th Okinawa Breast Oncology Meeting.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Kentaro; Tamaki, Nobumitsu; Kamada, Yoshihiko; Uehara, Kano; Zaha, Hisamitsu; Onomura, Mai; Ueda, Makoto; Kurashita, Kaname; Miyazato, Keiko; Higa, Junko; Miyara, Kyuichiro; Shiraishi, Makiko; Murayama, Shigemi; Ishida, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    The rate of breast cancer mortality in Okinawa has gradually been increasing up to 2010. Now Okinawa has the second worst mortality rate in Japan, in part due to the enormous dietary changes resulting from the post-World War II US military occupation, high incidence of obesity, high non-optimal treatment rate, and low breast-cancer screening rate. To reduce breast cancer mortality in Okinawa, we established the Okinawa Breast Oncology Meeting (OBOM) in 2012. At the 7th OBOM held on January 10th, 2014, we discussed the breast cancer mortality in Okinawa focusing on lifestyle, breast cancer screening and optimal treatments. The Okinawan women who were overweight and/or obese during premenopausal and postmenopausal ages had a statistically significant higher risk of breast cancer development compared to those with non-overweight and/or obese women. The traditional diet of Okinawa consists of foods low in calories but rich in nutritional value. Therefore, we recommend Okinawan people not to forget the Okinawan traditional lifestyle, and to reduce their bodyweight to prevent breast cancer. One of the main goals of the OBOM is to raise breast cancer screening attendance rates to 50% (29.2% in 2010). We should standardize the quality control for breast cancer screening in Okinawa. It is important to continue enlightening the Okinawan population to receive optimal treatment. In addition, we are striving to establish systematic medical cooperation between the hospitals specializing in breast cancer treatment with rural hospitals. The OBOM group endeavors to contribute to the improvement of breast cancer mortality in Okinawa.

  19. Alloy characterization of a 7th Century BC archeological bronze vase - Overcoming patina constraints using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Schiavon, N.; Queralt, I.; Arruda, A. M.; Sampaio, J. M.; Brunetti, A.

    2015-05-01

    In this work we evaluate the composition of a bronze alloy using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For this purpose, a 7th Century BC archeological vase from the SW Iberian Peninsula, displaying a well formed corrosion patina was analyzed by means of a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Realistic MC simulations of the experimental setup were performed with the XRMC code package which is based on an intensive use of variance-reduction techniques and uses XRAYLIB a constantly updated X-ray library of atomic data. A single layer model was applied for simulating XRF of polished/pristine bronze whereas a two-or-three-layer model was developed for bronze covered respectively by a corrosion patina alone or coupled with a superficial soil derived crust. These simulations took into account corrosion (cerussite (PbCO3), cuprite (Cu2O), malachite (Cu2CO3(OH)2), litharge (PbO)) and soil derived products (goethite (FeO(OH)) and quartz (SiO2)) identified by means of X-ray diffraction and Raman micro analytical techniques. Results confirm previous research indicating that the XRF/Monte Carlo protocol is well suited when a two-layered model is considered, whereas in areas where the patina + soil derived products' crust is too thick, X-rays from the alloy substrate are not able to exit the sample. Quantitative results based on MC simulations indicate that the vase is made of a lead-bronze alloy: Mn (0.2%), Fe (1.0%), Cu (81.8%), As (0.5%), Ag (0.6%), Sn (8.0%) and Pb (8.0%).

  20. Balancing acts: A mixed methods study of the figured world of African American 7th graders in urban science classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland-Solomon, Tanya E.

    What beliefs and cultural models do youth who are underrepresented in science have about the domain of science and about themselves as science learners? What do they imagine is possible for them in relation to science both now and in the future? In other words, what constitutes their figured world of science? This dissertation study, using a mixed methods design, offers new perspectives on the ways that underrepresented youth's unexamined assumptions or cultural models and resources may shape their identities and motivation to learn science. Through analyses of survey and interview data, I found that urban African American youths' social context, gender, racial identity, and perceptions of the science they had in school influenced their motivation to learn science. Analyses of short-term classroom observations and interviews suggested that students had competing cultural models that they used in their constructions of identities as science learners, which they espoused and adopted in relation to how well they leveraged the science-related cultural resources available to them. Results from this study suggested that these 7th graders would benefit from access to more expansive cultural models through access to individuals with scientific capital as a way to allow them to create fruitful identities as science learners. If we want to ensure that students from groups that are underrepresented in science not only have better outcomes, but aspire to and enter the science career pipeline, we must also begin to support them in their negotiations of competing cultural models that limit their ability to adopt science-learner identities in their classrooms. This study endeavored to understand the particular cultural models and motivational beliefs that drive students to act, and what types of individuals they imagine scientists and science workers to be. This study also examined how cultural models and resources influence identity negotiation, specifically the roles youths

  1. PREFACE: EUCAS '05: The 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Vienna University of Technology, Austria, 11 15 September 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Gordon; Weber, Harald W.; Sauerzopf, Franz M.

    2006-03-01

    This issue of Superconductor Science and Technology contains the plenary and invited papers presented at the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS '05) that was held at the Vienna University of Technology from 11-15 September 2005. All those contributed papers that were submitted to the Conference Proceedings will be published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The scientific aims of EUCAS '05 followed the tradition established at the preceding conferences in Göttingen, Edinburgh, Eindhoven, Sitges (Barcelona), Lyngby (Copenhagen) and finally Sorrento (Napoli). The focus was placed on the interplay between the most recent developments in superconductor research and the positioning of applications of superconductivity in the marketplace. Although initially founded as an exchange forum mainly for European scientists, it has gradually developed into a truly international meeting with significant attendance from the Far East and the United States. The Vienna conference attracted 813 participants in the scientific programme and 90 accompanying persons. 59% of all participants came from Europe, 31% from the Far East, 6% from the United States and Canada as well as 4% from other nations worldwide. 27 companies presented their latest developments in the field. 32 plenary and invited lectures highlighted the state-of-the-art in the areas of materials, large-scale as well as small-scale applications; 625 contributed papers (among them 556 posters) demonstrated the broad range of exciting activities in all research areas of our field. EUCAS '05 spread a lot of optimism and enthusiasm for this fascinating field of research and for its well established technological potential, especially among the numerous young researchers attending this conference. We are grateful to all those who participated in the meeting and contributed to its success.

  2. Geometrical optical illusionists.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical optical illusions were given this title by Oppel in 1855. Variants on such small distortions of visual space were illustrated thereafter, many of which bear the names of those who first described them. Some original forms of the geometrical optical illusions are shown together with 'perceptual portraits' of those who described them. These include: Roget, Chevreul, Fick, Zöllner, Poggendorff, Hering, Kundt, Delboeuf Mach, Helmholtz, Hermann, von Bezold, Müller-Lyer, Lipps, Thiéry, Wundt, Münsterberg, Ebbinghaus, Titchener, Ponzo, Luckiesh, Sander, Ehrenstein, Gregory, Heard, White, Shepard, and. Lingelbach. The illusions are grouped under the headings of orientation, size, the combination of size and orientation, and contrast. Early theories of illusions, before geometrical optical illusions were so named, are mentioned briefly.

  3. Inflation from geometrical tachyons

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Steven; Ward, John

    2005-10-15

    We propose an alternative formulation of tachyon inflation using the geometrical tachyon arising from the time dependent motion of a BPS D3-brane in the background geometry due to k parallel NS5-branes arranged around a ring of radius R. Because of the fact that the mass of this geometrical tachyon field is {radical}(2/k) times smaller than the corresponding open-string tachyon mass, we find that the slow-roll conditions for inflation and the number of e-foldings can be satisfied in a manner that is consistent with an effective 4-dimensional model and with a perturbative string coupling. We also show that the metric perturbations produced at the end of inflation can be sufficiently small and do not lead to the inconsistencies that plague the open-string tachyon models. Finally we argue for the existence of a minimum of the geometrical tachyon potential which could give rise to a traditional reheating mechanism.

  4. Geometrical optical illusionists.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical optical illusions were given this title by Oppel in 1855. Variants on such small distortions of visual space were illustrated thereafter, many of which bear the names of those who first described them. Some original forms of the geometrical optical illusions are shown together with 'perceptual portraits' of those who described them. These include: Roget, Chevreul, Fick, Zöllner, Poggendorff, Hering, Kundt, Delboeuf Mach, Helmholtz, Hermann, von Bezold, Müller-Lyer, Lipps, Thiéry, Wundt, Münsterberg, Ebbinghaus, Titchener, Ponzo, Luckiesh, Sander, Ehrenstein, Gregory, Heard, White, Shepard, and. Lingelbach. The illusions are grouped under the headings of orientation, size, the combination of size and orientation, and contrast. Early theories of illusions, before geometrical optical illusions were so named, are mentioned briefly. PMID:25507310

  5. Geometrical optical illusionists.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical optical illusions were given this title by Oppel in 1855. Variants on such small distortions of visual space were illustrated thereafter, many of which bear the names of those who first described them. Some original forms of the geometrical optical illusions are shown together with 'perceptual portraits' of those who described them. These include: Roget, Chevreul, Fick, Zöllner, Poggendorff, Hering, Kundt, Delboeuf Mach, Helmholtz, Hermann, von Bezold, Müller-Lyer, Lipps, Thiéry, Wundt, Münsterberg, Ebbinghaus, Titchener, Ponzo, Luckiesh, Sander, Ehrenstein, Gregory, Heard, White, Shepard, and. Lingelbach. The illusions are grouped under the headings of orientation, size, the combination of size and orientation, and contrast. Early theories of illusions, before geometrical optical illusions were so named, are mentioned briefly. PMID:25420326

  6. 7th U.S. / Japan Natural Resources (UJNR) Panel on Earthquake Research: Abstract Volume and Technical Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detweiler, Shane T.; Ellsworth, William L.

    2008-01-01

    making information public in a timely manner. The Panel visited sites along the east coast of Shikoku that were inundated by the tsunami caused by the 1946 Nankai earthquake where they heard from survivors of the disaster and saw new tsunami shelters and barriers. They also visited the Median Tectonic Line, a major onshore strike-slip fault on Shikoku. The 7th Joint Panel meeting was held in Seattle, Wash., U.S.A. from October 27-30, 2008.

  7. PREFACE: Geometrically frustrated magnetism Geometrically frustrated magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason S.

    2011-04-01

    Frustrated magnetism is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics that has grown tremendously over the past 20 years. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement in the field of geometrically frustrated magnets and is inspired by the 2010 Highly Frustrated Magnetism (HFM 2010) meeting in Baltimore, MD, USA. Geometric frustration is a broad phenomenon that results from an intrinsic incompatibility between some fundamental interactions and the underlying lattice geometry based on triangles and tetrahedra. Most studies have centred around the kagomé and pyrochlore based magnets but recent work has looked at other structures including the delafossite, langasites, hyper-kagomé, garnets and Laves phase materials to name a few. Personally, I hope this issue serves as a great reference to scientist both new and old to this field, and that we all continue to have fun in this very frustrated playground. Finally, I want to thank the HFM 2010 organizers and all the sponsors whose contributions were an essential part of the success of the meeting in Baltimore. Geometrically frustrated magnetism contents Spangolite: an s = 1/2 maple leaf lattice antiferromagnet? T Fennell, J O Piatek, R A Stephenson, G J Nilsen and H M Rønnow Two-dimensional magnetism and spin-size effect in the S = 1 triangular antiferromagnet NiGa2S4 Yusuke Nambu and Satoru Nakatsuji Short range ordering in the modified honeycomb lattice compound SrHo2O4 S Ghosh, H D Zhou, L Balicas, S Hill, J S Gardner, Y Qi and C R Wiebe Heavy fermion compounds on the geometrically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland lattice M S Kim and M C Aronson A neutron polarization analysis study of moment correlations in (Dy0.4Y0.6)T2 (T = Mn, Al) J R Stewart, J M Hillier, P Manuel and R Cywinski Elemental analysis and magnetism of hydronium jarosites—model kagome antiferromagnets and topological spin glasses A S Wills and W G Bisson The Herbertsmithite Hamiltonian: μSR measurements on single crystals

  8. Geometric Series via Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Infinite series is a challenging topic in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum for many students. In fact, there is a vast literature in mathematics education research on convergence issues. One of the most important types of infinite series is the geometric series. Their beauty lies in the fact that they can be evaluated explicitly and that…

  9. Geometric grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a highly automated hexahedral grid generator based on extensive geometrical and solid modeling operations developed in response to a vision of a designer-driven one day turnaround CFD process which implies a designer-driven one hour grid generation process.

  10. 1500 System Geometric Dictionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peloquin, Paul V.

    A general description is provided of the "geometric dictionary," a graphic display aid, used by the Computer-Assisted Instruction Laboratory at the Pennsylvania State University. The purpose of the description is to enable the reader to duplicate and use the dictionary on any cathode ray tube terminal of the IBM 1500 system. The major advantages…

  11. A Geometric Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Julie; Marshall, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Children possess a genuine curiosity for exploring the natural world around them. One third grade teacher capitalized on this inherent trait by leading her students on "A Geometric Scavenger Hunt." The four-lesson inquiry investigation described in this article integrates mathematics and science. Among the students' discoveries was the fact that…

  12. Pragmatic geometric model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of subsurface model reliability is mathematically and technically demanding as there are many different sources of uncertainty and some of the factors can be assessed merely in a subjective way. For many practical applications in industry or risk assessment (e. g. geothermal drilling) a quantitative estimation of possible geometric variations in depth unit is preferred over relative numbers because of cost calculations for different scenarios. The talk gives an overview of several factors that affect the geometry of structural subsurface models that are based upon typical geological survey organization (GSO) data like geological maps, borehole data and conceptually driven construction of subsurface elements (e. g. fault network). Within the context of the trans-European project "GeoMol" uncertainty analysis has to be very pragmatic also because of different data rights, data policies and modelling software between the project partners. In a case study a two-step evaluation methodology for geometric subsurface model uncertainty is being developed. In a first step several models of the same volume of interest have been calculated by omitting successively more and more input data types (seismic constraints, fault network, outcrop data). The positions of the various horizon surfaces are then compared. The procedure is equivalent to comparing data of various levels of detail and therefore structural complexity. This gives a measure of the structural significance of each data set in space and as a consequence areas of geometric complexity are identified. These areas are usually very data sensitive hence geometric variability in between individual data points in these areas is higher than in areas of low structural complexity. Instead of calculating a multitude of different models by varying some input data or parameters as it is done by Monte-Carlo-simulations, the aim of the second step of the evaluation procedure (which is part of the ongoing work) is to

  13. [First results of participation of the Czech Republic in the 7th Framework Programme, priority Health, in years 2007-2013].

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita

    2013-01-01

    European Commission has announced the first preliminary results of participation in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7), priority Health. The overview presents the basic statistics regarding the participation of the Czech teams, universities, institutions, and small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) in FP7 projects. The aim of the article is to present the basic data on the projects with the Czech participation, the EU financial contribution for Czech teams and the main research topics. PMID:24041023

  14. Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional Times. Conference Proceedings of the Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) (7th, Berlin, Germany, September 4-7, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Käpplinger, Bernd, Ed.; Lichte, Nina, Ed.; Haberzeth, Erik, Ed.; Kulmus, Claudia, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    This book assembles over 50 papers from the 7th Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA), which was held from the 4th to the 7th of September 2013 at Humboldt-University in Berlin. The title of the conference was "Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional…

  15. Metastatic lymph node ratio, 6th or 7th AJCC edition: witch is the best lymph node classification for esophageal cancer? Prognosis factor analysis in 487 patients

    PubMed Central

    CORAL, Roberto V.; BIGOLIN, André V.; CORAL, Roberto P.; HARTMANN, Antonio; DRANKA, Carolina; ROEHE, Adriana V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The esophageal cancer is one of the most common and aggressive worldwide. Recently, the AJCC changed the staging system, considering, among others, the important role of the lymph node metastasis on the prognosis. Aim To discuss the applicability of different forms of lymph node staging in a western surgical center. Methods Four hundred eighty seven patients with esophageal cancer were enrolled. Three staging systems were evaluated, the 6th and the 7th AJCC editions and the Lymph Node Metastatic Ratio. Results The majority of the cases were squamous cell carcinoma. The mean lymph node sample was eight. Considering the survival, there was no significant difference between the patients when they were classified by the 7th AJCC edition. Analysis of the Lymph Node Metastatic Ratio, just on the group of patients with 0 to 25%, has shown significant difference (p=0,01). The 6th AJCC edition shows the major significant difference between among the classifications evaluated. Conclusion In this specific population, the 7th AJCC edition for esophageal cancer was not able to find differences in survival when just the lymph node analysis was considered. PMID:26176242

  16. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2004: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2005-03-01

    With the ongoing miniaturization of devices and controlled nanostructuring of materials, the importance of atomic-scale information on surfaces and surface properties is growing continuously. The astonishing progress in nanoscience and nanotechnology that took place during the last two decades was in many ways related to recent progress in high-resolution imaging techniques such as scanning tunnelling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Since the mid-1990s, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) performed in ultrahigh vacuum has evolved as an alternative technique that achieves atomic resolution, but without the restriction to conducting surfaces of the previously established techniques. Advances of the rapidly developing field of NC-AFM are discussed at annual conferences as part of a series that started in 1998 in Osaka, Japan. This special issue of Nanotechnology is a compilation of original work presented at the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy that took place in Seattle, USA, 12-15 September 2004. Over the years, the conference grew in size and scope. Atomic resolution imaging of oxides and semiconductors remains an issue. Noticeable new developments have been presented in this regard such as, e.g., the demonstrated ability to manipulate individual atoms. Additionally, the investigation of individual molecules, clusters, and organic materials gains more and more attention. In this context, considerable effort is undertaken to transfer the NC-AFM principle based on frequency modulation to applications in air and liquids with the goal of enabling high-resolution surface studies of biological material in native environments, as well as to reduce the experimental complexity, which so far involves the availability of (costly) vacuum systems. Force spectroscopy methods continue to be improved and are applied to topics such as the imaging of the three-dimensional force field as a function of the distance with

  17. Selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-bio (BAMN2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Oh, Ilkwon

    2014-07-01

    The 7th International Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio was held on the magnificent and beautiful Jeju Island in Korea on 26-30 August 2013. In June 2007, the volcanic island and lava tube cave systems were designated as UNESCO World Natural Heritage Sites for their natural beauty and unique geographical values. The aim of the congress was to offer high-level lectures, extensive discussions and communications covering the state-of-the-art on biomimetics, artificial muscles, and nano-bio technologies providing an overview of their potential applications in the industrial, biomedical, scientific and robotic fields. This conference provided a necessary platform for an ongoing dialogue between researchers from different areas (chemistry, physics, biology, medicine, engineering, robotics, etc) within biomimetics, artificial muscle and nano-bio technologies. This special issue of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers that were presented at BAMN2013. Of the 400 or so papers and over 220 posters presented at this international congress, 15 papers were finally received, reviewed and accepted for this special issue, following the regular peer review procedures of the journal. The special issue covers polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites, and their applications. In particular, electromechanical performance and other characteristics of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) fabricated with various commercially available ion exchange membranes are discussed. Additionally, the control of free-edge interlaminar stresses in composite laminates using piezoelectric actuators is elaborated on. Further, the electrode effects of a cellulose-based electroactive paper energy harvester are described. Next, a flexible tactile-feedback touch screen using transparent ferroelectric polymer film vibrators is discussed. A broad coverage of bio-applications of IPMC transducers is

  18. Selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-bio (BAMN2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Oh, Ilkwon

    2014-07-01

    The 7th International Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio was held on the magnificent and beautiful Jeju Island in Korea on 26-30 August 2013. In June 2007, the volcanic island and lava tube cave systems were designated as UNESCO World Natural Heritage Sites for their natural beauty and unique geographical values. The aim of the congress was to offer high-level lectures, extensive discussions and communications covering the state-of-the-art on biomimetics, artificial muscles, and nano-bio technologies providing an overview of their potential applications in the industrial, biomedical, scientific and robotic fields. This conference provided a necessary platform for an ongoing dialogue between researchers from different areas (chemistry, physics, biology, medicine, engineering, robotics, etc) within biomimetics, artificial muscle and nano-bio technologies. This special issue of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers that were presented at BAMN2013. Of the 400 or so papers and over 220 posters presented at this international congress, 15 papers were finally received, reviewed and accepted for this special issue, following the regular peer review procedures of the journal. The special issue covers polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites, and their applications. In particular, electromechanical performance and other characteristics of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) fabricated with various commercially available ion exchange membranes are discussed. Additionally, the control of free-edge interlaminar stresses in composite laminates using piezoelectric actuators is elaborated on. Further, the electrode effects of a cellulose-based electroactive paper energy harvester are described. Next, a flexible tactile-feedback touch screen using transparent ferroelectric polymer film vibrators is discussed. A broad coverage of bio-applications of IPMC transducers is

  19. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  20. Geometrically representing spin correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ian G.; Mirasola, Anthony; Hollingsworth, Jacob; Mukherjee, Rick; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a general method to visualize spin correlations, and we demonstrate its usefulness in ultracold matter from fermions in lattices to trapped ions and ultracold molecules. Correlations are of fundamental interest in many-body physics: they characterize phases in condensed matter and AMO, and are required for quantum sensing and computing. However, it is often difficult to understand even the simplest correlations - for example between two spin-1/2's - directly from the components Cab = - for { a , b } ∈ { x , y , z } . Not only are the nine independent Cab unwieldy, but considering the components also obscures the natural geometric structure. For example, simple spin rotations lead to complex transformations among the nine Cab. We provide a one-to-one map between the spin correlations and certain three-dimensional objects, analogous to the map between single spins and Bloch vectors. This object makes the geometric structure of the correlations manifest. Moreover, much as one can reason geometrically about dynamics using a Bloch vector - e.g. a magnetic field causes it to precess and dephasing causes it to shrink - we show that analogous reasoning holds for our visualization method.

  1. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-07-16

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov-Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects.

  2. Representing geometrical knowledge.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J A

    1997-01-01

    This paper introduces perspex algebra which is being developed as a common representation of geometrical knowledge. A perspex can currently be interpreted in one of four ways. First, the algebraic perspex is a generalization of matrices, it provides the most general representation for all of the interpretations of a perspex. The algebraic perspex can be used to describe arbitrary sets of coordinates. The remaining three interpretations of the perspex are all related to square matrices and operate in a Euclidean model of projective space-time, called perspex space. Perspex space differs from the usual Euclidean model of projective space in that it contains the point at nullity. It is argued that the point at nullity is necessary for a consistent account of perspective in top-down vision. Second, the geometric perspex is a simplex in perspex space. It can be used as a primitive building block for shapes, or as a way of recording landmarks on shapes. Third, the transformational perspex describes linear transformations in perspex space that provide the affine and perspective transformations in space-time. It can be used to match a prototype shape to an image, even in so called 'accidental' views where the depth of an object disappears from view, or an object stays in the same place across time. Fourth, the parametric perspex describes the geometric and transformational perspexes in terms of parameters that are related to everyday English descriptions. The parametric perspex can be used to obtain both continuous and categorical perception of objects. The paper ends with a discussion of issues related to using a perspex to describe logic. PMID:9304680

  3. The geometric horopter.

    PubMed

    Howarth, P A

    2011-02-23

    Two aspects of the geometric horopter, which here is based on the criterion of equality of angle, are clarified. The first is that in the fixation plane (containing the nodal points and the fixation point) the locus of points lying on the horopter is the larger arc of a circle, and not a full circle as has been previously accepted. The second is that elsewhere, the locus of these points is a straight line perpendicular to this plane and midway between the eyes. These rules hold for both symmetric and asymmetric convergence, and for fixation elevated or depressed from the horizontal.

  4. Geometric phase in Bohmian mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2010-10-15

    Using the quantum kinematic approach of Mukunda and Simon, we propose a geometric phase in Bohmian mechanics. A reparametrization and gauge invariant geometric phase is derived along an arbitrary path in configuration space. The single valuedness of the wave function implies that the geometric phase along a path must be equal to an integer multiple of 2{pi}. The nonzero geometric phase indicates that we go through the branch cut of the action function from one Riemann sheet to another when we locally travel along the path. For stationary states, quantum vortices exhibiting the quantized circulation integral can be regarded as a manifestation of the geometric phase. The bound-state Aharonov-Bohm effect demonstrates that the geometric phase along a closed path contains not only the circulation integral term but also an additional term associated with the magnetic flux. In addition, it is shown that the geometric phase proposed previously from the ensemble theory is not gauge invariant.

  5. Geometric time delay interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2005-08-01

    The space-based gravitational-wave observatory LISA, a NASA-ESA mission to be launched after 2012, will achieve its optimal sensitivity using time delay interferometry (TDI), a LISA-specific technique needed to cancel the otherwise overwhelming laser noise in the interspacecraft phase measurements. The TDI observables of the Michelson and Sagnac types have been interpreted physically as the virtual measurements of a synthesized interferometer. In this paper, I present Geometric TDI, a new and intuitive approach to extend this interpretation to all TDI observables. Unlike the standard algebraic formalism, Geometric TDI provides a combinatorial algorithm to explore exhaustively the space of second-generation TDI observables (i.e., those that cancel laser noise in LISA-like interferometers with time-dependent arm lengths). Using this algorithm, I survey the space of second-generation TDI observables of length (i.e., number of component phase measurements) up to 24, and I identify alternative, improved forms of the standard second-generation TDI observables. The alternative forms have improved high-frequency gravitational-wave sensitivity in realistic noise conditions (because they have fewer nulls in the gravitational-wave and noise response functions), and are less susceptible to instrumental gaps and glitches (because their component phase measurements span shorter time periods).

  6. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 1, Sessions 1-5

    SciTech Connect

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F.

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 1, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Geometrical Destabilization of Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaux-Petel, Sébastien; Turzyński, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    We show the existence of a general mechanism by which heavy scalar fields can be destabilized during inflation, relying on the fact that the curvature of the field space manifold can dominate the stabilizing force from the potential and destabilize inflationary trajectories. We describe a simple and rather universal setup in which higher-order operators suppressed by a large energy scale trigger this instability. This phenomenon can prematurely end inflation, thereby leading to important observational consequences and sometimes excluding models that would otherwise perfectly fit the data. More generally, it modifies the interpretation of cosmological constraints in terms of fundamental physics. We also explain how the geometrical destabilization can lead to powerful selection criteria on the field space curvature of inflationary models.

  8. Geometrical aspects of entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Leinaas, Jon Magne; Myrheim, Jan; Ovrum, Eirik

    2006-07-15

    We study geometrical aspects of entanglement, with the Hilbert-Schmidt norm defining the metric on the set of density matrices. We focus first on the simplest case of two two-level systems and show that a 'relativistic' formulation leads to a complete analysis of the question of separability. Our approach is based on Schmidt decomposition of density matrices for a composite system and nonunitary transformations to a standard form. The positivity of the density matrices is crucial for the method to work. A similar approach works to some extent in higher dimensions, but is a less powerful tool. We further present a numerical method for examining separability and illustrate the method by a numerical study of bound entanglement in a composite system of two three-level systems.

  9. Geometrical pattern learning

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, P.W.

    1993-04-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of learning the positions of spheres in metric spaces, given as data randomly drawn points classified according to whether they are internal or external to an unknown sphere. The particular metrics under consideration are geometrical shape metrics, and the results are intended to be applicable to the problem of learning to identify a shape from related shapes classified according to whether they resemble it visually. While it is typically NP-hard to locate a central point for a hypothesis sphere, we find that it is however often possible to obtain a non-spherical hypothesis which can accurately predict whether further random points lie within the unknown sphere. We exhibit algorithms which achieve this, and in the process indicate useful general techniques for computational learning. Finally we exhibit a natural shape metric and show that it defines a class of spheres not predictable in this sense, subject to standard cryptographic assumptions.

  10. Geometric Frustration with Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Nayoon; Silevitch, Daniel M.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.

    2014-03-01

    We study the effects of Nd doping on the geometrically-frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet Gadolinium Gallium Garnet (GGG), using linear and nonlinear ac magnetic susceptibility. Doping levels from 0.1 to 1 percent Nd alleviate the intrinsic frustration of pure GGG and elevate the ordering temperature compared to the pure material. We use nonlinear pump-probe magnetic susceptometry to examine cluster dynamics for both the pure and the doped series. At low frequency (~10 Hz), spectral hole burning is possible, indicating the presence of spin clusters with discrete energy levels largely decoupled from the overall spin bath. At kHz, we find a Fano resonance, revealing scattering pathways between spin cluster excitations and the bath. We trace the evolution of this resonance behavior as a function of dopant concentration.

  11. Comparison of Values in 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Grade Primary Education Music Class Students'? Workbooks According to Rokeach?s and Akbas's Value Classifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakirer, H. Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the values in the songs of 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education music classes students? workbooks according to the value categorizations proposed by Rockeach and Akbas and which values among the categories mentioned are taught to the students in the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education…

  12. Geometrical method of decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, C.

    2012-12-01

    The computation of tunes and matched beam distributions are essential steps in the analysis of circular accelerators. If certain symmetries—like midplane symmetry—are present, then it is possible to treat the betatron motion in the horizontal, the vertical plane, and (under certain circumstances) the longitudinal motion separately using the well-known Courant-Snyder theory, or to apply transformations that have been described previously as, for instance, the method of Teng and Edwards. In a preceding paper, it has been shown that this method requires a modification for the treatment of isochronous cyclotrons with non-negligible space charge forces. Unfortunately, the modification was numerically not as stable as desired and it was still unclear, if the extension would work for all conceivable cases. Hence, a systematic derivation of a more general treatment seemed advisable. In a second paper, the author suggested the use of real Dirac matrices as basic tools for coupled linear optics and gave a straightforward recipe to decouple positive definite Hamiltonians with imaginary eigenvalues. In this article this method is generalized and simplified in order to formulate a straightforward method to decouple Hamiltonian matrices with eigenvalues on the real and the imaginary axis. The decoupling of symplectic matrices which are exponentials of such Hamiltonian matrices can be deduced from this in a few steps. It is shown that this algebraic decoupling is closely related to a geometric “decoupling” by the orthogonalization of the vectors E→, B→, and P→, which were introduced with the so-called “electromechanical equivalence.” A mathematical analysis of the problem can be traced down to the task of finding a structure-preserving block diagonalization of symplectic or Hamiltonian matrices. Structure preservation means in this context that the (sequence of) transformations must be symplectic and hence canonical. When used iteratively, the decoupling

  13. Geometric Effects on Electron Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L

    2007-07-06

    The development of an electron cloud in the vacuum chambers of high intensity positron and proton storage rings may limit the machine performances by inducing beam instabilities, beam emittance increase, beam loss, vacuum pressure increases and increased heat load on the vacuum chamber wall. The electron multipacting is a kind of geometric resonance phenomenon and thus is sensitive to the geometric parameters such as the aperture of the beam pipe, beam shape and beam bunch fill pattern, etc. This paper discusses the geometric effects on the electron cloud build-up in a beam chamber and examples are given for different beams and accelerators.

  14. Guitars, Violins, and Geometric Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita; Haehl, Martha

    2007-01-01

    This article describes middle school mathematics activities that relate measurement, ratios, and geometric sequences to finger positions or the placement of frets on stringed musical instruments. (Contains 2 figures and 2 tables.)

  15. Antenna with Dielectric Having Geometric Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A. (Inventor); Cravey, Robin L. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An antenna includes a ground plane, a dielectric disposed on the ground plane, and an electrically-conductive radiator disposed on the dielectric. The dielectric includes at least one layer of a first dielectric material and a second dielectric material that collectively define a dielectric geometric pattern, which may comprise a fractal geometry. The radiator defines a radiator geometric pattern, and the dielectric geometric pattern is geometrically identical, or substantially geometrically identical, to the radiator geometric pattern.

  16. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing. PMID:26154384

  17. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number— in an inertialess environment—is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the “belly phase,” peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing. PMID:26154384

  18. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing.

  19. Ninety-day oral toxicity studies on two genetically modified maize MON810 varieties in Wistar Han RCC rats (EU 7th Framework Programme project GRACE).

    PubMed

    Zeljenková, Dagmar; Ambrušová, Katarína; Bartušová, Mária; Kebis, Anton; Kovrižnych, Jevgenij; Krivošíková, Zora; Kuricová, Miroslava; Líšková, Aurélia; Rollerová, Eva; Spustová, Viera; Szabová, Elena; Tulinská, Jana; Wimmerová, Soňa; Levkut, Mikuláš; Révajová, Viera; Ševčíková, Zuzana; Schmidt, Kerstin; Schmidtke, Jörg; La Paz, Jose Luis; Corujo, Maria; Pla, Maria; Kleter, Gijs A; Kok, Esther J; Sharbati, Jutta; Hanisch, Carlos; Einspanier, Ralf; Adel-Patient, Karine; Wal, Jean-Michel; Spök, Armin; Pöting, Annette; Kohl, Christian; Wilhelm, Ralf; Schiemann, Joachim; Steinberg, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    The GMO Risk Assessment and Communication of Evidence (GRACE; www.grace-fp7.eu ) project is funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme. A key objective of GRACE is to conduct 90-day animal feeding trials, animal studies with an extended time frame as well as analytical, in vitro and in silico studies on genetically modified (GM) maize in order to comparatively evaluate their use in GM plant risk assessment. In the present study, the results of two 90-day feeding trials with two different GM maize MON810 varieties, their near-isogenic non-GM varieties and four additional conventional maize varieties are presented. The feeding trials were performed by taking into account the guidance for such studies published by the EFSA Scientific Committee in 2011 and the OECD Test Guideline 408. The results obtained show that the MON810 maize at a level of up to 33 % in the diet did not induce adverse effects in male and female Wistar Han RCC rats after subchronic exposure, independently of the two different genetic backgrounds of the event. PMID:25270621

  20. One-year oral toxicity study on a genetically modified maize MON810 variety in Wistar Han RCC rats (EU 7th Framework Programme project GRACE).

    PubMed

    Zeljenková, Dagmar; Aláčová, Radka; Ondrejková, Júlia; Ambrušová, Katarína; Bartušová, Mária; Kebis, Anton; Kovrižnych, Jevgenij; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena; Wimmerová, Soňa; Černák, Martin; Krivošíková, Zora; Kuricová, Miroslava; Líšková, Aurélia; Spustová, Viera; Tulinská, Jana; Levkut, Mikuláš; Révajová, Viera; Ševčíková, Zuzana; Schmidt, Kerstin; Schmidtke, Jörg; Schmidt, Paul; La Paz, Jose Luis; Corujo, Maria; Pla, Maria; Kleter, Gijs A; Kok, Esther J; Sharbati, Jutta; Bohmer, Marc; Bohmer, Nils; Einspanier, Ralf; Adel-Patient, Karine; Spök, Armin; Pöting, Annette; Kohl, Christian; Wilhelm, Ralf; Schiemann, Joachim; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The GRACE (GMO Risk Assessment and Communication of Evidence; www.grace-fp7.eu ) project was funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme. A key objective of GRACE was to conduct 90-day animal feeding trials, animal studies with an extended time frame as well as analytical, in vitro and in silico studies on genetically modified (GM) maize in order to comparatively evaluate their use in GM plant risk assessment. In the present study, the results of a 1-year feeding trial with a GM maize MON810 variety, its near-isogenic non-GM comparator and an additional conventional maize variety are presented. The feeding trials were performed by taking into account the guidance for such studies published by the EFSA Scientific Committee in 2011 and the OECD Test Guideline 452. The results obtained show that the MON810 maize at a level of up to 33 % in the diet did not induce adverse effects in male and female Wistar Han RCC rats after a chronic exposure.

  1. One-year oral toxicity study on a genetically modified maize MON810 variety in Wistar Han RCC rats (EU 7th Framework Programme project GRACE).

    PubMed

    Zeljenková, Dagmar; Aláčová, Radka; Ondrejková, Júlia; Ambrušová, Katarína; Bartušová, Mária; Kebis, Anton; Kovrižnych, Jevgenij; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena; Wimmerová, Soňa; Černák, Martin; Krivošíková, Zora; Kuricová, Miroslava; Líšková, Aurélia; Spustová, Viera; Tulinská, Jana; Levkut, Mikuláš; Révajová, Viera; Ševčíková, Zuzana; Schmidt, Kerstin; Schmidtke, Jörg; Schmidt, Paul; La Paz, Jose Luis; Corujo, Maria; Pla, Maria; Kleter, Gijs A; Kok, Esther J; Sharbati, Jutta; Bohmer, Marc; Bohmer, Nils; Einspanier, Ralf; Adel-Patient, Karine; Spök, Armin; Pöting, Annette; Kohl, Christian; Wilhelm, Ralf; Schiemann, Joachim; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The GRACE (GMO Risk Assessment and Communication of Evidence; www.grace-fp7.eu ) project was funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme. A key objective of GRACE was to conduct 90-day animal feeding trials, animal studies with an extended time frame as well as analytical, in vitro and in silico studies on genetically modified (GM) maize in order to comparatively evaluate their use in GM plant risk assessment. In the present study, the results of a 1-year feeding trial with a GM maize MON810 variety, its near-isogenic non-GM comparator and an additional conventional maize variety are presented. The feeding trials were performed by taking into account the guidance for such studies published by the EFSA Scientific Committee in 2011 and the OECD Test Guideline 452. The results obtained show that the MON810 maize at a level of up to 33 % in the diet did not induce adverse effects in male and female Wistar Han RCC rats after a chronic exposure. PMID:27439414

  2. Prognostic factors in advanced pharyngeal and oral cavity cancer; significance of multimodality imaging in terms of 7th edition of TNM

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As with most cancers the prognosis in pharyngeal and oral cavity cancer largely depends on tumour stage. Physical examination, including endoscopy should be combined with technical radiologic imaging to record the precise extent of tumour. The TNM staging system of the head and neck region is, in fact, an anatomic staging system that describes the anatomic extent of the primary tumour as well as the involvement of regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. Modifications in the TNM staging system should consider not only the expert opinions and published reports in the literature but the technical advances in technology for improved assessment of tumour extent and the shifting paradigms in therapeutic strategies. “T” stage of the tumour is defined by its size, the depth of the invasion and the involvement of vital structures. In the 7th edition of TNM classification, for stage T4 tumors (larger than 4 cm), subcategories a and b were introduced to indicate the involvement of vital structures and their suitability for surgical resection (except for nasopharynx cancer). Nodal metastasis is the most important predictor of outcome for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Better and more reliable methods of pretreatment tumour assessment are therefore crucial to ensure that the clinical assessment of tumor approximates its actual pathologic extent. CT and MRI are both useful for assessing extensions of pharyngeal- and oral cavity cancer in advanced stage. MRI is superior in visualizing most primary tumour sites. PMID:25608735

  3. Ninety-day oral toxicity studies on two genetically modified maize MON810 varieties in Wistar Han RCC rats (EU 7th Framework Programme project GRACE).

    PubMed

    Zeljenková, Dagmar; Ambrušová, Katarína; Bartušová, Mária; Kebis, Anton; Kovrižnych, Jevgenij; Krivošíková, Zora; Kuricová, Miroslava; Líšková, Aurélia; Rollerová, Eva; Spustová, Viera; Szabová, Elena; Tulinská, Jana; Wimmerová, Soňa; Levkut, Mikuláš; Révajová, Viera; Ševčíková, Zuzana; Schmidt, Kerstin; Schmidtke, Jörg; La Paz, Jose Luis; Corujo, Maria; Pla, Maria; Kleter, Gijs A; Kok, Esther J; Sharbati, Jutta; Hanisch, Carlos; Einspanier, Ralf; Adel-Patient, Karine; Wal, Jean-Michel; Spök, Armin; Pöting, Annette; Kohl, Christian; Wilhelm, Ralf; Schiemann, Joachim; Steinberg, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    The GMO Risk Assessment and Communication of Evidence (GRACE; www.grace-fp7.eu ) project is funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme. A key objective of GRACE is to conduct 90-day animal feeding trials, animal studies with an extended time frame as well as analytical, in vitro and in silico studies on genetically modified (GM) maize in order to comparatively evaluate their use in GM plant risk assessment. In the present study, the results of two 90-day feeding trials with two different GM maize MON810 varieties, their near-isogenic non-GM varieties and four additional conventional maize varieties are presented. The feeding trials were performed by taking into account the guidance for such studies published by the EFSA Scientific Committee in 2011 and the OECD Test Guideline 408. The results obtained show that the MON810 maize at a level of up to 33 % in the diet did not induce adverse effects in male and female Wistar Han RCC rats after subchronic exposure, independently of the two different genetic backgrounds of the event.

  4. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained with the material. Thus to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made form highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressability. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical prediction models are demonstrated. Although more costly than its predecessors, the present analysis is based on the detailed architecture developed by one of the authors and his colleagues and accounts for many of the geometric complexities that other analyses ignore.

  5. Guiding light via geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slussarenko, Sergei; Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Piccirillo, Bruno; Santamato, Enrico; Assanto, Gaetano; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    All known methods for transverse confinement and guidance of light rely on modification of the refractive index, that is, on the scalar properties of electromagnetic radiation. Here, we disclose the concept of a dielectric waveguide that exploits vectorial spin-orbit interactions of light and the resulting geometric phases. The approach relies on the use of anisotropic media with an optic axis that lies orthogonal to the propagation direction but is spatially modulated, so that the refractive index remains constant everywhere. A spin-controlled cumulative phase distortion is imposed on the beam, balancing diffraction for a specific polarization. As well as theoretical analysis, we present an experimental demonstration of the guidance using a series of discrete geometric-phase lenses made from liquid crystal. Our findings show that geometric phases may determine the optical guiding behaviour well beyond a Rayleigh length, paving the way to a new class of photonic devices. The concept is applicable to the whole electromagnetic spectrum.

  6. Geometric scalar theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Novello, M.; Bittencourt, E.; Goulart, E.; Salim, J.M.; Toniato, J.D.; Moschella, U. E-mail: eduhsb@cbpf.br E-mail: egoulart@cbpf.br E-mail: toniato@cbpf.br

    2013-06-01

    We present a geometric scalar theory of gravity. Our proposal will be described using the ''background field method'' introduced by Gupta, Feynman, Deser and others as a field theory formulation of general relativity. We analyze previous criticisms against scalar gravity and show how the present proposal avoids these difficulties. This concerns not only the theoretical complaints but also those related to observations. In particular, we show that the widespread belief of the conjecture that the source of scalar gravity must be the trace of the energy-momentum tensor — which is one of the main difficulties to couple gravity with electromagnetic phenomenon in previous models — does not apply to our geometric scalar theory. From the very beginning this is not a special relativistic scalar gravity. The adjective ''geometric'' pinpoints its similarity with general relativity: this is a metric theory of gravity. Some consequences of this new scalar theory are explored.

  7. Guiding light via geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slussarenko, Sergei; Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Piccirillo, Bruno; Santamato, Enrico; Assanto, Gaetano; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    All known methods for transverse confinement and guidance of light rely on modification of the refractive index, that is, on the scalar properties of electromagnetic radiation. Here, we disclose the concept of a dielectric waveguide that exploits vectorial spin–orbit interactions of light and the resulting geometric phases. The approach relies on the use of anisotropic media with an optic axis that lies orthogonal to the propagation direction but is spatially modulated, so that the refractive index remains constant everywhere. A spin-controlled cumulative phase distortion is imposed on the beam, balancing diffraction for a specific polarization. As well as theoretical analysis, we present an experimental demonstration of the guidance using a series of discrete geometric-phase lenses made from liquid crystal. Our findings show that geometric phases may determine the optical guiding behaviour well beyond a Rayleigh length, paving the way to a new class of photonic devices. The concept is applicable to the whole electromagnetic spectrum.

  8. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  9. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  10. Geometric validation plan for ASTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Akira; Matsumoto, Ken; Fujisada, Hiroyuki

    1998-12-01

    The ASTER system is a multispectral imager which covers a spectral range from visible to thermal infrared light by combining three subsystems composed of four telescopes. To ensure the high-quality data products concerning to the geolocation and band-to-band matching performance, the geometric registration is needed. This paper describes the geometric validation procedure for a multi-telescope imager with a cross-track pointing function. The strategy for the maintenance of database files and the preparation a GCP library is also shown.

  11. Teleportation of geometric structures in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Diederik; Czachor, Marek; Orłowski, Łukasz

    2009-04-01

    The simplest quantum teleportation algorithms can be represented in geometric terms in spaces of dimensions 3 (for real state vectors) and 4 (for complex state vectors). The geometric representation is based on geometric-algebra coding, a geometric alternative to the tensor-product coding typical of quantum mechanics. We discuss all the elementary ingredients of the geometric version of the algorithm: geometric analogs of states and controlled Pauli gates. A fully geometric presentation is possible if one employs a nonstandard representation of directed magnitudes, formulated in terms of colors defined via stereographic projection of a color wheel, and not by means of directed volumes.

  12. Biomedical Challenges Presented by the American Indian, Proceedings of the Special Session of the PAHO Advisory Committee on Medical Research (7th, Washington, D.C., June 25, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan American Health Organization, Washington, DC.

    At each meeting of the Pan American Health Organization Advisory Committee on Medical Research, a special 1-day session is held on a topic chosen by the committee as being of particular interest. At the 7th meeting, which convened in June of 1968 in Washington, D.C., the session surveyed the origin, present distribution, and principal biological…

  13. Immigration and Nationality Act (With Amendments and Notes on Related Laws). Committee Print for the Use of the Committee on the Judiciary House of Representatives, United States, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session. 7th Edition. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Garner J.

    This is the entire text of the 7th edition (revised September 1980) of the Immigration and Nationality Act with amendments and notes on related laws. The law covers immigration, nationality and naturalization, and refugee assistance. Appendices include information on related provisions of the law, processing of immigrants and nonimmigrants, and…

  14. Industrial Arts: "Youth's Gateway to the Future." Addresses and Proceedings of the 40th National and 7th International Conference of the American Industrial Arts Association (Atlanta, Georgia, February 27-March 3, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Kentucky Univ., Highland Heights.

    Included in this document are the addresses and proceedings of the 40th National and 7th International Annual Conference of the American Industrial Arts Association. The proceedings are organized by the following subject groups: career education, curriculum, drafting, electricity/electronics, elementary school industrial arts, energy, evaluation,…

  15. Vergence, Vision, and Geometric Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Michael P.

    1975-01-01

    Provides a definition of vergence in terms of the curvature of the wave fronts, and gives examples to illustrate the advantages of this approach. The vergence treatment of geometrical optics provides both conceptual and algebraic advantages, particularly for the life science student, over the traditional object distance-image distance-focal length…

  16. Geometric quantum noise of spin.

    PubMed

    Shnirman, Alexander; Gefen, Yuval; Saha, Arijit; Burmistrov, Igor S; Kiselev, Mikhail N; Altland, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    The presence of geometric phases is known to affect the dynamics of the systems involved. Here, we consider a quantum degree of freedom, moving in a dissipative environment, whose dynamics is described by a Langevin equation with quantum noise. We show that geometric phases enter the stochastic noise terms. Specifically, we consider small ferromagnetic particles (nanomagnets) or quantum dots close to Stoner instability, and investigate the dynamics of the total magnetization in the presence of tunneling coupling to the metallic leads. We generalize the Ambegaokar-Eckern-Schön effective action and the corresponding semiclassical equations of motion from the U(1) case of the charge degree of freedom to the SU(2) case of the magnetization. The Langevin forces (torques) in these equations are strongly influenced by the geometric phase. As a first but nontrivial application, we predict low temperature quantum diffusion of the magnetization on the Bloch sphere, which is governed by the geometric phase. We propose a protocol for experimental observation of this phenomenon.

  17. Celestial mechanics with geometric algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.

    1983-01-01

    Geometric algebra is introduced as a general tool for Celestial Mechanics. A general method for handling finite rotations and rotational kinematics is presented. The constants of Kepler motion are derived and manipulated in a new way. A new spinor formulation of perturbation theory is developed.

  18. The geometric oblateness of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, F. A.; Avis, C. C.; Colombo, G.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers photographs of Uranus obtained by the Stratoscope II balloon-borne telescope in 1970. These data have been redigitized and reanalyzed, and the geometric oblateness of Uranus was determined from the isophotes near the limb using an expression in terms of the equatorial and polar radii.

  19. Platonic Symmetry and Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsombor-Murray, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Cubic symmetry is used to build the other four Platonic solids and some formalism from classical geometry is introduced. Initially, the approach is via geometric construction, e.g., the "golden ratio" is necessary to construct an icosahedron with pentagonal faces. Then conventional elementary vector algebra is used to extract quantitative…

  20. Geometric hashing and object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, Peter F.; Huber, Birkett

    1999-09-01

    We discuss a new geometric hashing method for searching large databases of 2D images (or 3D objects) to match a query built from geometric information presented by a single 3D object (or single 2D image). The goal is to rapidly determine a small subset of the images that potentially contain a view of the given object (or a small set of objects that potentially match the item in the image). Since this must be accomplished independent of the pose of the object, the objects and images, which are characterized by configurations of geometric features such as points, lines and/or conics, must be treated using a viewpoint invariant formulation. We are therefore forced to characterize these configurations in terms of their 3D and 2D geometric invariants. The crucial relationship between the 3D geometry and its 'residual' in 2D is expressible as a correspondence (in the sense of algebraic geometry). Computing a set of generating equations for the ideal of this correspondence gives a complete characterization of the view of independent relationships between an object and all of its possible images. Once a set of generators is in hand, it can be used to devise efficient recognition algorithms and to give an efficient geometric hashing scheme. This requires exploiting the form and symmetry of the equations. The result is a multidimensional access scheme whose efficiency we examine. Several potential directions for improving this scheme are also discussed. Finally, in a brief appendix, we discuss an alternative approach to invariants for generalized perspective that replaces the standard invariants by a subvariety of a Grassmannian. The advantage of this is that one can circumvent many annoying general position assumptions and arrive at invariant equations (in the Plucker coordinates) that are more numerically robust in applications.

  1. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained within the material. Thus, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made from highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressibility. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical property predictions models are demonstrated.

  2. The verdict geometric quality library.

    SciTech Connect

    Knupp, Patrick Michael; Ernst, C.D. (Elemental Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT); Thompson, David C.; Stimpson, C.J.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Verdict is a collection of subroutines for evaluating the geometric qualities of triangles, quadrilaterals, tetrahedra, and hexahedra using a variety of metrics. A metric is a real number assigned to one of these shapes depending on its particular vertex coordinates. These metrics are used to evaluate the input to finite element, finite volume, boundary element, and other types of solvers that approximate the solution to partial differential equations defined over regions of space. The geometric qualities of these regions is usually strongly tied to the accuracy these solvers are able to obtain in their approximations. The subroutines are written in C++ and have a simple C interface. Each metric may be evaluated individually or in combination. When multiple metrics are evaluated at once, they share common calculations to lower the cost of the evaluation.

  3. Polar metals by geometric design.

    PubMed

    Kim, T H; Puggioni, D; Yuan, Y; Xie, L; Zhou, H; Campbell, N; Ryan, P J; Choi, Y; Kim, J-W; Patzner, J R; Ryu, S; Podkaminer, J P; Irwin, J; Ma, Y; Fennie, C J; Rzchowski, M S; Pan, X Q; Gopalan, V; Rondinelli, J M; Eom, C B

    2016-05-01

    Gauss's law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals--it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedral--the structural signatures of perovskites--owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties. PMID:27096369

  4. Polar metals by geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. H.; Puggioni, D.; Yuan, Y.; Xie, L.; Zhou, H.; Campbell, N.; Ryan, P. J.; Choi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Patzner, J. R.; Ryu, S.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Irwin, J.; Ma, Y.; Fennie, C. J.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Pan, X. Q.; Gopalan, V.; Rondinelli, J. M.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Gauss’s law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals—it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedra—the structural signatures of perovskites—owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.

  5. Polar metals by geometric design.

    PubMed

    Kim, T H; Puggioni, D; Yuan, Y; Xie, L; Zhou, H; Campbell, N; Ryan, P J; Choi, Y; Kim, J-W; Patzner, J R; Ryu, S; Podkaminer, J P; Irwin, J; Ma, Y; Fennie, C J; Rzchowski, M S; Pan, X Q; Gopalan, V; Rondinelli, J M; Eom, C B

    2016-05-01

    Gauss's law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals--it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedral--the structural signatures of perovskites--owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.

  6. Geometric mean for subspace selection.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Wu, Xindong; Maybank, Stephen J

    2009-02-01

    Subspace selection approaches are powerful tools in pattern classification and data visualization. One of the most important subspace approaches is the linear dimensionality reduction step in the Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA), which has been successfully employed in many fields such as biometrics, bioinformatics, and multimedia information management. However, the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA has a critical drawback: for a classification task with c classes, if the dimension of the projected subspace is strictly lower than c - 1, the projection to a subspace tends to merge those classes, which are close together in the original feature space. If separate classes are sampled from Gaussian distributions, all with identical covariance matrices, then the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA maximizes the mean value of the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergences between different classes. Based on this viewpoint, the geometric mean for subspace selection is studied in this paper. Three criteria are analyzed: 1) maximization of the geometric mean of the KL divergences, 2) maximization of the geometric mean of the normalized KL divergences, and 3) the combination of 1 and 2. Preliminary experimental results based on synthetic data, UCI Machine Learning Repository, and handwriting digits show that the third criterion is a potential discriminative subspace selection method, which significantly reduces the class separation problem in comparing with the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA and its several representative extensions. PMID:19110492

  7. Geometric mean for subspace selection.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Wu, Xindong; Maybank, Stephen J

    2009-02-01

    Subspace selection approaches are powerful tools in pattern classification and data visualization. One of the most important subspace approaches is the linear dimensionality reduction step in the Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA), which has been successfully employed in many fields such as biometrics, bioinformatics, and multimedia information management. However, the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA has a critical drawback: for a classification task with c classes, if the dimension of the projected subspace is strictly lower than c - 1, the projection to a subspace tends to merge those classes, which are close together in the original feature space. If separate classes are sampled from Gaussian distributions, all with identical covariance matrices, then the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA maximizes the mean value of the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergences between different classes. Based on this viewpoint, the geometric mean for subspace selection is studied in this paper. Three criteria are analyzed: 1) maximization of the geometric mean of the KL divergences, 2) maximization of the geometric mean of the normalized KL divergences, and 3) the combination of 1 and 2. Preliminary experimental results based on synthetic data, UCI Machine Learning Repository, and handwriting digits show that the third criterion is a potential discriminative subspace selection method, which significantly reduces the class separation problem in comparing with the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA and its several representative extensions.

  8. A Multi-Layer Phoswich Radioxenon Detection System (7th Qtr Report), Reporting Period 10/01/07 - 12/31/07

    SciTech Connect

    David M. Hamby

    2008-01-29

    Description of activities conducted this report period: (1) Electronics Development--To improve the overall performance of the two-channel digital pulse processor (DPP2), the PCB has been redesigned and the new printed board is now under assembly. The system is enhanced with two new fast ADCs from Analog Devices (AD9230-250), each with a sampling rate of 250 MHz and a resolution of 12 bits. The data bus uses a high performance Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) standard. The offset and gain of each channel are separately controlled digitally by the GUI software. (2) GUI Software Development--A GUI is being developed using the Python programming language. All functions from the preceding MATLAB code have been re-implemented including basic waveform readout, pulse shape discrimination, and plotting of energy spectra. In addition, the GUI can be used to control sampling runs based on the number of pulses captured, either in real or live time. Calibration coefficients and pulse shape discrimination boundaries can be changed on the fly so that the detector may be characterized experimentally. Plots generated by the GUI can be exported as graphic data. At present, the software has only been tested using one channel, pending availability of the new DPP board (DPP2). However, the functions have been written to allow easy expansion to two channels. (3) Light Collection Modeling--The XEPHWICH design has been modeled to determine its light capture efficiency. Research in the 7th quarter includes additional simulations representing significant increase in data resolution, well over an order of magnitude greater than previous simulations. The final data set represents approximately 11 billion visible photons divided equally among 110 thousand data points. A laboratory experiment is being designed and executed to experimentally determine light capture efficiency as a function of position within the scintillators. (4) Radioxenon Fission Source--We have designed and

  9. Geometrical Visualisation--Epistemic and Emotional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodd, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    A well-documented experience of students of elementary Euclidean geometry is "seeing" a geometric result and being sure about its truth; this sort of experience gives rise to the notion of geometrical visualisation that is developed here. In this essay a philosophical argument for the epistemic potential of geometrical visualisation is reviewed,…

  10. Development of a Geometric Spatial Visualization Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganesh, Bibi; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Sherrod, Sonya

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents the development of the Geometric Spatial Assessment. We detail the development of this instrument which was designed to identify middle school students' strategies and advancement in understanding of four geometric concept domains (geometric spatial visualization, spatial projection, cardinal directions, and periodic patterns)…

  11. SQCD Vacua and Geometrical Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Wetenhall, Ben

    2008-11-23

    We consider the geometrical engineering constructions for the N = 1 SQCD vacua. After one T-duality, these geometries with wrapped D5 branes become N = 1 brane configurations with NS-branes and D4-branes. After performing a flop, the geometries contain branes, antibranes and branes wrapped on non-holomorphic cycles. The various tachyon condensations between pairs of wrapped D5 branes and anti-D5 branes together with deformations of the cycles give rise to a variety of supersymmetric and metastable non-supersymmetric vacua.

  12. Moving walls and geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchi, Paolo; Garnero, Giancarlo; Marmo, Giuseppe; Samuel, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We unveil the existence of a non-trivial Berry phase associated to the dynamics of a quantum particle in a one dimensional box with moving walls. It is shown that a suitable choice of boundary conditions has to be made in order to preserve unitarity. For these boundary conditions we compute explicitly the geometric phase two-form on the parameter space. The unboundedness of the Hamiltonian describing the system leads to a natural prescription of renormalization for divergent contributions arising from the boundary.

  13. EDITORIAL: The 7th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebling, C.; Woias, P.

    2008-10-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM) contains a selection of papers from the 7th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion (PowerMEMS 2007). The workshop was held in Freiburg, Germany on 27-29 November 2007 under the joint organization of the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (FhG-ISE), Freiburg and the Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK) of the Albert-Ludwig-University of Freiburg. PowerMEMS 2007 continues a series of workshops initiated in 2000 in Japan to create an annual discussion forum in the emerging field of micro energy technology. With a single exception in 2001, the workshop has continued as an annual meeting ever since, with a continuous increase in the number of presentations and participants. The program of PowerMEMS 2007 was composed of 2 invited talks, 25 oral talks and 61 poster presentations. From these 88 presentations 16 have been selected for this special issue. It was at the end of 1959 when the Caltech physicist Richard Feynman gave his famous lecture entitled 'There Is Plenty of Room at the Bottom' in which he discussed the possibilities of miniaturization for both storage capacity ('Encyclopaedia Britannica on the head of a pin') as well as micro machining ('rearranging the atoms'), although there were absolutely no technological possibilities in sight for an adequate realization of such ideas. Now, nearly 50 years later, we not only have incredible knowledge about the nanoworld, but even more we are now able to generate microelectromechanical devices which, next to their electronic properties, can integrate physical and analytical functions. Today, Feynman might easily have added a second lecture entitled 'There is Plenty of Energy at the Bottom'. Micro energy technology has seen a tremendous rise in MEMS and material sciences and is regarded today as one of their hot topics. Also, there are more and more companies in this

  14. Measurement error in geometric morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Fruciano, Carmelo

    2016-06-01

    Geometric morphometrics-a set of methods for the statistical analysis of shape once saluted as a revolutionary advancement in the analysis of morphology -is now mature and routinely used in ecology and evolution. However, a factor often disregarded in empirical studies is the presence and the extent of measurement error. This is potentially a very serious issue because random measurement error can inflate the amount of variance and, since many statistical analyses are based on the amount of "explained" relative to "residual" variance, can result in loss of statistical power. On the other hand, systematic bias can affect statistical analyses by biasing the results (i.e. variation due to bias is incorporated in the analysis and treated as biologically-meaningful variation). Here, I briefly review common sources of error in geometric morphometrics. I then review the most commonly used methods to measure and account for both random and non-random measurement error, providing a worked example using a real dataset.

  15. NPP VIIRS Geometric Performance Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Wolfe, Robert E.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on-board the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite is scheduled for launch in October, 2011. It is to provide satellite measured radiance/reflectance data for both weather and climate applications. Along with radiometric calibration, geometric characterization and calibration of Sensor Data Records (SDRs) are crucial to the VIIRS Environmental Data Record (EDR) algorithms and products which are used in numerical weather prediction (NWP). The instrument geometric performance includes: 1) sensor (detector) spatial response, parameterized by the dynamic field of view (DFOV) in the scan direction and instantaneous FOV (IFOV) in the track direction, modulation transfer function (MTF) for the 17 moderate resolution bands (M-bands), and horizontal spatial resolution (HSR) for the five imagery bands (I-bands); 2) matrices of band-to-band co-registration (BBR) from the corresponding detectors in all band pairs; and 3) pointing knowledge and stability characteristics that includes scan plane tilt, scan rate and scan start position variations, and thermally induced variations in pointing with respect to orbital position. They have been calibrated and characterized through ground testing under ambient and thermal vacuum conditions, numerical modeling and analysis. This paper summarizes the results, which are in general compliance with specifications, along with anomaly investigations, and describes paths forward for characterizing on-orbit BBR and spatial response, and for improving instrument on-orbit performance in pointing and geolocation.

  16. Geometric pumping in autophoretic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelin, Sebastien; Montenegro Johnson, Thomas; de Canio, Gabriele; Lobatto-Dauzier, Nicolas; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Pumping at the microscale has important applications from biological fluid handling to lab-on-a-chip systems. It can be achieved either from a global (e.g. imposed pressure gradient) or local forcing (e.g. ciliary pumping). Phoretic slip flows generated from concentration or temperature gradients are examples of such local flow forcing. Autophoresis is currently receiving much attention for the design of self-propelled particles achieving force- and torque-free locomotion by combining two essential surface properties: (i) an activity that modifies the solute content of the particle's environment (e.g. catalytic reaction or solute release), and (ii) a mobility that generates a slip flow from the resulting local concentration gradients. Recent work showed that geometric asymmetry is sufficient for a chemically-homogeneous particle to self-propel. Here we extend this idea to micro-pumping in active channels whose walls possess both chemical activity and phoretic mobility. Using a combination of theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, we show that geometrically-asymmetric but chemically-homogeneous channels can generate pumping and analyze the resulting flow patterns.

  17. Geometrical deployment for braided stent.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, Pierre; Brina, Olivier; Ouared, Rafik; Yilmaz, Hasan; Farhat, Mohamed; Erceg, Gorislav; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Kulcsar, Zsolt; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2016-05-01

    The prediction of flow diverter stent (FDS) implantation for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is being increasingly required for hemodynamic simulations and procedural planning. In this paper, a deployment model was developed based on geometrical properties of braided stents. The proposed mathematical description is first applied on idealized toroidal vessels demonstrating the stent shortening in curved vessels. It is subsequently generalized to patient specific vasculature predicting the position of the filaments along with the length and local porosity of the stent. In parallel, in-vitro and in-vivo FDS deployments were measured by contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (CBCT) in idealized and patient-specific geometries. These measurements showed a very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the virtual deployments and provided experimental validations of the underlying geometrical assumptions. In particular, they highlighted the importance of the stent radius assessment in the accuracy of the deployment prediction. Thanks to its low computational cost, the proposed model is potentially implementable in clinical practice providing critical information for patient safety and treatment outcome assessment. PMID:26891065

  18. Geometric frustration on a 1/9th site depleted triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, John; Beck, Jarrett

    2013-03-01

    In the searches both for new spin liquid and spin ice (artificial and macroscopic) candidates, geometrically frustrated two-dimensional spin systems have played a prominent role. Here we present a study of the classical antiferromagnetic Ising (AFI) model on the sorrel net, a 1/9th site depleted and 1/7th bond depleted triangular lattice. The AFI model on this corner-shared triangle net is found to have a large residual entropy per spin S/N = 0 . 48185 +/- 0 . 00008 , indicating the sorrel net is highly geometrically frustrated. Anticipating that it may be difficult to achieve perfect bond depletion, we investigate the physics resulting from turning back on the depleted bonds (J2). We present the phase diagram, analytic expressions for the long range partially ordered ground state spin structure for antiferromagnetic J2 and the short range ordered ground state spin structure for ferromagnetic J2, the magnetic susceptibility and the static structure factor. We briefly comment on the possibility that artificial spin ice on the sorrel lattice could by made, and on a recent report [T. D. Keene et al., Dalton Trans. 40 2983 (2011)] of the creation of a 1/9th depleted cobalt hydroxide oxalate. This work was supported by NSERC (JMH) and NSERC USRA (JJB)

  19. Geometric optimization of thermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebrahim, Asad Mansour

    2000-10-01

    The work in chapter 1 extends to three dimensions and to convective heat transfer the constructal method of minimizing the thermal resistance between a volume and one point. In the first part, the heat flow mechanism is conduction, and the heat generating volume is occupied by low conductivity material (k 0) and high conductivity inserts (kp) that are shaped as constant-thickness disks mounted on a common stem of kp material. In the second part the interstitial spaces once occupied by k0 material are bathed by forced convection. The internal and external geometric aspect ratios of the elemental volume and the first assembly are optimized numerically subject to volume constraints. Chapter 2 presents the constrained thermodynamic optimization of a cross-flow heat exchanger with ram air on the cold side, which is used in the environmental control systems of aircraft. Optimized geometric features such as the ratio of channel spacings and flow lengths are reported. It is found that the optimized features are relatively insensitive to changes in other physical parameters of the installation and relatively insensitive to the additional irreversibility due to discharging the ram-air stream into the atmosphere, emphasizing the robustness of the thermodynamic optimum. In chapter 3 the problem of maximizing exergy extraction from a hot stream by distributing streams over a heat transfer surface is studied. In the first part, the cold stream is compressed in an isothermal compressor, expanded in an adiabatic turbine, and discharged into the ambient. In the second part, the cold stream is compressed in an adiabatic compressor. Both designs are optimized with respect to the capacity-rate imbalance of the counter-flow and the pressure ratio maintained by the compressor. This study shows the tradeoff between simplicity and increased performance, and outlines the path for further conceptual work on the extraction of exergy from a hot stream that is being cooled gradually. The aim

  20. Elastic scattering in geometrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plebaniak, Zbigniew; Wibig, Tadeusz

    2016-10-01

    The experimental data on proton-proton elastic and inelastic scattering emerging from the measurements at the Large Hadron Collider, calls for an efficient model to fit the data. We have examined the optical, geometrical picture and we have found the simplest, linear dependence of this model parameters on the logarithm of the interaction energy with the significant change of the respective slopes at one point corresponding to the energy of about 300 GeV. The logarithmic dependence observed at high energies allows one to extrapolate the proton-proton elastic, total (and inelastic) cross sections to ultra high energies seen in cosmic rays events which makes a solid justification of the extrapolation to very high energy domain of cosmic rays and could help us to interpret the data from an astrophysical and a high energy physics point of view.

  1. Geometrical setting of solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Fiala, Zdenek

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Solid mechanics within the Riemannian symmetric manifold GL (3, R)/O (3, R). > Generalized logarithmic strain. > Consistent linearization. > Incremental principle of virtual power. > Time-discrete approximation. - Abstract: The starting point in the geometrical setting of solid mechanics is to represent deformation process of a solid body as a trajectory in a convenient space with Riemannian geometry, and then to use the corresponding tools for its analysis. Based on virtual power of internal stresses, we show that such a configuration space is the (globally) symmetric space of symmetric positive-definite real matrices. From this unifying point of view, we shall analyse the logarithmic strain, the stress rate, as well as linearization and intrinsic integration of corresponding evolution equation.

  2. Geometrical characteristics of uniportal VATS

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Gaetano; Viti, Andrea; Terzi, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In terms of accuracy and efficacy Uniportal Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) resections are comparable to standard VATS. In standard three-ports VATS, the geometric configuration of a parallelogram generates interference with the optical source, creating a plane with a torsion angle not favorable on the flat two-dimensional vision of currently available monitors. The potential advantages of single-port VATS approach include not only the one intercostal space incision (reduction of postoperative pain) but also a translational approach of VATS instruments along a sagittal plane. Accordingly, the Uniportal approach enables VATS instruments to draw two parallel lines on the plane, bringing them to approach the target lesion from a caudo-cranial perspective thus achieving a projective plane. As a consequence, taking advantage of the unique spatial features specific to uniportal VATS, the surgeon is enabled to bring the operative fulcrum inside the chest to address the target lesion in a fashion similar to open surgery. PMID:24040527

  3. PREFACE PASREG: The 7th International Workshop on the Processing and Applications of Superconducting (RE)BCO Large Grain Materials (Washington DC, 29-31 July 2010) PASREG: The 7th International Workshop on the Processing and Applications of Superconducting (RE)BCO Large Grain Materials (Washington DC, 29-31 July 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freyhardt, Herbert; Cardwell, David; Strasik, Mike

    2010-12-01

    Large grain, (RE)BCO bulk superconductors fabricated by top seeded melt growth (TSMG) are able to generate large magnetic fields compared to conventional, iron-based permanent magnets. Following 20 years of development, these materials are now beginning to realize their considerable potential for a variety of engineering applications such as magnetic separators, flywheel energy storage and magnetic bearings. MgB2 has also continued to emerge as a potentially important bulk superconducting material for engineering applications below 20 K due to its lack of granularity and the ease with which complex shapes of this material can be fabricated. This issue of Superconductor Science and Technology contains a selection of papers presented at the 7th International Workshop on the Processing and Applications of Superconducting (RE)BCO Large Grain Materials, including MgB2, held 29th-31sy July 2010 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington DC, USA, to report progress made in this field in the previous three year period. The workshop followed those held previously in Cambridge, UK (1997), Morioka, Japan (1999), Seattle, USA (2001), Jena, Germany (2003), Tokyo, Japan (2005) and again in Cambridge, UK (2007). The scope of the seventh PASREG workshop was extended to include processing and characterization aspects of the broader spectrum of bulk high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, including melt-cast Bi-HTS and bulk MgB2, recent developments in the field and innovative applications of bulk HTS. A total of 38 papers were presented at this workshop, of which 30 were presented in oral form and 8 were presented as posters. The organizers wish to acknowledge the efforts of Sue Butler of the University of Houston for her local organization of the workshop. The eighth PASREG workshop will be held in Taiwan in the summer of 2012.

  4. Geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chong; Sun, Xiaowei; Wang, Youde

    2013-12-15

    It is well-known that the LIE (Locally Induction Equation) admit soliton-type solutions and same soliton solutions arise from different and apparently irrelevant physical models. By comparing the solitons of LIE and Killing magnetic geodesics, we observe that these solitons are essentially decided by two families of isometries of the domain and the target space, respectively. With this insight, we propose the new concept of geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds, such as geometric Schrödinger flows and KdV flows for maps. Moreover, we give several examples of geometric solitons of the Schrödinger flow and geometric KdV flow, including magnetic curves as geometric Schrödinger solitons and explicit geometric KdV solitons on surfaces of revolution.

  5. Splitting homomorphisms and the Geometrization Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Robert

    2000-09-01

    This paper gives an algebraic conjecture which is shown to be equivalent to Thurston's Geometrization Conjecture for closed, orientable 3-manifolds. It generalizes the Stallings-Jaco theorem which established a similar result for the Poincaré Conjecture. The paper also gives two other algebraic conjectures; one is equivalent to the finite fundamental group case of the Geometrization Conjecture and the other is equivalent to the union of the Geometrization Conjecture and Thurston's Virtual Bundle Conjecture.

  6. Geometric Mathematical Framework for Multibody System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terze, Zdravko; Vrdoljak, Milan; Zlatar, Dario

    2010-09-01

    The paper surveys geometric mathematical framework for computational modeling of multibody system dynamics. Starting with the configuration space of rigid body motion and analysis of it's Lie group structure, the elements of respective Lie algebra are addressed and basic relations pertinent to geometrical formulations of multibody system dynamics are surveyed. Dynamical model of multibody system on manifold introduced, along with the outline of geometric characteristics of holonomic and non-holonomic kinematical constraints.

  7. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, data analysis, Videos S

  8. Geometric Quantization and Foliation Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skerritt, Paul

    A standard question in the study of geometric quantization is whether symplectic reduction interacts nicely with the quantized theory, and in particular whether "quantization commutes with reduction." Guillemin and Sternberg first proposed this question, and answered it in the affirmative for the case of a free action of a compact Lie group on a compact Kahler manifold. Subsequent work has focused mainly on extending their proof to non-free actions and non-Kahler manifolds. For realistic physical examples, however, it is desirable to have a proof which also applies to non-compact symplectic manifolds. In this thesis we give a proof of the quantization-reduction problem for general symplectic manifolds. This is accomplished by working in a particular wavefunction representation, associated with a polarization that is in some sense compatible with reduction. While the polarized sections described by Guillemin and Sternberg are nonzero on a dense subset of the Kahler manifold, the ones considered here are distributional, having support only on regions of the phase space associated with certain quantized, or "admissible", values of momentum. We first propose a reduction procedure for the prequantum geometric structures that "covers" symplectic reduction, and demonstrate how both symplectic and prequantum reduction can be viewed as examples of foliation reduction. Consistency of prequantum reduction imposes the above-mentioned admissibility conditions on the quantized momenta, which can be seen as analogues of the Bohr-Wilson-Sommerfeld conditions for completely integrable systems. We then describe our reduction-compatible polarization, and demonstrate a one-to-one correspondence between polarized sections on the unreduced and reduced spaces. Finally, we describe a factorization of the reduced prequantum bundle, suggested by the structure of the underlying reduced symplectic manifold. This in turn induces a factorization of the space of polarized sections that agrees

  9. The Hospital Microbiome Project: Meeting Report for the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project Workshop on sampling design and building science measurements, Chicago, USA, June 7th-8th 2012

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel; Alverdy, John; An, Gary; Coleman, Maureen; Garcia-Houchins, Sylvia; Green, Jessica; Keegan, Kevin; Kelley, Scott T.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Kociolek, Larry; Levin, Hal; Landon, Emily; Olsiewski, Paula; Knight, Rob; Siegel, Jeffrey; Weber, Stephen; Gilbert, Jack

    2013-01-01

    This report details the outcome of the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project workshop held on June 7th-8th, 2012 at the University of Chicago, USA. The workshop was arranged to determine the most appropriate sampling strategy and approach to building science measurement to characterize the development of a microbial community within a new hospital pavilion being built at the University of Chicago Medical Center. The workshop made several recommendations and led to the development of a full proposal to the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as well as to the creation of the Hospital Microbiome Consortium. PMID:23961316

  10. Geometric precipices in string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Watson, Scott

    2008-03-15

    We consider the effects of graviton multiplet fields on transitions between string gas phases. Focusing on the dilaton field, we show that it may obstruct transitions between different thermodynamic phases of the string gas, because the sign of its dimensionally reduced, T-duality invariant, part is conserved when the energy density of the Universe is positive. Thus, many interesting solutions for which this sign is positive end up in a future curvature singularity. Because of this, some of the thermodynamic phases of the usual gravitating string gases behave like superselection sectors. For example, a past-regular Hagedorn phase and an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) phase dominated by string momentum modes cannot be smoothly connected in the framework of string cosmology with positive sources. The singularity separates them like a geometric precipice in the moduli space, preventing the dynamics of the theory from bridging across. Sources which simultaneously violate the positivity of energy and null energy condition (NEC) could modify these conclusions. We provide a quantitative measure of positivity of energy and NEC violations that would be necessary for such transitions. These effects must dominate the Universe at the moment of transition, altering the standard gas pictures. At present, it is not known how to construct such sources from first principles in string theory.

  11. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  12. Geometric Reasoning for Automated Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Knight, Russell L.; Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An important aspect of mission planning for NASA s operation of the International Space Station is the allocation and management of space for supplies and equipment. The Stowage, Configuration Analysis, and Operations Planning teams collaborate to perform the bulk of that planning. A Geometric Reasoning Engine is developed in a way that can be shared by the teams to optimize item placement in the context of crew planning. The ISS crew spends (at the time of this writing) a third or more of their time moving supplies and equipment around. Better logistical support and optimized packing could make a significant impact on operational efficiency of the ISS. Currently, computational geometry and motion planning do not focus specifically on the optimized orientation and placement of 3D objects based on multiple distance and containment preferences and constraints. The software performs reasoning about the manipulation of 3D solid models in order to maximize an objective function based on distance. It optimizes for 3D orientation and placement. Spatial placement optimization is a general problem and can be applied to object packing or asset relocation.

  13. Phenomenological modeling of geometric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin; Guo, Qinghua; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Fan, Dianyuan; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Metasurfaces, with their superior capability in manipulating the optical wavefront at the subwavelength scale and low manufacturing complexity, have shown great potential for planar photonics and novel optical devices. However, vector field simulation of metasurfaces is so far limited to periodic-structured metasurfaces containing a small number of meta-atoms in the unit cell by using full-wave numerical methods. Here, focusing on achiral meta-atoms only with electric polarizability and thickness far less than the wavelength of light, and ignoring the coupling between meta-atoms, we propose a general phenomenological method to analytically model the metasurfaces based on the assumption that the meta-atoms possess localized resonances with Lorentz-Drude forms, whose exact form can be retrieved from the full wave simulation of a single element. Applied to phase modulated geometric metasurfaces constituted by identical meta-atoms with different orientations, our analytical results show good agreement with full-wave numerical simulations. The proposed theory provides an efficient method to model and design optical devices based on metasurfaces.

  14. Geometric morphology of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Schlei, B. R.; Prasad, L.; Skourikhine, A. N.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate how to derive morphological information from micrographs, i.e., grey-level images, of polymeric foams. The segmentation of the images is performed by applying a pulse-coupled neural network. This processing generates blobs of the foams walls/struts and voids, respectively. The contours of the blobs and their corresponding points form the input to a constrained Delaunay tessellation, which provides an unstructured grid of the material under consideration. The subsequently applied Chordal Axis Transform captures the intrinsic shape characteristics, and facilitates the identification and localization of key morphological features. While stochastic features of the polymeric foams struts/walls such as areas, aspect ratios, etc., already can be computed at this stage, the foams voids require further geometric processing. The voids are separated into single foam cells. This shape manipulation leads to a refinement of the initial blob contours, which then requires the repeated application of the constrained Delaunay tessellation and Chordal Axis Transform, respectively. Using minimum enclosing rectangles for each foam cell, finally the stochastic features of the foam voids are computed.

  15. Phenomenological modeling of geometric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin; Guo, Qinghua; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Fan, Dianyuan; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Metasurfaces, with their superior capability in manipulating the optical wavefront at the subwavelength scale and low manufacturing complexity, have shown great potential for planar photonics and novel optical devices. However, vector field simulation of metasurfaces is so far limited to periodic-structured metasurfaces containing a small number of meta-atoms in the unit cell by using full-wave numerical methods. Here, focusing on achiral meta-atoms only with electric polarizability and thickness far less than the wavelength of light, and ignoring the coupling between meta-atoms, we propose a general phenomenological method to analytically model the metasurfaces based on the assumption that the meta-atoms possess localized resonances with Lorentz-Drude forms, whose exact form can be retrieved from the full wave simulation of a single element. Applied to phase modulated geometric metasurfaces constituted by identical meta-atoms with different orientations, our analytical results show good agreement with full-wave numerical simulations. The proposed theory provides an efficient method to model and design optical devices based on metasurfaces. PMID:27137005

  16. The geometric semantics of algebraic quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Cruz Morales, John Alexander; Zilber, Boris

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we will present an ongoing project that aims to use model theory as a suitable mathematical setting for studying the formalism of quantum mechanics. We argue that this approach provides a geometric semantics for such a formalism by means of establishing a (non-commutative) duality between certain algebraic and geometric objects.

  17. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  18. Early Sex Differences in Weighting Geometric Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lourenco, Stella F.; Addy, Dede; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Fabian, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    When geometric and non-geometric information are both available for specifying location, men have been shown to rely more heavily on geometry compared to women. To shed insight on the nature and developmental origins of this sex difference, we examined how 18- to 24-month-olds represented the geometry of a surrounding (rectangular) space when…

  19. On geometric interpretation of the berry phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanaev, M. O.

    2012-03-01

    A geometric interpretation of the Berry phase and its Wilczek-Zee non-Abelian generalization are given in terms of connections on principal fiber bundles. It is demonstrated that a principal fiber bundle can be trivial in all cases, while the connection and its holonomy group are nontrivial. Therefore, the main role is played by geometric rather than topological effects.

  20. Parabolas: Connection between Algebraic and Geometrical Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriki, Atara

    2011-01-01

    A parabola is an interesting curve. What makes it interesting at the secondary school level is the fact that this curve is presented in both its contexts: algebraic and geometric. Being one of Apollonius' conic sections, the parabola is basically a geometric entity. It is, however, typically known for its algebraic characteristics, in particular…

  1. Second-quantized formulation of geometric phases

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, Shinichi; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2005-07-15

    The level crossing problem and associated geometric terms are neatly formulated by the second-quantized formulation. This formulation exhibits a hidden local gauge symmetry related to the arbitrariness of the phase choice of the complete orthonormal basis set. By using this second-quantized formulation, which does not assume adiabatic approximation, a convenient exact formula for the geometric terms including off-diagonal geometric terms is derived. The analysis of geometric phases is then reduced to a simple diagonalization of the Hamiltonian, and it is analyzed both in the operator and path-integral formulations. If one diagonalizes the geometric terms in the infinitesimal neighborhood of level crossing, the geometric phases become trivial (and thus no monopole singularity) for arbitrarily large but finite time interval T. The integrability of Schroedinger equation and the appearance of the seemingly nonintegrable phases are thus consistent. The topological proof of the Longuet-Higgins' phase-change rule, for example, fails in the practical Born-Oppenheimer approximation where a large but finite ratio of two time scales is involved and T is identified with the period of the slower system. The difference and similarity between the geometric phases associated with level crossing and the exact topological object such as the Aharonov-Bohm phase become clear in the present formulation. A crucial difference between the quantum anomaly and the geometric phases is also noted.

  2. Testing the geometric clutch hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Charles B

    2004-12-01

    The Geometric Clutch hypothesis is based on the premise that transverse forces (t-forces) acting on the outer doublets of the eukaryotic axoneme coordinate the action of the dynein motors to produce flagellar and ciliary beating. T-forces result from tension and compression on the outer doublets when a bend is present on the flagellum or cilium. The t-force acts to pry the doublets apart in an active bend, and push the doublets together when the flagellum is passively bent and thus could engage and disengage the dynein motors. Computed simulations of this working mechanism have reproduced the beating pattern of simple cilia and flagella, and of mammalian sperm. Cilia-like beating, with a clearly defined effective and recovery stroke, can be generated using one uniformly applied switching algorithm. When the mechanical properties and dimensions appropriate to a specific flagellum are incorporated into the model the same algorithm can simulate a sea urchin or bull sperm-like beat. The computed model reproduces many of the observed behaviors of real flagella and cilia. The model can duplicate the results of outer arm extraction experiments in cilia and predicted two types of arrest behavior that were verified experimentally in bull sperm. It also successfully predicted the experimentally determined nexin elasticity. Calculations based on live and reactivated sea urchin and bull sperm yielded a value of 0.5 nN/microm for the t-force at the switch-point. This is a force sufficient to overcome the shearing force generated by all the dyneins on one micron of outer doublet. A t-force of this magnitude should produce substantial distortion of the axoneme at the switch-point, especially in spoke or spoke-head deficient motile flagella. This concrete and verifiable prediction is within the grasp of recent advances in imaging technology, specifically cryoelectron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. PMID:15567522

  3. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the “membrane size” for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111—3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman–Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  4. Harmonization of description and classification of fetal observations: achievements and problems still unresolved: report of the 7th Workshop on the Terminology in Developmental Toxicology Berlin, 4-6 May 2011.

    PubMed

    Solecki, Roland; Barbellion, Stephane; Bergmann, Brigitte; Bürgin, Heinrich; Buschmann, Jochen; Clark, Ruth; Comotto, Laura; Fuchs, Antje; Faqi, Ali Said; Gerspach, Ralph; Grote, Konstanze; Hakansson, Helen; Heinrich, Verena; Heinrich-Hirsch, Barbara; Hofmann, Thomas; Hübel, Ulrich; Inazaki, Thelma Helena; Khalil, Samia; Knudsen, Thomas B; Kudicke, Sabine; Lingk, Wolfgang; Makris, Susan; Müller, Simone; Paumgartten, Francisco; Pfeil, Rudolf; Rama, Elkiane Macedo; Schneider, Steffen; Shiota, Kohei; Tamborini, Eva; Tegelenbosch, Mariska; Ulbrich, Beate; van Duijnhoven, E A J; Wise, David; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the 7th Workshop on the Terminology in Developmental Toxicology held in Berlin, May 4-6, 2011. The series of Berlin Workshops has been mainly concerned with the harmonization of terminology and classification of fetal anomalies in developmental toxicity studies. The main topics of the 7th Workshop were knowledge on the fate of anomalies after birth, use of Version 2 terminology for maternal-fetal observations and non-routinely used species, reclassification of "grey zone" anomalies and categorization of fetal observations for human health risk assessment. The paucity of data on health consequences of the postnatal permanence of fetal anomalies is relevant and further studies are needed. The Version 2 terminology is an important step forward and the terms listed in this glossary are considered also to be appropriate for most observations in non-routinely used species. Continuation of the Berlin Workshops was recommended. Topics suggested for the next Workshop were grouping of fetal observations for reporting and statistical analysis. PMID:22781580

  5. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers.

    PubMed

    Stagner, L; Heidbrink, W W

    2014-11-01

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, "Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry," J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, "Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes," Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5-11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  6. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-15

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, “Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry,” J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, “Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5–11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  7. Conceptual aspects of geometric quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.

    2016-07-01

    Geometric quantum computation is the idea that geometric phases can be used to implement quantum gates, i.e., the basic elements of the Boolean network that forms a quantum computer. Although originally thought to be limited to adiabatic evolution, controlled by slowly changing parameters, this form of quantum computation can as well be realized at high speed by using nonadiabatic schemes. Recent advances in quantum gate technology have allowed for experimental demonstrations of different types of geometric gates in adiabatic and nonadiabatic evolution. Here, we address some conceptual issues that arise in the realizations of geometric gates. We examine the appearance of dynamical phases in quantum evolution and point out that not all dynamical phases need to be compensated for in geometric quantum computation. We delineate the relation between Abelian and non-Abelian geometric gates and find an explicit physical example where the two types of gates coincide. We identify differences and similarities between adiabatic and nonadiabatic realizations of quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases.

  8. Conceptual aspects of geometric quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.

    2016-10-01

    Geometric quantum computation is the idea that geometric phases can be used to implement quantum gates, i.e., the basic elements of the Boolean network that forms a quantum computer. Although originally thought to be limited to adiabatic evolution, controlled by slowly changing parameters, this form of quantum computation can as well be realized at high speed by using nonadiabatic schemes. Recent advances in quantum gate technology have allowed for experimental demonstrations of different types of geometric gates in adiabatic and nonadiabatic evolution. Here, we address some conceptual issues that arise in the realizations of geometric gates. We examine the appearance of dynamical phases in quantum evolution and point out that not all dynamical phases need to be compensated for in geometric quantum computation. We delineate the relation between Abelian and non-Abelian geometric gates and find an explicit physical example where the two types of gates coincide. We identify differences and similarities between adiabatic and nonadiabatic realizations of quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases.

  9. Geometric quantum discord under noisy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming; Qiu, Daowen

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we mainly analyze the dynamics of geometric quantum discord under a common dissipating environment. Our results indicate that geometric quantum discord is generated when the initial state is a product state. The geometric quantum discord increases from zero to a stable value with the increasing time, and the variations of stable values depend on the system size. For different initial product states, geometric quantum discord has some different behaviors in contrast with entanglement. For initial maximally entangled state, it is shown that geometric quantum discord decays with the increasing dissipated time. It is found that for EPR state, entanglement is more robust than geometric quantum discord, which is a sharp contrast to the existing result that quantum discord is more robust than entanglement in noisy environments. However, for GHZ state and W state, geometric quantum discord is more stable than entanglement. By the comparison of quantum discord and entanglement, we find that a common dissipating environment brings complicated effects on quantum correlation, which may deepen our understanding of physical impacts of decohering environment on quantum correlation. In the end, we analyze the effects of collective dephasing noise and rotating noise to a class of two-qubit X states, and we find that quantum correlation is not altered by the collective noises.

  10. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-01

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, "Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry," J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, "Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes," Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5-11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  11. The perception of geometrical structure from congruence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lappin, Joseph S.; Wason, Thomas D.

    1989-01-01

    The principle function of vision is to measure the environment. As demonstrated by the coordination of motor actions with the positions and trajectories of moving objects in cluttered environments and by rapid recognition of solid objects in varying contexts from changing perspectives, vision provides real-time information about the geometrical structure and location of environmental objects and events. The geometric information provided by 2-D spatial displays is examined. It is proposed that the geometry of this information is best understood not within the traditional framework of perspective trigonometry, but in terms of the structure of qualitative relations defined by congruences among intrinsic geometric relations in images of surfaces. The basic concepts of this geometrical theory are outlined.

  12. The geometric phase in nonlinear dissipative systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, C.Z.; Haken, H. )

    1992-10-30

    In this paper, the authors review the recent progress made in generalizing the concept of the geometric phase to nonlinear dissipative systems. The authors first illustrate the usual form of the parallel transport law with an elementary example of the parallel shift of a line on the complex plane. Important results about the non-adiabatical geometric (Aharonov and Anandan or AA) phase [sup 18] for the Schrodinger equations are reviewed in order to make a comparison with results for dissipative systems. The authors show that a geometric phase can be defined for dissipative systems with the cyclic attractors. Systems undergoing the Hopf bifurcation with a continuous symmetry are shown to possess such cyclic attractors. Examples from laser physics are discussed to exhibit the applicability of our formalism and the widespread existence of the geometric phase in dissipative systems.

  13. Geometric phases in discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2016-10-01

    In order to study the behaviour of discrete dynamical systems under adiabatic cyclic variations of their parameters, we consider discrete versions of adiabatically-rotated rotators. Parallelling the studies in continuous systems, we generalize the concept of geometric phase to discrete dynamics and investigate its presence in these rotators. For the rotated sine circle map, we demonstrate an analytical relationship between the geometric phase and the rotation number of the system. For the discrete version of the rotated rotator considered by Berry, the rotated standard map, we further explore this connection as well as the role of the geometric phase at the onset of chaos. Further into the chaotic regime, we show that the geometric phase is also related to the diffusive behaviour of the dynamical variables and the Lyapunov exponent.

  14. Geometric symmetries in superfluid vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kozik, Evgeny; Svistunov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Dynamics of quantized vortex lines in a superfluid feature symmetries associated with the geometric character of the complex-valued field, w(z)=x(z)+iy(z), describing the instant shape of the line. Along with a natural set of Noether's constants of motion, which - apart from their rather specific expressions in terms of w(z) - are nothing but components of the total linear and angular momenta of the fluid, the geometric symmetry brings about crucial consequences for kinetics of distortion waves on the vortex lines, the Kelvin waves. It is the geometric symmetry that renders Kelvin-wave cascade local in the wave-number space. Similar considerations apply to other systems with purely geometric degrees of freedom.

  15. The Pentagon Problem: Geometric Reasoning with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zbiek, Rose Mary

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity, involving pentagons and using a figure manipulator such as The Geometer's Sketchpad, that requires students to reason geometrically without making unsubstantiated assumptions based on diagrams. (MKR)

  16. Geometric methods in computational fluid dynamics. [turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    General methods for the construction of geometric computational fluid dynamic algorithms are presented which simulate a variety of flow fields in various nontrivial regions. Included are: basic developments with tensors; various forms for the equations of motion; generalized numerical methods and boundary conditions; and methods for mesh generation to meet the strong geometric constraints of turbomachines. Coordinate generation is shown generally to yield mesh descriptions from one or more transformations that are smoothly joined together to form a composite mesh.

  17. Machine Learning and Geometric Technique for SLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Marin, Miguel; Bayro-Corrochano, Eduardo

    This paper describes a new approach for building 3D geometric maps using a laser rangefinder, a stereo camera system and a mathematical system the Conformal Geometric Algebra. The use of a known visual landmarks in the map helps to carry out a good localization of the robot. A machine learning technique is used for recognition of objects in the environment. These landmarks are found using the Viola and Jones algorithm and are represented with their position in the 3D virtual map.

  18. Geometrical expression of excess entropy production.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Takahiro; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2011-11-01

    We derive a geometrical expression of the excess entropy production for quasistatic transitions between nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian jump processes, which can be exactly applied to nonlinear and nonequilibrium situations. The obtained expression is geometrical; the excess entropy production depends only on a trajectory in the parameter space, analogous to the Berry phase in quantum mechanics. Our results imply that vector potentials are needed to construct the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium steady states. PMID:22181372

  19. The Geometric Grids of the Hieratic Numeral.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulfotouh, Hossam M. K.

    The paper discusses the geometrical designs of the hieratic numeral signs. It shows the regular-grid-patterns of squares upon which, the shapes of the already decoded hieratic numeral-signs, have been designed. Also, it shows the design of some hieratic numeral signs, based on subdividing the circle; and the hieratic signs of modular notation. It might reveal the basic geometrical level of understanding of anonymous ancient Egyptians who designed them some four thousand years ago.

  20. Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Geometric Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruskin, Jared M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Geometric Mechanics provides a comprehensive tour of two fields that are intimately entwined: dynamical systems is the study of the behavior of physical systems that may be described by a set of nonlinear first-order ordinary differential equations in Euclidean space, whereas geometric mechanics explores similar systems that instead evolve on differentiable manifolds. In the study of geometric mechanics, however, additional geometric structures are often present, since such systems arise from the laws of nature that govern the motions of particles, bodies, and even galaxies. In the first part of the text, we discuss linearization and stability of trajectories and fixed points, invariant manifold theory, periodic orbits, Poincaré maps, Floquet theory, the Poincaré-Bendixson theorem, bifurcations, and chaos. The second part of the text begins with a self-contained chapter on differential geometry that introduces notions of manifolds, mappings, vector fields, the Jacobi-Lie bracket, and differential forms. The final chapters cover Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics from a modern geometric perspective, mechanics on Lie groups, and nonholonomic mechanics via both moving frames and fiber bundle decompositions. The text can be reasonably digested in a single-semester introductory graduate-level course. Each chapter concludes with an application that can serve as a springboard project for further investigation or in-class discussion.

  1. Morphing of geometric composites via residual swelling.

    PubMed

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Shillig, Steven A; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas P

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and controlling the shape of thin, soft objects has been the focus of significant research efforts among physicists, biologists, and engineers in the last decade. These studies aim to utilize advanced materials in novel, adaptive ways such as fabricating smart actuators or mimicking living tissues. Here, we present the controlled growth-like morphing of 2D sheets into 3D shapes by preparing geometric composite structures that deform by residual swelling. The morphing of these geometric composites is dictated by both swelling and geometry, with diffusion controlling the swelling-induced actuation, and geometric confinement dictating the structure's deformed shape. Building on a simple mechanical analog, we present an analytical model that quantitatively describes how the Gaussian and mean curvatures of a thin disk are affected by the interplay among geometry, mechanics, and swelling. This model is in excellent agreement with our experiments and numerics. We show that the dynamics of residual swelling is dictated by a competition between two characteristic diffusive length scales governed by geometry. Our results provide the first 2D analog of Timoshenko's classical formula for the thermal bending of bimetallic beams - our generalization explains how the Gaussian curvature of a 2D geometric composite is affected by geometry and elasticity. The understanding conferred by these results suggests that the controlled shaping of geometric composites may provide a simple complement to traditional manufacturing techniques. PMID:26076671

  2. Unifying Geometrical Representations of Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsid, Scott; Serna, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We unify three approaches within the vast body of gauge-theory research that have independently developed distinct representations of a geometrical surface-like structure underlying the vector-potential. The three approaches that we unify are: those who use the compactified dimensions of Kaluza-Klein theory, those who use Grassmannian models (also called gauge theory embedding or models) to represent gauge fields, and those who use a hidden spatial metric to replace the gauge fields. In this paper we identify a correspondence between the geometrical representations of the three schools. Each school was mostly independently developed, does not compete with other schools, and attempts to isolate the gauge-invariant geometrical surface-like structures that are responsible for the resulting physics. By providing a mapping between geometrical representations, we hope physicists can now isolate representation-dependent physics from gauge-invariant physical results and share results between each school. We provide visual examples of the geometrical relationships between each school for electric and magnetic fields. We highlight a first new result: in all three representations a static electric field (electric field from a fixed ring of charge or a sphere of charge) has a hidden gauge-invariant time dependent surface that is underlying the vector potential.

  3. Overview on METEOSAT geometrical image data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diekmann, Frank J.

    1994-01-01

    Digital Images acquired from the geostationary METEOSAT satellites are processed and disseminated at ESA's European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany. Their scientific value is mainly dependent on their radiometric quality and geometric stability. This paper will give an overview on the image processing activities performed at ESOC, concentrating on the geometrical restoration and quality evaluation. The performance of the rectification process for the various satellites over the past years will be presented and the impacts of external events as for instance the Pinatubo eruption in 1991 will be explained. Special developments both in hard and software, necessary to cope with demanding tasks as new image resampling or to correct for spacecraft anomalies, are presented as well. The rotating lens of MET-5 causing severe geometrical image distortions is an example for the latter.

  4. The Geometric Phase of Stock Trading.

    PubMed

    Altafini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Geometric phases describe how in a continuous-time dynamical system the displacement of a variable (called phase variable) can be related to other variables (shape variables) undergoing a cyclic motion, according to an area rule. The aim of this paper is to show that geometric phases can exist also for discrete-time systems, and even when the cycles in shape space have zero area. A context in which this principle can be applied is stock trading. A zero-area cycle in shape space represents the type of trading operations normally carried out by high-frequency traders (entering and exiting a position on a fast time-scale), while the phase variable represents the cash balance of a trader. Under the assumption that trading impacts stock prices, even zero-area cyclic trading operations can induce geometric phases, i.e., profits or losses, without affecting the stock quote. PMID:27556642

  5. The Geometric Phase of Stock Trading

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Geometric phases describe how in a continuous-time dynamical system the displacement of a variable (called phase variable) can be related to other variables (shape variables) undergoing a cyclic motion, according to an area rule. The aim of this paper is to show that geometric phases can exist also for discrete-time systems, and even when the cycles in shape space have zero area. A context in which this principle can be applied is stock trading. A zero-area cycle in shape space represents the type of trading operations normally carried out by high-frequency traders (entering and exiting a position on a fast time-scale), while the phase variable represents the cash balance of a trader. Under the assumption that trading impacts stock prices, even zero-area cyclic trading operations can induce geometric phases, i.e., profits or losses, without affecting the stock quote. PMID:27556642

  6. Connexions for the nuclear geometrical collective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, G.; Sparks, N.

    2015-11-01

    The Bohr-Mottelson-Frankfurt model of nuclear rotations and quadrupole vibrations is a foundational model in nuclear structure physics. The model, also called the geometrical collective model or simply GCM(3), has two hidden mathematical structures, one group theoretic and the other differential geometric. Although the group structure has been understood for some time, the geometric structure is a new feature that this paper investigates in some detail. Using the de Rham Laplacian \\triangle =\\star d \\star d for the kinetic energy extends significantly the physical scope of the GCM(3) model. This Laplacian contains a ‘magnetic’ term due to the connexion between base manifold rotational and fibre vortex degrees of freedom. When the connexion specializes to irrotational flow, the Laplacian reduces to the Bohr-Mottelson kinetic energy operator.

  7. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors.

  8. The geometric phase controls ultracold chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, the geometric phase is shown to control the outcome of an ultracold chemical reaction. The control is a direct consequence of the sign change on the interference term between two scattering pathways (direct and looping), which contribute to the reactive collision process in the presence of a conical intersection (point of degeneracy between two Born–Oppenheimer electronic potential energy surfaces). The unique properties of the ultracold energy regime lead to an effective quantization of the scattering phase shift enabling maximum constructive or destructive interference between the two pathways. By taking the O + OH → H + O2 reaction as an illustrative example, it is shown that inclusion of the geometric phase modifies ultracold reaction rates by nearly two orders of magnitude. Interesting experimental control possibilities include the application of external electric and magnetic fields that might be used to exploit the geometric phase effect reported here and experimentally switch on or off the reactivity.

  9. The geometric phase controls ultracold chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-01-01

    The geometric phase is shown to control the outcome of an ultracold chemical reaction. The control is a direct consequence of the sign change on the interference term between two scattering pathways (direct and looping), which contribute to the reactive collision process in the presence of a conical intersection (point of degeneracy between two Born–Oppenheimer electronic potential energy surfaces). The unique properties of the ultracold energy regime lead to an effective quantization of the scattering phase shift enabling maximum constructive or destructive interference between the two pathways. By taking the O+OH→H+O2 reaction as an illustrative example, it is shown that inclusion of the geometric phase modifies ultracold reaction rates by nearly two orders of magnitude. Interesting experimental control possibilities include the application of external electric and magnetic fields that might be used to exploit the geometric phase effect reported here and experimentally switch on or off the reactivity. PMID:26224326

  10. The geometric phase controls ultracold chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-07-01

    The geometric phase is shown to control the outcome of an ultracold chemical reaction. The control is a direct consequence of the sign change on the interference term between two scattering pathways (direct and looping), which contribute to the reactive collision process in the presence of a conical intersection (point of degeneracy between two Born-Oppenheimer electronic potential energy surfaces). The unique properties of the ultracold energy regime lead to an effective quantization of the scattering phase shift enabling maximum constructive or destructive interference between the two pathways. By taking the O+OH-->H+O2 reaction as an illustrative example, it is shown that inclusion of the geometric phase modifies ultracold reaction rates by nearly two orders of magnitude. Interesting experimental control possibilities include the application of external electric and magnetic fields that might be used to exploit the geometric phase effect reported here and experimentally switch on or off the reactivity.

  11. The Geometric Phase of Stock Trading.

    PubMed

    Altafini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Geometric phases describe how in a continuous-time dynamical system the displacement of a variable (called phase variable) can be related to other variables (shape variables) undergoing a cyclic motion, according to an area rule. The aim of this paper is to show that geometric phases can exist also for discrete-time systems, and even when the cycles in shape space have zero area. A context in which this principle can be applied is stock trading. A zero-area cycle in shape space represents the type of trading operations normally carried out by high-frequency traders (entering and exiting a position on a fast time-scale), while the phase variable represents the cash balance of a trader. Under the assumption that trading impacts stock prices, even zero-area cyclic trading operations can induce geometric phases, i.e., profits or losses, without affecting the stock quote.

  12. MM Algorithms for Geometric and Signomial Programming.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kenneth; Zhou, Hua

    2014-02-01

    This paper derives new algorithms for signomial programming, a generalization of geometric programming. The algorithms are based on a generic principle for optimization called the MM algorithm. In this setting, one can apply the geometric-arithmetic mean inequality and a supporting hyperplane inequality to create a surrogate function with parameters separated. Thus, unconstrained signomial programming reduces to a sequence of one-dimensional minimization problems. Simple examples demonstrate that the MM algorithm derived can converge to a boundary point or to one point of a continuum of minimum points. Conditions under which the minimum point is unique or occurs in the interior of parameter space are proved for geometric programming. Convergence to an interior point occurs at a linear rate. Finally, the MM framework easily accommodates equality and inequality constraints of signomial type. For the most important special case, constrained quadratic programming, the MM algorithm involves very simple updates.

  13. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors. PMID:27193936

  14. Telencephalon and geometric space in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Juan Pedro; Bingman, Verner Peter; Portavella, Manuel; López, Juan Carlos

    2006-11-01

    Neuroanatomical evidence indicates that the lateral pallium (LP) of ray-finned fishes could be homologous to the hippocampus of mammals and birds. Recent studies have found that hippocampus of mammals and birds is critical for learning geometric properties of space. In this work, we studied the effects of lesions to the lateral pallium of goldfish on the encoding of geometric spatial information. Goldfish with telencephalic lesions were trained to search for a goal in a rectangular-shaped arena containing one different wall that served as the only distinctive environmental feature. Although fish with lateral pallium lesions learned the task even faster than sham and medial pallium (MP)-lesioned animals, subsequent probe trials showed that they were insensitive to geometric information. Sham and medial pallium-lesioned animals could use both geometric and feature information to locate the goal. By contrast, fish with lateral palium lesions relied exclusively on the feature information provided by the wall of a different colour. These results indicate that lesions to the lateral pallium of goldfish, like hippocampal lesions in mammals and birds, selectively impair the encoding of geometric spatial information of environmental space. Thus, the forebrain structures of teleost fish that are neuroanatomically equivalent to the mammalian and avian hippocampus also share a central role in supporting spatial cognition. Present results suggest that the presence of a hippocampal-dependent memory system implicated in the processing of geometric spatial information is an ancient feature of the vertebrate forebrain that has been conserved during the divergent evolution of different vertebrate groups.

  15. Primary School Teacher Candidates' Geometric Habits of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köse, Nilu¨fer Y.; Tanisli, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Geometric habits of mind are productive ways of thinking that support learning and using geometric concepts. Identifying primary school teacher candidates' geometric habits of mind is important as they affect the development of their future students' geometric thinking. Therefore, this study attempts to determine primary school…

  16. A geometric approach to quantum vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Vittorio; Spera, Mauro

    1989-12-01

    In this paper a geometrical description is given of the theory of quantum vortices first developed by Rasetti and Regge [Physica A 80, 217 (1975)] relying on the symplectic techniques of Marsden and Weinstein [J. Phys. D 7, 305 (1983)], and Kirillov-Kostant-Souriau geometric quantization. The RR-current algebra is interpreted as the natural Hamiltonian algebra associated to a certain coadjoint orbit of the group G=SDiff(R3), the KKS prequantization condition of which is related to the Feynman-Onsager relation. This orbit is also shown to possess a G-invariant Kaehler structure, whence, in principle, it is possible to quantize it in a natural way.

  17. Local Geometrical Machinery for Complexity and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    In this Chapter, we present local geometrical machinery for studying complexity and control, consisting of dynamics on Kähler manifolds, which combine three geometrical structures-Riemannian, symplectic and complex (Hermitian)-in a mutually compatible way. In other words, every Kähler manifold is simultaneously Riemannian, symplectic and complex (Hermitian). It is well known that Riemannian manifolds represent the stage on which Lagrangian dynamics is set, symplectic manifolds represent the stage for Hamiltonian dynamics, and complex (Hermitian) varieties comprise the stage for quantum dynamics. Therefore, Kähler manifolds represent the richest dynamical stage available where Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and quantum dynamics all dance together.

  18. Geometrical compression of lidar return signals.

    PubMed

    Harms, J; Lahmann, W; Weitkamp, C

    1978-04-01

    The dynamic range of lidar return signals has been calculated for coaxial transmitter-receiver geometries via the spatial distribution of irradiance in the detector plane as a function of distance z. It is shown that the z(-2)dependence from the lidar equation can be converted to almost constant signal amplitude for distances up to 3 km by suitable and realistic choice of the geometric parameters. On the other hand, no signal degradation with respect to the lidar equation occurs at large distances. This geometrical compression of lidar return signal amplitudes is rated superior to electronic compression methods such as gain switching or logarithmic amplification. PMID:20197946

  19. Model-based vision using geometric hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Alexander, III; Patton, Ronald

    1991-04-01

    The Geometric Hashing technique developed by the NYU Courant Institute has been applied to various automatic target recognition applications. In particular, I-MATH has extended the hashing algorithm to perform automatic target recognition ofsynthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. For this application, the hashing is performed upon the geometric locations of dominant scatterers. In addition to being a robust model-based matching algorithm -- invariant under translation, scale, and 3D rotations of the target -- hashing is of particular utility because it can still perform effective matching when the target is partially obscured. Moreover, hashing is very amenable to a SIMD parallel processing architecture, and thus potentially realtime implementable.

  20. NRP 7th Edition: Are You Prepared?

    PubMed

    Zaichkin, Jeanette; Mccarney, Linda; Weiner, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The seventh edition of the American Academy of Pediatrics/American Heart Association Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) materials must be in use by January 1, 2017. As in previous editions, changes in resuscitation science are based on an international review and consensus of current resuscitation science. The seventh edition NRP materials also include enhancements to training materials aimed at improving the quality of NRP instruction and providing the opportunity for ongoing education. A standardized approach to instructor training, an online Instructor Toolkit, eSim cases, and a new learning management system are among the new resources. PMID:27461196

  1. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Danieli, M G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2014-12-01

    Immunomodulation uses synthetic, natural and recombinant preparations to modify the immune response to a desired level, typically to treat specific autoimmune diseases, as will be discussed in this section. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disease, affecting 1% of the population worldwide. Currently, a first-line disease-modifying therapy for RA is methotrexate; however, more than 40 monoclonal antibodies are in use or under investigation for the treatment of RA. This panoply of biological disease-modifying agents means that clinicians can make use of drugs with different mechanisms of action should one type become ineffective. In autoimmune pemphigus conditions, identification of pathogenic autoantibodies against intercellular cadherin desmoglein 1 and/or 3 antigens is one of the criteria for appropriate diagnosis. In pemphigoid conditions, autoantibodies are directed against bullous pemphigoid antigens BP230 and BP180, and in both types of immunobullous disease intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), as adjuvant therapy in combination with a cytotoxic drug, is effective in reducing autoantibody levels, disease severity and background steroid use. Further studies are required to establish the role of monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of autoimmune bullous disease. IVIg may also be effective in another at-risk population with autoimmune disease, namely secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM). However, the mechanism of action of IVIg in secondary RM is largely unknown, although levels of natural killer cell biomarkers, particularly CD56(+) , have been shown to decline after IVIg treatment. Data from meta-analyses of heterogeneous placebo-controlled trials indicate that IVIg may be effective in secondary RM, but most trials to date have used immunomodulatory doses lower than those considered to be efficient in autoimmune disease. The results of a recently completed study may help to address this question.

  2. The 7th International Cryocooler Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-04-01

    The partial contents of this document include the following: SDIO and Air Force Cryocooler Technology Developments at USAF Phillips Laboratory; JPL Cryocooler Development and Test Program Overview; Development and Demonstration of a Diaphragm Stirling 65 K Standard Spacecraft Cryocooler; Stirling Space Cooler; Thermal, Vibration, and Reliability Test Results for a Balanced 80 K Cryocooler; Spacecraft Cooler Characterization; Performance of a Long Life Reverse Brayton Cryocooler; SDI Cryocooler Producibility Program; Miniature Pulse Tube Cooler; Flow Patterns Intrinsic to the Pulse Tube Refrigerator; Experimental Investigation of the Regenerative Magnetic Refrigerator Operating Between 4.2 K and 1.8 K; A 4 K Gifford-McMahon Refrigerator for Radio Astronomy; A Stirling Cycle Cryocooler for 4 K Applications; Regenerator Performance and Refrigeration Mechanism for 4 K GM Refrigerator Using Rare Earth Compound Regenerator Materials; Superfluid Stirling Refrigerator with a Counterflow Regenerator; Graded and Nongraded Regenerator Performance; Evolution of the 10 K Periodic Sorption Refrigerator Concept; Development of a Periodic 10 K Sorption Cryocooler; Assessment of a Hydrogen Joule-Thomson Expander and Vanadium Hydride Sorption Beds for 20 K Cryocoolers; Design of a Metal Hydride Sorption Cryocooler System; Linear Compressor for JT Cryocooler; JT Cryostat with Liquid-Solid Cryogen Reservoir; Design of A Metal Hydride Sorption Cryocooler System; Linear Compressor for JT Cooler; and Phase Equilibria in Cryogenic Mixtures.

  3. Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. This book offers a unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications.

  4. Reinforcing Geometric Properties with Shapedoku Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.; Nickell, Jennifer V.

    2013-01-01

    Shapedoku is a new type of puzzle that combines logic and spatial reasoning with understanding of basic geometric concepts such as slope, parallelism, perpendicularity, and properties of shapes. Shapedoku can be solved by individuals and, as demonstrated here, can form the basis of a review for geometry students as they create their own. In this…

  5. Geometric Models for Collaborative Search and Filtering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitton, Ephrat

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores the use of geometric and graphical models for a variety of information search and filtering applications. These models serve to provide an intuitive understanding of the problem domains and as well as computational efficiencies to our solution approaches. We begin by considering a search and rescue scenario where both…

  6. How Do Young Children Learn Geometric Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohe, Pia

    Twenty children (ages 5 and 6) from each of seven cultural groups (Caucasian, Black, Jewish, Puerto Rican, Chinese, Korean-American and native Korean) were given a copying task of 21 geometric shapes to test the cultural invariancy of Piaget's topological-projective-Euclidean concept acquisition sequence. All subjects were either middle or lower…

  7. Geometric Mean--What Does It Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalder, Robin S.

    2012-01-01

    The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and numerous mathematics educators promote the combination of conceptual understanding and procedural learning in the successful instruction of mathematics. Despite this, when geometric mean is taught in a typical American geometry class, it is taught as a process only despite the many connections…

  8. The geometrical significance of the Laplacian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styer, Daniel F.

    2015-12-01

    The Laplacian operator can be defined, not only as a differential operator, but also through its averaging properties. Such a definition lends geometric significance to the operator: a large Laplacian at a point reflects a "nonconformist" (i.e., different from average) character for the function there. This point of view is used to motivate the wave equation for a drumhead.

  9. Geometric interpretations for resonances of plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Oulton, Rupert F.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-07-01

    The field of plasmonics can be roughly categorized into two branches: surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating in waveguides and localized surface plasmons (LSPs) supported by scattering particles. Investigations along these two directions usually employ different approaches, resulting in more or less a dogma that the two branches progress almost independently of each other, with few interactions. Here in this work we interpret LSPs from a Bohr model based geometric perspective relying on SPPs, thus establishing a connection between these two sub-fields. Besides the clear explanations of conventional scattering features of plasmonic nanoparticles, based on this geometric model we further demonstrate other anomalous scattering features (higher order modes supported at lower frequencies, and blueshift of the resonance with increasing particle sizes) and multiple electric resonances of the same order supported at different frequencies, which have been revealed to originate from backward SPP modes and multiple dispersion bands supported in the corresponding plasmonic waveguides, respectively. Inspired by this geometric model, it is also shown that, through solely geometric tuning, the absorption of each LSP resonance can be maximized to reach the single channel absorption limit, provided that the scattering and absorption rates are tuned to be equal.

  10. Geometric Interpretation of the Pauli Spinor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frescura, F. A. M.; Hiley, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a reexamination of an intuitively geometric view of the nonrelativistic Pauli spinor in a simplified discussion of the connection between the rotation group and special transformations in the plane of projection. This view of the spinor is related to those based on the existence of an istropic or null vector. (SK)

  11. Children's Learning of Geometrical Concepts Through Logo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard

    1987-01-01

    Exploratory study aimed to investigate elements of geometrical concepts that children learn through Logo programing. A test designed to assess three components of length and angle was administered to 84 children who had learned Logo for one year and 92 who had not. Data indicated a positive effect of Logo work on some items, but not all.…

  12. Geometric Transformations in Middle School Mathematics Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorin, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed treatment of geometric transformations in presently available middle grades (6, 7, 8) student mathematics textbooks. Fourteen textbooks from four widely used textbook series were evaluated: two mainline publisher series, Pearson (Prentice Hall) and Glencoe (Math Connects); one National Science Foundation (NSF) funded curriculum…

  13. Modern Geometric Algebra: A (Very Incomplete!) Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Geometric algebra is based on two simple ideas. First, the area of a rectangle is equal to the product of the lengths of its sides. Second, if a figure is broken apart into several pieces, the sum of the areas of the pieces equals the area of the original figure. Remarkably, these two ideas provide an elegant way to introduce, connect, and…

  14. If Only Clairaut Had Dynamic Geometric Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hyewon; Reys, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Geometry is a major area of study in middle school mathematics, yet middle school and secondary students have difficulty learning important geometric concepts. This article considers Alexis-Claude Clairaut's approach that emphasizes engaging student curiosity about key ideas and theorems instead of directly teaching theorems before their…

  15. Impossible Geometric Constructions: A Calculus Writing Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awtrey, Chad

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a writing project that offers students the opportunity to solve one of the most famous geometric problems of Greek antiquity; namely, the impossibility of trisecting the angle [pi]/3. Along the way, students study the history of Greek geometry problems as well as the life and achievements of Carl Friedrich Gauss. Included is…

  16. More Meaning from the Geometric Mean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Bryan C.

    2003-01-01

    Provides classroom suggestions for combining numerical, algebraic, and geometric techniques with the understanding of a simple method for computing square roots. Historical origins of the method illustrate the debt owed to ancient minds living in what are now India, Pakistan, Iraq, and Egypt. (Author/NB)

  17. Geometrizing the Quantum - A Toy Model

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Benjamin

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the equations of relativistic Bohmian mechanics for multiple bosonic particles have a dual description in terms of a classical theory of conformally 'curved' space-time. This shows that it is possible to formulate quantum mechanics as a purely classical geometrical theory. The results are further generalized to interactions with an external electromagnetic field.

  18. A Geometric Approach to Fair Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbanel, Julius

    2010-01-01

    We wish to divide a cake among some collection of people (who may have very different notions of the comparative value of pieces of cake) in a way that is both "fair" and "efficient." We explore the meaning of these terms, introduce two geometric tools to aid our analysis, and present a proof (due to Dietrich Weller) that establishes the existence…

  19. Geometric Determinants of Human Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tom; Trinkler, Iris; Burgess, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Geometric alterations to the boundaries of a virtual environment were used to investigate the representations underlying human spatial memory. Subjects encountered a cue object in a simple rectangular enclosure, with distant landmarks for orientation. After a brief delay, during which they were removed from the arena, subjects were returned to it…

  20. Geometric approach to dislocation and disclination theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, A.I.; Ovchinnikov, S.G.

    1988-05-01

    Cartan structure equations are used to create a four-dimensional geometric description of dislocations in continuum theory. It is shown that the dislocation distribution is determined by the torsion tensor, while the disclination distribution is determined by the curvature tensor. An analogy to electrodynamics is offered.

  1. Can EPR non-locality be geometrical?

    SciTech Connect

    Ne`eman, Y. |; Botero, A.

    1995-10-01

    The presence in Quantum Mechanics of non-local correlations is one of the two fundamentally non-intuitive features of that theory. The non-local correlations themselves fall into two classes: EPR and Geometrical. The non-local characteristics of the geometrical type are well-understood and are not suspected of possibly generating acausal features, such as faster-than-light propagation of information. This has especially become true since the emergence of a geometrical treatment for the relevant gauge theories, i.e. Fiber Bundle geometry, in which the quantum non-localities are seen to correspond to pure homotopy considerations. This aspect is reviewed in section 2. Contrary-wise, from its very conception, the EPR situation was felt to be paradoxical. It has been suggested that the non-local features of EPR might also derive from geometrical considerations, like all other non-local characteristics of QM. In[7], one of the authors was able to point out several plausibility arguments for this thesis, emphasizing in particular similarities between the non-local correlations provided by any gauge field theory and those required by the preservation of the quantum numbers of the original EPR state-vector, throughout its spatially-extended mode. The derivation was, however, somewhat incomplete, especially because of the apparent difference between, on the one hand, the closed spatial loops arising in the analysis of the geometrical non-localities, from Aharonov-Bohm and Berry phases to magnetic monopoles and instantons, and on the other hand, in the EPR case, the open line drawn by the positions of the two moving decay products of the disintegrating particle. In what follows, the authors endeavor to remove this obstacle and show that as in all other QM non-localities, EPR is somehow related to closed loops, almost involving homotopy considerations. They develop this view in section 3.

  2. Subgraphs and network motifs in geometric networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Alon, Uri

    2005-02-01

    Many real-world networks describe systems in which interactions decay with the distance between nodes. Examples include systems constrained in real space such as transportation and communication networks, as well as systems constrained in abstract spaces such as multivariate biological or economic data sets and models of social networks. These networks often display network motifs: subgraphs that recur in the network much more often than in randomized networks. To understand the origin of the network motifs in these networks, it is important to study the subgraphs and network motifs that arise solely from geometric constraints. To address this, we analyze geometric network models, in which nodes are arranged on a lattice and edges are formed with a probability that decays with the distance between nodes. We present analytical solutions for the numbers of all three- and four-node subgraphs, in both directed and nondirected geometric networks. We also analyze geometric networks with arbitrary degree sequences and models with a bias for directed edges in one direction. Scaling rules for scaling of subgraph numbers with system size, lattice dimension, and interaction range are given. Several invariant measures are found, such as the ratio of feedback and feed-forward loops, which do not depend on system size, dimension, or connectivity function. We find that network motifs in many real-world networks, including social networks and neuronal networks, are not captured solely by these geometric models. This is in line with recent evidence that biological network motifs were selected as basic circuit elements with defined information-processing functions.

  3. A GEOMETRICAL HEIGHT SCALE FOR SUNSPOT PENUMBRAE

    SciTech Connect

    Puschmann, K. G.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; MartInez Pillet, V. E-mail: brc@iac.e

    2010-09-10

    Inversions of spectropolarimetric observations of penumbral filaments deliver the stratification of different physical quantities in an optical depth scale. However, without establishing a geometrical height scale, their three-dimensional geometrical structure cannot be derived. This is crucial in understanding the correct spatial variation of physical properties in the penumbral atmosphere and to provide insights into the mechanism capable of explaining the observed penumbral brightness. The aim of this work is to determine a global geometrical height scale in the penumbra by minimizing the divergence of the magnetic field vector and the deviations from static equilibrium as imposed by a force balance equation that includes pressure gradients, gravity, and the Lorentz force. Optical depth models are derived from the inversion of spectropolarimetric data of an active region observed with the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. We use a genetic algorithm to determine the boundary condition for the inference of geometrical heights. The retrieved geometrical height scale permits the evaluation of the Wilson depression at each pixel and the correlation of physical quantities at each height. Our results fit into the uncombed penumbral scenario, i.e., a penumbra composed of flux tubes with channeled mass flow and with a weaker and more horizontal magnetic field as compared with the background field. The ascending material is hotter and denser than their surroundings. We do not find evidence of overturning convection or field-free regions in the inner penumbral area analyzed. The penumbral brightness can be explained by the energy transfer of the ascending mass carried by the Evershed flow, if the physical quantities below z = -75 km are extrapolated from the results of the inversion.

  4. Where's the Orange? Geometric and Extra-Geometric Influences on English Children's Descriptions of Spatial Locations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Lynn V.; Coventry, Kenny R.; Clibbens, John

    2004-01-01

    The effect of both geometric and extra-geometric factors on children's production of "in" is reported (free-response paradigm). Eighty children across four age groups (means 4;1, 5;5, 6;1, and 7;1) were shown video scenes of puppets placing real objects in various positions with reference to a bowl and a plate. Located objects were placed at three…

  5. Separate geometric and non-geometric modules for spatial reorientation: evidence from a lopsided animal brain.

    PubMed

    Vallortigara, Giorgio; Pagni, Piero; Sovrano, Valeria Anna

    2004-04-01

    Research has proved that disoriented children and nonhuman animals can reorient themselves using geometric and nongeometric features of the environment, showing conjoined use of both types of information to different degree depending on species and developmental level. Little is known of the neurobiological bases of these spatial reorientation processes. Here we take advantage of the neuroanatomical peculiarities of the visual system of birds (showing segregation of information between the two sides of the brain to a considerable degree) to investigate the way in which geometric and nongeometric information is encoded and used by the left and right hemispheres. Domestic chicks were trained binocularly in an environment with a distinctive geometry (a rectangular cage) with panels at the corners providing nongeometric cues. Between trials, chicks were passively disoriented to disable dead reckoning. When tested after removal of the panels, left-eyed chicks, but not right-eyed chicks, reoriented using the residual information provided by the geometry of the cage. When tested after removal of geometric information (i.e., in a square-shaped cage), both right- and left-eyed chicks reoriented using the residual nongeometric information provided by the panels. When trained binocularly with only geometric information, at test, left-eyed chicks reoriented better than right-eyed chicks. Finally, when geometric and nongeometric cues provided contradictory information, left-eyed chicks showed more reliance on geometric cues, whereas right-eyed chicks showed more reliance on nongeometric cues. The results suggest separate mechanisms for dealing with spatial reorientation problems, with the right hemisphere taking charge of large-scale geometry of the environment and with both hemispheres taking charge of local, nongeometric cues when available in isolation, but with a predominance of the left hemisphere when competition between geometric and non-geometric information occurs

  6. Geometric modeling for computer aided design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, James L.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past several years, it has been the primary goal of this grant to design and implement software to be used in the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles. The work carried out under this grant was performed jointly with members of the Vehicle Analysis Branch (VAB) of NASA LaRC, Computer Sciences Corp., and Vigyan Corp. This has resulted in the development of several packages and design studies. Primary among these are the interactive geometric modeling tool, the Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (smart), and the integration and execution tools provided by the Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution (EASIE). In addition, it is the purpose of the personnel of this grant to provide consultation in the areas of structural design, algorithm development, and software development and implementation, particularly in the areas of computer aided design, geometric surface representation, and parallel algorithms.

  7. a Modular Geometric Model for Underwater Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, H.-G.

    2015-04-01

    Underwater applications of photogrammetric measurement techniques usually need to deal with multimedia photogrammetry aspects, which are characterized by the necessity of handling optical rays that are broken at interfaces between optical media with different refrative indices according to Snell's Law. This so-called multimedia geometry has to be incorporated into geometric models in order to achieve correct measurement results. The paper shows a flexible yet strict geometric model for the handling of refraction effects on the optical path, which can be implemented as a module into photogrammetric standard tools such as spatial resection, spatial intersection, bundle adjustment or epipolar line computation. The module is especially well suited for applications, where an object in water is observed by cameras in air through one or more plane parallel glass interfaces, as it allows for some simplifications here.

  8. Quantum state discrimination: A geometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, Damian; Miszczak, Jarosław Adam; Puchała, Zbigniew; Życzkowski, Karol

    2008-04-01

    We analyze the problem of finding sets of quantum states that can be deterministically discriminated. From a geometric point of view, this problem is equivalent to that of embedding a simplex of points whose distances are maximal with respect to the Bures distance (or trace distance). We derive upper and lower bounds for the trace distance and for the fidelity between two quantum states, which imply bounds for the Bures distance between the unitary orbits of both states. We thus show that, when analyzing minimal and maximal distances between states of fixed spectra, it is sufficient to consider diagonal states only. Hence when optimal discrimination is considered, given freedom up to unitary orbits, it is sufficient to consider diagonal states. This is illustrated geometrically in terms of Weyl chambers.

  9. Finsler geometric extension of Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Christian; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2012-03-01

    We construct gravitational dynamics for Finsler spacetimes in terms of an action integral on the unit tangent bundle. These spacetimes are generalizations of Lorentzian metric manifolds which satisfy necessary causality properties. A coupling procedure for matter fields to Finsler gravity completes our new theory that consistently becomes equivalent to Einstein gravity in the limit of metric geometry. We provide a precise geometric definition of observers and their measurements and show that the transformations, by means of which different observers communicate, form a groupoid that generalizes the usual Lorentz group. Moreover, we discuss the implementation of Finsler spacetime symmetries. We use our results to analyze a particular spacetime model that leads to Finsler geometric refinements of the linearized Schwarzschild solution.

  10. Scale-invariant geometric random graphs.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng; Rogers, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We introduce and analyze a class of growing geometric random graphs that are invariant under rescaling of space and time. Directed connections between nodes are drawn according to influence zones that depend on node position in space and time, mimicking the heterogeneity and increased specialization found in growing networks. Through calculations and numerical simulations we explore the consequences of scale invariance for geometric random graphs generated this way. Our analysis reveals a dichotomy between scale-free and Poisson distributions of in- and out-degree, the existence of a random number of hub nodes, high clustering, and unusual percolation behavior. These properties are similar to those of empirically observed web graphs. PMID:27078369

  11. Geometric stability of topological lattice phases

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, T. S.; Möller, Gunnar; Roy, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect illustrates the range of novel phenomena which can arise in a topologically ordered state in the presence of strong interactions. The possibility of realizing FQH-like phases in models with strong lattice effects has attracted intense interest as a more experimentally accessible venue for FQH phenomena which calls for more theoretical attention. Here we investigate the physical relevance of previously derived geometric conditions which quantify deviations from the Landau level physics of the FQHE. We conduct extensive numerical many-body simulations on several lattice models, obtaining new theoretical results in the process, and find remarkable correlation between these conditions and the many-body gap. These results indicate which physical factors are most relevant for the stability of FQH-like phases, a paradigm we refer to as the geometric stability hypothesis, and provide easily implementable guidelines for obtaining robust FQH-like phases in numerical or real-world experiments. PMID:26530311

  12. Topological minimally entangled states via geometric measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerschaper, Oliver; García-Saez, Artur; Orús, Román; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2014-11-01

    Here we show how the Minimally Entangled States (MES) of a 2d system with topological order can be identified using the geometric measure of entanglement. We show this by minimizing this measure for the doubled semion, doubled Fibonacci and toric code models on a torus with non-trivial topological partitions. Our calculations are done either quasi-exactly for small system sizes, or using the tensor network approach in Orús et al (arXiv:1406.0585) for large sizes. As a byproduct of our methods, we see that the minimisation of the geometric entanglement can also determine the number of Abelian quasiparticle excitations in a given model. The results in this paper provide a very efficient and accurate way of extracting the full topological information of a 2d quantum lattice model from the multipartite entanglement structure of its ground states.

  13. The classical geometrization of the electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo Duarte, Celso

    2015-08-01

    Following the line of the history, if by one side the electromagnetic theory was consolidated on the 19th century, the emergence of the special and the general relativity theories on the 20th century opened possibilities of further developments, with the search for the unification of the gravitation and the electromagnetism on a single unified theory. Some attempts to the geometrization of the electromagnetism emerged in this context, where these first models resided strictly on a classical basis. Posteriorly, they were followed by more complete and embracing quantum field theories. The present work reconsiders the classical viewpoint, with the purpose of showing that at first-order of approximation the electromagnetism constitutes a geometric structure aside other phenomena as gravitation, and that magnetic monopoles do not exist at least up to this order of approximation. Even though being limited, the model is consistent and offers the possibility of an experimental test of validity.

  14. The bouncing ball through a geometrical series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Sergio; Alfaro, Luis L.; Chavez, Juan E.; Bastarrachea, Aztlan; Hurtado, Jazmin

    2008-10-01

    The mathematical representation of the physical situation related to a bouncing ball on the floor is an important understanding difficulty for most of the students during the introductory mechanics and mathematics courses. The research group named Physics and mathematics in context from the University of Ciudad Juarez is concerned about the versatility in the change from a mathematical representation to the own physical context of any problem under a traditional instruction. In this case, the main idea is the association of the physical properties of the bouncing ball situation to the nearest mathematical model based on a geometrical series. The proposal of the cognitive development is based on a geometrical series that shows the time the ball takes to stop. In addition, we show the behavior of the ratio of the consecutive heights during the motion.

  15. Robot arm geometric link parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayati, S. A.

    A general method for estimating serial link manipulator geometric parameter errors is proposed in this paper. The positioning accuracy of the end-effector may be increased significantly by updating the nominal link parameters in the control software to represent the physical system more accurately. The proposed method is applicable for serial link manipulators with any combination of revolute or prismatic joints, and is not limited to a specific measurement technique.

  16. Multiphase flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basagaoglu, H.; Meakin, P.; Green, C.T.; Mathew, M.; ,

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with fluid-fluid and solid-fluid interaction potentials was used to study gravity-driven flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections. Simulated scenarios included fluid dripping from a fracture aperture, two-phase flow through intersecting fractures and thin-film flow on smooth and undulating solid surfaces. Qualitative comparisons with recently published experimental findings indicate that for these scenarios the LB model captured the underlying physics reasonably well.

  17. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  18. Chirality: a relational geometric-physical property.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Hans

    2013-11-01

    The definition of the term chirality by Lord Kelvin in 1893 and 1904 is analyzed by taking crystallography at that time into account. This shows clearly that chirality is a relational geometric-physical property, i.e., two relations between isometric objects are possible: homochiral or heterochiral. In scientific articles the relational term chirality is often mistaken for the two valued measure for the individual (absolute) sense of chirality, an arbitrary attributive term.

  19. Geometric simulation of structures containing rigid units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    Much insight into the behaviour of the framework silicates can be obtained from the Rigid Unit model. I review results from geometric analyses [1] of framework structures, quantifying the significance of rigid unit motion in thermal disorder and in defect accomodation, and from a method of simulation [2,3] based on a whole-body `geometric potential' rather than on interatomic potentials. I show the application of the geometric potential to the symmetry-constrained generation of hypothetical zeolite frameworks [4], and to the rapid generation of protein conformations using insights from rigid cluster decomposition [5]. 1. Wells, Dove and Tucker, Journal of Applied Crystallography, 37:536--544 (2004). 2. G.D. Gatta and S.A. Wells, Phys. Chem. Min. 31:1--10 (2004). 3. A. Sartbaeva, S. A. Wells, S. A. T. Redfern, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, 8173 (2004) 4. M. M. J. Treacy, I. Rivin, E. Balkovsky, K. H. Randall and M. D. Foster, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 74, 121-132 (2004). 5. M.F. Thorpe, Ming Lei, A.J. Rader, Donald J. Jacobs, and Leslie A. Kuhn, Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 19, 1:60 - 69, (2001).

  20. Salt Bridges: Geometrically Specific, Designable Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Donald, Jason E.; Kulp, Daniel W.; DeGrado, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Salt bridges occur frequently in proteins, providing conformational specificity and contributing to molecular recognition and catalysis. We present a comprehensive analysis of these interactions in protein structures by surveying a large database of protein structures. Salt bridges between Asp or Glu and His, Arg, or Lys display extremely well-defined geometric preferences. Several previously observed preferences are confirmed and others that were previously unrecognized are discovered. Salt bridges are explored for their preferences for different separations in sequence and in space, geometric preferences within proteins and at protein-protein interfaces, cooperativity in networked salt bridges, inclusion within metal-binding sites, preference for acidic electrons, apparent conformational side chain entropy reduction upon formation, and degree of burial. Salt bridges occur far more frequently between residues at close than distant sequence separations, but at close distances there remain strong preferences for salt bridges at specific separations. Specific types of complex salt bridges, involving three or more members, are also discovered. As we observe a strong relationship between the propensity to form a salt bridge and the placement of salt-bridging residues in protein sequences, we discuss the role that salt bridges might play in kinetically influencing protein folding and thermodynamically stabilizing the native conformation. We also develop a quantitative method to select appropriate crystal structure resolution and B-factor cutoffs. Detailed knowledge of these geometric and sequence dependences should aid de novo design and prediction algorithms. PMID:21287621

  1. Salt bridges: geometrically specific, designable interactions.

    PubMed

    Donald, Jason E; Kulp, Daniel W; DeGrado, William F

    2011-03-01

    Salt bridges occur frequently in proteins, providing conformational specificity and contributing to molecular recognition and catalysis. We present a comprehensive analysis of these interactions in protein structures by surveying a large database of protein structures. Salt bridges between Asp or Glu and His, Arg, or Lys display extremely well-defined geometric preferences. Several previously observed preferences are confirmed, and others that were previously unrecognized are discovered. Salt bridges are explored for their preferences for different separations in sequence and in space, geometric preferences within proteins and at protein-protein interfaces, co-operativity in networked salt bridges, inclusion within metal-binding sites, preference for acidic electrons, apparent conformational side chain entropy reduction on formation, and degree of burial. Salt bridges occur far more frequently between residues at close than distant sequence separations, but, at close distances, there remain strong preferences for salt bridges at specific separations. Specific types of complex salt bridges, involving three or more members, are also discovered. As we observe a strong relationship between the propensity to form a salt bridge and the placement of salt-bridging residues in protein sequences, we discuss the role that salt bridges might play in kinetically influencing protein folding and thermodynamically stabilizing the native conformation. We also develop a quantitative method to select appropriate crystal structure resolution and B-factor cutoffs. Detailed knowledge of these geometric and sequence dependences should aid de novo design and prediction algorithms.

  2. Geometric Phase Effect in Heat Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie; Hanggi, Petter; Li, Baowen

    2011-03-01

    Nonlinear molecular heat-pumping devices, which operate via explicitly modulating at least two parameters, are crucial for energy control in low dimensional nano-scale systems. We have applied slow two-parameter modulations on such a molecular junctions and consequently uncovered an intrinsic heat flux contribution, additional to the known, usual dynamical heat flux (from hot to cold). This additional heat flux derives from a nontrivial geometric origin that relates to a non-vanishing, so termed finite Berry phase. It provides a free lunch for the pumped heat and even can direct heat flux against the temperature bias. In addition we are able to show that this so pumped energy exhibits a novel robust fractional quantization phenomenon. Interestingly, this additional geometric heat pump mechanism is also shown to cause a breakdown of the heat-flux fluctuation theorem, which holds true for the non-driving, stationary heat flux transfer. The validity of this theorem is guaranteed whenever (i) the geometric phase contribution vanishes and (ii) the cyclic protocol preserves the detailed balance symmetry.

  3. Evolutionary Optimization of a Geometrically Refined Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, P. V.; Tinker, M. L.; Dozier, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    Structural optimization is a field of research that has experienced noteworthy growth for many years. Researchers in this area have developed optimization tools to successfully design and model structures, typically minimizing mass while maintaining certain deflection and stress constraints. Numerous optimization studies have been performed to minimize mass, deflection, and stress on a benchmark cantilever truss problem. Predominantly traditional optimization theory is applied to this problem. The cross-sectional area of each member is optimized to minimize the aforementioned objectives. This Technical Publication (TP) presents a structural optimization technique that has been previously applied to compliant mechanism design. This technique demonstrates a method that combines topology optimization, geometric refinement, finite element analysis, and two forms of evolutionary computation: genetic algorithms and differential evolution to successfully optimize a benchmark structural optimization problem. A nontraditional solution to the benchmark problem is presented in this TP, specifically a geometrically refined topological solution. The design process begins with an alternate control mesh formulation, multilevel geometric smoothing operation, and an elastostatic structural analysis. The design process is wrapped in an evolutionary computing optimization toolset.

  4. Interacting geometric priors for robust multimodel fitting.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trung Thanh; Chin, Tat-Jun; Schindler, Konrad; Suter, David

    2014-10-01

    Recent works on multimodel fitting are often formulated as an energy minimization task, where the energy function includes fitting error and regularization terms, such as low-level spatial smoothness and model complexity. In this paper, we introduce a novel energy with high-level geometric priors that consider interactions between geometric models, such that certain preferred model configurations may be induced.We argue that in many applications, such prior geometric properties are available and should be fruitfully exploited. For example, in surface fitting to point clouds, the building walls are usually either orthogonal or parallel to each other. Our proposed energy function is useful in dealing with unknown distributions of data errors and outliers, which are often the factors leading to biased estimation. Furthermore, the energy can be efficiently minimized using the expansion move method. We evaluate the performance on several vision applications using real data sets. Experimental results show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods without significant increase in computation.

  5. The geometric phase controls ultracold chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, the geometric phase is shown to control the outcome of an ultracold chemical reaction. The control is a direct consequence of the sign change on the interference term between two scattering pathways (direct and looping), which contribute to the reactive collision process in the presence of a conical intersection (point of degeneracy between two Born–Oppenheimer electronic potential energy surfaces). The unique properties of the ultracold energy regime lead to an effective quantization of the scattering phase shift enabling maximum constructive or destructive interference between the two pathways. By taking the O + OH → H + O2more » reaction as an illustrative example, it is shown that inclusion of the geometric phase modifies ultracold reaction rates by nearly two orders of magnitude. Interesting experimental control possibilities include the application of external electric and magnetic fields that might be used to exploit the geometric phase effect reported here and experimentally switch on or off the reactivity.« less

  6. A Geometric Theory of Nonlinear Morphoelastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik, Souhayl; Angoshtari, Arzhang; Goriely, Alain; Yavari, Arash

    2016-08-01

    Many thin three-dimensional elastic bodies can be reduced to elastic shells: two-dimensional elastic bodies whose reference shape is not necessarily flat. More generally, morphoelastic shells are elastic shells that can remodel and grow in time. These idealized objects are suitable models for many physical, engineering, and biological systems. Here, we formulate a general geometric theory of nonlinear morphoelastic shells that describes both the evolution of the body shape, viewed as an orientable surface, as well as its intrinsic material properties such as its reference curvatures. In this geometric theory, bulk growth is modeled using an evolving referential configuration for the shell, the so-called material manifold. Geometric quantities attached to the surface, such as the first and second fundamental forms, are obtained from the metric of the three-dimensional body and its evolution. The governing dynamical equations for the body are obtained from variational consideration by assuming that both fundamental forms on the material manifold are dynamical variables in a Lagrangian field theory. In the case where growth can be modeled by a Rayleigh potential, we also obtain the governing equations for growth in the form of kinetic equations coupling the evolution of the first and the second fundamental forms with the state of stress of the shell. We apply these ideas to obtain stress-free growth fields of a planar sheet, the time evolution of a morphoelastic circular cylindrical shell subject to time-dependent internal pressure, and the residual stress of a morphoelastic planar circular shell.

  7. Geometric phase effects in ultracold chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Jisha; Naduvalath, Balakrishnan; Kendrick, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In molecules, the geometric phase, also known as Berry's phase, originates from the adiabatic transport of the electronic wavefunction when the nuclei follow a closed path encircling a conical intersection between two electronic potential energy surfaces. It is demonstrated that the inclusion of the geometric phase has an important effect on ultracold chemical reaction rates. The effect appears in rotationally and vibrationally resolved integral cross sections as well as cross sections summed over all product quantum states. It arises from interference between scattering amplitudes of two reaction pathways: a direct path and a looping path that encircle the conical intersection between the two lowest adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces. Illustrative results are presented for the O+ OH --> H+ O2 reaction and for hydrogen exchange in H+ H2 and D+HD reactions. It is also qualitatively demonstrated that the geometric phase effect can be modulated by applying an external electric field allowing the possibility of quantum control of chemical reactions in the ultracold regime. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1505557 (N.B.) and ARO MURI Grant No. W911NF-12-1-0476 (N.B.).

  8. Early sex differences in weighting geometric cues.

    PubMed

    Lourenco, Stella F; Addy, Dede; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Fabian, Lydia

    2011-11-01

    When geometric and non-geometric information are both available for specifying location, men have been shown to rely more heavily on geometry compared to women. To shed insight on the nature and developmental origins of this sex difference, we examined how 18- to 24-month-olds represented the geometry of a surrounding (rectangular) space when direct non-geometric information (i.e. a beacon) was also available for localizing a hidden object. Children were tested on a disorientation task with multiple phases. Across experiments, boys relied more heavily than girls on geometry to guide localization, as indicated by their errors during the initial phase of the task, and by their search choices following transformations that left only geometry available, or that, under limited conditions, created a conflict between beacon and geometry. Analyses of search times suggested that girls, like boys, had encoded geometry, and testing in a square space ruled out explanations concerned with motivational and methodological variables. Taken together, the findings provide evidence for an early sex difference in the weighting of geometry. This sex difference, we suggest, reflects subtle variation in how boys and girls approach the problem of combining multiple sources of location information.

  9. Landsat-5 bumper-mode geometric correction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storey, J.C.; Choate, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) scan mirror was switched from its primary operating mode to a backup mode in early 2002 in order to overcome internal synchronization problems arising from long-term wear of the scan mirror mechanism. The backup bumper mode of operation removes the constraints on scan start and stop angles enforced in the primary scan angle monitor operating mode, requiring additional geometric calibration effort to monitor the active scan angles. It also eliminates scan timing telemetry used to correct the TM scan geometry. These differences require changes to the geometric correction algorithms used to process TM data. A mathematical model of the scan mirror's behavior when operating in bumper mode was developed. This model includes a set of key timing parameters that characterize the time-varying behavior of the scan mirror bumpers. To simplify the implementation of the bumper-mode model, the bumper timing parameters were recast in terms of the calibration and telemetry data items used to process normal TM imagery. The resulting geometric performance, evaluated over 18 months of bumper-mode operations, though slightly reduced from that achievable in the primary operating mode, is still within the Landsat specifications when the data are processed with the most up-to-date calibration parameters.

  10. Geometrical branching model: Correlations and jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Rudolph C.

    1988-04-01

    A geometrical model for multiparticle production at low as well as high pT is discussed. Below the threshold of substantial production of jets, the model has geometrical scaling and Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling, the latter being a result of Furry branching in multiplicity distribution at each impact parameter. Above the threshold the production of jets is explicitly taken into account by use of perturbative QCD. The separation into soft and hard components is done in the eikonal formalism consistent with unitarity. Geometrical scaling defines the soft component of the eikonal function. The hard component is related to the jet-production cross section; the pT cutoff is not chosen arbitrarily, but is to be determined by σel and σtot. Forward-backward multiplicity correlation can be calculated separately for the cases of no jets and with jets. The emphasis in this paper is on the formalism of the model. The procedure to determine the multiplicity distribution at all s is discussed.

  11. Geometrization of the physics with teleparallelism. II. Towards a fully geometric Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, José G.; Torr, Douglas G.; Lecompte, Alvaro

    1992-04-01

    In an accompanying paper (I), it is shown that the basic equations of the theory of Lorentzian connections with teleparallelism (TP) acquire standard forms of physical field equations upon removal of the constraints represented by the Bianchi identities. A classical physical theory results that supersedes general relativity and Maxwell-Lorentz electrodynamics if the connection is viewed as Finslerian. The theory also encompasses a short-range, strong, classical interaction. It has, however, an open end, since the source side of the torsion field equation is not geometric. In this paper, Kaehler's partial geometrization of the Dirac equation is taken as a starting point for the development of fully geometric Dirac equations via the correspondence principle given in I. For this purpose, Kaehler's calculus (where the spinors are differential forms) is generalized so that it also applies when the torsion is not zero. The point is then made that the forms can take values in tangent Clifford algebras rather than in tensor algebras. The basic “Eigenschaft” of the Kaehler calculus also is examined from the physical perspective of dimensional analysis. Geometric Dirac equations of great structural simplicity are finally inferred from the standard Dirac equation by using the aforementioned correspondence principle. The realm of application of the Dirac theory is thus enriched in principle, though only at an abstract level at this point: the standard spinors, which are scalar-valued forms in the Kaehler version of that theory, become Clifford-valued. In addition, the geometrization of the Dirac equation implies a geometrization of the Dirac current. When this current is replaced in the field equations for the torsion, the theory of Paper I becomes fully geometric.

  12. Geometric Approaches to Quadratic Equations from Other Times and Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Patricia R.; Bradley, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on geometric solutions of quadratic problems. Presents a collection of geometric techniques from ancient Babylonia, classical Greece, medieval Arabia, and early modern Europe to enhance the quadratic equation portion of an algebra course. (KHR)

  13. The effect of the 4MAT learning model on the achievement and motivation of 7th grade students on the subject of particulate nature of matter and an examination of student opinions on the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, İdris; Bılgın, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background:Many researchers agree that students, especially primary students, have learning difficulties on the 'Particulate Nature of Matter' unit. One reason for this difficulty is not considering individual differences for teaching science. In 4MAT model learning, environment is arranged according to individual differences. Purpose:The purpose of this study is to examine (1) the effects of the 4MAT learning model on the7th grade students' academic achievement and motivation on the 'Particulate Nature of Matter' unit and (2) identify student opinions on the 4MAT model. Sample:The sample consists of 235 students (115 experimental, 120 control) in Turkey. Design and methods:Experimental groups were instructed with the 4MAT model while control groups were instructed with a traditional method. Achievement Test (AchToM) and Motivation Scale (MotScl) were administered to students as pre- and post-tests. Moreover, the opinions of students in the experimental groups on the 4MAT model were ascertained through open-ended questions after the application. Results:According to independent t-test results, statistical difference in favour of the experimental groups was detected between the post-AchToM (ES = 1.43; p < .0001) and post-MotScl (ES = 0.32; p < .05) scores. According to data obtained from the questionnaire, the application of the 4MAT model increases student motivation and participation in the lesson, lessons are more amusing and enjoyable, and the self-confidence of the students increases. Besides these positive opinions, however, a few students stated that the method took too much time, they were not motivated and it did not help them in understanding the subject. Conclusions:The 4MAT model is more effective than traditional method in terms of increasing achievement and motivation. The model takes all learners into account. Thus, the teacher or educator should use the 4MAT model to ensure all students' learning in their classroom.

  14. Validation and Comparison of the 7th Edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging System and Other Prognostic Models to Predict Relapse-Free Survival in Asian Patients with Parotid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chang-Hsien; Liu, Chien-Ting; Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Hung, Chia-Yen; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Lin, Yung-Chang; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Hung, Yung-Shin; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Parotid cancer is a rare malignancy characterized by a heterogeneous histologic subtype and distinct biologic behavior. The present study aimed to externally validate and compare the performances of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system (7th Edition), Carrillo score, and Vander Poorten score in the prediction of tumor relapse probability in a large cohort of Asian parotid cancer patients. Methods: In total, 261 patients who underwent primary surgery for localized parotid cancer between 2002 and 2014 at the four affiliated hospitals of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were identified. All patients were categorized into different prognostic groups defined by these three models for the comparison of associated relapse-free survival (RFS) rates. Results: The 5-year overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and RFS rates were 82.9%, 86.2%, and 77.5%, respectively. All three models were significantly powerful in discriminating between the tumors of patients in the lowest and highest risk groups. The c-statistic for predicting the 5-year RFS was 0.74 for the AJCC staging, 0.74 for the Vander Poorten score, and 0.62 for the Carrillo score. The AJCC staging and Vander Poorten score gave significantly high c-statistic values compared to the Carrillo score. Conclusion: Our data validated that all three models are significantly powerful in discriminating tumor relapse between patients in lowest and highest risk groups. The AJCC system and Vander Poorten score proved superior to the Carrillo score, and showed similar performances in discriminating between the 5-year RFS probabilities of low and high-risk Asian parotid cancer patients.

  15. Identifying and Fostering Higher Levels of Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Škrbec, Maja; Cadež, Tatjana Hodnik

    2015-01-01

    Pierre M. Van Hiele created five levels of geometric thinking. We decided to identify the level of geometric thinking in the students in Slovenia, aged 9 to 11 years. The majority of students (60.7%) are at the transition between the zero (visual) level and the first (descriptive) level of geometric thinking. Nearly a third (31.7%) of students is…

  16. Children's Use of Geometric Information in Mapping Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasilyeva, Marina; Bowers, Edmond

    2006-01-01

    Accumulating evidence, particularly from research using the disorientation technique, demonstrates early sensitivity to geometric properties of space. However, it is not known whether children can use geometric cues to interpret a map. The current study examined how 3- to 6-year-olds use geometric features of layouts in solving mapping tasks.…

  17. Optimization of biotechnological systems through geometric programming

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Sanguino, Alberto; Voit, Eberhard O; Gonzalez-Alcon, Carlos; Torres, Nestor V

    2007-01-01

    Background In the past, tasks of model based yield optimization in metabolic engineering were either approached with stoichiometric models or with structured nonlinear models such as S-systems or linear-logarithmic representations. These models stand out among most others, because they allow the optimization task to be converted into a linear program, for which efficient solution methods are widely available. For pathway models not in one of these formats, an Indirect Optimization Method (IOM) was developed where the original model is sequentially represented as an S-system model, optimized in this format with linear programming methods, reinterpreted in the initial model form, and further optimized as necessary. Results A new method is proposed for this task. We show here that the model format of a Generalized Mass Action (GMA) system may be optimized very efficiently with techniques of geometric programming. We briefly review the basics of GMA systems and of geometric programming, demonstrate how the latter may be applied to the former, and illustrate the combined method with a didactic problem and two examples based on models of real systems. The first is a relatively small yet representative model of the anaerobic fermentation pathway in S. cerevisiae, while the second describes the dynamics of the tryptophan operon in E. coli. Both models have previously been used for benchmarking purposes, thus facilitating comparisons with the proposed new method. In these comparisons, the geometric programming method was found to be equal or better than the earlier methods in terms of successful identification of optima and efficiency. Conclusion GMA systems are of importance, because they contain stoichiometric, mass action and S-systems as special cases, along with many other models. Furthermore, it was previously shown that algebraic equivalence transformations of variables are sufficient to convert virtually any types of dynamical models into the GMA form. Thus

  18. Aerospace plane guidance using geometric control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Mark A.; Mease, Kenneth D.

    1990-01-01

    A reduced-order method employing decomposition, based on time-scale separation, of the 4-D state space in a 2-D slow manifold and a family of 2-D fast manifolds is shown to provide an excellent approximation to the full-order minimum-fuel ascent trajectory. Near-optimal guidance is obtained by tracking the reduced-order trajectory. The tracking problem is solved as regulation problems on the family of fast manifolds, using the exact linearization methodology from nonlinear geometric control theory. The validity of the overall guidance approach is indicated by simulation.

  19. Crystallization kinetics: A solution for geometrical impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, R. A.; Saleh, A. M.

    2002-04-01

    Starting from the wrong derivation by Erukhimovitch and Baram of an equation alternative to the classical Kolmogoroff-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami one for the transformed fraction in an infinite specimen, undergoing an isothermal first-order phase transformation, it is shown that a different exact solution of the geometrical problem of impingement can be obtained. Such solution is equivalent to the empirical one already presented by Austin and Rickett more than sixty years ago and allows to better fit experimental results for isothermal transformations. This also suggests that perhaps different statistical derivations could allow to reach the same result.

  20. Geometric Aspects of Biological Sequence Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Stojmirović, Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We introduce a geometric framework suitable for studying the relationships among biological sequences. In contrast to previous works, our formulation allows asymmetric distances (quasi-metrics), originating from uneven weighting of strings, which may induce non-trivial partial orders on sets of biosequences. The distances considered are more general than traditional generalized string edit distances. In particular, our framework enables non-trivial conversion between sequence similarities, both local and global, and distances. Our constructions apply to a wide class of scoring schemes and require much less restrictive gap penalties than the ones regularly used. Numerous examples are provided to illustrate the concepts introduced and their potential applications. PMID:19361329

  1. A geometric criterion for adiabatic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, T.J. ); Kovacic, G. )

    1994-03-01

    Chaos in adiabatic Hamiltonian systems is a recent discovery and a pervasive phenomenon in physics. In this work, a geometric criterion is discussed based on the theory of action from classical mechanics to detect the existence of Smale horseshoe chaos in adiabatic systems. It is used to show that generic adiabatic planar Hamiltonian systems exhibit stochastic dynamics in large regions of phase space. To illustrate the method, results are obtained for three problems concerning relativistic particle dynamics, fluid mechanics, and passage through resonance, results which either could not be obtained with existing methods, or which were difficult and analytically impractical to obtain with them.

  2. Geometric derivation of the chronometric redshift.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I E

    1993-01-01

    The chronometric redshift-distance relation z = tan 2(1/2rho), where rho is the distance in radians in the Einstein metric, is derived by an elementary geometric analysis comparable to that in traditional analysis of the expanding universe model. The differential dTt of Einstein time evolution Tt through time t, as applied to the local Minkowski coordinates x, takes the form sec2(1/2t). At the point of observation t = rho, implying that for a sufficiently localized source, observed wave lengths are a factor of sec2(1/2rho) greater than the corresponding emitted wave lengths. PMID:11607440

  3. Geometrical Wake of a Smooth Flat Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    A transverse geometrical wake generated by a beam passing through a smooth flat collimator with a gradually varying gap between the upper and lower walls is considered. Based on generalization of the approach recently developed for a smooth circular taper we reduce the electromagnetic problem of the impedance calculation to the solution of two much simpler static problems - a magnetostatic and an electrostatic ones. The solution shows that in the limit of not very large frequencies, the impedance increases with the ratio h/d where h is the width and d is the distance between the collimating jaws. Numerical results are presented for the NLC Post Linac collimator.

  4. State-Space Regularization: Geometric Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chavent, G.; Kunisch, K.

    1998-05-15

    Regularization of nonlinear ill-posed inverse problems is analyzed for a class of problems that is characterized by mappings which are the composition of a well-posed nonlinear and an ill-posed linear mapping. Regularization is carried out in the range of the nonlinear mapping. In applications this corresponds to the state-space variable of a partial differential equation or to preconditioning of data. The geometric theory of projection onto quasi-convex sets is used to analyze the stabilizing properties of this regularization technique and to describe its asymptotic behavior as the regularization parameter tends to zero.

  5. The minimal geometric deformation approach extended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, R.; Ovalle, J.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-11-01

    The minimal geometric deformation approach was introduced in order to study the exterior spacetime around spherically symmetric self-gravitating systems, such as stars or similar astrophysical objects, in the Randall-Sundrum brane-world framework. A consistent extension of this approach is developed here, which contains modifications of both the time component and the radial component of a spherically symmetric metric. A modified Schwarzschild geometry is obtained as an example of its simplest application, and a new solution that is potentially useful to describe stars in the brane-world is also presented.

  6. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  7. Some Geometrical Aspects of M-Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Azcárraga, José A.; Izquierdo, José M.

    2008-06-01

    Some geometrical aspects of super-p-brane theory, M-theory, and their connection with supergravity, are reviewed. In particular, the different fractions of preserved supersymmetries are discussed both from the algebraic and the supergravity solutions point of view. We also review the `preon conjecture' according to which states preserving a 31/32 fraction of supersymmetries would be the building blocks of M-theory, and on the failed attempts made so far to find these states in terms of supergravity solutions.

  8. Geometric derivation of the quantum speed limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Philip J.; Kok, Pieter

    2010-08-15

    The Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin inequalities play an important role in the study of quantum-mechanical processes in nature since they provide general limits on the speed of dynamical evolution. However, to date there has been only one derivation of the Margolus-Levitin inequality. In this paper, alternative geometric derivations for both inequalities are obtained from the statistical distance between quantum states. The inequalities are shown to hold for unitary evolution of pure and mixed states, and a counterexample to the inequalities is given for evolution described by completely positive trace-preserving maps. The counterexample shows that there is no quantum speed limit for nonunitary evolution.

  9. On the minimum of independent geometrically distributed random variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardo, Gianfranco; Leemis, Lawrence M.; Nicol, David

    1994-01-01

    The expectations E(X(sub 1)), E(Z(sub 1)), and E(Y(sub 1)) of the minimum of n independent geometric, modifies geometric, or exponential random variables with matching expectations differ. We show how this is accounted for by stochastic variability and how E(X(sub 1))/E(Y(sub 1)) equals the expected number of ties at the minimum for the geometric random variables. We then introduce the 'shifted geometric distribution' and show that there is a unique value of the shift for which the individual shifted geometric and exponential random variables match expectations both individually and in the minimums.

  10. Finite octree meshing through topologically driven geometric operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grice, Kurt R.

    1987-01-01

    The octree technique is developed into the finite octree, and an overview is given. Modeler requirements are given. The octree discretization is discussed along with geometric communication operators. Geometric communication operators returning topological associativity and geometric communication operators returning spatial data are also discussed and illustrated. The advantages are given of the boundary representation and of geometric communication operators. The implementation plays an important role in the integration with a variety of geometric modelers. The capabilities of closed loop processes within a complete finite element system are presented.

  11. A geometric approach to direct minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Voorhis, Troy; Head-Gordon, Martin

    The approach presented, geometric direct minimization (GDM), is derived from purely geometrical arguments, and is designed to minimize a function of a set of orthonormal orbitals. The optimization steps consist of sequential unitary transformations of the orbitals, and convergence is accelerated using the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) approach in the iterative subspace, together with a diagonal approximation to the Hessian for the remaining degrees of freedom. The approach is tested by implementing the solution of the self-consistent field (SCF) equations and comparing results with the standard direct inversion in the iterative subspace (DIIS) method. It is found that GDM is very robust and converges in every system studied, including several cases in which DIIS fails to find a solution. For main group compounds, GDM convergence is nearly as rapid as DIIS, whereas for transition metalcontaining systems we find that GDM is significantly slower than DIIS. A hybrid procedure where DIIS is used for the first several iterations and GDM is used thereafter is found to provide a robust solution for transition metal-containing systems.

  12. Geometric representation of fundamental particles' inertial mass

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, L.; Spencer, James

    2015-07-22

    A geometric representation of the (N = 279) masses of quarks, leptons, hadrons and gauge bosons was introduced by employing a Riemann Sphere facilitating the interpretation of the N masses in terms of a single particle, the Masson, which might be in one of the N eigen-states. Geometrically, its mass is the radius of the Riemann Sphere. Dynamically, its derived mass is near the mass of the nucleon regardless of whether it is determined from all N particles of only the hadrons, the mesons or the baryons separately. Ignoring all the other properties of these particles, it is shown that the eigen-values, the polar representation θν of the masses on the Sphere, satisfy the symmetry θν + θN+1-ν = π within less than 1% relative error. In addition, these pair correlations include the pairs θγ + θtop ≃ π and θgluon + θH ≃ π as well as pairing the weak gauge bosons with the three neutrinos.

  13. Translating cosmological special relativity into geometric algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Martin Erik

    2012-11-01

    Geometric algebra and Clifford algebra are important tools to describe and analyze the physics of the world we live in. Although there is enormous empirical evidence that we are living in four dimensional spacetime, mathematical worlds of higher dimensions can be used to present the physical laws of our world in an aesthetical and didactical more appealing way. In physics and mathematics education we are therefore confronted with the question how these high dimensional spaces should be taught. But as an immediate confrontation of students with high dimensional compactified spacetimes would expect too much from them at the beginning of their university studies, it seems reasonable to approach the mathematics and physics of higher dimensions step by step. The first step naturally is the step from four dimensional spacetime of special relativity to a five dimensional spacetime world. As a toy model for this artificial world cosmological special relativity, invented by Moshe Carmeli, can be used. This five dimensional non-compactified approach describes a spacetime which consists not only of one time dimension and three space dimensions. In addition velocity is regarded as a fifth dimension. This model very probably will not represent physics correctly. But it can be used to discuss and analyze the consequences of an additional dimension in a clear and simple way. Unfortunately Carmeli has formulated cosmological special relativity in standard vector notation. Therefore a translation of cosmological special relativity into the mathematical language of Grassmann and Clifford (Geometric algebra) is given and the physics of cosmological special relativity is discussed.

  14. Nanoparticle fabrication by geometrically confined nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denomme, Ryan C.; Iyer, Krishna; Kreder, Michael; Smith, Brendan; Nieva, Patricia M.

    2013-07-01

    Arrays of metal nanoparticles, typically gold or silver, exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance, a phenomenon that has many applications, such as chemical and biological sensing. However, fabrication of metal nanoparticle arrays with high uniformity and repeatability, at a reasonable cost, is difficult. Nanosphere lithography (NSL) has been used before to produce inexpensive nanoparticle arrays through the use of monolayers of self-assembled microspheres as a deposition mask. However, control over the size and location of the arrays, as well as uniformity over large areas is poor, thus limiting its use to research purposes. In this paper, a new NSL method, called here geometrically confined NSL (GCNSL), is presented. In GCNSL, microsphere assembly is confined to geometric patterns defined in photoresist, allowing high-precision and large-scale nanoparticle patterning while still remaining low cost. Using this new method, it is demonstrated that 400 nm polystyrene microspheres can be assembled inside of large arrays of photoresist patterns. Results show that optimal microsphere assembly is achieved with long and narrow rectangular photoresist patterns. The combination of microsphere monolayers and photoresist patterns is then used as a deposition mask to produce silver nanoparticles at precise locations on the substrate with high uniformity, repeatability, and quality.

  15. Geometric and Radiometric Evaluation of Rasat Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cam, Ali; Topan, Hüseyin; Oruç, Murat; Özendi, Mustafa; Bayık, Çağlar

    2016-06-01

    RASAT, the second remote sensing satellite of Turkey, was designed and assembled, and also is being operated by TÜBİTAK Uzay (Space) Technologies Research Institute (Ankara). RASAT images in various levels are available free-of-charge via Gezgin portal for Turkish citizens. In this paper, the images in panchromatic (7.5 m GSD) and RGB (15 m GSD) bands in various levels were investigated with respect to its geometric and radiometric characteristics. The first geometric analysis is the estimation of the effective GSD as less than 1 pixel for radiometrically processed level (L1R) of both panchromatic and RGB images. Secondly, 2D georeferencing accuracy is estimated by various non-physical transformation models (similarity, 2D affine, polynomial, affine projection, projective, DLT and GCP based RFM) reaching sub-pixel accuracy using minimum 39 and maximum 52 GCPs. The radiometric characteristics are also investigated for 8 bits, estimating SNR between 21.8-42.2, and noise 0.0-3.5 for panchromatic and MS images for L1R when the sea is masked to obtain the results for land areas. The analysis show that RASAT images satisfies requirements for various applications. The research is carried out in Zonguldak test site which is mountainous and partly covered by dense forest and urban areas.

  16. Geometrical analysis of cytochrome c unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urie, Kristopher G.; Pletneva, Ekaterina; Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Kozak, John J.

    2011-01-01

    A geometrical model has been developed to study the unfolding of iso-1 cytochrome c. The model draws on the crystallographic data reported for this protein. These data were used to calculate the distance between specific residues in the folded state, and in a sequence of extended states defined by n = 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 residue units. Exact calculations carried out for each of the 103 residues in the polypeptide chain demonstrate that different regions of the chain have different unfolding histories. Regions where there is a persistence of compact structures can be identified, and this geometrical characterization is fully consistent with analyses of time-resolved fluorescence energy-transfer (TrFET) data using dansyl-derivatized cysteine side-chain probes at positions 39, 50, 66, 85, and 99. The calculations were carried out assuming that different regions of the polypeptide chain unfold synchronously. To test this assumption, lattice Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study systematically the possible importance of asynchronicity. Calculations show that small departures from synchronous dynamics can arise if displacements of residues in the main body of the chain are much more sluggish than near-terminal residues.

  17. Processing geometric representations on SIMD computers

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Y.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis contributes to designing parallel algorithms to process border and linear quadtree representations on mesh-connected computers (MCCs) and hypercubes. This thesis consists of two parts. The first part studies some primitive operations on mesh-connected computers and hypercubes. These include various routing tasks and several versions of the parallel prefix algorithms. It is shown how general routings can be done in O(n) time on an n {times} n mesh and O(d{sup 2}) on a d-dimensional hypercube (d-cube). Also presented are optimal routing algorithms for some classes of permutation routings. For the parallel prefix problem, the author describes how the initial prefixes can be computed efficiently when the data are mapped into the MCC or the hypercube in some specific manners. The second part deals with processing border codes and linear quadtrees. These include generating border codes and linear quadtrees from a given image, reconstructing the image from its geometric representations, computing various geometric properties, answering the point-in-region query, performing set operations, etc. For linear quadtrees, algorithms are also designed for finding neighbors of equal or larger size for all nodes simultaneously. A connected component-labeling algorithm is also presented.

  18. A Geometric Theory of Growth Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavari, Arash

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we formulate a geometric theory of the mechanics of growing solids. Bulk growth is modeled by a material manifold with an evolving metric. The time dependence of the metric represents the evolution of the stress-free (natural) configuration of the body in response to changes in mass density and “shape”. We show that the time dependency of the material metric will affect the energy balance and the entropy production inequality; both the energy balance and the entropy production inequality have to be modified. We then obtain the governing equations covariantly by postulating invariance of energy balance under time-dependent spatial diffeomorphisms. We use the principle of maximum entropy production in deriving an evolution equation for the material metric. In the case of isotropic growth, we find those growth distributions that do not result in residual stresses. We then look at Lagrangian field theory of growing elastic solids. We will use the Lagrange-d’Alembert principle with Rayleigh’s dissipation functions to derive the governing equations. We make an explicit connection between our geometric theory and the conventional multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient, F= F e F g, into growth and elastic parts. We linearize the nonlinear theory and derive a linearized theory of growth mechanics. Finally, we obtain the stress-free growth distributions in the linearized theory.

  19. Geometrically nonlinear behavior of piezoelectric laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovitch, Oded

    2005-08-01

    The geometrically nonlinear behavior of piezo-laminated plates actuated with isotropic or anisotropic piezoelectric layers is analytically investigated. The analytical model is derived using the variational principle of virtual work along with the lamination and plate theories, the von Karman large displacement and moderate rotation kinematic relations, and the anisotropic piezoelectric constitutive laws. A solution strategy that combines the approach of the method of lines, the advantages of the finite element concept, and the variational formulation is developed. This approach yields a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations with nonlinear boundary conditions, which are solved using the multiple-shooting method. Convergence and verification of the model are examined through comparison with linear and nonlinear results of other approximation methods. The nonlinear response of two active plate structures is investigated numerically. The first plate is actuated in bending using monolithic piezoceramic layers and the second one is actuated in twist using macro-fiber composites. The results quantitatively reveal the complicated in-plane stress state associated with the piezoelectric actuation and the geometrically nonlinear coupling of the in-plane and out-of-plane responses of the plate. The influence of the nonlinear effects ranges from significant stiffening in certain combinations of electrical loads and boundary conditions to amplifications of the induced deflections in others. The paper closes with a summary and conclusions.

  20. Geometrical, response, and gap properties of Lindbladians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Victor V.; Bradlyn, Barry; Fraas, Martin; Jiang, Liang

    We study Lindbladians admitting multi-dimensional steady-state subspaces (SSS) which can be used to store, protect, and process quantum information. We derive an analytical formula for the left eigenmatrices of such Lindbladians corresponding to purely imaginary eigenvalues. This formula resolves how Lindbladian evolution affects perturbative response and geometrical features of the SSS and allows us to generalize recent work to all types of SSS. We show that Hamiltonian and certain jump operator perturbations induce, to first order, exclusively unitary evolution on the SSS. Similarly, the holonomy (generalization of geometric phase) induced on the SSS after adiabatic traversal of a closed path in parameter space is unitary. We derive a new Riemannian metric tensor in parameter space induced by one type of SSS, generalizing the Fubini-Study metric to Lindbladians possessing one or more mixed steady states. We derive a Kubo formula governing linear response of the SSS to Hamiltonian perturbations. Finally, we show that the energy scale governing leakage out of the SSS is different from the conventional Lindbladian dissipative gap.

  1. Geometrical versus wave optics under gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit

    2015-06-01

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely, null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics—rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches—we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  2. Geometric defects in quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Andrey

    2016-08-01

    We describe a geometric (or gravitational) analog of the Laughlin quasiholes in fractional quantum Hall states. Analogously to the quasiholes, these defects can be constructed by an insertion of an appropriate vertex operator into the conformal block representation of a trial wave function; however, unlike the quasiholes these defects are extrinsic and do not correspond to true excitations of the quantum fluid. We construct a wave function in the presence of such defects and explain how to assign an electric charge and a spin to each defect and calculate the adiabatic, non-Abelian statistics of the defects. The defects turn out to be equivalent to the genons in that their adiabatic exchange statistics can be described in terms of representations of the mapping class group of an appropriate higher genus Riemann surface. We present a general construction that, in principle, makes it possible to calculate the statistics of Zn genons for any "parent" topological phase. We illustrate the construction on the example of the Laughlin state and perform an explicit calculation of the braiding matrices. In addition to non-Abelian statistics, geometric defects possess a universal Abelian overall phase, determined by the gravitational anomaly.

  3. Geometrical basis for the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, F. )

    1994-02-01

    The robust character of the Standard Model is confirmed. Examination of its geometrical basis in three equivalent internal symmetry spaces - the unitary plane C[sup 2], the quaternion space Q, and the real space R[sup 4] - as well as the real space R[sup 3] uncovers mathematical properties that predict the physical properties of leptons and quarks. The finite rotational subgroups of the gauge group SU(2)[sub L] [times] U(1)[sub Y] generate exactly three lepton families and four quark families and reveal how quarks and leptons are related. Among the physical properties explained are the mass ratios of the six leptons and eight quarks, the origin of the left-handed preference by the weak interaction, the geometrical source of color symmetry, and the zero neutrino masses. The (u,d) and (c,s) quark families team together to satisfy the triangle anomaly cancellation with the electron family, while the other families pair one-to-one for cancellation. The spontaneously broken symmetry is discrete and needs no Higgs mechanism. Predictions include all massless neutrinos, the top quark at 160 GeV/c[sup 2], the b[prime] quark at 80 GeV/c[sup 2], and the t[prime] quark at 2600 GeV/c[sup 2].

  4. Geometric control of myogenic cell fate

    PubMed Central

    de Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Hoang, Mike Bao-Trong; Conboy, Irina M

    2006-01-01

    This work combines expertise in stem cell biology and bioengineering to define the system for geometric control of proliferation and differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells. We have created an artificial niche of myogenic progenitor cells, namely, modified extracellular matrix (ECM) substrates with spatially embedded growth or differentiation factors (GF, DF) that predictably direct muscle cell fate in a geometric pattern. Embedded GF and DF signal progenitor cells from specifically defined areas on the ECM successfully competed against culture media for myogenic cell fate determination at a clearly defined boundary. Differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes is induced in growth-promoting medium, myotube formation is delayed in differentiation-promoting medium, and myogenic cells, at different stages of proliferation and differentiation, can be induced to coexist adjacently in identical culture media. This method can be used to identify molecular interactions between cells in different stages of myogenic differentiation, which are likely to be important determinants of tissue repair. The designed ECM niches can be further developed into a vehicle for transplantation of myogenic progenitor cells maintaining their regenerative potential. Additionally, this work may also serve as a general model to engineer synthetic cellular niches to harness the regenerative potential of organ stem cells. PMID:17722537

  5. Geometric Toys in the Attic? A Corpus Analysis of Early Exposure to Geometric Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Ilyse; Verdine, Brian; Golinkoff, Roberta; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Preschoolers' experiences with shapes are important because geometry is foundational to aspects of mathematics and it is now part of the Common Core for school-readiness. Exposure to shapes also provides experiences that are key to developing spatial thinking more broadly. Yet achieving a strong conceptual understanding of geometric categories can…

  6. Thematic mapper: detailed radiometric and geometric characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, Hugh

    1983-01-01

    Those radiometric characteristics of the Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM) that can be established without absolute calibration of spectral data have been examined. Subscenes of radiometric all raw data (B-data) were examined on an individual detector basis: areas of uniform radiance were used to characterize subtle radiometric differences and noise problems. A variety of anomalies have been discovered with magnitude of a few digital levels or less: the only problem not addressable by ground processing is irregular width of the digital levels. Essentially all of this non-ideal performance is incorporated in the fully processed (P-type) images, but disguised by the geometric resampling procedure. The overall performance of the Thematic Mapper is a great improvement over previous Landsat scanners. The effective resolution in radiance is degraded by about a factor of two by irregular width of the digital levels. Several detectors have a change of gain with a period of several scans, the largest effect is about 4%. These detectors appear to switch between two response levels during scan direction reversal; there is no apparent periodicity to these changes. This can cause small apparent difference between forward and reverse scans for portions of an image. The high-frequency noise level of each detector was characterized by the standard deviation of the first derivative in the sample direction across a flat field. Coherent sinusoidal noise patterns were determined using one-dimensional Fourier transforms. A "stitching" pattern in Band 1 has a period of 13.8 samples with a peak-to-peak amplitude ranging from 1 to 5 DN. Noise with a period of 3.24 samples is pronounced for most detectors in band 1, to a lesser extent in bands 2, 3, and 4, and below background noise levels in bands 5, 6, and 7. The geometric fidelity of the GSFC film writer used for Thematic Mapper (TM) images was assessed by measurement with accuracy bette than three micrometers of a test grid. A set of 55

  7. Random geometric graphs with general connection functions.

    PubMed

    Dettmann, Carl P; Georgiou, Orestis

    2016-03-01

    In the original (1961) Gilbert model of random geometric graphs, nodes are placed according to a Poisson point process, and links formed between those within a fixed range. Motivated by wireless ad hoc networks "soft" or "probabilistic" connection models have recently been introduced, involving a "connection function" H(r) that gives the probability that two nodes at distance r are linked (directly connect). In many applications (not only wireless networks), it is desirable that the graph is connected; that is, every node is linked to every other node in a multihop fashion. Here the connection probability of a dense network in a convex domain in two or three dimensions is expressed in terms of contributions from boundary components for a very general class of connection functions. It turns out that only a few quantities such as moments of the connection function appear. Good agreement is found with special cases from previous studies and with numerical simulations. PMID:27078372

  8. Facial symmetry assessment based on geometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoping; Cao, Hanqiang

    2015-12-01

    Face image symmetry is an important factor affecting the accuracy of automatic face recognition. Selecting high symmetrical face image could improve the performance of the recognition. In this paper, we proposed a novel facial symmetry evaluation scheme based on geometric features, including centroid, singular value, in-plane rotation angle of face and the structural similarity index (SSIM). First, we calculate the value of the four features according to the corresponding formula. Then, we use fuzzy logic algorithm to integrate the value of the four features into a single number which represents the facial symmetry. The proposed method is efficient and can adapt to different recognition methods. Experimental results demonstrate its effectiveness in improving the robustness of face detection and recognition.

  9. Geometrical model of the Baltic artesian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennikovs, J.; Virbulis, J.; Bethers, U.

    2012-04-01

    Baltic artesian basin (BAB) is a multi-layer sedimentary basin spanning around 480'000 km2. BAB is located in the territory of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, parts of Poland, Russia, Belarus and large area of the Baltic Sea, including island of Gotland. The thickness of sedimentary cover is about 5000 m in the south-western part. Crystalline bedding reaches the surface in the northern and north-western parts. The aim of the present work is development of the model of geometric structure and three dimensional finite element mesh for the hydrogeological model of the whole BAB. The information that is used to build the geometrical structure includes: (1) Stratigraphic information from boreholes in Latvia and Estonia (2) Maps of height isolines of geological layers for Latvia and Lithuania (3) Maps of sub-quaternary deposits in Latvia and Lithuania (4) Maps of fault lines on the crystalline basement surface in Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia (5) Buried valley data from Latvia and Estonia (6) Earth topography data (7) Baltic sea depth data (8) Data from published geological cross-sections, information from books and other sources. Unification of the heterogeneous information from different sources, which are employed for building of the geometrical structure of the model are performed. Special algorithms are developed for this purpose considering the priority, importance and plausibility of each of the data sources. Pre-processing of the borehole information to screen out the outlying borehole data has been performed. Model of geological structure contains 42 layers. It includes aquifers and aquitards from Cambrian up to the Quaternary deposits. Fault displacements are incorporated into the model taking into account data from the published structural maps. Four reconstructed regional erosion surfaces (upper Ordovician, Devonian, Permian and Quaternary) are included into the model Three dimensional mesh of the geological structure is constructed layer-wise. The triangular

  10. Geometric aeolian dune crest migration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, T.; Mohrig, D. C.; Kocurek, G.; Pedersen, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a geometric aeolian dune crest model that provides a predictive linkage between local lee face sediment deposition and wholesale landform change. The model is driven using an initial condition of 3D dune crest data obtained from a time series of airborne LIDAR surveys of White Sands, NM, and wind observations from nearby Holloman AFB. Transient dune migration is modeled by volume filling of a simple theoretical dune geometry with sediment flux derived using shear velocity dependent transport (Bagnold, 1941) modified by a new incidence angle dependent lee face sediment deposition function styled after Rubin and Hunter (1985). Model calibration is achieved using an azimuthal wind direction correction and threshold values for shear velocity dependent sediment transport. Agreement between observations and model results are presented using a l2 norm representing a global error estimate.

  11. Geometric formulation of the uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosyk, G. M.; Osán, T. M.; Lamberti, P. W.; Portesi, M.

    2014-03-01

    A geometric approach to formulate the uncertainty principle between quantum observables acting on an N-dimensional Hilbert space is proposed. We consider the fidelity between a density operator associated with a quantum system and a projector associated with an observable, and interpret it as the probability of obtaining the outcome corresponding to that projector. We make use of fidelity-based metrics such as angle, Bures, and root infidelity to propose a measure of uncertainty. The triangle inequality allows us to derive a family of uncertainty relations. In the case of the angle metric, we recover the Landau-Pollak inequality for pure states and show, in a natural way, how to extend it to the case of mixed states in arbitrary dimension. In addition, we derive and compare alternative uncertainty relations when using other known fidelity-based metrics.

  12. A geometrical perspective for the bargaining problem.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong

    2010-01-01

    A new treatment to determine the Pareto-optimal outcome for a non-zero-sum game is presented. An equilibrium point for any game is defined here as a set of strategy choices for the players, such that no change in the choice of any single player will increase the overall payoff of all the players. Determining equilibrium for multi-player games is a complex problem. An intuitive conceptual tool for reducing the complexity, via the idea of spatially representing strategy options in the bargaining problem is proposed. Based on this geometry, an equilibrium condition is established such that the product of their gains over what each receives is maximal. The geometrical analysis of a cooperative bargaining game provides an example for solving multi-player and non-zero-sum games efficiently. PMID:20436675

  13. Random geometric graphs with general connection functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, Carl P.; Georgiou, Orestis

    2016-03-01

    In the original (1961) Gilbert model of random geometric graphs, nodes are placed according to a Poisson point process, and links formed between those within a fixed range. Motivated by wireless ad hoc networks "soft" or "probabilistic" connection models have recently been introduced, involving a "connection function" H (r ) that gives the probability that two nodes at distance r are linked (directly connect). In many applications (not only wireless networks), it is desirable that the graph is connected; that is, every node is linked to every other node in a multihop fashion. Here the connection probability of a dense network in a convex domain in two or three dimensions is expressed in terms of contributions from boundary components for a very general class of connection functions. It turns out that only a few quantities such as moments of the connection function appear. Good agreement is found with special cases from previous studies and with numerical simulations.

  14. A geometric approach to quantum state separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagan, E.; Yerokhin, V.; Shehu, A.; Feldman, E.; Bergou, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Probabilistic quantum state transformations can be characterized by the degree of state separation they provide. This, in turn, sets limits on the success rate of these transformations. We consider optimum state separation of two known pure states in the general case where the known states have arbitrary a priori probabilities. The problem is formulated from a geometric perspective and shown to be equivalent to the problem of finding tangent curves within two families of conics that represent the unitarity constraints and the objective functions to be optimized, respectively. We present the corresponding analytical solutions in various forms. In the limit of perfect state separation, which is equivalent to unambiguous state discrimination, the solution exhibits a phenomenon analogous to a second order symmetry breaking phase transition. We also propose a linear optics implementation of separation which is based on the dual rail representation of qubits and single-photon multiport interferometry.

  15. Geometric Mechanics of Curved Crease Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Dudte, Levi H.; Mahadevan, L.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-09-01

    Folding a sheet of paper along a curve can lead to structures seen in decorative art and utilitarian packing boxes. Here we present a theory for the simplest such structure: an annular circular strip that is folded along a central circular curve to form a three-dimensional buckled structure driven by geometrical frustration. We quantify this shape in terms of the radius of the circle, the dihedral angle of the fold, and the mechanical properties of the sheet of paper and the fold itself. When the sheet is isometrically deformed everywhere except along the fold itself, stiff folds result in creases with constant curvature and oscillatory torsion. However, relatively softer folds inherit the broken symmetry of the buckled shape with oscillatory curvature and torsion. Our asymptotic analysis of the isometrically deformed state is corroborated by numerical simulations that allow us to generalize our analysis to study structures with multiple curved creases.

  16. Geometric mechanics of curved crease origami.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marcelo A; Dudte, Levi H; Mahadevan, L; Santangelo, Christian D

    2012-09-14

    Folding a sheet of paper along a curve can lead to structures seen in decorative art and utilitarian packing boxes. Here we present a theory for the simplest such structure: an annular circular strip that is folded along a central circular curve to form a three-dimensional buckled structure driven by geometrical frustration. We quantify this shape in terms of the radius of the circle, the dihedral angle of the fold, and the mechanical properties of the sheet of paper and the fold itself. When the sheet is isometrically deformed everywhere except along the fold itself, stiff folds result in creases with constant curvature and oscillatory torsion. However, relatively softer folds inherit the broken symmetry of the buckled shape with oscillatory curvature and torsion. Our asymptotic analysis of the isometrically deformed state is corroborated by numerical simulations that allow us to generalize our analysis to study structures with multiple curved creases. PMID:23005633

  17. A geometric approach to spectral subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2008-01-01

    The traditional power spectral subtraction algorithm is computationally simple to implement but suffers from musical noise distortion. In addition, the subtractive rules are based on incorrect assumptions about the cross terms being zero. A new geometric approach to spectral subtraction is proposed in the present paper that addresses these shortcomings of the spectral subtraction algorithm. A method for estimating the cross terms involving the phase differences between the noisy (and clean) signals and noise is proposed. Analysis of the gain function of the proposed algorithm indicated that it possesses similar properties as the traditional MMSE algorithm. Objective evaluation of the proposed algorithm showed that it performed significantly better than the traditional spectral subtractive algorithm. Informal listening tests revealed that the proposed algorithm had no audible musical noise. PMID:19122867

  18. Geometric Phase of a Transported Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Dittirich, W.

    2004-02-25

    An oscillator constrained to a plane that is transported along some surface will rotate by an angle dependent only on the path and the surface, not on the speed at which it is transported. This is thus an example of a geometric phase. We analyze this phase using the methods of parallel transport. This concept plays a key role in General Relativity, but it can also be applied in classical mechanics. The Foucault pendulum can be seen as an application of this analysis, where the surface is a sphere and the curve is a line of constant latitude. In view of some considerable confusion and erroneous treatments in the recent literature, we here present a rather simple way for visualizing the motion of the Foucault pendulum using concepts that are based on Frenet's formulae and the methods of parallel displacement.

  19. Geometric Correction System Capabilities, Processing, and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, S.B.

    1999-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Remote Sensing Laboratory developed the geometric correction system (GCS) as a state-of-the-art solution for removing distortions from multispectral line scanner data caused by aircraft motion. The system operates on Daedalus AADS-1268 scanner data acquired from fixed-wing and helicopter platforms. The aircraft attitude, altitude, acceleration, and location are recorded and applied to the data, thereby determining the location of the earth with respect to a given datum and projection. The GCS has yielded a positional accuracy of 0.5 meters when used with a 1-meter digital elevation model. Data at this level of accuracy are invaluable in making precise areal estimates and as input into a geographic information system. The combination of high-spatial resolution and accurate geo-rectification makes the GCS a unique tool in identifying and locating environmental conditions, finding targets of interest, and detecting changes as they occur over time.

  20. A Geometrical Approach to Bell's Theorem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2000-01-01

    Bell's theorem can be proved through simple geometrical reasoning, without the need for the Psi function, probability distributions, or calculus. The proof is based on N. David Mermin's explication of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiment, which involves Stern-Gerlach detectors which flash red or green lights when detecting spin-up or spin-down. The statistics of local hidden variable theories for this experiment can be arranged in colored strips from which simple inequalities can be deduced. These inequalities lead to a demonstration of Bell's theorem. Moreover, all local hidden variable theories can be graphed in such a way as to enclose their statistics in a pyramid, with the quantum-mechanical result lying a finite distance beneath the base of the pyramid.

  1. On the geometric form of volcanoes - Comment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The model of Lacey et al. (1981) accounting for the geometric regularity and approximate cone shape of volcanoes is discussed. It is pointed out that, contrary to the model, volcano eruptions do not occur randomly in elevation and azimuth, but are commonly restricted to summit vents and a few well defined flank zones, so that the form of a volcano is determined by its vent locations and styles of eruption. Other false predictions of the model include the constancy of lava volumes at all vent elevations, the increase in volcano radius as the square root of time, a critical height for volcano growth, the influence of planetary gravity on volcano height and the negligible influence of ash falls and flows and erosional deposition. It is noted that the model of Shteynberg and Solov'yev, in which cone shape is related to stresses due to increasing cone height, may provide a better understanding of volcano morphology.

  2. Random broadcast on random geometric graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Elsasser, Robert; Friedrich, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider the random broadcast time on random geometric graphs (RGGs). The classic random broadcast model, also known as push algorithm, is defined as: starting with one informed node, in each succeeding round every informed node chooses one of its neighbors uniformly at random and informs it. We consider the random broadcast time on RGGs, when with high probability: (i) RGG is connected, (ii) when there exists the giant component in RGG. We show that the random broadcast time is bounded by {Omicron}({radical} n + diam(component)), where diam(component) is a diameter of the entire graph, or the giant component, for the regimes (i), or (ii), respectively. In other words, for both regimes, we derive the broadcast time to be {Theta}(diam(G)), which is asymptotically optimal.

  3. THEMATIC MAPPER: DETAILED RADIOMETRIC AND GEOMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, Hugh

    1983-01-01

    The paper is in abstract form. It discusses those radiometric characteristics of the Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM) that can be established without absolute calibration or spectral data. Subscenes of radiometrically raw data (B-data) were examined on an individual detector basis; areas of uniform radiance were used to characterize subtle radiometric differences and noise problems. The effective resolution in radiance is degraded by about a factor of two by irregular width of the digital levels. Several detectors have a change of gain with a period of several scans, the largest effect is about 4%. The geometric fidelity of the GSFC filmwriter used for Thematic Mapper (TM) images was assessed by measurement with accuracy better than three micrometers of a test grid.

  4. Spin dynamics in geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. S.; Ehlers, G.; Bramwell, S. T.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the spin dynamics of several antiferromagnetic pyrochlore oxides. These magnets are geometrically frustrated and only reach their ground states at temperatures much lower than that expected from mean field theory. Here we present data on the magnetic nature, especially the spin dynamics of Tb2Ti2O7, Gd2Ti2O7 and Y2Mo2O7. In these systems the ground states are found to be very different. Y2Mo2O7 freezes completely into a spin glass-like state, Tb2Ti2O7 is a cooperative paramagnetic and remains dynamic down to 15 mK and Gd2Ti2O7 enters a unique partially ordered state at {\\sim }1 K.

  5. On the geometrization of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2016-08-01

    Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is commonly formulated in terms of wavefunctions (probability amplitudes) obeying the static and the time-dependent Schrödinger equations (SE). Despite the success of this representation of the quantum world a wave-particle duality concept is required to reconcile the theory with observations (experimental measurements). A first solution to this dichotomy was introduced in the de Broglie-Bohm theory according to which a pilot-wave (solution of the SE) is guiding the evolution of particle trajectories. Here, I propose a geometrization of quantum mechanics that describes the time evolution of particles as geodesic lines in a curved space, whose curvature is induced by the quantum potential. This formulation allows therefore the incorporation of all quantum effects into the geometry of space-time, as it is the case for gravitation in the general relativity.

  6. Efficient broadcast on random geometric graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Elsasser, Robert; Friedrich, Tobias; Sauerwald, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A Randon Geometric Graph (RGG) is constructed by distributing n nodes uniformly at random in the unit square and connecting two nodes if their Euclidean distance is at most r, for some prescribed r. They analyze the following randomized broadcast algorithm on RGGs. At the beginning, there is only one informed node. Then in each round, each informed node chooses a neighbor uniformly at random and informs it. They prove that this algorithm informs every node in the largest component of a RGG in {Omicron}({radical}n/r) rounds with high probability. This holds for any value of r larger than the critical value for the emergence of a giant component. In particular, the result implies that the diameter of the giant component is {Theta}({radical}n/r).

  7. Geometric investigations of a vorticity model equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kolev, Boris; Preston, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    This article consists of a detailed geometric study of the one-dimensional vorticity model equation which is a particular case of the generalized Constantin-Lax-Majda equation. Wunsch showed that this equation is the Euler-Arnold equation on Diff (S1) when the latter is endowed with the right-invariant homogeneous H ˙ 1 / 2-metric. In this article we prove that the exponential map of this Riemannian metric is not Fredholm and that the sectional curvature is locally unbounded. Furthermore, we prove a Beale-Kato-Majda-type blow-up criterion, which we then use to demonstrate a link to our non-Fredholmness result. Finally, we extend a blow-up result of Castro-Córdoba to the periodic case and to a much wider class of initial conditions, using a new generalization of an inequality for Hilbert transforms due to Córdoba-Córdoba.

  8. Generalized geometric vacua with eight supercharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graña, Mariana; Ntokos, Praxitelis

    2016-08-01

    We investigate compactifications of type II and M-theory down to AdS 5 with generic fluxes that preserve eight supercharges, in the framework of Exceptional Generalized Geometry. The geometric data and gauge fields on the internal manifold are encoded in a pair of generalized structures corresponding to the vector and hyper-multiplets of the reduced five-dimensional supergravity. Supersymmetry translates into integrability conditions for these structures, generalizing, in the case of type IIB, the Sasaki-Einstein conditions. We show that the ten and eleven-dimensional type IIB and M-theory Killing-spinor equations specialized to a warped AdS 5 background imply the generalized integrability conditions.

  9. Geometric invariance of compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wei-Tao; Wu, Bin; She, Zhen-Su; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    A symmetry based approach is applied to analyze the mean velocity and temperature fields of compressible, flat plate turbulent boundary layers (CTBL). A Reynolds stress length scale and a turbulent heat flux length scale are identified to possess the same defect scaling law in the CTBL bulk, which is solely owing to the constraint of the wall to the geometry of the wall-attached eddies, but invariant to compressibility and wall heat transfer. This invariance is called the geometric invariance of CTBL eddies and is likely the origin of the Mach number invariance of Morkovin's hypothesis, as well as the similarity of energy and momentum transports. A closure for the turbulent transport by using the invariant lengths is attainted to predict the mean velocity and temperature profiles in the CTBL bulk- superior to the van Driest transformation and the Reynolds analogy based relations for its sound physics and higher accuracy. Additionally, our approach offers a new understanding of turbulent Prandtl number.

  10. A Geometric Representation of Collective Attention Flows

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Peiteng; Huang, Xiaohan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jiang; Deng, Su; Wu, Yahui

    2015-01-01

    With the fast development of Internet and WWW, “information overload” has become an overwhelming problem, and collective attention of users will play a more important role nowadays. As a result, knowing how collective attention distributes and flows among different websites is the first step to understand the underlying dynamics of attention on WWW. In this paper, we propose a method to embed a large number of web sites into a high dimensional Euclidean space according to the novel concept of flow distance, which both considers connection topology between sites and collective click behaviors of users. With this geometric representation, we visualize the attention flow in the data set of Indiana university clickstream over one day. It turns out that all the websites can be embedded into a 20 dimensional ball, in which, close sites are always visited by users sequentially. The distributions of websites, attention flows, and dissipations can be divided into three spherical crowns (core, interim, and periphery). 20% popular sites (Google.com, Myspace.com, Facebook.com, etc.) attracting 75% attention flows with only 55% dissipations (log off users) locate in the central layer with the radius 4.1. While 60% sites attracting only about 22% traffics with almost 38% dissipations locate in the middle area with radius between 4.1 and 6.3. Other 20% sites are far from the central area. All the cumulative distributions of variables can be well fitted by “S”-shaped curves. And the patterns are stable across different periods. Thus, the overall distribution and the dynamics of collective attention on websites can be well exhibited by this geometric representation. PMID:26325390

  11. Geometric morphometric footprint analysis of young women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most published attempts to quantify footprint shape are based on a small number of measurements. We applied geometric morphometric methods to study shape variation of the complete footprint outline in a sample of 83 adult women. Methods The outline of the footprint, including the toes, was represented by a comprehensive set of 85 landmarks and semilandmarks. Shape coordinates were computed by Generalized Procrustes Analysis. Results The first four principal components represented the major axes of variation in foot morphology: low-arched versus high-arched feet, long and narrow versus short and wide feet, the relative length of the hallux, and the relative length of the forefoot. These shape features varied across the measured individuals without any distinct clusters or discrete types of footprint shape. A high body mass index (BMI) was associated with wide and flat feet, and a high frequency of wearing high-heeled shoes was associated with a larger forefoot area of the footprint and a relatively long hallux. Larger feet had an increased length-to-width ratio of the footprint, a lower-arched foot, and longer toes relative to the remaining foot. Footprint shape differed on average between left and right feet, and the variability of footprint asymmetry increased with BMI. Conclusions Foot shape is affected by lifestyle factors even in a sample of young women (median age 23 years). Geometric morphometrics proved to be a powerful tool for the detailed analysis of footprint shape that is applicable in various scientific disciplines, including forensics, orthopedics, and footwear design. PMID:23886074

  12. Preservation of the geometric quantum discord in noisy environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Tian, Dong-Ping

    2014-04-15

    Geometric description of quantum correlations is favored for their distinct physical significance. Geometric discords based on the trace distance and the Bures distance are shown to be well-defined quantum correlation measures. Here, we examine their particular dynamical behaviors under independent as well as common structured reservoirs and reveal their robustness against decoherence. We showed that the two well-defined geometric discords may be preserved well or even be improved and generated by the noisy process of the common reservoir. Moreover, we also provided a strategy for the long-time preservation of these two geometric discords in independent reservoirs. -- Highlights: •Inherent robustness of the trace distance and the Bures distance discord. •Generating geometric discord from classical states by the noisy process. •Improvement of the geometric discord in common reservoir. •The robust pathway for preserving discord in independent reservoirs.

  13. The geometric factor of a cylindrical plate electrostatic analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, A. D.

    1971-01-01

    A method for calculating the geometric factor of cylindrical plate electrostatic energy analyzers with various detector geometries is described. The effects of the fringe-field are estimated. For a special simple case an exact geometric factor is calculated enabling an estimate of the inaccuracies of the approximations used in other cases. The results of some calculations are presented and a simple approximate expression for the geometric factor is deduced.

  14. Geometry and dynamics of one-norm geometric quantum discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming; Qiu, Daowen; Mateus, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of one-norm geometric quantum discord and present a geometric interpretation of one-norm geometric quantum discord for a class of two-qubit states. It is found that one-norm geometric quantum discord has geometric behavior different from that described in Lang and Caves (Phys Rev Lett 105:150501, 2010), Li et al. (Phys Rev A 83:022321, 2011) and Yao et al. (Phys Lett A 376:358-364, 2012). We also compare the dynamics of the one-norm geometric quantum discord and other measures of quantum correlations under correlated noise. It is shown that different decoherent channels bring different influences to quantum correlations measured by concurrence, entropic quantum discord and geometric quantum discord, which depend on the memory parameter and decoherence parameter. We lay emphasis on the behaviors such as entanglement sudden death and sudden transition of quantum discord. Finally, we study the dynamical behavior of one-norm geometric quantum discord in one-dimensional anisotropic XXZ model by utilizing the quantum renormalization group method. It is shown that the one-norm geometric quantum discord demonstrates quantum phase transition through renormalization group approach.

  15. Anisotropy without tensors: a novel approach using geometric algebra.

    PubMed

    Matos, Sérgio A; Ribeiro, Marco A; Paiva, Carlos R

    2007-11-12

    The most widespread approach to anisotropic media is dyadic analysis. However, to get a geometrical picture of a dielectric tensor, one has to resort to a coordinate system for a matrix form in order to obtain, for example, the index-ellipsoid, thereby obnubilating the deeper coordinate-free meaning of anisotropy itself. To overcome these shortcomings we present a novel approach to anisotropy: using geometric algebra we introduce a direct geometrical interpretation without the intervention of any coordinate system. By applying this new approach to biaxial crystals we show the effectiveness and insight that geometric algebra can bring to the optics of anisotropic media.

  16. Geometric phase for collinear conical intersections. I. Geometric phase angle and vector potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xuan; Brue, Daniel A.; Blandon, Juan D.; Parker, Gregory A.; Kendrick, Brian K.

    2011-02-14

    We present a method for properly treating collinear conical intersections in triatomic systems. The general vector potential (gauge theory) approach for including the geometric phase effects associated with collinear conical intersections in hyperspherical coordinates is presented. The current study develops an introductory method in the treatment of collinear conical intersections by using the phase angle method. The geometric phase angle, {eta}, in terms of purely internal coordinates is derived using the example of a spin-aligned quartet lithium triatomic system. A numerical fit and thus an analytical form for the associated vector potentials are explicitly derived for this triatomic A{sub 3} system. The application of this methodology to AB{sub 2} and ABC systems is also discussed.

  17. An Introduction to Geometric Algebra with some Preliminary Thoughts on the Geometric Meaning of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Martin Erik

    2014-10-01

    It is still a great riddle to me why Wolfgang Pauli and P.A.M. Dirac had not fully grasped the meaning of their own mathematical constructions. They invented magnificent, fantastic and very important mathematical features of modern physics, but they only delivered half of the interpretations of their own inventions. Of course, Pauli matrices and Dirac matrices represent operators, which Pauli and Dirac discussed in length. But this is only part of the true meaning behind them, as the non-commutative ideas of Grassmann, Clifford, Hamilton and Cartan allow a second, very far reaching interpretation of Pauli and Dirac matrices. An introduction to this alternative interpretation will be discussed. Some applications of this view on Pauli and Dirac matrices are given, e.g. a geometric algebra picture of the plane wave solution of the Maxwell equation, a geometric algebra picture of special relativity, a toy model of SU(3) symmetry, and some only very preliminary thoughts about a possible geometric meaning of quantum mechanics.

  18. Topological and differential geometrical gauge field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaty, Joseph

    between bosons (quantized) and fermions (not quantized). Thus I produced results that were previously unobtainable. Furthermore, since topological charge takes place in Flat Spacetime, I investigated the quantization of the Curved Spacetime version of topological charge (Differential Geometrical Charge) by developing the differential geometrical Gauge Field Theory. It should be noted that the homotopy classification method is not at all applicable to Curved Spacetime. I also modified the Dirac equation in Curved Spacetime by using Einstein's field equation in order to account for the presence of matter. As a result, my method has allowed me to address four cases of topological charge (both spinless and spin one- half, in both Flat and in Curved Spacetime) whereas earlier methods had been blind to all but one of these cases (spinless in Flat Spacetime). (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  19. Studying avian encephalization with geometric morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Watanabe, Akinobu; Kawabe, Soichiro

    2016-08-01

    Encephalization is a core concept in comparative neurobiology, aiming to quantify the neurological capacity of organisms. For measuring encephalization, many studies have employed relative brain sizes corrected for expected allometric scaling to body size. Here we highlight the utility of a multivariate geometric morphometric (GM) approach for visualizing and analyzing neuroanatomical shape variation associated with encephalization. GM readily allows the statistical evaluation of covariates, such as size, and many software tools exist for visualizing their effects on shape. Thus far, however, studies using GM have not attempted to translate the meaning of encephalization to shape data. As such, we tested the statistical relationship between size and encephalization quotients (EQs) to brain shape utilizing a broad interspecific sample of avian endocranial data. Although statistically significant, the analyses indicate that allometry accounts for <10% of total neuroanatomical shape variation. Notably, we find that EQs, despite being corrected for allometric scaling based on size, contain size-related neuroanatomical shape changes. In addition, much of what is traditionally considered encephalization comprises clade-specific trends in relative forebrain expansion, particularly driven by landbirds. EQs, therefore, fail to capture 90% of the total neuroanatomical variation after correcting for allometry and shared phylogenetic history. Moving forward, GM techniques provide crucial tools for investigating key drivers of this vast, largely unexplored aspect of avian brain morphology. PMID:27112986

  20. Geometrical beaming of stellar mass ULXs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Matthew J.; King, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence or lack of eclipses in the X-ray light curves of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) can be directly linked to the accreting system geometry. In the case where the compact object is stellar mass and radiates isotropically, we should expect eclipses by a main-sequence to sub-giant secondary star on the recurrence time-scale of hours to days. X-ray light curves are now available for large numbers of ULXs as a result of the latest XMM-Newton catalogue. We determine the amount of fractional variability that should be injected into an otherwise featureless light curve for a given set of system parameters as a result of eclipses and compare this to the available data. We find that the vast majority of sources for which the variability has been measured to be non-zero and for which available observations meet the criteria for eclipse searches, have fractional variabilities which are too low to derive from eclipses and so must be viewed such that θ ≤ cos- 1(R*/a). This would require that the disc subtends a larger angle than that of the secondary star and is therefore consistent with a conical outflow formed from super-critical accretion rates and implies some level of geometrical beaming in ULXs.

  1. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory, and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure in five different ways. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle-group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a long-standing question posed by Kruskal about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no adhoc elements, which is then applied to gyromotion. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A theory motivated by free electron lasers gives new restrictions on the change of area of projected parallelepipeds under canonical transformations.

  2. Geometrical aspects on the dark matter problem

    SciTech Connect

    Capistrano, A.J.S.; Cabral, L.A.

    2014-09-15

    In the present paper we apply Nash’s theory of perturbative geometry to the study of dark matter gravity in a higher-dimensional space–time. It is shown that the dark matter gravitational perturbations at local scale can be explained by the extrinsic curvature of the standard cosmology. In order to test our model, we use a spherically symmetric metric embedded in a five-dimensional bulk. As a result, considering a sample of 10 low surface brightness and 6 high surface brightness galaxies, we find a very good agreement with the observed rotation curves of smooth hybrid alpha-HI measurements. - Highlights: • The metric perturbation and the embedding lead naturally to a “brane-world”-like higher dimensional structure. • Nash’s theorem as a cornerstone of the formation of geometrical structures. • The dark matter gravitational perturbations at local scale can be explained by the extrinsic curvature. • A good agreement was found with the observed rotation curves of smooth hybrid alpha-HI measurements.

  3. The inertial and geometrical properties of helmets.

    PubMed

    Njus, G O; Liu, Y K; Nye, T A

    1984-10-01

    The center of gravity (CG) and the principal mass moments of inertia about the CG of Army aviator, American football, and bicycle helmets were experimentally determined by a variation of the classic differential weighing and torsional pendulum techniques. In the course of these experiments, an innovative method for three-dimensional (3D) digitization was found. An electronic caliper, which measured length, was used with a computer algorithm to achieve 3D digitization. The results of the above measurements show that the weight of the helmet and the distances from the CG to the orthogonal coordinate axes intercepts with the outer shell surface were highly correlated with its principal mass moments of inertia. A set of regression equations was derived on theoretical considerations and served to unify the experimentally obtained data. Our results indicate that the principal mass moments of inertia of helmets vary linearly with its mass but nonlinearly with size and shape. For a helmet, given its weight and certain geometrical distances, the regression equations estimate the principal mass moments of inertia to within 5% of its experimentally-determined values. For the helmets studied in this series, a modified linear-regression relationship between the principal mass moments of inertia and its mass was found. This result is reasonable because the mass distribution of the current generation of helmets are set primarily by the head size and secondarily by helmet size, shape, and materials.

  4. Geometric stiffening in multibody dynamics formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharf, Inna

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the issue of geometric stiffening as it arises in the context of multibody dynamics. This topic has been treated in a number of previous publications in this journal and appears to be a debated subject. The controversy revolves primarily around the 'correct' methodology for incorporating the stiffening effect into dynamics formulations. The main goal of this work is to present the different approaches that have been developed for this problem through an in-depth review of several publications dealing with this subject. This is done with the goal of contributing to a precise understanding of the existing methodologies for modelling the stiffening effects in multibody systems. Thus, in presenting the material we attempt to illuminate the key characteristics of the various methods as well as show how they relate to each other. In addition, we offer a number of novel insights and clarifying interpretations of these schemes. The paper is completed with a general classification and comparison of the different approaches.

  5. Geometric morphometrics of hominoid infraspinous fossa shape.

    PubMed

    Green, David J; Serrins, Jesse D; Seitelman, Brielle; Martiny, Amy R; Gunz, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries of early hominin scapulae from Ethiopia (Dikika, Woranso-Mille) and South Africa (Malapa) have motivated new examinations of the relationship between scapular morphology and locomotor function. In particular, infraspinous fossa shape has been shown to significantly differ among hominoids. However, this region presents relatively few homologous landmarks, such that traditional distance and angle-based methods may oversimplify this three-dimensional structure. To more thoroughly assess infraspinous fossa shape variation as it relates to function among adult hominoid representatives, we considered two geometric morphometric (GM) approaches--one employing five homologous landmarks ("wireframe") and another with 83 sliding semilandmarks along the border of the infraspinous fossa. We identified several differences in infraspinous fossa shape with traditional approaches, particularly in superoinferior fossa breadth and scapular spine orientation. The wireframe analysis reliably captured the range of shape variation in the sample, which reflects the relatively straightforward geometry of the infraspinous fossa. Building on the traditional approach, the GM results highlighted how the orientation of the medial portion of the infraspinous fossa differed relative to both the axillary border and spine. These features distinguished Pan from Gorilla in a way that traditional analyses had not been able to discern. Relative to the wireframe method, the semilandmark approach further distinguished Pongo from Homo, highlighting aspects of infraspinous fossa morphology that may be associated with climbing behaviors in hominoid taxa. These results highlight the ways that GM methods can enhance our ability to evaluate complex aspects of shape for refining and testing hypotheses about functional morphology.

  6. Geometric Explanation for AN Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacinich, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    The appearance and interpretation of an accelerating universe may be an observed distortion resulting from a universe defined by spherical geometry. The annihilation of Planck and anti-Planck mass is paramount in explaining the Big-Bang [1]. In a model similar to the standard model of a Riemannian-Friedmann-Lemaitre hypersphere, the primordial energy of the Big-Bang is released in the form of electromagnetic-like radiation that expands radiantly in every 4D direction from time zero in the structure of hyper-waves carried by Planck and anti-Planck bosons. The resulting geometry shows that time is synonymous with the lightspeed expansion of our universe. In this model we find that time is not parallel but radiant. This implies that time is a vector - where every place we observe has a unique time direction (angle) with a magnitude (age) and a light cone. The result of this condition is the illusion that the further back we look from our position in spacetime, space appears to be contracted and time appears to run slower both exponentially and logarithmically. Simply stated, we can not rely on observations unless we understand the geometric distortions inherent in curved photon paths.

  7. Effect of geometrical frustration on inverse freezing.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Morais, C V; Zimmer, F M

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between geometrical frustration (GF) and inverse freezing (IF) is studied within a cluster approach. The model considers first-neighbor (J_{1}) and second-neighbor (J_{2}) intracluster antiferromagnetic interactions between Ising spins on a checkerboard lattice and long-range disordered couplings (J) among clusters. We obtain phase diagrams of temperature versus J_{1}/J in two cases: the absence of J_{2} interaction and the isotropic limit J_{2}=J_{1}, where GF takes place. An IF reentrant transition from the spin-glass (SG) to paramagnetic (PM) phase is found for a certain range of J_{1}/J in both cases. The J_{1} interaction leads to a SG state with high entropy at the same time that can introduce a low-entropy PM phase. In addition, it is observed that the cluster size plays an important role. The GF increases the PM phase entropy, but larger clusters can give an entropic advantage for the SG phase that favors IF. Therefore, our results suggest that disordered systems with antiferromagnetic clusters can exhibit an IF transition even in the presence of GF. PMID:26871062

  8. Geometric modeling for computer aided design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, James L.; Olariu, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The primary goal of this grant has been the design and implementation of software to be used in the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles particularly focused on the elements of geometric design, graphical user interfaces, and the interaction of the multitude of software typically used in this engineering environment. This has resulted in the development of several analysis packages and design studies. These include two major software systems currently used in the conceptual level design of aerospace vehicles. These tools are SMART, the Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool, and EASIE, the Environment for Software Integration and Execution. Additional software tools were designed and implemented to address the needs of the engineer working in the conceptual design environment. SMART provides conceptual designers with a rapid prototyping capability and several engineering analysis capabilities. In addition, SMART has a carefully engineered user interface that makes it easy to learn and use. Finally, a number of specialty characteristics have been built into SMART which allow it to be used efficiently as a front end geometry processor for other analysis packages. EASIE provides a set of interactive utilities that simplify the task of building and executing computer aided design systems consisting of diverse, stand-alone, analysis codes. Resulting in a streamlining of the exchange of data between programs reducing errors and improving the efficiency. EASIE provides both a methodology and a collection of software tools to ease the task of coordinating engineering design and analysis codes.

  9. The Geometric Solution of Laplace's Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhoum, Ezzat Gamal

    In 1891, J.J. Thomson--the discoverer of the electron--stated a formula that relates the first derivative of the electric field intensity to the mean curvature of an equipotential surface. That formula was later proved by others, but remained unexploited in any practical purpose to this date. This dissertation presents a numerical method based on Thomson's formula for the rapid solution of Laplace's equation, the governing equation of field theory. The presented method is based on geometric construction principles. Specifically, the method uses the concept of representing equipotential surfaces by polynomials for the rapid tracing of these surfaces; and is therefore fundamentally different from previously-known techniques which are based on discretizing the domain or the boundary of the problem. The new method is especially suited for problems which have complicated or irregular boundaries as well as problems in exterior domains. Previously, such types of problems have required a number of computations of O(N.M), where N is the number of points taken on the boundary of the problem and M is the number of points inside the domain at which the solution is to be computed. The new method requires an O(M) computations only; and is therefore significantly faster than the previous techniques. Applications include problems of electrostatics, cosmology, biomedical engineering, nuclear and particle physics, etc.

  10. The inertial and geometrical properties of helmets.

    PubMed

    Njus, G O; Liu, Y K; Nye, T A

    1984-10-01

    The center of gravity (CG) and the principal mass moments of inertia about the CG of Army aviator, American football, and bicycle helmets were experimentally determined by a variation of the classic differential weighing and torsional pendulum techniques. In the course of these experiments, an innovative method for three-dimensional (3D) digitization was found. An electronic caliper, which measured length, was used with a computer algorithm to achieve 3D digitization. The results of the above measurements show that the weight of the helmet and the distances from the CG to the orthogonal coordinate axes intercepts with the outer shell surface were highly correlated with its principal mass moments of inertia. A set of regression equations was derived on theoretical considerations and served to unify the experimentally obtained data. Our results indicate that the principal mass moments of inertia of helmets vary linearly with its mass but nonlinearly with size and shape. For a helmet, given its weight and certain geometrical distances, the regression equations estimate the principal mass moments of inertia to within 5% of its experimentally-determined values. For the helmets studied in this series, a modified linear-regression relationship between the principal mass moments of inertia and its mass was found. This result is reasonable because the mass distribution of the current generation of helmets are set primarily by the head size and secondarily by helmet size, shape, and materials. PMID:6513769

  11. Geometric Modeling of Inclusions as Ellipsoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Nonmetallic inclusions in gas turbine disk alloys can have a significant detrimental impact on fatigue life. Because large inclusions that lead to anomalously low lives occur infrequently, probabilistic approaches can be utilized to avoid the excessively conservative assumption of lifing to a large inclusion in a high stress location. A prerequisite to modeling the impact of inclusions on the fatigue life distribution is a characterization of the inclusion occurrence rate and size distribution. To help facilitate this process, a geometric simulation of the inclusions was devised. To make the simulation problem tractable, the irregularly sized and shaped inclusions were modeled as arbitrarily oriented, three independent dimensioned, ellipsoids. Random orientation of the ellipsoid is accomplished through a series of three orthogonal rotations of axes. In this report, a set of mathematical models for the following parameters are described: the intercepted area of a randomly sectioned ellipsoid, the dimensions and orientation of the intercepted ellipse, the area of a randomly oriented sectioned ellipse, the depth and width of a randomly oriented sectioned ellipse, and the projected area of a randomly oriented ellipsoid. These parameters are necessary to determine an inclusion s potential to develop a propagating fatigue crack. Without these mathematical models, computationally expensive search algorithms would be required to compute these parameters.

  12. Exploring Eucladoceros ecomorphology using geometric morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Curran, Sabrina C

    2015-01-01

    An increasingly common method for reconstructing paleoenvironmental parameters of hominin sites is ecological functional morphology (ecomorphology). This study provides a geometric morphometric study of cervid rearlimb morphology as it relates to phylogeny, size, and ecomorphology. These methods are then applied to an extinct Pleistocene cervid, Eucladoceros, which is found in some of the earliest hominin-occupied sites in Eurasia. Variation in cervid postcranial functional morphology associated with different habitats can be summarized as trade-offs between joint stability versus mobility and rapid movement versus power-generation. Cervids in open habitats emphasize limb stability to avoid joint dislocation during rapid flight from predators. Closed-adapted cervids require more joint mobility to rapidly switch directions in complex habitats. Two skeletal features (of the tibia and calcaneus) have significant phylogenetic signals, while two (the femur and third phalanx) do not. Additionally, morphology of two of these features (tibia and third phalanx) were correlated with body size. For the tibial analysis (but not the third phalanx) this correlation was ameliorated when phylogeny was taken into account. Eucladoceros specimens from France and Romania fall on the more open side of the habitat continuum, a result that is at odds with reconstructions of their diet as browsers, suggesting that they may have had a behavioral regime unlike any extant cervid.

  13. Geometric foundations of Cartan gauge gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catren, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We use the theory of Cartan connections to analyze the geometrical structures underpinning the gauge-theoretical descriptions of the gravitational interaction. According to the theory of Cartan connections, the spin connection ω and the soldering form θ that define the fundamental variables of the Palatini formulation of general relativity can be understood as different components of a single field, namely a Cartan connection A = ω + θ. In order to stress both the similarities and the differences between the notions of Ehresmann connection and Cartan connection, we explain in detail how a Cartan geometry (PH → M, A) can be obtained from a G-principal bundle PG → M endowed with an Ehresmann connection (being the Lorentz group H a subgroup of G) by means of a bundle reduction mechanism. We claim that this reduction must be understood as a partial gauge fixing of the local gauge symmetries of PG, i.e. as a gauge fixing that leaves "unbroken" the local Lorentz invariance. We then argue that the "broken" part of the symmetry — that is the internal local translational invariance — is implicitly preserved by the invariance under the external diffeomorphisms of M.

  14. Attentional biases in geometric form perception.

    PubMed

    Latimer, C; Stevens, C; Irish, M; Webber, L

    2000-08-01

    This paper reports the operation of robust attentional bias to the top and right during perception of small, single geometric forms. Same/different judgements of successively presented standard and comparison forms are faster when local differences are located at top and right rather than in other regions of the forms. The bias persists when form size is reduced to approximately one degree of visual angle, and it is unaffected by saccadic eye movements and by instructions to attend to other reliably differentiating regions of the forms. Results lend support in various degrees to two of the possible explanations of the bias: (1) a static, skewed distribution of attentional resources around eye fixation; and (2) biased, covert scanning that commences invariably at the top and right of stimulus forms. Origins of the bias in terms of possible left-hemispheric capacity for constructing representations of visual stimuli from parts, as well as in terms of reading experience and prevailing optic flow during locomotion through space are considered. Recent investigations of conditions under which the bias can be maintained or reduced are mentioned.

  15. Geometric investigation of a gaming active device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Fabio; Remondino, Fabio; Battisti, Roberto; Nocerino, Erica

    2011-07-01

    3D imaging systems are widely available and used for surveying, modeling and entertainment applications, but clear statements regarding their characteristics, performances and limitations are still missing. The VDI/VDE and the ASTME57 committees are trying to set some standards but the commercial market is not reacting properly. Since many new users are approaching these 3D recording methodologies, clear statements and information clarifying if a package or system satisfies certain requirements before investing are fundamental for those users who are not really familiar with these technologies. Recently small and portable consumer-grade active sensors came on the market, like TOF rangeimaging cameras or low-cost triangulation-based range sensor. A quite interesting active system was produced by PrimeSense and launched on the market thanks to the Microsoft Xbox project with the name of Kinect. The article reports the geometric investigation of the Kinect active sensors, considering its measurement performances, the accuracy of the retrieved range data and the possibility to use it for 3D modeling application.

  16. Geometric deviation modeling by kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weidong; Hu, Yueming; Liu, Yu; Dai, Wanyi

    2015-09-01

    Typical representation of dimension and geometric accuracy is limited to the self-representation of dimension and geometric deviation based on geometry variation thinking, yet the interactivity affection of geometric variation and gesture variation of multi-rigid body is not included. In this paper, a kinematic matrix model based on Lagrangian coordinate is introduced, with the purpose of unified model for geometric variation and gesture variation and their interactive and integrated analysis. Kinematic model with joint, local base and movable base is built. The ideal feature of functional geometry is treated as the base body; the fitting feature of functional geometry is treated as the adjacent movable body; the local base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the ideal geometry, and the movable base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the fitting geometry. Furthermore, the geometric deviation is treated as relative location or rotation variation between the movable base and the local base, and it's expressed by the Lagrangian coordinate. Moreover, kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate for different types of geometry tolerance zones is constructed, and total freedom for each kinematic model is discussed. Finally, the Lagrangian coordinate library, kinematic matrix library for geometric deviation modeling is illustrated, and an example of block and piston fits is introduced. Dimension and geometric tolerances of the shaft and hole fitting feature are constructed by kinematic matrix and Lagrangian coordinate, and the results indicate that the proposed kinematic matrix is capable and robust in dimension and geometric tolerances modeling.

  17. Growing and Growing: Promoting Functional Thinking with Geometric Growing Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    Design research methodology is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated instruction theory about students' development of functional thinking in the context of geometric growing patterns. The two research questions are: (1) How does students' functional thinking develop in the context of geometric growing patterns? (2) What are…

  18. A Note on a Geometric Interpretation of the Correlation Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Edmond

    1982-01-01

    An alternate geometric interpretation of the correlation coefficient to that given in most statistics texts for psychology and education is presented. This interpretation is considered to be more consistent with the statistical model for the data, and richer in geometric meaning. (Author)

  19. Creativity and Motivation for Geometric Tasks Designing in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumanová, Lucia; Smiešková, Edita

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we focus on creativity needed for geometric tasks designing, visualization of geometric problems and use of ICT. We present some examples of various problems related to tessellations. Altogether 21 students--pre-service teachers participated in our activity within a geometry course at CPU in Nitra, Slovakia. Our attempt was to…

  20. On an Assumption of Geometric Foundation of Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Tortoriello, Francesco Saverio; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In line with the latest positions of Gottlob Frege, this article puts forward the hypothesis that the cognitive bases of mathematics are geometric in nature. Starting from the geometry axioms of the "Elements" of Euclid, we introduce a geometric theory of proportions along the lines of the one introduced by Grassmann in…

  1. Geometric Scaling from Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Caola, Fabrizio; Forte, Stefano

    2008-07-11

    We show that the geometric scaling of the total virtual photon-proton cross section data can be explained using standard linear Dokshitzer-Gribov-Altarelli-Parisi perturbative evolution with generic boundary conditions in a wide kinematic region. This allows us to single out the region where geometric scaling may provide evidence for parton saturation.

  2. Geometric quadratic stochastic operator on countable infinite set

    SciTech Connect

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir; Hamzah, Nur Zatul Akmar

    2015-02-03

    In this paper we construct the family of Geometric quadratic stochastic operators defined on the countable sample space of nonnegative integers and investigate their trajectory behavior. Such operators can be reinterpreted in terms of of evolutionary operator of free population. We show that Geometric quadratic stochastic operators are regular transformations.

  3. Active Learning Environment with Lenses in Geometric Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tural, Güner

    2015-01-01

    Geometric optics is one of the difficult topics for students within physics discipline. Students learn better via student-centered active learning environments than the teacher-centered learning environments. So this study aimed to present a guide for middle school teachers to teach lenses in geometric optics via active learning environment…

  4. Children's Strategies in Imagining Spatio-Geometrical Transformations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillicuddy-De Lisi, Ann V.; De Lisi, Richard

    1981-01-01

    Seventy-five children, 6 to 13 years of age, were assigned to one of five groups on the basis of Piagetian tests of spatial-geometrical knowledge. Subjects imagined and executed three transformations of geometric figures: square-enlargement, diamond enlargement and transformation of a small diamond into a large square. (CM)

  5. Homothetic Transformations and Geometric Loci: Properties of Triangles and Quadrilaterals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammana, Maria Flavia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we use geometric transformations to find some interesting properties related with geometric loci. In particular, given a triangle or a cyclic quadrilateral, the locus generated by the centroid or by the orthocentre (for triangles) or by the anticentre (for cyclic quadrilaterals) when one vertex moves on the circumcircle of the…

  6. Geometric Potential and Transport in Photonic Topological Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Szameit, Alexander; Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Nolte, Stefan; Tuennermann, Andreas; Longhi, Stefano

    2010-04-16

    We report on the experimental realization of an optical analogue of a quantum geometric potential for light wave packets constrained on thin dielectric guiding layers fabricated in silica by the femtosecond laser writing technology. We further demonstrate the optical version of a topological crystal, with the observation of Bloch oscillations and Zener tunneling of a purely geometric nature.

  7. Prospective Middle School Mathematics Teachers' Preconceptions of Geometric Translations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanik, H. Bahadir

    2011-01-01

    This article reports an analysis of 44 prospective middle school mathematics teachers' pre-existing knowledge of rigid geometric transformations, specifically the geometric translations. The main data source for this study was the participants' responses to the tasks that were presented during semi-structured clinical interviews. The findings of…

  8. Technical note: Revisiting the geometric theorems for volume averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2013-12-01

    The geometric theorems reported by Quintard and Whitaker [5, Appendix B] are re-examined. We show (1) The geometrical theorems can be interpreted in terms of the raw spatial moments of the pore structure within the averaging volume. (2) For the case where the first spatial moment is aligned with the center of mass of the averaging volume, the geometric theorems can be expressed in terms of the central moments of the porous medium. (3) When the spatial moments of the pore structure are spatially stationary, the geometrical theorems allow substantial simplification of nonlocal terms arising in the averaged equations. (4) In the context of volume averaging, the geometric theorems of Quintard and Whitaker [5, Appendix B] are better interpreted as statements regarding the spatial stationarity of specific volume averaged quantities rather than an explicit statement about the media disorder.

  9. Entanglement dynamics via geometric phases in quantum spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, C. S.; Sarandy, M. S.

    2011-04-15

    We introduce a connection between entanglement induced by interaction and geometric phases acquired by a composite quantum spin system. We begin by analyzing the evaluation of cyclic (Aharonov-Anandan) and noncyclic (Mukunda-Simon) geometric phases for general spin chains evolving in the presence of time-independent magnetic fields. Then, by considering Heisenberg chains, we show that the interaction geometric phase, namely, the total geometric phase with subtraction of free spin contributions, is directly related to the global (Meyer-Wallach) entanglement exhibited by an initially separable state during its evolution in Hilbert space. This is analytically shown for N=2 spins and numerically illustrated for larger chains. This relationship promotes the interaction geometric phase to an indicator of global entanglement in the system, which may constitute a useful tool for quantum tasks based on entanglement as a resource to their performance.

  10. A geometric representation scheme suitable for shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    A geometric representation scheme is outlined which utilizes the natural design variable concept. A base configuration with distinct topological features is created. This configuration is then deformed to define components with similar topology but different geometry. The values of the deforming loads are the geometric entities used in the shape representation. The representation can be used for all geometric design studies; it is demonstrated here for structural optimization. This technique can be used in parametric design studies, where the system response is defined as functions of geometric entities. It can also be used in shape optimization, where the geometric entities of an original design are modified to maximize performance and satisfy constraints. Two example problems are provided. A cantilever beam is elongated to meet new design specifications and then optimized to reduce volume and satisfy stress constraints. A similar optimization problem is presented for an automobile crankshaft section. The finite element method is used to perform the analyses.

  11. Sudden change of geometric quantum discord in finite temperature reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ming-Liang Sun, Jian

    2015-03-15

    We investigate sudden change (SC) behaviors of the distance-based measures of geometric quantum discords (GQDs) for two non-interacting qubits subject to the two-sided and the one-sided thermal reservoirs. We found that the GQDs defined by different distances exhibit different SCs, and thus the SCs are the combined result of the chosen discord measure and the property of a state. We also found that the thermal reservoir may generate states having different orderings related to different GQDs. These inherent differences of the GQDs reveal that they are incompatible in characterizing quantum correlations both quantitatively and qualitatively. - Highlights: • Comparable study of different distance-based geometric quantum discords. • Evolution of the geometric quantum discords in finite temperature reservoirs. • Different geometric quantum discords exhibit distinct sudden changes. • Nonunique states ordering imposed by different geometric quantum discords.

  12. Digital polarization holography advancing geometrical phase optics.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Luciano; Roberts, David E; Liao, Zhi; Nersisyan, Sarik; Uskova, Olena; Wickboldt, Lloyd; Tabiryan, Nelson; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Geometrical phase or the fourth generation (4G) optics enables realization of optical components (lenses, prisms, gratings, spiral phase plates, etc.) by patterning the optical axis orientation in the plane of thin anisotropic films. Such components exhibit near 100% diffraction efficiency over a broadband of wavelengths. The films are obtained by coating liquid crystalline (LC) materials over substrates with patterned alignment conditions. Photo-anisotropic materials are used for producing desired alignment conditions at the substrate surface. We present and discuss here an opportunity of producing the widest variety of "free-form" 4G optical components with arbitrary spatial patterns of the optical anisotropy axis orientation with the aid of a digital spatial light polarization converter (DSLPC). The DSLPC is based on a reflective, high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) combined with an "ad hoc" optical setup. The most attractive feature of the use of a DSLPC for photoalignment of nanometer thin photo-anisotropic coatings is that the orientation of the alignment layer, and therefore of the fabricated LC or LC polymer (LCP) components can be specified on a pixel-by-pixel basis with high spatial resolution. By varying the optical magnification or de-magnification the spatial resolution of the photoaligned layer can be adjusted to an optimum for each application. With a simple "click" it is possible to record different optical components as well as arbitrary patterns ranging from lenses to invisible labels and other transparent labels that reveal different images depending on the side from which they are viewed. PMID:27505793

  13. Neutron Studies of Geometrically Frustrated Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason

    2004-03-01

    Antiferromagnetically coupled spins residing on a network of corner sharing triangles (Kagome) or tetrahedra (pyrochlore) have attracted much attention in recent years [1-4] and often display phenomena known broadly as geometrical frustration. Because of their low propensity to order, even for classical spins, antiferromagnetic materials based on a pyrochlore lattice appear to be excellent systems for studying exotic ground states. It has also been shown that ferromagnetically coupled spins can be frustrated on such a lattice, if there is considerable local Ising anisotropy. Detailed neutron scattering measurements (elastic and inelastic scattering) taken on the antiferromagnets, Tb_2Ti_2O7 and Gd_2Ti_2O_7, and the ferromagnet, Ho_2Ti_2O_7, will be presented. The neutron data will be backed up with bulk property results. Evidence of short-range magnetic correlations, frozen moments and long-range magnetic ordering in different parts of applied field and temperature space will be discussed. Tb_2Ti_2O7 is a cooperative paramagnet with an effective paramagnetic moment of 9.7 μ_B, has be shown to magnetically order in modest fields and temperatures, however in zero field the system does not order above 15 mK. Ho_2Ti_2O7 is known as a "dipolar spin ice" [3-4] compound and this will be discussed in some detail. If time permits I will present new results on the magnetic ordering of Gd_2Ti_2O7 in zero field. [1] Magnetic Systems with Competing Interactions, edited by H.T. Diep (World Scientific, Singapore, 1994) and Can. J. Phys. 79, (2001). [2] J. S. Gardner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 82, 1012, (1999). [3] S. T. Bramwell and M. P. Gingras, Science, 294, 1495, (2001). [4] A. P. Ramirez et al., Nature, 399, 333 (1999).

  14. Geometric characterization of the Arjuna orbital domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2015-01-01

    Arjuna-type orbits are characterized by being Earth-like, having both low-eccentricity and low-inclination. Objects following these trajectories experience repeated trappings in the 1:1 commensurability with the Earth and can become temporary Trojans, horseshoe librators, quasi-satellites, and even transient natural satellites. Here, we review what we know about this peculiar dynamical group and use a Monte Carlo simulation to characterize geometrically the Arjuna orbital domain, studying its visibility both from the ground and with the European Space Agency Gaia spacecraft. The visibility analysis from the ground together with the discovery circumstances of known objects are used as proxies to estimate the current size of this population. The impact cross-section of the Earth for minor bodies in this resonant group is also investigated. We find that, for ground-based observations, the solar elongation at perigee of nearly half of these objects is less than 90\\degr. They are best observed by space-borne telescopes, but Gaia is not going to improve significantly the current discovery rate for members of this class. Our results suggest that the size of this population may have been underestimated by current models. On the other hand, their intrinsically low encounter velocities with the Earth induce a 10-1000-fold increase in the impact cross-section with respect to what is typical for objects in the Apollo or Aten asteroid populations. We estimate that their probability of capture as transient natural satellites of our planet is about 8 %.

  15. Aftershock Statistics explained from Geometric Reductionism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    The decay of aftershocks has recently been shown to follow a stretched exponential function instead of the Omori law (Mignan, Geophys. Res. Lett., 2015). This triggers a complete re-investigation of aftershock statistics in Southern California and a new physical interpretation of these results: (1) After verifying the stretched exponential behavior of aftershocks in time, I show that aftershocks follow a pure exponential in space. I then (re)demonstrate that K(M) = exp(α(M-mmin-ΔmB)) with K the aftershock production by mainshock magnitude M, α the Gutenberg-Richter distribution slope and ΔmB Båth's parameter. Based on these observations, I propose the Recursive Aftershock Stretched Exponential (RASE) model. (2) I investigate the origin of aftershocks using geometric reductionism made possible by the Non-Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory postulate, which states that spatial density switches from δb0 for background seismicity to δbp for activated events (such as foreshocks, induced seismicity and here aftershocks) when the static stress field σ(r) exceeds the threshold σ(rA*) ∝ Δσ* with r the distance to source. The postulate explains the exponential spatial distribution (assuming that aftershocks fill a noisy fractal network within rA*) and aftershock production (assuming a constant stress drop) with K(M) = δbp.V(M), V being the volume of a rounded cuboid centred on the fault of length l ∝ exp(αM), and with radius rA*. Finally the observed stretching factor β ≈ 0.4 is explained topologically from the fractal dimension D ≈ 1.5.

  16. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-04-04

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism.

  17. A geometric model of defensive peripersonal space.

    PubMed

    Bufacchi, R J; Liang, M; Griffin, L D; Iannetti, G D

    2016-01-01

    Potentially harmful stimuli occurring within the defensive peripersonal space (DPPS), a protective area surrounding the body, elicit stronger defensive reactions. The spatial features of the DPPS are poorly defined and limited to descriptive estimates of its extent along a single dimension. Here we postulated a family of geometric models of the DPPS, to address two important questions with respect to its spatial features: What is its fine-grained topography? How does the nervous system represent the body area to be defended? As a measure of the DPPS, we used the strength of the defensive blink reflex elicited by electrical stimulation of the hand (hand-blink reflex, HBR), which is reliably modulated by the position of the stimulated hand in egocentric coordinates. We tested the goodness of fit of the postulated models to HBR data from six experiments in which we systematically explored the HBR modulation by hand position in both head-centered and body-centered coordinates. The best-fitting model indicated that 1) the nervous system's representation of the body area defended by the HBR can be approximated by a half-ellipsoid centered on the face and 2) the DPPS extending from this area has the shape of a bubble elongated along the vertical axis. Finally, the empirical observation that the HBR is modulated by hand position in head-centered coordinates indicates that the DPPS is anchored to the face. The modeling approach described in this article can be generalized to describe the spatial modulation of any defensive response. PMID:26510762

  18. Random geometric prior forest for multiclass object segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Song, Mingli; Tao, Dacheng; Bu, Jiajun; Chen, Chun

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in object detection have led to the development of segmentation by detection approaches that integrate top-down geometric priors for multiclass object segmentation. A key yet under-addressed issue in utilizing top-down cues for the problem of multiclass object segmentation by detection is efficiently generating robust and accurate geometric priors. In this paper, we propose a random geometric prior forest scheme to obtain object-adaptive geometric priors efficiently and robustly. In the scheme, a testing object first searches for training neighbors with similar geometries using the random geometric prior forest, and then the geometry of the testing object is reconstructed by linearly combining the geometries of its neighbors. Our scheme enjoys several favorable properties when compared with conventional methods. First, it is robust and very fast because its inference does not suffer from bad initializations, poor local minimums or complex optimization. Second, the figure/ground geometries of training samples are utilized in a multitask manner. Third, our scheme is object-adaptive but does not require the labeling of parts or poselets, and thus, it is quite easy to implement. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, we integrate the obtained top-down geometric priors with conventional bottom-up color cues in the frame of graph cut. The proposed random geometric prior forest achieves the best segmentation results of all of the methods tested on VOC2010/2012 and is 90 times faster than the current state-of-the-art method. PMID:25974937

  19. Geometric and potential driving formation and evolution of biomolecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bates, P W; Chen, Zhan; Sun, Yuhui; Wei, Guo-Wei; Zhao, Shan

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents new geometrical flow equations for the theoretical modeling of biomolecular surfaces in the context of multiscale implicit solvent models. To account for the local variations near the biomolecular surfaces due to interactions between solvent molecules, and between solvent and solute molecules, we propose potential driven geometric flows, which balance the intrinsic geometric forces that would occur for a surface separating two homogeneous materials with the potential forces induced by the atomic interactions. Stochastic geometric flows are introduced to account for the random fluctuation and dissipation in density and pressure near the solvent-solute interface. Physical properties, such as free energy minimization (area decreasing) and incompressibility (volume preserving), are realized by some of our geometric flow equations. The proposed approach for geometric and potential forces driving the formation and evolution of biological surfaces is illustrated by extensive numerical experiments and compared with established minimal molecular surfaces and molecular surfaces. Local modification of biomolecular surfaces is demonstrated with potential driven geometric flows. High order geometric flows are also considered and tested in the present work for surface generation. Biomolecular surfaces generated by these approaches are typically free of geometric singularities. As the speed of surface generation is crucial to implicit solvent model based molecular dynamics, four numerical algorithms, a semi-implicit scheme, a Crank-Nicolson scheme, and two alternating direction implicit (ADI) schemes, are constructed and tested. Being either stable or conditionally stable but admitting a large critical time step size, these schemes overcome the stability constraint of the earlier forward Euler scheme. Aided with the Thomas algorithm, one of the ADI schemes is found to be very efficient as it balances the speed and accuracy.

  20. Geometric effects on stress wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K L; Trim, M W; Horstemeyer, M F; Lee, N; Williams, L N; Liao, J; Rhee, H; Prabhu, R

    2014-02-01

    The present study, through finite element simulations, shows the geometric effects of a bioinspired solid on pressure and impulse mitigation for an elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic material. Because of the bioinspired geometries, stress wave mitigation became apparent in a nonintuitive manner such that potential real-world applications in human protective gear designs are realizable. In nature, there are several toroidal designs that are employed for mitigating stress waves; examples include the hyoid bone on the back of a woodpecker's jaw that extends around the skull to its nose and a ram's horn. This study evaluates four different geometries with the same length and same initial cross-sectional diameter at the impact location in three-dimensional finite element analyses. The geometries in increasing complexity were the following: (1) a round cylinder, (2) a round cylinder that was tapered to a point, (3) a round cylinder that was spiraled in a two dimensional plane, and (4) a round cylinder that was tapered and spiraled in a two-dimensional plane. The results show that the tapered spiral geometry mitigated the greatest amount of pressure and impulse (approximately 98% mitigation) when compared to the cylinder regardless of material type (elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic) and regardless of input pressure signature. The specimen taper effectively mitigated the stress wave as a result of uniaxial deformational processes and an induced shear that arose from its geometry. Due to the decreasing cross-sectional area arising from the taper, the local uniaxial and shear stresses increased along the specimen length. The spiral induced even greater shear stresses that help mitigate the stress wave and also induced transverse displacements at the tip such that minimal wave reflections occurred. This phenomenon arose although only longitudinal waves were introduced as the initial boundary condition (BC). In nature, when shearing occurs within or between materials

  1. Spin relaxation in geometrically frustrated pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsiger, Sarah Ruth

    This thesis describes muSR experiments which focus on systems where the magnetic ions occupy the vertices of edge or corner sharing triangular units, in particular the pyrochlores A2B2O7. The scientific interest in pyrochlores is based on the fact that they display novel magnetic behaviour at low temperatures due to geometrical frustration. The ground state of these systems is sensitively dependent on such factors as the range of the spin-spin interactions, disorder, anisotropy, thermal and quantum fluctuations. For example, Y2Mo2O7 shows many features reminiscent of a conventional spin glass, even though this material has nominally zero chemical disorder. It is found that the muon spin polarisation obeys a time-field scaling relation which indicates that the spin-spin autocorrelation function has a power law form in time, in stark contrast with the exponential form often assumed for conventional magnets above their transition temperature. Gd2Ti2O7 shows long range order, but only at a temperature much lower than its Curie-Weiss temperature, a signature of a frustrated system. In the paramagnetic regime, it is well described by an isotropic Heisenberg Hamiltonian with nearest neighbour couplings in the presence of a Zeeman interaction, from which the spin-spin autocorrelation function may be calculated as a power series in time. The muon spin relaxation rate decreases with magnetic field as the Zeeman energy becomes comparable with the exchange coupling between Gd spins. Thus, an independent measure of the exchange coupling or equivalently the Gd spin fluctuation rate is extracted. By contrast, Tb2Ti2O7 has been identified as a type of cooperative paramagnet. Short range correlations develop below 50 K. However, there is no long range ordering down to very low temperatures (0.075 K). The Tb3+ ion is subject to strong crystal electric field effects: point charge calculations indicate that this system is Ising like at low temperatures. Thus this system may be

  2. Geometrical parameters of E+S pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampazzo, Roberto; Sulentic, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    Local environmental conditions (i.e., density and angular momentum properties of protogalactic clouds) are thought to be factors affecting the ultimate morphology of a galaxy. The existence of significant numbers of mixed morphology (E/SO+S) pairs of galaxies would represent a direct challenge to this idea unless all early-type components are formed by mergers. The authors wished to isolate candidate E+S pairs for detailed study. The authors have observed 22 pairs of mixed morphology galaxies (containing at least one early-type component) selected from a catalog of Sulentic (1988: unpublished) based upon the ESO sky survey. The observed sample and relevant morphological and interaction characteristics are summarized in tabular form. The authors report the relevant geometrical properties of the galaxies in another table. They list the maximum values measured for the ellipticity and the a(4)/a shape parameter together with the total measured twisting along the profile beyond the seeing disk (they set an inner limit of 3 arcsed). An asterisk indicates objects in which a(4)/a is neither predominantly boxy nor disky. They found a large number of true mixed pairs with 13/22 E+S pairs in the present sample. The remaining objects include 5 disk pairs (composed of SO and S members) and 3 early-type pairs comprising E and SO members. They estimate that between 25 and 50 percent of the pairs in any complete sample will be of the E+S type. This suggests that 100 to 200 such pairs exist on the sky brighter than m sub pg = 16.0. They found no global evidence for a difference between E members of this sample and those in more general samples (e.g., Bender et al. 1989). In particular, they found that about 30 percent of the early-type galaxies cannot be classified either predominantly boxy or disky because the a(4)/a profile shows both of these features at a comparable level or does not show any significant trend. Isophotal twisting is observed with a range and distribution

  3. Combining appearance and geometric features for facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Liu, Honghai

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a method for facial expression recognition combining appearance and geometric facial features. The proposed framework consistently combines multiple facial representations at both global and local levels. First, covariance descriptors are computed to represent regional features combining various feature information with a low dimensionality. Then geometric features are detected to provide a general facial movement description of the facial expression. These appearance and geometric features are combined to form a vector representation of the facial expression. The proposed method is tested on the CK+ database and shows encouraging performance.

  4. Geometrical Pumping with a Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Lu, H-I; Schemmer, M; Aycock, L M; Genkina, D; Sugawa, S; Spielman, I B

    2016-05-20

    We realized a quantum geometric "charge" pump for a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the lowest Bloch band of a novel bipartite magnetic lattice. Topological charge pumps in filled bands yield quantized pumping set by the global-topological-properties of the bands. In contrast, our geometric charge pump for a BEC occupying just a single crystal momentum state exhibits nonquantized charge pumping set by local-geometrical-properties of the band structure. Like topological charge pumps, for each pump cycle we observed an overall displacement (here, not quantized) and a temporal modulation of the atomic wave packet's position in each unit cell, i.e., the polarization. PMID:27258857

  5. Estimation of spreading fire geometrical characteristics using near infrared stereovision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, L.; Toulouse, T.; Akhloufi, M.; Pieri, A.; Tison, Y.

    2013-03-01

    In fire research and forest firefighting, there is a need of robust metrological systems able to estimate the geometrical characteristics of outdoor spreading fires. In recent years, we assist to an increased interest in wildfire research to develop non destructive techniques based on computer vision. This paper presents a new approach for the estimation of fire geometrical characteristics using near infrared stereovision. Spreading fire information like position, rate of spread, height and surface, are estimated from the computed 3D fire points. The proposed system permits to track fire spreading on a ground area of 5mx10m. Keywords: near infrared, stereovision, spreading fire, geometrical characteristics

  6. An overview of the thematic mapper geometric correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Geometric accuracy specifications for LANDSAT 4 are reviewed and the processing concepts which form the basis of NASA's thematic mapper geometric correction system are summarized for both the flight and ground segments. The flight segment includes the thematic mapper instrument, attitude measurement devices, attitude control, and ephemeris processing. For geometric correction the ground segment uses mirror scan correction data, payload correction data, and control point information to determine where TM detector samples fall on output map projection systems. Then the raw imagery is reformatted and resampled to produce image samples on a selected output projection grid system.

  7. Auto-focusing accelerating hyper-geometric laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, A. A.; Kotlyar, V. V.; Porfirev, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    We derive a new solution to the paraxial wave equation that defines a two-parameter family of three-dimensional structurally stable vortex annular auto-focusing hyper-geometric (AH) beams, with their complex amplitude expressed via a degenerate hyper-geometric function. The AH beams are found to carry an orbital angular momentum and be auto-focusing, propagating on an accelerating path toward a focus, where the annular intensity pattern is ‘sharply’ reduced in diameter. An explicit expression for the complex amplitude of vortex annular auto-focusing hyper-geometric-Gaussian beams is derived. The experiment has been shown to be in good agreement with theory.

  8. Geometrical Pumping with a Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Lu, H-I; Schemmer, M; Aycock, L M; Genkina, D; Sugawa, S; Spielman, I B

    2016-05-20

    We realized a quantum geometric "charge" pump for a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the lowest Bloch band of a novel bipartite magnetic lattice. Topological charge pumps in filled bands yield quantized pumping set by the global-topological-properties of the bands. In contrast, our geometric charge pump for a BEC occupying just a single crystal momentum state exhibits nonquantized charge pumping set by local-geometrical-properties of the band structure. Like topological charge pumps, for each pump cycle we observed an overall displacement (here, not quantized) and a temporal modulation of the atomic wave packet's position in each unit cell, i.e., the polarization.

  9. Measurement of geometric dephasing using a superconducting qubit

    PubMed Central

    Berger, S.; Pechal, M.; Kurpiers, P.; Abdumalikov, A. A.; Eichler, C.; Mlynek, J. A.; Shnirman, A.; Gefen, Yuval; Wallraff, A.; Filipp, S.

    2015-01-01

    A quantum system interacting with its environment is subject to dephasing, which ultimately destroys the information it holds. Here we use a superconducting qubit to experimentally show that this dephasing has both dynamic and geometric origins. It is found that geometric dephasing, which is present even in the adiabatic limit and when no geometric phase is acquired, can either reduce or restore coherence depending on the orientation of the path the qubit traces out in its projective Hilbert space. It accompanies the evolution of any system in Hilbert space subjected to noise. PMID:26515812

  10. A family of non-restricted D = 11 geometric supersymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinker, Frank

    2014-12-01

    We construct a two parameter family of eleven-dimensional indecomposable Cahen-Wallach spaces with irreducible, non-flat, non-restricted geometric supersymmetry of fraction ν = 3/4. Its compactified moduli space can be parameterized by a compact interval with two points corresponding to two non-isometric, decomposable spaces. These singular spaces are associated to a restricted N = 4 geometric supersymmetry with ν = 1/2 in dimension six and a non-restricted N = 2 geometric supersymmetry with ν = 3/4 in dimension nine.

  11. Geometric phase, quantum Fisher information, geometric quantum correlation and quantum phase transition in the cavity-Bose-Einstein-condensate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the quantum phase transition of an atomic ensemble trapped in a single-mode optical cavity via the geometric phase and quantum Fisher information of an extra probe atom which is injected into the optical cavity and interacts with the cavity field. We also find that the geometric quantum correlation between two probe atoms exhibits a double sudden transition phenomenon and show this double sudden transition phenomenon is closely associated with the quantum phase transition of the atomic ensemble. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical scheme to prolong the frozen time during which the geometric quantum correlation remains constant by applying time-dependent electromagnetic field.

  12. The arithmetico-geometric sequence: an application of linear algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosi, Greg

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a linear algebra-based derivation of the analytic formula for the sum of the first nth terms of the arithmetico-geometric sequence. Furthermore, the advantage of the derivation is briefly discussed.

  13. On an assumption of geometric foundation of numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Saverio Tortoriello, Francesco; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In line with the latest positions of Gottlob Frege, this article puts forward the hypothesis that the cognitive bases of mathematics are geometric in nature. Starting from the geometry axioms of the Elements of Euclid, we introduce a geometric theory of proportions along the lines of the one introduced by Grassmann in Ausdehnungslehre in 1844. Assuming as axioms, the cognitive contents of the theorems of Pappus and Desargues, through their configurations, in an Euclidean plane a natural field structure can be identified that reveals the purely geometric nature of complex numbers. Reasoning based on figures is becoming a growing interdisciplinary field in logic, philosophy and cognitive sciences, and is also of considerable interest in the field of education, moreover, recently, it has been emphasized that the mutual assistance that geometry and complex numbers give is poorly pointed out in teaching and that a unitary vision of geometrical aspects and calculation can be clarifying.

  14. Geometric analysis and restitution of digital multispectral scanner data arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. R.; Mikhail, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to define causes of geometric defects within digital multispectral scanner (MSS) data arrays, to analyze the resulting geometric errors, and to investigate restitution methods to correct or reduce these errors. Geometric transformation relationships for scanned data, from which collinearity equations may be derived, served as the basis of parametric methods of analysis and restitution of MSS digital data arrays. The linearization of these collinearity equations is presented. Algorithms considered for use in analysis and restitution included the MSS collinearity equations, piecewise polynomials based on linearized collinearity equations, and nonparametric algorithms. A proposed system for geometric analysis and restitution of MSS digital data arrays was used to evaluate these algorithms, utilizing actual MSS data arrays. It was shown that collinearity equations and nonparametric algorithms both yield acceptable results, but nonparametric algorithms possess definite advantages in computational efficiency. Piecewise polynomials were found to yield inferior results.

  15. Geometric Algebra Software for Teaching Complex Numbers, Vectors and Spinors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lounesto, Pertti; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents a calculator-type computer program, CLICAL, in conjunction with complex number, vector, and other geometric algebra computations. Compares the CLICAL with other symbolic programs for algebra. (Author/YP)

  16. Adaptive Source Coding Schemes for Geometrically Distributed Integer Alphabets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K-M.; Smyth, P.

    1993-01-01

    Revisit the Gallager and van Voorhis optimal source coding scheme for geometrically distributed non-negative integer alphabets and show that the various subcodes in the popular Rice algorithm can be derived from the Gallager and van Voorhis code.

  17. Geometric Brownian Motion with Tempered Stable Waiting Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Janusz; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka

    2012-08-01

    One of the earliest system that was used to asset prices description is Black-Scholes model. It is based on geometric Brownian motion and was used as a tool for pricing various financial instruments. However, when it comes to data description, geometric Brownian motion is not capable to capture many properties of present financial markets. One can name here for instance periods of constant values. Therefore we propose an alternative approach based on subordinated tempered stable geometric Brownian motion which is a combination of the popular geometric Brownian motion and inverse tempered stable subordinator. In this paper we introduce the mentioned process and present its main properties. We propose also the estimation procedure and calibrate the analyzed system to real data.

  18. Measurement of a vacuum-induced geometric phase.

    PubMed

    Gasparinetti, Simone; Berger, Simon; Abdumalikov, Abdufarrukh A; Pechal, Marek; Filipp, Stefan; Wallraff, Andreas J

    2016-05-01

    Berry's geometric phase naturally appears when a quantum system is driven by an external field whose parameters are slowly and cyclically changed. A variation in the coupling between the system and the external field can also give rise to a geometric phase, even when the field is in the vacuum state or any other Fock state. We demonstrate the appearance of a vacuum-induced Berry phase in an artificial atom, a superconducting transmon, interacting with a single mode of a microwave cavity. As we vary the phase of the interaction, the artificial atom acquires a geometric phase determined by the path traced out in the combined Hilbert space of the atom and the quantum field. Our ability to control this phase opens new possibilities for the geometric manipulation of atom-cavity systems also in the context of quantum information processing. PMID:27386533

  19. NPP VIIRS Early On-Orbit Geometric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Robert E.; Lin, Guoqing; Nishihama, Masahiro; Tewari, Krishna; Montano, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on-board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite was launched in October, 2011. The instrument geometric performance includes sensor spatial response, band-to-band co-registration (BBR), and geolocation accuracy and precision. The geometric performance is an important aspect of sensor data record (SDR) calibration and validation. In this paper we will discuss geometric performance parameter characterization using the first seven-month of VIIRS' earth and lunar data, and compare with the at-launch performance using ground testing data and analysis of numerical modeling results as the first step in on-orbit geometric calibration and validation.

  20. Measurement of a vacuum-induced geometric phase

    PubMed Central

    Gasparinetti, Simone; Berger, Simon; Abdumalikov, Abdufarrukh A.; Pechal, Marek; Filipp, Stefan; Wallraff, Andreas J.

    2016-01-01

    Berry’s geometric phase naturally appears when a quantum system is driven by an external field whose parameters are slowly and cyclically changed. A variation in the coupling between the system and the external field can also give rise to a geometric phase, even when the field is in the vacuum state or any other Fock state. We demonstrate the appearance of a vacuum-induced Berry phase in an artificial atom, a superconducting transmon, interacting with a single mode of a microwave cavity. As we vary the phase of the interaction, the artificial atom acquires a geometric phase determined by the path traced out in the combined Hilbert space of the atom and the quantum field. Our ability to control this phase opens new possibilities for the geometric manipulation of atom-cavity systems also in the context of quantum information processing. PMID:27386533

  1. Shield support selection based on geometric characteristics of coal seam

    SciTech Connect

    K. Goshtasbi; K. Oraee; F. Khakpour-yeganeh

    2006-01-15

    The most initial investment in longwall face equipping is the cost of powered support. Selection of proper shields for powered supports is based on load, geometric characterization of coal seams and economical considerations.

  2. Geometric phase and its applications to fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capolupo, A.; Vitiello, G.

    2016-09-01

    We report on recent results showing that the geometric phase can be used as a tool in the analysis of many different physical systems, as mixed boson systems, CPT and CP violations, Unruh effects, and thermal states. We show that the geometric phases appearing in the time evolution of mixed meson systems like Bs0- bar{{B}}_{{s}}^{{0}} and the K0- bar{{K}}^{{0}}_{} are linked to the parameter z describing the CPT violation. A non-zero phase difference between particle and antiparticle arises only in the presence of CPT symmetry breaking. Then the geometric phase can represent a completely new test for the CPT invariance. Moreover, we study the geometric phase of systems represented by mixed state and undergoing a nonunitary evolution and propose the realization of interferometers which can prove the existence of the Unruh effect and can allow very precise measurements of temperature.

  3. "Geometric" planetology and origin of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, Gennady G.

    2010-05-01

    The comparative wave planetology [1 & othres] demonstrates graphically its main conceptual point: orbits make structures. The structures are produced by a warping action of stationary waves induced in bodies by non-circular orbits with periodically changing bodies' accelerations. A geometric model of tectonic granulation of planets is a schematic row of even circles adorned with granules radius of which increases in direction from Sun to the outer planets. It was shown that the granule radii are inversely proportional to the orbital frequencies of planets. Thus, there is a following row of these radii: Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1. It was also shown that these radii well correlate with planetary surface "ruggedness". This observation led to a conception of the "relief-forming potential of planets"[2]. So, this potential is rather weak in Mercury and Venus, rather high in Mars and intermediate in Earth. Certainly, orbital eccentricities were even higher at the earlier period of planet formation, at debris zones of their accretion causing scattering debris material. This scattering was small at Mercury' and Venus' zones, large at the Mars' zone and intermediate at the Earth's zone. Consequently, gravity kept debris in the first zones, allowed them escape in the martian zone, and allowed to have separated debris sub zone in the vicinity of the Earth's zone or around not fully consolidated (accreted) Earth. Rejecting the giant impact hypotheses of Moon formation as contradicting the fact of the ubiquitous wave induced tectonic dichotomy of celestial bodies (Theorem1 [3]) one should concentrate at hypotheses dealing with formation of the satellite from primordial debris in a near-Earth heliocentric orbit or in a circumterrestrial orbit from debris wave separated from the Earth' zone of accretion. Wave scattering of primordial material from an accretion zone or from a not fully accreted (consolidated) body is a normal process

  4. Geometric constrained variational calculus. II: The second variation (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Enrico; Bruno, Danilo; Luria, Gianvittorio; Pagani, Enrico

    2016-10-01

    Within the geometrical framework developed in [Geometric constrained variational calculus. I: Piecewise smooth extremals, Int. J. Geom. Methods Mod. Phys. 12 (2015) 1550061], the problem of minimality for constrained calculus of variations is analyzed among the class of differentiable curves. A fully covariant representation of the second variation of the action functional, based on a suitable gauge transformation of the Lagrangian, is explicitly worked out. Both necessary and sufficient conditions for minimality are proved, and reinterpreted in terms of Jacobi fields.

  5. Geometric visualization of self-propulsion in a complex medium.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Ross L; Ding, Yang; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I

    2013-02-15

    Combining geometric mechanics theory, laboratory robotic experiment, and numerical simulation, we study the locomotion in granular media of the simplest noninertial swimmer, the Purcell three-link swimmer. Using granular resistive force laws as inputs, the theory relates translation and rotation of the body to shape changes (movements of the links). This allows analysis, visualization, and prediction of effective movements that are verified by experiment. The geometric approach also facilitates comparison between swimming in granular media and in viscous fluids. PMID:25166411

  6. Imperfect Geometric Control and Overdamping for The Damped Wave Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burq, Nicolas; Christianson, Hans

    2015-05-01

    We consider the damped wave equation on a manifold with imperfect geometric control. We show the sub-exponential energy decay estimate in (Christianson, J Funct Anal 258(3):1060-1065, 2010) is optimal in the case of one hyperbolic periodic geodesic. We show if the equation is overdamped, then the energy decays exponentially. Finally we show if the equation is overdamped but geometric control fails for one hyperbolic periodic geodesic, then nevertheless the energy decays exponentially.

  7. Integration of geometric modeling and advanced finite element preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.; Finnigan, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    The structure to a geometry based finite element preprocessing system is presented. The key features of the system are the use of geometric operators to support all geometric calculations required for analysis model generation, and the use of a hierarchic boundary based data structure for the major data sets within the system. The approach presented can support the finite element modeling procedures used today as well as the fully automated procedures under development.

  8. Optimized geometric configuration of active ring laser gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, John; Salloum, Tony

    2016-05-01

    We present a thorough derivation of the Sagnac effect for a ring laser gyroscope of any arbitrary polygonal configuration. We determine optimized alternative geometric configurations for the mirrors. The simulations incur the implementation of a lasing medium with the standard square system, triangular, pentagonal, and oblongated square configuration (diamond). Simulations of possible new geometric configurations are considered, as well as the possibility of adjusting the concavity of the mirrors.

  9. Special generalized densities and propagators: A geometric account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canarutto, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Starting from a short review of spaces of generalized sections of vector bundles, we give a concise systematic description, in precise geometric terms, of Leray densities, principal value densities, propagators and elementary solutions of field equations in flat spacetime. We then sketch a partly original geometric presentation of free quantum fields and show how propagators arise from their graded commutators in the boson and fermion cases.

  10. Geometric phase for open quantum systems and stochastic unravelings

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Angelo; Ippoliti, Emiliano

    2006-06-15

    We analyze the geometric phase for an open quantum system when computed by resorting to a stochastic unraveling of the reduced density matrix (quantum jump approach or stochastic Schroedinger equations). We show that the resulting phase strongly depends on the type of unraveling used for the calculations: as such, this phase is not a geometric object since it depends on nonphysical parameters, which are not related to the path followed by the density matrix during the evolution of the system.

  11. Geometric Phase for Adiabatic Evolutions of General Quantum States

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Biao; Liu, Jie; Niu, Qian; Singh, David J

    2005-01-01

    The concept of a geometric phase (Berry's phase) is generalized to the case of noneigenstates, which is applicable to both linear and nonlinear quantum systems. This is particularly important to nonlinear quantum systems, where, due to the lack of the superposition principle, the adiabatic evolution of a general state cannot be described in terms of eigenstates. For linear quantum systems, our new geometric phase reduces to a statistical average of Berry's phases. Our results are demonstrated with a nonlinear two-level model.

  12. Geometric integrator for simulations in the canonical ensemble.

    PubMed

    Tapias, Diego; Sanders, David P; Bravetti, Alessandro

    2016-08-28

    We introduce a geometric integrator for molecular dynamics simulations of physical systems in the canonical ensemble that preserves the invariant distribution in equations arising from the density dynamics algorithm, with any possible type of thermostat. Our integrator thus constitutes a unified framework that allows the study and comparison of different thermostats and of their influence on the equilibrium and non-equilibrium (thermo-)dynamic properties of a system. To show the validity and the generality of the integrator, we implement it with a second-order, time-reversible method and apply it to the simulation of a Lennard-Jones system with three different thermostats, obtaining good conservation of the geometrical properties and recovering the expected thermodynamic results. Moreover, to show the advantage of our geometric integrator over a non-geometric one, we compare the results with those obtained by using the non-geometric Gear integrator, which is frequently used to perform simulations in the canonical ensemble. The non-geometric integrator induces a drift in the invariant quantity, while our integrator has no such drift, thus ensuring that the system is effectively sampling the correct ensemble.

  13. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  14. Geometric integrator for simulations in the canonical ensemble.

    PubMed

    Tapias, Diego; Sanders, David P; Bravetti, Alessandro

    2016-08-28

    We introduce a geometric integrator for molecular dynamics simulations of physical systems in the canonical ensemble that preserves the invariant distribution in equations arising from the density dynamics algorithm, with any possible type of thermostat. Our integrator thus constitutes a unified framework that allows the study and comparison of different thermostats and of their influence on the equilibrium and non-equilibrium (thermo-)dynamic properties of a system. To show the validity and the generality of the integrator, we implement it with a second-order, time-reversible method and apply it to the simulation of a Lennard-Jones system with three different thermostats, obtaining good conservation of the geometrical properties and recovering the expected thermodynamic results. Moreover, to show the advantage of our geometric integrator over a non-geometric one, we compare the results with those obtained by using the non-geometric Gear integrator, which is frequently used to perform simulations in the canonical ensemble. The non-geometric integrator induces a drift in the invariant quantity, while our integrator has no such drift, thus ensuring that the system is effectively sampling the correct ensemble. PMID:27586910

  15. Sigma models for genuinely non-geometric backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios; Jonke, Larisa; Lechtenfeld, Olaf

    2015-11-01

    The existence of genuinely non-geometric backgrounds, i.e. ones without geometric dual, is an important question in string theory. In this paper we examine this question from a sigma model perspective. First we construct a particular class of Courant algebroids as protobialgebroids with all types of geometric and non-geometric fluxes. For such structures we apply the mathematical result that any Courant algebroid gives rise to a 3D topological sigma model of the AKSZ type and we discuss the corresponding 2D field theories. It is found that these models are always geometric, even when both 2-form and 2-vector fields are neither vanishing nor inverse of one another. Taking a further step, we suggest an extended class of 3D sigma models, whose world volume is embedded in phase space, which allow for genuinely non-geometric backgrounds. Adopting the doubled formalism such models can be related to double field theory, albeit from a world sheet perspective.

  16. Geometric integrator for simulations in the canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapias, Diego; Sanders, David P.; Bravetti, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a geometric integrator for molecular dynamics simulations of physical systems in the canonical ensemble that preserves the invariant distribution in equations arising from the density dynamics algorithm, with any possible type of thermostat. Our integrator thus constitutes a unified framework that allows the study and comparison of different thermostats and of their influence on the equilibrium and non-equilibrium (thermo-)dynamic properties of a system. To show the validity and the generality of the integrator, we implement it with a second-order, time-reversible method and apply it to the simulation of a Lennard-Jones system with three different thermostats, obtaining good conservation of the geometrical properties and recovering the expected thermodynamic results. Moreover, to show the advantage of our geometric integrator over a non-geometric one, we compare the results with those obtained by using the non-geometric Gear integrator, which is frequently used to perform simulations in the canonical ensemble. The non-geometric integrator induces a drift in the invariant quantity, while our integrator has no such drift, thus ensuring that the system is effectively sampling the correct ensemble.

  17. Iso-geometric analysis for neutron diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S. K.; Eaton, M. D.; Williams, M. M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Iso-geometric analysis can be viewed as a generalisation of the finite element method. It permits the exact representation of a wider range of geometries including conic sections. This is possible due to the use of concepts employed in computer-aided design. The underlying mathematical representations from computer-aided design are used to capture both the geometry and approximate the solution. In this paper the neutron diffusion equation is solved using iso-geometric analysis. The practical advantages are highlighted by looking at the problem of a circular fuel pin in a square moderator. For this problem the finite element method requires the geometry to be approximated. This leads to errors in the shape and size of the interface between the fuel and the moderator. In contrast to this iso-geometric analysis allows the interface to be represented exactly. It is found that, due to a cancellation of errors, the finite element method converges more quickly than iso-geometric analysis for this problem. A fuel pin in a vacuum was then considered as this problem is highly sensitive to the leakage across the interface. In this case iso-geometric analysis greatly outperforms the finite element method. Due to the improvement in the representation of the geometry iso-geometric analysis can outperform traditional finite element methods. It is proposed that the use of iso-geometric analysis on neutron transport problems will allow deterministic solutions to be obtained for exact geometries. Something that is only currently possible with Monte Carlo techniques. (authors)

  18. Linear patterning of mesenchymal condensations is modulated by geometric constraints

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Darinka D.; Mao, Angelo S.; Smit, Theo H.; Mooney, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of the vertebral column starts with the formation of a linear array of mesenchymal condensations, forming the blueprint for the eventual alternating pattern of bone and cartilage. Despite growing insight into the molecular mechanisms of morphogenesis, the impact of the physical aspects of the environment is not well understood. We hypothesized that geometric boundary conditions may play a pivotal role in the linear patterning of condensations, as neighbouring tissues provide physical constraints to the cell population. To study the process of condensation and the patterning thereof under tightly controlled geometric constraints, we developed a novel in vitro model that combines micropatterning with the established micromass assay. The spacing and alignment of condensations changed with the width of the cell adhesive patterns, a phenomenon that could not be explained by cell availability alone. Moreover, the extent of chondrogenic commitment was increased on substrates with tighter geometric constraints. When the in vivo pattern of condensations was investigated in the developing vertebral column of chicken embryos, the measurements closely fit into the quantitative relation between geometric constraints and inter-condensation distance found in vitro. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of geometric constraints in skeletal patterning in a cellular process of self-organization. PMID:24718453

  19. Geometric and electrostatic modeling using molecular rigidity functions

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guowei

    2017-03-01

    Geometric and electrostatic modeling is an essential component in computational biophysics and molecular biology. Commonly used geometric representations admit geometric singularities such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets that lead to computational instabilities in the molecular modeling. Our present work explores the use of flexibility and rigidity index (FRI), which has a proved superiority in protein B-factor prediction, for biomolecular geometric representation and associated electrostatic analysis. FRI rigidity surfaces are free of geometric singularities. We propose a rigidity based Poisson–Boltzmann equation for biomolecular electrostatic analysis. These approaches to surface and electrostatic modeling are validated by a set of 21 proteins.more » Our results are compared with those of established methods. Finally, being smooth and analytically differentiable, FRI rigidity functions offer excellent curvature analysis, which characterizes concave and convex regions on protein surfaces. Polarized curvatures constructed by using the product of minimum curvature and electrostatic potential is shown to predict potential protein–ligand binding sites.« less

  20. Geometrical structures determined by the functional order in nervous nets.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, J J

    1984-01-01

    The functional order of a collection of neural elements may be defined as the order induced through the total of covariances of signals carried by the members of the collection. Thus functional order differs from geometrical order (e.g. somatotopy) in that geometrical order is only available to external observers, whereas functional order is available to the system itself. It has been shown before that the covariances can be used to construct a partially ordered set that explicitely represents the functional order. It is demonstrated that certain constraints, if satisfied, make this set isomorphic with certain geometrical entities such as triangulations. For instance there may exist a set of hyperspheres in a n-dimensional space with overlap relations that are described with the same partially ordered set as that which describes the simultaneous/successive order of signals in a nerve. Thus it is logically possible that the optic nerve carries (functionally) two-dimensional signals, quite apart from anatomical considerations (e.g. the geometrically two-dimensional structure of the retina which exists only to external observers). The dimension of the modality defined by a collection of nervous elements can in principle be obtained from a cross-correlation analysis of multi-unit recordings without any resort to geometrical data such as somatotopic mappings.

  1. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules II: Lagrangian representation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Geometric modeling of biomolecules plays an essential role in the conceptualization of biolmolecular structure, function, dynamics and transport. Qualitatively, geometric modeling offers a basis for molecular visualization, which is crucial for the understanding of molecular structure and interactions. Quantitatively, geometric modeling bridges the gap between molecular information, such as that from X-ray, NMR and cryo-EM, and theoretical/mathematical models, such as molecular dynamics, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Nernst-Planck equation. In this work, we present a family of variational multiscale geometric models for macromolecular systems. Our models are able to combine multiresolution geometric modeling with multiscale electrostatic modeling in a unified variational framework. We discuss a suite of techniques for molecular surface generation, molecular surface meshing, molecular volumetric meshing, and the estimation of Hadwiger’s functionals. Emphasis is given to the multiresolution representations of biomolecules and the associated multiscale electrostatic analyses as well as multiresolution curvature characterizations. The resulting fine resolution representations of a biomolecular system enable the detailed analysis of solvent-solute interaction, and ion channel dynamics, while our coarse resolution representations highlight the compatibility of protein-ligand bindings and possibility of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23813599

  2. Geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Recently, the structure, function, stability, and dynamics of subcellular structures, organelles, and multi-protein complexes have emerged as a leading interest in structural biology. Geometric modeling not only provides visualizations of shapes for large biomolecular complexes but also fills the gap between structural information and theoretical modeling, and enables the understanding of function, stability, and dynamics. This paper introduces a suite of computational tools for volumetric data processing, information extraction, surface mesh rendering, geometric measurement, and curvature estimation of biomolecular complexes. Particular emphasis is given to the modeling of cryo-electron microscopy data. Lagrangian-triangle meshes are employed for the surface presentation. On the basis of this representation, algorithms are developed for surface area and surface-enclosed volume calculation, and curvature estimation. Methods for volumetric meshing have also been presented. Because the technological development in computer science and mathematics has led to multiple choices at each stage of the geometric modeling, we discuss the rationales in the design and selection of various algorithms. Analytical models are designed to test the computational accuracy and convergence of proposed algorithms. Finally, we select a set of six cryo-electron microscopy data representing typical subcellular complexes to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithms in handling biomolecular surfaces and explore their capability of geometric characterization of binding targets. This paper offers a comprehensive protocol for the geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes. PMID:23212797

  3. Landsat 8 thermal infrared sensor geometric characterization and calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storey, James C.; Choate, Michael J.; Moe, Donald

    2014-01-01

    The Landsat 8 spacecraft was launched on 11 February 2013 carrying two imaging payloads: the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS). The TIRS instrument employs a refractive telescope design that is opaque to visible wavelengths making prelaunch geometric characterization challenging. TIRS geometric calibration thus relied heavily on on-orbit measurements. Since the two Landsat 8 payloads are complementary and generate combined Level 1 data products, the TIRS geometric performance requirements emphasize the co-alignment of the OLI and TIRS instrument fields of view and the registration of the OLI reflective bands to the TIRS long-wave infrared emissive bands. The TIRS on-orbit calibration procedures include measuring the TIRS-to-OLI alignment, refining the alignment of the three TIRS sensor chips, and ensuring the alignment of the two TIRS spectral bands. The two key TIRS performance metrics are the OLI reflective to TIRS emissive band registration accuracy, and the registration accuracy between the TIRS thermal bands. The on-orbit calibration campaign conducted during the commissioning period provided an accurate TIRS geometric model that enabled TIRS Level 1 data to meet all geometric accuracy requirements. Seasonal variations in TIRS-to-OLI alignment have led to several small calibration parameter adjustments since commissioning.

  4. Geometric phases in astigmatic optical modes of arbitrary order

    SciTech Connect

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2010-08-15

    The transverse spatial structure of a paraxial beam of light is fully characterized by a set of parameters that vary only slowly under free propagation. They specify bosonic ladder operators that connect modes of different orders, in analogy to the ladder operators connecting harmonic-oscillator wave functions. The parameter spaces underlying sets of higher-order modes are isomorphic to the parameter space of the ladder operators. We study the geometry of this space and the geometric phase that arises from it. This phase constitutes the ultimate generalization of the Gouy phase in paraxial wave optics. It reduces to the ordinary Gouy phase and the geometric phase of nonastigmatic optical modes with orbital angular momentum in limiting cases. We briefly discuss the well-known analogy between geometric phases and the Aharonov-Bohm effect, which provides some complementary insights into the geometric nature and origin of the generalized Gouy phase shift. Our method also applies to the quantum-mechanical description of wave packets. It allows for obtaining complete sets of normalized solutions of the Schroedinger equation. Cyclic transformations of such wave packets give rise to a phase shift, which has a geometric interpretation in terms of the other degrees of freedom involved.

  5. Geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the structure, function, stability, and dynamics of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes have emerged as a leading interest in structural biology. Geometric modeling not only provides visualizations of shapes for large biomolecular complexes but also fills the gap between structural information and theoretical modeling, and enables the understanding of function, stability, and dynamics. This paper introduces a suite of computational tools for volumetric data processing, information extraction, surface mesh rendering, geometric measurement, and curvature estimation of biomolecular complexes. Particular emphasis is given to the modeling of cryo-electron microscopy data. Lagrangian-triangle meshes are employed for the surface presentation. On the basis of this representation, algorithms are developed for surface area and surface-enclosed volume calculation, and curvature estimation. Methods for volumetric meshing have also been presented. Because the technological development in computer science and mathematics has led to multiple choices at each stage of the geometric modeling, we discuss the rationales in the design and selection of various algorithms. Analytical models are designed to test the computational accuracy and convergence of proposed algorithms. Finally, we select a set of six cryo-electron microscopy data representing typical subcellular complexes to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithms in handling biomolecular surfaces and explore their capability of geometric characterization of binding targets. This paper offers a comprehensive protocol for the geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

  6. Geometric descriptions of entangled states by auxiliary varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Holweck, Frederic; Luque, Jean-Gabriel; Thibon, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-15

    The aim of the paper is to propose geometric descriptions of multipartite entangled states using algebraic geometry. In the context of this paper, geometric means each stratum of the Hilbert space, corresponding to an entangled state, is an open subset of an algebraic variety built by classical geometric constructions (tangent lines, secant lines) from the set of separable states. In this setting, we describe well-known classifications of multipartite entanglement such as 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Multiplication-Sign (n+ 1), for n Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1, quantum systems and a new description with the 2 Multiplication-Sign 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 quantum system. Our results complete the approach of Miyake and make stronger connections with recent work of algebraic geometers. Moreover, for the quantum systems detailed in this paper, we propose an algorithm, based on the classical theory of invariants, to decide to which subvariety of the Hilbert space a given state belongs.

  7. Dietary ecology of Murinae (Muridae, Rodentia): a geometric morphometric approach.

    PubMed

    Gómez Cano, Ana Rosa; Hernández Fernández, Manuel; Alvarez-Sierra, M Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Murine rodents represent a highly diverse group, which displays great ecological versatility. In the present paper we analyse the relationship between dental morphology, on one hand, using geometric morphometrics based upon the outline of first upper molar and the dietary preference of extant murine genera, on the other. This ecomorphological study of extant murine rodents demonstrates that dietary groups can be distinguished with the use of a quantitative geometric morphometric approach based on first upper molar outline. A discriminant analysis of the geometric morphometric variables of the first upper molars enables us to infer the dietary preferences of extinct murine genera from the Iberian Peninsula. Most of the extinct genera were omnivore; only Stephanomys showed a pattern of dental morphology alike that of the herbivore genera. PMID:24236090

  8. Dietary Ecology of Murinae (Muridae, Rodentia): A Geometric Morphometric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Cano, Ana Rosa; Hernández Fernández, Manuel; Álvarez-Sierra, M. Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Murine rodents represent a highly diverse group, which displays great ecological versatility. In the present paper we analyse the relationship between dental morphology, on one hand, using geometric morphometrics based upon the outline of first upper molar and the dietary preference of extant murine genera, on the other. This ecomorphological study of extant murine rodents demonstrates that dietary groups can be distinguished with the use of a quantitative geometric morphometric approach based on first upper molar outline. A discriminant analysis of the geometric morphometric variables of the first upper molars enables us to infer the dietary preferences of extinct murine genera from the Iberian Peninsula. Most of the extinct genera were omnivore; only Stephanomys showed a pattern of dental morphology alike that of the herbivore genera. PMID:24236090

  9. Universal freezing of quantum correlations within the geometric approach

    PubMed Central

    Cianciaruso, Marco; Bromley, Thomas R.; Roga, Wojciech; Lo Franco, Rosario; Adesso, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Quantum correlations in a composite system can be measured by resorting to a geometric approach, according to which the distance from the state of the system to a suitable set of classically correlated states is considered. Here we show that all distance functions, which respect natural assumptions of invariance under transposition, convexity, and contractivity under quantum channels, give rise to geometric quantifiers of quantum correlations which exhibit the peculiar freezing phenomenon, i.e., remain constant during the evolution of a paradigmatic class of states of two qubits each independently interacting with a non-dissipative decohering environment. Our results demonstrate from first principles that freezing of geometric quantum correlations is independent of the adopted distance and therefore universal. This finding paves the way to a deeper physical interpretation and future practical exploitation of the phenomenon for noisy quantum technologies. PMID:26053239

  10. Geometric and Topological Methods for Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Alexander; Contreras, Iván.; Reyes-Lega, Andrés. F.

    2013-05-01

    Introduction; 1. A brief introduction to Dirac manifolds Henrique Bursztyn; 2. Differential geometry of holomorphic vector bundles on a curve Florent Schaffhauser; 3. Paths towards an extension of Chern-Weil calculus to a class of infinite dimensional vector bundles Sylvie Paycha; 4. Introduction to Feynman integrals Stefan Weinzierl; 5. Iterated integrals in quantum field theory Francis Brown; 6. Geometric issues in quantum field theory and string theory Luis J. Boya; 7. Geometric aspects of the standard model and the mysteries of matter Florian Scheck; 8. Absence of singular continuous spectrum for some geometric Laplacians Leonardo A. Cano García; 9. Models for formal groupoids Iván Contreras; 10. Elliptic PDEs and smoothness of weakly Einstein metrics of Hölder regularity Andrés Vargas; 11. Regularized traces and the index formula for manifolds with boundary Alexander Cardona and César Del Corral; Index.

  11. Characteristic signatures of quantum criticality driven by geometrical frustration

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Stingl, Christian; Kim, Moo-Sung; Takabatake, Toshiro; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Geometrical frustration describes situations where interactions are incompatible with the lattice geometry and stabilizes exotic phases such as spin liquids. Whether geometrical frustration of magnetic interactions in metals can induce unconventional quantum critical points is an active area of research. We focus on the hexagonal heavy fermion metal CeRhSn, where the Kondo ions are located on distorted kagome planes stacked along the c axis. Low-temperature specific heat, thermal expansion, and magnetic Grüneisen parameter measurements prove a zero-field quantum critical point. The linear thermal expansion, which measures the initial uniaxial pressure derivative of the entropy, displays a striking anisotropy. Critical and noncritical behaviors along and perpendicular to the kagome planes, respectively, prove that quantum criticality is driven be geometrical frustration. We also discovered a spin flop–type metamagnetic crossover. This excludes an itinerant scenario and suggests that quantum criticality is related to local moments in a spin liquid–like state. PMID:26601165

  12. Automated house internal geometric quality inspection using laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuchen; Zhang, Zhichao; Qiu, Zhouyan

    2015-12-01

    Taking a terrestrial laser scanner to scan the room of a house, the scanned data can be used to inspect the geometric quality of the room. Taking advantage of the scan line feature, we can quickly calculate normal of the scanned points. Afterwards, we develop a fast plane segmentation approach to recognize the walls of the room according to the semantic constraints of a common room. With geometric and semantic constraints, we can exclude points that don't belong to the inspecting room. With the segmented results, we can accurately do global search of max and min height, width and length of a room, and the flatness of the wall as well. Experiment shows the robustness of this geometric inspecting approach. This approach has the ability to measure some important indicators that cannot be done by manual work.

  13. Exploring percolative landscapes: Infinite cascades of geometric phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timonin, P. N.; Chitov, Gennady Y.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of many kinetic processes in 1+1 (space-time) dimensions results in 2 D directed percolative landscapes. The active phases of these models possess numerous hidden geometric orders characterized by various types of large-scale and/or coarse-grained percolative backbones that we define. For the patterns originated in the classical directed percolation (DP) and contact process we show from the Monte Carlo simulation data that these percolative backbones emerge at specific critical points as a result of continuous phase transitions. These geometric transitions belong to the DP universality class and their nonlocal order parameters are the capacities of corresponding backbones. The multitude of conceivable percolative backbones implies the existence of infinite cascades of such geometric transitions in the kinetic processes considered. We present simple arguments to support the conjecture that such cascades of transitions are a generic feature of percolation as well as of many other transitions with nonlocal order parameters.

  14. Comparative Geometrical Investigations of Hand-Held Scanning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, T. P.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Lindstaedt, M.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Misgaiski-Hass, M.

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of hand-held scanning systems by different manufacturers are becoming available on the market. However, their geometrical performance is little-known to many users. Therefore the Laboratory for Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning of the HafenCity University Hamburg has carried out geometrical accuracy tests with the following systems in co-operation with the Bochum University of Applied Sciences (Laboratory for Photogrammetry) as well as the Humboldt University in Berlin (Institute for Computer Science): DOTProduct DPI-7, Artec Spider, Mantis Vision F5 SR, Kinect v1 + v2, Structure Sensor and Google's Project Tango. In the framework of these comparative investigations geometrically stable reference bodies were used. The appropriate reference data were acquired by measurement with two structured light projection systems (AICON smartSCAN and GOM ATOS I 2M). The comprehensive test results of the different test scenarios are presented and critically discussed in this contribution.

  15. Optical Mode Control by Geometric Phase in Quasicrystal Metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulevich, Igor; Maguid, Elhanan; Shitrit, Nir; Veksler, Dekel; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2015-11-01

    We report on the observation of optical spin-controlled modes from a quasicrystalline metasurface as a result of an aperiodic geometric phase induced by anisotropic subwavelength structure. When geometric phase defects are introduced in the aperiodic structured surface, the modes exhibit polarization helicity dependence resulting in the optical spin-Hall effect. The radiative thermal dispersion bands from a quasicrystal structure are studied where the observed bands arise from the optical spin-orbit interaction induced by the aperiodic space-variant orientations of anisotropic antennas. The optical spin-flip behavior of the revealed modes that arise from the geometric phase pickup is experimentally observed within the visible spectrum by measuring the spin-projected diffraction patterns. The introduced ability to manipulate the light-matter interaction of quasicrystals in a spin-dependent manner provides the route for molding light via spin-optical aperiodic artificial planar surfaces.

  16. Optical Mode Control by Geometric Phase in Quasicrystal Metasurface.

    PubMed

    Yulevich, Igor; Maguid, Elhanan; Shitrit, Nir; Veksler, Dekel; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2015-11-13

    We report on the observation of optical spin-controlled modes from a quasicrystalline metasurface as a result of an aperiodic geometric phase induced by anisotropic subwavelength structure. When geometric phase defects are introduced in the aperiodic structured surface, the modes exhibit polarization helicity dependence resulting in the optical spin-Hall effect. The radiative thermal dispersion bands from a quasicrystal structure are studied where the observed bands arise from the optical spin-orbit interaction induced by the aperiodic space-variant orientations of anisotropic antennas. The optical spin-flip behavior of the revealed modes that arise from the geometric phase pickup is experimentally observed within the visible spectrum by measuring the spin-projected diffraction patterns. The introduced ability to manipulate the light-matter interaction of quasicrystals in a spin-dependent manner provides the route for molding light via spin-optical aperiodic artificial planar surfaces.

  17. A discrete geometric approach to solving time independent Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Specogna, Ruben; Trevisan, Francesco

    2011-02-20

    The time independent Schroedinger equation stems from quantum theory axioms as a partial differential equation. This work aims at providing a novel discrete geometric formulation of this equation in terms of integral variables associated with precise geometric elements of a pair of three-dimensional interlocked grids, one of them based on tetrahedra. We will deduce, in a purely geometric way, a computationally efficient discrete counterpart of the time independent Schroedinger equation in terms of a standard symmetric eigenvalue problem. Moreover boundary and interface conditions together with non homogeneity and anisotropy of the media involved are accounted for in a straightforward manner. This approach yields to a sensible computational advantage with respect to the finite element method, where a generalized eigenvalue problem has to be solved instead. Such a modeling tool can be used for analyzing a number of quantum phenomena in modern nano-structured devices, where the accounting of the real 3D geometry is a crucial issue.

  18. Gaussian geometric discord in terms of Hellinger distance

    SciTech Connect

    Suciu, Serban Isar, Aurelian

    2015-12-07

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, we address the quantification of general non-classical correlations in Gaussian states of continuous variable systems from a geometric perspective. We give a description of the Gaussian geometric discord by using the Hellinger distance as a measure for quantum correlations between two non-interacting non-resonant bosonic modes embedded in a thermal environment. We evaluate the Gaussian geometric discord by taking two-mode squeezed thermal states as initial states of the system and show that it has finite values between 0 and 1 and that it decays asymptotically to zero in time under the effect of the thermal bath.

  19. Thermal geometric discords in a two-qutrit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ya-Li; Hou, Xi-Wen

    2016-06-01

    The investigation of quantum discord has mostly focused on two-qubit systems due to the complicated minimization involved in quantum discord for high-dimensional states. In this work, three geometric discords are studied for the thermal state in a two-qutrit system with various couplings, external magnetic fields, and temperatures as well, where the entanglement measured in terms of the generalized negativity is calculated for reference. It is shown that three geometric discords are more robust against temperature and magnetic field than the entanglement negativity. However, all four quantities exhibit a similar behavior at lower temperature and weak magnetic field. Remarkably, three geometric discords at finite temperature reveal the phenomenon of double sudden changes at different magnetic fields while the negativity does not. Moreover, the hierarchy among three discords is discussed. Those adjustable discords with the varied coupling, temperature, and magnetic field are useful for the understanding of quantum correlations in high-dimensional states and quantum information processing.

  20. Dietary ecology of Murinae (Muridae, Rodentia): a geometric morphometric approach.

    PubMed

    Gómez Cano, Ana Rosa; Hernández Fernández, Manuel; Alvarez-Sierra, M Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Murine rodents represent a highly diverse group, which displays great ecological versatility. In the present paper we analyse the relationship between dental morphology, on one hand, using geometric morphometrics based upon the outline of first upper molar and the dietary preference of extant murine genera, on the other. This ecomorphological study of extant murine rodents demonstrates that dietary groups can be distinguished with the use of a quantitative geometric morphometric approach based on first upper molar outline. A discriminant analysis of the geometric morphometric variables of the first upper molars enables us to infer the dietary preferences of extinct murine genera from the Iberian Peninsula. Most of the extinct genera were omnivore; only Stephanomys showed a pattern of dental morphology alike that of the herbivore genera.

  1. Geometric transitions and D-term SUSY breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Aganagic, Mina; Aganagic, Mina; Beem, Christopher

    2007-11-05

    We propose a new way of using geometric transitions to study metastable vacua in string theory and certain confining gauge theories. The gauge theories in question are N=2 supersymmetric theories deformed to N=1 by superpotential terms. We first geometrically engineer supersymmetry-breaking vacua by wrapping D5 branes on rigid 2-cycles in noncompact Calabi-Yau geometries, such that the central charges of the branes are misaligned. In a limit of slightly misaligned charges, this has a gauge theory description, where supersymmetry is broken by Fayet-Iliopoulos D-terms. Geometric transitions relate these configurations to dual Calabi-Yaus with fluxes, where H_RR, H_NS and dJ are all nonvanishing. We argue that the dual geometry can be effectively used to study the resulting non-supersymmetric, confining vacua

  2. Ground-state geometric quantum computing in superconducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Moettoenen, M.

    2010-11-15

    We present a theoretical proposal for the implementation of geometric quantum computing based on a Hamiltonian which has a doubly degenerate ground state. Thus the system which is steered adiabatically, remains in the ground-state. The proposed physical implementation relies on a superconducting circuit composed of three SQUIDs and two superconducting islands with the charge states encoding the logical states. We obtain a universal set of single-qubit gates and implement a nontrivial two-qubit gate exploiting the mutual inductance between two neighboring circuits, allowing us to realize a fully geometric ground-state quantum computing. The introduced paradigm for the implementation of geometric quantum computing is expected to be robust against environmental effects.

  3. Geometric model from microscopic theory for nuclear absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Sarah; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    A parameter-free geometric model for nuclear absorption is derived herein from microscopic theory. The expression for the absorption cross section in the eikonal approximation, taken in integral form, is separated into a geometric contribution that is described by an energy-dependent effective radius and two surface terms that cancel in an asymptotic series expansion. For collisions of light nuclei, an expression for the effective radius is derived from harmonic oscillator nuclear density functions. A direct extension to heavy nuclei with Woods-Saxon densities is made by identifying the equivalent half-density radius for the harmonic oscillator functions. Coulomb corrections are incorporated, and a simplified geometric form of the Bradt-Peters type is obtained. Results spanning the energy range from 1 MeV/nucleon to 1 GeV/nucleon are presented. Good agreement with experimental results is obtained.

  4. Automated landmarking and geometric characterization of the carotid siphon.

    PubMed

    Bogunović, Hrvoje; Pozo, José María; Cárdenes, Rubén; Villa-Uriol, María Cruz; Blanc, Raphaël; Piotin, Michel; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2012-05-01

    The geometry of the carotid siphon has a large variability between subjects, which has prompted its study as a potential geometric risk factor for the onset of vascular pathologies on and off the internal carotid artery (ICA). In this work, we present a methodology for an objective and extensive geometric characterization of carotid siphon parameterized by a set of anatomical landmarks. We introduce a complete and automated characterization pipeline. Starting from the segmentation of vasculature from angiographic image and its centerline extraction, we first identify ICA by characterizing vessel tree bifurcations and training a support vector machine classifier to detect ICA terminal bifurcation. On ICA centerline curve, we detect anatomical landmarks of carotid siphon by modeling it as a sequence of four bends and selecting their centers and interfaces between them. Bends are detected from the trajectory of the curvature vector expressed in the parallel transport frame of the curve. Finally, using the detected landmarks, we characterize the geometry in two complementary ways. First, with a set of local and global geometric features, known to affect hemodynamics. Second, using large deformation diffeomorphic metric curve mapping (LDDMCM) to quantify pairwise shape similarity. We processed 96 images acquired with 3D rotational angiography. ICA identification had a cross-validation success rate of 99%. Automated landmarking was validated by computing limits of agreement with the reference taken to be the locations of the manually placed landmarks averaged across multiple observers. For all but one landmark, either the bias was not statistically significant or the variability was within 50% of the inter-observer one. The subsequently computed values of geometric features and LDDMCM were commensurate to the ones obtained with manual landmarking. The characterization based on pair-wise LDDMCM proved better in classifying the carotid siphon shape classes than the one

  5. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  6. Calibration and verification of thermographic cameras for geometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagüela, S.; González-Jorge, H.; Armesto, J.; Arias, P.

    2011-03-01

    Infrared thermography is a technique with an increasing degree of development and applications. Quality assessment in the measurements performed with the thermal cameras should be achieved through metrology calibration and verification. Infrared cameras acquire temperature and geometric information, although calibration and verification procedures are only usual for thermal data. Black bodies are used for these purposes. Moreover, the geometric information is important for many fields as architecture, civil engineering and industry. This work presents a calibration procedure that allows the photogrammetric restitution and a portable artefact to verify the geometric accuracy, repeatability and drift of thermographic cameras. These results allow the incorporation of this information into the quality control processes of the companies. A grid based on burning lamps is used for the geometric calibration of thermographic cameras. The artefact designed for the geometric verification consists of five delrin spheres and seven cubes of different sizes. Metrology traceability for the artefact is obtained from a coordinate measuring machine. Two sets of targets with different reflectivity are fixed to the spheres and cubes to make data processing and photogrammetric restitution possible. Reflectivity was the chosen material propriety due to the thermographic and visual cameras ability to detect it. Two thermographic cameras from Flir and Nec manufacturers, and one visible camera from Jai are calibrated, verified and compared using calibration grids and the standard artefact. The calibration system based on burning lamps shows its capability to perform the internal orientation of the thermal cameras. Verification results show repeatability better than 1 mm for all cases, being better than 0.5 mm for the visible one. As it must be expected, also accuracy appears higher in the visible camera, and the geometric comparison between thermographic cameras shows slightly better

  7. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-15

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace–Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  8. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  9. Fused Traditional and Geometric Morphometrics Demonstrate Pinniped Whisker Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ginter, Carly C.; DeWitt, Thomas J.; Fish, Frank E.; Marshall, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrissae (whiskers) are important components of the mammalian tactile sensory system, and primarily function as detectors of vibrotactile information from the environment. Pinnipeds possess the largest vibrissae among mammals and their vibrissal hair shafts demonstrate a diversity of shapes. The vibrissae of most phocid seals exhibit a beaded morphology with repeating sequences of crests and troughs along their length. However, there are few detailed analyses of pinniped vibrissal morphology, and these are limited to a few species. Therefore, we comparatively characterized differences in vibrissal hair shaft morphologies among phocid species with a beaded profile, phocid species with a smooth profile, and otariids with a smooth profile using traditional and geometric morphometric methods. Traditional morphometric measurements (peak-to-peak distance, crest width, trough width and total length) were collected using digital photographs. Elliptic Fourier analysis (geometric morphometrics) was used to quantify the outlines of whole vibrissae. The traditional and geometric morphometric datasets were subsequently combined by mathematically scaling each to true rank, followed by a single eigendecomposition. Quadratic discriminant function analysis demonstrated that 79.3, 97.8 and 100% of individuals could be correctly classified to their species based on vibrissal shape variables in the traditional, geometric and combined morphometric analyses, respectively. Phocids with beaded vibrissae, phocids with smooth vibrissae, and otariids each occupied distinct morphospace in the geometric morphometric and combined data analyses. Otariids split into two groups in the geometric morphometric analysis and gray seals appeared intermediate between beaded- and smooth-whiskered species in the traditional and combined analyses. Vibrissal hair shafts modulate the transduction of environmental stimuli to the mechanoreceptors in the follicle-sinus complex (F-SC), which results in

  10. Geometrical rectification of spin-scan images from Pioneer 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, R. N.; Burke, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Images of Saturn received from Pioneer 11 suffer from geometrical distortions due to the curvilinear scan lines and the unequal sampling intervals in orthogonal directions, which are inherent in spin-scan imaging. In this paper geometrical image rectification by polynomial transformation based on control points is discussed. Factors that affect the accuracy of reconstruction are shown to include the spatial distribution and spatial density of control points, and the order of the polynomial distortion model. A computer implementation of the technique is described.

  11. Geometric registration and rectification of spaceborne SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.; Pang, S. N.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the development of automated location and geometric rectification techniques for digitally processed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. A software package has been developed that is capable of determining the absolute location of an image pixel to within 60 m using only the spacecraft ephemeris data and the characteristics of the SAR data collection and processing system. Based on this location capability algorithms have been developed that geometrically rectify the imagery, register it to a common coordinate system and mosaic multiple frames to form extended digital SAR maps. These algorithms have been optimized using parallel processing techniques to minimize the operating time. Test results are given using Seasat SAR data.

  12. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  13. Geometric modeling and analysis of large latticed surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Hefzy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    The application of geometrical schemes, similar to geodesic domes, to large spherical antenna reflectors was investigated. The shape and size of flat segmented latticed surfaces which approximate general shells of revolution, and in particular spherical and paraboloidal reflective surfaces, were determined. The extensive mathematical and computational geometric analyses of the reflector resulted in the development of a general purpose computer program capable of generating the complete design parameters of the dish. The program also includes a graphical self contained subroutine for graphic display of the required design.

  14. Geometric derivations of minimal sets of sufficient multiview constraints

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Orrin H.; Oshel, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    Geometric interpretations of four of the most common determinant formulations of multiview constraints are given, showing that they all enforce the same geometry and that all of the forms commonly in use in the machine vision community are a subset of a more general form. Generalising the work of Yi Ma yields a new general 2 x 2 determinant trilinear and 3 x 3 determinant quadlinear. Geometric descriptions of degenerate multiview constraints are given, showing that it is necessary, but insufficient, that the determinant equals zero. Understanding the degeneracies leads naturally into proofs for minimum sufficient sets of bilinear, trilinear and quadlinear constraints for arbitrary numbers of conjugate observations.

  15. Homothetic transformations and geometric loci: properties of triangles and quadrilaterals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flavia Mammana, Maria

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we use geometric transformations to find some interesting properties related with geometric loci. In particular, given a triangle or a cyclic quadrilateral, the locus generated by the centroid or by the orthocentre (for triangles) or by the anticentre (for cyclic quadrilaterals) when one vertex moves on the circumcircle of the figure are considered. These loci are studied in paragraphs 3 and 4. By means of the homothetic transformations some properties of triangles and quadrilaterals are found. The study of these properties can be used, with profit, in a classroom activity supported by Dynamic Geometry System.

  16. Comparisons between geometrical optics and Lorenz-Mie theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungut, A.; Grehan, G.; Gouesbet, G.

    1981-01-01

    Both the Lorenz-Mie and geometrical optics theories are used in calculating the scattered light patterns produced by transparent spherical particles over a wide range of diameters, between 1.0 and 100 microns, and for the range of forward scattering angles from zero to 20 deg. A detailed comparison of the results shows the greater accuracy of the geometrical optics theory in the forward direction. Emphasis is given to the simultaneous sizing and velocimetry of particles by means of pedestal calibration methods.

  17. One step geometrical calibration method for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Díaz, Jesús; Stritzel, Jenny; Rahlves, Maik; Majdani, Omid; Reithmeier, Eduard; Ortmaier, Tobias; Roth, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel one-step calibration methodology for geometrical distortion correction for optical coherence tomography (OCT). A calibration standard especially designed for OCT is introduced, which consists of an array of inverse pyramidal structures. The use of multiple landmarks situated on four different height levels on the pyramids allow performing a 3D geometrical calibration. The calibration procedure itself is based on a parametric model of the OCT beam propagation. It is validated by experimental results and enables the reduction of systematic errors by more than one order of magnitude. In future, our results can improve OCT image reconstruction and interpretation for medical applications such as real time monitoring of surgery.

  18. Geometric Heat Engines Featuring Power that Grows with Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Raz, O; Subaşı, Y; Pugatch, R

    2016-04-22

    Thermodynamics places a limit on the efficiency of heat engines, but not on their output power or on how the power and efficiency change with the engine's cycle time. In this Letter, we develop a geometrical description of the power and efficiency as a function of the cycle time, applicable to an important class of heat engine models. This geometrical description is used to design engine protocols that attain both the maximal power and maximal efficiency at the fast driving limit. Furthermore, using this method, we also prove that no protocol can exactly attain the Carnot efficiency at nonzero power.

  19. Image processing method for multicore fiber geometric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanbiao; Ning, Tigang; Li, Jing; Li, Chao; Ma, Shaoshuo

    2016-05-01

    An image processing method has been developed to obtain multicore fiber geometric parameters. According to the characteristics of multicore fiber, we using MATLAB to processing the sectional view of the multicore fiber (MCF), and the algorithm mainly concludes the following steps: filter out image noise, edge detection, use an appropriate threshold for boundary extraction and an improved curve-fitting algorithm for reconstruction the cross section, then we get the relative geometric parameters of the MCF in pixels. We also compares different edge detection operator and analyzes each detection results, which can provide a meaningful reference for edge detection.

  20. Cosmological models in Weyl geometrical scalar-tensor theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.; Alves Junior, F. A. P.; Barreto, A. B.; Romero, C.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate cosmological models in a recently proposed geometrical theory of gravity, in which the scalar field appears as part of the spacetime geometry. We extend the previous theory to include a scalar potential in the action. We solve the vacuum field equations for different choices of the scalar potential and give a detailed analysis of the solutions. We show that, in some cases, a cosmological scenario is found that seems to suggest the appearance of a geometric phase transition. We build a toy model, in which the accelerated expansion of the early Universe is driven by pure geometry.

  1. Optimal control of underactuated mechanical systems: A geometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Leonardo; Martín De Diego, David; Zuccalli, Marcela

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we consider a geometric formalism for optimal control of underactuated mechanical systems. Our techniques are an adaptation of the classical Skinner and Rusk approach for the case of Lagrangian dynamics with higher-order constraints. We study a regular case where it is possible to establish a symplectic framework and, as a consequence, to obtain a unique vector field determining the dynamics of the optimal control problem. These developments will allow us to develop a new class of geometric integrators based on discrete variational calculus.

  2. Geometric Heat Engines Featuring Power that Grows with Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz, O.; Subaşı, Y.; Pugatch, R.

    2016-04-01

    Thermodynamics places a limit on the efficiency of heat engines, but not on their output power or on how the power and efficiency change with the engine's cycle time. In this Letter, we develop a geometrical description of the power and efficiency as a function of the cycle time, applicable to an important class of heat engine models. This geometrical description is used to design engine protocols that attain both the maximal power and maximal efficiency at the fast driving limit. Furthermore, using this method, we also prove that no protocol can exactly attain the Carnot efficiency at nonzero power.

  3. Geometrical frustration in an element solid: (beta)-rhombohedral boron

    SciTech Connect

    Ogitsu, T; Gygi, F; Reed, J; Udagawa, M; Motome, Y; Schwegler, E; Galli, G

    2009-05-19

    Although a comprehensive understanding of the basic properties of most elemental solids has been achieved, there are still fundamental, open questions regarding simple substances, e.g. boron. Based on an Ising model that describes the intrinsic defect states in elemental boron, we show that this system is the only known element to exhibit geometrical frustration in its solid form. Interestingly, we find that the peculiar transport properties of boron that have been reported over the past forty years originate from the presence of geometrical frustration.

  4. Estimation of Defect's Geometric Parameters with a Thermal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protasov, A.; Sineglazov, V.

    2003-03-01

    The problem of estimation of flaws' parameters has been realized in two stages. At the first stage, it has been estimated relationship between temperature difference of a heated sample's surface and geometrical parameters of the flaw. For this purpose we have solved a direct heat conduction problem for various combination of the geometrical sizes of the flaw. At the second stage, we have solved an inverse heat conduction problem using the H - infinity method of identification. The results have shown good convergence to real parameters.

  5. Influence of geometric nonlinearities on skin-stiffener interface stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, D.; Hyer, M. W.

    1988-01-01

    A method for computing skin-stiffener interface stresses in stiffened composite panels is developed. Both geometrically linear and nonlinear analyses are considered. Particular attention is given to the flange termination region where stresses are expected to exhibit unbounded characteristics. The method is based on a finite-element analysis and an elasticity solution. The results indicate that the inclusion of geometric nonlinearities is very important for an accurate determination of the interface stresses. Membrane flattening of the panel tends to reduce the tendency of the stiffener to separate.

  6. Why Einstein did not believe that general relativity geometrizes gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmkuhl, Dennis

    2014-05-01

    I argue that, contrary to folklore, Einstein never really cared for geometrizing the gravitational or (subsequently) the electromagnetic field; indeed, he thought that the very statement that General Relativity geometrizes gravity "is not saying anything at all". Instead, I shall show that Einstein saw the "unification" of inertia and gravity as one of the major achievements of General Relativity. Interestingly, Einstein did not locate this unification in the field equations but in his interpretation of the geodesic equation, the law of motion of test particles.

  7. Spin freezing in geometrically frustrated antiferromagnets with weak disorder.

    PubMed

    Saunders, T E; Chalker, J T

    2007-04-13

    We investigate the consequences for geometrically frustrated antiferromagnets of weak disorder in the strength of exchange interactions. Taking as a model the classical Heisenberg antiferromagnet with nearest neighbor exchange on the pyrochlore lattice, we examine low-temperature behavior. We show that spatial modulation of exchange generates long-range effective interactions within the extensively degenerate ground states of the clean system. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we find a spin glass transition at a temperature set by the disorder strength. Disorder of this type, which is generated by random strains in the presence of magnetoelastic coupling, may account for the spin freezing observed in many geometrically frustrated magnets.

  8. Geometrical phase imprinted on eigenfunctions near an exceptional point

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo-Young

    2010-12-15

    We illustrate how to get the geometric phase from eigenfunctions in the vicinity of an exceptional point in a dielectric microcavity whose non-Hermitian character comes from the outgoing-wave boundary condition. It is shown that the geometrical phase {+-}{pi} can be obtained either from total variation of the inner product of eigenfunctions or from a continuous change of phase plot, not of intensity plot, during a double cyclic parameter variation encircling the exceptional point. One can use either of the two ways by properly choosing the arbitrary phase of the calculated eigenfunctions.

  9. Methods and apparatuses for signaling with geometric constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged F. (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Communication systems are described that use signal constellations, which have unequally spaced (i.e. geometrically shaped) points. In many embodiments, the communication systems use specific geometric constellations that are capacity optimized at a specific SNR. In addition, ranges within which the constellation points of a capacity optimized constellation can be perturbed and are still likely to achieve a given percentage of the optimal capacity increase compared to a constellation that maximizes d.sub.min, are also described. Capacity measures that are used in the selection of the location of constellation points include, but are not limited to, parallel decode (PD) capacity and joint capacity.

  10. Geometrical Pumping with a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.-I.; Schemmer, M.; Aycock, L. M.; Genkina, D.; Sugawa, S.; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-05-01

    We realized a quantum geometric "charge" pump for a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the lowest Bloch band of a novel bipartite magnetic lattice. Topological charge pumps in filled bands yield quantized pumping set by the global—topological—properties of the bands. In contrast, our geometric charge pump for a BEC occupying just a single crystal momentum state exhibits nonquantized charge pumping set by local—geometrical—properties of the band structure. Like topological charge pumps, for each pump cycle we observed an overall displacement (here, not quantized) and a temporal modulation of the atomic wave packet's position in each unit cell, i.e., the polarization.

  11. Defects' geometric feature recognition based on infrared image edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junyan, Liu; Qingju, Tang; Yang, Wang; Yumei, Lu; Zhiping, Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Edge detection is an important technology in image segmentation, feature extraction and other digital image processing areas. Boundary contains a wealth of information in the image, so to extract defects' edges in infrared images effectively enables the identification of defects' geometric features. This paper analyzed the detection effect of classic edge detection operators, and proposed fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering-Canny operator algorithm to achieve defects' edges in the infrared images. Results show that the proposed algorithm has better effect than the classic edge detection operators, which can identify the defects' geometric feature much more completely and clearly. The defects' diameters have been calculated based on the image edge detection results.

  12. Geometric phase of atoms in a magnetic storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; You, L.

    2006-12-15

    A magnetically trapped atom experiences an adiabatic geometric (Berry's) phase due to changing field direction. We investigate theoretically such an Aharonov-Bohm-like geometric phase for atoms adiabatically moving inside a storage ring as demonstrated in several recent experiments. Our result shows that this phase shift is easily observable in a closed-loop interference experiment, and thus the shift has to be accounted for in the proposed inertial sensing applications. The spread in phase shift due to the atom transverse distribution is quantified through numerical simulations.

  13. The Construction of Abstract Units in Geometric and Numeric Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, Grayson H.; Reynolds, Anne

    1996-01-01

    Data from (n=4) students in grades three through six showed a consistent parallel between the types of units constructed in a geometric setting with those in a numeric context. Students who constructed abstract composite units in tiling the plane also did so in adding and subtracting whole numbers. (Author/MKR)

  14. 3-D Geometric Modeling for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Holly K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes new geometric computer models used in contemporary computer-aided design (CAD) software including wire frame, surface, solid, and parametric models. Reviews their use in engineering design and discusses the impact of these new technologies on the engineering design graphics curriculum. (Author/CCM)

  15. Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing. Drafting Module 9. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Missouri Vocational Instruction Management System instructor's drafting guide has been keyed to the drafting competency profile developed by state industry and education professionals. The guide contains a cross-reference table of instructional materials. This unit covers geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. The unit contains the…

  16. Geometric Aspects of Force Controllability for a Swimming Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khapalov, A. Y.

    2008-02-15

    We study controllability properties (swimming capabilities) of a mathematical model of an abstract object which 'swims' in the 2-D Stokes fluid. Our goal is to investigate how the geometric shape of this object affects the forces acting upon it. Such problems are of interest in biology and engineering applications dealing with propulsion systems in fluids.

  17. Emergent geometric frustration of artificial magnetic skyrmion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fusheng; Reichhardt, C.; Gan, Weiliang; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Lew, Wen Siang

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic skyrmions have been receiving growing attention as potential information storage and magnetic logic devices since an increasing number of materials have been identified that support skyrmion phases. Explorations of artificial frustrated systems have led to new insights into controlling and engineering new emergent frustration phenomena in frustrated and disordered systems. Here, we propose a skyrmion spin ice, giving a unifying framework for the study of geometric frustration of skyrmion crystals (SCs) in a nonfrustrated artificial geometrical lattice as a consequence of the structural confinement of skyrmions in magnetic potential wells. The emergent ice rules from the geometrically frustrated SCs highlight a novel phenomenon in this skyrmion system: emergent geometrical frustration. We demonstrate how SC topology transitions between a nonfrustrated periodic configuration and a frustrated icelike ordering can also be realized reversibly. The proposed artificial frustrated skyrmion systems can be annealed into different ice phases with an applied current-induced spin-transfer torque, including a long-range ordered ice rule obeying ground state, as-relaxed random state, biased state, and monopole state. The spin-torque reconfigurability of the artificial skyrmion ice states, difficult to achieve in other artificial spin ice systems, is compatible with standard spintronic device fabrication technology, which makes the semiconductor industrial integration straightforward.

  18. Geometrical Similarity Transformations in Dynamic Geometry Environment Geogebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andraphanova, Natalia V.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the article is usage of modern computer technologies through the example of interactive geometry environment Geogebra as an innovative technology of representing and studying of geometrical material which involves such didactical opportunities as vizualisation, simulation and dynamics. There is shown a classification of geometric…

  19. Fast non-Abelian geometric gates via transitionless quantum driving

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Kyaw, Thi Ha; Tong, D. M.; Sjöqvist, Erik; Kwek, Leong-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    A practical quantum computer must be capable of performing high fidelity quantum gates on a set of quantum bits (qubits). In the presence of noise, the realization of such gates poses daunting challenges. Geometric phases, which possess intrinsic noise-tolerant features, hold the promise for performing robust quantum computation. In particular, quantum holonomies, i.e., non-Abelian geometric phases, naturally lead to universal quantum computation due to their non-commutativity. Although quantum gates based on adiabatic holonomies have already been proposed, the slow evolution eventually compromises qubit coherence and computational power. Here, we propose a general approach to speed up an implementation of adiabatic holonomic gates by using transitionless driving techniques and show how such a universal set of fast geometric quantum gates in a superconducting circuit architecture can be obtained in an all-geometric approach. Compared with standard non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation, the holonomies obtained in our approach tends asymptotically to those of the adiabatic approach in the long run-time limit and thus might open up a new horizon for realizing a practical quantum computer. PMID:26687580

  20. Some Geometric Inequalities Relating to an Interior Point in Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yu-Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Liang, Chun-Lei

    2010-01-01

    In this short note, by using one of Li and Liu's theorems [K.-H. Li, "The solution of CIQ. 39," "Commun. Stud. Inequal." 11(1) (2004), p. 162 (in Chinese)], "s-R-r" method, Cauchy's inequality and the theory of convex function, we solve some geometric inequalities conjectures relating to an interior point in triangle. (Contains 1 figure.)