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Sample records for 7tm receptor structures

  1. Hitchhiking on the heptahelical highway: structure and function of 7TM receptor complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tesmer, John J. G.

    2017-01-01

    A revolution in the analysis of seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors has provided detailed information about how these physiologically important signalling proteins interact with extracellular cues. However, it has proven much more challenging to understand how they convey information to their principal intracellular targets: heterotrimeric G proteins, G protein-coupled receptor kinases, and arrestins. Recent structures now suggest a common mechanism that enables structurally diverse cytoplasmic proteins to hitch a ride on hundreds of different activated 7TM receptors in order to instigate physiological change. PMID:27093944

  2. Structure of the human smoothened receptor 7TM bound to an antitumor agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Wu, Huixian; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Huang, Xi-Ping; Liu, Wei; Siu, Fai Yiu; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    The smoothened (SMO) receptor, a key signal transducer in the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is both responsible for the maintenance of normal embryonic development and implicated in carcinogenesis. The SMO receptor is classified as a class Frizzled (class F) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), although the canonical Hh signaling pathway involves the transcription factor Gli and the sequence similarity with class A GPCRs is less than 10%. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.5 Å resolution of the transmembrane domain of the human SMO receptor bound to the small molecule antagonist LY2940680. Although the SMO receptor shares the seven transmembrane helical (7TM) fold, most conserved motifs for class A GPCRs are absent, and the structure reveals an unusually complex arrangement of long extracellular loops stabilized by four disulfide bonds. The ligand binds at the extracellular end of the 7TM bundle and forms extensive contacts with the loops. PMID:23636324

  3. Solution Structure and Sugar-Binding Mechanism of Mouse Latrophilin-1 RBL: a 7TM Receptor-Attached Lectin-Like Domain

    PubMed Central

    Vakonakis, Ioannis; Langenhan, Tobias; Prömel, Simone; Russ, Andreas; Campbell, Iain D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Latrophilin-1 (Lat-1), a target receptor for α-Latrotoxin, is a putative G protein-coupled receptor implicated in synaptic function. The extracellular portion of Lat-1 contains a rhamnose binding lectin (RBL)-like domain of unknown structure. RBL domains, first isolated from the eggs of marine species, are also found in the ectodomains of other metazoan transmembrane proteins, including a recently discovered coreceptor of the neuronal axon guidance molecule SLT-1/Slit. Here, we describe a structure of this domain from the mouse Lat-1. RBL adopts a unique α/β fold with long structured loops important for monosaccharide recognition, as shown in the structure of a complex with L-rhamnose. Sequence alignments and mutagenesis show that residues important for carbohydrate binding are often absent in other receptor-attached examples of RBL, including the SLT-1/Slit coreceptor. We postulate that this domain class facilitates direct protein-protein interactions in many transmembrane receptors. PMID:18547526

  4. A concise synthesis of 1,4-dihydro-[1,4]diazepine-5,7-dione, a novel 7-TM receptor ligand core structure with melanocortin receptor agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Jerzy R; Laudeman, Chris P; Sammond, Doug M; Villeneuve, Manon; Minick, Douglas J; Grizzle, Mary K; Daniels, Alejandro J; Andrews, John L; Ignar, Diane M

    2010-03-01

    Finding small non-peptide molecules for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) whose endogenous ligands are peptides, is a very important task for medicinal chemists. Over the years, compounds mimicking peptide structures have been discovered, and scaffolds emulating peptide backbones have been designed. In our work on GPCR ligands, including cholecystokinin receptor-1 (CCKR-1) agonists, we have employed benzodiazepines as a core structure. Looking for ways to reduce molecular weight and possibly improve physical properties of GPCR ligands, we embarked on the search for molecules providing similar scaffolds to the benzodiazepine with lower molecular weight. One of our target core structures was 1,4-dihydro-[1,4]diazepine-5,7-dione. There was not, however, a known synthetic route to such molecules. Here we report the discovery of a simple and concise method for synthesis of 2-[6-(1H-indazol-3-ylmethyl)-5,7-dioxo-4-phenyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-[1,4]diazepin-1-yl]-N-isopropyl-N-phenyl-acetamide as an example of a compound containing the tetrahydrodiazepine-5,7-dione core. Compounds from this series were tested in numerous GPCR assays and demonstrated activity at melanocortin 1 and 4 receptors (MC1R and MC4R). Selected compounds from this series were tested in vivo in Peptide YY (PYY)-induced food intake. Compounds dosed by intracerebroventricular and oral routes reduced PYY-induced food intake and this effect was reversed by the cyclic peptide MC4R antagonist SHU9119.

  5. 7TM X-ray structures for class C GPCRs as new drug-discovery tools. 1. mGluR5.

    PubMed

    Topiol, Sid; Sabio, Michael

    2016-01-15

    We illustrate, with a focus on mGluR5, how the recently published, first X-ray structures of mGluR 7TM domains, specifically those of mGluR1 and mGluR5 complexed with negative allosteric modulators (NAMs), will begin to influence ligand- (e.g., drug- or sweetener-) discovery efforts involving class C GPCRs. With an extensive docking study allowing full ligand flexibility and full side chain flexibility of all residues in the ligand-binding cavity, we have predicted and analyzed the binding modes of a variety of structurally diverse mGluR5 NAM ligands, showing how the X-ray structures serve to effectively rationalize each ligand's binding characteristics. We demonstrated that the features that are inherent in our earlier overlay model are preserved in the protein structure-based docking models. We identified structurally diverse compounds, which potentially act as mGluR NAMs, and revealed binding-site differences by performing high-throughput docking using a database of approximately six million structures of commercially available compounds and the mGluR1 and mGluR5 X-ray structures. By comparing the 7TM domains of the mGluR5 and mGluR1 X-rays structures, we identified selectivity factors within group I of the mGluRs. Similarly, using homology models that we built for mGluR2 and mGluR4, we have identified the factors leading to the selectivity between group I and groups II and III for ligands occupying the deepest portion of the mGluR5 binding cavity. Finally, we have proposed a structure-based explanation of the pharmacological switching within a set of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) and their corresponding, very close NAM analogs.

  6. Biased agonism and allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptor 183 - a 7TM receptor also known as Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2.

    PubMed

    Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Madsen, Christian Medom; Lückmann, Michael; Echeverria, Clara Castello; Sailer, Andreas Walter; Frimurer, Thomas Michael; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2017-07-01

    The GPCR Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2, also known as GPR183) is activated by oxysterols and plays a pivotal role in the regulation of B cell migration during immune responses. While the molecular basis of agonist binding has been addressed in several studies, the concept of biased agonism of the EBI2 receptor has not been explored. We investigated the effects of the EBI2 endogenous agonist 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC) on G protein-dependent and -independent pathways as well as sodium ion allosterism using site-directed mutagenesis and functional studies. Moreover, we generated a homology model of the EBI2 receptor to investigate the structural basis of the allosteric modulation by sodium. Residue N114, located in the middle of transmembrane-III at position III:11/3.35, was found to function as an efficacy switch. Thus, substituting N114 with an alanine (N114A) completely abolished heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gi α activation by 7α,25-OHC even though the specific binding of [(3) H]-7α,25-OHC increased. In contrast, the N114A mutant was still able to recruit β-arrestin and even had an enhanced potency (18.7-fold) compared with EBI2 wild type. Sodium had a negative allosteric effect on oxysterol binding that was mediated via N114, verifying the key role of N114. This was further supported by molecular modelling of the ion binding site based on a EBI2 receptor homology model. Collectively, our data point to N114 as a key residue for EBI2 signalling controlling the balance between G protein-dependent and -independent pathways and facilitating sodium binding. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Development of 7TM receptor-ligand complex models using ligand-biased, semi-empirical helix-bundle repacking in torsion space: application to the agonist interaction of the human dopamine D2 receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malo, Marcus; Persson, Ronnie; Svensson, Peder; Luthman, Kristina; Brive, Lars

    2013-03-01

    Prediction of 3D structures of membrane proteins, and of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in particular, is motivated by their importance in biological systems and the difficulties associated with experimental structure determination. In the present study, a novel method for the prediction of 3D structures of the membrane-embedded region of helical membrane proteins is presented. A large pool of candidate models are produced by repacking of the helices of a homology model using Monte Carlo sampling in torsion space, followed by ranking based on their geometric and ligand-binding properties. The trajectory is directed by weak initial restraints to orient helices towards the original model to improve computation efficiency, and by a ligand to guide the receptor towards a chosen conformational state. The method was validated by construction of the β1 adrenergic receptor model in complex with ( S)-cyanopindolol using bovine rhodopsin as template. In addition, models of the dopamine D2 receptor were produced with the selective and rigid agonist ( R)- N-propylapomorphine (( R)-NPA) present. A second quality assessment was implemented by evaluating the results from docking of a library of 29 ligands with known activity, which further discriminated between receptor models. Agonist binding and recognition by the dopamine D2 receptor is interpreted using the 3D structure model resulting from the approach. This method has a potential for modeling of all types of helical transmembrane proteins for which a structural template with sequence homology sufficient for homology modeling is not available or is in an incorrect conformational state, but for which sufficient empirical information is accessible.

  8. Structure determination of the seven-helical transmembrane receptor sensory rhodopsin II by solution NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Antoine; Mott, Helen R.; Bostock, Mark J.; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Nietlispach, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Seven-helical membrane proteins represent a challenge for structural biology. Here, we report the first NMR structure determination of a detergent-solubilized seven-helical transmembrane (7TM) protein, the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin II (pSRII) from Natronomonas pharaonis, as a proof of principle. The overall quality of the structure ensemble is extremely good (backbone root mean squared deviation of 0.48 Å) and agrees well with previously determined X-ray structures. Furthermore, measurements in more native-like small phospholipid bicelles indicate that the protein structure is the same as in detergent micelles, suggesting that environment specific effects are minimal when using mild detergents. We use our case study as a platform to discuss the feasibility of similar solution NMR studies for other 7TM proteins including members of the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). PMID:20512150

  9. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants.

  10. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor.

  11. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor. PMID:28098154

  12. Molecular mechanism of agonism and inverse agonism in the melanocortin receptors: Zn(2+) as a structural and functional probe.

    PubMed

    Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-06-01

    Among the rhodopsin-like 7TM receptors, the MC receptors are functionally unique because their high constitutive signaling activity is regulated not only by endogenous peptide agonists-MSH peptides-but also by endogenous inverse agonists, namely, the proteins agouti and AGRP. Moreover, the metal-ion Zn(2+) increases the signaling activity of at least the MC1 and MC4 receptors in three distinct ways: (1). by directly functioning as an agonist; (2). by potentiating the action of the endogenous agonist; and (3). by inhibiting the binding of the endogenous inverse agonist. Structurally the MC receptors are part of a small subset of 7TM receptors in which the main ligand-binding crevice, and especially extracellular loops 2 and 3, appear to be specially designed for easy ligand access and bias towards an active state of the receptor-i.e., constitutive activity. Thus, in the MC receptors extracellular loop 2 is ultrashort because TM-IV basically connects directly into TM-V, whereas extracellular loop 3 appears to be held in a particular, constrained conformation by a putative, internal disulfide bridge. The interaction mode for the small and well-defined zinc-ion between a third, free Cys residue in extracellular loop 3 and conceivably an Asp residue located at the inner face of TM-III gives important information concerning the activation mechanism for the MC receptors.

  13. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-01-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:26227798

  14. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-07-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism.

  15. Effect of surface coating of KYb2F7:Tm3+ on optical properties and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza, Francisco J.; Avalos, Julio C.; Yust, Brian G.; Tsin, Andrew; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2016-09-01

    This project aims to provide an insight on the effects of biocompatible polymers on the optical properties and the nanoparticle-cell interaction of KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals that exhibit strong near infrared (NIR) fluorescence. KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals were synthesized with a diameter of 20-30 nm and surface modified with poly(ethylene glycol), Pluronic® F-127, and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone), due to the associated advantages. Some of these include biocompatibility and biodistribution in the instance of agglomeration and hydrophobicity as well as the addition of a targeting agent and drug loading by further functionalization. Despite the decrease in fluorescence intensity induced by the surface modification, thulium’s emission fingerprint was easily detected. Moreover, surface modified KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals failed to induce a toxic response on endothelial cells following a 24 h uptake period up to concentrations of 100 μg ml-1. In vitro toxicity and confocal imaging have demonstrated the versatility of these NIR fluorescence nanocrystals in biomedical imaging, drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy.

  16. Effect of surface coating of KYb2F7:Tm3+ on optical properties and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Francisco J; Avalos, Julio C; Yust, Brian G; Tsin, Andrew; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2016-01-01

    This project aims to provide an insight on the effects of biocompatible polymers on the optical properties and the nanoparticle-cell interaction of KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals that exhibit strong near infrared (NIR) fluorescence. KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals were synthesized with a diameter of 20–30 nm and surface modified with poly(ethylene glycol), Pluronic® F-127, and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone), due to the associated advantages. Some of these include biocompatibility and biodistribution in the instance of agglomeration and hydrophobicity as well as the addition of a targeting agent and drug loading by further functionalization. Despite the decrease in fluorescence intensity induced by the surface modification, thulium’s emission fingerprint was easily detected. Moreover, surface modified KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals failed to induce a toxic response on endothelial cells following a 24 h uptake period up to concentrations of 100 μg ml−1. In vitro toxicity and confocal imaging have demonstrated the versatility of these NIR fluorescence nanocrystals in biomedical imaging, drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy. PMID:27518385

  17. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  18. Biased and G Protein-Independent Signaling of Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2014-01-01

    Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM-receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand–receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of “classic” redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor-, or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the solution

  19. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors assemble from five subunits (GluK1-5) into tetrameric ion channels. Kainate receptors are located at both pre- and postsynaptic membranes in the central nervous system where they contribute to excitatory synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered questions and challenges in front of us. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'.

  20. Fine Structure of APLYSIA Statocyst Receptor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    receptors. Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 30:133-145, 1965. 5. Flock, A. Sensory transduction in hair cells. In: Handbook of Sensory...and Lundquist, P.-G. Structural basis for directional sen- sitivity in cochlear and vestibular sensory receptors. Cold Spring Harbor Symp

  1. Crystal structures of the human adiponectin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Motoyama, Kanna; Ikeda, Mariko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Terada, Takaho; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hato, Masakatsu; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Hino, Tomoya; Murata, Takeshi; Iwata, So; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin stimulation of its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, increases AMPK and PPAR activities, respectively, thereby contributing to healthy longevity as key anti-diabetic molecules. AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 were predicted to contain seven transmembrane helices with the opposite topology to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)s. Here we report the crystal structures of human AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 at 2.9- and 2.4-Å resolution, respectively, which represent a novel class of receptor structure. The seven-transmembrane helices, conformationally distinct from those of GPCRs, enclose a large cavity where three conserved histidine residues coordinate a zinc ion. The zinc-binding structure may play a role in the adiponectin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and UCP2 upregulation. Adiponectin may broadly interact with the extracellular face, rather than the C-terminal flexible tail, of the receptors. The present information will facilitate the understanding of novel structure-function relationships and the development and optimization of AdipoR agonists for the treatment of obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:25855295

  2. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π–cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG–W–NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78–85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  3. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luiz Anastacio; da Silva, João Herminio Martins; Ferreira, Dinarte Neto Moreira; Fidalgo-Neto, Antonio Augusto; Teixeira, Pedro Celso Nogueira; de Souza, Cristina Alves Magalhães; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl; de Freitas, Mônica Santos

    2014-01-01

    Currently, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors. PMID:24637936

  4. SAR studies on mGlu5 receptor positive allosteric modulators (2003- 2013).

    PubMed

    Hao, Junliang; Xiong, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a class C G-protein-coupled receptor which possesses a large extracellular N-terminal domain (ATD) connected to the seven-transmembrane (7-TM) domain. In contrast to the glutamate and its close analogs binding at the orthosteric site on the ATD region, allosteric modulators bind at topographically distinct sites in the 7-TM region. Activation of mGlu5 receptors at either the orthosteric or allosteric sites results in enhancement of NMDA receptor function and represents a promising opportunity for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since the disclosure of the first mGlu5 positive allosteric modulators (PAM) in 2003, there have been intense industry-wide efforts to discover and develop safe and efficacious agents capable of selectively enhancing mGlu5 receptor function at the allosteric sites. Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been made, and multiple chemical scaffolds have been identified as mGlu5 PAMs, possibly binding to different allosteric sites on the 7-TM domain. These ligands have helped gain novel insights into the biology of mGlu5 receptor allosteric activation. Here we provide a comprehensive review on the structure-activity relationship (SAR) progress on the mGlu5 PAMs reported in the primary literature and include appropriate and complementary examples from the patent literature. Important in vivo studies of select compounds from individual scaffolds are highlighted, and challenges facing the clinical development of mGlu5 receptor PAMs are discussed.

  5. Cloning and Characterization of a 7 Transmembrane Receptor from the Adherent Cells of Chicken Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu San; Wu, Hsing Chieh; Shien, Jui Hung; Chiu, Hua Hsien; Lee, Long Huw

    2014-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor gene from the adherent cells of chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was cloned and characterized. The open reading frame of the chicken-7TM (Ch-7TM) receptor gene was 1008 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 335 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of approximately 37.1 kDa. Hydrophobic stretches indicated the presence of 7 TM domains. Moreover, the complete nucleotide sequences encoding 7TM of duck (Du-7TM) and goose (Go-7TM), corresponding to the open reading frame of Ch-7TM, were determined. Each of the Du- and Go-7TM encoding regions comprised 990 nucleotides, representing an 18-nucleotide deletion in alignment with the Ch-7TM encoding region, resulting in a 6-amino-acid deletion at the 3′-end. No signal peptides were predicted. Six phosphorylation sites were predicted and conserved for all three 7TMs. The proteins of the three 7TMs were similar, with 11 conserved cysteine residues. No glycosylation sites could be predicted. The results of the pairwise comparisons indicated that the Ch-7TM encoding region and Ch-7TM protein were the least similar to those of Du- and Go-7TMs. These results were in accordance with those of the phylogenetic analysis, which indicated that the Du- and Go-7TM encoding regions clustered, but were separated from the Ch-7TM encoding region. Monoclonal antibody B28D5 was prepared from spleens of mice immunized with the bacterially expressed N-terminal (55 amino acid residues) region of the Ch-7TM protein for further use. Double staining with B28D5 and KUL01 suggested that Ch-7TM was expressed in subsets of the adherent cells, among which a subset that was recognized with both antibodies was likely of monocyte and macrophage lineage. However, the fluorescence intensities of B28D5 and, particularly, KUL01 decreased after the adherent cells were incubated for additional 48 h. PMID:24466279

  6. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery. PMID:25981301

  7. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-09-15

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery.

  8. A Globin Domain in a Neuronal Transmembrane Receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum

    PubMed Central

    Tilleman, Lesley; Germani, Francesca; De Henau, Sasha; Helbo, Signe; Desmet, Filip; Berghmans, Herald; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Hoogewijs, David; Schoofs, Liliane; Braeckman, Bart P.; Moens, Luc; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of GLB-33, a putative neuropeptide receptor that is exclusively expressed in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This unique chimeric protein is composed of a 7-transmembrane domain (7TM), GLB-33 7TM, typical of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and of a globin domain (GD), GLB-33 GD. Comprehensive sequence similarity searches in the genome of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, revealed a chimeric protein that is similar to a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide neuropeptide receptor. The three-dimensional structures of the separate domains of both species and of the full-length proteins were modeled. The 7TM domains of both proteins appeared very similar, but the globin domain of the A. suum receptor surprisingly seemed to lack several helices, suggesting a novel truncated globin fold. The globin domain of C. elegans GLB-33, however, was very similar to a genuine myoglobin-type molecule. Spectroscopic analysis of the recombinant GLB-33 GD showed that the heme is pentacoordinate when ferrous and in the hydroxide-ligated form when ferric, even at neutral pH. Flash-photolysis experiments showed overall fast biphasic CO rebinding kinetics. In its ferrous deoxy form, GLB-33 GD is capable of reversibly binding O2 with a very high affinity and of reducing nitrite to nitric oxide faster than other globins. Collectively, these properties suggest that the globin domain of GLB-33 may serve as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor and/or as a nitrite reductase. Both properties are potentially able to modulate the neuropeptide sensitivity of the neuronal transmembrane receptor. PMID:25666609

  9. Melanocortin 1 Receptor: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; Boulanger, Mary C.; D’Orazio, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a melanocytic Gs protein coupled receptor that regulates skin pigmentation, UV responses, and melanoma risk. It is a highly polymorphic gene, and loss of function correlates with a fair, UV-sensitive, and melanoma-prone phenotype due to defective epidermal melanization and sub-optimal DNA repair. MC1R signaling, achieved through adenylyl cyclase activation and generation of the second messenger cAMP, is hormonally controlled by the positive agonist melanocortin, the negative agonist agouti signaling protein, and the neutral antagonist β-defensin 3. Activation of cAMP signaling up-regulates melanin production and deposition in the epidermis which functions to limit UV penetration into the skin and enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER), the genomic stability pathway responsible for clearing UV photolesions from DNA to avoid mutagenesis. Herein we review MC1R structure and function and summarize our laboratory’s findings on the molecular mechanisms by which MC1R signaling impacts NER. PMID:27303435

  10. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    PubMed

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Structural Analysis of Chemokine Receptor-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Arimont, Marta; Sun, Shan-Liang; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2017-03-10

    This review focuses on the construction and application of structural chemokine receptor models for the elucidation of molecular determinants of chemokine receptor modulation and the structure-based discovery and design of chemokine receptor ligands. A comparative analysis of ligand binding pockets in chemokine receptors is presented, including a detailed description of the CXCR4, CCR2, CCR5, CCR9, and US28 X-ray structures, and their implication for modeling molecular interactions of chemokine receptors with small-molecule ligands, peptide ligands, and large antibodies and chemokines. These studies demonstrate how the integration of new structural information on chemokine receptors with extensive structure-activity relationship and site-directed mutagenesis data facilitates the prediction of the structure of chemokine receptor-ligand complexes that have not been crystallized. Finally, a review of structure-based ligand discovery and design studies based on chemokine receptor crystal structures and homology models illustrates the possibilities and challenges to find novel ligands for chemokine receptors.

  12. A globin domain in a neuronal transmembrane receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum: molecular modeling and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Tilleman, Lesley; Germani, Francesca; De Henau, Sasha; Helbo, Signe; Desmet, Filip; Berghmans, Herald; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Hoogewijs, David; Schoofs, Liliane; Braeckman, Bart P; Moens, Luc; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-04-17

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of GLB-33, a putative neuropeptide receptor that is exclusively expressed in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This unique chimeric protein is composed of a 7-transmembrane domain (7TM), GLB-33 7TM, typical of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and of a globin domain (GD), GLB-33 GD. Comprehensive sequence similarity searches in the genome of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, revealed a chimeric protein that is similar to a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide neuropeptide receptor. The three-dimensional structures of the separate domains of both species and of the full-length proteins were modeled. The 7TM domains of both proteins appeared very similar, but the globin domain of the A. suum receptor surprisingly seemed to lack several helices, suggesting a novel truncated globin fold. The globin domain of C. elegans GLB-33, however, was very similar to a genuine myoglobin-type molecule. Spectroscopic analysis of the recombinant GLB-33 GD showed that the heme is pentacoordinate when ferrous and in the hydroxide-ligated form when ferric, even at neutral pH. Flash-photolysis experiments showed overall fast biphasic CO rebinding kinetics. In its ferrous deoxy form, GLB-33 GD is capable of reversibly binding O2 with a very high affinity and of reducing nitrite to nitric oxide faster than other globins. Collectively, these properties suggest that the globin domain of GLB-33 may serve as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor and/or as a nitrite reductase. Both properties are potentially able to modulate the neuropeptide sensitivity of the neuronal transmembrane receptor. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Receptor recognition mechanisms of coronaviruses: a decade of structural studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang

    2015-02-01

    Receptor recognition by viruses is the first and essential step of viral infections of host cells. It is an important determinant of viral host range and cross-species infection and a primary target for antiviral intervention. Coronaviruses recognize a variety of host receptors, infect many hosts, and are health threats to humans and animals. The receptor-binding S1 subunit of coronavirus spike proteins contains two distinctive domains, the N-terminal domain (S1-NTD) and the C-terminal domain (S1-CTD), both of which can function as receptor-binding domains (RBDs). S1-NTDs and S1-CTDs from three major coronavirus genera recognize at least four protein receptors and three sugar receptors and demonstrate a complex receptor recognition pattern. For example, highly similar coronavirus S1-CTDs within the same genus can recognize different receptors, whereas very different coronavirus S1-CTDs from different genera can recognize the same receptor. Moreover, coronavirus S1-NTDs can recognize either protein or sugar receptors. Structural studies in the past decade have elucidated many of the puzzles associated with coronavirus-receptor interactions. This article reviews the latest knowledge on the receptor recognition mechanisms of coronaviruses and discusses how coronaviruses have evolved their complex receptor recognition pattern. It also summarizes important principles that govern receptor recognition by viruses in general.

  14. Receptor Recognition Mechanisms of Coronaviruses: a Decade of Structural Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Receptor recognition by viruses is the first and essential step of viral infections of host cells. It is an important determinant of viral host range and cross-species infection and a primary target for antiviral intervention. Coronaviruses recognize a variety of host receptors, infect many hosts, and are health threats to humans and animals. The receptor-binding S1 subunit of coronavirus spike proteins contains two distinctive domains, the N-terminal domain (S1-NTD) and the C-terminal domain (S1-CTD), both of which can function as receptor-binding domains (RBDs). S1-NTDs and S1-CTDs from three major coronavirus genera recognize at least four protein receptors and three sugar receptors and demonstrate a complex receptor recognition pattern. For example, highly similar coronavirus S1-CTDs within the same genus can recognize different receptors, whereas very different coronavirus S1-CTDs from different genera can recognize the same receptor. Moreover, coronavirus S1-NTDs can recognize either protein or sugar receptors. Structural studies in the past decade have elucidated many of the puzzles associated with coronavirus-receptor interactions. This article reviews the latest knowledge on the receptor recognition mechanisms of coronaviruses and discusses how coronaviruses have evolved their complex receptor recognition pattern. It also summarizes important principles that govern receptor recognition by viruses in general. PMID:25428871

  15. Structure of a mammalian ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Zalk, Ran; Clarke, Oliver B; des Georges, Amédée; Grassucci, Robert A; Reiken, Steven; Mancia, Filippo; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Frank, Joachim; Marks, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) mediate the rapid release of calcium (Ca(2+)) from intracellular stores into the cytosol, which is essential for numerous cellular functions including excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. Lack of sufficient structural detail has impeded understanding of RyR gating and regulation. Here we report the closed-state structure of the 2.3-megadalton complex of the rabbit skeletal muscle type 1 RyR (RyR1), solved by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy at an overall resolution of 4.8 Å. We fitted a polyalanine-level model to all 3,757 ordered residues in each protomer, defining the transmembrane pore in unprecedented detail and placing all cytosolic domains as tertiary folds. The cytosolic assembly is built on an extended α-solenoid scaffold connecting key regulatory domains to the pore. The RyR1 pore architecture places it in the six-transmembrane ion channel superfamily. A unique domain inserted between the second and third transmembrane helices interacts intimately with paired EF-hands originating from the α-solenoid scaffold, suggesting a mechanism for channel gating by Ca(2+).

  16. Structure of a mammalian ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zalk, Ran; Clarke, Oliver B.; des Georges, Amédée; Grassucci, Robert A.; Reiken, Steven; Mancia, Filippo; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Frank, Joachim; Marks, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) mediate rapid release of calcium (Ca2+) from intracellular stores into the cytosol, which is essential for numerous cellular functions including excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. Lack of sufficient structural detail has impeded understanding of RyR gating and regulation. Here, we report the closed-state structure of the 2.3 MDa complex of the rabbit skeletal muscle type 1 RyR (RyR1), solved by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy at an overall resolution of 4.8 Å. We fitted a polyalanine-level model to all 3939 ordered residues in each protomer, defining the transmembrane pore in unprecedented detail and placing all cytosolic domains as tertiary folds. The cytosolic assembly is built on an extended α-solenoid scaffold connecting key regulatory domains to the pore. The RyR1 pore architecture places it in the six-transmembrane (6TM) ion channel superfamily. A unique domain inserted between the second and third transmembrane helices interacts intimately with paired EF-hands originating from the α-solenoid scaffold, suggesting a mechanism for channel gating by Ca2+. PMID:25470061

  17. ECM receptors in neuronal structure, synaptic plasticity, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Kerrisk, Meghan E; Cingolani, Lorenzo A; Koleske, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    During central nervous system development, extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors and their ligands play key roles as guidance molecules, informing neurons where and when to send axonal and dendritic projections, establish connections, and form synapses between pre- and postsynaptic cells. Once stable synapses are formed, many ECM receptors transition in function to control the maintenance of stable connections between neurons and regulate synaptic plasticity. These receptors bind to and are activated by ECM ligands. In turn, ECM receptor activation modulates downstream signaling cascades that control cytoskeletal dynamics and synaptic activity to regulate neuronal structure and function and thereby impact animal behavior. The activities of cell adhesion receptors that mediate interactions between pre- and postsynaptic partners are also strongly influenced by ECM composition. This chapter highlights a number of ECM receptors, their roles in the control of synapse structure and function, and the impact of these receptors on synaptic plasticity and animal behavior.

  18. ECM receptors in neuronal structure, synaptic plasticity, and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kerrisk, Meghan E.; Cingolani, Lorenzo A.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    During central nervous system development, extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors and their ligands play key roles as guidance molecules, informing neurons where and when to send axonal and dendritic projections, establish connections, and form synapses between pre- and postsynaptic cells. Once stable synapses are formed, many ECM receptors transition in function to control the maintenance of stable connections between neurons and regulate synaptic plasticity. These receptors bind to and are activated by ECM ligands. In turn, ECM receptor activation modulates downstream signaling cascades that control cytoskeletal dynamics and synaptic activity to regulate neuronal structure and function and thereby impact animal behavior. The activities of cell adhesion receptors that mediate interactions between pre- and post-synaptic partners are also strongly influenced by ECM composition. This chapter highlights a number of ECM receptors, their roles in the control of synapse structure and function, and the impact of these receptors on synaptic plasticity and animal behavior. PMID:25410355

  19. Structural and functional insights into nuclear receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lihua; Li, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are important transcriptional factors that share high sequence identity and conserved domains, including a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD). The LBD plays a crucial role in ligand-mediated nuclear receptor activity. Hundreds of different crystal structures of nuclear receptors have revealed a general mechanism for the molecular basis of ligand binding and ligand-mediated regulation of nuclear receptors. Despite the conserved fold of nuclear receptor LBDs, the ligand-binding pocket is the least conserved region among different nuclear receptor LBDs. Structural comparison and analysis show that several features of the pocket, like the size and also the shape, have contributed to the ligand binding affinity and specificity. In addition, the plastic nature of the ligand-binding pockets in many nuclear receptors provides greater flexibility to further accommodate specific ligands with a variety of conformations. Nuclear receptor coactivators usually contain multiple LXXLL motifs that are used to interact with nuclear receptors. The nuclear receptors respond differently to distinct ligands and readily exchange their ligands in different environments. The conformational flexibility of the AF-2 helix allows the nuclear receptor to sense the presence of the bound ligands, either an agonist or an antagonist, and to recruit the coactivators or corepressors that ultimately determine the transcriptional activation or repression of nuclear receptors. PMID:20723571

  20. Insights into the interaction of negative allosteric modulators with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5: discovery and computational modeling of a new series of ligands with nanomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Anighoro, Andrew; Graziani, Davide; Bettinelli, Ilaria; Cilia, Antonio; De Toma, Carlo; Longhi, Matteo; Mangiarotti, Fabio; Menegon, Sergio; Pirona, Lorenza; Poggesi, Elena; Riva, Carlo; Rastelli, Giulio

    2015-07-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a biological target implicated in major neurological and psychiatric disorders. In the present study, we have investigated structural determinants of the interaction of negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) with the seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain of mGlu5. A homology model of the 7TM receptor domain built on the crystal structure of the mGlu1 template was obtained, and the binding modes of known NAMs, namely MPEP and fenobam, were investigated by docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The results were validated by comparison with mutagenesis data available in the literature for these two ligands, and subsequently corroborated by the recently described mGlu5 crystal structure. Moreover, a new series of NAMs was synthesized and tested, providing compounds with nanomolar affinity. Several structural modifications were sequentially introduced with the aim of identifying structural features important for receptor binding. The synthesized NAMs were docked in the validated homology model and binding modes were used to interpret and discuss structure-activity relationships within this new series of compounds. Finally, the models of the interaction of NAMs with mGlu5 were extended to include important non-aryl alkyne mGlu5 NAMs taken from the literature. Overall, the results provide useful insights into the molecular interaction of negative allosteric modulators with mGlu5 and may facilitate the design of new modulators for this class of receptors.

  1. [Structure and Function of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor].

    PubMed

    Inouye, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Animal defense mechanisms against both endogenous and exogenous toxic compounds function mainly through receptor-type transcription factors, including the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Following xenobiotic stimulation, CAR translocates into the nucleus and transactivates its target genes including oxygenic and conjugative enzymes and transporters in hepatocytes. We identified subcellular localization signals in the rat CAR: two nuclear localization signals (NLS1 and 2); two nuclear export signals (NES1 and 2); and a cytoplasmic retention region. The nuclear import of CAR is regulated by the importin-Ran system and microtubule network. Five splice variants (SV1-5) were identified in rat liver in addition to wild-type CAR. When expressed in immortalized cells, their artificial transcripts were inactive as transcription factors. A CAR mutant with three consecutive alanine residues inserted into the ligand-binding domain of CAR showed ligand-dependent activation of target genes in immortalized cells, which is in marked contrast to the constitutive transactivating nature of wild-type CAR. Using this assay system, androstenol and clotrimazole, both of which are inverse agonists of CAR, were classified as an antagonist and weak agonist, respectively. A member of the DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase family (DP97) and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) were found to be gene (or promotor)-specific coactivators of CAR. The expression of the CAR gene might be under the control of clock genes mediated by the nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α.

  2. Structural Basis for Receptor Selectivity by the Whitewater Arroyo Mammarenavirus.

    PubMed

    Shimon, Amir; Shani, Orly; Diskin, Ron

    2017-09-01

    Whitewater Arroyo virus belongs to the "New World" group of mammarenaviruses that reside in rodent reservoirs and are prevalent in North and South Americas. Clades B and A/B of New World mammarenaviruses use transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) for entry. While all of these viruses use rodent-derived TfR1 orthologs, some can also use the human-TfR1 and thereby infect humans. Although we have structural information for TfR1 recognition by pathogenic virus, we do not know what the structural differences are between the receptor-binding domains of pathogenic and non-pathogenic viruses that allow some but not all viruses to utilize the human receptor for entry. The poor understanding of the molecular determinants of mammarenavirus host range, and thus pathogenicity, is partly due to the low sequence similarity between the receptor-binding domains from these viruses and the limited available structural information that preclude the use of modeling approaches. Here we present the first crystal structure of a receptor-binding domain of a non-pathogenic clade A/B mammarenavirus. This structure reveals the magnitude of structural differences within the receptor-binding domains of TfR1-tropic viruses. Our structural and sequence analyses indicate that the same structural incompatibilities with the human receptor equally affect both pathogenic and non-pathogenic mammarenaviruses. Non-pathogenic viruses do not have specific structural elements that prevent them from using the human receptor. Instead, the ability to utilize the human receptor directly depends on the extent of weak interactions throughout the receptor-binding site that in some viruses are sufficiently strong to overcome the structural incompatibilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent advances in Cys-loop receptor structure and function.

    PubMed

    Sine, Steven M; Engel, Andrew G

    2006-03-23

    Throughout the nervous system, moment-to-moment communication relies on postsynaptic receptors to detect neurotransmitters and change the membrane potential. For the Cys-loop superfamily of receptors, recent structural data have catalysed a leap in our understanding of the three steps of chemical-to-electrical transduction: neurotransmitter binding, communication between the binding site and the barrier to ions, and opening and closing of the barrier. The emerging insights might be expected to explain how mutations of receptors cause neurological disease, but the opposite is generally true. Namely, analyses of disease-causing mutations have clarified receptor structure-function relationships as well as mechanisms governing the postsynaptic response.

  4. Primary Structure of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    quantities of starting material (for reviews of receptor, see Popot and Changeux, 1984; Stroud and Finer-Moore, 1985). This work led to the...Cloning of the Acetylcholine Receptor. Cold Spring Harbor Symp. on Quant. Biol. XLVIH: 71-78. 15. Popot , J-L. and Changeux, J-P. (1984) The

  5. The structural role of receptor tyrosine sulfation in chemokine recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ludeman, Justin P; Stone, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification of secreted and transmembrane proteins, including many GPCRs such as chemokine receptors. Most chemokine receptors contain several potentially sulfated tyrosine residues in their extracellular N-terminal regions, the initial binding site for chemokine ligands. Sulfation of these receptors increases chemokine binding affinity and potency. Although receptor sulfation is heterogeneous, insights into the molecular basis of sulfotyrosine (sTyr) recognition have been obtained using purified, homogeneous sulfopeptides corresponding to the N-termini of chemokine receptors. Receptor sTyr residues bind to a shallow cleft defined by the N-loop and β3-strand elements of cognate chemokines. Tyrosine sulfation enhances the affinity of receptor peptides for cognate chemokines in a manner dependent on the position of sulfation. Moreover, tyrosine sulfation can alter the selectivity of receptor peptides among several cognate chemokines for the same receptor. Finally, binding to receptor sulfopeptides can modulate the oligomerization state of chemokines, thereby influencing the ability of a chemokine to activate its receptor. These results increase the motivation to investigate the structural basis by which tyrosine sulfation modulates chemokine receptor activity and the biological consequences of this functional modulation. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24116930

  6. Extracellular disulfide bridges serve different purposes in two homologous chemokine receptors, CCR1 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Rummel, Pia C; Thiele, Stefanie; Hansen, Lærke S; Petersen, Trine P; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander H; Ulven, Trond; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2013-09-01

    In addition to the 7 transmembrane receptor (7TM)-conserved disulfide bridge between transmembrane (TM) helix 3 and extracellular loop (ECL)-2, chemokine receptors (CCR) contain a disulfide bridge between the N terminus and what previously was believed to be ECL-3. Recent crystal and NMR structures of the CXC chemokine receptors (CXCR) CXCR4 and CXCR1, combined with structural analysis of all endogenous chemokine receptors indicate that this chemokine receptor-conserved bridge in fact connects the N terminus to the top of TM-7. By employing chemokine ligands that mainly target extracellular receptor regions and small-molecule ligands that predominantly interact with residues in the main binding crevice, we show that the 7TM-conserved bridge is essential for all types of ligand-mediated activation, whereas the chemokine-conserved bridge is dispensable for small-molecule activation in CCR1. However, in striking contrast to previous studies in other chemokine receptors, high-affinity CCL3 chemokine binding was maintained in the absence of either bridge. In the highly related CCR5, a completely different dependency was observed as neither activation nor binding of the same chemokines was retained in the absence of either bridge. In contrast, both bridges were dispensable for activation by the same small molecules. This indicates that CCR5 activity is independent of extracellular regions, whereas in CCR1 the preserved folding of ECL-2 is necessary for activation. These results indicate that conserved structural features in a receptor subgroup do not necessarily provide specific traits for the whole subgroup but rather provide unique traits to the single receptors.

  7. [Nucleotide receptors--structure and function, history and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Barańska, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    First nucleotide receptors were discovered by Geoffrey Burnstock in 70ties of the last century, as a purinoreceptors activated by ATP. It was further found that they may be activated both by purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and their name was changed to nucleotide receptors. They are divided into two fsamilies: P1, activated by adenosine and P2, activated by nucleotides which are further divided into P2X and P2Y subfamilies. P2X are ionotropic receptors activated by ATP, P2Y (as the P1) are metabotropic receptors coupled with protein G. P2Y receptors are activated by ATP, ADP, UTP, UDP and UDP-sugar derivatives. This review describes early history of extracellular nucleotide signaling studies and presents current knowledge of the particular nucleotide receptors subtypes. The article also describes the structure and functional roles of these receptors and speculates about future research and therapeutic directions in this field.

  8. Structural basis for cytokinin receptor signaling: an evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Steklov, Mikhail Yu; Lomin, Sergey N; Osolodkin, Dmitry I; Romanov, Georgy A

    2013-06-01

    Cytokinins are ubiquitous plant hormones; their signal is perceived by sensor histidine kinases-cytokinin receptors. This review focuses on recent advances on cytokinin receptor structure, in particular sensing module and adjacent domains which play an important role in hormone recognition, signal transduction and receptor subcellular localization. Principles of cytokinin binding site organization and point mutations affecting signaling are discussed. To date, more than 100 putative cytokinin receptor genes from different plant species were revealed due to the total genome sequencing. This allowed us to employ an evolutionary and bioinformatics approaches to clarify some new aspects of receptor structure and function. Non-transmembrane areas adjacent to the ligand-binding CHASE domain were characterized in detail and new conserved protein motifs were recovered. Putative mechanisms for cytokinin-triggered receptor activation were suggested.

  9. Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole

    SciTech Connect

    Granier, Sébastien; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2012-07-11

    The opioid receptor family comprises three members, the {mu}-, {delta}- and {kappa}-opioid receptors, which respond to classical opioid alkaloids such as morphine and heroin as well as to endogenous peptide ligands like endorphins. They belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, and are excellent therapeutic targets for pain control. The {delta}-opioid receptor ({delta}-OR) has a role in analgesia, as well as in other neurological functions that remain poorly understood. The structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR have recently been solved. Here we report the crystal structure of the mouse {delta}-OR, bound to the subtype-selective antagonist naltrindole. Together with the structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR, the {delta}-OR structure provides insights into conserved elements of opioid ligand recognition while also revealing structural features associated with ligand-subtype selectivity. The binding pocket of opioid receptors can be divided into two distinct regions. Whereas the lower part of this pocket is highly conserved among opioid receptors, the upper part contains divergent residues that confer subtype selectivity. This provides a structural explanation and validation for the 'message-address' model of opioid receptor pharmacology, in which distinct 'message' (efficacy) and 'address' (selectivity) determinants are contained within a single ligand. Comparison of the address region of the {delta}-OR with other GPCRs reveals that this structural organization may be a more general phenomenon, extending to other GPCR families as well.

  10. Emerging structural insights into the function of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Erkan; Regan, Michael C.; Furukawa, Hiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission crucial for brain development and function including learning and memory formation. Recently a wealth of structural studies on iGluRs, including AMPA receptors (AMPARs), kainate receptors, and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) became available.. These studies showed structures of non-NMDARs including AMPAR and kainate receptor in various functional states, thereby providing the first visual sense of how non-NMDAR iGluRs may function in the context of homotetramers. Furthermore, they provided the first view of heterotetrameric NMDAR ion channels, which illuminated the similarities with and differences from non-NMDARs, thus raising a mechanistic distinction between the two groups of iGluRs. Here we review mechanistic insights into iGluR functions gained through structural studies of multiple groups. PMID:25941168

  11. Design and structure of stapled peptides binding to estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Chris; Roberts, Lee R; Schade, Markus; Bazin, Richard; Bent, Andrew; Davies, Nichola L; Moore, Rob; Pannifer, Andrew D; Pickford, Andrew R; Prior, Stephen H; Read, Christopher M; Scott, Andrew; Brown, David G; Xu, Bin; Irving, Stephen L

    2011-06-29

    Synthetic peptides that specifically bind nuclear hormone receptors offer an alternative approach to small molecules for the modulation of receptor signaling and subsequent gene expression. Here we describe the design of a series of novel stapled peptides that bind the coactivator peptide site of estrogen receptors. Using a number of biophysical techniques, including crystal structure analysis of receptor-stapled peptide complexes, we describe in detail the molecular interactions and demonstrate that all-hydrocarbon staples modulate molecular recognition events. The findings have implications for the design of stapled peptides in general.

  12. Understanding nuclear receptor form and function using structural biology.

    PubMed

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Huang, Pengxiang; Chandra, Vikas; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a major transcription factor family whose members selectively bind small-molecule lipophilic ligands and transduce those signals into specific changes in gene programs. For over two decades, structural biology efforts were focused exclusively on the individual ligand-binding domains (LBDs) or DNA-binding domains of NRs. These analyses revealed the basis for both ligand and DNA binding and also revealed receptor conformations representing both the activated and repressed states. Additionally, crystallographic studies explained how NR LBD surfaces recognize discrete portions of transcriptional coregulators. The many structural snapshots of LBDs have also guided the development of synthetic ligands with therapeutic potential. Yet, the exclusive structural focus on isolated NR domains has made it difficult to conceptualize how all the NR polypeptide segments are coordinated physically and functionally in the context of receptor quaternary architectures. Newly emerged crystal structures of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-retinoid X receptor α (PPARγ-RXRα) heterodimer and hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α homodimer have recently revealed the higher order organizations of these receptor complexes on DNA, as well as the complexity and uniqueness of their domain-domain interfaces. These emerging structural advances promise to better explain how signals in one domain can be allosterically transmitted to distal receptor domains, also providing much better frameworks for guiding future drug discovery efforts.

  13. Structural Features for Functional Selectivity at Serotonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Chong; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D.; Jiang, Yi; Chu, Meihua; Siu, Fai Yiu; Liu, Wei; Xu, H. Eric; Cherezov, Vadim; Roth, Bryan L.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Drugs active at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can differentially modulate either canonical or non-canonical signaling pathways via a phenomenon known as functional selectivity or biased signaling. We report biochemical studies that show that the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), its precursor ergotamine (ERG) and related ergolines display strong functional selectivity for β-arrestin signaling at the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor 5-HT2B, while being relatively unbiased at the 5-HT1B receptor. To investigate the structural basis for biased signaling, we determined the crystal structure of the human 5-HT2B receptor bound to ERG, and compared it with the 5-HT1B/ERG structure. Given the relatively poor understanding of GPCR structure-function to date, insight into different GPCR signaling pathways are important to better understand both adverse and favorable therapeutic activities. PMID:23519215

  14. Structural analysis of beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kerlavage, A.R.; Fraser, C.M.; Venter, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have recently cloned the gene encoding the human brain beta-adrenergic receptor. Beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors have also been cloned from other tissues. In order to correlate the primary structures of these receptors with their function, they have undertaken detailed mapping of their functionally important sites. Purified guinea pig lung beta receptor was radioiodinated and digested with trypsin. The resultant peptides were resolved by reverse phase HPLC into nine peaks containing /sup 125/I, corresponding exactly with the predicted number of tyrosine containing peptides in the beta receptor. Hamster lung beta receptor was labeled with (/sup 125/I)-iodocyanopindolol diazarine ((/sup 125/I)CYPD) and partially purified by SDS-PAGE. The (/sup 125/I)CYPD-labeled receptor was extracted from the gel, digested with either trypsin or CNBr and the digests were resolved by reverse phase HPLC. The tryptic digest contained one (/sup 125/I)CYPD-labeled peak and the CNBr digest contained two. Rat brain muscarinic receptor was specifically labeled with (/sup 3/H)-propylbenzilyl-choline mustard ((/sup 3/H)PrBCM) and partially purified by SDS-PABE. The (/sup 3/H)PrBCM-labeled receptor was extracted from the gel and digested with CNBr. The resultant HPLC profile revealed a single (/sup 3/H)PrBCM-labeled peak. These data yield information on the location of functional sites within the primary sequences of these receptors.

  15. Mammalian Gravity Receptors: Structure and Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium metabolism in mammalian gravity receptors is examined. To accomplish this objective it is necessary to study both the mineral deposits of the receptors, the otoconia, and the sensory areas themselves, the saccular and utricular maculas. The main focus was to elucidate the natures of the organic and inorganic phases of the crystalline masses, first in rat otoconia but more recently in otoliths and otoconia of a comparative series of vertebrates. Some of the ultrastructural findings in rat maculas, however, have prompted a more thorough study of the organization of the hair cells and innervation patterns in graviceptors.

  16. Mammalian Gravity Receptors: Structure and Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium metabolism in mammalian gravity receptors is examined. To accomplish this objective it is necessary to study both the mineral deposits of the receptors, the otoconia, and the sensory areas themselves, the saccular and utricular maculas. The main focus was to elucidate the natures of the organic and inorganic phases of the crystalline masses, first in rat otoconia but more recently in otoliths and otoconia of a comparative series of vertebrates. Some of the ultrastructural findings in rat maculas, however, have prompted a more thorough study of the organization of the hair cells and innervation patterns in graviceptors.

  17. Expression of human peripheral cannabinoid receptor for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Wong, Karen K.; Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Human peripheral-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with the maltose-binding protein, thioredoxin, and a deca-histidine tag. Functional activity and structural integrity of the receptor in bacterial protoplast membranes was confirmed by extensive binding studies with a variety of natural and synthetic cannabinoid ligands. E. coli membranes expressing CB2 also activated cognate G-proteins in an in vitro coupled assay. Detergent-solubilized receptor was purified to 80%–90% homogeneity by affinity chromatography followed by ion-exchange chromatography. By high-resolution NMR on the receptor in DPC micelles, it was determined that purified CB2 forms 1:1 complexes with the ligands CP-55,940 and anandamide. The receptor was successfully reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine bilayers and the membranes were deposited into a porous substrate as tubular lipid bilayers for structural studies by NMR and scattering techniques. PMID:16195551

  18. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y; Kondo, Naomi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito; Kato, Zenichiro

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors' recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is unique among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-18 activity.

  19. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  20. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang

    2009-11-24

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel beta-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of beta-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a "virus-binding hotspot" on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  1. Crystal Structure of a Lipid G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Jo, Euijung; Griffith, Mark T; Scott, Fiona L; Reinhart, Greg; Desale, Hans; Clemons, Bryan; Cahalan, Stuart M; Schuerer, Stephan C; Sanna, M Germana; Han, Gye Won; Kuhn, Peter; Rosen, Hugh; Stevens, Raymond C

    2012-03-01

    The lyso-phospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate modulates lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development and integrity, heart rate, and vascular tone and maturation by activating G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. Here, we present the crystal structure of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 fused to T4-lysozyme (S1P1-T4L) in complex with an antagonist sphingolipid mimic. Extracellular access to the binding pocket is occluded by the amino terminus and extracellular loops of the receptor. Access is gained by ligands entering laterally between helices I and VII within the transmembrane region of the receptor. This structure, along with mutagenesis, agonist structure-activity relationship data, and modeling, provides a detailed view of the molecular recognition and requirement for hydrophobic volume that activates S1P1, resulting in the modulation of immune and stromal cell responses.

  2. Correlating Structural and Energetic Changes in Glycine Receptor Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Suzanne; Lynch, Joseph W.; Keramidas, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) mediate fast chemoelectrical transduction in the nervous system. The mechanism by which the energy of ligand binding leads to current-conducting receptors is poorly understood and may vary among family members. We addressed these questions by correlating the structural and energetic mechanisms by which a naturally occurring M1 domain mutation (α1Q−26′E) enhances receptor activation in homo- and heteromeric glycine receptors. We systematically altered the charge of spatially clustered residues at positions 19′ and 24′, in the M2 and M2-M3 linker domains, respectively, which are known to be critical to efficient receptor activation, on a background of α1Q−26′E. Changes in the durations of single receptor activations (clusters) and conductance were used to determine interaction coupling energies, which we correlated with conformational displacements as measured in pLGIC crystal structures. Presence of the α1Q−26′E enhanced cluster durations and reduced channel conductance in homo- and heteromeric receptors. Strong coupling between α1−26′ and α119′ across the subunit interface suggests an important role in receptor activation. A lack of coupling between α1−26′ and α124′ implies that 24′ mutations disrupt activation via other interactions. A similar lack of energetic coupling between α1−26′ and reciprocal mutations in the β subunit suggests that this subunit remains relatively static during receptor activation. However, the channel effects of α1Q−26′E on α1β receptors suggests at least one α1-α1 interface per pentamer. The coupling-energy change between α1−26′ and α119′ correlates with a local structural rearrangement essential for pLGIC activation, implying it comprises a key energetic pathway in activating glycine receptors and other pLGICs. PMID:25572390

  3. Structural basis of kainate subtype glutamate receptor desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Joel R.; Chittori, Sagar; Merk, Alan; Rao, Prashant; Han, Tae Hee; Serpe, Mihaela; Mayer, Mark L.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are ligand gated tetrameric ion channels that mediate synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They are instrumental in vertebrate cognition and their dysfunction underlies diverse diseases1,2. In both the resting and desensitized states of AMPA and kainate subtype glutamate receptors the ion channels are closed while the ligand binding domain, which is physically coupled to the channel, adopts dramatically different conformations3–6. Without an atomic model for the desensitized state, it is not possible to address a central question in receptor gating: how the resting and desensitized receptor states both display closed ion channels, even though they have major differences in quaternary structure of the ligand binding domain. By determining the cryo-EM structure of the kainate receptor GluK2 subtype in its desensitized state at 3.8 Å resolution, we show that desensitization is characterized by establishment of a ring-like structure in the ligand binding domain layer of the receptor. Formation of this “desensitization ring” is mediated by staggered helix contacts between adjacent subunits, which leads to a pseudo four-fold symmetric arrangement of the ligand binding domains, illustrating subtle changes in symmetry that are at the heart of the gating mechanism. Disruption of the desensitization ring is likely the key switch that enables restoration of the receptor to its resting state, thereby completing the gating cycle. PMID:27580033

  4. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.; Mushrush, Darren J.; Pruitt, Rory N.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  5. Analysis of Human Dopamine D3 Receptor Quaternary Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Marsango, Sara; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Pou, Chantevy; Varela Liste, María José; Milligan, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor is a class A, rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor that can form dimers and/or higher order oligomers. However, the molecular basis for production of these complexes is not well defined. Using combinations of molecular modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and homogenous time-resolved FRET, the interfaces that allow dopamine D3 receptor monomers to interact were defined and used to describe likely quaternary arrangements of the receptor. These were then compared with published crystal structures of dimeric β1-adrenoreceptor, μ-opioid, and CXCR4 receptors. The data indicate important contributions of residues from within each of transmembrane domains I, II, IV, V, VI, and VII as well as the intracellular helix VIII in the formation of D3-D3 receptor interfaces within homo-oligomers and are consistent with the D3 receptor adopting a β1-adrenoreceptor-like quaternary arrangement. Specifically, results suggest that D3 protomers can interact with each other via at least two distinct interfaces: the first one comprising residues from transmembrane domains I and II along with those from helix VIII and a second one involving transmembrane domains IV and V. Moreover, rather than existing only as distinct dimeric species, the results are consistent with the D3 receptor also assuming a quaternary structure in which two transmembrane domain I-II-helix VIII dimers interact to form a ”rhombic” tetramer via an interface involving residues from transmembrane domains VI and VII. In addition, the results also provide insights into the potential contribution of molecules of cholesterol to the overall organization and potential stability of the D3 receptor and possibly other GPCR quaternary structures. PMID:25931118

  6. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito; Kato, Zenichiro

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is unique among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-18 activity. PMID:25500532

  7. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito; Kato, Zenichiro

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is unique among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-8 activity.

  8. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    DOE PAGES

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; ...

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is uniquemore » among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-8 activity.« less

  9. Structural Basis for Apelin Control of the Human Apelin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingli; Yue, Yang; Ma, Yanbin; Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Qingtong; Song, Yunpeng; Shen, Yuqing; Li, Xun; Ma, Xiaochuan; Li, Chao; Hanson, Michael A; Han, Gye Won; Sickmier, E Allen; Swaminath, Gayathri; Zhao, Suwen; Stevens, Raymond C; Hu, Liaoyuan A; Zhong, Wenge; Zhang, Mingqiang; Xu, Fei

    2017-06-06

    Apelin receptor (APJR) is a key regulator of human cardiovascular function and is activated by two different endogenous peptide ligands, apelin and Elabela, each with different isoforms diversified by length and amino acid sequence. Here we report the 2.6-Å resolution crystal structure of human APJR in complex with a designed 17-amino-acid apelin mimetic peptide agonist. The structure reveals that the peptide agonist adopts a lactam constrained curved two-site ligand binding mode. Combined with mutation analysis and molecular dynamics simulations with apelin-13 binding to the wild-type APJR, this structure provides a mechanistic understanding of apelin recognition and binding specificity. Comparison of this structure with that of other peptide receptors suggests that endogenous peptide ligands with a high degree of conformational flexibility may bind and modulate the receptors via a similar two-site binding mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  11. END-PLATE ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR: STRUCTURE, MECHANISM, PHARMACOLOGY, AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The synapse is a localized neurohumoral contact between a neuron and an effector cell and may be considered the quantum of fast intercellular communication. Analogously, the postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor may be considered the quantum of fast chemical to electrical transduction. Our understanding of postsynaptic receptors began to develop about a hundred years ago with the demonstration that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve released acetylcholine and slowed the heart beat. During the past 50 years, advances in understanding postsynaptic receptors increased at a rapid pace, owing largely to studies of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the motor endplate. The endplate AChR belongs to a large superfamily of neurotransmitter receptors, called Cys-loop receptors, and has served as an exemplar receptor for probing fundamental structures and mechanisms that underlie fast synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recent studies provide an increasingly detailed picture of the structure of the AChR and the symphony of molecular motions that underpin its remarkably fast and efficient chemoelectrical transduction. PMID:22811427

  12. End-plate acetylcholine receptor: structure, mechanism, pharmacology, and disease.

    PubMed

    Sine, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    The synapse is a localized neurohumoral contact between a neuron and an effector cell and may be considered the quantum of fast intercellular communication. Analogously, the postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor may be considered the quantum of fast chemical to electrical transduction. Our understanding of postsynaptic receptors began to develop about a hundred years ago with the demonstration that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve released acetylcholine and slowed the heart beat. During the past 50 years, advances in understanding postsynaptic receptors increased at a rapid pace, owing largely to studies of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the motor endplate. The endplate AChR belongs to a large superfamily of neurotransmitter receptors, called Cys-loop receptors, and has served as an exemplar receptor for probing fundamental structures and mechanisms that underlie fast synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recent studies provide an increasingly detailed picture of the structure of the AChR and the symphony of molecular motions that underpin its remarkably fast and efficient chemoelectrical transduction.

  13. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  14. Structure-activity relationships of strychnine analogs at glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Mohsen, Amal M Y; Heller, Eberhard; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Jensen, Anders A; Zlotos, Darius P

    2014-08-01

    Nine strychnine derivatives including neostrychnine, strychnidine, isostrychnine, 21,22-dihydro-21-hydroxy-22-oxo-strychnine, and several hydrogenated analogs were synthesized, and their antagonistic activities at human α1 and α1β glycine receptors were evaluated. Isostrychnine has shown the best pharmacological profile exhibiting an IC50 value of 1.6 μM at α1 glycine receptors and 3.7-fold preference towards the α1 subtype. SAR Analysis indicates that the lactam moiety and the C(21) = C(22) bond in strychnine are essential structural features for its high antagonistic potency at glycine receptors. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  15. Understanding Nuclear Receptor Form and Function Using Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Huang, Pengxiang; Chandra, Vikas; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a major transcription factor family whose members selectively bind small molecule lipophilic ligands and transduce those signals into specific changes in gene programs. For over two decades, structural biology efforts were directed exclusively on the individual ligand binding domains (LBDs) or DNA binding domains (DBDs) of NRs. These analyses revealed the basis for both ligand and DNA binding, and also revealed receptor conformations representing both the activated and repressed states. Additionally, crystallographic studies explained how NR LBD surfaces recognize discrete portions of transcriptional coregulators. The many structural snapshots of LBDs have also guided the development of synthetic ligands with therapeutic potential. Yet, the exclusive structural focus on isolated NR domains has made it difficult to conceptualize how all the NR polypeptide segments are coordinated physically and functionally in the context of receptor quaternary architectures. Newly emerged crystal structures of the PPARγ-RXRα heterodimer and HNF-4α homodimer have recently revealed the higher order organizations of these receptor complexes on DNA, as well as the complexity and uniqueness of their domain-domain interfaces. These emerging structural advances promise to better explain how signals in one domain can be allosterically transmitted to distal receptor domains, also providing much better frameworks for guiding future drug discovery efforts. PMID:24103914

  16. Structural insights into competitive antagonism in NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Annie; Tajima, Nami; Fernandez-Cuervo, Gabriela; Garnier-Amblard, Ethel C.; Furukawa, Hiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary There has been a great level of enthusiasm to down-regulate overactive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors to protect neurons from excitotoxicity. NMDA receptors play pivotal roles in basic brain development and functions as well as in neurological disorders and diseases. However, mechanistic understanding of antagonism in NMDA receptors is limited due to complete lack of antagonist-bound structures for the l-glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits. Here we report the crystal structures of GluN1/GluN2A NMDA receptor ligand-binding domain (LBD) heterodimers in complex with GluN1- and GluN2-targeting antagonists. The crystal structures reveal that the antagonists, D-(−)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (d-AP5) and 1-(Phenanthrene-2-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (PPDA), have discrete binding modes and mechanisms for opening of the bilobed architecture of GluN2A LBD compared to the agonist-bound form. The current study shows distinct ways by which the conformations of NMDA receptor LBDs may be controlled and coupled to receptor inhibition and provides possible strategies to develop therapeutic compounds with higher subtype-specificity. PMID:24462099

  17. Novel lysophosphoplipid receptors: their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Makide, Kumiko; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Okutani, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2014-01-01

    It is now accepted that lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) have a wide variety of functions as lipid mediators that are exerted through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) specific to each lysophospholipid. While the roles of some LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate, have been thoroughly examined, little is known about the roles of several other LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), lysophosphatidylthreonine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylglycerol. Recently, a GPCR was found for LPI (GPR55) and three GPCRs (GPR34/LPS1, P2Y10/LPS2, and GPR174/LPS3) were found for LysoPS. In this review, we focus on these newly identified GPCRs and summarize the actions of LysoPS and LPI as lipid mediators. PMID:24891334

  18. Crystal Structure of Antagonist Bound Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Roth, Christopher B.; Terakado, Masahiko; Kurata, Haruto; Omi, Rie; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Warshaviak, Dora; Nakade, Shinji; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Mileni, Mauro; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Griffith, Mark T.; Rodgers, Caroline; Han, Gye Won; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Chun, Jerold; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid biology continues to emerge as an area of significant therapeutic interest, particularly as the result of an enhanced understanding of the wealth of signaling molecules with diverse physiological properties. This growth in knowledge is epitomized by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which functions through interactions with six cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Herein we present three crystal structures of LPA1 in complex with antagonist tool compounds selected and designed through structural and stability analysis. Structural analysis combined with molecular dynamics identified a basis for ligand access to the LPA1 binding pocket from the extracellular space contrasting with the proposed access for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor. Characteristics of the LPA1 binding pocket raise the possibility of promiscuous ligand recognition of phosphorylated endocannabinoids. Cell-based assays confirmed this hypothesis, linking the distinct receptor systems through metabolically related ligands with potential functional and therapeutic implications for treatment of disease. PMID:26091040

  19. Structural organization of G-protein-coupled receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomize, Andrei L.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    1999-07-01

    Atomic-resolution structures of the transmembrane 7-α-helical domains of 26 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) (including opsins, cationic amine, melatonin, purine, chemokine, opioid, and glycoprotein hormone receptors and two related proteins, retinochrome and Duffy erythrocyte antigen) were calculated by distance geometry using interhelical hydrogen bonds formed by various proteins from the family and collectively applied as distance constraints, as described previously [Pogozheva et al., Biophys. J., 70 (1997) 1963]. The main structural features of the calculated GPCR models are described and illustrated by examples. Some of the features reflect physical interactions that are responsible for the structural stability of the transmembrane α-bundle: the formation of extensive networks of interhelical H-bonds and sulfur-aromatic clusters that are spatially organized as 'polarity gradients' the close packing of side-chains throughout the transmembrane domain; and the formation of interhelical disulfide bonds in some receptors and a plausible Zn2+ binding center in retinochrome. Other features of the models are related to biological function and evolution of GPCRs: the formation of a common 'minicore' of 43 evolutionarily conserved residues; a multitude of correlated replacements throughout the transmembrane domain; an Na+-binding site in some receptors, and excellent complementarity of receptor binding pockets to many structurally dissimilar, conformationally constrained ligands, such as retinal, cyclic opioid peptides, and cationic amine ligands. The calculated models are in good agreement with numerous experimental data.

  20. Structural basis of ligand recognition in 5-HT3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kesters, Divya; Thompson, Andrew J; Brams, Marijke; van Elk, René; Spurny, Radovan; Geitmann, Matthis; Villalgordo, Jose M; Guskov, Albert; Helena Danielson, U; Lummis, Sarah C R; Smit, August B; Ulens, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a pentameric serotonin-gated ion channel, which mediates rapid excitatory neurotransmission and is the target of a therapeutically important class of anti-emetic drugs, such as granisetron. We report crystal structures of a binding protein engineered to recognize the agonist serotonin and the antagonist granisetron with affinities comparable to the 5-HT3 receptor. In the serotonin-bound structure, we observe hydrophilic interactions with loop E-binding site residues, which might enable transitions to channel opening. In the granisetron-bound structure, we observe a critical cation–π interaction between the indazole moiety of the ligand and a cationic centre in loop D, which is uniquely present in the 5-HT3 receptor. We use a series of chemically tuned granisetron analogues to demonstrate the energetic contribution of this electrostatic interaction to high-affinity ligand binding in the human 5-HT3 receptor. Our study offers the first structural perspective on recognition of serotonin and antagonism by anti-emetics in the 5-HT3 receptor. PMID:23196367

  1. Structure and Function of Serotonin G protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCorvy, John D.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  2. Structure and Dynamics of the M3 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jurgen; Kobilka, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), the first neurotransmitter to be identified1, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate.2–4 Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences.5–6 We describe here the structure of the Gq/11-coupled M3 mAChR bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the Gi/o-coupled M2 receptor, offers new possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows the first structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and raise additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer new insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors. PMID:22358844

  3. LYRA, a webserver for lymphocyte receptor structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Michael Schantz; Anderson, Mads Valdemar; Jespersen, Martin Closter; Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    The accurate structural modeling of B- and T-cell receptors is fundamental to gain a detailed insight in the mechanisms underlying immunity and in developing new drugs and therapies. The LYRA (LYmphocyte Receptor Automated modeling) web server (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/LYRA/) implements a complete and automated method for building of B- and T-cell receptor structural models starting from their amino acid sequence alone. The webserver is freely available and easy to use for non-specialists. Upon submission, LYRA automatically generates alignments using ad hoc profiles, predicts the structural class of each hypervariable loop, selects the best templates in an automatic fashion, and provides within minutes a complete 3D model that can be downloaded or inspected online. Experienced users can manually select or exclude template structures according to case specific information. LYRA is based on the canonical structure method, that in the last 30 years has been successfully used to generate antibody models of high accuracy, and in our benchmarks this approach proves to achieve similarly good results on TCR modeling, with a benchmarked average RMSD accuracy of 1.29 and 1.48 Å for B- and T-cell receptors, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, LYRA is the first automated server for the prediction of TCR structure.

  4. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, Brian E.; Lee, Sangbae; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Botos, Istvan; White, Courtney F.; Du, Haijuan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2016-12-07

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. In conclusion, the loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist.

  5. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Krumm, Brian E.; Lee, Sangbae; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; ...

    2016-12-07

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecularmore » dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. In conclusion, the loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist.« less

  6. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, Brian E.; Lee, Sangbae; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Botos, Istvan; White, Courtney F.; Du, Haijuan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2016-12-07

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. The loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist.

  7. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Brian E.; Lee, Sangbae; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Botos, Istvan; White, Courtney F.; Du, Haijuan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. The loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist. PMID:27924846

  8. Subunit structure of the follitropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, J.

    1985-01-01

    Both of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of intact human follitropin (FSH) were radioiodinated with /sup 125/I-FSH-sodium iodide and chloramine-T, and could be resolved on polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE). The electrophoretic mobility of radioiodinated FSH ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits as well as the ..cap alpha beta.. dimer changed markedly depending on the concentration of reducing agents. /sup 125/I-FSH (Ka = 1.4 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/), complexes to the receptor on procine granulosa cells or in Triton X-100 extracts, was affinity-crosslinked with a cleavable (nondisulfide) homobifunctional reagent, bis(2-(succinimidooxycarbonyloxy)ethyl)sulfone, solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate with or without reducing agents, and electrophoresed. Crosslinked samples revealed three additional bands of slower electrophoretic mobility, corresponding to 65 (unreduced 62), 83 (unreduced 76) and 117 (unreduced 110)kDa, in addition to hormone bands. Formation of the three bands requires the /sup 125/I-FSH hormone to bind specifically to the receptor with subsequent cross-linking. The rate of formation and cleavage of the cross-linked complexes indicated a sequential and incremental addition of 22, 18, and 34 kDa components to the FSH ..cap alpha beta.. dimer. The results of reduction of cross-linked complexes demonstrated the existence of disulfide linkage between the three components. FSH was photoactively derivatized with N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 4-azidobenzolyl-glycine and radioiodinated for photoaffinity labeling. When derivatized /sup 125/I-FSH (Ka = 1.12 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/) bound to the cell was photolyzed for cross-linking and resolved on the SDS-PAGE, two new bands (106 and 61 kDa) under reducing condition appeared in addition to the hormone bands. Upon reduction with dithiotheitol and second-dimensional electrophoresis, the unreduced 104 kDa (reduced 106 kDa) band released two small components 31 and 14 kDa.

  9. Investigation of orexin-2 selective receptor antagonists: Structural modifications resulting in dual orexin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Skudlarek, Jason W; DiMarco, Christina N; Babaoglu, Kerim; Roecker, Anthony J; Bruno, Joseph G; Pausch, Mark A; O'Brien, Julie A; Cabalu, Tamara D; Stevens, Joanne; Brunner, Joseph; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Wuelfing, W Peter; Garson, Susan L; Fox, Steven V; Savitz, Alan T; Harrell, Charles M; Gotter, Anthony L; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J

    2017-03-15

    In an ongoing effort to explore the use of orexin receptor antagonists for the treatment of insomnia, dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) were structurally modified, resulting in compounds selective for the OX2R subtype and culminating in the discovery of 23, a highly potent, OX2R-selective molecule that exhibited a promising in vivo profile. Further structural modification led to an unexpected restoration of OX1R antagonism. Herein, these changes are discussed and a rationale for selectivity based on computational modeling is proposed.

  10. Transmembrane signaling by GPCRs: insight from rhodopsin and opsin structures.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hui-Woog; Park, Jung Hee; Kim, Yong Ju; Ernst, Oliver P

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), also known as seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, are the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. As versatile signaling molecules, they mediate cellular responses to extracellular signals. Diffusible ligands like hormones and neurotransmitters bind to GPCRs to modulate GPCR activity. An extraordinary and highly specialized GPCR is the photoreceptor rhodopsin which contains the chromophore retinal as its covalently bound ligand. For receptor activation the configuration of retinal is altered by photon absorption. To date, rhodopsin is the only GPCR for which crystal structures of inactive, active and ligand-free conformations are known. Although the photochemical activation is unique to rhodopsin, many mechanistic insights from this receptor can be generalized for GPCRs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural Studies of GABAA Receptor Binding Sites: Which Experimental Structure Tells us What?

    PubMed Central

    Puthenkalam, Roshan; Hieckel, Marcel; Simeone, Xenia; Suwattanasophon, Chonticha; Feldbauer, Roman V.; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Ernst, Margot

    2016-01-01

    Atomic resolution structures of cys-loop receptors, including one of a γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA receptor) subtype, allow amazing insights into the structural features and conformational changes that these pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) display. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of more than 30 cys-loop receptor structures of homologous proteins that revealed several allosteric binding sites not previously described in GABAA receptors. These novel binding sites were examined in GABAA receptor homology models and assessed as putative candidate sites for allosteric ligands. Four so far undescribed putative ligand binding sites were proposed for follow up studies based on their presence in the GABAA receptor homology models. A comprehensive analysis of conserved structural features in GABAA and glycine receptors (GlyRs), the glutamate gated ion channel, the bacterial homologs Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC) and Gloeobacter violaceus GLIC, and the serotonin type 3 (5-HT3) receptor was performed. The conserved features were integrated into a master alignment that led to improved homology models. The large fragment of the intracellular domain that is present in the structure of the 5-HT3 receptor was utilized to generate GABAA receptor models with a corresponding intracellular domain fragment. Results of mutational and photoaffinity ligand studies in GABAA receptors were analyzed in the light of the model structures. This led to an assignment of candidate ligands to two proposed novel pockets, candidate binding sites for furosemide and neurosteroids in the trans-membrane domain were identified. The homology models can serve as hypotheses generators, and some previously controversial structural interpretations of biochemical data can be resolved in the light of the presented multi-template approach to comparative modeling. Crystal and cryo-EM microscopic structures of the closest homologs that were solved in different conformational

  12. Structural basis of receptor sharing by interleukin 17 cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Lauren K.; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Stanford-MED

    2010-02-19

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper T cells (T{sub H}-17 cells), together with their effector cytokines, including members of the IL-17 family, are emerging as key mediators of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Here we present the crystal structure of a complex of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) bound to IL-17F in a 1:2 stoichiometry. The mechanism of complex formation was unique for cytokines and involved the engagement of IL-17 by two fibronectin-type domains of IL-17RA in a groove between the IL-17 homodimer interface. Binding of the first receptor to the IL-17 cytokines modulated the affinity and specificity of the second receptor-binding event, thereby promoting heterodimeric versus homodimeric complex formation. IL-17RA used a common recognition strategy to bind to several members of the IL-17 family, which allows it to potentially act as a shared receptor in multiple different signaling complexes.

  13. Surface-Bound Biomembranes Incorporating Receptors: Electrochemical and Structural Characterization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-06

    receptnr; (Darszon, 1983; Levitzki , 1985). Here it is used to form planar structures that are potentially more stable and reproducible than the...4, 90-96. Levitzki , A.(1985). Reconstitution of membrane receptor systems. Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 822, 127-153. 16 Heuser, J.E. & Salpeter, S.R

  14. MRT-92 inhibits Hedgehog signaling by blocking overlapping binding sites in the transmembrane domain of the Smoothened receptor.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Lucile; Faure, Helene; Roudaut, Hermine; Schoenfelder, Angele; Mann, Andre; Girard, Nicolas; Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier; Petricci, Elena; Taddei, Maurizio; Rognan, Didier; Ruat, Martial

    2015-05-01

    The Smoothened (Smo) receptor, a member of class F G protein-coupled receptors, is the main transducer of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway implicated in a wide range of developmental and adult processes. Smo is the target of anticancer drugs that bind to a long and narrow cavity in the 7-transmembrane (7TM) domain. X-ray structures of human Smo (hSmo) bound to several ligands have revealed 2 types of 7TM-directed antagonists: those binding mostly to extracellular loops (site 1, e.g., LY2940680) and those penetrating deeply in the 7TM cavity (site 2, e.g., SANT-1). Here we report the development of the acylguanidine MRT-92, which displays subnanomolar antagonist activity against Smo in various Hh cell-based assays. MRT-92 inhibits rodent cerebellar granule cell proliferation induced by Hh pathway activation through pharmacologic (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 0.4 nM) or genetic manipulation. Using [(3)H]MRT-92 (Kd = 0.3 nM for hSmo), we created a comprehensive framework for the interaction of small molecule modulators with hSmo and for understanding chemoresistance linked to hSmo mutations. Guided by molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis data, our work convincingly confirms that MRT-92 simultaneously recognized and occupied both sites 1 and 2. Our data demonstrate the existence of a third type of Smo antagonists, those entirely filling the Smo binding cavity from the upper extracellular part to the lower cytoplasmic-proximal subpocket. Our studies should help design novel potent Smo antagonists and more effective therapeutic strategies for treating Hh-linked cancers and associated chemoresistance. © FASEB.

  15. Structure and Assembly Mechanism for Heteromeric Kainate Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Janesh; Schuck, Peter; Mayer, Mark L.

    2012-10-25

    Native glutamate receptor ion channels are tetrameric assemblies containing two or more different subunits. NMDA receptors are obligate heteromers formed by coassembly of two or three divergent gene families. While some AMPA and kainate receptors can form functional homomeric ion channels, the KA1 and KA2 subunits are obligate heteromers which function only in combination with GluR57. The mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor assembly involve an initial step in which the amino terminal domains (ATD) assemble as dimers. Here, we establish by sedimentation velocity that the ATDs of GluR6 and KA2 coassemble as a heterodimer of K{sub d} 11 nM, 32,000-fold lower than the K{sub d} for homodimer formation by KA2; we solve crystal structures for the GluR6/KA2 ATD heterodimer and heterotetramer assemblies. Using these structures as a guide, we perform a mutant cycle analysis to probe the energetics of assembly and show that high-affinity ATD interactions are required for biosynthesis of functional heteromeric receptors.

  16. Structure of the human histamine H1 receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    De Backer, M D; Loonen, I; Verhasselt, P; Neefs, J M; Luyten, W H

    1998-01-01

    Histamine H1 receptor expression has been reported to change in disorders such as allergic rhinitis, autoimmune myocarditis, rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Here we report the isolation and characterization of genomic clones containing the 5' flanking (regulatory) region of the human histamine H1 receptor gene. An intron of approx. 5.8 kb was identified in the 5' untranslated region, which suggests that an entire subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors may contain an intron immediately upstream of the start codon. The transcription initiation site was mapped by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends to a region 6.2 kb upstream of the start codon. Immediately upstream of the transcription start site a fragment of 1.85 kb was identified that showed promoter activity when placed upstream of a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected into cells expressing the histamine H1 receptor. The promoter sequence shares a number of characteristics with the promoter sequences of other G-protein-coupled receptor encoding genes, including binding sites for several transcription factors, and the absence of TATA and CAAT sequences at the appropriate locations. The promoter sequence described here differs from that reported previously [Fukui, Fujimoto, Mizuguchi, Sakamoto, Horio, Takai, Yamada and Ito (1994) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 201, 894-901] because the reported genomic clone was chimaeric. Furthermore our study provides evidence that the 3' untranslated region of the H1 receptor mRNA is much longer than previously accepted. Together, these findings provide a complete view of the structure of the human histamine H1 receptor gene. Both the coding region of the H1 receptor gene and its promoter region were independently mapped to chromosome 3p25. PMID:9794809

  17. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  18. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S.; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy. PMID:26657998

  19. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling.

    PubMed

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Schmidt, Brian L; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-12-11

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy.

  20. Structural insights into µ-opioid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N; Sanborn, Adrian L; Kato, Hideaki E; Livingston, Kathryn E; Thorsen, Thor S; Kling, Ralf C; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M; Traynor, John R; Weis, William I; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O; Kobilka, Brian K

    2015-08-20

    Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To shed light on the structural basis for μOR activation, here we report a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the murine μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and a G protein mimetic camelid antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor. Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three G-protein-coupled receptors.

  1. Structural Basis for Selectivity and Diversity in Angiotensin II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Han, Gye Won; Batyuk, Alexander; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Kate L.; Patel, Nilkanth; Sadybekov, Anastasiia; Zamlynny, Beata; Rudd, Michael T.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Tolstikova, Alexandra; White, Thomas A.; Hunter, Mark S.; Weierstall, Uwe; Liu, Wei; Babaoglu, Kerim; Moore, Eric L.; Katz, Ryan D.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Sharma, Sujata; Sheth, Payal; Soisson, Stephen M.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Cherezov, Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptors, AT1R and AT2R, serve as key components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. While AT1R plays a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, the function of AT2R is enigmatic with a variety of reported effects. To elucidate the mechanisms for the functional diversity and ligand selectivity between these receptors, we report crystal structures of the human AT2R bound to an AT2R-selective and an AT1R/AT2R-dual ligand, respectively, capturing the receptor in an active-like conformation. Unexpectedly, helix VIII was found in a non-canonical position, stabilizing the active-like state, but at the same time preventing the recruitment of G proteins/β-arrestins, in agreement with the lack of signaling responses in standard cellular assays. Structure-activity relationship, docking and mutagenesis studies revealed the interactions critical for ligand binding and selectivity. Our results thus provide insights into the structural basis for distinct functions of the angiotensin receptors, and may guide the design of novel selective ligands. PMID:28379944

  2. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  3. Structural basis of receptor sharing by interleukin 17 cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Ely, Lauren K.; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2009-01-01

    T helper type 17 (TH-17) cells, together with their effector cytokines including interleukin 17 (IL-17) family members, are emerging as key mediators of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Here we present the crystal structure of a 1:2 complex of IL-17RA bound to IL-17F. The manner of complex formation is unique for cytokines, and involves two fibronectin-type domains of IL-17RA engaging IL-17 within a groove between the IL-17 homodimer interface in a knob-and-hole fashion. The first receptor-binding event to the IL-17 cytokines modulates the affinity and specificity of the second receptor-binding event, thereby promoting heterodimeric versus homodimeric complex formation. IL-17RA utilizes a common recognition strategy to bind to several IL-17 family members, allowing it to potentially act as a shared receptor within multiple different signaling complexes. PMID:19838198

  4. Solution structures and molecular interactions of selective melanocortin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lim, Sung-Kil; Lee, Weontae

    2010-12-01

    The solution structures and inter-molecular interaction of the cyclic melanocortin antagonists SHU9119, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 with receptor molecules have been determined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. While SHU9119 is known as a nonselective antagonist, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 are selective for the melanocortin subtype-4 receptor (MC4R) involved in modulation of food intake. Data from NMR and molecular dynamics suggest that the conformation of the Trp9 sidechain in the three MC4R-selective antagonists is quite different from that of SHU9119. This result strongly supports the concept that the spatial orientation of the hydrophobic aromatic residue is more important for determining selectivity than the presence of a basic, "arginine-like" moiety responsible for biological activity. We propose that the conformation of hydrophobic residues of MCR antagonists is critical for receptor-specific selectivity.

  5. Molecular modeling of the human vasopressin V2 receptor/agonist complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplewski, Cezary; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    1998-05-01

    The V2 vasopressin renal receptor (V2R), which controls antidiuresis in mammals, is a member of the large family of heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Using the automated GPCR modeling facility available via Internet (http://expasy.hcuge.ch/swissmod/SWISS-MODEL.html) for construction of the 7TM domain in accord with the bovine rhodopsin (RD) footprint, and the SYBYL software for addition of the intra- and extracellular domains, the human V2R was modeled. The structure was further refined and its conformational variability tested by the use of a version of the Constrained Simulated Annealing (CSA) protocol developed in this laboratory. An inspection of the resulting structure reveals that the V2R (likewise any GPCR modeled this way) is much thicker and accordingly forms a more spacious TM cavity than most of the hitherto modeled GPCR constructs do, typically based on the structure of bacteriorhodopsin (BRD). Moreover, in this model the 7TM helices are arranged differently than they are in any BRD-based model. Thus, the topology and geometry of the TM cavity, potentially capable of receiving ligands, is in this model quite different than it is in the earlier models. In the subsequent step, two ligands, the native [arginine8]vasopressin (AVP) and the selective agonist [d-arginine8]vasopressin (DAVP) were inserted, each in two topologically non-equivalent ways, into the TM cavity and the resulting structures were equilibrated and their conformational variabilities tested using CSA as above. The best docking was selected and justified upon consideration of ligand-receptor interactions and structure-activity data. Finally, the amino acid residues were indicated, mainly in TM helices 3-7, as potentially important in both AVP and DAVP docking. Among those Cys112, Val115-Lys116, Gln119, Met123 in helix 3; Glu174 in helix 4; Val206, Ala210, Val213-Phe214 in helix 5; Trp284, Phe287-Phe288, Gln291 in helix 6; and Phe307, Leu310, Ala314 and

  6. Molecular modeling of the human vasopressin V2 receptor/agonist complex.

    PubMed

    Czaplewski, C; Kaźmierkiewicz, R; Ciarkowski, J

    1998-05-01

    The V2 vasopressin renal receptor (V2R), which controls antidiuresis in mammals, is a member of the large family of heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Using the automated GPCR modeling facility available via Internet (http:/(/)expasy.hcuge.ch/swissmod/SWISS-MODEL.+ ++html) for construction of the 7TM domain in accord with the bovine rhodopsin (RD) footprint, and the SYBYL software for addition of the intra- and extracellular domains, the human V2R was modeled. The structure was further refined and its conformational variability tested by the use of a version of the Constrained Simulated Annealing (CSA) protocol developed in this laboratory. An inspection of the resulting structure reveals that the V2R (likewise any GPCR modeled this way) is much thicker and accordingly forms a more spacious TM cavity than most of the hitherto modeled GPCR constructs do, typically based on the structure of bacteriorhodopsin (BRD). Moreover, in this model the 7TM helices are arranged differently than they are in any BRD-based model. Thus, the topology and geometry of the TM cavity, potentially capable of receiving ligands, is in this model quite different than it is in the earlier models. In the subsequent step, two ligands, the native [arginine8]vasopressin (AVP) and the selective agonist [D-arginine8]vasopressin (DAVP) were inserted, each in two topologically non-equivalent ways, into the TM cavity and the resulting structures were equilibrated and their conformational variabilities tested using CSA as above. The best docking was selected and justified upon consideration of ligand-receptor interactions and structure-activity data. Finally, the amino acid residues were indicated, mainly in TM helices 3-7, as potentially important in both AVP and DAVP docking. Among those Cys112, Val115-Lys116, Gln119, Met123 in helix 3; Glu174 in helix 4; Val206, Ala210, Val213-Phe214 in helix 5; Trp284, Phe287-Phe288, Gln291 in helix 6; and Phe307, Leu310, Ala314

  7. Molecular structural characteristics as determinants of estrogen receptor selectivity.

    PubMed

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, S; Turner, J V; Glass, B D

    2008-09-29

    Recent reports that a wide variety of natural and man-made compounds are capable of competing with natural hormones for estrogen receptors serve as timely examples of the need to advance screening techniques to support human health and ascertain ecological risk. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) can potentially serve as screening tools to identify and prioritize untested compounds for further empirical evaluations. Computer-based QSAR molecular models have been used to describe ligand-receptor interactions and to predict chemical structures that possess desired pharmacological characteristics. These have recently included combined and differential relative binding affinities of potential estrogenic compounds at estrogen receptors (ER) alpha and beta. In the present study, artificial neural network (ANN) QSAR models were developed that were able to predict differential relative binding affinities of a series of structurally diverse compounds with estrogenic activity. The models were constructed with a dataset of 93 compounds and tested with an additional dataset of 30 independent compounds. High training correlations (r2=0.83-0.91) were observed while validation results for the external compounds were encouraging (r2=0.62-0.86). The models were used to identify structural features of phytoestrogens that are responsible for selective ligand binding to ERalpha and ERbeta. Numerous structural characteristics are required for complexation with receptors. In particular, size, shape and polarity of ligands, heterocyclic rings, lipophilicity, hydrogen bonding, presence of quaternary carbon atom, presence, position, length and configuration of a bulky side chain, were identified as the most significant structural features responsible for selective binding to ERalpha and ERbeta.

  8. Structure of the Angiotensin Receptor Revealed by Serial Femtosecond Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haitao; Unal, Hamiyet; Gati, Cornelius; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Nelson, Garrett; Weierstall, Uwe; Sawaya, Michael R.; Xu, Qingping; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Wang, Chong; Ishchenko, Andrii; Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Desnoyer, Russell; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Petra; Stevens, Raymond C.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-05-07

    We report that angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that serves as a primary regulator for blood pressure maintenance. Although several anti-hypertensive drugs have been developed as AT1R blockers (ARBs), the structural basis for AT1R ligand-binding and regulation has remained elusive, mostly due to the difficulties of growing high quality crystals for structure determination using synchrotron radiation. By applying the recently developed method of serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser, we successfully determined the room-temperature crystal structure of the human AT1R in complex with its selective antagonist ZD7155 at 2.9 Å resolution. The AT1R-ZD7155 complex structure revealed key structural features ofAT1R and critical interactions for ZD7155 binding. Finally, docking simulations of the clinically used ARBs into the AT1R structure further elucidated both the common and distinct binding modes for these anti-hypertensive drugs. Our results thereby provide fundamental insights into AT1R structure-function relationship and structure-based drug design.

  9. Structure of the Angiotensin Receptor Revealed by Serial Femtosecond Crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haitao; Unal, Hamiyet; Gati, Cornelius; ...

    2015-05-07

    We report that angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that serves as a primary regulator for blood pressure maintenance. Although several anti-hypertensive drugs have been developed as AT1R blockers (ARBs), the structural basis for AT1R ligand-binding and regulation has remained elusive, mostly due to the difficulties of growing high quality crystals for structure determination using synchrotron radiation. By applying the recently developed method of serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser, we successfully determined the room-temperature crystal structure of the human AT1R in complex with its selective antagonist ZD7155 at 2.9 Å resolution. Themore » AT1R-ZD7155 complex structure revealed key structural features ofAT1R and critical interactions for ZD7155 binding. Finally, docking simulations of the clinically used ARBs into the AT1R structure further elucidated both the common and distinct binding modes for these anti-hypertensive drugs. Our results thereby provide fundamental insights into AT1R structure-function relationship and structure-based drug design.« less

  10. Structural and Functional Analysis of Domains of the Progesterone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Krista K.; Roemer, Sarah C.; Churchill, Mair E.A.; Edwards, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are multi-domain proteins composed of conserved well-structured regions, such as ligand (LBD) and DNA binding domains (DBD), plus other naturally unstructured regions including the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the hinge region between the LBD and DBD. The hinge is more than just a flexible region between the DBD and LBD and is capable of binding co-regulatory proteins and the minor groove of DNA flanking hormone response elements. Because the hinge can directly participate in DNA binding it has also been termed the carboxyl terminal extension (CTE) of the DNA binding domain. The CTE and NTD are dynamic regions of the receptor that can adopt multiple conformations depending on the environment of interacting proteins and DNA. Both regions have important regulatory roles for multiple receptor functions that are related to the ability of the CTE and NTD to form multiple active conformations. This review focuses on studies of the CTE and NTD of progesterone receptor (PR), as well as related work with other steroid/nuclear receptors. PMID:21803119

  11. Structure-based rationale for interleukin 5 receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Tetsuya; Harrington, Adrian E; Gopi, Hosahudya; Chaiken, Irwin

    2008-01-01

    Human interleukin 5 (IL5) is the major hematopoietin that stimulates the proliferation, migration and activation of eosinophils and is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and other myeloproliferative diseases. IL5 functions through the signaling of a common receptor subunit beta (beta c), in a receptor activation process that requires initial recruitment of an IL5 specific receptor subunit alpha (IL5Ralpha), for cytokine presentation to beta c. Important advances have been made to understand molecular mechanisms of cytokine recognition and receptor antagonism. Mutational studies indicate that a pair of charge complementary regions play an essential role in specific interaction between IL5Ralpha and IL5. Moreover, peptide studies with the IL5 system have identified a cyclic peptide inhibitor, AF17121, which binds specifically to IL5Ralpha by mimicking the cytokine. A key receptor-recognition pharmacophore has been identified in this peptide inhibitor, and sites of inhibitor recognition can be proposed in the homology-deduced structural model of IL5Ralpha. These results provide an experimental platform to derive enhanced-potency peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors have potential use as tools to evaluate the role of eosinophilia in disease and as potential leads to antagonists to treat hyper-eosinophilic diseases such as eosinophilic esophagitis, asthma and chronic myeloproliferative leukemias.

  12. Structural and functional analysis of domains of the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hill, Krista K; Roemer, Sarah C; Churchill, Mair E A; Edwards, Dean P

    2012-01-30

    Steroid hormone receptors are multi-domain proteins composed of conserved well-structured regions, such as ligand (LBD) and DNA binding domains (DBD), plus other naturally unstructured regions including the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the hinge region between the LBD and DBD. The hinge is more than just a flexible region between the DBD and LBD and is capable of binding co-regulatory proteins and the minor groove of DNA flanking hormone response elements. Because the hinge can directly participate in DNA binding it has also been termed the carboxyl terminal extension (CTE) of the DNA binding domain. The CTE and NTD are dynamic regions of the receptor that can adopt multiple conformations depending on the environment of interacting proteins and DNA. Both regions have important regulatory roles for multiple receptor functions that are related to the ability of the CTE and NTD to form multiple active conformations. This review focuses on studies of the CTE and NTD of progesterone receptor (PR), as well as related work with other steroid/nuclear receptors.

  13. The venus kinase receptor (VKR) family: structure and evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) form a family of transmembrane proteins widely conserved in Metazoa, with key functions in cell-to-cell communication and control of multiple cellular processes. A new family of RTK named Venus Kinase Receptor (VKR) has been described in invertebrates. The VKR receptor possesses a Venus Fly Trap (VFT) extracellular module, a bilobate structure that binds small ligands to induce receptor kinase activity. VKR was shown to be highly expressed in the larval stages and gonads of several invertebrates, suggesting that it could have functions in development and/or reproduction. Results Analysis of recent genomic data has allowed us to extend the presence of VKR to five bilaterian phyla (Platyhelminthes, Arthropoda, Annelida, Mollusca, Echinodermata) as well as to the Cnidaria phylum. The presence of NveVKR in the early-branching metazoan Nematostella vectensis suggested that VKR arose before the bilaterian radiation. Phylogenetic and gene structure analyses showed that the 40 receptors identified in 36 animal species grouped monophyletically, and likely evolved from a common ancestor. Multiple alignments of tyrosine kinase (TK) and VFT domains indicated their important level of conservation in all VKRs identified up to date. We showed that VKRs had inducible activity upon binding of extracellular amino-acids and molecular modeling of the VFT domain confirmed the structure of the conserved amino-acid binding site. Conclusions This study highlights the presence of VKR in a large number of invertebrates, including primitive metazoans like cnidarians, but also its absence from nematodes and chordates. This little-known RTK family deserves to be further explored in order to determine its evolutionary origin, its possible interest for the emergence and specialization of Metazoa, and to understand its function in invertebrate development and/or reproductive biology. PMID:23721482

  14. Structural Allostery and Binding of the Transferring Receptor Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Liu, R.; Zak, O.; Aisen, P.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    The structural allostery and binding interface for the human serum transferrin (Tf){center_dot}transferrin receptor (TfR) complex were identified using radiolytic footprinting and mass spectrometry. We have determined previously that the transferrin C-lobe binds to the receptor helical domain. In this study we examined the binding interactions of full-length transferrin with receptor and compared these data with a model of the complex derived from cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions. The footprinting results provide the following novel conclusions. First, we report characteristic oxidations of acidic residues in the C-lobe of native Tf and basic residues in the helical domain of TfR that were suppressed as a function of complex formation; this confirms ionic interactions between these protein segments as predicted by cryo-EM data and demonstrates a novel method for detecting ion pair interactions in the formation of macromolecular complexes. Second, the specific side-chain interactions between the C-lobe and N-lobe of transferrin and the corresponding interactions sites on the transferrin receptor predicted from cryo-EM were confirmed in solution. Last, the footprinting data revealed allosteric movements of the iron binding C- and N-lobes of Tf that sequester iron as a function of complex formation; these structural changes promote tighter binding of the metal ion and facilitate efficient ion transport during endocytosis.

  15. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  16. Structural basis for selectivity and diversity in angiotensin II receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haitao; Han, Gye Won; Batyuk, Alexander; ...

    2017-04-20

    The angiotensin II receptors AT1R and AT2R serve as key components of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system. AT1R has a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, but the function of AT2R is unclear and it has a variety of reported effects. To identify the mechanisms that underlie the differences in function and ligand selectivity between these receptors, here we report crystal structures of human AT2R bound to an AT2R-selective ligand and to an AT1R/AT2R dual ligand, capturing the receptor in an active-like conformation. Unexpectedly, helix VIII was found in a non-canonical position, stabilizing the active-like state, but at the samemore » time preventing the recruitment of G proteins or β-arrestins, in agreement with the lack of signalling responses in standard cellular assays. Structure–activity relationship, docking and mutagenesis studies revealed the crucial interactions for ligand binding and selectivity. Finally, our results thus provide insights into the structural basis of the distinct functions of the angiotensin receptors, and may guide the design of new selective ligands.« less

  17. Central nicotinic receptors: structure, function, ligands, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, M Novella; Gratteri, Paola; Guandalini, Luca; Martini, Elisabetta; Bonaccini, Claudia; Gualtieri, Fulvio

    2007-06-01

    The growing interest in nicotinic receptors, because of their wide expression in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and their involvement in several important CNS pathologies, has stimulated the synthesis of a high number of ligands able to modulate their function. These membrane proteins appear to be highly heterogeneous, and still only incomplete information is available on their structure, subunit composition, and stoichiometry. This is due to the lack of selective ligands to study the role of nAChR under physiological or pathological conditions; so far, only compounds showing selectivity between alpha4beta2 and alpha7 receptors have been obtained. The nicotinic receptor ligands have been designed starting from lead compounds from natural sources such as nicotine, cytisine, or epibatidine, and, more recently, through the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. This review focuses on the structure of the new agonists, antagonists, and allosteric ligands of nicotinic receptors, it highlights the current knowledge on the binding site models as a molecular modeling approach to design new compounds, and it discusses the nAChR modulators which have entered clinical trials.

  18. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates. PMID:26888328

  19. Structural basis for collagen recognition by the immune receptor OSCAR

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Long; Hinerman, Jennifer M.; Blaszczyk, Michal; Miller, Jeanette L. C.; Conrady, Deborah G.; Barrow, Alexander D.; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is a collagen-binding immune receptor with important roles in dendritic cell maturation and activation of inflammatory monocytes as well as in osteoclastogenesis. The crystal structure of the OSCAR ectodomain is presented, both free and in complex with a consensus triple-helical peptide (THP). The structures revealed a collagen-binding site in each immunoglobulin-like domain (D1 and D2). The THP binds near a predicted collagen-binding groove in D1, but a more extensive interaction with D2 is facilitated by the unusually wide D1-D2 interdomain angle in OSCAR. Direct binding assays, combined with site-directed mutagenesis, confirm that the primary collagen-binding site in OSCAR resides in D2, in marked contrast to the related collagen receptors, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1). Monomeric OSCAR D1D2 binds to the consensus THP with a KD of 28 µM measured in solution, but shows a higher affinity (KD 1.5 μM) when binding to a solid-phase THP, most likely due to an avidity effect. These data suggest a 2-stage model for the interaction of OSCAR with a collagen fibril, with transient, low-affinity interactions initiated by the membrane-distal D1, followed by firm adhesion to the primary binding site in D2. PMID:26552697

  20. Structural basis for collagen recognition by the immune receptor OSCAR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Long; Hinerman, Jennifer M; Blaszczyk, Michal; Miller, Jeanette L C; Conrady, Deborah G; Barrow, Alexander D; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Herr, Andrew B

    2016-02-04

    The osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is a collagen-binding immune receptor with important roles in dendritic cell maturation and activation of inflammatory monocytes as well as in osteoclastogenesis. The crystal structure of the OSCAR ectodomain is presented, both free and in complex with a consensus triple-helical peptide (THP). The structures revealed a collagen-binding site in each immunoglobulin-like domain (D1 and D2). The THP binds near a predicted collagen-binding groove in D1, but a more extensive interaction with D2 is facilitated by the unusually wide D1-D2 interdomain angle in OSCAR. Direct binding assays, combined with site-directed mutagenesis, confirm that the primary collagen-binding site in OSCAR resides in D2, in marked contrast to the related collagen receptors, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1). Monomeric OSCAR D1D2 binds to the consensus THP with a KD of 28 µM measured in solution, but shows a higher affinity (KD 1.5 μM) when binding to a solid-phase THP, most likely due to an avidity effect. These data suggest a 2-stage model for the interaction of OSCAR with a collagen fibril, with transient, low-affinity interactions initiated by the membrane-distal D1, followed by firm adhesion to the primary binding site in D2. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Structural and Functional Similarity of Amphibian Constitutive Androstane Receptor with Mammalian Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mathäs, Marianne; Burk, Oliver; Gödtel-Armbrust, Ute; Herlyn, Holger; Wojnowski, Leszek; Windshügel, Björn

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptors and xenosensors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) induce the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters, which also affects various endobiotics. While human and mouse CAR feature a high basal activity and low induction upon ligand exposure, we recently identified two constitutive androstane receptors in Xenopus laevis (xlCARα and β) that possess PXR-like characteristics such as low basal activity and activation in response to structurally diverse compounds. Using a set of complementary computational and biochemical approaches we provide evidence for xlCARα being the structural and functional counterpart of mammalian PXR. A three-dimensional model of the xlCARα ligand-binding domain (LBD) reveals a human PXR-like L-shaped ligand binding pocket with a larger volume than the binding pockets in human and murine CAR. The shape and amino acid composition of the ligand-binding pocket of xlCAR suggests PXR-like binding of chemically diverse ligands which was confirmed by biochemical methods. Similarly to PXR, xlCARα possesses a flexible helix 11’. Modest increase in the recruitment of coactivator PGC-1α may contribute to the enhanced basal activity of three gain-of-function xlCARα mutants humanizing key LBD amino acid residues. xlCARα and PXR appear to constitute an example of convergent evolution. PMID:24797902

  2. Differential Regulation of 6- and 7-Transmembrane Helix Variants of μ-Opioid Receptor in Response to Morphine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Marino; Samoshkin, Alexander; Viet, Chi T.; Gauthier, Josee; Li Fraine, Steven P.; Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological effect of opioids originates, at the cellular level, by their interaction with the μ-opioid receptor (mOR) resulting in the regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and inwardly rectifying K+ channels that ultimately modulate the synaptic transmission. Recently, an alternative six trans-membrane helix isoform of mOR, (6TM-mOR) has been identified, but its function and signaling are still largely unknown. Here, we present the structural and functional mechanisms of 6TM-mOR signaling activity upon binding to morphine. Our data suggest that despite the similarity of binding modes of the alternative 6TM-mOR and the dominant seven trans-membrane helix variant (7TM-mOR), the interaction with morphine generates different dynamic responses in the two receptors, thus, promoting the activation of different mOR-specific signaling pathways. We characterize a series of 6TM-mOR-specific cellular responses, and observed that they are significantly different from those for 7TM-mOR. Morphine stimulation of 6TM-mOR does not promote a cellular cAMP response, while it increases the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and reduces the cellular K+ conductance. Our findings indicate that 6TM-mOR has a unique contribution to the cellular opioid responses. Therefore, it should be considered as a relevant target for the development of novel pharmacological tools and medical protocols involving the use of opioids. PMID:26554831

  3. Structural basis for hijacking siderophore receptors by antimicrobial lasso peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mathavan, Indran; Zirah, Séverine; Mehmood, Shahid; Choudhury, Hassanul G.; Goulard, Christophe; Li, Yanyan; Robinson, Carol V.; Rebuffat, Sylvie; Beis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    The lasso peptide microcin J25 is known to hijack the siderophore receptor FhuA for initiating internalization. Here, we provide the first structural evidence on the recognition mechanism and our biochemical data show that another closely related lasso peptide cannot interact with FhuA. Our work provides an explanation on the narrow activity spectrum of lasso peptides and opens the path to the development of new antibacterials. PMID:24705590

  4. Crystal Structure of the Human Laminin Receptor Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson,K.; Wu, J.; Hubbard, S.; Meruelo, D.

    2008-01-01

    The human laminin receptor (LamR) interacts with many ligands, including laminin, prions, Sindbis virus, and the polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and has been implicated in a number of diseases. LamR is overexpressed on tumor cells, and targeting LamR elicits anti-cancer effects. Here, we report the crystal structure of human LamR, which provides insights into its function and should facilitate the design of novel therapeutics targeting LamR.

  5. Structural Characterization of the Interdomain Features of the Estrogen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    crystallize full-length nuclear receptors including the ER-alpha, and at the same time of PPAR - gamma /RXR-alpha, in several different protein and DNA complexes...Our recent structure determination of the PPAR - gamma / RXR-alpha heterodimer on DNA have revealed important new biological insights for the nuclear...110 residues are intrinsically disordered. Our parallel efforts on the PPAR - gamma protein also demonstrated that most of it’s a/B region in the N

  6. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, MH Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2–3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  7. Alteration of Large-Scale Chromatin Structure by Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Anne C.; Rajendran, Ramji R.; Stenoien, David L.; Mancini, Michael A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Belmont, Andrew S.

    2002-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily important in human physiology and disease, recruits coactivators which modify local chromatin structure. Here we describe effects of ER on large-scale chromatin structure as visualized in live cells. We targeted ER to gene-amplified chromosome arms containing large numbers of lac operator sites either directly, through a lac repressor-ER fusion protein (lac rep-ER), or indirectly, by fusing lac repressor with the ER interaction domain of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator 1. Significant decondensation of large-scale chromatin structure, comparable to that produced by the ∼150-fold-stronger viral protein 16 (VP16) transcriptional activator, was produced by ER in the absence of estradiol using both approaches. Addition of estradiol induced a partial reversal of this unfolding by green fluorescent protein-lac rep-ER but not by wild-type ER recruited by a lac repressor-SRC570-780 fusion protein. The chromatin decondensation activity did not require transcriptional activation by ER nor did it require ligand-induced coactivator interactions, and unfolding did not correlate with histone hyperacetylation. Ligand-induced coactivator interactions with helix 12 of ER were necessary for the partial refolding of chromatin in response to estradiol using the lac rep-ER tethering system. This work demonstrates that when tethered or recruited to DNA, ER possesses a novel large-scale chromatin unfolding activity. PMID:11971975

  8. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein.

  9. Structural insights into μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N.; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Kato, Hideaki E.; Livingston, Kathryn E.; Thorsen, Thor S.; Kling, Ralf; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M.; Traynor, John R.; Weis, William I.; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To understand the structural basis for μOR activation, we obtained a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and stabilized by a G protein-mimetic camelid-antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor (M2R). Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three GPCRs. PMID:26245379

  10. A combined computational and structural model of the full-length human prolactin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Katrine; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte W.; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Robinson, Carol V.; Olsen, Johan G.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2016-01-01

    The prolactin receptor is an archetype member of the class I cytokine receptor family, comprising receptors with fundamental functions in biology as well as key drug targets. Structurally, each of these receptors represent an intriguing diversity, providing an exceptionally challenging target for structural biology. Here, we access the molecular architecture of the monomeric human prolactin receptor by combining experimental and computational efforts. We solve the NMR structure of its transmembrane domain in micelles and collect structural data on overlapping fragments of the receptor with small-angle X-ray scattering, native mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Along with previously published data, these are integrated by molecular modelling to generate a full receptor structure. The result provides the first full view of a class I cytokine receptor, exemplifying the architecture of more than 40 different receptor chains, and reveals that the extracellular domain is merely the tip of a molecular iceberg. PMID:27174498

  11. A combined computational and structural model of the full-length human prolactin receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugge, Katrine; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte W.; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Robinson, Carol V.; Olsen, Johan G.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2016-05-01

    The prolactin receptor is an archetype member of the class I cytokine receptor family, comprising receptors with fundamental functions in biology as well as key drug targets. Structurally, each of these receptors represent an intriguing diversity, providing an exceptionally challenging target for structural biology. Here, we access the molecular architecture of the monomeric human prolactin receptor by combining experimental and computational efforts. We solve the NMR structure of its transmembrane domain in micelles and collect structural data on overlapping fragments of the receptor with small-angle X-ray scattering, native mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Along with previously published data, these are integrated by molecular modelling to generate a full receptor structure. The result provides the first full view of a class I cytokine receptor, exemplifying the architecture of more than 40 different receptor chains, and reveals that the extracellular domain is merely the tip of a molecular iceberg.

  12. Distinct second extracellular loop structures of the brain cannabinoid CB(1) receptor: implication in ligand binding and receptor function.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Rudd, James; Ding, Tomas T

    2011-02-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) second extracellular loop (E2) is known to play an important role in receptor structure and function. The brain cannabinoid (CB(1)) receptor is unique in that it lacks the interloop E2 disulfide linkage to the transmembrane (TM) helical bundle, a characteristic of many GPCRs. Recent mutation studies of the CB(1) receptor, however, suggest the presence of an alternative intraloop disulfide bond between two E2 Cys residues. Considering the oxidation state of these Cys residues, we determine the molecular structures of the 17-residue E2 in the dithiol form (E2(dithiol)) and in the disulfide form (E2(disulfide)) of the CB(1) receptor in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, using a combination of simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. We characterize the CB(1) receptor models with these two E2 forms, CB(1)(E2(dithiol)) and CB(1)(E2(disulfide)), by analyzing interaction energy, contact number, core crevice, and cross correlation. The results show that the distinct E2 structures interact differently with the TM helical bundle and uniquely modify the TM helical topology, suggesting that E2 of the CB(1) receptor plays a critical role in stabilizing receptor structure, regulating ligand binding, and ultimately modulating receptor activation. Further studies on the role of E2 of the CB(1) receptor are warranted, particularly comparisons of the ligand-bound form with the present ligand-free form.

  13. The structure and function of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Kobilka, Brian K

    2009-05-21

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate most of our physiological responses to hormones, neurotransmitters and environmental stimulants, and so have great potential as therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. They are also fascinating molecules from the perspective of membrane-protein structure and biology. Great progress has been made over the past three decades in understanding diverse GPCRs, from pharmacology to functional characterization in vivo. Recent high-resolution structural studies have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of GPCR activation and constitutive activity.

  14. Structural and Functional Attributes of the Interleukin-36 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guanghui; Ybe, Joel A; Saha, Siddhartha S; Caviness, Gary; Raymond, Ernest; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Mbow, M Lamine; Kao, C Cheng

    2016-08-05

    Signal transduction by the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) is linked to several human diseases. However, the structure and function of the IL-36R is not well understood. A molecular model of the IL-36R complex was generated and a cell-based reporter assay was established to assess the signal transduction of recombinant subunits of the IL-36R. Mutational analyses and functional assays have identified residues of the receptor subunit IL-1Rrp2 needed for cytokine recognition, stable protein expression, disulfide bond formation and glycosylation that are critical for signal transduction. We also observed that, overexpression of ectodomain (ECD) of Il-1Rrp2 or IL-1RAcP exhibited dominant-negative effect on IL-36R signaling. The presence of IL-36 cytokine significantly increased the interaction of IL-1Rrp2 ECD with the co-receptor IL-1RAcP. Finally, we found that single nucleotide polymorphism A471T in the Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain (TIR) of the IL-1Rrp2 that is present in ∼2% of the human population, down-regulated IL-36R signaling by a decrease of interaction with IL-1RAcP. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Structural Dynamics of Insulin Receptor and Transmembrane Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tatulian, Suren A

    2015-09-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a (αβ)2-type transmembrane tyrosine kinase that plays a central role in cell metabolism. Each αβ heterodimer consists of an extracellular ligand-binding α-subunit and a membrane-spanning β-subunit that comprises the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (TK) domain and the phosphorylation sites. The α- and β-subunits are linked via a single disulfide bridge, and the (αβ)2 tetramer is formed by disulfide bonds between the α-chains. Insulin binding induces conformational changes in IR that reach the intracellular β-subunit followed by a protein phosphorylation and activation cascade. Defects in this signaling process, including IR dysfunction caused by mutations, result in type 2 diabetes. Rational drug design aimed at treatment of diabetes relies on knowledge of the detailed structure of IR and the dynamic structural transformations during transmembrane signaling. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies have provided important clues about the mode of binding of insulin to IR, the resulting structural changes and their transmission to the TK domain, but a complete understanding of the structural basis underlying insulin signaling has not been achieved. This review presents a critical analysis of the current status of the structure-function relationship of IR, with a comparative assessment of the other IR family receptors, and discusses potential advancements that may provide insight into the molecular mechanism of insulin signaling.

  16. Computational study of the heterodimerization between μ and δ receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Kai, Ming; Jin, Lian; Wang, Rui

    2009-06-01

    A growing body of evidence indicated that the G protein coupled receptors exist as homo- or hetero-dimers in the living cell. The heterodimerization between μ and δ opioid receptors has attracted researchers' particular interests, it is reported to display novel pharmacological and signalling regulation properties. In this study, we construct the full-length 3D-model of μ and δ opioid receptors using the homology modelling method. Threading program was used to predict the possible templates for the N- and C-terminus domains. Then, a 30 ns molecular dynamics simulations was performed with each receptor embedded in an explicit membrane-water environment to refine and explore the conformational space. Based on the structures extracted from the molecular dynamics, the likely interface of μ-δ heterodimer was investigated through the analysis of protein-protein docking, cluster, shape complementary and interaction energy. The computational modelling works revealed that the most likely interface of heterodimer was formed between the transmembrane1,7 (TM1,7) domains of μ receptor and the TM(4,5) domains of δ receptor, with emphasis on μ-TM1 and δ-TM4, the next likely interface was μ(TM6,7)-δ(TM4,5), with emphasis on μ-TM6 and δ-TM4. Our results were consistent with previous reports.

  17. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D; Betz, Robin M; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E; Shoichet, Brian K; Dror, Ron O; Roth, Bryan L

    2017-01-26

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD's key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR-a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD's slow binding kinetics may be due to a "lid" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD's binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD's actions at human serotonin receptors. PAPERCLIP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D.; Betz, Robin M.; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L.; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dror, Ron O.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2017-01-01

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD’s key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR—a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD’s slow binding kinetics may be due to a “lid” formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD’s binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD’s actions at human serotonin receptors.

  19. Structure of an extracellular gp130 cytokine receptor signaling complex.

    PubMed

    Chow, D; He, X; Snow, A L; Rose-John, S; Garcia, K C

    2001-03-16

    The activation of gp130, a shared signal-transducing receptor for a family of cytokines, is initiated by recognition of ligand followed by oligomerization into a higher order signaling complex. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes a functional homolog of human interleukin-6 (IL-6) that activates human gp130. In the 2.4 angstrom crystal structure of the extracellular signaling assembly between viral IL-6 and human gp130, two complexes are cross-linked into a tetramer through direct interactions between the immunoglobulin domain of gp130 and site III of viral IL-6, which is necessary for receptor activation. Unlike human IL-6 (which uses many hydrophilic residues), the viral cytokine largely uses hydrophobic amino acids to contact gp130, which enhances the complementarity of the viral IL-6-gp130 binding interfaces. The cross-reactivity of gp130 is apparently due to a chemical plasticity evident in the amphipathic gp130 cytokine-binding sites.

  20. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-05

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action.

  1. Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1.

    PubMed

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Pu, Mengchen; Qu, Lu; Han, Gye Won; Wu, Yiran; Zhao, Suwen; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Shanshan; Korde, Anisha; Laprairie, Robert B; Stahl, Edward L; Ho, Jo-Hao; Zvonok, Nikolai; Zhou, Han; Kufareva, Irina; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang; Hanson, Michael A; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2016-10-20

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals.

  2. Crystal structure of pentapeptide-independent chemotaxis receptor methyltransferase (CheR) reveals idiosyncratic structural determinants for receptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Batra, Monu; Sharma, Rajesh; Malik, Anjali; Dhindwal, Sonali; Kumar, Pravindra; Tomar, Shailly

    2016-12-01

    Chemotactic methyltransferase, CheR catalyse methylation of specific glutamate residues in the cytoplasmic domain of methyl-accepting chemotactic protein receptors (MCPRs). The methylation of MCPRs is essential for the chemical sensing and chemotactic bacterial mobility towards favorable chemicals or away from unfavorable ones. In this study, crystal structure of B. subtilis CheR (BsCheR) in complex with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH) has been determined to 1.8Å resolution. This is the first report of crystal structure belonging to the pentapeptide-independent CheR (PICheR) class. Till date, only one crystal structure of CheR from S. typhimurium (StCheR) belonging to pentapeptide-dependent CheR (PDCheR) class is available. Structural analysis of BsCheR reveals a helix-X-helix motif (HXH) with Asp53 as the linker residue in the N-terminal domain. The key structural features of the PDCheR β-subdomain involved in the formation of a tight complex with the pentapeptide binding motif in MCPRs were found to be absent in the structure of BsCheR. Additionally, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments were performed to investigate S-adenosyl-(l)-methionine (SAM) binding affinity and KD was determined to be 0.32mM. The structure of BsCheR reveals that mostly residues of the large C-terminal domain contribute to SAH binding, with contributions of few residues from the linker region and the N-terminal domain. Structural investigations and sequence analysis carried out in this study provide critical insights into the distinct receptor recognition mechanism of the PDCheR and PICheR methyltransferase classes.

  3. Nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Peter J.; Fairall, Louise; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2012-01-01

    Co-repressor proteins, such as SMRT and NCoR, mediate the repressive activity of unliganded nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. They appear to act as intrinsically disordered “hub proteins” that integrate the activities of a range of transcription factors with a number of histone modifying enzymes. Although these co-repressor proteins are challenging targets for structural studies due to their largely unstructured character, a number of structures have recently been determined of co-repressor interaction regions in complex with their interacting partners. These have yielded considerable insight into the mechanism of assembly of these complexes, the structural basis for the specificity of the interactions and also open opportunities for targeting these interactions therapeutically. PMID:21925568

  4. Emerging models of glutamate receptor ion channel structure and function.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Mark L

    2011-10-12

    Excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain is mediated by ligand-gated ion channels (iGluRs) activated by glutamate. Distinct from other neurotransmitter receptors, the extracellular domains of iGluRs are loosely packed assemblies with two clearly distinct layers, each of which has both local and global 2-fold axes of symmetry. By contrast, the iGluR transmembrane segments have 4-fold symmetry and share a conserved pore loop architecture found in tetrameric voltage-gated ion channels. The striking layered architecture of iGluRs revealed by the 3.6 Å resolution structure of an AMPA receptor homotetramer likely arose from gene fusion events that occurred early in evolution. Although this modular design has greatly facilitated biophysical and structural studies on individual iGluR domains, and suggested conserved mechanisms for iGluR gating, recent work is beginning to reveal unanticipated diversity in the structure, allosteric regulation, and assembly of iGluR subtypes.

  5. The Histamine H3 Receptor: Structure, Pharmacology, and Function.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Alamilla, Gustavo; Márquez-Gómez, Ricardo; García-Gálvez, Ana-Maricela; Morales-Figueroa, Guadalupe-Elide; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Among the four G protein-coupled receptors (H1-H4) identified as mediators of the biologic effects of histamine, the H3 receptor (H3R) is distinguished for its almost exclusive expression in the nervous system and the large variety of isoforms generated by alternative splicing of the corresponding mRNA. Additionally, it exhibits dual functionality as autoreceptor and heteroreceptor, and this enables H3Rs to modulate the histaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems. The cloning of the H3R cDNA in 1999 by Lovenberg et al. allowed for detailed studies of its molecular aspects. In this work, we review the characteristics of the H3R, namely, its structure, constitutive activity, isoforms, signal transduction pathways, regional differences in expression and localization, selective agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, dimerization with other neurotransmitter receptors, and the main presynaptic and postsynaptic effects resulting from its activation. The H3R has attracted interest as a potential drug target for the treatment of several important neurologic and psychiatric disorders, such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, and addiction.

  6. Structure of the homodimeric androgen receptor ligand-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Marta; Prekovic, Stefan; Gallastegui, Nerea; Helsen, Christine; Abella, Montserrat; Zielinska, Karolina; Gay, Marina; Vilaseca, Marta; Taulès, Marta; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; van Royen, Martin E.; Claessens, Frank; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a crucial role in normal physiology, development and metabolism as well as in the aetiology and treatment of diverse pathologies such as androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS), male infertility and prostate cancer (PCa). Here we show that dimerization of AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is induced by receptor agonists but not by antagonists. The 2.15-Å crystal structure of homodimeric, agonist- and coactivator peptide-bound AR-LBD unveils a 1,000-Å2 large dimerization surface, which harbours over 40 previously unexplained AIS- and PCa-associated point mutations. An AIS mutation in the self-association interface (P767A) disrupts dimer formation in vivo, and has a detrimental effect on the transactivating properties of full-length AR, despite retained hormone-binding capacity. The conservation of essential residues suggests that the unveiled dimerization mechanism might be shared by other nuclear receptors. Our work defines AR-LBD homodimerization as an essential step in the proper functioning of this important transcription factor. PMID:28165461

  7. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Zachariassen, Linda G.; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna G.; Pickering, Darryl S.; Plested, Andrew J. R.

    2016-01-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Despite recent advances in structural studies of AMPARs, information about the specific conformational changes that underlie receptor function is lacking. Here, we used single and dual insertion of GFP variants at various positions in AMPAR subunits to enable measurements of conformational changes using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells. We produced dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2 subunit constructs that had normal activity and displayed intrareceptor FRET. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in live HEK293 cells to determine distinct steady-state FRET efficiencies in the presence of different ligands, suggesting a dynamic picture of the resting state. Patch-clamp fluorometry of the double- and single-insert constructs showed that both the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) and the loop region between the M1 and M2 helices move during activation and the CTD is detached from the membrane. Our time-resolved measurements revealed unexpectedly complex fluorescence changes within these intracellular domains, providing clues as to how posttranslational modifications and receptor function interact. PMID:27313205

  8. Structure-activity relationship of nuclear receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Greschik, Holger; Moras, Dino

    2003-01-01

    Small molecules such as retinoids, steroid hormones, fatty acids, cholesterol metabolites, or xenobiotics are involved in the regulation of numerous physiological and patho-physiological processes by binding to and controlling the activity of members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. In addition to natural ligands, synthetic agonists or antagonists have been identified that in some cases specifically target NR isotypes, or elicit tissue-, signaling pathway-, or promoter-selective transcriptional responses. For these ligands the term "selective NR modulators" (SNRMs) has been introduced. Structure determination of apo- and holo-NR ligand-binding domains (LBDs)--some of them complexed to small coactivator or corepressor fragments--revealed the major principles of ligand-dependent NR action and determinants of (isotype-) selective ligand binding. These studies also stimulated the interpretation of tissue-specific effects of SNRMs on wild-type or mutant receptors. In contrast to the increasing knowledge on the structure-activity relationship of NRs with known SNRMs, rather basic questions remain about the regulation of orphan NRs (for which no ligands are known) or "adopted" orphan NRs (for which only recently ligands were identified). Several crystal structures of orphan NR LBDs uncovered unexpected properties, contributed to the understanding of orphan NR function, and may in the future permit the identification or design of ligands. This review will (i) focus on the current understanding of the structure-activity relationship of NR-ligand interactions, (ii) discuss recent advances in the field of "orphan" NR crystallography, and (iii) outline future challenges in NR structural biology.

  9. Structure of the LDL receptor extracellular domain at endosomalpH

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, Gabby; Henry, Lisa; Henderson, Keith; Ichtchenko,Konstantin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2002-09-05

    The structure of the low-density lipoprotein receptor extracellular portion has been determined. The document proposes a mechanism for the release of lipoprotein in the endosome. Without this release, the mechanism of receptor recycling cannot function.

  10. X-ray structure of the human α4β2 nicotinic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Perez, Claudio L.; Noviello, Colleen M.; Hibbs, Ryan E.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ligand gated ion channels that mediate fast chemical neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junction and play diverse signaling roles in the central nervous system. The nicotinic receptor has been a model system for cell surface receptors, and specifically for ligand-gated ion channels, for well over a century1,2. In addition to the receptors’ prominent roles in the development of the fields of pharmacology and neurobiology, nicotinic receptors are important therapeutic targets for neuromuscular disease, addiction, epilepsy, and for neuromuscular blocking agents used during surgery2–4. The overall architecture of the receptor was described in landmark studies of the nicotinic receptor isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo marmorata5. Structures of a soluble ligand binding domain have provided atomic-scale insights into receptor-ligand interactions6, while high-resolution structures of other members of the pentameric receptor superfamily provide touchstones for an emerging allosteric gating mechanism7. All available high-resolution structures are of homopentameric receptors. However, the vast majority of pentameric receptors (called Cys-loop receptors in eukaryotes) present physiologically are heteromeric. Here we present the X-ray crystallographic structure of the human α4β2 nicotinic receptor, the most abundant nicotinic subtype in the brain. This structure provides insights into the architectural principles governing ligand recognition, heteromer assembly, ion permeation and desensitization in this prototypical receptor class. PMID:27698419

  11. The rat growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor gene: structure, regulation, and generation of receptor isoforms with different signaling properties.

    PubMed

    Miller, T L; Godfrey, P A; Dealmeida, V I; Mayo, K E

    1999-09-01

    The interaction of GHRH with membrane-bound receptors on somatotroph cells of the anterior pituitary is an important step in the regulation of GH synthesis and secretion. The identification of a G protein-coupled receptor for GHRH has made it possible to investigate the pathway by which GHRH regulates pituitary somatotroph cell function. To initiate an analysis of the mechanisms regulating expression and function of the GHRH receptor, the structure of the gene and its promoter region were analyzed. The coding sequence of the rat GHRH receptor gene is contained within 14 exons spanning approximately 15 kb of genomic DNA. Four transcription start sites are located within 286 bp upstream of the initiation codon. The 5' flanking region of the GHRH receptor gene acts as a functional promoter in rat pituitary tumor GH3 cells, and basal promoter activity is enhanced in GH3 and COS7 cells by cotransfection of an expression construct encoding the pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1. The rat GHRH receptor gene is subject to at least 1 alternative RNA processing event that generates 2 receptor isoforms differing by 41 amino acids within the third intracellular loop (IL) of the protein. The short isoform of the GHRH receptor is predominant in pituitary cells. The MtT/S pituitary tumor cell line was found to express the GHRH receptor, and different populations of these cells produce predominantly the long or short isoforms of the receptor messenger RNA, suggesting that the alternative splicing can be regulated. Functional analysis of the two GHRH receptor isoforms demonstrates that both bind GHRH, but only the short isoform signals through a cAMP-mediated pathway. Neither receptor isoform is able to stimulate calcium mobilization from internal stores after GHRH treatment. Our findings indicate that the pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1 is involved in the somatotroph-specific expression of the GHRH receptor gene and that functionally distinct receptor

  12. A structural view of nuclear hormone receptor: endocrine disruptor interactions.

    PubMed

    le Maire, Albane; Bourguet, William; Balaguer, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) represent a broad class of exogenous substances that cause adverse effects in the endocrine system by interfering with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action. The molecular mechanisms of EDCs involve different pathways including interactions with nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) which are primary targets of a large variety of environmental contaminants. Here, based on the crystal structures currently available in the Protein Data Bank, we review recent studies showing the many ways in which EDCs interact with NHRs and impact their signaling pathways. Like the estrogenic chemical diethylstilbestrol, some EDCs mimic the natural hormones through conserved protein-ligand contacts, while others, such as organotins, employ radically different binding mechanisms. Such structure-based knowledge, in addition to providing a better understanding of EDC activities, can be used to predict the endocrine-disrupting potential of environmental pollutants and may have applications in drug discovery.

  13. Structure of the STRA6 receptor for retinol uptake

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunting; Clarke, Oliver B.; Kim, Jonathan; Stowe, Sean; Kim, Youn-Kyung; Assur, Zahra; Cavalier, Michael; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; von Alpen, Desiree C.; Manzini, Chiara; Blaner, William S.; Frank, Joachim; Quadro, Loredana; Weber, David J.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Mancia, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A homeostasis is critical to normal cellular function. Retinol-binding protein (RBP) is the sole specific carrier in the bloodstream for hydrophobic retinol, the main form in which vitamin A is transported. The integral membrane receptor STRA6 mediates cellular uptake of vitamin A by recognizing RBP-retinol to trigger release and internalization of retinol. We present the structure of zebrafish STRA6 determined to 3.9-angstrom resolution by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. STRA6 has one intramembrane and nine transmembrane helices in an intricate dimeric assembly. Unexpectedly, calmodulin is bound tightly to STRA6 in a noncanonical arrangement. Residues involved with RBP binding map to an archlike structure that covers a deep lipophilic cleft. This cleft is open to the membrane, suggesting a possible mode for internalization of retinol through direct diffusion into the lipid bilayer. PMID:27563101

  14. Structural, signalling and regulatory properties of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors: prototypic family C G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, E; Challiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 a new type of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was cloned, the type 1a metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor, which, despite possessing the defining seven-transmembrane topology of the GPCR superfamily, bore little resemblance to the growing number of other cloned GPCRs. Subsequent studies have shown that there are eight mammalian mGlu receptors that, together with the calcium-sensing receptor, the GABA(B) receptor (where GABA is gamma-aminobutyric acid) and a subset of pheromone, olfactory and taste receptors, make up GPCR family C. Currently available data suggest that family C GPCRs share a number of structural, biochemical and regulatory characteristics, which differ markedly from those of the other GPCR families, most notably the rhodopsin/family A GPCRs that have been most widely studied to date. This review will focus on the group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5). This subgroup of receptors is widely and differentially expressed in neuronal and glial cells within the brain, and receptor activation has been implicated in the control of an array of key signalling events, including roles in the adaptative changes needed for long-term depression or potentiation of neuronal synaptic connectivity. In addition to playing critical physiological roles within the brain, the mGlu receptors are also currently the focus of considerable attention because of their potential as drug targets for the treatment of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:11672421

  15. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification.

    PubMed

    Chicote, Javier U; DeSalle, Rob; García-España, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs) are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i) have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans), (ii) are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes); (iii) a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates) generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv) R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins.

  16. Complete structural characterisation of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, P; Ramsden, D B; Williams, A C

    1996-01-01

    Aims—To clone and characterise the complete structural gene for the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This gene, located on chromosome 7, encodes a cytosolic receptor protein which, upon activation by various xenobiotic ligands, translocates to the nucleus, where it acts as a specific transcription factor. Methods—Primers, based on the AhR cDNA sequence, were used in conjunction with recently developed long range PCR techniques to amplify contiguous sections of the cognate gene. The amplicons produced were then cloned and characterised. A cDNA probe was also used to screen a human P1 library. Results—Using the cDNA primers, DNA fragments which mapped the entire coding region of the gene were amplified and cloned. All but one of these fragments were amplified directly from human genomic DNA. The remaining fragment was amplified using DNA prepared from a P1 clone as the PCR template. This P1 clone, obtained by screening a human P1 library, also contained the entire Ah locus. Characterisation of amplified and cloned DNA fragments provided sufficient information for the construction of a complete structural map of the gene. This also included 150 base pairs of nucleotide sequence data at all intronic termini. Conclusions—These data indicate that the human AhR gene is about 50 kilobases long and contains 11 exons. The overall intron/exon structure of the human gene is homologous to that of the previously characterised mouse gene; however, it is probably some 20 kilobases larger. These results demonstrate the need for further characterisation and provide the data to facilitate this. Images PMID:16696038

  17. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification

    PubMed Central

    Chicote, Javier U.; DeSalle, Rob; García-España, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs) are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i) have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans), (ii) are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes); (iii) a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates) generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv) R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins. PMID:28257417

  18. Crystal Structures of the Nuclear Receptor, Liver Receptor Homolog 1, Bound to Synthetic Agonists.

    PubMed

    Mays, Suzanne G; Okafor, C Denise; Whitby, Richard J; Goswami, Devrishi; Stec, Józef; Flynn, Autumn R; Dugan, Michael C; Jui, Nathan T; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-12-02

    Liver receptor homolog 1 (NR5A2, LRH-1) is an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that regulates diverse biological processes, including metabolism, proliferation, and the resolution of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Although preclinical and cellular studies demonstrate that LRH-1 has great potential as a therapeutic target for metabolic diseases and cancer, development of LRH-1 modulators has been difficult. Recently, systematic modifications to one of the few known chemical scaffolds capable of activating LRH-1 failed to improve efficacy substantially. Moreover, mechanisms through which LRH-1 is activated by synthetic ligands are entirely unknown. Here, we use x-ray crystallography and other structural methods to explore conformational changes and receptor-ligand interactions associated with LRH-1 activation by a set of related agonists. Unlike phospholipid LRH-1 ligands, these agonists bind deep in the pocket and do not interact with residues near the mouth nor do they expand the pocket like phospholipids. Unexpectedly, two closely related agonists with similar efficacies (GSK8470 and RJW100) exhibit completely different binding modes. The dramatic repositioning is influenced by a differential ability to establish stable face-to-face π-π-stacking with the LRH-1 residue His-390, as well as by a novel polar interaction mediated by the RJW100 hydroxyl group. The differing binding modes result in distinct mechanisms of action for the two agonists. Finally, we identify a network of conserved water molecules near the ligand-binding site that are important for activation by both agonists. This work reveals a previously unappreciated complexity associated with LRH-1 agonist development and offers insights into rational design strategies. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Subunit structure of the acetylcholine receptor from Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed

    Conti-Tronconi, B M; Hunkapiller, M W; Lindstrom, J M; Raftery, M A

    1982-11-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of the four major peptides (Mr 41,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 62,000) present in purified preparations of Electrophorus electricus nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) have been determined for 24 cycles by automated sequence analysis procedures yielding four unique polypeptide sequences. The sequences showed a high degree of similarity, having identical residues in a number of positions ranging between 37% and 50% for specific pairs of subunits. Comparison of the sequences obtained with those of the subunits of similar molecular weight from Torpedo californica AcChoR revealed an even higher degree of homology (from 46% to 71%) for these two highly diverged species. Simultaneous sequence analysis of the amino termini present in native, purified Electrophorus AcChoR showed that these four related sequences were the only ones present and that they occur in a ratio of 2:1:1:1, with the smallest subunit ("alpha 1") being present in two copies. Genealogical analysis suggests that the subunits of both Torpedo and Electrophorus AcChoRs derive from a common ancestral gene, the divergence having occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry and the very early divergence of the four subunits, as well as the highly conserved structure of the AcChoR complex along animal evolution, suggest that each of the subunits evolved to perform discrete crucial roles in the physiological function of the AcChoR.

  20. Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Rachel A; Grossmann, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2nd messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field. PMID:27057074

  1. New insights into the structural bases of activation of Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors of the Cys-loop superfamily mediate rapid synaptic transmission throughout the nervous system, and include receptors activated by ACh, GABA, glycine and serotonin. They are involved in physiological processes, including learning and memory, and in neurological disorders, and they are targets for clinically relevant drugs. Cys-loop receptors assemble either from five copies of one type of subunit, giving rise to homomeric receptors, or from several types of subunits, giving rise to heteromeric receptors. Homomeric receptors are invaluable models for probing fundamental relationships between structure and function. Receptors contain a large extracellular domain that carries the binding sites and a transmembrane region that forms the ion pore. How the structural changes elicited by agonist binding are propagated through a distance of 50Å to the ion channel gate is central to understanding receptor function. Depending on the receptor subtype, occupancy of either two, as in the prototype muscle nicotinic receptor, or three binding sites, as in homomeric receptors, is required for full activation. The conformational changes initiated at the binding sites are propagated to the gate through the interface between the extracellular and transmembrane domains. This region forms a network that relays structural changes from the binding site towards the pore, and also contributes to open channel lifetime and rate of desensitization. Thus, this coupling region controls the beginning and duration of a synaptic response. Here we review recent advances in the molecular mechanism by which Cys-loop receptors are activated with particular emphasis on homomeric receptors.

  2. Structures and regulation of non-X orphan nuclear receptors: A retinoid hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear receptors are defined as a family of ligand regulated transcription factors [1-6]. While this definition reflects that ligand binding is a key property of nuclear receptors, it is still a heated subject of debate if all the nuclear receptors (48 human members) can bind ligands (ligands referred here to both physiological and synthetic ligands). Recent studies in nuclear receptor structure biology and pharmacology have undoubtedly increased our knowledge of nuclear receptor functions and their regulation. As a result, they point to new avenues for the discovery and development of nuclear receptor regulators, including nuclear receptor ligands. Here we review the recent literature on orphan nuclear receptor structural analysis and ligand identification, particularly on the orphan nuclear receptors that do not heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors, which we term as non-X orphan receptors. We also propose a speculative "retinoid hypothesis" for a subset of non-X orphan nuclear receptors, which we hope to help shed light on orphan nuclear receptor biology and drug discovery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Orphan Nuclear Receptors'.

  3. Modification of Chromatin Structure by the Thyroid Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Li; Sachs; Shi; Wolffe

    1999-05-01

    Pioneering experiments and recent observations have established the thyroid hormone receptor as a master manipulator of the chromosomal environment in targeting the activation and repression of transcription. Here we review how the thyroid hormone receptor is assembled into chromatin, where in the absence of thyroid hormone the receptor recruits histone deacetylase to silence transcription. On addition of hormone, the receptor undergoes a conformational change that leads to the release of deacetylase, while facilitating the recruitment of transcriptional coactivators that act as histone acetyltransferases. We discuss the biological importance of these observations for gene control by the thyroid hormone receptor and for oncogenic transformation by the mutated thyroid hormone receptor, v-ErbA.

  4. Distinct Second Extracellular Loop Structures of the Brain Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor: Implication in Ligand Binding and Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Rudd, James; Ding, Tomas T.

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) second extracellular loop (E2) is known to play an important role in receptor structure and function. The brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is unique in that it lacks the inter-loop E2 disulfide linkage to the transmembrane (TM) helical bundle, a characteristic of many GPCRs. Recent mutation studies of the CB1 receptor, however, suggest the presence of an alternative intra-loop disulfide bond between two E2 Cys residues. Considering the oxidation state of these Cys residues, we determine the molecular structures of the 17-residue E2 in the dithiol form (E2dithiol) and in the disulfide form (E2disulfide) of the CB1 receptor in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer, employing a combination of simulated annealing (SA) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approaches. We characterize the CB1 receptor models with these two E2 forms, CB1(E2dithiol) and CB1(E2disulfide), by analyzing interaction energy, contact number, core crevice and cross-correlation. The results show that the distinct E2 structures interact differently with the TM helical bundle and uniquely modify the TM helical topology, suggesting that E2 plays a critical role in stabilizing receptor structure, regulating ligand binding, and ultimately modulating receptor activation. Further studies on the role of E2 of the CB1 receptor are warranted; particularly comparisons of the ligand-bound form with the present ligand-free form. PMID:21120862

  5. Angiotensin Receptors: Structure, Function, Signaling and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Khuraijam Dhanachandra; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensinogen – a serpin family protein predominantly produced by the liver is systematically processed by proteases of the Renin Angiotensin system (RAS) generating hormone peptides. Specific cell surface receptors for at least three distinct angiotensin peptides produce distinct cellular signals that regulate system-wide physiological response to RAS. Two well characterized receptors are angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor) and type 2 receptor (AT2 receptor). They respond to the octapeptide hormone angiotensin II. The oncogene product MAS is a putative receptor for Ang (1–7). While these are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), the in vivo angiotensin IV binding sites may be type 2 transmembrane proteins. These four receptors together regulate cardiovascular, hemodynamic, neurological, renal, and endothelial functions; as well as cell proliferation, survival, matrix-cell interactions and inflammation. Angiotensin receptors are important therapeutic targets for several diseases. Thus, researchers and pharmaceutical companies are focusing on drugs targeting AT1 receptor than AT2 receptor, MAS and AngIV binding sites. AT1 receptor blockers are the cornerstone of current treatment for hypertension, heart failure, renal failure and many types of vascular diseases including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurism and Marfan syndrome. PMID:27512731

  6. Structural determinants of the insulin receptor-related receptor activation by alkali.

    PubMed

    Deyev, Igor E; Mitrofanova, Alla V; Zhevlenev, Egor S; Radionov, Nikita; Berchatova, Anastasiya A; Popova, Nadezhda V; Serova, Oxana V; Petrenko, Alexander G

    2013-11-22

    IRR is a member of the insulin receptor (IR) family that does not have any known agonist of a peptide nature but can be activated by mildly alkaline medium and was thus proposed to function as an extracellular pH sensor. IRR activation by alkali is defined by its N-terminal extracellular region. To reveal key structural elements involved in alkali sensing, we developed an in vitro method to quantify activity of IRR and its mutants. Replacing the IRR L1C domains (residues 1-333) or L2 domain (residues 334-462) or both with the homologous fragments of IR reduced the receptor activity to 35, 64, and 7% percent, respectively. Within L1C domains, five amino acid residues (Leu-135, Gly-188, Arg-244, and vicinal His-318 and Lys-319) were identified as IRR-specific by species conservation analysis of the IR family. These residues are exposed and located in junctions between secondary structure folds. The quintuple mutation of these residues to alanine had the same negative effect as the entire L1C domain replacement, whereas none of the single mutations was as effective. Separate mutations of these five residues and of L2 produced partial negative effects that were additive. The pH dependence of cell-expressed mutants (L1C and L2 swap, L2 plus triple LGR mutation, and L2 plus quintuple LGRHK mutation) was shifted toward alkalinity and, in contrast with IRR, did not show significant positive cooperativity. Our data suggest that IRR activation is not based on a single residue deprotonation in the IRR ectodomain but rather involves synergistic conformational changes at multiple points.

  7. Structural Determinants of the Insulin Receptor-related Receptor Activation by Alkali*

    PubMed Central

    Deyev, Igor E.; Mitrofanova, Alla V.; Zhevlenev, Egor S.; Radionov, Nikita; Berchatova, Anastasiya A.; Popova, Nadezhda V.; Serova, Oxana V.; Petrenko, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    IRR is a member of the insulin receptor (IR) family that does not have any known agonist of a peptide nature but can be activated by mildly alkaline medium and was thus proposed to function as an extracellular pH sensor. IRR activation by alkali is defined by its N-terminal extracellular region. To reveal key structural elements involved in alkali sensing, we developed an in vitro method to quantify activity of IRR and its mutants. Replacing the IRR L1C domains (residues 1–333) or L2 domain (residues 334–462) or both with the homologous fragments of IR reduced the receptor activity to 35, 64, and 7% percent, respectively. Within L1C domains, five amino acid residues (Leu-135, Gly-188, Arg-244, and vicinal His-318 and Lys-319) were identified as IRR-specific by species conservation analysis of the IR family. These residues are exposed and located in junctions between secondary structure folds. The quintuple mutation of these residues to alanine had the same negative effect as the entire L1C domain replacement, whereas none of the single mutations was as effective. Separate mutations of these five residues and of L2 produced partial negative effects that were additive. The pH dependence of cell-expressed mutants (L1C and L2 swap, L2 plus triple LGR mutation, and L2 plus quintuple LGRHK mutation) was shifted toward alkalinity and, in contrast with IRR, did not show significant positive cooperativity. Our data suggest that IRR activation is not based on a single residue deprotonation in the IRR ectodomain but rather involves synergistic conformational changes at multiple points. PMID:24121506

  8. Structural basis of transcobalamin recognition by human CD320 receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Amer; Woo, Jae-Sung; Schmitz, Jennifer; Prinz, Bernadette; Root, Katharina; Chen, Fan; Bloch, Joël S.; Zenobi, Renato; Locher, Kaspar P.

    2016-07-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) requires capture of transcobalamin (TC) from the plasma by CD320, a ubiquitous cell surface receptor of the LDLR family. Here we present the crystal structure of human holo-TC in complex with the extracellular domain of CD320, visualizing the structural basis of the TC-CD320 interaction. The observed interaction chemistry can rationalize the high affinity of CD320 for TC and lack of haptocorrin binding. The in vitro affinity and complex stability of TC-CD320 were quantitated using a solid-phase binding assay and thermostability analysis. Stable complexes with TC were also observed for the disease-causing CD320ΔE88 mutant and for the isolated LDLR-A2 domain. We also determined the structure of the TC-CD320ΔE88 complex, which revealed only minor changes compared with the wild-type complex. Finally, we demonstrate significantly reduced in vitro affinity of TC for CD320 at low pH, recapitulating the proposed ligand release during the endocytic pathway.

  9. Gonococcal pili. Primary structure and receptor binding domain.

    PubMed

    Schoolnik, G K; Fernandez, R; Tai, J Y; Rothbard, J; Gotschlich, E C

    1984-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pilin from gonococcal strain MS11 and the sequence of constant and variable regions from strain R10 pilin have been determined in order to elucidate the structural basis for adherence function, antigenic diversity, and polymeric structure. The MS11 pilin sequence consists of 159 amino acids in a single polypeptide chain with two cysteines in disulfide linkage and serine-bonded phosphate residues. TC-2 (31-111), a soluble monomeric pilus peptide prepared by arginine-specific digestion, bound human endocervical, but not buccal or HeLa cells and therefore is postulated to encompass the receptor binding domain. Variable regions of CNBr-3 appear to confer antigenic diversity and comprise segments in which changes in the position of charged residues occur in hydrophilic, beta-turns. Residues 2-21 and 202-221 of gonococcal pilins and lower eucaryotic actins, respectively, exhibit 50% homology. When these residues are arranged at intervals of 100 degrees of arc on "helical wheels," the identical amino acids comprise a hydrophobic face on one side of the helix. This observation, the hydrophobic character of this region and the tendency for TC-1 (residues 1-30) to aggregate in water, suggest that this stretch interacts with other subunits to stabilize polymeric structure.

  10. Recent Structural and Mechanistic Insights into Endplate Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.; Gao, Fan; Lee, Won Yong; Mukhtasimova, Nuriya; Wang, Hai-Long; Engel, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary movement mediated by skeletal muscle relies on endplate acetylcholine receptors (AChR) to detect nerve-released ACh and depolarize themuscle fiber. Recent structural and mechanistic studies of the endplate AChR have catalyzed a leap in our understanding of the molecular steps in this chemical-to-electrical transduction process. Studies of acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) give insight into ACh recognition, the first step in activation of the AChR. An atomic structural model of the Torpedo AChR at a resolution of 0.4 nm, together with single-ion channel recording methods, allow tracing of the link between the agonist binding event and gating of the ion channel, as well as determination of how the channel moves when it opens to allow flow of cations. Structural models of the human AChR enable precise mapping of disease-causing mutations, while studies of the speed with which single AChR channels open and close cast light on pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:18567853

  11. Structural basis of transcobalamin recognition by human CD320 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Amer; Woo, Jae-Sung; Schmitz, Jennifer; Prinz, Bernadette; Root, Katharina; Chen, Fan; Bloch, Joël S.; Zenobi, Renato; Locher, Kaspar P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) requires capture of transcobalamin (TC) from the plasma by CD320, a ubiquitous cell surface receptor of the LDLR family. Here we present the crystal structure of human holo-TC in complex with the extracellular domain of CD320, visualizing the structural basis of the TC-CD320 interaction. The observed interaction chemistry can rationalize the high affinity of CD320 for TC and lack of haptocorrin binding. The in vitro affinity and complex stability of TC-CD320 were quantitated using a solid-phase binding assay and thermostability analysis. Stable complexes with TC were also observed for the disease-causing CD320ΔE88 mutant and for the isolated LDLR-A2 domain. We also determined the structure of the TC-CD320ΔE88 complex, which revealed only minor changes compared with the wild-type complex. Finally, we demonstrate significantly reduced in vitro affinity of TC for CD320 at low pH, recapitulating the proposed ligand release during the endocytic pathway. PMID:27411955

  12. The CCK(-like) receptor in the animal kingdom: functions, evolution and structures.

    PubMed

    Staljanssens, Dorien; Azari, Elnaz Karimian; Christiaens, Olivier; Beaufays, Jérôme; Lins, Laurence; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-03-01

    In this review, the cholecystokinin (CCK)(-like) receptors throughout the animal kingdom are compared on the level of physiological functions, evolutionary basis and molecular structure. In vertebrates, the CCK receptor is an important member of the G-protein coupled receptors as it is involved in the regulation of many physiological functions like satiety, gastrointestinal motility, gastric acid secretion, gall bladder contraction, pancreatic secretion, panic, anxiety and memory and learning processes. A homolog for this receptor is also found in nematodes and arthropods, called CK receptor and sulfakinin (SK) receptor, respectively. These receptors seem to have evolved from a common ancestor which is probably still closely related to the nematode CK receptor. The SK receptor is more closely related to the CCK receptor and seems to have similar functions. A molecular 3D-model for the CCK receptor type 1 has been built together with the docking of the natural ligands for the CCK and SK receptors in the CCK receptor type 1. These molecular models can help to study ligand-receptor interactions, that can in turn be useful in the development of new CCK(-like) receptor agonists and antagonists with beneficial health effects in humans or potential for pest control.

  13. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP MODELS FOR PREDICTION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING AFFINITY OF STRUCTURALLY DIVERSE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The demonstrated ability of a variety of structurally diverse chemicals to bind to the estrogen receptor has raised the concern that chemicals in the environment may be causing adverse effects through interference with nuclear receptor pathways. Many structure-activity relationsh...

  14. The receptor kinase family: primary structure of rhodopsin kinase reveals similarities to the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, W; Inglese, J; Palczewski, K; Onorato, J J; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1991-01-01

    Light-dependent deactivation of rhodopsin as well as homologous desensitization of beta-adrenergic receptors involves receptor phosphorylation that is mediated by the highly specific protein kinases rhodopsin kinase (RK) and beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK), respectively. We report here the cloning of a complementary DNA for RK. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of homology to beta ARK. In a phylogenetic tree constructed by comparing the catalytic domains of several protein kinases, RK and beta ARK are located on a branch close to, but separate from the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C subfamilies. From the common structural features we conclude that both RK and beta ARK are members of a newly delineated gene family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor kinases that may function in diverse pathways to regulate the function of such receptors. Images PMID:1656454

  15. The Structure of the GM-CSF Receptor Complex Reveals a Distinct Mode of Cytokine Receptor Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Guido; Hercus, Timothy R.; McClure, Barbara J.; Stomski, Frank C.; Dottore, Mara; Powell, Jason; Ramshaw, Hayley; Woodcock, Joanna M.; Xu, Yibin; Guthridge, Mark; McKinstry, William J.; Lopez, Angel F.; Parker, Michael W.

    2008-08-11

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that controls the production and function of blood cells, is deregulated in clinical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia, yet offers therapeutic value for other diseases. Its receptors are heterodimers consisting of a ligand-specific {alpha} subunit and a {beta}c subunit that is shared with the interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 receptors. How signaling is initiated remains an enigma. We report here the crystal structure of the human GM-CSF/GM-CSF receptor ternary complex and its assembly into an unexpected dodecamer or higher-order complex. Importantly, mutagenesis of the GM-CSF receptor at the dodecamer interface and functional studies reveal that dodecamer formation is required for receptor activation and signaling. This unusual form of receptor assembly likely applies also to IL-3 and IL-5 receptors, providing a structural basis for understanding their mechanism of activation and for the development of therapeutics.

  16. Structure-function study of the fourth transmembrane segment of the GABAρ1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The Cys-loop family of receptors mediates synaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. These receptors share several structural characteristics and assemble in the plasma membrane as multimers with fivefold symmetry. Of these, the ionotropic GABA receptors are key players in the pathogenesis of diseases like epilepsy, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Different experimental approaches have shed some light on the mechanisms behind the function of these receptors; but little is known about their structure at high resolution. Sequence homology with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor predicts that ionotropic GABA receptors possess four transmembrane segments (TM1–4) and that TM2 forms the wall of the ion channel. However, the role of the other three segments is unclear. The GABAρ1 receptor plays a fundamental role in the regulation of neurotransmission along the visual pathway, is highly sensitive to GABA, and exhibits little desensitization. In our recent investigations of the role of TM4 in receptor function, a key residue in this domain (W475) was found to be involved in activation of the receptor. Here we have generated a structural model of the GABAρ1 receptor in silico and assessed its validity by electrophysiologically testing nine amino acid substitutions of W475 and deletions of the neighboring residues (Y474 and S476). The results identify a critical linkage between the ligand-binding domain and the TM4 domain and provide a framework for more detailed structure-function analyses of ionotropic GABA receptors. PMID:20876117

  17. Structural determinants of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor gating.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Chakraborty, Asima; Xu, Le; Mei, Yingwu; Samsó, Montserrat; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    Ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) releases Ca(2+) from intracellular stores upon nerve impulse to trigger skeletal muscle contraction. Effector binding at the cytoplasmic domain tightly controls gating of the pore domain of RyR1 to release Ca(2+). However, the molecular mechanism that links effector binding to channel gating is unknown due to lack of structural data. Here, we used a combination of computational and electrophysiological methods and cryo-EM densities to generate structural models of the open and closed states of RyR1. Using our structural models, we identified an interface between the pore-lining helix (Tyr-4912-Glu-4948) and a linker helix (Val-4830-Val-4841) that lies parallel to the cytoplasmic membrane leaflet. To test the hypothesis that this interface controls RyR1 gating, we designed mutations in the linker helix to stabilize either the open (V4830W and T4840W) or closed (H4832W and G4834W) state and validated them using single channel experiments. To further confirm this interface, we designed mutations in the pore-lining helix to stabilize the closed state (Q4947N, Q4947T, and Q4947S), which we also validated using single channel experiments. The channel conductance and selectivity of the mutations that we designed in the linker and pore-lining helices were indistinguishable from those of WT RyR1, demonstrating our ability to modulate RyR1 gating without affecting ion permeation. Our integrated computational and experimental approach significantly advances the understanding of the structure and function of an unusually large ion channel.

  18. Functional Probes of Drug–Receptor Interactions Implicated by Structural Studies: Cys-Loop Receptors Provide a Fertile Testing Ground

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structures of integral membrane receptors provide valuable models for drug–receptor interactions across many important classes of drug targets and have become much more widely available in recent years. However, it remains to be determined to what extent these images are relevant to human receptors in their biological context and how subtle issues such as subtype selectivity can be informed by them. The high precision structural modifications enabled by unnatural amino acid mutagenesis on mammalian receptors expressed in vertebrate cells allow detailed tests of predictions from structural studies. Using the Cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels, we show that functional studies lead to detailed binding models that, at times, are significantly at odds with the structural studies on related invertebrate proteins. Importantly, broad variations in binding interactions are seen for very closely related receptor subtypes and for varying drugs at a given binding site. These studies highlight the essential interplay between structural studies and functional studies that can guide efforts to develop new pharmaceuticals. PMID:24568098

  19. Functional probes of drug-receptor interactions implicated by structural studies: Cys-loop receptors provide a fertile testing ground.

    PubMed

    Van Arnam, Ethan B; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2014-08-14

    Structures of integral membrane receptors provide valuable models for drug-receptor interactions across many important classes of drug targets and have become much more widely available in recent years. However, it remains to be determined to what extent these images are relevant to human receptors in their biological context and how subtle issues such as subtype selectivity can be informed by them. The high precision structural modifications enabled by unnatural amino acid mutagenesis on mammalian receptors expressed in vertebrate cells allow detailed tests of predictions from structural studies. Using the Cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels, we show that functional studies lead to detailed binding models that, at times, are significantly at odds with the structural studies on related invertebrate proteins. Importantly, broad variations in binding interactions are seen for very closely related receptor subtypes and for varying drugs at a given binding site. These studies highlight the essential interplay between structural studies and functional studies that can guide efforts to develop new pharmaceuticals.

  20. The Design and Structure of Outer Membrane Receptors from Peroxisomes, Mitochondria, and Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Whelan, James; Vrielink, Alice

    2015-10-06

    The eukaryotic cell is defined by compartments that allow specialization of function. This compartmental structure generates a new concept in cell biology compared with the simpler prokaryotic cell structure, namely the specific targeting of proteins to intracellular compartments. Protein targeting is achieved by the action of specialized signals on proteins destined for organelles that are recognized by cognate receptors. An understanding of the specificity of targeting signal recognition leading to import requires an understanding of the receptor structures. Here, we focus on the structures of receptors of different import machineries located on the outer membrane of three organelles: peroxisomes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. This review provides an overview of the structural features of outer membrane import receptors that recognize targeting signals. Finally, we briefly discuss combinatorial approaches that might aid in understanding the structural factors mediating receptor targeting signal recognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Subunit structure of the acetylcholine receptor from Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed Central

    Conti-Tronconi, B M; Hunkapiller, M W; Lindstrom, J M; Raftery, M A

    1982-01-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of the four major peptides (Mr 41,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 62,000) present in purified preparations of Electrophorus electricus nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) have been determined for 24 cycles by automated sequence analysis procedures yielding four unique polypeptide sequences. The sequences showed a high degree of similarity, having identical residues in a number of positions ranging between 37% and 50% for specific pairs of subunits. Comparison of the sequences obtained with those of the subunits of similar molecular weight from Torpedo californica AcChoR revealed an even higher degree of homology (from 46% to 71%) for these two highly diverged species. Simultaneous sequence analysis of the amino termini present in native, purified Electrophorus AcChoR showed that these four related sequences were the only ones present and that they occur in a ratio of 2:1:1:1, with the smallest subunit ("alpha 1") being present in two copies. Genealogical analysis suggests that the subunits of both Torpedo and Electrophorus AcChoRs derive from a common ancestral gene, the divergence having occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry and the very early divergence of the four subunits, as well as the highly conserved structure of the AcChoR complex along animal evolution, suggest that each of the subunits evolved to perform discrete crucial roles in the physiological function of the AcChoR. Images PMID:6959131

  2. Structure and Machanism-Base Design of ErbB Receptor Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0449 TITLE: Structure and Machanism -Base Design of ErbB Receptor Inhibitors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel J. Leahy...CONTRACT NUMBER Structure and Machanism -Base Design of ErbB Receptor Inhibitors 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0449 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  3. Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Structure, Signaling, Ligands, Functions, and Interactions with Opioid Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Calo', Girolamo; Cox, Brian M.; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2016-01-01

    The NOP receptor (nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide receptor) is the most recently discovered member of the opioid receptor family and, together with its endogenous ligand, N/OFQ, make up the fourth members of the opioid receptor and opioid peptide family. Because of its more recent discovery, an understanding of the cellular and behavioral actions induced by NOP receptor activation are less well developed than for the other members of the opioid receptor family. All of these factors are important because NOP receptor activation has a clear modulatory role on mu opioid receptor-mediated actions and thereby affects opioid analgesia, tolerance development, and reward. In addition to opioid modulatory actions, NOP receptor activation has important effects on motor function and other physiologic processes. This review discusses how NOP pharmacology intersects, contrasts, and interacts with the mu opioid receptor in terms of tertiary structure and mechanism of receptor activation; location of receptors in the central nervous system; mechanisms of desensitization and downregulation; cellular actions; intracellular signal transduction pathways; and behavioral actions with respect to analgesia, tolerance, dependence, and reward. This is followed by a discussion of the agonists and antagonists that have most contributed to our current knowledge. Because NOP receptors are highly expressed in brain and spinal cord and NOP receptor activation sometimes synergizes with mu receptor-mediated actions and sometimes opposes them, an understanding of NOP receptor pharmacology in the context of these interactions with the opioid receptors will be crucial to the development of novel therapeutics that engage the NOP receptor. PMID:26956246

  4. Structural determinants for activation or inhibition of ryanodine receptors by basic residues in the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop.

    PubMed Central

    Casarotto, M G; Green, D; Pace, S M; Curtis, S M; Dulhunty, A F

    2001-01-01

    The structures of peptide A, and six other 7-20 amino acid peptides corresponding to sequences in the A region (Thr671- Leu690) of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop have been examined, and are correlated with the ability of the peptides to activate or inhibit skeletal ryanodine receptor calcium release channels. The peptides adopted either random coil or nascent helix-like structures, which depended upon the polarity of the terminal residues as well as the presence and ionisation state of two glutamate residues. Enhanced activation of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, and activation of current flow through single ryanodine receptor channels (at -40 mV), was seen with peptides containing the basic residues 681Arg Lys Arg Arg Lys685, and was strongest when the residues were a part of an alpha-helix. Inhibition of channels (at +40 mV) was also seen with peptides containing the five positively charged residues, but was not enhanced in helical peptides. These results confirm the hypothesis that activation of ryanodine receptor channels by the II-III loop peptides requires both the basic residues and their participation in helical structure, and show for the first time that inhibition requires the basic residues, but is not structure-dependent. These findings imply that activation and inhibition result from peptide binding to separate sites on the ryanodine receptor. PMID:11371447

  5. Mammalian. beta. /sub 1/- and. beta. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors: immunological and structural comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Moxham, C.P.; George, S.T.; Graziano, M.P.; Brandwein, H.J.; Malbon, C.C.

    1986-11-05

    ..beta../sub 1/- and ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors, pharmacologically distinct proteins, have been reported to be structurally dissimilar. In the present study three techniques were employed to compare the nature of mammalian ..beta../sub 1/- and ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors. Antibodies against each of the receptor subtypes were raised separately. Polyclonal antisera against ..beta../sub 1/-receptors of rat fat cells were raised in mice, and antisera against ..beta../sub 2/-receptors of guinea pig lung were raised in rabbits. Receptors purified from rat fat cells (..beta../sub 1/-), S49 mouse lymphoma cells (..beta../sub 2/-), and rat liver (..beta../sub 2/-) were probed with these antisera. Each anti-receptor antisera demonstrated the ability to immunoprecipitate purified receptors of both ..beta../sub 1/- and ..beta../sub 2/-subtypes. The mobility of ..beta..-receptors subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was probed using antireceptor antibodies and nitrocellulose blots of the gels. Fat cell ..beta../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors display M/sub r/ = 67,000 under reducing conditions and M/sub r/ = 54,000 under nonreducing conditions, as previously reported. Both ..beta../sub 1/- and ..beta../sub 2/-receptors displayed this same shift in electrophoretic mobility observed in the presence as compared to the absence of disulfide bridge-reducing agents, as detected both by autoradiography of the radiolabeled receptors and by immunoblotting of native receptors. Finally, isoelectric focusing of purified radioiodinated ..beta../sub 1/- and ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors revealed identical isoelectric points. These data are the first to provide analyses of immunological, structural, and biochemical features of ..beta../sub 1/- and ..beta../sub 2/-subtypes in tandem and underscore the structural similarities that exist between these pharmacologically distinct receptors.

  6. Structure-based receptor MIMICS targeted against bacterial superantigen toxins

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Goutam; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Shiflett, Patrick R.; Lehnert, Nancy M.

    2009-08-18

    The invention provides therapeutic compositions useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. The compositions comprise genetically engineered bifunctional polypeptides containing a specific T-cell receptor binding domain and a specific MHC class II receptor binding domain, each targeting non-overlapping epitopes on a superantigen molecule against which they are designed. The anti-superantigen "receptor mimetics" or "chimeras" are rationally designed to recreate the modality of superantigen binding directly to both the TCR and the MHC-II receptor, and are capable of acting as decoys for superantigen binding, effectively out-competing the host T-cell and MHC-II receptors, the natural host receptors.

  7. Chemokine and chemokine receptor structure and interactions: implications for therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Salanga, Catherina L.; Handel, Tracy M.

    2015-01-01

    The control of cell migration by chemokines involves interactions with two types of receptors: seven transmembrane chemokine-type G protein-coupled receptors and cell surface or extracellular matrix associated glycosaminoglycans. Coordinated interaction of chemokines with both types of receptors is required for directional migration of cells in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Accumulated structural information, culminating most recently in the structure of a chemokine receptor in complex with a chemokine, has led to a view where chemokine oligomers bind to glycosaminoglycans through epitopes formed when chemokine subunits come together, while chemokine monomers bind to receptors in a pseudo two-step mechanism of receptor activation. Exploitation of this structural knowledge has and will continue to provide important information for therapeutic strategies, as described in this review. PMID:25708536

  8. Structural basis and functions of abscisic acid receptors PYLs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing L.; Jiang, Lun; Xin, Qi; Liu, Yang; Tan, Jian X.; Chen, Zhong Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many developmental processes and responses to adaptive stresses in plants. Recently, a new family of nucleocytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) has been identified as bona fide ABA receptors. PYLs together with protein phosphatases type-2C (PP2Cs), Snf1 (Sucrose-non-fermentation 1)-related kinases subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) and downstream substrates constitute the core ABA signaling network. Generally, PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s kinases by physical interaction and direct dephosphorylation. Upon ABA binding, PYLs change their conformations and then contact and inhibit PP2Cs, thus activating SnRK2s. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in research regarding the structures of the core signaling pathways of ABA, including the (+)-ABA, (−)-ABA and ABA analogs pyrabactin as well as 6AS perception by PYLs, SnRK2s mimicking PYLs in binding PP2Cs. PYLs inhibited PP2Cs in both the presence and absence of ABA and activated SnRK2s. The present review elucidates multiple ABA signal perception and transduction by PYLs, which might shed light on how to design small chemical compounds for improving plant performance in the future. PMID:25745428

  9. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  10. The ethylene-receptor family from Arabidopsis: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Bleecker, A B; Esch, J J; Hall, A E; Rodríguez, F I; Binder, B M

    1998-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development. Ethylene is perceived by a family of high-affinity receptors typified by the ETR1 protein from Arabidopsis. The ETR1 gene codes for a protein which contains a hydrophobic N-terminal domain that binds ethylene and a C-terminal domain that is related in sequence to histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signal transducers found in bacteria. A structural model for the ethylene-binding domain is presented in which a Cu(I) ion is coordinated within membrane-spanning alpha-helices of the hydrophobic domain. It is proposed that binding of ethylene to the transition metal would induce a conformational change in the sensor domain that would be propagated to the cytoplasmic transmitter domain of the protein. A total of four additional genes that are related in sequence to ETR1 have been identified in Arabidopsis. Specific missense mutations in any one of the five genes leads to ethylene insensitivity in planta. Models for signal transduction that can account for the genetic dominance of these mutations are discussed. PMID:9800203

  11. Determinants of oligomeric structure in the chicken liver glycoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Verrey, F; Drickamer, K

    1993-01-01

    The oligomeric state of the chicken liver receptor (chicken hepatic lectin), which mediates endocytosis of glycoproteins terminating with N-acetylglucosamine, has been investigated using physical methods as well as chemical cross-linking. Receptor isolated from liver and from transfected rat fibroblasts expressing the full-length polypeptide is a homotrimer immediately following solubilization in non-ionic detergent, but forms the previously observed hexamer during purification. These results are most consistent with the presence of a trimer of receptor polypeptides in liver membranes and in transfected cells. Analysis of truncated receptors reveals that the C-terminal extracellular portion of this type-II transmembrane protein does not form stable oligomers when isolated from the membrane anchor and cytoplasmic tail. The behaviour of chimeric receptors, in which the cytoplasmic tail of the glycoprotein receptor is replaced with the corresponding segments of rat liver asialoglycoprotein receptor or the beta-subunit of Na+,K(+)-ATPase, or with unrelated sequences from globin, indicates that the cytoplasmic tail influences oligomer stability. Replacement of N-terminal portions of the receptor with corresponding segments of influenza virus neuraminidase results in formation of tetramers, suggesting that the membrane anchor and flanking sequences are important determinants of oligomer formation. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8503842

  12. Topology of Class A G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Insights Gained from Crystal Structures of Rhodopsins, Adrenergic and Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Debarshi; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Biological membranes are densely packed with membrane proteins that occupy approximately half of their volume. In almost all cases, membrane proteins in the native state lack the higher-order symmetry required for their direct study by diffraction methods. Despite many technical difficulties, numerous crystal structures of detergent solubilized membrane proteins have been determined that illustrate their internal organization. Among such proteins, class A G protein-coupled receptors have become amenable to crystallization and high resolution X-ray diffraction analyses. The derived structures of native and engineered receptors not only provide insights into their molecular arrangements but also furnish a framework for designing and testing potential models of transformation from inactive to active receptor signaling states and for initiating rational drug design. PMID:18945819

  13. Structure of the retinoid X receptor α-liver X receptor β (RXRα-LXRβ) heterodimer on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Xiaohua; Toresson, Gudrun; Benod, Cindy; Suh, Ji Ho; Philips, Kevin J; Webb, Paul; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2014-03-11

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are conditional transcription factors with common multidomain organization that bind diverse DNA elements. How DNA sequences influence NR conformation is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the human retinoid X receptor α–liver X receptor β (RXRα–LXRβ) heterodimer on its cognate element, an AGGTCA direct repeat spaced by 4 nt. The complex has an extended X-shaped arrangement, with DNA- and ligand-binding domains crossed, in contrast to the parallel domain arrangement of other NRs that bind an AGGTCA direct repeat spaced by 1 nt. The LXRβ core binds DNA via canonical contacts and auxiliary DNA contacts that enhance affinity for the response element. Comparisons of RXRα–LXRβs in the crystal asymmetric unit and with previous NR structures reveal flexibility in NR organization and suggest a role for RXRα in adaptation of heterodimeric complexes to DNA.

  14. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist.

    PubMed

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2012-01-25

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  15. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  16. [Opioid receptors of the CNS: function, structure and distribution].

    PubMed

    Slamberová, R

    2004-01-01

    Even though the alkaloids of opium, such as morphine and codeine, were isolated at the beginning of 19th century, the opioid receptors were not determined until 1970's. The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides, such as endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, has helped to differentiate between the specific opioid receptor subtypes, mu, delta and kappa, that are used up to now. Opioid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system unevenly. Each receptor subtype has its own specific and nonspecific agonists and antagonists. Opioides, as exogenous opioid receptor agonists, are drugs that are often used in medicine for their analgesic effects, but they are also some of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Opioides may also induce long-term changes in the numbers and binding activities of opioid receptors. Some of our studies in fact demonstrate that prenatal morphine exposure can alter opioid receptors of adult rats. This may begin to provide insight into the sources of some of the morphological and behavioral changes in the progeny of mothers that received or abused opioides during pregnancy.

  17. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of selective antagonists of glucagon receptor using QuaSAR descriptors.

    PubMed

    Manoj Kumar, Palanivelu; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Hari Narayana Moorthy, Narayana Subbiah; Trivedi, Piyush

    2006-11-01

    In the present paper, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach was applied to understand the affinity and selectivity of a novel series of triaryl imidazole derivatives towards glucagon receptor. Statistically significant and highly predictive QSARs were derived for glucagon receptor inhibition by triaryl imidazoles using QuaSAR descriptors of molecular operating environment (MOE) employing computer-assisted multiple regression procedure. The generated QSAR models revealed that factors related to hydrophobicity, molecular shape and geometry predominantly influences glucagon receptor binding affinity of the triaryl imidazoles indicating the relevance of shape specific steric interactions between the molecule and the receptor. Further, QSAR models formulated for selective inhibition of glucagon receptor over p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase of the compounds in the series highlights that the same structural features, which influence the glucagon receptor affinity, also contribute to their selective inhibition.

  18. Structural basis for receptor activity-modifying protein-dependent selective peptide recognition by a G protein-coupled receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Booe, Jason M.; Walker, Christopher S.; Barwell, James; ...

    2015-05-14

    Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind relatedmore » GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. Lastly, the structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes.« less

  19. Interactions between Intracellular Domains as Key Determinants of the Quaternary Structure and Function of Receptor Heteromers*

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Ferré, Sergi; Cordomi, Arnau; Moreno, Estefania; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Hoffmann, Hanne; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Pardo, Leonardo; Franco, Rafael; Woods, Amina S.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers are macromolecular complexes with unique functional properties different from those of its individual protomers. Little is known about what determines the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers resulting in their unique functional properties. In this study, using resonance energy transfer techniques in experiments with mutated receptors, we provide for the first time clear evidence for a key role of intracellular domains in the determination of the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers between adenosine A2A, cannabinoid CB1, and dopamine D2 receptors. In these interactions, arginine-rich epitopes form salt bridges with phosphorylated serine or threonine residues from CK1/2 consensus sites. Each receptor (A2A, CB1, and D2) was found to include two evolutionarily conserved intracellular domains to establish selective electrostatic interactions with intracellular domains of the other two receptors, indicating that these particular electrostatic interactions constitute a general mechanism for receptor heteromerization. Mutation experiments indicated that the interactions of the intracellular domains of the CB1 receptor with A2A and D2 receptors are fundamental for the correct formation of the quaternary structure needed for the function (MAPK signaling) of the A2A-CB1-D2 receptor heteromers. Analysis of MAPK signaling in striatal slices of CB1 receptor KO mice and wild-type littermates supported the existence of A1-CB1-D2 receptor heteromer in the brain. These findings allowed us to propose the first molecular model of the quaternary structure of a receptor heteromultimer. PMID:20562103

  20. Classification, Nomenclature, and Structural Aspects of Adhesion GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Nijmeijer, Saskia; de Graaf, Chris; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-01-01

    Representation of the nine distinct aGPCR subfamilies and their unique N-terminal domain architecture. The illustration also shows the extracellular structural feature shared by all aGPCRs (except ADGRA1), known as the GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain, that mediates autoproteolysis and subsequent attachment of the cleaved NTF and CTF fragments The adhesion family of G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) is unique among all GPCR families with long N-termini and multiple domains that are implicated in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Initially, aGPCRs in the human genome were phylogenetically classified into nine distinct subfamilies based on their 7TM sequence similarity. This phylogenetic grouping of genes into subfamilies was found to be in congruence in closely related mammals and other vertebrates as well. Over the years, aGPCR repertoires have been mapped in many species including model organisms, and, currently, there is a growing interest in exploring the pharmacological aspects of aGPCRs. Nonetheless, the aGPCR nomenclature has been highly diverse because experts in the field have used different names for different family members based on their characteristics (e.g., epidermal growth factor-seven-span transmembrane (EGF-TM7)), but without harmonization with regard to nomenclature efforts. In order to facilitate naming of orthologs and other genetic variants in different species in the future, the Adhesion-GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposed a unified nomenclature for aGPCRs. Here, we review the classification and the most recent/current nomenclature of aGPCRs and as well discuss the structural topology of the extracellular domain (ECD)/N-terminal fragment (NTF) that is comparable with this 7TM subfamily classification. Of note, we systematically describe the structural domains in the ECD of aGPCR subfamilies and

  1. Acetylcholine Receptors in Model Membranes: Structure/Function Correlates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    These are small, positively charge, water-soluble, heteroryclic guanidines that bind with . nanomolar KDs to a site on the extracellular-facing side of...of this polypeptide toxin to native channels is influenced by both membrane potential and occupancy of the alkaloid toxin receptor site (172). LqTX...binding recovered after reconstitution with endogenous lipid was not affected by either membrane potential or occupany of the alkaloid toxin receptor site

  2. Crystal structures of the A2A adenosine receptor and their use in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-12-20

    New insights into drug design are derived from the X-ray crystallographic structures of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the adenosine receptors (ARs) are at the forefront of this effort. The 3D knowledge of receptor binding and activation promises to enable drug discovery for GPCRs in general, and specifically for the ARs. The predictability of modeling based on the X-ray structures of the A2AAR has been well demonstrated in the identification, design and modification of both known and novel AR agonists and antagonists. It is expected that structure-based design of drugs acting through ARs will provide new avenues to clinically useful agents.

  3. The structure of the third intracellular loop of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Susumu; Oka, Yoshiaki; Haga, Kazuko; Kojima, Shuichi; Tateishi, Yukihiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Haga, Tatsuya

    2006-01-09

    We have examined whether the long third intracellular loop (i3) of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype has a rigid structure. Circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of M2i3 expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli indicated that M2i3 consists mostly of random coil. In addition, the differential CD spectrum between the M2 and M2deltai3 receptors, the latter of which lacks most of i3 except N- and C-terminal ends, gave no indication of secondary structure. These results suggest that the central part of i3 of the M2 receptor has a flexible structure.

  4. Xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2013-02-01

    Xenobiotic compounds undergo a critical range of biotransformations performed by the phase I, II, and III drug-metabolizing enzymes. The oxidation, conjugation, and transportation of potentially harmful xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds achieved by these catalytic systems are significantly regulated, at the gene expression level, by members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family of ligand-modulated transcription factors. Activation of NRs by a variety of endo- and exogenous chemicals are elemental to induction and repression of drug-metabolism pathways. The master xenobiotic sensing NRs, the promiscuous pregnane X receptor and less-promiscuous constitutive androstane receptor are crucial to initial ligand recognition, jump-starting the metabolic process. Other receptors, including farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, liver X receptor, and RAR-related orphan receptor, are not directly linked to promiscuous xenobiotic binding, but clearly play important roles in the modulation of metabolic gene expression. Crystallographic studies of the ligand-binding domains of nine NRs involved in drug metabolism provide key insights into ligand-based and constitutive activity, coregulator recruitment, and gene regulation. Structures of other, noncanonical transcription factors also shed light on secondary, but important, pathways of control. Pharmacological targeting of some of these nuclear and atypical receptors has been instituted as a means to treat metabolic and developmental disorders and provides a future avenue to be explored for other members of the xenobiotic-sensing NRs.

  5. Xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism: a structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Xenobiotic compounds undergo a critical range of biotransformations performed by the phase I, II, and III drug-metabolizing enzymes. The oxidation, conjugation, and transportation of potentially harmful xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds achieved by these catalytic systems are significantly regulated, at the gene expression level, by members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family of ligand-modulated transcription factors. Activation of NRs by a variety of endo- and exogenous chemicals are elemental to induction and repression of drug-metabolism pathways. The master xenobiotic sensing NRs, the promiscuous pregnane X receptor and less-promiscuous constitutive androstane receptor are crucial to initial ligand recognition, jump-starting the metabolic process. Other receptors, including farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, liver X receptor, and RAR-related orphan receptor, are not directly linked to promiscuous xenobiotic binding, but clearly play important roles in the modulation of metabolic gene expression. Crystallographic studies of the ligand-binding domains of nine NRs involved in drug metabolism provide key insights into ligand-based and constitutive activity, coregulator recruitment, and gene regulation. Structures of other, noncanonical transcription factors also shed light on secondary, but important, pathways of control. Pharmacological targeting of some of these nuclear and atypical receptors has been instituted as a means to treat metabolic and developmental disorders and provides a future avenue to be explored for other members of the xenobiotic-sensing NRs. PMID:23210723

  6. The Structure of the Mouse Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor in Lipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Deluz, Cédric; Hassaine, Gherici; Grasso, Luigino; Graf-Meyer, Alexandra; Vogel, Horst; Stahlberg, Henning

    2016-01-05

    The function of membrane proteins is best understood if their structure in the lipid membrane is known. Here, we determined the structure of the mouse serotonin 5-HT3 receptor inserted in lipid bilayers to a resolution of 12 Å without stabilizing antibodies by cryo electron tomography and subtomogram averaging. The reconstruction reveals protein secondary structure elements in the transmembrane region, the extracellular pore, and the transmembrane channel pathway, showing an overall similarity to the available X-ray model of the truncated 5-HT3 receptor determined in the presence of a stabilizing nanobody. Structural analysis of the 5-HT3 receptor embedded in a lipid bilayer allowed the position of the membrane to be determined. Interactions between the densely packed receptors in lipids were visualized, revealing that the interactions were maintained by the short horizontal helices. In combination with methodological improvements, our approach enables the structural analysis of membrane proteins in response to voltage and ligand gating.

  7. Structure of the bacteriophage T4 long tail fiber receptor-binding tip

    PubMed Central

    Bartual, Sergio G.; Otero, José M.; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Kahn, Richard; Fox, Gavin C.; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most numerous organisms in the biosphere. In spite of their biological significance and the spectrum of potential applications, little high-resolution structural detail is available on their receptor-binding fibers. Here we present the crystal structure of the receptor-binding tip of the bacteriophage T4 long tail fiber, which is highly homologous to the tip of the bacteriophage lambda side tail fibers. This structure reveals an unusual elongated six-stranded antiparallel beta-strand needle domain containing seven iron ions coordinated by histidine residues arranged colinearly along the core of the biological unit. At the end of the tip, the three chains intertwine forming a broader head domain, which contains the putative receptor interaction site. The structure reveals a previously unknown beta-structured fibrous fold, provides insights into the remarkable stability of the fiber, and suggests a framework for mutations to expand or modulate receptor-binding specificity. PMID:21041684

  8. Ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking (LigBEnD): a hybrid ligand/receptor structure-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Polo C.-H.; Abagyan, Ruben; Totrov, Maxim

    2017-09-01

    Ligand docking to flexible protein molecules can be efficiently carried out through ensemble docking to multiple protein conformations, either from experimental X-ray structures or from in silico simulations. The success of ensemble docking often requires the careful selection of complementary protein conformations, through docking and scoring of known co-crystallized ligands. False positives, in which a ligand in a wrong pose achieves a better docking score than that of native pose, arise as additional protein conformations are added. In the current study, we developed a new ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking method and composite scoring function which combine the use of ligand-based atomic property field (APF) method with receptor structure-based docking. This method helps us to correctly dock 30 out of 36 ligands presented by the D3R docking challenge. For the six mis-docked ligands, the cognate receptor structures prove to be too different from the 40 available experimental Pocketome conformations used for docking and could be identified only by receptor sampling beyond experimentally explored conformational subspace.

  9. The Molecular Basis of IL-10 Function: From Receptor Structure to the Onset of Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the cell surface IL-10 receptor complex is the first step in initiating IL-10 signaling pathways that regulate intestinal inflammation, viral persistence, and even tumor surveillance. The discovery of IL-10 homologs in the genomes of herpes viruses suggests IL-10 signaling pathways can be manipulated at the level of the receptor complex. This chapter will describe our current molecular understanding of IL-10 receptor assembly based on crystal structures and biochemical analyses of cellular and viral IL-10 receptor complexes. PMID:25004819

  10. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. [corrected]. LXXXIX. Update on the extended family of chemokine receptors and introducing a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M; Graham, Gerard J; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Murphy, Philip M; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145-176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human Genome

  11. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  12. Structural and functional evolution of the P2Y12-like receptor group

    PubMed Central

    Hermsdorf, Thomas; Engemaier, Eva; Engel, Kathrin; Liebscher, Ines; Thor, Doreen; Zierau, Klaas; Römpler, Holger; Schulz, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Metabotropic pyrimidine and purine nucleotide receptors (P2Y receptors) belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). They are distinguishable from adenosine receptors (P1) as they bind adenine and/or uracil nucleotide triphosphates or diphosphates depending on the subtype. Over the past decade, P2Y receptors have been cloned from a variety of tissues and species, and as many as eight functional subtypes have been characterized. Most recently, several members of the P2Y12-like receptor group, which includes the clopidogrel-sensitive ADP receptor P2Y12, have been deorphanized. The P2Y12-like receptor group comprises several structurally related GPCR which, however, display heterogeneous agonist specificity including nucleotides, their derivatives, and lipids. Besides the established function of P2Y12 in platelet activation, expression in macrophages, neuronal and glial cells as well as recent results from functional studies implicate that several members of this group may have specific functions in neurotransmission, inflammation, chemotaxis, and response to tissue injury. This review focuses specifically on the structure-function relation and shortly summarizes some aspects of the physiological relevance of P2Y12-like receptor members. PMID:18404440

  13. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors.

    PubMed

    Hopf, Thomas A; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-13

    Insect odorant receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection.

  14. Crystal structure of human glycine receptor-α3 bound to antagonist strychnine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Chen, Hao; Michelsen, Klaus; Schneider, Stephen; Shaffer, Paul L

    2015-10-08

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels of the Cys-loop receptor family are essential mediators of fast neurotransmission throughout the nervous system and are implicated in many neurological disorders. Available X-ray structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic Cys-loop receptors provide tremendous insights into the binding of agonists, the subsequent opening of the ion channel, and the mechanism of channel activation. Yet the mechanism of inactivation by antagonists remains unknown. Here we present a 3.0 Å X-ray structure of the human glycine receptor-α3 homopentamer in complex with a high affinity, high-specificity antagonist, strychnine. Our structure allows us to explore in detail the molecular recognition of antagonists. Comparisons with previous structures reveal a mechanism for antagonist-induced inactivation of Cys-loop receptors, involving an expansion of the orthosteric binding site in the extracellular domain that is coupled to closure of the ion pore in the transmembrane domain.

  15. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor X-ray structures: potential implications for drug development.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Andrew C; Hu, Jianxin; Kobilka, Brian K; Wess, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists are widely used as bronchodilating drugs in pulmonary medicine. The therapeutic efficacy of these agents depends on the blockade of M3 muscarinic receptors expressed on airway smooth muscle cells. All muscarinic antagonists currently used as bronchodilating agents show high affinity for all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, thus increasing the likelihood of unwanted side effects. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies have provided detailed structural information about the nature of the orthosteric muscarinic binding site (the conventional acetylcholine binding site) and an 'outer' receptor cavity that can bind allosteric (non-orthosteric) drugs. These new findings should guide the development of selective M3 receptor blockers that have little or no effect on other muscarinic receptor subtypes.

  16. Structure of the murine constitutive androstane receptor complexed to androstenol: a molecular basis for inverse agonism

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, L.; Vincent, J.; Brunzelle, J.S.; Dussault, I.; Lin, M.; Ianculescu, I.; Sherman, M.A.; Forman, B.M.; Fernandez, E.

    2010-03-08

    The nuclear receptor CAR is a xenobiotic responsive transcription factor that plays a central role in the clearance of drugs and bilirubin while promoting cocaine and acetaminophen toxicity. In addition, CAR has established a 'reverse' paradigm of nuclear receptor action where the receptor is active in the absence of ligand and inactive when bound to inverse agonists. We now report the crystal structure of murine CAR bound to the inverse agonist androstenol. Androstenol binds within the ligand binding pocket, but unlike many nuclear receptor ligands, it makes no contacts with helix H12/AF2. The transition from constitutive to basal activity (androstenol bound) appears to be associated with a ligand-induced kink between helices H10 and H11. This disrupts the previously predicted salt bridge that locks H12 in the transcriptionally active conformation. This mechanism of inverse agonism is distinct from traditional nuclear receptor antagonists thereby offering a new approach to receptor modulation.

  17. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  18. Structure-Based Virtual Screening for Dopamine D2 Receptor Ligands as Potential Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Silva, Andrea G; Loza, María I; Kolb, Peter; Castro, Marián; Poso, Antti

    2016-04-05

    Structure-based virtual screening using a D2 receptor homology model was performed to identify dopamine D2 receptor ligands as potential antipsychotics. From screening a library of 6.5 million compounds, 21 were selected and were subjected to experimental validation. From these 21 compounds tested, ten D2 ligands were identified (47.6% success rate, among them D2 receptor antagonists, as expected) that have additional affinity for other receptors tested, in particular 5-HT2A receptors. The affinity (Ki values) of the compounds ranged from 58 nm to about 24 μM. Similarity and fragment analysis indicated a significant degree of structural novelty among the identified compounds. We found one D2 receptor antagonist that did not have a protonatable nitrogen atom, which is a key structural element of the classical D2 pharmacophore model necessary for interaction with the conserved Asp(3.32) residue. This compound exhibited greater than 20-fold binding selectivity for the D2 receptor over the D3 receptor. We provide additional evidence that the amide hydrogen atom of this compound forms a hydrogen bond with Asp(3.32), as determined by tests of its derivatives that cannot maintain this interaction. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Thal, David M.; Sun, Bingfa; Feng, Dan; ...

    2016-03-09

    Muscarinic M1–M5 acetylcholine receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that regulate many vital functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In particular, the M1 and M4 receptor subtypes have emerged as attractive drug targets for treatments of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia, but the high conservation of the acetylcholine-binding pocket has spurred current research into targeting allosteric sites on these receptors. In this paper, we report the crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors bound to the inverse agonist, tiotropium. Comparison of these structures with each other, as well as with the previously reported M2 andmore » M3 receptor structures, reveals differences in the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites that contribute to a role in drug selectivity at this important receptor family. Finally, we also report identification of a cluster of residues that form a network linking the orthosteric and allosteric sites of the M4 receptor, which provides new insight into how allosteric modulation may be transmitted between the two spatially distinct domains.« less

  20. The mouse eugenol odorant receptor: structural and functional plasticity of a broadly tuned odorant binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Baud, Olivia; Etter, Sylvain; Spreafico, Morena; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2011-02-08

    Molecular interactions of odorants with their olfactory receptors (ORs) are of central importance for the ability of the mammalian olfactory system to detect and discriminate a vast variety of odors with a limited set of receptors. How a particular OR binds and distinguishes different odorant molecules remains largely unknown on a structural basis. Here we investigated this question for the mouse eugenol receptor (mOR-EG). By screening a large odorant library, we discovered a wide range of chemical structures activating the receptor in heterologous mammalian cells. Potent agonists comprise (i) benzene, (ii) cyclohexane, or (iii) polycyclic structures substituted with alcohol, aldehyde, keto, ether, or esterified carboxylic groups. To detect those amino acids within the receptor that are in contact with a particular bound odorant molecule, we investigated how distinct mOR-EG point mutants were activated by the different odorant agonists found for the wild-type receptor. We identified 11 amino acids as a part of the receptor's ligand binding pocket. Molecular modeling predicted 10 of these residues in transmembrane helices TM3-TM6 and one in the extracellular loop between TM2 and TM3. These amino acids participate in odorant binding with variable importance depending on the type of odorant, revealing functional "fingerprints" of ligand-receptor interactions.

  1. Modulation of GABA-A receptors of astrocytes and STC-1 cells by taurine structural analogs.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Cabrera-Ruíz, Elizabeth; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2014-11-01

    Taurine activates and modulates GABA receptors in vivo as well as those expressed in heterologous systems. This study aimed to determine whether the structural analogs of taurine: homotaurine and hypotaurine, have the ability to activate GABA-A receptors that include GABAρ subunits. The expression of GABA-A receptors containing GABAρ has been reported in the STC-1 cells and astrocytes. In both cell types, taurine, homo-, and hypotaurine gated with low efficiency a picrotoxin-sensitive GABA-A receptor. The known bimodal modulatory effect of taurine on GABAρ receptors was not observed; however, differences between the activation and deactivation rates were detected when they were perfused together with GABA. In silico docking simulations suggested that taurine, hypo-, and homotaurine do not form a cation-π interaction such as that generated by GABA in the agonist-binding site of GABAρ. This observation complements the electrophysiological data suggesting that taurine and its analogs act as partial agonists of GABA-A receptors. All the observations above suggest that the structural analogs of taurine are partial agonists of GABA-A receptors that occupy the agonist-binding site, but their structures do not allow the proper interaction with the receptor to fully gate its Cl(-) channel.

  2. Crystal Structures of the M1 and M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thal, David M.; Sun, Bingfa; Feng, Dan; Nawaratne, Vindhya; Leach, Katie; Felder, Christian C.; Bures, Mark G.; Evans, David A.; Weis, William I.; Bachhawat, Priti; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Sexton, Patrick M.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Summary Muscarinic M1–M5 acetylcholine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that regulate many vital functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In particular, the M1 and M4 receptor subtypes have emerged as attractive drug targets for treatments of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, but the high conservation of the acetylcholine-binding pocket has spurred current research into targeting allosteric sites on these receptors. Here, we report the first crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors bound to the inverse agonist, tiotropium. Comparison of these structures to each other, as well as the previously reported M2 and M3 receptor structures, reveals differences in the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites that contribute to a role in drug selectivity at this important receptor family. We also report identification of a cluster of residues that form a network linking the orthosteric and allosteric sites of the M4 receptor, which provides new insight into how allosteric modulation may be transmitted between the two spatially distinct domains. PMID:26958838

  3. A structural chemogenomics analysis of aminergic GPCRs: lessons for histamine receptor ligand design.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, A J; Kuhne, S; de Esch, I J P; Leurs, R; de Graaf, C

    2013-09-01

    Chemogenomics focuses on the discovery of new connections between chemical and biological space leading to the discovery of new protein targets and biologically active molecules. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a particularly interesting protein family for chemogenomics studies because there is an overwhelming amount of ligand binding affinity data available. The increasing number of aminergic GPCR crystal structures now for the first time allows the integration of chemogenomics studies with high-resolution structural analyses of GPCR-ligand complexes. In this study, we have combined ligand affinity data, receptor mutagenesis studies, and amino acid sequence analyses to high-resolution structural analyses of (hist)aminergic GPCR-ligand interactions. This integrated structural chemogenomics analysis is used to more accurately describe the molecular and structural determinants of ligand affinity and selectivity in different key binding regions of the crystallized aminergic GPCRs, and histamine receptors in particular. Our investigations highlight interesting correlations and differences between ligand similarity and ligand binding site similarity of different aminergic receptors. Apparent discrepancies can be explained by combining detailed analysis of crystallized or predicted protein-ligand binding modes, receptor mutation studies, and ligand structure-selectivity relationships that identify local differences in essential pharmacophore features in the ligand binding sites of different receptors. We have performed structural chemogenomics studies that identify links between (hist)aminergic receptor ligands and their binding sites and binding modes. This knowledge can be used to identify structure-selectivity relationships that increase our understanding of ligand binding to (hist)aminergic receptors and hence can be used in future GPCR ligand discovery and design. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Structure and mechanism of activity-based inhibition of the EGF-Receptor by Mig6

    PubMed Central

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Byung Il; Cho, Ahye; Kim, Kihong; Park, Angela K.J.; Park, Woong-Yang; Murray, Bradley; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Marto, Jarrod A.; Cho, Jeonghee; Eck, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Mig6 is a feedback inhibitor that directly binds, inhibits and drives internalization of ErbB-family receptors. Mig6 selectivity targets activated receptors. Here we find that the EGF receptor phosphorylates Mig6 on Tyr394, and that this phosphorylation is primed by prior phosphorylation of an adjacent residue, Tyr395, by Src. Crystal structures of human EGFR–Mig6 complexes reveal the structural basis for enhanced phosphorylation of primed Mig6 and show how Mig6 rearranges after phosphorylation by EGFR to effectively irreversibly inhibit the same receptor that catalyzed its phosphorylation. This dual phosphorylation site allows Mig6 to inactivate EGFR in a manner that requires activation of the target receptor and can be modulated by Src. Loss of Mig6 is a driving event in human cancer; analysis of 1057 gliomas reveals frequent focal deletions of ERRFI, the gene that encodes Mig6, in EGFR-amplified glioblastomas. PMID:26280531

  5. New chromene scaffolds for adenosine A(2A) receptors: synthesis, pharmacology and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Areias, Filipe; Costa, Marta; Castro, Marián; Brea, José; Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Proença, M Fernanda; Mestres, Jordi; Loza, María I

    2012-08-01

    In silico screening of a collection of 1584 academic compounds identified a small molecule hit for the human adenosine A(2A) receptor (pK(i) = 6.2) containing a novel chromene scaffold (3a). To explore the structure-activity relationships of this new chemical series for adenosine receptors, a focused library of 43 2H-chromene-3-carboxamide derivatives was synthesized and tested in radioligand binding assays at human adenosine A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) receptors. The series was found to be enriched with bioactive compounds for adenosine receptors, with 14 molecules showing submicromolar affinity (pK(i) ≥ 6.0) for at least one adenosine receptor subtype. These results provide evidence that the chromene scaffold, a core structure present in natural products from a wide variety of plants, vegetables, and fruits, constitutes a valuable source for novel therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Structures of receptor complexes formed by hemagglutinins from the Asian Influenza pandemic of 1957.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junfeng; Stevens, David J; Haire, Lesley F; Walker, Philip A; Coombs, Peter J; Russell, Rupert J; Gamblin, Steven J; Skehel, John J

    2009-10-06

    The viruses that caused the three influenza pandemics of the twentieth century in 1918, 1957, and 1968 had distinct hemagglutinin receptor binding glycoproteins that had evolved the capacity to recognize human cell receptors. We have determined the structure of the H2 hemagglutinin from the second pandemic, the "Asian Influenza" of 1957. We compare it with the 1918 "Spanish Influenza" hemagglutinin, H1, and the 1968 "Hong Kong Influenza" hemagglutinin, H3, and show that despite its close overall structural similarity to H1, and its more distant relationship to H3, the H2 receptor binding site is closely related to that of H3 hemagglutinin. By analyzing hemagglutinins of potential H2 avian precursors of the pandemic virus, we show that the human receptor can be bound by avian hemagglutinins that lack the human-specific mutations of H2 and H3 pandemic viruses, Gln-226Leu, and Gly-228Ser. We show how Gln-226 in the avian H2 receptor binding site, together with Asn-186, form hydrogen bond networks through bound water molecules to mediate binding to human receptor. We show that the human receptor adopts a very similar conformation in both human and avian hemagglutinin-receptor complexes. We also show that Leu-226 in the receptor binding site of human virus hemagglutinins creates a hydrophobic environment near the Sia-1-Gal-2 glycosidic linkage that favors binding of the human receptor and is unfavorable for avian receptor binding. We consider the significance for the development of pandemics, of the existence of avian viruses that can bind to both avian and human receptors.

  7. Structural basis for receptor sharing and activation by interleukin-20 receptor-2 (IL-20R2) binding cytokines.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, Naomi J; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Harris, Bethany D; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Walter, Mark R

    2012-07-31

    Interleukin 20 (IL-20) is a pleotropic IL-10 family cytokine that protects epithelial surfaces from pathogens. However, dysregulated IL-20 signaling is implicated in several human pathologies including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. IL-20, and related cytokines IL-19 and IL-24, designated IL-20 subfamily cytokines (IL-20SFCs), induce cellular responses through an IL-20R1/IL-20R2 (type I) receptor heterodimer, whereas IL-20 and IL-24 also signal through the IL-22R1/IL-20R2 (type II) receptor complex. The crystal structure of the IL-20/IL-20R1/IL-20R2 complex reveals how type I and II complexes discriminate cognate from noncognate ligands. The structure also defines how the receptor-cytokine interfaces are affinity tuned to allow distinct signaling through a receptor complex shared by three different ligands. Our results provide unique insights into the complexity of IL-20SFC signaling that may be critical in the design of mechanistic-based inhibitors of IL-20SFC-mediated inflammatory disease.

  8. Structural and functional differences between pheromonotropic and melanotropic PK/PBAN receptors.

    PubMed

    Hariton-Shalev, Aliza; Shalev, Moran; Adir, Noam; Belausov, Edurad; Altstein, Miriam

    2013-11-01

    The pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PK/PBAN) plays a major role in regulating a wide range of physiological processes in insects. The ubiquitous and multifunctional nature of the PK/PBAN peptide family raises many questions regarding the mechanisms by which these neuropeptides elicit their effects and the nature of the receptors that mediate their functions. A sex pheromone gland receptor of the PK/PBAN family from Heliothis peltigera female moth and a Spodoptera littoralis larval receptor were cloned and stably expressed, and their structural models, electrostatic potentials and cellular functional properties were evaluated. Homology modeling indicated highly conserved amino-acid residues in appropriate structural positions as experimentally shown for class A G-protein coupled receptors. Structural differences could be proposed and electrostatic potentials of the two receptor models revealed net charge differences. Calcium mobilization assays demonstrated that both receptors were fully functional and could initiate extracellular calcium influx to start PK/PBAN signal transduction. Evaluation of the signaling response of both receptors to PBAN and diapause hormone (DH) revealed a highly sensitive, though differential response. Both receptors responded to PBAN whereas only Spl-PK/PBAN-R exhibited a high response toward DH. The structural, electrostatic and cellular functional differences indicate that different PK/PBAN in vivo functions may be mediated by different PK/PBAN receptors and elicited by different peptide(s). The results advance our understanding of the mode of action of the PK/PBAN family, and might help in exploring novel high-affinity receptor-specific antagonists that can serve as a basis for the development of new families of insect-control agents. © 2013.

  9. The structure of corepressor Dax-1 bound to its target nuclear receptor LRH-1

    PubMed Central

    Sablin, Elena P.; Woods, April; Krylova, Irina N.; Hwang, Peter; Ingraham, Holly A.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The Dax-1 protein is an enigmatic nuclear receptor that lacks an expected DNA binding domain, yet functions as a potent corepressor of nuclear receptors. Here we report the structure of Dax-1 bound to one of its targets, liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1). Unexpectedly, Dax-1 binds to LRH-1 using a new module, a repressor helix built from a family conserved sequence motif, PCFXXLP. Mutations in this repressor helix that are linked with human endocrine disorders dissociate the complex and attenuate Dax-1 function. The structure of the Dax-1:LRH-1 complex provides the molecular mechanism for the function of Dax-1 as a potent transcriptional repressor. PMID:19015525

  10. Large-scale production and protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies.

    PubMed

    Milić, Dalibor; Veprintsev, Dmitry B

    2015-01-01

    Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) gave insights into molecular mechanisms of their action and contributed significantly to molecular pharmacology. This is primarily due to technical advances in protein engineering, production and crystallization of these important receptor targets. On the other hand, NMR spectroscopy of GPCRs, which can provide information about their dynamics, still remains challenging due to difficulties in preparation of isotopically labeled receptors and their low long-term stabilities. In this review, we discuss methods used for expression and purification of GPCRs for crystallographic and NMR studies. We also summarize protein engineering methods that played a crucial role in obtaining GPCR crystal structures.

  11. Large-scale production and protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Milić, Dalibor; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.

    2015-01-01

    Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) gave insights into molecular mechanisms of their action and contributed significantly to molecular pharmacology. This is primarily due to technical advances in protein engineering, production and crystallization of these important receptor targets. On the other hand, NMR spectroscopy of GPCRs, which can provide information about their dynamics, still remains challenging due to difficulties in preparation of isotopically labeled receptors and their low long-term stabilities. In this review, we discuss methods used for expression and purification of GPCRs for crystallographic and NMR studies. We also summarize protein engineering methods that played a crucial role in obtaining GPCR crystal structures. PMID:25873898

  12. Structural model of the cytosolic domain of the plant ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1).

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Hubert; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Kaljunen, Heidi; Tuukkanen, Anne; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2015-01-30

    Ethylene initiates important aspects of plant growth and development through disulfide-linked receptor dimers located in the endoplasmic reticulum. The receptors feature a small transmembrane, ethylene binding domain followed by a large cytosolic domain, which serves as a scaffold for the assembly of large molecular weight complexes of different ethylene receptors and other cellular participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Here we report the crystallographic structures of the ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1) catalytic ATP-binding and the ethylene response sensor 1 dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domains and the solution structure of the entire cytosolic domain of ETR1, all from Arabidopsis thaliana. The isolated dimeric ethylene response sensor 1 DHp domain is asymmetric, the result of different helical bending angles close to the conserved His residue. The structures of the catalytic ATP-binding, DHp, and receiver domains of ethylene receptors and of a homologous, but dissimilar, GAF domain were refined against experimental small angle x-ray scattering data, leading to a structural model of the entire cytosolic domain of the ethylene receptor 1. The model illustrates that the cytosolic domain is shaped like a dumbbell and that the receiver domain is flexible and assumes a position different from those observed in prokaryotic histidine kinases. Furthermore the cytosolic domain of ETR1 plays a key role, interacting with all other receptors and several participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Our model, therefore, provides the first step toward a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanics of this important signal transduction process in plants.

  13. Tetrapeptide Endomorphin Analogs Require Both Full Length and Truncated Splice Variants of the Mu Opioid Receptor Gene Oprm1 for Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Gina F; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace; Narayan, Ankita; Hunkele, Amanda; Marx, Sarah; Xu, Jin; Pintar, John; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2016-12-21

    The mu opioid receptor gene undergoes extensive alternative splicing. Mu opioids can be divided into three classes based on the role of different groups of splice variants. Morphine and methadone require only full length seven transmembrane (7TM) variants for analgesia, whereas IBNtxA (3'-iodobenzyol-6β-naltrexamide) needs only truncated 6TM variants. A set of endomorphin analogs fall into a third group that requires both 6TM and 7TM splice variants. Unlike morphine, endomorphin 1 and 2, DAPP (Dmt,d-Ala-Phe-Phe-NH2), and IDAPP (3'-iodo-Dmt-d-Ala-Phe-Phe-NH2) analgesia was lost in an exon 11 knockout mouse lacking 6TM variants. Restoring 6TM variant expression in a knockout mouse lacking both 6TM and 7TM variants failed to rescue DAPP or IDAPP analgesia. However, re-establishing 6TM expression in an exon 11 knockout mouse that still expressed 7TM variants did rescue the response, consistent with the need for both 6TM and 7TM variants. In receptor binding assays, (125)I-IDAPP labeled more sites (Bmax) than (3)H-DAMGO ([d-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(ol)(5)]-enkephalin) in wild-type mice. In exon 11 knockout mice, (125)I-IDAPP binding was lowered to levels similar to (3)H-DAMGO, which remained relatively unchanged compared to wild-type mice. (125)I-IDAPP binding was totally lost in an exon 1/exon 11 knockout model lacking all Oprm1 variant expression, confirming that the drug was not cross labeling non-mu opioid receptors. These findings suggested that (125)I-IDAPP labeled two populations of mu binding sites in wild-type mice, one corresponding to 7TM variants and the second dependent upon 6TM variants. Together, these data indicate that endomorphin analogs represent a unique, genetically defined, and distinct class of mu opioid analgesic.

  14. Structural insights into the interaction of IL-33 with its receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Hammel, Michal; He, Yanfeng; Tainer, John A; Jeng, U-Ser; Zhang, Linqi; Wang, Shuying; Wang, Xinquan

    2013-09-10

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is an important member of the IL-1 family that has pleiotropic activities in innate and adaptive immune responses in host defense and disease. It signals through its ligand-binding primary receptor ST2 and IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAcP), both of which are members of the IL-1 receptor family. To clarify the interaction of IL-33 with its receptors, we determined the crystal structure of IL-33 in complex with the ectodomain of ST2 at a resolution of 3.27 Å. Coupled with structure-based mutagenesis and binding assay, the structural results define the molecular mechanism by which ST2 specifically recognizes IL-33. Structural comparison with other ligand-receptor complexes in the IL-1 family indicates that surface-charge complementarity is critical in determining ligand-binding specificity of IL-1 primary receptors. Combined crystallography and small-angle X-ray-scattering studies reveal that ST2 possesses hinge flexibility between the D3 domain and D1D2 module, whereas IL-1RAcP exhibits a rigid conformation in the unbound state in solution. The molecular flexibility of ST2 provides structural insights into domain-level conformational change of IL-1 primary receptors upon ligand binding, and the rigidity of IL-1RAcP explains its inability to bind ligands directly. The solution architecture of IL-33-ST2-IL-1RAcP complex from small-angle X-ray-scattering analysis resembles IL-1β-IL-1RII-IL-1RAcP and IL-1β-IL-1RI-IL-1RAcP crystal structures. The collective results confer IL-33 structure-function relationships, supporting and extending a general model for ligand-receptor assembly and activation in the IL-1 family.

  15. Structural Insights in the Assembly of Large Oligomeric Signalosomes in the Toll-like Receptor/IL-1 Receptor Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Ferrao, Ryan; Li, Jixi; Bergamin, Elisa; Wu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR)/IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) superfamily plays fundamentally important roles in innate immune and inflammatory responses. Recent structural studies have begun to unveil the surprising concept that upon ligand stimulation TLR/IL-1Rs assemble large oligomeric intracellular signaling complexes, or signalosomes, to induce activation of ubiquitin ligases and kinases, leading eventually to activation of the transcription factors that are responsible for the expression of immune and inflammatory response genes. The different scaffolds of assembly identified from the structural studies provide a molecular foundation in understanding the formation of microscopically visible signaling clusters that have long been known to cell biologists. Here, we illustrate the potential mechanisms of assembly step by step from the membrane proximal interactions to the more downstream events. Formation of large oligomeric signalosomes may help to establish a digital, threshold response in TLR/IL-1R signaling. PMID:22649099

  16. Structure-based drug design for G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Congreve, Miles; Dias, João M; Marshall, Fiona H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the structural biology of G protein-coupled receptors has undergone a transformation over the past 5 years. New protein-ligand complexes are described almost monthly in high profile journals. Appreciation of how small molecules and natural ligands bind to their receptors has the potential to impact enormously how medicinal chemists approach this major class of receptor targets. An outline of the key topics in this field and some recent examples of structure- and fragment-based drug design are described. A table is presented with example views of each G protein-coupled receptor for which there is a published X-ray structure, including interactions with small molecule antagonists, partial and full agonists. The possible implications of these new data for drug design are discussed.

  17. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, Wout; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-10-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that have important roles in the cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and although they are potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human P2X receptors. The mechanisms of receptor desensitization and ion permeation, principles of antagonism, and complete structures of the pore-forming transmembrane domains of these receptors remain unclear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the human P2X3 receptor in apo/resting, agonist-bound/open-pore, agonist-bound/closed-pore/desensitized and antagonist-bound/closed states. The open state structure harbours an intracellular motif we term the ‘cytoplasmic cap’, which stabilizes the open state of the ion channel pore and creates lateral, phospholipid-lined cytoplasmic fenestrations for water and ion egress. The competitive antagonists TNP-ATP and A-317491 stabilize the apo/resting state and reveal the interactions responsible for competitive inhibition. These structures illuminate the conformational rearrangements that underlie P2X receptor gating and provide a foundation for the development of new pharmacological agents.

  18. Structural Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Receptor Specificity from the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-02-13

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral envelope protein that mediates viral attachment to host cells and elicits membrane fusion. The HA receptor-binding specificity is a key determinant for the host range and transmissibility of influenza viruses. In human pandemics of the 20th century, the HA normally has acquired specificity for human-like receptors before widespread infection. Crystal structures of the H1 HA from the 2009 human pandemic (A/California/04/2009 [CA04]) in complex with human and avian receptor analogs reveal conserved recognition of the terminal sialic acid of the glycan ligands. However, favorable interactions beyond the sialic acid are found only for {alpha}2-6-linked glycans and are mediated by Asp190 and Asp225, which hydrogen bond with Gal-2 and GlcNAc-3. For {alpha}2-3-linked glycan receptors, no specific interactions beyond the terminal sialic acid are observed. Our structural and glycan microarray analyses, in the context of other high-resolution HA structures with {alpha}2-6- and {alpha}2-3-linked glycans, now elucidate the structural basis of receptor-binding specificity for H1 HAs in human and avian viruses and provide a structural explanation for the preference for {alpha}2-6 siaylated glycan receptors for the 2009 pandemic swine flu virus.

  19. Revisiting automated G-protein coupled receptor modeling: the benefit of additional template structures for a neurokinin-1 receptor model.

    PubMed

    Kneissl, Benny; Leonhardt, Bettina; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Tautermann, Christofer S

    2009-05-28

    The feasibility of automated procedures for the modeling of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) is investigated on the example of the human neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor. We use a combined method of homology modeling and molecular docking and analyze the information content of the resulting docking complexes regarding the binding mode for further refinements. Moreover, we explore the impact of different template structures, the bovine rhodopsin structure, the human beta(2) adrenergic receptor, and in particular a combination of both templates to include backbone flexibility in the target conformational space. Our results for NK1 modeling demonstrate that model selection from a set of decoys can in general not solely rely on docking experiments but still requires additional mutagenesis data. However, an enrichment factor of 2.6 in a nearly fully automated approach indicates that reasonable models can be created automatically if both available templates are used for model construction. Thus, the recently resolved GPCR structures open new ways to improve the model building fundamentally.

  20. Concomitant Action of Structural Elements and Receptor Phosphorylation Determines Arrestin-3 Interaction with the Free Fatty Acid Receptor FFA4*

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Adrian J.; Hudson, Brian D.; Shimpukade, Bharat; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Prihandoko, Rudi; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to being nutrients, free fatty acids act as signaling molecules by activating a family of G protein-coupled receptors. Among these is FFA4, previously called GPR120, which responds to medium and long chain fatty acids, including health-promoting ω-3 fatty acids, which have been implicated in the regulation of metabolic and inflammatory responses. Here we show, using mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, and phosphospecific antibodies, that agonist-regulated phosphorylation of the human FFA4 receptor occurred primarily at five residues (Thr347, Thr349, Ser350, Ser357, and Ser360) in the C-terminal tail. Mutation of these residues reduced both the efficacy and potency of ligand-mediated arrestin-3 recruitment as well as affecting recruitment kinetics. Combined mutagenesis of all five of these residues was insufficient to fully abrogate interaction with arrestin-3, but further mutagenesis of negatively charged residues revealed additional structural components for the interaction with arrestin-3 within the C-terminal tail of the receptor. These elements consist of the acidic residues Glu341, Asp348, and Asp355 located close to the phosphorylation sites. Receptor phosphorylation thus operates in concert with structural elements within the C-terminal tail of FFA4 to allow for the recruitment of arrestin-3. Importantly, these mechanisms of arrestin-3 recruitment operate independently from Gq/11 coupling, thereby offering the possibility that ligands showing stimulus bias could be developed that exploit these differential coupling mechanisms. Furthermore, this provides a strategy for the design of biased receptors to probe physiologically relevant signaling. PMID:24817122

  1. Identification of essential cannabinoid-binding domains: structural insights into early dynamic events in receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Bertalovitz, Alexander C; Kendall, Debra A

    2011-09-23

    The classical cannabinoid agonist HU210, a structural analog of (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, binds to brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptors and activates signal transduction pathways. To date, an exact molecular description of the CB1 receptor is not yet available. Utilizing the minor binding pocket of the CB1 receptor as the primary ligand interaction site, we explored HU210 binding using lipid bilayer molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Among the potential ligand contact residues, we identified residues Phe-174(2.61), Phe-177(2.64), Leu-193(3.29), and Met-363(6.55) as being critical for HU210 binding by mutational analysis. Using these residues to guide the simulations, we determined essential cannabinoid-binding domains in the CB1 receptor, including the highly sought after hydrophobic pocket important for the binding of the C3 alkyl chain of classical and nonclassical cannabinoids. Analyzing the simulations of the HU210-CB1 receptor complex, the CP55940-CB1 receptor complex, and the (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-CB1 receptor complex, we found that the positioning of the C3 alkyl chain and the aromatic stacking between Trp-356(6.48) and Trp-279(5.43) is crucial for the Trp-356(6.48) rotamer change toward receptor activation through the rigid-body movement of H6. The functional data for the mutant receptors demonstrated reductions in potency for G protein activation similar to the reductions seen in ligand binding affinity for HU210.

  2. Drug Binding Poses Relate Structure with Efficacy in the μ Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Katy J; Henderson, Graeme; Kelly, Eamonn; Sessions, Richard B

    2017-06-16

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOPr) is a clinically important G protein-coupled receptor that couples to Gi/o proteins and arrestins. At present, the receptor conformational changes that occur following agonist binding and activation are poorly understood. This study has employed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the binding mode and receptor conformational changes induced by structurally similar opioid ligands of widely differing intrinsic agonist efficacy, norbuprenorphine, buprenorphine, and diprenorphine. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays for Gi activation and arrestin-3 recruitment in human embryonic kidney 293 cells confirmed that norbuprenorphine is a high efficacy agonist, buprenorphine a low efficacy agonist, and diprenorphine an antagonist at the MOPr. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that these ligands adopt distinct binding poses and engage different subsets of residues, despite sharing a common morphinan scaffold. Notably, norbuprenorphine interacted with sodium ion-coordinating residues W293(6.48) and N150(3.35), whilst buprenorphine and diprenorphine did not. Principal component analysis of the movements of the receptor transmembrane domains showed that the buprenorphine-bound receptor occupied a distinct set of conformations to the norbuprenorphine-bound receptor. Addition of an allosteric sodium ion caused the receptor and ligand to adopt an inactive conformation. The differences in ligand-residue interactions and receptor conformations observed here may underlie the differing efficacies for cellular signalling outputs for these ligands. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    SciTech Connect

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor structures: ligand specificity, molecular switch and interactions with regulators.

    PubMed

    Zoete, Vincent; Grosdidier, Aurelien; Michielin, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) compose a family of nuclear receptors that mediate the effects of lipidic ligands at the transcriptional level. In this review, we highlight advances in the understanding of the PPAR ligand binding domain (LBD) structure at the atomic level. The overall structure of PPARs LBD is described, and important protein ligand interactions are presented. Structure-activity relationships between isotypes structures and ligand specificity are addressed. It is shown that the numerous experimental three-dimensional structures available, together with in silico simulations, help understanding the role played by the activating function-2 (AF-2) in PPARs activation and its underlying molecular mechanism. The relation between the PPARs constitutive activity and the intrinsic stability of the active conformation is discussed. Finally, the interactions of PPARs LBD with co-activators or co-repressors, as well as with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) are described and considered in relation to PPARs activation.

  5. Structural analysis of nuclear receptors: from isolated domains to integral proteins.

    PubMed

    Brélivet, Yann; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino

    2012-01-30

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand dependent transcription factors that regulate gene expression. A number of in depth structure-function relationship studies have been performed, in particular with drug design perspectives. Recent structural results concerning integral receptors in diverse functional states, obtained using a combination of different methods, now allow a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in molecular regulation. The structural data highlight the importance of DNA sequences for binding selectivity and the role of promoter response elements in the spatial organization of the protein domains into functional complexes. The solution structures of several heterodimer complexes reveal how the DNA directs the positioning of coactivators. In the case of PPARγ-RXRα the comparison with the crystal structure reveals two different conformational states that illustrate the flexibility of the receptors. The results shed light on the dynamics of the molecular recognition process.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure and dynamics of 5-HT3 serotonin receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, M. Yu.; Popinako, A. V.; Prokopiev, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we investigated structure, dynamics and ion transportation in transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 serotonin receptor. High-resolution (0.35 nm) structure of the 5-HT3 receptor in complex with stabilizing nanobodies was determined by protein crystallography in 2014 (Protein data bank (PDB) code 4PIR). Transmembrane domain of the structure was prepared in complex with explicit membrane environment (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and solvent (TIP3P water model). Molecular dynamics protocols for simulation and stabilization of the transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 receptor model were developed and 60 ns simulation of the structure was conducted in order to explore structural parameters of the system. We estimated the mean force profile for Na+ ions using umbrella sampling method.

  7. Interferons and Their Receptors in Birds: A Comparison of Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Cross Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2014-01-01

    Interferon may be thought of as a key, with the interferon receptor as the signal lock: Crosstalk between them maintains their balance during viral infection. In this review, the protein structure of avian interferon and the interferon receptor are discussed, indicating remarkable similarity between different species. However, the structures of the interferon receptors are more sophisticated than those of the interferons, suggesting that the interferon receptor is a more complicated signal lock system and has considerable diversity in subtypes or structures. Preliminary evolutionary analysis showed that the subunits of the interferon receptor formed a distinct clade, and the orthologs may be derived from the same ancestor. Furthermore, the development of interferons and interferon receptors in birds may be related to an animal’s age and the maintenance of a balanced state. In addition, the equilibrium between interferon and its receptor during pathological and physiological states revealed that the virus and the host influence this equilibrium. Birds could represent an important model for studies on interferon’s antiviral activities and may provide the basis for new antiviral strategies. PMID:25405736

  8. Interferons and their receptors in birds: a comparison of gene structure, phylogenetic analysis, and cross modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2014-11-14

    Interferon may be thought of as a key, with the interferon receptor as the signal lock: Crosstalk between them maintains their balance during viral infection. In this review, the protein structure of avian interferon and the interferon receptor are discussed, indicating remarkable similarity between different species. However, the structures of the interferon receptors are more sophisticated than those of the interferons, suggesting that the interferon receptor is a more complicated signal lock system and has considerable diversity in subtypes or structures. Preliminary evolutionary analysis showed that the subunits of the interferon receptor formed a distinct clade, and the orthologs may be derived from the same ancestor. Furthermore, the development of interferons and interferon receptors in birds may be related to an animal's age and the maintenance of a balanced state. In addition, the equilibrium between interferon and its receptor during pathological and physiological states revealed that the virus and the host influence this equilibrium. Birds could represent an important model for studies on interferon's antiviral activities and may provide the basis for new antiviral strategies.

  9. Functional coupling of Cys-226 and Cys-296 in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor indicates a disulfide bond that is close to the activation pocket.

    PubMed

    Mann, Rosalind J; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; de Maturana, Rakel López; Sinfield, John K; Donnelly, Dan

    2010-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane α-helical (7TM) integral membrane proteins that play a central role in both cell signaling and in the action of many pharmaceuticals. The crystal structures of several Family A GPCRs have shown the presence of a disulfide bond linking transmembrane helix 3 (TM3) to the second extracellular loop (ECL2), enabling ECL2 to stabilize and contribute to the ligand binding pocket. Family B GPCRs share no significant sequence identity with those in Family A but nevertheless share two conserved cysteines in topologically equivalent positions. Since there are no available crystal structures for the 7TM domain of any Family B GPCR, we used mutagenesis alongside pharmacological analysis to investigate the role of ECL2 and the conserved cysteine residues. We mutated Cys-226, at the extracellular end of TM3 of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, to alanine and observed a 38-fold reduction in GLP-1 potency. Interestingly, this potency loss was restored by the additional substitution of Cys-296 in ECL2 to alanine. Alongside the complete conservation of these cysteine residues in Family B GPCRs, this functional coupling suggested the presence of a disulfide bond. Further mutagenesis demonstrated that the low potency observed at the C226A mutant, compared with the C226A-C296A double mutant, was the result of the bulky nature of the released Cys-296 side chain. Since this suggested that ECL2 was in close proximity to the agonist activation pocket, an alanine scan of ECL2 was carried out which confirmed the important role of this loop in agonist-induced receptor activation.

  10. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  11. Structural Characterization of the Interdomain Features of the Estrogen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor, including its response to drugs used for breast cancer , such as Tamoxifen . We are employing the first studies to crystallize full-length...consider for breast cancer therapy. We have expressed and purified the full-length hER proteins this past year, concentrating on an E. coli expression...solution to maximize protein solubility and folding. High affinity ligands such as tamoxifen (the drug used in breast cancer therapy), estradiol (The

  12. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  13. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Chaperoning G Protein-Coupled Receptors: From Cell Biology to Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Michael

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins that traverse the plasma membrane seven times (hence, are also called 7TM receptors). The polytopic structure of GPCRs makes the folding of GPCRs difficult and complex. Indeed, many wild-type GPCRs are not folded optimally, and defects in folding are the most common cause of genetic diseases due to GPCR mutations. Both general and receptor-specific molecular chaperones aid the folding of GPCRs. Chemical chaperones have been shown to be able to correct the misfolding in mutant GPCRs, proving to be important tools for studying the structure-function relationship of GPCRs. However, their potential therapeutic value is very limited. Pharmacological chaperones (pharmacoperones) are potentially important novel therapeutics for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in GPCR genes that resulted in misfolded mutant proteins. Pharmacoperones also increase cell surface expression of wild-type GPCRs; therefore, they could be used to treat diseases that do not harbor mutations in GPCRs. Recent studies have shown that indeed pharmacoperones work in both experimental animals and patients. High-throughput assays have been developed to identify new pharmacoperones that could be used as therapeutics for a number of endocrine and other genetic diseases. PMID:24661201

  15. Structural and Molecular Evidence Suggesting Coronavirus-driven Evolution of Mouse Receptor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guiqing; Yang, Yang; Pasquarella, Joseph R; Xu, Liqing; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V; Li, Fang

    2017-02-10

    Hosts and pathogens are locked in an evolutionary arms race. To infect mice, mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) has evolved to recognize mouse CEACAM1a (mCEACAM1a) as its receptor. To elude MHV infections, mice may have evolved a variant allele from the Ceacam1a gene, called Ceacam1b, producing mCEACAM1b, which is a much poorer MHV receptor than mCEACAM1a. Previous studies showed that sequence differences between mCEACAM1a and mCEACAM1b in a critical MHV-binding CC' loop partially account for the low receptor activity of mCEACAM1b, but detailed structural and molecular mechanisms for the differential MHV receptor activities of mCEACAM1a and mCEACAM1b remained elusive. Here we have determined the crystal structure of mCEACAM1b and identified the structural differences and additional residue differences between mCEACAM1a and mCEACAM1b that affect MHV binding and entry. These differences include conformational alterations of the CC' loop as well as residue variations in other MHV-binding regions, including β-strands C' and C'' and loop C'C''. Using pseudovirus entry and protein-protein binding assays, we show that substituting the structural and residue features from mCEACAM1b into mCEACAM1a reduced the viral receptor activity of mCEACAM1a, whereas substituting the reverse changes from mCEACAM1a into mCEACAM1b increased the viral receptor activity of mCEACAM1b. These results elucidate the detailed molecular mechanism for how mice may have kept pace in the evolutionary arms race with MHV by undergoing structural and residue changes in the MHV receptor, providing insight into this possible example of pathogen-driven evolution of a host receptor protein.

  16. Structural Basis of Neurohormone Perception by the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Torso.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Simon; Goyal, Yogesh; von Grotthuss, Marcin; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Klein, Daryl E

    2015-12-17

    In insects, brain-derived Prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) activates the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Torso to initiate metamorphosis through the release of ecdysone. We have determined the crystal structure of silkworm PTTH in complex with the ligand-binding region of Torso. Here we show that ligand-induced Torso dimerization results from the sequential and negatively cooperative formation of asymmetric heterotetramers. Mathematical modeling of receptor activation based upon our biophysical studies shows that ligand pulses are "buffered" at low receptor levels, leading to a sustained signal. By contrast, high levels of Torso develop the signal intensity and duration of a noncooperative system. We propose that this may allow Torso to coordinate widely different functions from a single ligand by tuning receptor levels. Phylogenic analysis indicates that Torso is found outside arthropods, including human parasitic roundworms. Together, our findings provide mechanistic insight into how this receptor system, with roles in embryonic and adult development, is regulated.

  17. Insulin receptors: binding kinetics and structure-function relationship of insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Gammeltoft, S.

    1984-10-01

    Morphological and biochemical work suggests that internalization of the receptor-insulin complex from the plasma membrane transfers insulin to intracellular organelles like the lysosomes, the Golgi apparatus, or nucleus, where degradation by insulin protease takes place, whereas the receptor is recycled back to the membrane. Recent advances in the studies of biosynthesis and cellular dynamics of receptors indicate that intracellular processing and redistribution of binding sites may play a role in the mechanism of insulin action. Insulin receptors are widely distributed in all cell types, but evidence has accumulated that receptors show tissue and species variations in their functional properties regarding binding affinity, insulin specificity, cooperativity, and insulin degradation and in structural properties such as antigenic determinants and glycosidic composition. Perhaps these differences reflect cellular adaptations and variations in the physiological role of insulin.

  18. Muscarinic receptors as model targets and antitargets for structure-based ligand discovery.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Andrew C; Weiss, Dahlia R; Rossi, Mario; Hu, Jianxin; Hu, Kelly; Eitel, Katrin; Gmeiner, Peter; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K; Shoichet, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate virtually all aspects of human physiology and represent an important class of therapeutic drug targets. Many GPCR-targeted drugs resemble endogenous agonists, often resulting in poor selectivity among receptor subtypes and restricted pharmacologic profiles. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family exemplifies these problems; thousands of ligands are known, but few are receptor subtype-selective and nearly all are cationic in nature. Using structure-based docking against the M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, we screened 3.1 million molecules for ligands with new physical properties, chemotypes, and receptor subtype selectivities. Of 19 docking-prioritized molecules tested against the M2 subtype, 11 had substantial activity and 8 represented new chemotypes. Intriguingly, two were uncharged ligands with low micromolar to high nanomolar Ki values, an observation with few precedents among aminergic GPCRs. To exploit a single amino-acid substitution among the binding pockets between the M2 and M3 receptors, we selected molecules predicted by docking to bind to the M3 and but not the M2 receptor. Of 16 molecules tested, 8 bound to the M3 receptor. Whereas selectivity remained modest for most of these, one was a partial agonist at the M3 receptor without measurable M2 agonism. Consistent with this activity, this compound stimulated insulin release from a mouse β-cell line. These results support the ability of structure-based discovery to identify new ligands with unexplored chemotypes and physical properties, leading to new biologic functions, even in an area as heavily explored as muscarinic pharmacology.

  19. Sharpening the edges of understanding the structure/function of the LPA1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Murph, Mandi; Nguyen, Giang; Radhakrishna, Harish; Mills, Gordon B.

    2008-01-01

    Since the molecular cloning of the vzg-1/Edg-2/LPA1 gene, studies have attempted to characterize LPA1 receptor functionality into a single categorical role, different from the other Edg-family LPA receptors. The desire to categorize LPA1 function has highlighted its complexity and demonstrated that the LPA1 receptor does not have one absolute function throughout every system. The central nervous system is highly enriched in the LPA1 receptor, suggesting an integral role in neuronal processes. Metastatic and invasive breast cancer also appears to have LPA-mediated LPA1 receptor functions that enhance phenotypes associated with tumorigenesis. LPA1 possesses a number of motifs conserved among G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): a DRY-like motif, a PDZ domain, Ser/Thr predicted sites of phosphorylation, a dileucine motif, double cysteines in the tail and conserved residues that stabilize structure and determine ligand binding. The third intracellular loop of the LPA1 receptor may be the crux of receptor signaling and attenuation with phosphorylation of Thr-236 potentially a key determinant of basal LPA1 signaling. Mutagenesis data supports the notion that Thr-236 regulates this process since mutating Thr-236 to Ala-236 increased basal and LPA-mediated serum response factor (SRF) signaling activity and Lys-236 further increased this basal signaling. Here we describe progress on defining the major functions of the LPA1 receptor, discuss a context dependent dualistic role as both a negative regulator in cancer and a proto-oncogene, outline its structural components at the molecular amino-acid level and present mutagenesis data on the third intracellular loop of the receptor. PMID:18501205

  20. Structural basis for receptor sharing and activation by interleukin-20 receptor-2 (IL-20R2) binding cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Naomi J.; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Harris, Bethany D.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Walter, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin 20 (IL-20) is a pleotropic IL-10 family cytokine that protects epithelial surfaces from pathogens. However, dysregulated IL-20 signaling is implicated in several human pathologies including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. IL-20, and related cytokines IL-19 and IL-24, designated IL-20 subfamily cytokines (IL-20SFCs), induce cellular responses through an IL-20R1/IL-20R2 (type I) receptor heterodimer, whereas IL-20 and IL-24 also signal through the IL-22R1/IL-20R2 (type II) receptor complex. The crystal structure of the IL-20/IL-20R1/IL-20R2 complex reveals how type I and II complexes discriminate cognate from noncognate ligands. The structure also defines how the receptor–cytokine interfaces are affinity tuned to allow distinct signaling through a receptor complex shared by three different ligands. Our results provide unique insights into the complexity of IL-20SFC signaling that may be critical in the design of mechanistic-based inhibitors of IL-20SFC–mediated inflammatory disease. PMID:22802649

  1. The nuclear xenobiotic receptor CAR: structural determinants of constitutive activation and heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Suino, Kelly; Peng, Li; Reynolds, Ross; Li, Yong; Cha, Ji-Young; Repa, Joyce J; Kliewer, Steven A; Xu, H Eric

    2004-12-22

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) induces xenobiotic, bilirubin, and thyroid hormone metabolism as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor (RXR). Unlike ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, CAR is constitutively active. Here, we report the heterodimeric structure of the CAR and RXR ligand binding domains (LBDs), which reveals an unusually large dimerization interface and a small CAR ligand binding pocket. Constitutive CAR activity appears to be mediated by the compact nature of the CAR LBD that displays several unique features including a shortened AF2 helix and helix H10, which are linked by a two-turn helix that normally adopts an extended loop in other receptors, and an extended helix H2 that stabilizes the canonical LBD fold by packing tightly against helix H3. These structural observations provide a molecular framework for understanding the atypical transcriptional activation properties of CAR.

  2. Structure-guided development of dual β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Dietmar; Stanek, Markus; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Aiming to discover dual-acting β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor ligands, a structure-guided approach for the evolution of GPCR agonists that address multiple targets was elaborated. Starting from GPCR crystal structures, we describe the design, synthesis and biological investigation of a defined set of compounds leading to the identification of the benzoxazinone (R)-3, which shows agonist properties at the adrenergic β2 receptor and substantial G protein-promoted activation at the D2 receptor. This directed approach yielded molecular probes with tuned dual activity. The congener desOH-3 devoid of the benzylic hydroxyl function was shown to be a β2 adrenergic antagonist/D2 receptor agonist with Ki values in the low nanomolar range. The compounds may serve as a promising starting point for the investigation and treatment of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of syncytium structure of receptor systems on stochastic resonance induced by chaotic potential fluctuation.

    PubMed Central

    Kashimori, Y; Funakubo, H; Kambara, T

    1998-01-01

    To study a role of syncytium structure of sensory receptor systems in the detection of weak signals through stochastic resonance, we present a model of a receptor system with syncytium structure in which receptor cells are interconnected by gap junctions. The apical membrane of each cell includes two kinds of ion channels whose gating processes are described by the deterministic model. The membrane potential of each cell fluctuates chaotically or periodically, depending on the dynamical state of collective channel gating. The chaotic fluctuation of membrane potential acts as internal noise for the stochastic resonance. The detection ability of the system increases as the electric conductance between adjacent cells generated by the gap junction increases. This effect of gap junctions arises mainly from the fact that the synchronization of chaotic fluctuation of membrane potential between the receptor cells is strengthened as the density of gap junctions is increased. PMID:9746512

  4. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  5. Subunit structure of the follitropin (FSH) receptor. Photoaffinity labeling of the membrane-bound receptor follitropin complex in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.; Branca, A.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1985-11-15

    Human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH) was acylated with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB) and radioiodinated (55 microCi/micrograms) for use as a photoaffinity probe to investigate the subunit structure of the FSH receptor in calf testis. After incubation with the photoaffinity probe and photolysis with UV light, the cross-linked hormone-receptor complex was solubilized from the membrane and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Autoradiography of the polyacrylamide gels revealed two major bands, 64 kDa and 84 kDa. These were equivalent in molecular mass to those observed in a previous study in which performed hormone-receptor complexes were solubilized with detergent prior to formation of covalent cross-linkages through the use of homobifunctional cross-linking reagents. Reduction with dithiothreitol resulted in the loss of radioactivity from the 84-kDa band with a concomitant increase in the intensity of the 64-kDa band. Since dithiothreitol increases the dissociation of intact radioiodinated azidobenzoyl-FSH into subunits, it is suggested that the conversion of the 84-kDa band to the 64-kDa band by dithiothreitol is due to the loss of non-cross-linked hFSH subunit from the 84-kDa band and that the two bands observed after photoaffinity labeling arise from covalent bond formation between hFSH and a receptor subunit having a relative molecular weight (Mr) of 48,000. In addition to the predominant photolabeling of the receptor to yield the 64-kDa and 84-kDa bands, several other, less intense bands (54 kDa, 76 kDa, 97 kDa, and 116 kDa) were also consistently observed on autoradiographs.

  6. Structural determinants of agonist-selective signaling at the sst(2A) somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Falko; Doll, Christian; Pöll, Florian; Kliewer, Andrea; Schröder, Helmut; Schulz, Stefan

    2011-05-01

    The clinically used somatostatin (SS-14) analogs octreotide and pasireotide (SOM230) stimulate distinct species-specific patterns of sst(2A) somatostatin receptor phosphorylation and internalization. Like SS-14, octreotide promotes the phosphorylation of at least six carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues, namely S341, S343, T353, T354, T356, and T359, which in turn leads to a robust endocytosis of both rat and human sst(2A) receptors. Unlike SS-14, pasireotide fails to induce any substantial phosphorylation or internalization of the rat sst(2A) receptor. Nevertheless, pasireotide is able to stimulate a selective phosphorylation of S341 and S343 of the human sst(2A) receptor followed by a clearly detectable receptor sequestration. Here, we show that transplantation of amino acids 1-180 of the human sst(2A) receptor to the rat sst(2A) receptor facilitates pasireotide-induced internalization. Conversely, construction of a rat-human sst(2A) chimera conferred resistance to pasireotide-induced internalization. We then created a series of site-directed mutants leading to the identification of amino acids 27, 30, 163, and 164 that when exchanged to their human counterparts facilitated pasireotide-driven S341/S343 phosphorylation and internalization of the rat sst(2A) receptor. Exchange of these amino acids to their rat counterparts completely blocked the pasireotide-mediated internalization of the human sst(2A) receptor. Notably, octreotide and SS-14 stimulated a full phosphorylation and internalization of all mutant sst(2A) receptors tested. Together, these findings suggest that pasireotide activates the sst(2A) receptor via a molecular switch that is structurally and functionally distinct from that turned on during octreotide-driven sst(2A) activation.

  7. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  8. Structural analysis of the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Lin; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2010-10-28

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65 Å resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10 Å relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  9. Structural Analysis of the Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65{angstrom} resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10{angstrom} relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  10. Structural features of the Nogo receptor signaling complexes at the neuron/myelin interface.

    PubMed

    Saha, Nayanendu; Kolev, Momchil; Nikolov, Dimitar B

    2014-10-01

    Upon spinal cord injury, the central nervous system axons are unable to regenerate, partially due to the repulsive action of myelin inhibitors, such as the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Nogo-A and the oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp). These inhibitors bind and signal through a single receptor/co-receptor complex that comprises of NgR1/LINGO-1 and either p75 or TROY, triggering intracellular downstream signaling that impedes the re-growth of axons. Structure-function analysis of myelin inhibitors and their neuronal receptors, particularly the NgRs, have provided novel information regarding the molecular details of the inhibitor/receptor/co-receptor interactions. Structural and biochemical studies have revealed the architecture of many of these proteins and identified the molecular regions important for assembly of the inhibitory signaling complexes. It was also recently shown that gangliosides, such as GT1b, mediate receptor/co-receptor binding. In this review, we highlight these studies and summarize our current understanding of the multi-protein cell-surface complexes mediating inhibitory signaling events at the neuron/myelin interface.

  11. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs.

    PubMed

    Dror, Ron O; Green, Hillary F; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W; Valcourt, James R; Pan, Albert C; Arlow, Daniel H; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E

    2013-11-14

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15 Å from the classical, 'orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  12. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Ron O.; Green, Hillary F.; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W.; Valcourt, James R.; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J. Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E.

    2013-11-01

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15Å from the classical, `orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  13. Death Receptor 5 Networks Require Membrane Cholesterol for Proper Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Andrew K; Valley, Christopher C; Peery, Stephen L; Brummel, Benjamin; Braun, Anthony R; Karim, Christine B; Sachs, Jonathan N

    2016-12-04

    Death receptor 5 (DR5) is an apoptosis-inducing member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, whose activity has been linked to membrane cholesterol content. Upon ligand binding, DR5 forms large clusters within the plasma membrane that have often been assumed to be manifestations of receptor co-localization in cholesterol-rich membrane domains. However, we have recently shown that DR5 clusters are more than just randomly aggregated receptors. Instead, these are highly structured networks held together by receptor dimers. These dimers are stabilized by specific transmembrane helix-helix interactions, including a disulfide bond in the long isoform of the receptor. The complex relationships among DR5 network formation, transmembrane helix dimerization, membrane cholesterol, and receptor activity has not been established. It is unknown whether the membrane itself plays an active role in driving DR5 transmembrane helix interactions or in the formation of the networks. We show that cholesterol depletion in cells does not inhibit the formation of DR5 networks. However, the networks that form in cholesterol-depleted cells fail to induce caspase cleavage. These results suggest a potential structural difference between active and inactive networks. As evidence, we show that cholesterol is necessary for the covalent dimerization of DR5 transmembrane domains. Molecular simulations and experiments in synthetic vesicles on the DR5 transmembrane dimer suggest that dimerization is facilitated by increased helicity in a thicker bilayer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Structures and receptor binding of hemagglutinins from human-infecting H7N9 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Fei; Qi, Jianxun; Wu, Ying; Song, Hao; Gao, Feng; Bi, Yuhai; Zhang, Yanfang; Fan, Zheng; Qin, Chengfeng; Sun, Honglei; Liu, Jinhua; Haywood, Joel; Liu, Wenjun; Gong, Weimin; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong; Wang, Yu; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2013-10-11

    An avian-origin human-infecting influenza (H7N9) virus was recently identified in China. We have evaluated the viral hemagglutinin (HA) receptor-binding properties of two human H7N9 isolates, A/Shanghai/1/2013 (SH-H7N9) (containing the avian-signature residue Gln(226)) and A/Anhui/1/2013 (AH-H7N9) (containing the mammalian-signature residue Leu(226)). We found that SH-H7N9 HA preferentially binds the avian receptor analog, whereas AH-H7N9 HA binds both avian and human receptor analogs. Furthermore, an AH-H7N9 mutant HA (Leu(226) → Gln) was found to exhibit dual receptor-binding property, indicating that other amino acid substitutions contribute to the receptor-binding switch. The structures of SH-H7N9 HA, AH-H7N9 HA, and its mutant in complex with either avian or human receptor analogs show how AH-H7N9 can bind human receptors while still retaining the avian receptor-binding property.

  15. Structural basis for specificity of TGF[beta] family receptor small molecule inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Zeqiraj, Elton; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Sicheri, Frank; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; David, Laurent

    2012-07-24

    Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}) receptor kinase inhibitors have a great therapeutic potential. SB431542 is one of the mainly used kinase inhibitors of the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway receptors, but needs improvement of its EC{sub 50} (EC{sub 50} = 1 {mu}M) to be translated to clinical use. A key feature of SB431542 is that it specifically targets receptors from the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway but not the closely related receptors from the bone morphogenic proteins (BMP) pathway. To understand the mechanisms of this selectivity, we solved the crystal structure of the TGF{beta} type I receptor (T{beta}RI) kinase domain in complex with SB431542. We mutated T{beta}RI residues coordinating SB431542 to their counterparts in activin-receptor like kinase 2 (ALK2), a BMP receptor kinase, and tested the kinase activity of mutated T{beta}RI. We discovered that a Ser280Thr mutation yielded a T{beta}RI variant that was resistant to SB431542 inhibition. Furthermore, the corresponding Thr283Ser mutation in ALK2 yielded a BMP receptor sensitive to SB431542. This demonstrated that Ser280 is the key determinant of selectivity for SB431542. This work provides a framework for optimising the SB431542 scaffold to more potent and selective inhibitors of the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway.

  16. Structural insights into ligand-induced activation of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.; Lawrence, M.; Streltsov, V.; Garrett, T.; McKern, N.; Lou, M.-Z.; Lovrecz, G.; Adams, T.

    2008-04-29

    The current model for insulin binding to the insulin receptor proposes that there are two binding sites, referred to as sites 1 and 2, on each monomer in the receptor homodimer and two binding surfaces on insulin, one involving residues predominantly from the dimerization face of insulin (the classical binding surface) and the other residues from the hexamerization face. High-affinity binding involves one insulin molecule using its two surfaces to make bridging contacts with site 1 from one receptor monomer and site 2 from the other. Whilst the receptor dimer has two identical site 1-site 2 pairs, insulin molecules cannot bridge both pairs simultaneously. Our structures of the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain dimer and the L1-CR-L2 fragments of IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) explain many of the features of ligand-receptor binding and allow the two binding sites on the receptor to be described. The IR dimer has an unexpected folded-over conformation which places the C-terminal surface of the first fibronectin-III domain in close juxtaposition to the known L1 domain ligand-binding surface suggesting that the C-terminal surface of FnIII-1 is the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding. This is very different from previous models based on three-dimensional reconstruction from scanning transmission electron micrographs. Our single-molecule images indicate that IGF-1R has a morphology similar to that of IR. In addition, the structures of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of the IR and IGF-1R show that there are major differences in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The implications of these findings for ligand-induced receptor activation will be discussed. This review summarizes the key findings regarding the discovery and characterization of the insulin receptor, the identification and arrangement of its structural domains in the sequence and the key features associated with ligand binding. The remainder of the review

  17. Interconversion of Functional Activity by Minor Structural Alterations in Nonpeptide AT2 Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Migration of the methylene imidazole side chain in the first reported selective drug-like AT2 receptor agonist C21/M024 (1) delivered the AT2 receptor antagonist C38/M132 (2). We now report that the AT2 receptor antagonist compound 4, a biphenyl derivative that is structurally related to 2, is transformed to the agonist 6 by migration of the isobutyl group. The importance of the relative position of the methylene imidazole and the isobutyl substituent is highlighted herein. PMID:25699147

  18. Purinergic P2X receptors: structural models and analysis of ligand-target interaction.

    PubMed

    Dal Ben, Diego; Buccioni, Michela; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Thomas, Ajiroghene; Volpini, Rosaria

    2015-01-07

    The purinergic P2X receptors are ligand-gated cation channels activated by the endogenous ligand ATP. They assemble as homo- or heterotrimers from seven cloned subtypes (P2X1-7) and all trimer subunits present a common topology consisting in intracellular N- and C- termini, two transmembrane domains and a large extracellular domain. These membrane proteins are present in virtually all mammalian tissues and regulate a large variety of responses in physio- and pathological conditions. The development of ligands that selectively activate or block specific P2X receptor subtypes hence represents a promising strategy to obtain novel pharmacological tools for the treatment of pain, cancer, inflammation, and neurological, cardiovascular, and endocrine diseases. The publication of the crystal structures of zebrafish P2X4 receptor in inactive and ATP-bound active forms provided structural data for the analysis of the receptor structure, the interpretation of mutagenesis data, and the depiction of ligand binding and receptor activation mechanism. In addition, the availability of ATP-competitive ligands presenting selectivity for P2X receptor subtypes supports the design of new potent and selective ligands with possibly improved pharmacokinetic profiles, with the final aim to obtain new drugs. This study describes molecular modelling studies performed to develop structural models of the human and rat P2X receptors in inactive and active states. These models allowed to analyse the role of some non-conserved residues at ATP binding site and to study the receptor interaction with some non-specific or subtype selective agonists and antagonists.

  19. Mapping surface structures of the human insulin receptor with monoclonal antibodies: localization of main immunogenic regions to the receptor kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D O; Roth, R A

    1986-03-25

    A panel of 37 monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor has been used to characterize the receptor's major antigenic regions and their relationship to receptor functions. Three antibodies recognized extracellular surface structures, including the insulin binding site and a region not associated with insulin binding. The remaining 34 monoclonal antibodies were directed against the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor beta subunit. Competitive binding studies demonstrated that four antigenic regions (beta 1, beta 2, beta 3, and beta 4) are found on this domain. Sixteen of the antibodies were found to be directed against beta 1, nine against beta 2, seven against beta 3, and two against beta 4. Antibodies to all four regions inhibited the receptor-associated protein kinase activity to some extent, although antibodies directed against the beta 2 region completely inhibited the kinase activity of the receptor both in the autophosphorylation reaction and in the phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate, histone. Antibodies to the beta 2 region also did not recognize autophosphorylated receptor. In addition, antibodies to this same region recognized the receptor for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) as well as the insulin receptor. In contrast, antibodies to other cytoplasmic regions did not recognize the IGF-I receptor as well as the insulin receptor. These results indicate that the major immunogenic regions of the insulin receptor are located on the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor beta subunit and are associated with the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the receptor. In addition, these results suggest that a portion of the insulin receptor is highly homologous to that of the IGF-I receptor.

  20. Mammalian Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: From Structure to Function

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Edson X.; Pereira, Edna F. R.; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Rogers, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The classical studies of nicotine by Langley at the turn of the 20th century introduced the concept of a “receptive substance,” from which the idea of a “receptor” came to light. Subsequent studies aided by the Torpedo electric organ, a rich source of muscle-type nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), and the discovery of α-bungarotoxin, a snake toxin that binds pseudo-irreversibly to the muscle nAChR, resulted in the muscle nAChR being the best characterized ligand-gated ion channel hitherto. With the advancement of functional and genetic studies in the late 1980s, the existence of nAChRs in the mammalian brain was confirmed and the realization that the numerous nAChR subtypes contribute to the psychoactive properties of nicotine and other drugs of abuse and to the neuropathology of various diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and schizophrenia, has since emerged. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these findings and the more recent revelations of the impact that the rich diversity in function and expression of this receptor family has on neuronal and nonneuronal cells throughout the body. Despite these numerous developments, our understanding of the contributions of specific neuronal nAChR subtypes to the many facets of physiology throughout the body remains in its infancy. PMID:19126755

  1. The genomic structure of the human UFO receptor.

    PubMed

    Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Faust, M; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1993-02-01

    Using a DNA transfection-tumorigenicity assay we have recently identified the UFO oncogene. It encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by the juxtaposition of two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats in its extracellular domain. Here we describe the genomic organization of the human UFO locus. The UFO receptor is encoded by 20 exons that are distributed over a region of 44 kb. Different isoforms of UFO mRNA are generated by alternative splicing of exon 10 and differential usage of two imperfect polyadenylation sites resulting in the presence or absence of 1.5-kb 3' untranslated sequences. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analyses revealed multiple transcriptional initiation sites including a major site 169 bp upstream of the translation start site. The promoter region is GC rich, lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains potential recognition sites for a variety of trans-acting factors, including Sp1, AP-2 and the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Proto-UFO and its oncogenic counterpart exhibit identical cDNA and promoter regions sequences. Possible modes of UFO activation are discussed.

  2. Application of GPCR Structures for Modelling of Free Fatty Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Irina G

    2017-01-01

    Five G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified to be activated by free fatty acids (FFA). Among them, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120) bind long-chain fatty acids, FFA2 (GPR43) and FFA3 (GPR41) bind short-chain fatty acids and GPR84 binds medium-chain fatty acids. Free fatty acid receptors have now emerged as potential targets for the treatment of diabetes, obesity and immune diseases. The recent progress in crystallography of GPCRs has now enabled the elucidation of the structure of FFA1 and provided reliable templates for homology modelling of other FFA receptors. Analysis of the crystal structure and improved homology models, along with mutagenesis data and structure activity, highlighted an unusual arginine charge-pairing interaction in FFA1-3 for receptor modulation, distinct structural features for ligand binding to FFA1 and FFA4 and an arginine of the second extracellular loop as a possible anchoring point for FFA at GPR84. Structural data will be helpful for searching novel small-molecule modulators at the FFA receptors.

  3. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, Wout; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Summary P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that play important roles in cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and as potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human P2X receptors. Mechanisms of receptor desensitization and ion permeation, principles of antagonism, and complete structure of the pore-forming transmembrane domains remain unclear. We report x-ray crystal structures of human P2X3 receptor in apo/resting, agonist-bound/open-pore, agonist-bound/desensitized and antagonist-bound closed states. The open state structure harbors an intracellular motif we term the “cytoplasmic cap”, that stabilizes the open state of the ion channel pore and creates lateral, phospholipid-lined cytoplasmic fenestrations for water and ion egress. Competitive antagonists TNP-ATP and A-317491 stabilize the apo/resting state and reveal the interactions responsible for competitive inhibition. These structures illuminate the conformational rearrangements underpinning P2X receptor gating and provide a foundation for development of new pharmacologic agents. PMID:27626375

  4. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors are divided into three classes (A, B and C) based on homology of their seven transmembrane domains. Class C is the smallest class with 22 human receptor subtypes including eight metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1-8) receptors, two GABAB receptors (GABAB1 and GABAB2), three taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we review the existence of post-translational modifications in class C G protein-coupled receptors and their regulatory roles, with particular focus on glycosylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, disulphide bonding and lipidation.

  5. T4-lysozyme fusion for the production of human formyl peptide receptors for structural determination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Cui, Ying; Wang, Jiqian

    2014-03-01

    T4-lysozyme (T4L) fusion was introduced in the intracellular loop of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) of human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3), and the ability of T4L fusion to be used in the production of human FPR3 for structural determination was evaluated in this work. The T4L variant of human FPR3 termed FPR3-T4L was expressed in stable tetracycline-inducible HEK293 cells. A systematic detergent screening showed that fos-choline-14 was the optimal detergent to solubilize and subsequently purify FPR3-T4L from HEK293 cells. Immunoaffinity purification in combination with gel filtration was employed to purify the T4L-fused receptor to high homogeneity. The final yield of the human FPR3-T4L monomer from 2 g of cells was 0.2 mg. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the receptor adopted a correct secondary structure after purification, while ligand binding measurement indicated that the receptor was functional. Thus, the presence of T4L fusion did not evidently disturb the expression in HEK293 cells, proper folding, and functionality of human FPR3. Our study of evaluating T4L fusion for the recombinant production of human formyl peptide receptor would facilitate ongoing efforts in the structural characterization of GPCRs.

  6. Structure of the insulin receptor ectodomain reveals a folded-over conformation.

    PubMed

    McKern, Neil M; Lawrence, Michael C; Streltsov, Victor A; Lou, Mei-Zhen; Adams, Timothy E; Lovrecz, George O; Elleman, Thomas C; Richards, Kim M; Bentley, John D; Pilling, Patricia A; Hoyne, Peter A; Cartledge, Kellie A; Pham, Tam M; Lewis, Jennifer L; Sankovich, Sonia E; Stoichevska, Violet; Da Silva, Elizabeth; Robinson, Christine P; Frenkel, Maurice J; Sparrow, Lindsay G; Fernley, Ross T; Epa, V Chandana; Ward, Colin W

    2006-09-14

    The insulin receptor is a phylogenetically ancient tyrosine kinase receptor found in organisms as primitive as cnidarians and insects. In higher organisms it is essential for glucose homeostasis, whereas the closely related insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is involved in normal growth and development. The insulin receptor is expressed in two isoforms, IR-A and IR-B; the former also functions as a high-affinity receptor for IGF-II and is implicated, along with IGF-1R, in malignant transformation. Here we present the crystal structure at 3.8 A resolution of the IR-A ectodomain dimer, complexed with four Fabs from the monoclonal antibodies 83-7 and 83-14 (ref. 4), grown in the presence of a fragment of an insulin mimetic peptide. The structure reveals the domain arrangement in the disulphide-linked ectodomain dimer, showing that the insulin receptor adopts a folded-over conformation that places the ligand-binding regions in juxtaposition. This arrangement is very different from previous models. It shows that the two L1 domains are on opposite sides of the dimer, too far apart to allow insulin to bind both L1 domains simultaneously as previously proposed. Instead, the structure implicates the carboxy-terminal surface of the first fibronectin type III domain as the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding.

  7. Insights into the channel gating of P2X receptors from structures, dynamics and small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Yu, Ye

    2016-01-01

    P2X receptors, as ATP-gated non-selective trimeric ion channels, are permeable to Na+, K+ and Ca2+. Comparing with other ligand-gated ion channel families, P2X receptors are distinct in their unique gating properties and pathophysiological roles, and have attracted attention as promising drug targets for a variety of diseases, such as neuropathic pain, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and thrombus. Several small molecule inhibitors for distinct P2X subtypes have entered into clinical trials. However, many questions regarding the gating mechanism of P2X remain unsolved. The structural determinations of P2X receptors at the resting and ATP-bound open states revealed that P2X receptor gating is a cooperative allosteric process involving multiple domains, which marks the beginning of the post-structure era of P2X research at atomic level. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure-function relationship of P2X receptors, depict the whole picture of allosteric changes during the channel gating, and summarize the active sites that may contribute to new strategies for developing novel allosteric drugs targeting P2X receptors. PMID:26725734

  8. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W.M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-08-18

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1-108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an {alpha}-helical structure extending from residues 14-29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor.

  9. Multi-Component Protein - Protein Docking Based Protocol with External Scoring for Modeling Dimers of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Guixà-González, Ramon; Carrió, Pau; Poso, Antti; Dove, Stefan; Pastor, Manuel; Selent, Jana

    2015-04-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to GPCR complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure. For this purpose, a multi-component protocol was derived based on protein-protein docking which generates populations of dimers compatible with membrane integration, considering all reasonable interfaces. At the next stage, we applied a scoring procedure based on up to eleven different parameters including shape or electrostatics complementarity. Two methods of consensus scoring were performed: (i) average scores of 100 best scored dimers with respect to each interface, and (ii) frequencies of interfaces among 100 best scored dimers. In general, our multi-component protocol gives correct indications for dimer interfaces that have been observed in X-ray crystal structures of GPCR dimers (opsin dimer, chemokine CXCR4 and CCR5 dimers, κ opioid receptor dimer, β1 adrenergic receptor dimer and smoothened receptor dimer) but also suggests alternative dimerization interfaces. Interestingly, at times these alternative interfaces are scored higher than the experimentally observed ones suggesting them to be also relevant in the life cycle of studied GPCR dimers. Further results indicate that GPCR dimer and higher-order oligomer formation may involve transmembrane helices (TMs) TM1-TM2-TM7, TM3-TM4-TM5 or TM4-TM5-TM6 but not TM1-TM2-TM3 or TM2-TM3-TM4 which is in general agreement with available experimental and computational data.

  10. Molecular Structure of P2Y Receptors: Mutagenesis, Modeling, and Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jayasekara, M.P. Suresh; Costanzi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    There are eight subtypes of P2Y receptors (P2YRs) that are activated, and in some cases inhibited, by a range of extracellular nucleotides. These nucleotides are ubiquitous, but their extracellular concentration can rise dramatically in response to hypoxia, ischemia, or mechanical stress, injury, and release through channels and from vesicles. Two subclasses of P2YRs were defined based on clustering of sequences, second messengers, and receptor sequence analysis. The numbering system for P2YR subtypes is discontinuous; i.e., P2Y1–14Rs have been defined, but six of the intermediate-numbered cloned receptor sequences (e.g., P2y3, P2y5, P2y7–10) are not functional mammalian nucleotide receptors. Of these two clusters, the P2Y12–14 subtypes couple via Gαi to inhibit adenylate cyclase, while the remaining subtypes couple through Gαq to activate phospholipase C. Collectively, the P2YRs respond to both purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, in the form of 5′-mono- and dinucleotides and nucleoside-5′-diphosphosugars. In recent years, the medicinal chemistry of P2Y receptors has advanced significantly, to provide selective agonists and antagonists for many but not all of the subtypes. Ligand design has been aided by insights from structural probing using molecular modelling and mutagenesis. Currently, the molecular modelling of the receptors is effectively based on the X-ray structure of the CXCR4 receptor, which is the closest to the P2Y receptors among all the currently crystallized receptors in terms of sequence similarity. It is now a challenge to develop novel and selective P2YR ligands for disease treatment (although antagonists of the P2Y12R are already widely used as antithrombotics). PMID:23336097

  11. Modulation of the estrogen receptor structure, evidence of a heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Toulas, C.; Guilbaud, N.; Delassus, F.; Bayard, F.; Faye, J.C. )

    1990-01-01

    In order to analyse the molecular weight polymorphism of the estrogen receptor (ER) in MCF-7 cells, we have developed a procedure which allowed in situ linkage of ER by (3H) tamoxifen aziridine and provided labelled proteins in conditions which minimized protease activities. After labelling, cell lysis was performed in SDS buffer containing various concentrations of mercaptoethanol. Proteins extracted with phenolic solution and precipitated by cold acetone were analysed by SDS PAGE. It appears that beside the form of 67 kDa already described, binding entities of tamoxifen aziridine were also present at a molecular mass of 110 kDa and 45 kDa. On the other hand, investigations on the effect of 12-0-Tetradecanoyl Phorbol 13-Acetate (TPA) showed that TPA induces a decrease of the 67 kDa entity.

  12. Structure of an agonist-bound human A2A adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Wu, Huixian; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C

    2011-04-15

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors upon agonist binding is a critical step in the signaling cascade for this family of cell surface proteins. We report the crystal structure of the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) bound to an agonist UK-432097 at 2.7 angstrom resolution. Relative to inactive, antagonist-bound A(2A)AR, the agonist-bound structure displays an outward tilt and rotation of the cytoplasmic half of helix VI, a movement of helix V, and an axial shift of helix III, resembling the changes associated with the active-state opsin structure. Additionally, a seesaw movement of helix VII and a shift of extracellular loop 3 are likely specific to A(2A)AR and its ligand. The results define the molecule UK-432097 as a "conformationally selective agonist" capable of receptor stabilization in a specific active-state configuration.

  13. Structural Basis of Intracellular TGF-β Signaling: Receptors and Smads.

    PubMed

    Chaikuad, Apirat; Bullock, Alex N

    2016-11-01

    Stimulation of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family receptors activates an intracellular phosphorylation-dependent signaling cascade that culminates in Smad transcriptional activation and turnover. Structural studies have identified a number of allosteric mechanisms that control the localization, conformation, and oligomeric state of the receptors and Smads. Such mechanisms dictate the ordered binding of substrate and adaptor proteins that determine the directionality of the signaling process. Activation of the pathway has been illustrated by the various structures of the receptor-activated Smads (R-Smads) with SARA, Smad4, and YAP, respectively, whereas mechanisms of down-regulation have been elucidated by the structural complexes of FKBP12, Ski, and Smurf1. Interesting parallels have emerged between the R-Smads and the Forkhead-associated (FHA) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-associated domains, as well as the Hippo pathway. However, important questions remain as to the mechanism of Smad-independent signaling.

  14. Structural Basis for Inhibition of the Insulin Receptor by the Adaptor Protein Grb14

    SciTech Connect

    Depetris,R.; Hu, J.; Gimpelevich, I.; Holt, L.; Daly, R.; Hubbard, S.

    2005-01-01

    Grb14, a member of the Grb7 adaptor protein family, possesses a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, a C-terminal Src homology-2 (SH2) domain, and an intervening stretch of {approx}45 residues known as the BPS region, which is unique to this adaptor family. Previous studies have demonstrated that Grb14 is a tissue-specific negative regulator of insulin receptor signaling and that inhibition is mediated by the BPS region. We have determined the crystal structure of the Grb14 BPS region in complex with the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor. The structure reveals that the N-terminal portion of the BPS region binds as a pseudosubstrate inhibitor in the substrate peptide binding groove of the kinase. Together with the crystal structure of the SH2 domain, we present a model for the interaction of Grb14 with the insulin receptor, which indicates how Grb14 functions as a selective protein inhibitor of insulin signaling.

  15. Structural evidence for evolution of shark Ig new antigen receptor variable domain antibodies from a cell-surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, V A; Varghese, J N; Carmichael, J A; Irving, R A; Hudson, P J; Nuttall, S D

    2004-08-24

    The Ig new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are single-domain antibodies found in the serum of sharks. Here, we report 2.2- and 2.8-A structures of the type 2 IgNAR variable domains 12Y-1 and 12Y-2. Structural features include, first, an Ig superfamily topology transitional between cell adhesion molecules, antibodies, and T cell receptors; and, second, a vestigial complementarity-determining region 2 at the "bottom" of the molecule, apparently discontinuous from the antigen-binding paratope and similar to that observed in cell adhesion molecules. Thus, we suggest that IgNARs originated as cell-surface adhesion molecules coopted to the immune repertoire and represent an evolutionary lineage independent of variable heavy chain/variable light chain type antibodies. Additionally, both 12Y-1 and 12Y-2 form unique crystallographic dimers, predominantly mediated by main-chain framework interactions, which represent a possible model for primordial cell-based interactions. Unusually, the 12Y-2 complementarity-determining region 3 also adopts an extended beta-hairpin structure, suggesting a distinct selective advantage in accessing cryptic antigenic epitopes.

  16. NTB-A Receptor Crystal Structure: Insights into Homophilic Interactions in the Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Receptor Family

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Ramagopal, U.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Yan, Q.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; Nathenson, S.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family includes homophilic and heterophilic receptors that regulate both innate and adaptive immunity. The ectodomains of most SLAM family members are composed of an N-terminal IgV domain and a C-terminal IgC2 domain. NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A) is a homophilic receptor that stimulates cytotoxicity in natural killer (NK) cells, regulates bactericidal activities in neutrophils, and potentiates T helper 2 (Th2) responses. The 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the complete NTB-A ectodomain revealed a rod-like monomer that self-associates to form a highly kinked dimer spanning an end-to-end distance of {approx}100 {angstrom}. The NTB-A homophilic and CD2-CD58 heterophilic dimers show overall structural similarities but differ in detailed organization and physicochemical properties of their respective interfaces. The NTB-A structure suggests a mechanism responsible for binding specificity within the SLAM family and imposes physical constraints relevant to the colocalization of SLAM-family proteins with other signaling molecules in the immunological synapse.

  17. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P.; Brennan, Sarah C.; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X.; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D.; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Colecraft, Henry M.; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R.

    2016-07-19

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+and PO43-ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ions stabilize the active state, PO43-ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits.

  18. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+ homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+ and PO43- ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ ions stabilize the active state, PO43- ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13662.001 PMID:27434672

  19. Palonosetron-5-HT3 Receptor Interactions As Shown by a Binding Protein Cocrystal Structure.

    PubMed

    Price, Kerry L; Lillestol, Reidun K; Ulens, Chris; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2016-12-21

    Palonosetron is a potent 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and an effective therapeutic agent against emesis. Here we identify the molecular determinants of compound recognition in the receptor binding site by obtaining a high resolution structure of palonosetron bound to an engineered acetylcholine binding protein that mimics the 5-HT3 receptor binding site, termed 5-HTBP, and by examining the potency of palonosetron in a range of 5-HT3 receptors with mutated binding site residues. The structural data indicate that palonosetron forms a tight and effective wedge in the binding pocket, made possible by its rigid tricyclic ring structure and its interactions with binding site residues; it adopts a binding pose that is distinct from the related antiemetics granisetron and tropisetron. The functional data show many residues previously shown to interact with agonists and antagonists in the binding site are important for palonosetron binding, and indicate those of particular importance are W183 (a cation-π interaction and a hydrogen bond) and Y153 (a hydrogen bond). This information, and the availability of the structure of palonosetron bound to 5-HTBP, should aid the development of novel and more efficacious drugs that act via 5-HT3 receptors.

  20. X-ray structure, symmetry and mechanism of an AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevsky, Alexander I.; Rosconi, Michael P.; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-02-02

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening a transmembrane ion channel upon binding of glutamate. Despite their crucial role in neurobiology, the architecture and atomic structure of an intact ionotropic glutamate receptor are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-sensitive, homotetrameric, rat GluA2 receptor at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution in complex with a competitive antagonist. The receptor harbours an overall axis of two-fold symmetry with the extracellular domains organized as pairs of local dimers and with the ion channel domain exhibiting four-fold symmetry. A symmetry mismatch between the extracellular and ion channel domains is mediated by two pairs of conformationally distinct subunits, A/C and B/D. Therefore, the stereochemical manner in which the A/C subunits are coupled to the ion channel gate is different from the B/D subunits. Guided by the GluA2 structure and site-directed cysteine mutagenesis, we suggest that GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors have a similar architecture, with subunits arranged in a 1-2-1-2 pattern. We exploit the GluA2 structure to develop mechanisms of ion channel activation, desensitization and inhibition by non-competitive antagonists and pore blockers.

  1. Crystal structure of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain of human IL-1RAPL.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Brint, Elizabeth K; O'Neill, Luke A J; Tong, Liang

    2004-07-23

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain is conserved in the intracellular regions of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1Rs) as well as in several cytoplasmic adapter molecules. This domain has crucial roles in signal transduction by these receptors for host immune response. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.3-A resolution of the TIR domain of human IL-1RAPL, the first structure of a TIR domain of the IL-1R superfamily. There are large structural differences between this TIR domain and that of TLR1 and TLR2. Helix alphaD in IL-1RAPL is almost perpendicular to its equivalent in TLR1 or TLR2. The BB loop contains a hydrogen bond unique to IL-1RAPL between Thr residues at the 8th and 10th positions. The structural and sequence diversity among these domains may be important for specificity in the signal transduction by these receptors. A dimer of the TIR domain of IL-1RAPL is observed in the crystal, although this domain is monomeric in solution. Residues in the dimer interface are mostly unique to IL-1RAPL, which is consistent with the distinct functional roles of this receptor. Our functional studies show IL-1RAPL can activate JNK but not the ERK or the p38 MAP kinases, whereas its close homolog, TIGIRR, cannot activate JNK. Deletion mutagenesis studies show that the activation of JNK by IL-1RAPL does not depend on the integrity of its TIR domain, suggesting a distinct mechanism of signaling through this receptor.

  2. Structure of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor in complex with a peptide mimetic

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Liu, Wei; Chun, Eugene; Katritch, Vsevolod; Wu, Huixian; Vardy, Eyal; Huang, Xi-Ping; Trapella, Claudio; Guerrini, Remo; Calo, Girolamo; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2012-07-11

    Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, {delta}, {kappa} and {mu} ({delta}-OR, {kappa}-OR and {mu}-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ({approx}60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptide N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors {kappa} (ref. 5) and {mu} (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.

  3. Structure and Receptor Binding of the Hemagglutinin from a Human H6N1 Influenza Virus

    DOE PAGES

    Tzarum, Netanel; de Vries, Robert P.; Zhu, Xueyong; ...

    2015-03-11

    Avian influenza viruses that cause infection and are transmissible in humans involve changes in the receptor binding site (RBS) of the viral hemagglutinin (HA) that alter receptor preference from α2-3-linked (avian-like) to α2-6-linked (human-like) sialosides. A human case of avian-origin H6N1 influenza virus was recently reported, but the molecular mechanisms contributing to it crossing the species barrier are unknown. We find that, although the H6 HA RBS contains D190V and G228S substitutions that potentially promote human receptor binding, recombinant H6 HA preferentially binds α2-3-linked sialosides, indicating no adaptation to human receptors. Crystal structures of H6 HA with avian and humanmore » receptor analogs reveal that H6 HA preferentially interacts with avian receptor analogs. Lastly, this binding mechanism differs from other HA subtypes due to a unique combination of RBS residues, highlighting additional variation in HA-receptor interactions and the challenges in predicting which influenza strains and subtypes can infect humans and cause pandemics.« less

  4. Hepatic structural enhancement and insulin resistance amelioration due to AT1 receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-01-18

    Over the last decade, the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on the development of obesity and its comorbidities has been extensively addressed. Both circulating and local RAS components are up-regulated in obesity and involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease onset. Pharmacological manipulations of RAS are viable strategies to tackle metabolic impairments caused by the excessive body fat mass. Renin inhibitors rescue insulin resistance, but do not have marked effects on hepatic steatosis. However, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) yield beneficial hepatic remodeling. ARBs elicit body mass loss and normalize insulin levels, tackling insulin resistance. Also, this drug class increases adiponectin levels, besides countering interleukin-6, tumoral necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta 1. The latter is essential to prevent from liver fibrosis. When conjugated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activation, ARB fully rescues fatty liver. These effects might be orchestrated by an indirect up-regulation of MAS receptor due to angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade. These associations of ARB with PPAR activation and ACE2-angiotensin (ANG) (1-7)-MAS receptor axis deserve a better understanding. This editorial provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding AT1R blockade effects on sensitivity to insulin and hepatic structural alterations as well as the intersections of AT1R blockade with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation and ACE2-ANG (1-7) - MAS receptor axis.

  5. Hepatic structural enhancement and insulin resistance amelioration due to AT1 receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on the development of obesity and its comorbidities has been extensively addressed. Both circulating and local RAS components are up-regulated in obesity and involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease onset. Pharmacological manipulations of RAS are viable strategies to tackle metabolic impairments caused by the excessive body fat mass. Renin inhibitors rescue insulin resistance, but do not have marked effects on hepatic steatosis. However, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) yield beneficial hepatic remodeling. ARBs elicit body mass loss and normalize insulin levels, tackling insulin resistance. Also, this drug class increases adiponectin levels, besides countering interleukin-6, tumoral necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta 1. The latter is essential to prevent from liver fibrosis. When conjugated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activation, ARB fully rescues fatty liver. These effects might be orchestrated by an indirect up-regulation of MAS receptor due to angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade. These associations of ARB with PPAR activation and ACE2-angiotensin (ANG) (1-7)-MAS receptor axis deserve a better understanding. This editorial provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding AT1R blockade effects on sensitivity to insulin and hepatic structural alterations as well as the intersections of AT1R blockade with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation and ACE2-ANG (1-7) - MAS receptor axis. PMID:28144388

  6. Structural Organization of a Full-Length Gp130/LIF-R Cytokine Receptor Transmembrane Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Skiniotis, G.; Lupardus, P.J.; Martick, M.; Walz, T.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-26

    gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-R{alpha}). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6R{alpha} hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-R{alpha} heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-R{alpha}/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the 'tall' class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others.

  7. Structure of the integral membrane domain of the GLP1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Frimurer, T M; Bywater, R P

    1999-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the integral membrane domain of the GLP1 receptor, a member of the secretin receptor family of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily is proposed. The probable arrangement of the seven helices in this receptor was deduced from a detailed analysis of all the sequences in the secretin receptor family. The analysis includes: 1) identifying the transmembrane helices, 2) charge distribution analysis to estimate to which extent the transmembrane helices are buried, 3) Fourier transform analysis of different property profiles within the transmembrane helices to determine the orientation of exposed and buried faces of the helices, 4) alignment of sequences with those of the rhodopsin-like family using the novel "cold spot" method reported herein, 5) determination of lengths of transmembrane helices and their connecting loops and the constraints these impose on packing, tilting and organization, 6) incorporation of mutagenesis and ligand specificity data. We find that there is a close similarity between the structural properties of receptors of the secretin family and those of the rhodopsin-like family as typified by the frog rhodopsin structure recently solved by electron cryomicroscopy.

  8. Evidence that the subunit structure of gonadotropin receptor is preserved during regression of rat corpus luteum

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.; Menon, K.N.J.

    1986-05-29

    The level of hCG/LH receptor has been shown to undergo marked changes during the life span of rat corpus luteum. To evaluate whether these fluctuations are due to changes in the receptor subunit structure or receptor protein content, the /sup 125/I-hCG binding activity and the receptor subunit structure were determined during different time periods of pseudopregnancy. The maximum /sup 125/I-hCG binding activity was observed on day 7, after which it decreased by 20 and 45% on day 11 and day 14, respectively. The Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-hCG binding data showed that the decrease in binding activity was caused by a change in the number of binding sites rather than a change in the binding affinity. The LH/hCG receptor in ovarian membranes obtained on days 7, 11 and 14 were characterized by the method of affinity cross-linking. All four subunits of the LH/hCG receptor were detected in the ovarian membranes at all stages while the intensity decreased parallel to a decrease in hCG binding from day 7 to day 14.

  9. The Thrombopoietin Receptor: Structural Basis of Traffic and Activation by Ligand, Mutations, Agonists, and Mutated Calreticulin

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Leila N.; Defour, Jean-Philippe; Pecquet, Christian; Constantinescu, Stefan N.

    2017-01-01

    A well-functioning hematopoietic system requires a certain robustness and flexibility to maintain appropriate quantities of functional mature blood cells, such as red blood cells and platelets. This review focuses on the cytokine receptor that plays a significant role in thrombopoiesis: the receptor for thrombopoietin (TPO-R; also known as MPL). Here, we survey the work to date to understand how this receptor functions at a molecular level throughout its lifecycle, from traffic to the cell surface, dimerization and binding cognate cytokine via its extracellular domain, through to its subsequent activation of associated Janus kinases and initiation of downstream signaling pathways, as well as the regulation of these processes. Atomic level resolution structures of TPO-R have remained elusive. The identification of disease-causing mutations in the receptor has, however, offered some insight into structure and function relationships, as has artificial means of receptor activation, through TPO mimetics, transmembrane-targeting receptor agonists, and engineering in dimerization domains. More recently, a novel activation mechanism was identified whereby mutated forms of calreticulin form complexes with TPO-R via its extracellular N-glycosylated domain. Such complexes traffic pathologically in the cell and persistently activate JAK2, downstream signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs), and other pathways. This pathologic TPO-R activation is associated with a large fraction of human myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:28408900

  10. Structural organization of a full-length gp130/LIF-R cytokine receptor transmembrane complex

    PubMed Central

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Lupardus, Patrick; Martick, Monika; Walz, Thomas; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Summary gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-Rα). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6Rα hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-Rα heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-Rα/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the ‘tall’ class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others. PMID:18775332

  11. [Structural characteristics of prolactin, growth hormone and their receptors as determinants of biological actions].

    PubMed

    Sandoval Sánchez, G C; Fonseca, M E; Ochoa Resendiz, R; Zárate Treviño, A

    1998-08-01

    The pituitary hormones prolactin and growth hormone are structurally related. Both hormones exist in the circulation in several molecular forms, differing in aminoacid sequences, posttranslational modifications and fragments produced by proteolytic cleavage. Heterogencity may produce a diversity of inmunological and biological actions. It has been suggested that each of this forms may be a isohormone with a different physiological role. The predominance of one of them in serun could account for the complex and often contradictory actions of the hormones. In addition receptors also have structural homology and so the possibility exist that these hormones share binding affinity to the receptors and can produce endocrinological problems in some special conditions.

  12. Comparison of the subunit structure of acetylcholine receptors from muscle and electric organ of Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed

    Gullick, W J; Lindstrom, J M

    1983-08-02

    The acetylcholine receptors of the electric organ and muscle tissues of Electrophorus electricus are composed of alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits. Receptor subunits from the two tissues were compared by peptide mapping with monoclonal antibodies, an affinity-labeling reagent, and a lectin to characterize particular peptide fragments. These experiments indicate that the corresponding receptor subunits from the two tissues are extensively homologous or identical throughout their amino acid sequences. Small differences in the electrophoresis of peptide fragments of alpha subunits between the two tissues occurred on fragments which bound labeled lectin. These results suggest that the acetylcholine receptors in electric organ and muscle tissues of Electrophorus differ in structure only by minor posttranslational modifications perhaps involving carbohydrate.

  13. From G Protein-coupled Receptor Structure Resolution to Rational Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Ali; Dias, Joao M; Marshall, Fiona H

    2015-08-07

    A number of recent technical solutions have led to significant advances in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology. Apart from a detailed mechanistic view of receptor activation, the new structures have revealed novel ligand binding sites. Together, these insights provide avenues for rational drug design to modulate the activities of these important drug targets. The application of structural data to GPCR drug discovery ushers in an exciting era with the potential to improve existing drugs and discover new ones. In this review, we focus on technical solutions that have accelerated GPCR crystallography as well as some of the salient findings from structures that are relevant to drug discovery. Finally, we outline some of the approaches used in GPCR structure based drug design.

  14. Crystal structure of the plant receptor-like kinase TDR in complex with the TDIF peptide

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Junko; Kato, Kazuki; Nakane, Takanori; Kondo, Yuki; Fukuda, Hiroo; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    In plants, leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RKs) perceive ligands, including peptides and small molecules, to regulate various physiological processes. TDIF, a member of the CLE peptide family, specifically interacts with the LRR-RK TDR to inhibit meristem differentiation into tracheary elements, and promotes cell proliferation. Here we report the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of TDR in complex with the TDIF peptide. The extracellular domain of TDR adopts a superhelical structure comprising 22 LRRs, and specifically recognizes TDIF by its inner concave surface. Together with our biochemical and sequence analyses, our structure reveals a conserved TDIF-recognition mechanism of TDR among plant species. Furthermore, a structural comparison of TDR with other plant LRR-RKs suggested the activation mechanism of TDR by TDIF. The structure of this CLE peptide receptor provides insights into the recognition mechanism of the CLE family peptides. PMID:27498761

  15. Structure of the fungal β-glucan-binding immune receptor dectin-1: Implications for function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James; O'Callaghan, Chris A.; Marshall, Andrew S.J.; Gilbert, Robert J.C.; Siebold, Christian; Gordon, Siamon; Brown, Gordon D.; Jones, E. Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    The murine molecule dectin-1 (known as the β-glucan receptor in humans) is an immune cell surface receptor implicated in the immunological defense against fungal pathogens. Sequence analysis has indicated that the dectin-1 extracellular domain is a C-type lectin-like domain, and functional studies have established that it binds fungal β-glucans. We report several dectin-1 crystal structures, including a high-resolution structure and a 2.8 Å resolution structure in which a short soaked natural β-glucan is trapped in the crystal lattice. In vitro characterization of dectin-1 in the presence of its natural ligand indicates higher-order complex formation between dectin-1 and β-glucans. These combined structural and biophysical data considerably extend the current knowledge of dectin-1 structure and function, and suggest potential mechanisms of defense against fungal pathogens. PMID:17473009

  16. Structural determinants of D-cycloserine efficacy at the NR1/NR2C NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dravid, Shashank M.; Burger, Pieter B.; Prakash, Anand; Geballe, Matthew T.; Yadav, Roopali; Le, Phuong; Vellano, Kimberly; Snyder, James P.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied relative efficacies of NR1 agonists glycine and D-cycloserine (DCS), and found efficacy to be dependent on the NR2 subunit. DCS shows partial agonism at NR1/NR2B but has higher relative efficacy than glycine at NR1/NR2C receptor. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the NR1/NR2B and NR1/NR2C agonist binding domain dimer suggest only subtle differences in the interactions of DCS with NR1 binding site residues relative to glycine. The most pronounced differences were observed in the NR1/NR2C simulation between the orientation of helix F and G of the NR1 subunit. Interestingly, Helix F was previously proposed to influence receptor gating and to adopt an orientation depending on agonist efficacy. MD simulations and site-directed mutagenesis further suggest a role for residues at the agonist binding domain dimer interface in regulating DCS efficacy. To relate the structural rearrangements to receptor gating, we recorded single-channel currents from outside-out patches containing a single active NR1/NR2C receptor. DCS increased the mean open time and open probability of NR1/NR2C receptors in comparison to glycine. Maximum likelihood fitting of a gating model for NR1/NR2C receptor activation to the single channel data suggests that DCS specifically accelerates the rate constant governing a fast gating step and reduces the closing rate. These changes appear to reflect a decreased activation energy for a pregating step and increased stability of the open states. We suggest that the higher efficacy of DCS at NR1/NR2C receptors involves structural rearrangements at the dimer interface and an effect on NR1/NR2C receptor pre-gating conformational changes. PMID:20164358

  17. Comparative genomics uncovers novel structural and functional features of the heterotrimeric GTPase signaling system

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Vivek; Abhiman, Saraswathi; de Souza, Robson F.; Aravind, L.

    2012-01-01

    parallel systems in animals. Furthermore, this newly characterized diversity of RGS domains helps in defining their ancestral conserved interfaces with Gα and also those interfaces that are prone to extensive lineage-specific diversification and are thereby responsible for selectivity in Gα-RGS interactions. Several mushrooms show LSEs of Gαs but not of RGS proteins pointing to the probable differentiation of Gαs in conjunction with mating-type diversity. When combined with the characterization of the 7TM receptors (GPCRs), it becomes apparent that, through much of eukaryotic evolution, cells contained both 7TM receptors that acted as GEFs and those as GAPs (with C-terminal RGS domains) for Gαs. Only in some lineages like animals and stramenopiles the 7TM receptors were restricted to GEF only roles, probably due to selection imposed by the rate-constants of the Gαs that underwent lineage-specific expansion in them. In the alveolate lineage the 7TM receptors occur independently of heterotrimeric G-proteins, suggesting the prevalence of G-protein-independent signaling in these organisms. PMID:21182906

  18. High-resolution crystal structure of the human CB1 cannabinoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhenhua; Yin, Jie; Chapman, Karen; Grzemska, Magdalena; Clark, Lindsay; Wang, Junmei; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    The human cannabinoid G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) CB1 and CB2 mediate the functional responses to the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG), as well as the widely consumed plant (phyto)cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)1. The cannabinoid receptors have been the targets of intensive drug discovery efforts due to the therapeutic potential of modulators for controlling pain2, epilepsy3, obesity4, and other maladies. While much progress has recently been made in understanding the biophysical properties of GPCRs, investigations of the molecular mechanisms of the cannabinoids and their receptors have lacked high-resolution structural data. We used GPCR engineering and lipidic cubic phase (LCP) crystallization to determine the structure of the human CB1 receptor bound to the inhibitor taranabant at 2.6 Å resolution. CB1's extracellular surface, including the highly conserved membrane-proximal amino-terminal (N-terminal) region, is distinct from other lipid-activated GPCRs and forms a critical part of the ligand binding pocket. Docking studies further demonstrate how this same pocket may accommodate the cannabinoid agonist THC. Our CB1 structure provides an atomic framework for studying cannabinoid receptor function, and will aid the design and optimization of cannabinoid system modulators for therapeutic ends. PMID:27851727

  19. Structural basis of interleukin-5 dimer recognition by its α receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, Seisuke; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Hino, Nobumasa; Ohsawa, Noboru; Ikutani, Masashi; Takaki, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Hara-Yokoyama, Miki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-5 (IL-5), a major hematopoietin, stimulates eosinophil proliferation, migration, and activation, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. The specific IL-5 receptor (IL-5R) consists of the IL-5 receptor α subunit (IL-5RA) and the common receptor β subunit (βc). IL-5 binding to IL-5R on target cells induces rapid tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of various cellular proteins, including JAK1/JAK2 and STAT1/STAT5. Here, we report the crystal structure of dimeric IL-5 in complex with the IL-5RA extracellular domains. The structure revealed that IL-5RA sandwiches the IL-5 homodimer by three tandem domains, arranged in a “wrench-like” architecture. This association mode was confirmed for human cells expressing IL-5 and the full-length IL-5RA by applying expanded genetic code technology: protein photo-cross-linking experiments revealed that the two proteins interact with each other in vivo in the same manner as that in the crystal structure. Furthermore, a comparison with the previously reported, partial GM-CSF•GM-CSFRA•βc structure enabled us to propose complete structural models for the IL-5 and GM-CSF receptor complexes, and to identify the residues conferring the cytokine-specificities of IL-5RA and GM-CSFRA. PMID:22528658

  20. Cannabinoids go nuclear: evidence for activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, S E

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids act at two classical cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), a 7TM orphan receptor and the transmitter-gated channel transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 receptor. Recent evidence also points to cannabinoids acting at members of the nuclear receptor family, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, with three subtypes α, β (δ) and γ), which regulate cell differentiation and lipid metabolism. Much evidence now suggests that endocannabinoids are natural activators of PPARα. Oleoylethanolamide regulates feeding and body weight, stimulates fat utilization and has neuroprotective effects mediated through activation of PPARα. Similarly, palmitoylethanolamide regulates feeding and lipid metabolism and has anti-inflammatory properties mediated by PPARα. Other endocannabinoids that activate PPARα include anandamide, virodhamine and noladin. Some (but not all) endocannabinoids also activate PPARγ; anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol have anti-inflammatory properties mediated by PPARγ. Similarly, ajulemic acid, a structural analogue of a metabolite of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), causes anti-inflammatory effects in vivo through PPARγ. THC also activates PPARγ, leading to a time-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated arteries. Other cannabinoids which activate PPARγ include N-arachidonoyl-dopamine, HU210, WIN55212-2 and CP55940. In contrast, little research has been carried out on the effects of cannabinoids at PPARδ. In this newly emerging area, a number of research questions remain unanswered; for example, why do cannabinoids activate some isoforms and not others? How much of the chronic effects of cannabinoids are through activation of nuclear receptors? And importantly, do cannabinoids confer the same neuro- and cardioprotective benefits as other PPARα and PPARγ agonists? This review will summarize the published literature implicating cannabinoid-mediated PPAR effects and discuss the implications thereof. PMID:17704824

  1. Cannabinoids go nuclear: evidence for activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, S E

    2007-11-01

    Cannabinoids act at two classical cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), a 7TM orphan receptor and the transmitter-gated channel transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 receptor. Recent evidence also points to cannabinoids acting at members of the nuclear receptor family, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, with three subtypes alpha, beta (delta) and gamma), which regulate cell differentiation and lipid metabolism. Much evidence now suggests that endocannabinoids are natural activators of PPAR alpha. Oleoylethanolamide regulates feeding and body weight, stimulates fat utilization and has neuroprotective effects mediated through activation of PPAR alpha. Similarly, palmitoylethanolamide regulates feeding and lipid metabolism and has anti-inflammatory properties mediated by PPAR alpha. Other endocannabinoids that activate PPAR alpha include anandamide, virodhamine and noladin. Some (but not all) endocannabinoids also activate PPAR gamma; anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol have anti-inflammatory properties mediated by PPAR gamma. Similarly, ajulemic acid, a structural analogue of a metabolite of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), causes anti-inflammatory effects in vivo through PPAR gamma. THC also activates PPAR gamma, leading to a time-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated arteries. Other cannabinoids which activate PPAR gamma include N-arachidonoyl-dopamine, HU210, WIN55212-2 and CP55940. In contrast, little research has been carried out on the effects of cannabinoids at PPAR delta. In this newly emerging area, a number of research questions remain unanswered; for example, why do cannabinoids activate some isoforms and not others? How much of the chronic effects of cannabinoids are through activation of nuclear receptors? And importantly, do cannabinoids confer the same neuro- and cardioprotective benefits as other PPAR alpha and PPAR gamma agonists? This review will summarize the published literature implicating cannabinoid-mediated PPAR

  2. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Zacarías, Natalia V. Ortiz; de Vries, Henk; Han, Gye Won; Gustavsson, Martin; Dabros, Marta; Zhao, Chunxia; Cherney, Robert J.; Carter, Percy; Stamos, Dean; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Heitman, Laura H.; Tebben, Andrew; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, here we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.

  3. Studies on the structure of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor using photoaffinity labeling procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The general objective of this project was to study the structure of the follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor using affinity labeling methods. A low density fraction derived from homogenates of bovine testis was found to contain high affinity and low capacity receptors specific for FSH. Electron microscopic examination of the fraction revealed structure resembling multilamellar membranous vesicles (MV). For photoaffinity labeling of the FSH receptors in MV, an azidobenzoyl-/sup 125/I-analog of human FSH was prepared (/sup 125/I-AB-hFSH) and binding of specific FSH receptors was studied. /sup 125/I-AB-hFSH binding of receptors was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by unlabeled hFSH, and binding was not prevented by structurally-related human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The formation of photocrosslinked protein of relative molecular mass (M/sub r/) 54,000, 64,000, 76,000, 84,000, 97,000 and 116,000 was found to be inhibited by unlabeled hFSH in a dose related manner, and to be dependent on photoactivation of the FSH derivative. The interpretation of the photoaffinity labeling experiments was that three proteins associated with the FSH receptor were photoaffinity labeled. Analysis by indirect means suggested that the three proteins were assembled to form oligomeric complexes, and based on the intensities and composition of the oligomeric species, spatial relationships of the polypeptides with respect to each other on the membrane surface were deduced. The results of photoaffinity labeling suggest the FSH receptor is composed of three subunits of M/sub r/ 38,000, 48,000, and 81,000 and exists in the membrane in part as a M/sub r/ 330,000 dimer.

  4. Structure, function and clinical significance of transferrin receptors.

    PubMed

    Feelders, R A; Kuiper-Kramer, E P; van Eijk, H G

    1999-01-01

    Iron plays an essential role in a spectrum of metabolic processes. Cellular iron uptake is facilitated by transferrin receptor (TfR)-mediated endocytosis. In recent years more insight has been obtained in TfR physiology and the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The synthesis of TfR and the iron storage protein ferritin is regulated reciprocally at the post-transcriptional level according to the cellular iron status. As a result of externalization of TfR during the endocytic cycle, a soluble form of TfR can be detected in serum. The serum TfR (sTfR) level is closely related to erythroid TfR turnover and the prime determinants of the sTfR concentration are cellular iron demands and erythroid proliferation rate. In the absence of a hyperplastic erythropoiesis the sTfR level is a sensitive parameter of early tissue iron deficiency. The entire spectrum of body iron status can be assessed by measurement of serum ferritin and sTfR levels, with ferritin as marker of tissue iron stores and sTfR as index of tissue iron needs. The sTfR may be a promising tool to detect iron deficiency in inflammatory states and in the anaemia of chronic disease as its concentration is, in contrast to ferritin levels, not influenced by the acute phase response. Determination of sTfR levels may also improve assessment of body iron stores during pregnancy and in neonates. Finally, the sTfR may be a useful parameter to monitor erythropoiesis in various clinical settings, for instance in the prediction of the haematological response to erythropoietin treatment. However, standardization of the sTfR assay, with definition of reference and pathological ranges, is necessary for the definitive introduction of the sTfR as major parameter of iron metabolism.

  5. Androgen receptor overexpression alters binding dynamics of the receptor to chromatin and chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Urbanucci, Alfonso; Marttila, Saara; Jänne, Olli A; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2012-08-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs) overexpress often androgen receptor (AR). Here, we investigated the effect of AR overexpression on the dynamics of AR loading and RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II) recruitment to chromatin. Acetylation of histone 3 (AcH3) on lysines 9 and 14 (K9 and K14) was also studied. We used an LNCaP-based AR overexpression cell line model that includes a control line and two sublines, LNCaP-ARmo and LNCaP-ARhi, which overexpress AR twofold to threefold and fourfold to fivefold, respectively. Cells were exposed to 1 or 100 nM of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on the promoters and enhancers of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) genes was performed. qRT-PCR was used to measure the levels of PSA and TMPRSS2 transcripts. Upon stimulation with 1 nM DHT, AR and RNA Pol II were recruited onto PSA and TMPRSS2 enhancer regions to a greater extent (P < 0.05) in AR-overexpressing cells compared to control cells. The difference in AR loading between the control and AR-overexpressing cells was abolished by a higher DHT concentration. The ratio of AcH3/H3 was increased in AR-overexpressing cells. The induction of transcription of PSA and TMPRSS2 occurred earlier in the AR-overexpressing cells. Our findings suggest that the levels of AR potentiate the recruitment of the AR, as well as components of the basic transcription machinery, to chromatin and affect the acetylation of histones in the presence of low levels of androgens. These changes result in enhanced gene transcription of AR target genes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Structure-activity relationships for allosteric NMDA receptor inhibitors based on 2-naphthoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Blaise Mathias; Irvine, Mark W.; Fang, Guangyu; Eaves, Richard J.; Mayo-Martin, Maria Belen; Laube, Bodo; Jane, David E.; Monaghan, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Over-activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is critically involved in many neurological conditions, thus there has been considerable interest in developing NMDA receptor antagonists. We have recently identified a series of naphthoic and phenanthroic acid compounds that allosterically modulate NMDA receptors through a novel mechanism of action. In the present study, we have determined the structure-activity relationships of 18 naphthoic acid derivatives for the ability to inhibit the four GluN1/GluN2(A-D) NMDA receptor subtypes. 2-Naphthoic acid has low activity at GluN2A-containing receptors and yet lower activity at other NMDA receptors. 3-Amino addition, and especially 3-hydroxy addition, to 2-naphthoic acid increased inhibitory activity at GluN1/GluN2C and GluN1/GluN2D receptors. Further halogen and phenyl substitutions to 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid leads to several relatively potent inhibitors, the most potent of which is UBP618 (1-bromo-2-hydroxy-6-phenylnaphthalene-3-carboxylic acid) with an IC50 ~ 2 μM at each of the NMDA receptor subtypes. While UBP618 is non-selective, elimination of the hydroxyl group in UBP618, as in UBP628 and UBP608, leads to an increase in GluN1/GluN2A selectivity. Of the compounds evaluated, specifically those with a 6-phenyl substitution were less able to fully inhibit GluN1/GluN2A, GluN1/GluN2B and GluN1/GluN2C responses (maximal % inhibition of 60 – 90%). Such antagonists may potentially have reduced adverse effects by not excessively blocking NMDA receptor signaling. Together, these studies reveal discrete structure-activity relationships for the allosteric antagonism of NMDA receptors that may facilitate the development of NMDA receptor modulator agents for a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurological conditions. PMID:22155206

  7. From Atomic Structures to Neuronal Functions of G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Palczewski, Krzysztof; Orban, Tivadar

    2015-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are essential mediators of signal transduction, neurotransmission, ion channel regulation, and other cellular events. GPCRs are activated by diverse stimuli, including light, enzymatic processing of their N-termini, and binding of proteins, peptides, or small molecules such as neurotransmitters. GPCR dysfunction caused by receptor mutations and environmental challenges contributes to many neurological diseases. Moreover, modern genetic technology has helped identify a rich array of mono- and multigenic defects in humans and animal models that connect such receptor dysfunction with disease affecting neuronal function. The visual system is especially suited to investigate GPCR structure and function because advanced imaging techniques permit structural studies of photoreceptor neurons at both macro and molecular levels that, together with biochemical and physiological assessment in animal models, provide a more complete understanding of GPCR signaling. PMID:23682660

  8. Structural Basis for Agonism and Antagonism for a Set of Chemically Related Progesterone Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Lusher, Scott J.; Raaijmakers, Hans C. A.; Vu-Pham, Diep; Dechering, Koen; Lam, Tsang Wai; Brown, Angus R.; Hamilton, Niall M.; Nimz, Olaf; Bosch, Rolien; McGuire, Ross; Oubrie, Arthur; de Vlieg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The progesterone receptor is able to bind to a large number and variety of ligands that elicit a broad range of transcriptional responses ranging from full agonism to full antagonism and numerous mixed profiles inbetween. We describe here two new progesterone receptor ligand binding domain x-ray structures bound to compounds from a structurally related but functionally divergent series, which show different binding modes corresponding to their agonistic or antagonistic nature. In addition, we present a third progesterone receptor ligand binding domain dimer bound to an agonist in monomer A and an antagonist in monomer B, which display binding modes in agreement with the earlier observation that agonists and antagonists from this series adopt different binding modes. PMID:21849509

  9. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. )

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Sequence, Structure and Ligand Binding Evolution of Rhodopsin-Like G Protein-Coupled Receptors: A Crystal Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Steffen; Grünewald, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest family of membrane receptors in the human genome. Advances in membrane protein crystallization so far resulted in the determination of 24 receptors available as high-resolution atomic structures. We performed the first phylogenetic analysis of GPCRs based on the available set of GPCR structures. We present a new phylogenetic tree of known human rhodopsin-like GPCR sequences based on this structure set. We can distinguish the three separate classes of small-ligand binding GPCRs, peptide binding GPCRs, and olfactory receptors. Analyzing different structural subdomains, we found that small molecule binding receptors most likely have evolved from peptide receptor precursors, with a rhodopsin/S1PR1 ancestor, most likely an ancestral opsin, forming the link between both classes. A light-activated receptor therefore seems to be the origin of the small molecule hormone receptors of the central nervous system. We find hints for a common evolutionary path of both ligand binding site and central sodium/water binding site. Surprisingly, opioid receptors exhibit both a binding cavity and a central sodium/water binding site similar to the one of biogenic amine receptors instead of peptide receptors, making them seemingly prone to bind small molecule ligands, e.g. opiates. Our results give new insights into the relationship and the pharmacological properties of rhodopsin-like GPCRs. PMID:25881057

  11. Structural basis of collagen recognition by human osteoclast-associated receptor and design of osteoclastogenesis inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Joel; Qi, Jianxun; Chen, Chun-Chi; Lu, Guangwen; Liu, Yingxia; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F.

    2016-01-01

    Human osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like collagen receptor that is up-regulated on osteoclasts during osteoclastogenesis and is expressed in a range of myeloid cells. As a member of the leukocyte receptor complex family of proteins, OSCAR shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology with other collagen receptors of this family, including glycoprotein VI, leukocyte-associated Ig-like receptor-1, and leukocyte Ig-like receptor B4, but recognizes a unique collagen sequence. Here, we present the crystal structures of OSCAR in its free form and in complex with a triple-helical collagen-like peptide (CLP). These structures reveal that the CLP peptide binds only one of the two Ig-like domains, the membrane-proximal domain (domain 2) of OSCAR, with the middle and trailing chain burying a total of 661 Å2 of solvent-accessible collagen surface. This binding mode is facilitated by the unusual topography of the OSCAR protein, which displays an obtuse interdomain angle and a rotation of domain 2 relative to the membrane-distal domain 1. Moreover, the binding of the CLP to OSCAR appears to be mediated largely by tyrosine residues and conformational changes at a shallow Phe pocket. Furthermore, we investigated CLP peptides as inhibitors of osteoclastogenesis and found that a peptide length of 40 amino acids is required to ensure adequate inhibition of osteoclastogenesis in vitro. These findings provide valuable structural insights into the mode of collagen recognition by OSCAR and into the use of synthetic peptide matrikines for osteoclastogenesis inhibition. PMID:26744311

  12. Structural basis of collagen recognition by human osteoclast-associated receptor and design of osteoclastogenesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Joel; Qi, Jianxun; Chen, Chun-Chi; Lu, Guangwen; Liu, Yingxia; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-01-26

    Human osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like collagen receptor that is up-regulated on osteoclasts during osteoclastogenesis and is expressed in a range of myeloid cells. As a member of the leukocyte receptor complex family of proteins, OSCAR shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology with other collagen receptors of this family, including glycoprotein VI, leukocyte-associated Ig-like receptor-1, and leukocyte Ig-like receptor B4, but recognizes a unique collagen sequence. Here, we present the crystal structures of OSCAR in its free form and in complex with a triple-helical collagen-like peptide (CLP). These structures reveal that the CLP peptide binds only one of the two Ig-like domains, the membrane-proximal domain (domain 2) of OSCAR, with the middle and trailing chain burying a total of 661 Å(2) of solvent-accessible collagen surface. This binding mode is facilitated by the unusual topography of the OSCAR protein, which displays an obtuse interdomain angle and a rotation of domain 2 relative to the membrane-distal domain 1. Moreover, the binding of the CLP to OSCAR appears to be mediated largely by tyrosine residues and conformational changes at a shallow Phe pocket. Furthermore, we investigated CLP peptides as inhibitors of osteoclastogenesis and found that a peptide length of 40 amino acids is required to ensure adequate inhibition of osteoclastogenesis in vitro. These findings provide valuable structural insights into the mode of collagen recognition by OSCAR and into the use of synthetic peptide matrikines for osteoclastogenesis inhibition.

  13. Structural insights into the nucleotide base specificity of P2X receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Go; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Tsukamoto, Hisao; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ryu, Satoshi; Touhara, Kazushige; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Furutani, Yuji; Hattori, Motoyuki; Nureki, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-gated cation channels involved in diverse physiological processes, ranging from muscle contraction to nociception. Despite the recent structure determination of the ATP-bound P2X receptors, the molecular mechanism of the nucleotide base specificity has remained elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of zebrafish P2X4 in complex with a weak affinity agonist, CTP, together with structure-based electrophysiological and spectroscopic analyses. The CTP-bound structure revealed a hydrogen bond, between the cytosine base and the side chain of the basic residue in the agonist binding site, which mediates the weak but significant affinity for CTP. The cytosine base is further recognized by two main chain atoms, as in the ATP-bound structure, but their bond lengths seem to be extended in the CTP-bound structure, also possibly contributing to the weaker affinity for CTP over ATP. This work provides the structural insights for the nucleotide base specificity of P2X receptors. PMID:28332633

  14. The Structure of A Biologically Active Estrogen Receptor-Coactivator Complex on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ping; Wang, Zhao; Feng, Qin; Pintilie, Grigore D.; Foulds, Charles E.; Lanz, Rainer B.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Estrogen receptor (ER) is a transcription factor critical for development, reproduction, metabolism and cancer. ER function hinges on its ability to recruit primary and secondary coactivators, yet structural information on the full-length receptor-coactivator complex to complement pre-existing and sometimes controversial biochemical information is lacking. Here we use cryo-EM to determine the quaternary structure of an active complex of DNA-bound ERα, steroid receptor coactivator 3 (SRC-3) and a secondary coactivator (p300). Our structural model suggests the following assembly mechanism for the complex: each of the two ligand-bound ERα monomers independently recruits one SRC-3 protein via the transactivation domain of ERα; the two SRC-3s in turn bind to different regions of one p300 protein through multiple contacts. We also present structural evidence for the location of activation function 1 (AF-1) in a full-length nuclear receptor, which supports a role for AF-1 in SRC-3 recruitment. PMID:25728767

  15. Structure-based discovery of selective serotonin 5-HT(1B) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, David; Brea, José; Loza, María Isabel; Carlsson, Jens

    2014-08-05

    The development of safe and effective drugs relies on the discovery of selective ligands. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) G protein-coupled receptors are therapeutic targets for CNS disorders but are also associated with adverse drug effects. The determination of crystal structures for the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors provided an opportunity to identify subtype selective ligands using structure-based methods. From docking screens of 1.3 million compounds, 22 molecules were predicted to be selective for the 5-HT1B receptor over the 5-HT2B subtype, a requirement for safe serotonergic drugs. Nine compounds were experimentally verified as 5-HT1B-selective ligands, with up to 300-fold higher affinities for this subtype. Three of the ligands were agonists of the G protein pathway. Analysis of state-of-the-art homology models of the two 5-HT receptors revealed that the crystal structures were critical for predicting selective ligands. Our results demonstrate that structure-based screening can guide the discovery of ligands with specific selectivity profiles.

  16. Ligand/kappa-Opioid Receptor Interactions: Insights from the X-Ray Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Mayorga, Karina; Byler, Kendall G.; Yongye, Austin B.; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Dooley, Colette T.; Houghten, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    During the past five years, the three-dimensional structures of 14 different G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been resolved by X-ray crystallography. The most recently published structures, those of the opioid receptors (ORs), are remarkably important in pain modulation, drug addiction, and mood disorders. These structures, confirmed previously proposed key interactions conferring potency and antagonistic properties, including the well-known interaction with Asp138, conserved in all aminergic GPCRs. In addition, crystallization of the opioid receptors highlighted the potential function of the ECL2 and ICL2 loops. We have previously reported a set of potent and selective kappa opioid receptor peptide agonists, of which ff(D-nle)r-NH2 is among the most potent and selective ones. These peptides were identified from the deconvolution of a 6,250,000 tetrapeptide combinatorial library. A derivative of this set is currently the subject of a phase 2 clinical trial in the United States. In this work, we describe comparative molecular modeling studies of kappa-OR peptide agonists with the co-crystallized antagonist, JDTic, and also report structure-activity relationships of 23 tetrapeptides. The overall binding and contact interactions are sound and interactions known to favor selectivity and potency were observed. Additional modeling studies will reveal conformational changes that the kappa-OR undergoes upon binding to these peptide agonists. PMID:23792349

  17. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-05-19

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors.

  18. The structural basis for agonist and partial agonist action on a β(1)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Warne, Tony; Moukhametzianov, Rouslan; Baker, Jillian G; Nehmé, Rony; Edwards, Patricia C; Leslie, Andrew G W; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Tate, Christopher G

    2011-01-13

    β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate intracellular G proteins upon binding catecholamine agonist ligands such as adrenaline and noradrenaline. Synthetic ligands have been developed that either activate or inhibit βARs for the treatment of asthma, hypertension or cardiac dysfunction. These ligands are classified as either full agonists, partial agonists or antagonists, depending on whether the cellular response is similar to that of the native ligand, reduced or inhibited, respectively. However, the structural basis for these different ligand efficacies is unknown. Here we present four crystal structures of the thermostabilized turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) β(1)-adrenergic receptor (β(1)AR-m23) bound to the full agonists carmoterol and isoprenaline and the partial agonists salbutamol and dobutamine. In each case, agonist binding induces a 1 Å contraction of the catecholamine-binding pocket relative to the antagonist bound receptor. Full agonists can form hydrogen bonds with two conserved serine residues in transmembrane helix 5 (Ser(5.42) and Ser(5.46)), but partial agonists only interact with Ser(5.42) (superscripts refer to Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering). The structures provide an understanding of the pharmacological differences between different ligand classes, illuminating how GPCRs function and providing a solid foundation for the structure-based design of novel ligands with predictable efficacies.

  19. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T.; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O.; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G.; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  20. A Comparative Structural Bioinformatics Analysis of the Insulin Receptor Family Ectodomain Based on Phylogenetic Information

    PubMed Central

    Rentería, Miguel E.; Gandhi, Neha S.; Vinuesa, Pablo; Helmerhorst, Erik; Mancera, Ricardo L.

    2008-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR), the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) and the insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR) are covalently-linked homodimers made up of several structural domains. The molecular mechanism of ligand binding to the ectodomain of these receptors and the resulting activation of their tyrosine kinase domain is still not well understood. We have carried out an amino acid residue conservation analysis in order to reconstruct the phylogeny of the IR Family. We have confirmed the location of ligand binding site 1 of the IGF1R and IR. Importantly, we have also predicted the likely location of the insulin binding site 2 on the surface of the fibronectin type III domains of the IR. An evolutionary conserved surface on the second leucine-rich domain that may interact with the ligand could not be detected. We suggest a possible mechanical trigger of the activation of the IR that involves a slight ‘twist’ rotation of the last two fibronectin type III domains in order to face the likely location of insulin. Finally, a strong selective pressure was found amongst the IRR orthologous sequences, suggesting that this orphan receptor has a yet unknown physiological role which may be conserved from amphibians to mammals. PMID:18989367

  1. Structural basis of interactions between epidermal growth factor receptor and SH2 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Longo, G M; Koland, J G

    1993-02-26

    The structural basis of the interactions between the activated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and SH2 domain proteins was investigated. The c-src SH2 domain (second domain of src homology) was expressed as a recombinant fusion protein, and an in vitro assay was developed to monitor EGF receptor/SH2 domain interactions. EGF receptor tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) forms expressed in the baculovirus/insect cell system were shown to bind to the SH2 domain when phosphorylated. These TKD/SH2 domain interactions were characterized by dissociation constants of 60-320 nM. Deletion analysis indicated that the entire SH2 domain was required for recognition of the phosphorylated TKD. The binding of a highly truncated TKD protein to the SH2 domain suggested that the sites recognized by the SH2 domain included the EGF receptor autophosphorylation site, tyr992. A phosphorylated EGF receptor peptide containing tyr992 was also shown to interact with the SH2 domain. This residue may therefore mediate interactions between the EGF receptor and tyrosine kinases in the src family.

  2. Heterologous production of death ligands' and death receptors' extracellular domains: structural features and efficient systems.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Michiro

    2012-08-01

    The extracellular domains of death ligands and those of death receptors are closely related to many serious human diseases through the initiation of apoptosis. Recombinant production of the extracellular domains has been investigated due to demand for a large amount of purified samples, which are a prerequisite for their biochemical characterization and constitute the fundamentals of medical applications. This review focuses on the recombinant production of extracellular domains of the major members of death ligand and death receptor families using non-mammalian expression systems with an emphasis on Fas ligand and Fas receptor. In contrast to the efficient production of the functional extracellular domains of TRAIL, TNFα and LTα by intracellular expression systems using Escherichia coli or Pichia pastoris, that of Fas ligand requires the secretory expression systems using P. pastoris or Dictyostelium discoideum, and the productivity in P. pastoris was largely dependent on tag sequence, potential N-glycosylation site and expressed protein region. On the other hand, the exploitation of insect cell systems is generally useful for the preparation of functional extracellular domains of death receptors containing many disulfide bridges in the absence of extended secondary structure, and a Bombyx mori larvae secretion system presented a superior productivity for human Fas receptor extracellular domain. Based on the results obtained so far, further efforts should be devoted to the artificial control of death ligand - death receptor interactions in order to make a contribution to medicine, represented by the development of novel biopharmaceuticals.

  3. Structural and functional characterization of the human formyl peptide receptor ligand-binding region.

    PubMed Central

    Radel, S J; Genco, R J; De Nardin, E

    1994-01-01

    The formyl peptide (N-formyl-1-methionyl-1-leucyl-1-phenylalanine [FMLP]) receptor is involved in the activation of neutrophils and their subsequent response to chemotactic N-formylated peptides. Recently, we found that the first extracellular loop closest to the N-terminal end of the FMLP receptor exhibited the strongest ligand binding compared with that shown by other extracellular regions. By constructing amino acid substitutional variants of this domain, we have determined that residues Arg-84 and Lys-85 on this loop play major roles in ligand-binding activity. Furthermore, random rearrangement of the residues of this receptor region demonstrated that the position of these charged amino acids did not affect their involvement in ligand binding, although their presence was essential for this binding to occur. We propose that the portion of the first N-terminal extracellular loop of the FMLP receptor containing residues Arg-84 and Lys-85 contributes significantly to the active site in ligand-receptor binding. We further propose that this binding is not dependent on defined structure but rather that these charged moieties may function as important "contacts" in receptor-ligand interactions. Images PMID:8168934

  4. Conservation of the genomic structure and receptor-mediated signaling between human and rat IL-24.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Tan, Z; Thomas, E K; Liang, P

    2004-08-01

    IL-24/MDA-7 is a new member of the IL-10 family of cytokines, which signals through two heterodimeric receptor complexes (IL-20R1/IL-20R2 and IL-22R/IL-20R2). Previously, we identified a rat gene named mob-5, which encodes a secreted protein that shares a high degree of homology with human IL-24. Expression of mob-5 and its putative cell surface receptors was shown to be upregulated by oncogenic ras. Here we show that not only do rat mob-5 and human IL-24 share a strikingly similar genomic structure but also that the rat MOB-5 protein can bind to and signal through the human IL-24 receptors. Like human IL-24, binding of the rat MOB-5 protein to the human IL-24 receptors leads to activation of the JAK/STAT pathway, which in turn supports receptor-dependent survival and proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Furthermore, using human colon cancer cell lines with somatic knockout of either the mutant or the wild-type k-ras allele, we demonstrate that the human IL-24 receptors also are upregulated by oncogenic ras. Taken together, these results provide strong experimental evidence that MOB-5 is indeed the rat homolog of human IL-24.

  5. Crystal structure of the human OX2 orexin receptor bound to the insomnia drug suvorexant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jie; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Kolb, Peter; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2015-03-01

    The orexin (also known as hypocretin) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to orexin neuropeptides in the central nervous system to regulate sleep and other behavioural functions in humans. Defects in orexin signalling are responsible for the human diseases of narcolepsy and cataplexy; inhibition of orexin receptors is an effective therapy for insomnia. The human OX2 receptor (OX2R) belongs to the β branch of the rhodopsin family of GPCRs, and can bind to diverse compounds including the native agonist peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and the potent therapeutic inhibitor suvorexant. Here, using lipid-mediated crystallization and protein engineering with a novel fusion chimaera, we solved the structure of the human OX2R bound to suvorexant at 2.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals how suvorexant adopts a π-stacked horseshoe-like conformation and binds to the receptor deep in the orthosteric pocket, stabilizing a network of extracellular salt bridges and blocking transmembrane helix motions necessary for activation. Computational docking suggests how other classes of synthetic antagonists may interact with the receptor at a similar position in an analogous π-stacked fashion. Elucidation of the molecular architecture of the human OX2R expands our understanding of peptidergic GPCR ligand recognition and will aid further efforts to modulate orexin signalling for therapeutic ends.

  6. in Silico investigation of the structural requirements for the AMPA receptor antagonism by quinoxaline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Faizul; Abugrain, Ismaiel Mohamed; Sanalla, Mohamed Hussin; Elnaas, Radwan Fatahalla; Rajab, Ibrahim Abdassalam Ibn

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders and their antagonism offers a suitable approach for the treatment of such disorders. The field of drug design and discovery aims to find best medicines to prevent, treat and cure diseases quickly and efficiently. In this regard, computational tools have helped medicinal chemists modify and optimize molecules to potent drug candidates with better pharmacokinetic profiles, and guiding biologists and pharmacologists to explore new disease genes as well as novel drug targets. In the present study, to understand the structural requirements for AMPA receptor antagonism, molecular docking study was performed on 41 structurally diverse antagonists based on quinoxaline nucleus. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results obtained signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r2 = 0.6) between experimental and docking predicted AMPA receptor antagonistic activity. The aromatic moiety of quinoxaline core has been proved to be vital for hydrophobic contacts exhibiting - interactions in docked conformations. However, polar moieties such as carboxylic group and 1,2,4-triazole moieties were noted to be sites for hydrophilic interactions in terms of hydrogen bonding with the receptor. These analyses can be exploited to design and develop novel AMPA receptor antagonists for the treatment of different neurological disorders. PMID:24250113

  7. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Structural Insights and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represents a novel approach to the development of probes and therapeutics that is expected to enable subtype-specific regulation of central nervous system target receptors. The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) are class C GPCRs that play important neuromodulatory roles throughout the brain, as such they are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention for a number of psychiatric and neurological disorders including anxiety, depression, Fragile X Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Over the last fifteen years, selective allosteric modulators have been identified for many members of the mGlu family. The vast majority of these allosteric modulators are thought to bind within the transmembrane-spanning domains of the receptors to enhance or inhibit functional responses. A combination of mutagenesis-based studies and pharmacological approaches are beginning to provide a better understanding of mGlu allosteric sites. Collectively, when mapped onto a homology model of the different mGlu subtypes based on the β2-adrenergic receptor, the previous mutagenesis studies suggest commonalities in the location of allosteric sites across different members of the mGlu family. In addition, there is evidence for multiple allosteric binding pockets within the transmembrane region that can interact to modulate one another. In the absence of a class C GPCR crystal structure, this approach has shown promise with respect to the interpretation of mutagenesis data and understanding structure-activity relationships of allosteric modulator pharmacophores. PMID:20637216

  8. The VPAC1 receptor: structure and function of a class B GPCR prototype

    PubMed Central

    Couvineau, A.; Ceraudo, E.; Tan, Y.-V.; Nicole, P.; Laburthe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represents a small sub-family encompassing 15 members, and are very promising targets for the development of drugs to treat many diseases such as chronic inflammation, neurodegeneration, diabetes, stress, and osteoporosis. The VPAC1 receptor which is an archetype of the class B GPCRs binds Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide widely distributed in central and peripheral nervous system modulating many physiological processes including regulation of exocrine secretions, hormone release, foetal development, immune response … VIP appears to exert beneficial effect in neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the structure and molecular pharmacology of VPAC1 receptors. Over the past decade, structure–function relationship studies have demonstrated that the N-terminal ectodomain (N-ted) of VPAC1 plays a pivotal role in VIP recognition. The use of different approaches such as directed mutagenesis, photoaffinity labeling, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), molecular modeling, and molecular dynamic simulation has led to demonstrate that: (1) the central and C-terminal part of the VIP molecule interacts with the N-ted of VPAC1 receptor which is itself structured as a « Sushi » domain; (2) the N-terminal end of the VIP molecule interacts with the first transmembrane domain of the receptor where three residues (K143, T144, and T147) play an important role in VPAC1 interaction with the first histidine residue of VIP. PMID:23162538

  9. Exploring the role of receptor flexibility in structure-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Feixas, Ferran; Lindert, Steffen; Sinko, William; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-02-01

    The proper understanding of biomolecular recognition mechanisms that take place in a drug target is of paramount importance to improve the efficiency of drug discovery and development. The intrinsic dynamic character of proteins has a strong influence on biomolecular recognition mechanisms and models such as conformational selection have been widely used to account for this dynamic association process. However, conformational changes occurring in the receptor prior and upon association with other molecules are diverse and not obvious to predict when only a few structures of the receptor are available. In view of the prominent role of protein flexibility in ligand binding and its implications for drug discovery, it is of great interest to identify receptor conformations that play a major role in biomolecular recognition before starting rational drug design efforts. In this review, we discuss a number of recent advances in computer-aided drug discovery techniques that have been proposed to incorporate receptor flexibility into structure-based drug design. The allowance for receptor flexibility provided by computational techniques such as molecular dynamics simulations or enhanced sampling techniques helps to improve the accuracy of methods used to estimate binding affinities and, thus, such methods can contribute to the discovery of novel drug leads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring the Role of Receptor Flexibility in Structure-Based Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Feixas, Ferran; Lindert, Steffen; Sinko, William; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The proper understanding of biomolecular recognition mechanisms that take place in a drug target is of paramount importance to improve the efficiency of drug discovery and development. The intrinsic dynamic character of proteins has a strong influence on biomolecular recognition mechanisms and models such as conformational selection have been widely used to account for this dynamic association process. However, conformational changes occurring in the receptor prior and upon association with other molecules are diverse and not obvious to predict when only a few structures of the receptor are available. In view of the prominent role of protein flexibility in ligand binding and its implications for drug discovery, it is of great interest to identify receptor conformations that play a major role in biomolecular recognition before starting rational drug design efforts. In this review, we discuss a number of recent advances in computer-aided drug discovery techniques that have been proposed to incorporate receptor flexibility into structure-based drug design. The allowance for receptor flexibility provided by computational techniques such as molecular dynamics simulations or enhanced sampling techniques helps to improve the accuracy of methods used to estimate binding affinities and, thus, such methods can contribute to the discovery of novel drug leads. PMID:24332165

  11. Structure and function relationship in the abdominal stretch receptor organs of the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Purali, Nuhan

    2005-08-08

    The structure/function relationship in the rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptor organs of the crayfish (Astacus leptodactylus) was investigated using confocal microscopy and neuronal modeling methods. Both receptor muscles were single muscle fibers with structural properties closely related to the function of the receptors. Dendrites of the rapidly adapting neuron terminated in a common pile of nerve endings going in all directions. Dendrites of the slowly adapting neuron terminated in a characteristic T shape in multiple regions of the receptor muscle. The slowly adapting main dendrite, which was on average 2.1 times longer and 21% thinner than the rapidly adapting main dendrite, induced larger voltage attenuation. The somal surface area of the slowly adapting neuron was on average 51% larger than that of the rapidly adapting neuron. Variation in the neuronal geometry was greatest among the slowly adapting neurons. A computational model of a neuron pair demonstrated that the rapidly and the slowly adapting neurons attenuated the dendritic receptor potential like low-pass filters with cut-off frequencies at 100 and 20 Hz, respectively. Recurrent dendrites were observed mostly in the slowly adapting neurons. Voltage signals were calculated to be propagated 23% faster in the rapidly adapting axon, which is 51% thicker than the slowly adapting axon. The present findings support the idea that the morphology of the rapidly and the slowly adapting neurons evolved to optimally sense the dynamic and the static features of the mechanical stimulus, respectively.

  12. in Silico investigation of the structural requirements for the AMPA receptor antagonism by quinoxaline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Azam, Faizul; Abugrain, Ismaiel Mohamed; Sanalla, Mohamed Hussin; Elnaas, Radwan Fatahalla; Rajab, Ibrahim Abdassalam Ibn

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders and their antagonism offers a suitable approach for the treatment of such disorders. The field of drug design and discovery aims to find best medicines to prevent, treat and cure diseases quickly and efficiently. In this regard, computational tools have helped medicinal chemists modify and optimize molecules to potent drug candidates with better pharmacokinetic profiles, and guiding biologists and pharmacologists to explore new disease genes as well as novel drug targets. In the present study, to understand the structural requirements for AMPA receptor antagonism, molecular docking study was performed on 41 structurally diverse antagonists based on quinoxaline nucleus. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results obtained signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r(2) = 0.6) between experimental and docking predicted AMPA receptor antagonistic activity. The aromatic moiety of quinoxaline core has been proved to be vital for hydrophobic contacts exhibiting - interactions in docked conformations. However, polar moieties such as carboxylic group and 1,2,4-triazole moieties were noted to be sites for hydrophilic interactions in terms of hydrogen bonding with the receptor. These analyses can be exploited to design and develop novel AMPA receptor antagonists for the treatment of different neurological disorders.

  13. Structural Basis for Platelet Collagen Responses by the Immune-type Receptor Glycoprotein VI

    SciTech Connect

    Horii,K.; Kahn, M.; Herr, A.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of circulating platelets by exposed vessel wall collagen is a primary step in the pathogenesis of heart attack and stroke, and drugs to block platelet activation have successfully reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In humans and mice, collagen activation of platelets is mediated by glycoprotein VI (GPVI), a receptor that is homologous to immune receptors but bears little sequence similarity to known matrix protein adhesion receptors. Here we present the crystal structure of the collagen-binding domain of human GPVI and characterize its interaction with a collagen-related peptide. Like related immune receptors, GPVI contains 2 immunoglobulin-like domains arranged in a perpendicular orientation. Significantly, GPVI forms a back-to-back dimer in the crystal, an arrangement that could explain data previously obtained from cell-surface GPVI inhibition studies. Docking algorithms identify 2 parallel grooves on the GPVI dimer surface as collagen-binding sites, and the orientation and spacing of these grooves precisely match the dimensions of an intact collagen fiber. These findings provide a structural basis for the ability of an immunetype receptor to generate signaling responses to collagen and for the development of GPVI inhibitors as new therapies for human cardiovascular disease.

  14. Dimeric Arrangement of the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and a Structural Mechanism for Ligand-induced Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G.; Parker, Naomi R.; Miller, Laurence J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-06-25

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP). Little is known about the oligomeric state of the receptor and its regulation by hormone. The crystal structure of the ligand-free PTH1R extracellular domain (ECD) reveals an unexpected dimer in which the C-terminal segment of both ECD protomers forms an {alpha}-helix that mimics PTH/PTHrP by occupying the peptide binding groove of the opposing protomer. ECD-mediated oligomerization of intact PTH1R was confirmed in living cells by bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. As predicted by the structure, PTH binding disrupted receptor oligomerization. A receptor rendered monomeric by mutations in the ECD retained wild-type PTH binding and cAMP signaling ability. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that PTH1R forms constitutive dimers that are dissociated by ligand binding and that monomeric PTH1R is capable of activating G protein.

  15. Hydrophobic Residues in Helix 8 of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Are Critical for Structural and Functional Properties†

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kwang H.; Nishiyama, Akiko; Mierke, Dale F.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the heptahelical transmembrane domain shared by all G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), many class A GPCRs adopt a helical domain, termed helix 8, in the membrane-proximal region of the C terminus. We investigated the role of residues in the hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces of amphiphilic helix 8 of human cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). To differentiate between a role for specific residues and global features, we made two key mutants: one involving replacement of the highly hydrophobic groups, Leu404, Phe408, and Phe412, all with alanine and the second involving substitution of the basic residues, Lys402, Arg405, and Arg409, all with the neutral glutamine. The former showed a very low Bmax based on binding isotherms, a minimal Emax based on GTPγS binding analysis, and defective localization relative to the wild-type CB1 receptor as revealed by confocal microscopy. However, the latter mutant and the wild-type receptors were indistinguishable. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of purified peptides with corresponding sequences indicated that the highly hydrophobic residues are critical for maintaining a strong helical structure in detergent, whereas the positively charged residues are not. Further investigation of mutant receptors revealed that CB1 localization requires a threshold level of hydrophobicity but not specific amino acids. Moreover, mutant receptors carrying two- to six-residue insertions amino-terminal to helix 8 revealed a graded decrease in Bmax values. Our results identify the key helix 8 components (including hydrophobicity of specific residues, structure, and location relative to TM7) determinant for receptor localization leading to robust ligand binding and G protein activation. PMID:20025243

  16. A structural feature of the non-peptide ligand interactions with mice mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Noori, Hamid R; Mucksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2014-01-01

    By binding to and activating the G-protein coupled μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system, opiates are known to induce analgesic and sedative effects. In particular, non-peptide opioid ligands are often used in clinical applications to induce these therapeutically beneficial effects, due to their superior pharmacokinetics and bioavailability in comparison to endogenous neuropeptides. However, since opioid alkaloids are highly addictive substances, it is necessary to understand the exact mechanisms of their actions, specifically the ligand-binding properties of the target receptors, in order to safely apply opiates for therapeutic purposes. Using an in silico molecular docking approach (AutoDock Vina) combined with two-step cluster analysis, we have computationally obtained the docking scores and the ligand-binding pockets of twelve representative non-peptide nonendogenous agonists and antagonists at the crystallographically identified μ-opioid receptor. Our study predicts the existence of two main binding sites that are congruently present in all opioid receptor types. Interestingly, in terms of the agonist or antagonist properties of the substances on the receptors, the clustering analysis suggests a relationship with the position of the ligand-binding pockets, particularly its depth within the receptor structure. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the substances is directly correlated to the proximity of the binding pockets to the extracellular space. In conclusion, the results provide further insights into the structural features of the functional pharmacology of opioid receptors, suggesting the importance of the binding position of non-peptide agonists and antagonists- specifically the distance and the level of exposure to the extracellular space- to their dissociation kinetics and subsequent potency.

  17. Structures of Receptor Complexes of a North American H7N2 Influenza Hemagglutinin with a Loop Deletion in the Receptor Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Chen, Li-Mei; Carney, Paul J.; Donis, Ruben O.; Stevens, James

    2010-01-01

    Human infections with subtype H7 avian influenza viruses have been reported as early as 1979. In 1996, a genetically stable 24-nucleotide deletion emerged in North American H7 influenza virus hemagglutinins, resulting in an eight amino acid deletion in the receptor-binding site. The continuous circulation of these viruses in live bird markets, as well as its documented ability to infect humans, raises the question of how these viruses achieve structural stability and functionality. Here we report a detailed molecular analysis of the receptor binding site of the North American lineage subtype H7N2 virus A/New York/107/2003 (NY107), including complexes with an avian receptor analog (3′-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 3′SLN) and two human receptor analogs (6′-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 6′SLN; sialyllacto-N-tetraose b, LSTb). Structural results suggest a novel mechanism by which residues Arg220 and Arg229 (H3 numbering) are used to compensate for the deletion of the 220-loop and form interactions with the receptor analogs. Glycan microarray results reveal that NY107 maintains an avian-type (α2-3) receptor binding profile, with only moderate binding to human-type (α2-6) receptor. Thus despite its dramatically altered receptor binding site, this HA maintains functionality and confirms a need for continued influenza virus surveillance of avian and other animal reservoirs to define their zoonotic potential. PMID:20824086

  18. Structures of Receptor Complexes of a North American H7N2 Influenza Hemagglutinin with a Loop Deletion in the Receptor Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hua; Chen, Li-Mei; Carney, Paul J.; Donis, Ruben O.; Stevens, James

    2012-02-21

    Human infections with subtype H7 avian influenza viruses have been reported as early as 1979. In 1996, a genetically stable 24-nucleotide deletion emerged in North American H7 influenza virus hemagglutinins, resulting in an eight amino acid deletion in the receptor-binding site. The continuous circulation of these viruses in live bird markets, as well as its documented ability to infect humans, raises the question of how these viruses achieve structural stability and functionality. Here we report a detailed molecular analysis of the receptor binding site of the North American lineage subtype H7N2 virus A/New York/107/2003 (NY107), including complexes with an avian receptor analog (3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 3'SLN) and two human receptor analogs (6'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 6'SLN; sialyllacto-N-tetraose b, LSTb). Structural results suggest a novel mechanism by which residues Arg220 and Arg229 (H3 numbering) are used to compensate for the deletion of the 220-loop and form interactions with the receptor analogs. Glycan microarray results reveal that NY107 maintains an avian-type ({alpha}2-3) receptor binding profile, with only moderate binding to human-type ({alpha}2-6) receptor. Thus despite its dramatically altered receptor binding site, this HA maintains functionality and confirms a need for continued influenza virus surveillance of avian and other animal reservoirs to define their zoonotic potential.

  19. Structural modification of H/sub 2/-receptor antagonists provide post-H/sub 2/-receptor gastric antisecretory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, S.T.; Dove, P.A.; Strike, D.P.; Schiehser, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    In the course of investigations into the gastric antisecretory activity of potential H/sub 2/-receptor antagonists, examples were discovered in which structural modification of the molecule altered a) antisecretory activity in the pylorus-ligated rat and b) the response to various stimulants of (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine (AP) uptake in isolated rat gastric mucosal cell preparations. Wy-45,662 (N-(3-(3-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenoxy)propyl)thieno(3,4-d) isothiazol-3-amine 1, 1-dioxide)), a very potent histamine H/sub 2/-antagonist and antisecretory agent in the rat (ED/sub 50/ (approx.) 0.3 mg/kg), had no effect in vitro at 1 ..mu..M on forskolin-induced (/sup 14/C)AP uptake while 10 nM Wy-45,662 completely suppressed histamine-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP uptake. In contrast, the N-benzylated form of Wy-45,662, Wy-46,499 dose-dependently (10/sup -7/-10/sup -6/M) suppressed forskolin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP uptake while retaining modest antisecretory activity (ED/sub 50/approx.8 mg/kg) in vivo. Wy-46,499's modest antisecretory activity was thus attributable to inhibition via a post-histamine H/sub 2/-receptor mechanism.

  20. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-Opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C.H.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W.; Roth, Bryan L.; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt(1)-Tic(2)-Phe(3)-Phe(4)-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt(1) and Tic(2). The observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics. PMID:25686086

  1. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; ...

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  2. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C. H.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W.; Roth, Bryan L.; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  3. α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a therapeutic target in the structure era.

    PubMed

    Taly, Antoine; Charon, Sebastien

    2012-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand-gated ion channels involved in cognitive processes and are associated with brain disorders which makes them interesting drug targets. This article presents a general overview of the receptor to introduce the α7 nAChR as a drug target. The advances in understanding of the structure/function properties of the nAChR produced during the last decade are detailed as they are crucial for rational drug design. The allosteric properties of the nAChR will also be described because they also have important consequences for drug design.

  4. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C H; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; White, Thomas A; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W; Roth, Bryan L; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-03-01

    Bifunctional μ- and δ-opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives, with diminished side effects, to alkaloid opiate analgesics. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bifunctional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. The observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical for understanding of the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides and for development of improved analgesics.

  5. Structural modeling of G-protein coupled receptors: An overview on automatic web-servers.

    PubMed

    Busato, Mirko; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    Despite the significant efforts and discoveries during the last few years in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expression and crystallization, the receptors with known structures to date are limited only to a small fraction of human GPCRs. The lack of experimental three-dimensional structures of the receptors represents a strong limitation that hampers a deep understanding of their function. Computational techniques are thus a valid alternative strategy to model three-dimensional structures. Indeed, recent advances in the field, together with extraordinary developments in crystallography, in particular due to its ability to capture GPCRs in different activation states, have led to encouraging results in the generation of accurate models. This, prompted the community of modelers to render their methods publicly available through dedicated databases and web-servers. Here, we present an extensive overview on these services, focusing on their advantages, drawbacks and their role in successful applications. Future challenges in the field of GPCR modeling, such as the predictions of long loop regions and the modeling of receptor activation states are presented as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural Determinants of the γ-8 TARP Dependent AMPA Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew R; Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Schober, Douglas A; Wright, Rebecca A; Wang, He; Qian, Yuewei; Witkin, Jeffrey M; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Kato, Akihiko S

    2017-09-05

    The forebrain specific AMPA receptor antagonist, LY3130481/CERC-611, which selectively antagonizes the AMPA receptors associated with TARP γ-8, an auxiliary subunit enriched in the forebrain, has potent antiepileptic activities without motor side effects. We designated the compounds with such activities as γ-8 TARP dependent AMPA receptor antagonists (γ-8 TDAAs). In this work, we further investigated the mechanisms of action using a radiolabeled γ-8 TDAA and ternary structural modeling with mutational validations to characterize the LY3130481 binding to γ-8. The radioligand binding to the cells heterologously expressing GluA1 and/or γ-8 revealed that γ-8 TDAAs binds to γ-8 alone without AMPA receptors. Homology modeling of γ-8, based on the crystal structures of a distant TARP homologue, murine claudin 19, in conjunction with knowledge of two γ-8 residues previously identified as critical for the LY3130481 TARP-dependent selectivity provided the basis for a binding mode prediction. This allowed further rational mutational studies for characterization of the structural determinants in TARP γ-8 for LY3130481 activities, both thermodynamically as well as kinetically.

  7. Structural adaptability in the ligand-binding pocket of the ecdysone hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Billas, Isabelle M L; Iwema, Thomas; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Mitschler, André; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino

    2003-11-06

    The ecdysteroid hormones coordinate the major stages of insect development, notably moulting and metamorphosis, by binding to the ecdysone receptor (EcR); a ligand-inducible nuclear transcription factor. To bind either ligand or DNA, EcR must form a heterodimer with ultraspiracle (USP), the homologue of retinoid-X receptor. Here we report the crystal structures of the ligand-binding domains of the moth Heliothis virescens EcR-USP heterodimer in complex with the ecdysteroid ponasterone A and with a non-steroidal, lepidopteran-specific agonist BYI06830 used in agrochemical pest control. The two structures of EcR-USP emphasize the universality of heterodimerization as a general mechanism common to both vertebrates and invertebrates. Comparison of the EcR structures in complex with steroidal and non-steroidal ligands reveals radically different and only partially overlapping ligand-binding pockets that could not be predicted by molecular modelling and docking studies. These findings offer new perspectives for the design of insect-specific, environmentally safe insecticides. The concept of a ligand-dependent binding pocket in EcR provides an insight into the moulding of nuclear receptors to their ligand, and has potential applications for human nuclear receptors.

  8. GPCR engineering yields high-resolution structural insights into beta2-adrenergic receptor function.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Choi, Hee-Jung; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Weis, William I; Stevens, Raymond C; Kobilka, Brian K

    2007-11-23

    The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) is a well-studied prototype for heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that respond to diffusible hormones and neurotransmitters. To overcome the structural flexibility of the beta2AR and to facilitate its crystallization, we engineered a beta2AR fusion protein in which T4 lysozyme (T4L) replaces most of the third intracellular loop of the GPCR ("beta2AR-T4L") and showed that this protein retains near-native pharmacologic properties. Analysis of adrenergic receptor ligand-binding mutants within the context of the reported high-resolution structure of beta2AR-T4L provides insights into inverse-agonist binding and the structural changes required to accommodate catecholamine agonists. Amino acids known to regulate receptor function are linked through packing interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds, suggesting a conformational pathway from the ligand-binding pocket to regions that interact with G proteins.

  9. Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Structure and Function and Response to Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Dani, John A

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) belong to the "Cys-loop" superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels that includes GABAA, glycine, and serotonin (5-HT3) receptors. There are 16 homologous mammalian nAChR subunits encoded by a multigene family. These subunits combine to form many different nAChR subtypes with various expression patterns, diverse functional properties, and differing pharmacological characteristics. Because cholinergic innervation is pervasive and nAChR expression is extremely broad, practically every area of the brain is impinged upon by nicotinic mechanisms. This review briefly examines the structural and functional properties of the receptor/channel complex itself. The review also summarizes activation and desensitization of nAChRs by the low nicotine concentrations obtained from tobacco. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure and the structural characteristics of channel gating has reached an advanced stage. Likewise, the basic functional properties of the channel also are reasonably well understood. It is these receptor/channel properties that underlie the participation of nAChRs in nearly every anatomical region of the mammalian brain.

  10. Structures of human folate receptors reveal biological trafficking states and diversity in folate and antifolate recognition.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Ardian S; Singh, Mirage; Reeder, Kristen M; Carter, Joshua J; Kovach, Alexander R; Meng, Wuyi; Ratnam, Manohar; Zhang, Faming; Dann, Charles E

    2013-09-17

    Antifolates, folate analogs that inhibit vitamin B9 (folic acid)-using cellular enzymes, have been used over several decades for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases. Cellular uptake of the antifolates in clinical use occurs primarily via widely expressed facilitative membrane transporters. More recently, human folate receptors (FRs), high affinity receptors that transport folate via endocytosis, have been proposed as targets for the specific delivery of new classes of antifolates or folate conjugates to tumors or sites of inflammation. The development of specific, FR-targeted antifolates would be accelerated if additional biophysical data, particularly structural models of the receptors, were available. Here we describe six distinct crystallographic models that provide insight into biological trafficking of FRs and distinct binding modes of folate and antifolates to these receptors. From comparison of the structures, we delineate discrete structural conformations representative of key stages in the endocytic trafficking of FRs and propose models for pH-dependent conformational changes. Additionally, we describe the molecular details of human FR in complex with three clinically prevalent antifolates, pemetrexed (also Alimta), aminopterin, and methotrexate. On the whole, our data form the basis for rapid design and implementation of unique, FR-targeted, folate-based drugs for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  11. Structures of human folate receptors reveal biological trafficking states and diversity in folate and antifolate recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wibowo, Ardian S.; Singh, Mirage; Reeder, Kristen M.; Carter, Joshua J.; Kovach, Alexander R.; Meng, Wuyi; Ratnam, Manohar; Zhang, Faming; Dann, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Antifolates, folate analogs that inhibit vitamin B9 (folic acid)-using cellular enzymes, have been used over several decades for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases. Cellular uptake of the antifolates in clinical use occurs primarily via widely expressed facilitative membrane transporters. More recently, human folate receptors (FRs), high affinity receptors that transport folate via endocytosis, have been proposed as targets for the specific delivery of new classes of antifolates or folate conjugates to tumors or sites of inflammation. The development of specific, FR-targeted antifolates would be accelerated if additional biophysical data, particularly structural models of the receptors, were available. Here we describe six distinct crystallographic models that provide insight into biological trafficking of FRs and distinct binding modes of folate and antifolates to these receptors. From comparison of the structures, we delineate discrete structural conformations representative of key stages in the endocytic trafficking of FRs and propose models for pH-dependent conformational changes. Additionally, we describe the molecular details of human FR in complex with three clinically prevalent antifolates, pemetrexed (also Alimta), aminopterin, and methotrexate. On the whole, our data form the basis for rapid design and implementation of unique, FR-targeted, folate-based drugs for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases. PMID:23934049

  12. Structural Basis for Activation of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase KIT by Stem Cell Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa,S.; Opatowsky, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Mandiyan, V.; Lax, I.; Schlessinger, J.

    2007-01-01

    Stem Cell Factor (SCF) initiates its multiple cellular responses by binding to the ectodomain of KIT, resulting in tyrosine kinase activation. We describe the crystal structure of the entire ectodomain of KIT before and after SCF stimulation. The structures show that KIT dimerization is driven by SCF binding whose sole role is to bring two KIT molecules together. Receptor dimerization is followed by conformational changes that enable lateral interactions between membrane proximal Ig-like domains D4 and D5 of two KIT molecules. Experiments with cultured cells show that KIT activation is compromised by point mutations in amino acids critical for D4-D4 interaction. Moreover, a variety of oncogenic mutations are mapped to the D5-D5 interface. Since key hallmarks of KIT structures, ligand-induced receptor dimerization, and the critical residues in the D4-D4 interface, are conserved in other receptors, the mechanism of KIT stimulation unveiled in this report may apply for other receptor activation.

  13. Structure-activity relationships of seco-prezizaane and picrotoxane/picrodendrane terpenoids by Quasar receptor-surface modeling.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas J; Gurrath, Marion; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2004-08-01

    The seco-prezizaane-type sesquiterpenes pseudoanisatin and parviflorolide from Illicium are noncompetitive antagonists at housefly (Musca domestica) gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. They show selectivity toward the insect receptor and thus represent new leads toward selective insecticides. Based on the binding data for 13 seco-prezizaane terpenoids and 17 picrotoxane and picrodendrane-type terpenoids to housefly and rat GABA receptors, a QSAR study was conducted by quasi-atomistic receptor-surface modeling (Quasar). The resulting models provide insight into the structural basis of selectivity and properties of the binding sites at GABA receptor-coupled chloride channels of insects and mammals.

  14. Recent advances in structure of progestins and their binding to progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Marisa; Heuze, Yvonne; Sánchez, Araceli; Garrido, Mariana; Bratoeff, Eugene

    2015-02-01

    The role of progesterone in women's cancers as well as the knowledge of the progesterone receptor (PR) structure has prompted the design of different therapies. The aim of this review is to describe the basic structure of PR agonists and antagonists as well as the recent treatments for illness associated with the progesterone receptor. The rational design for potent and effective drugs for the treatment of female cancer must consider the structural changes of the androgen and progestogen skeleton which are an indicator of their activity as progestins or antiprogestins. The presence of a hydroxyl group at C-17 in the progesterone skeleton brings about a loss of progestational activity whereas acetylation induces a progestational effect. The incorporation of an ethynyl functional group to the testosterone framework results in a loss of androgenic activity with a concomitant enhancement of the progestational effect. On the other hand, an ester function at C-3 of dehydroepiandrosterone skeleton induces partial antagonism to the PR.

  15. The nociceptin pharmacophore site for opioid receptor binding derived from the NMR structure and bioactivity relationships.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Michael J; Nesmelova, Irina; Young, Helen C; Hargittai, Balazs; Beavers, Mary Pat; Liu, Jingchun; Connolly, Peter J; Middleton, Steven A; Mayo, Kevin H

    2005-03-04

    Nociceptin, a 17 amino acid opioid-like peptide that has an inhibitory effect on synaptic transmission in the nervous system, is involved in learning, memory, attention, and emotion and is also implicated in the perception of pain and visual, auditory, and olfactory functions. In this study, we investigated the NMR solution structure of nociceptin in membrane-like environments (trifluoroethanol and SDS micelles) and found it to have a relatively stable helix conformation from residues 4-17 with functionally important N-terminal residues being folded aperidoically on top of the helix. In functional assays for receptor binding and calcium flux, alanine-scanning variants of nociceptin indicated that functionally important residues generally followed helix periodicity, consistent with the NMR structural model. Structure-activity relationships allowed identification of pharmacophore sites that were used in small molecule data base searches, affording hits with demonstrated nociceptin receptor binding affinities.

  16. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueyan; Uzuner, Ugur; Li, Man; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER) and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD) when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors. PMID:27589781

  17. NMR and computational methods in the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghitti, Michela; Musco, Giovanna; Spitaleri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The recurrent failures in drug discovery campaigns, the asymmetry between the enormous financial investments and the relatively scarce results have fostered the development of strategies based on complementary methods. In this context in recent years the rigid lock-and-key binding concept had to be revisited in favour of a dynamic model of molecular recognition accounting for conformational changes of both the ligand and the receptor. The high level of complexity required by a dynamic description of the processes underlying molecular recognition requires a multidisciplinary investigation approach. In this perspective, the combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with molecular docking, conformational searches along with molecular dynamics simulations has given new insights into the dynamic mechanisms governing ligand receptor interactions, thus giving an enormous contribution to the identification and design of new and effective drugs. Herein a succinct overview on the applications of both NMR and computational methods to the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions will be presented.

  18. Structure-Driven Pharmacology of Transient Receptor Potential Channel Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Caceres-Molina, Javier; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramon

    2016-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal receptor that mediates the flux of cations across the membrane in response to several stimuli, including heat, voltage, and ligands. The best known agonist of TRPV1 channels is capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers. In addition, peptides found in the venom of poisonous animals, along with the lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate, lysophosphatidic acid, and cholesterol, bind to TRPV1 with high affinity to modulate channel gating. Here, we discuss the functional evidence regarding ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 channels in light of structural data recently obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights into ligand binding and allosteric gating of TRPV1 channels and the relevance of accurate polymodal receptor biophysical characterization for drug design in novel pain therapies.

  19. Structure and antagonism of the receptor complex mediated by human TSLP in allergy and asthma.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Peelman, Frank; Braun, Harald; Lopez, Juan; Van Rompaey, Dries; Dansercoer, Ann; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Pauwels, Kris; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida; De Winter, Hans; Beyaert, Rudi; Lippens, Guy; Savvides, Savvas N

    2017-04-03

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is pivotal to the pathophysiology of widespread allergic diseases mediated by type 2 helper T cell (Th2) responses, including asthma and atopic dermatitis. The emergence of human TSLP as a clinical target against asthma calls for maximally harnessing its therapeutic potential via structural and mechanistic considerations. Here we employ an integrative experimental approach focusing on productive and antagonized TSLP complexes and free cytokine. We reveal how cognate receptor TSLPR allosterically activates TSLP to potentiate the recruitment of the shared interleukin 7 receptor α-chain (IL-7Rα) by leveraging the flexibility, conformational heterogeneity and electrostatics of the cytokine. We further show that the monoclonal antibody Tezepelumab partly exploits these principles to neutralize TSLP activity. Finally, we introduce a fusion protein comprising a tandem of the TSLPR and IL-7Rα extracellular domains, which harnesses the mechanistic intricacies of the TSLP-driven receptor complex to manifest high antagonistic potency.

  20. Structure and antagonism of the receptor complex mediated by human TSLP in allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Peelman, Frank; Braun, Harald; Lopez, Juan; Van Rompaey, Dries; Dansercoer, Ann; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Pauwels, Kris; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Hammad, Hamida; De Winter, Hans; Beyaert, Rudi; Lippens, Guy; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2017-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is pivotal to the pathophysiology of widespread allergic diseases mediated by type 2 helper T cell (Th2) responses, including asthma and atopic dermatitis. The emergence of human TSLP as a clinical target against asthma calls for maximally harnessing its therapeutic potential via structural and mechanistic considerations. Here we employ an integrative experimental approach focusing on productive and antagonized TSLP complexes and free cytokine. We reveal how cognate receptor TSLPR allosterically activates TSLP to potentiate the recruitment of the shared interleukin 7 receptor α-chain (IL-7Rα) by leveraging the flexibility, conformational heterogeneity and electrostatics of the cytokine. We further show that the monoclonal antibody Tezepelumab partly exploits these principles to neutralize TSLP activity. Finally, we introduce a fusion protein comprising a tandem of the TSLPR and IL-7Rα extracellular domains, which harnesses the mechanistic intricacies of the TSLP-driven receptor complex to manifest high antagonistic potency. PMID:28368013

  1. Pancreatic Polypeptide Is Recognized by Two Hydrophobic Domains of the Human Y4 Receptor Binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Pedragosa-Badia, Xavier; Sliwoski, Gregory R.; Dong Nguyen, Elizabeth; Lindner, Diana; Stichel, Jan; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of the human Y4 receptor (hY4R) interaction with human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) is crucial, not only for understanding its biological function but also for testing treatment strategies for obesity that target this interaction. Here, the interaction of receptor mutants with pancreatic polypeptide analogs was studied through double-cycle mutagenesis. To guide mutagenesis and interpret results, a three-dimensional comparative model of the hY4R-hPP complex was constructed based on all available class A G protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and refined using experimental data. Our study reveals that residues of the hPP and the hY4R form a complex network consisting of ionic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen binding. Residues Tyr2.64, Asp2.68, Asn6.55, Asn7.32, and Phe7.35 of Y4R are found to be important in receptor activation by hPP. Specifically, Tyr2.64 interacts with Tyr27 of hPP through hydrophobic contacts. Asn7.32 is affected by modifications on position Arg33 of hPP, suggesting a hydrogen bond between these two residues. Likewise, we find that Phe7.35 is affected by modifications of hPP at positions 33 and 36, indicating interactions between these three amino acids. Taken together, we demonstrate that the top of transmembrane helix 2 (TM2) and the top of transmembrane helices 6 and 7 (TM6–TM7) form the core of the peptide binding pocket. These findings will contribute to the rational design of ligands that bind the receptor more effectively to produce an enhanced agonistic or antagonistic effect. PMID:24375409

  2. Structural Insights into Cargo Recognition by the Yeast PTS1 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Stefanie; Drepper, Friedel; Fischer, Sven; Fodor, Krisztian; Passon, Daniel; Platta, Harald W.; Zenn, Michael; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Wilmanns, Matthias; Warscheid, Bettina; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The peroxisomal matrix protein import is facilitated by cycling import receptors that shuttle between the cytosol and the peroxisomal membrane. The import receptor Pex5p mediates the import of proteins harboring a peroxisomal targeting signal of type I (PTS1). Purified recombinant Pex5p forms a dimeric complex with the PTS1-protein Pcs60p in vitro with a KD of 0.19 μm. To analyze the structural basis for receptor-cargo recognition, the PTS1 and adjacent amino acids of Pcs60p were systematically scanned for Pex5p binding by an in vitro site-directed photo-cross-linking approach. The cross-linked binding regions of the receptor were subsequently identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. Most cross-links were found with TPR6, TPR7, as well as the 7C-loop of Pex5p. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a bivalent interaction mode for Pex5p and Pcs60p. Interestingly, Pcs60p lacking its C-terminal tripeptide sequence was efficiently cross-linked to the same regions of Pex5p. The KD value of the interaction of truncated Pcs60p and Pex5p was in the range of 7.7 μm. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed a monovalent binding mode for the interaction of Pex5p and Pcs60p lacking the PTS1. Our data indicate that Pcs60p contains a second contact site for its receptor Pex5p, beyond the C-terminal tripeptide. The physiological relevance of the ancillary binding region was supported by in vivo import studies. The bivalent binding mode might be explained by a two-step concept as follows: first, cargo recognition and initial tethering by the PTS1-receptor Pex5p; second, lock-in of receptor and cargo. PMID:26359497

  3. Structure-activity studies with endogenous allatostatins from Periplaneta americana: expressed receptor compared with functional bioassay.

    PubMed

    Gäde, Gerd; Marco, Heather G; Richter, Dietmar; Weaver, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    The A-allatostatins (F/YXFGLamides) are insect neuropeptides with inhibitory actions on juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis, muscular contraction and vitellogenesis. They exist in multiple forms within each species. In the cockroach, Periplaneta americana, only one receptor for A-allatostatin has been identified thus far. Here, we have characterised the receptor response to all 15 of the endogenous A-allatostatins encoded by the P. americana allatostatin prohormone gene, together with some analogues, using an indirect heterologous system involving co-expression of the receptor and a potassium channel subunit in Xenopus laevis oocytes and electrophysiological measurements. We have also determined the relative potency of the same peptides to inhibit JH synthesis in corpora allata. Our data reveal that the heterologously expressed receptor responds to all of the endogenous allatostatins and, although differences in potency are recorded, this cannot readily be related to particular differences in the primary structure of the peptides. Similarly, all allatostatins act on the corpora allata to inhibit the synthesis of JH, again with varying potency not readily related to peptide structure. Interestingly, some of the peptides did not perform consistently across the two assays. We show that the receptor is widely expressed in adult P. americana tissues (head, retrocerebral glands, fat body, ovary, male accessory gland, gut, leg muscle, Malpighian tubule and nerve cord) as well as in early larval instars. The spatial expression supports the known pleiotropic activity of allatostatins and role as a paracrine effector. This is the first report of such a detailed characterisation of an invertebrate receptor for allatostatin.

  4. Activation Induces Structural Changes in the Liganded Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Martin; Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian J.; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2009-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) binds to and activates the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (hAT1) of the G protein-coupled receptor class A family. Several activation mechanisms have been proposed for this family, but they have not yet been experimentally validated. We previously used the methionine proximity assay to show that 11 residues in transmembrane domain (TMD) III, VI, and VII of the hAT1 receptor reside in close proximity to the C-terminal residue of AngII. With the exception of a single change in TMD VI, the same contacts are present on N111G-hAT1, a constitutively active mutant; this N111G-hAT1 is a model for the active form of the receptor. In this study, two series of 53 individual methionine mutations were constructed in TMD I, II, IV, and V on both receptor forms. The mutants were photolabeled with a neutral antagonist, 125I-[Sar1,p-benzoyl-l-Phe8]AngII, and the resulting complexes were digested with cyanogen bromide. Although no new contacts were found for the hAT1 mutants, two were found in the constitutively active mutants, Phe-77 in TMD II and Asn-200 in TMD V. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a direct ligand contact with TMD II and TMD V has been reported. These contact point differences were used to identify the structural changes between the WT-hAT1 and N111G-hAT1 complexes through homology-based modeling and restrained molecular dynamics. The model generated revealed an important structural rearrangement of several TMDs from the basal to the activated form in the WT-hAT1 receptor. PMID:19635801

  5. A model for the quaternary structure of human placental insulin receptor deduced from electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, K; Tranum-Jensen, J; Carlsen, J; Vinten, J

    1991-01-01

    Electrophoretically pure and functionally intact human placental insulin receptor was studied by electron microscopy with negative-staining techniques. The quaternary structure of the detergent-solubilized receptor was determined. The receptor had the shape of a letter T approximately 24 nm in height and 18 nm in width with a thickness of the stem and the crossbar of 3-4 nm. No consistent change in ultrastructure of the receptor could be detected after the addition of insulin alone or insulin and Mn2+/Mg2+/ATP. After partial reduction of the alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetrameric receptor into alpha beta heterodimers, the electron micrographs showed a clear reduction in average size of the molecule with disappearance of the T profiles characteristic of the alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetramers. By incubation of the heterodimers in a phosphorylation medium containing insulin, a reassociation to molecules with molecular weights of the alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetramer took place judged from SDS/PAGE. Electron microscopy showed that the molecule formed larger aggregates, and only a few solitary T-shaped copies were seen. Images PMID:1986371

  6. Probing Structural Selectivity of Synthetic Heparin Binding to Stabilin Protein Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Pempe, Elizabeth H.; Xu, Yongmei; Gopalakrishnan, Sandhya; Liu, Jian; Harris, Edward N.

    2012-01-01

    As one of the most widely used drugs worldwide, heparin is an essential anticoagulant required for surgery, dialysis, treatment of thrombosis, cancer, and general circulatory management. Stabilin-2 is a scavenger clearance receptor with high expression in the sinusoidal endothelium of liver. It is believed that Stabilin-2 is the primary receptor for the clearance of unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins in the liver. Here, we identify the modifications and length of the heparin polymer that are required for binding and endocytosis by both human Stabilin receptors: Stabilin-2 and its homolog Stabilin-1 (also found in liver endothelium). Using enzymatically synthesized 35S-labeled heparan sulfate oligomers, we identified that sulfation of the 3-OH position of N-sulfated glucosamine (GlcNS) is the most beneficial modification for binding and endocytosis via both Stabilin receptors. In addition, our data suggest that a decasaccharide is the minimal size for binding to the Stabilin receptors. These findings define the physical parameters of the heparin structure required for efficient clearance from blood circulation. These results will also aid in the design of synthetic heparins with desired clearance rates. PMID:22547069

  7. Structure of the trypanosome haptoglobin–hemoglobin receptor and implications for nutrient uptake and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Matthew K.; Tkachenko, Olga; Brown, Alan; Reed, Jenny; Raper, Jayne; Carrington, Mark

    2013-01-01

    African trypanosomes are protected by a densely packed surface monolayer of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). A haptoglobin–hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) within this VSG coat mediates heme acquisition. HpHbR is also exploited by the human host to mediate endocytosis of trypanolytic factor (TLF)1 from serum, contributing to innate immunity. Here, the crystal structure of HpHbR from Trypanosoma congolense has been solved, revealing an elongated three α-helical bundle with a small membrane distal head. To understand the receptor in the context of the VSG layer, the dimensions of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR and VSG have been determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, revealing the receptor to be more elongated than VSG. It is, therefore, likely that the receptor protrudes above the VSG layer and unlikely that the VSG coat can prevent immunoglobulin binding to the receptor. The HpHb-binding site has been mapped by single-residue mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance. This site is located where it is readily accessible above the VSG layer. A single HbHpR polymorphism unique to human infective T. brucei gambiense has been shown to be sufficient to reduce binding of both HpHb and TLF1, modulating ligand affinity in a delicate balancing act that allows nutrient acquisition but avoids TLF1 uptake. PMID:23319650

  8. Structure of the trypanosome haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor and implications for nutrient uptake and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Matthew K; Tkachenko, Olga; Brown, Alan; Reed, Jenny; Raper, Jayne; Carrington, Mark

    2013-01-29

    African trypanosomes are protected by a densely packed surface monolayer of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) within this VSG coat mediates heme acquisition. HpHbR is also exploited by the human host to mediate endocytosis of trypanolytic factor (TLF)1 from serum, contributing to innate immunity. Here, the crystal structure of HpHbR from Trypanosoma congolense has been solved, revealing an elongated three α-helical bundle with a small membrane distal head. To understand the receptor in the context of the VSG layer, the dimensions of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR and VSG have been determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, revealing the receptor to be more elongated than VSG. It is, therefore, likely that the receptor protrudes above the VSG layer and unlikely that the VSG coat can prevent immunoglobulin binding to the receptor. The HpHb-binding site has been mapped by single-residue mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance. This site is located where it is readily accessible above the VSG layer. A single HbHpR polymorphism unique to human infective T. brucei gambiense has been shown to be sufficient to reduce binding of both HpHb and TLF1, modulating ligand affinity in a delicate balancing act that allows nutrient acquisition but avoids TLF1 uptake.

  9. Structure of the bacterial plant-ferredoxin receptor FusA

    PubMed Central

    Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Milner, Joel J.; Kelly, Sharon M.; Byron, Olwyn; Smith, Brian O.; Walker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Iron is a limiting nutrient in bacterial infection putting it at the centre of an evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. Gram-negative bacteria utilize TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors to obtain iron during infection. These receptors acquire iron either in concert with soluble iron-scavenging siderophores or through direct interaction and extraction from host proteins. Characterization of these receptors provides invaluable insight into pathogenesis. However, only a subset of virulence-related TonB-dependent receptors have been currently described. Here we report the discovery of FusA, a new class of TonB-dependent receptor, which is utilized by phytopathogenic Pectobacterium spp. to obtain iron from plant ferredoxin. Through the crystal structure of FusA we show that binding of ferredoxin occurs through specialized extracellular loops that form extensive interactions with ferredoxin. The function of FusA and the presence of homologues in clinically important pathogens suggests that small iron-containing proteins represent an iron source for bacterial pathogens. PMID:27796364

  10. Functional characterization and structural modeling of obesity associated mutations in the melanocortin 4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Karen; Pogozheva, Irina D; Yeo, Giles S H; Hadaschik, Dirk; Keogh, Julia M; Haskell-Leuvano, Carrie; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Mosberg, Henry I; Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) gene are the most common known cause of monogenic human obesity. The MC4R gene was sequenced in 2000 subjects with severe early-onset obesity. We detected seven different nonsense and 19 nonsynonymous mutations in a total of 94 probands, some of which have been reported previously by others. We functionally characterized the 11 novel obesity associated missense mutations. Seven of these mutants (L54P, E61K, I69T, S136P, M161T, T162I, and I269N) showed impaired cell surface trafficking, reduced level of maximal binding of the radioligand [125I]NDP-MSH, and reduced ability to generate cAMP in response to ligand. Four mutant MC4Rs (G55V, G55D, S136F, and A303T) displayed cell surface expression and agonist binding similar to the wild-type receptor but showed impaired cAMP production, suggesting that these residues are likely to be critical for conformational rearrangement essential for receptor activation. Homology modeling of these mutants using a model of MC4R based on the crystal structure of the beta2-adrenoreceptor was used to provide insights into the possible structural basis for receptor dysfunction. Transmembrane (TM) domains 1, 3, 6, 7, and peripheral helix 8 appear to participate in the agonist-induced conformational rearrangement necessary for coupling of ligand binding to signaling. We conclude that G55V, G55D, S136F, and A303T mutations are likely to strengthen helix-helix interactions between TM1 and TM2, TM3 and TM6, and TM7 and helix 8, respectively, preventing relative movement of these helices during receptor activation. The combination of functional studies and structural modeling of naturally occurring pathogenic mutations in MC4R can provide valuable information regarding the molecular mechanism of MC4R activation and its dysfunction in human disease.

  11. Structure of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein D Bound to the Human Receptor Nectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Arjun K.; Luftig, Micah A.; Lou, Huan; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Krummenacher, Claude; Carfi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Binding of herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein D (gD) to a cell surface receptor is required to trigger membrane fusion during entry into host cells. Nectin-1 is a cell adhesion molecule and the main HSV receptor in neurons and epithelial cells. We report the structure of gD bound to nectin-1 determined by x-ray crystallography to 4.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the nectin-1 binding site on gD differs from the binding site of the HVEM receptor. A surface on the first Ig-domain of nectin-1, which mediates homophilic interactions of Ig-like cell adhesion molecules, buries an area composed by residues from both the gD N- and C-terminal extensions. Phenylalanine 129, at the tip of the loop connecting β-strands F and G of nectin-1, protrudes into a groove on gD, which is otherwise occupied by C-terminal residues in the unliganded gD and by N-terminal residues in the gD/HVEM complex. Notably, mutation of Phe129 to alanine prevents nectin-1 binding to gD and HSV entry. Together these data are consistent with previous studies showing that gD disrupts the normal nectin-1 homophilic interactions. Furthermore, the structure of the complex supports a model in which gD-receptor binding triggers HSV entry through receptor-mediated displacement of the gD C-terminal region. PMID:21980294

  12. Structural insights into gene repression by the orphan nuclear receptor SHP

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X. Edward; He, Yuanzheng; Zechner, Christoph; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Melcher, Karsten; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan nuclear receptor that functions as a transcriptional repressor to regulate bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. Although the precise mechanism whereby SHP represses transcription is not known, E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation (EID1) was isolated as a SHP-interacting protein and implicated in SHP repression. Here we present the crystal structure of SHP in complex with EID1, which reveals an unexpected EID1-binding site on SHP. Unlike the classical cofactor-binding site near the C-terminal helix H12, the EID1-binding site is located at the N terminus of the receptor, where EID1 mimics helix H1 of the nuclear receptor ligand-binding domain. The residues composing the SHP–EID1 interface are highly conserved. Their mutation diminishes SHP–EID1 interactions and affects SHP repressor activity. Together, these results provide important structural insights into SHP cofactor recruitment and repressor function and reveal a conserved protein interface that is likely to have broad implications for transcriptional repression by orphan nuclear receptors. PMID:24379397

  13. Structure of the intact PPAR-Υ-RXR-α nuclear receptor complex on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Vikas; Huang, Pengxiang; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Raghuram, Srilatha; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2009-01-09

    Nuclear receptors are multi-domain transcription factors that bind to DNA elements from which they regulate gene expression. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) form heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor (RXR), and PPAR-{gamma} has been intensively studied as a drug target because of its link to insulin sensitization. Previous structural studies have focused on isolated DNA or ligand-binding segments, with no demonstration of how multiple domains cooperate to modulate receptor properties. Here we present structures of intact PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha} as a heterodimer bound to DNA, ligands and coactivator peptides. PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha} form a non-symmetric complex, allowing the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of PPAR-{gamma} to contact multiple domains in both proteins. Three interfaces link PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha}, including some that are DNA dependent. The PPAR-{gamma} LBD cooperates with both DNA-binding domains (DBDs) to enhance response-element binding. The A/B segments are highly dynamic, lacking folded substructures despite their gene-activation properties.

  14. Structural basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor.

    PubMed

    Lane-Serff, Harriet; MacGregor, Paula; Lowe, Edward D; Carrington, Mark; Higgins, Matthew K

    2014-12-12

    The haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) of African trypanosomes allows acquisition of haem and provides an uptake route for trypanolytic factor-1, a mediator of innate immunity against trypanosome infection. In this study, we report the structure of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR in complex with human haptoglobin-haemoglobin (HpHb), revealing an elongated ligand-binding site that extends along its membrane distal half. This contacts haptoglobin and the β-subunit of haemoglobin, showing how the receptor selectively binds HpHb over individual components. Lateral mobility of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored HpHbR, and a ∼50° kink in the receptor, allows two receptors to simultaneously bind one HpHb dimer. Indeed, trypanosomes take up dimeric HpHb at significantly lower concentrations than monomeric HpHb, due to increased ligand avidity that comes from bivalent binding. The structure therefore reveals the molecular basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by trypanosomes and identifies adaptations that allow efficient ligand uptake in the context of the complex trypanosome cell surface.

  15. Structure-activity relationship study of spider polyamine toxins as inhibitors of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao-Feng; Poulsen, Mette H; Hussein, Rama A; Nørager, Niels G; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2014-12-01

    The spider polyamine toxins Joro spider toxin-3 (JSTX-3) and Nephila polyamine toxins-1 and -8 (NPTX-1 and NPTX-8) are isolated from the venom of the orb-weaver spider Nephila clavata (Joro spider). They share a high degree of structural resemblance, their aromatic head groups being the only difference, and were recently found to be very potent open-channel blockers of ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors. In this study we designed and synthesized a collection of 24 analogues of these toxins using a recently developed solid-phase synthetic methodology. Systematic variation in two regions of the toxins and subsequent evaluation of biological activity at AMPA and NMDA subtypes of iGlu receptors provided succinct information on structure-activity relationships. In particular, one set of analogues were found to display exquisite selectivity and potency for AMPA receptors relative to the natural products. Thus, this systematic SAR study has provided new pharmacological tools for studies of iGlu receptors.

  16. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-07-24

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist with residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1.

  17. Structural and functional characterization of a novel type of ligand-independent RXR-USP receptor.

    PubMed

    Iwema, Thomas; Billas, Isabelle M L; Beck, Yannick; Bonneton, François; Nierengarten, Hélène; Chaumot, Arnaud; Richards, Geoff; Laudet, Vincent; Moras, Dino

    2007-08-22

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) and Ultraspiracle (USP) play a central role as ubiquitous heterodimerization partners of many nuclear receptors. While it has long been accepted that a wide range of ligands can activate vertebrate/mollusc RXRs, the existence and necessity of specific endogenous ligands activating RXR-USP in vivo is still matter of intense debate. Here we report the existence of a novel type of RXR-USP with a ligand-independent functional conformation. Our studies involved Tribolium USP (TcUSP) as representative of most arthropod RXR-USPs, with high sequence homology to vertebrate/mollusc RXRs. The crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of TcUSP was solved in the context of the functional heterodimer with the ecdysone receptor (EcR). While EcR exhibits a canonical ligand-bound conformation, USP adopts an original apo structure. Our functional data demonstrate that TcUSP is a constitutively silent partner of EcR, and that none of the RXR ligands can bind and activate TcUSP. These findings together with a phylogenetic analysis suggest that RXR-USPs have undergone remarkable functional shifts during evolution and give insight into receptor-ligand binding evolution and dynamics.

  18. Structural basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Serff, Harriet; MacGregor, Paula; Lowe, Edward D; Carrington, Mark; Higgins, Matthew K

    2014-01-01

    The haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) of African trypanosomes allows acquisition of haem and provides an uptake route for trypanolytic factor-1, a mediator of innate immunity against trypanosome infection. In this study, we report the structure of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR in complex with human haptoglobin-haemoglobin (HpHb), revealing an elongated ligand-binding site that extends along its membrane distal half. This contacts haptoglobin and the β-subunit of haemoglobin, showing how the receptor selectively binds HpHb over individual components. Lateral mobility of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored HpHbR, and a ∼50o kink in the receptor, allows two receptors to simultaneously bind one HpHb dimer. Indeed, trypanosomes take up dimeric HpHb at significantly lower concentrations than monomeric HpHb, due to increased ligand avidity that comes from bivalent binding. The structure therefore reveals the molecular basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by trypanosomes and identifies adaptations that allow efficient ligand uptake in the context of the complex trypanosome cell surface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05553.001 PMID:25497229

  19. Artonin E and Structural Analogs from Artocarpus Species Abrogates Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Etti, Imaobong; Abdullah, Rasedee; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Kadir, Arifah; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Etti, Christopher; Malami, Ibrahim; Waziri, Peter; How, Chee Wun

    2016-06-29

    The increasing rate of mortality ensued from breast cancer has encouraged research into safer and efficient therapy. The human Estrogen receptor α has been implicated in the majority of reported breast cancer cases. Molecular docking employing Glide, Schrodinger suite 2015, was used to study the binding affinities of small molecules from the Artocarpus species after their drug-like properties were ascertained. The structure of the ligand-binding domain of human Estrogen receptor α was retrieved from Protein Data Bank while the structures of compounds were collected from PubChem database. The binding interactions of the studied compounds were reported as well as their glide scores. The best glide scored ligand, was Artonin E with a score of -12.72 Kcal when compared to other studied phytomolecules and it evoked growth inhibition of an estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells in submicromolar concentration (3.8-6.9 µM) in comparison to a reference standard Tamoxifen (18.9-24.1 µM) within the tested time point (24-72 h). The studied ligands, which had good interactions with the target receptor, were also drug-like when compared with 95% of orally available drugs with the exception of Artoelastin, whose predicted physicochemical properties rendered it less drug-like. The in silico physicochemical properties, docking interactions and growth inhibition of the best glide scorer are indications of the anti-breast cancer relevance of the studied molecules.

  20. Structural basis for perception of diverse chemical substances by T1r taste receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nuemket, Nipawan; Yasui, Norihisa; Kusakabe, Yuko; Nomura, Yukiyo; Atsumi, Nanako; Akiyama, Shuji; Nango, Eriko; Kato, Yukinari; Kaneko, Mika K.; Takagi, Junichi; Hosotani, Maiko; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2017-01-01

    The taste receptor type 1 (T1r) family perceives ‘palatable' tastes. These receptors function as T1r2-T1r3 and T1r1-T1r3 heterodimers to recognize a wide array of sweet and umami (savory) tastes in sugars and amino acids. Nonetheless, it is unclear how diverse tastes are recognized by so few receptors. Here we present crystal structures of the extracellular ligand-binding domains (LBDs), the taste recognition regions of the fish T1r2-T1r3 heterodimer, bound to different amino acids. The ligand-binding pocket in T1r2LBD is rich in aromatic residues, spacious and accommodates hydrated percepts. Biophysical studies show that this binding site is characterized by a broad yet discriminating chemical recognition, contributing for the particular trait of taste perception. In contrast, the analogous pocket in T1r3LBD is occupied by a rather loosely bound amino acid, suggesting that the T1r3 has an auxiliary role. Overall, we provide a structural basis for understanding the chemical perception of taste receptors. PMID:28534491

  1. Structural basis for perception of diverse chemical substances by T1r taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Nuemket, Nipawan; Yasui, Norihisa; Kusakabe, Yuko; Nomura, Yukiyo; Atsumi, Nanako; Akiyama, Shuji; Nango, Eriko; Kato, Yukinari; Kaneko, Mika K; Takagi, Junichi; Hosotani, Maiko; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2017-05-23

    The taste receptor type 1 (T1r) family perceives 'palatable' tastes. These receptors function as T1r2-T1r3 and T1r1-T1r3 heterodimers to recognize a wide array of sweet and umami (savory) tastes in sugars and amino acids. Nonetheless, it is unclear how diverse tastes are recognized by so few receptors. Here we present crystal structures of the extracellular ligand-binding domains (LBDs), the taste recognition regions of the fish T1r2-T1r3 heterodimer, bound to different amino acids. The ligand-binding pocket in T1r2LBD is rich in aromatic residues, spacious and accommodates hydrated percepts. Biophysical studies show that this binding site is characterized by a broad yet discriminating chemical recognition, contributing for the particular trait of taste perception. In contrast, the analogous pocket in T1r3LBD is occupied by a rather loosely bound amino acid, suggesting that the T1r3 has an auxiliary role. Overall, we provide a structural basis for understanding the chemical perception of taste receptors.

  2. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; ...

    2015-07-24

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist withmore » residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1.« less

  3. Structural insights into gene repression by the orphan nuclear receptor SHP.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X Edward; He, Yuanzheng; Zechner, Christoph; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Kliewer, Steven A; Melcher, Karsten; Mangelsdorf, David J; Xu, H Eric

    2014-01-14

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan nuclear receptor that functions as a transcriptional repressor to regulate bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. Although the precise mechanism whereby SHP represses transcription is not known, E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation (EID1) was isolated as a SHP-interacting protein and implicated in SHP repression. Here we present the crystal structure of SHP in complex with EID1, which reveals an unexpected EID1-binding site on SHP. Unlike the classical cofactor-binding site near the C-terminal helix H12, the EID1-binding site is located at the N terminus of the receptor, where EID1 mimics helix H1 of the nuclear receptor ligand-binding domain. The residues composing the SHP-EID1 interface are highly conserved. Their mutation diminishes SHP-EID1 interactions and affects SHP repressor activity. Together, these results provide important structural insights into SHP cofactor recruitment and repressor function and reveal a conserved protein interface that is likely to have broad implications for transcriptional repression by orphan nuclear receptors.

  4. Structural Heterogeneity and Functional Domains of Murine Immunoglobulin G Fc Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Luster, Andrew D.; Weinshank, Richard; Kochan, Jarema; Pavlovec, Amalia; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Hulmes, Jeffrey; Pan, Yu-Ching E.; Unkeless, Jay C.

    1986-11-01

    Binding of antibodies to effector cells by way of receptors to their constant regions (Fc receptors) is central to the pathway that leads to clearance of antigens by the immune system. The structure and function of this important class of receptors on immune cells is addressed through the molecular characterization of Fc receptors (FcR) specific for the murine immunoglobulin G isotype. Structural diversity is encoded by two genes that by alternative splicing result in expression of molecules with highly conserved extracellular domains and different transmembrane and intracytoplasmic domains. The proteins encoded by these genes are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family, most homologous to the major histocompatibility complex molecule Eβ. Functional reconstitution of ligand binding by transfection of individual FcR genes demonstrates that the requirements for ligand binding are encoded in a single gene. These studies demonstrate the molecular basis for the functional heterogeneity of FcR's, accounting for the possible transduction of different signals in response to a single ligand.

  5. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the KRLB Region in Insulin Receptor Substrate-2

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,J.; Tseng, Y.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; White, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS1 and -2) are crucial adaptor proteins in mediating the metabolic and mitogenic effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1. These proteins consist of a pleckstrin homology domain, a phosphotyrosine binding domain and a C-terminal region containing numerous sites of tyrosine, serine and threonine phosphorylation. Previous yeast two-hybrid studies identified a region unique to IRS2, termed the kinase regulatory-loop binding (KRLB) region, which interacts with the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor. Here we present the crystal structure of the insulin receptor kinase in complex with a 15-residue peptide from the KRLB region. In the structure, this segment of IRS2 is bound in the kinase active site with Tyr628 positioned for phosphorylation. Although Tyr628 was phosphorylated by the insulin receptor, its catalytic turnover was poor, resulting in kinase inhibition. Our studies indicate that the KRLB region functions to limit tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS2.

  6. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist with residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1. PMID:26205105

  7. Nuclear receptor engineering based on novel structure activity relationships revealed by farnesyl pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Goyanka, Ritu; Das, Sharmistha; Samuels, Herbert H; Cardozo, Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) comprise the second largest protein family targeted by currently available drugs, acting via specific ligand interactions within the ligand binding domain (LBD). Recently, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) was shown to be a unique promiscuous NR ligand, activating a subset of NR family members and inhibiting wound healing in skin. The current study aimed at visualizing the unique basis of FPP interaction with multiple receptors in order to identify general structure-activity relationships that operate across the NR family. Docking of FPP to the 3D structures of the LBDs of a diverse set of NRs consistently revealed an electrostatic FPP pyrophosphate contact with an NR arginine conserved in the NR family, a hydrophobic farnesyl contact with NR helix-12 and a ligand binding pocket volume between 300 and 430 Å(3) as the minimal requirements for FPP activation of any NR. Lack of any of these structural features appears to render a given NR resistant to FPP activation. We used these structure-activity relationships to rationally design and successfully engineer several mutant human estrogen receptors that retain responsiveness to estradiol but no longer respond to FPP.

  8. [Structural Analyses of Toll-like Receptor Sensing Single-stranded Nucleic Acids and Its Application].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pattern-recognition receptors that recognize microbial components and initiate subsequent immune responses. TLR7 and TLR8 recognize single-stranded (ss)RNA and initiate innate immune responses. Moreover, several small-molecule compounds have been identified as TLR7 and TLR8 activators. We determined the crystal structures of unliganded and ligand-induced activated human TLR8 dimers. Upon ligand stimulation, the TLR8 dimer was reorganized such that the two C-termini were brought into proximity. Ligand binding induces reorganization of the TLR8 dimer, which enables downstream signaling processes. To elucidate how TLR8 recognizes its natural ligand, ssRNA, as well as how the receptor can be activated by ssRNA that is structurally and chemically very different from the chemical ligands, we performed crystallographic studies of TLR8 in complex with ssRNA. TLR8 recognizes, at distinct sites, uridine and small oligonucleotides derived from the degradation of ssRNA. Uridine bound the site on the dimerization interface where small chemical ligands are recognized, whereas short oligonucleotides bound a newly identified site. Based on structural information, new compounds have been developed. We describe the crystal structure of a newly developed agonist, C2-butyl furo[2,3-c]quinolone.

  9. Beyond small-molecule SAR: using the dopamine D3 receptor crystal structure to guide drug design.

    PubMed

    Keck, Thomas M; Burzynski, Caitlin; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor is a target of pharmacotherapeutic interest in a variety of neurological disorders including schizophrenia, restless leg syndrome, and drug addiction. The high protein sequence homology between the D3 and D2 receptors has posed a challenge to developing D3 receptor-selective ligands whose behavioral actions can be attributed to D3 receptor engagement, in vivo. However, through primarily small-molecule structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, a variety of chemical scaffolds have been discovered over the past two decades that have resulted in several D3 receptor-selective ligands with high affinity and in vivo activity. Nevertheless, viable clinical candidates remain limited. The recent determination of the high-resolution crystal structure of the D3 receptor has invigorated structure-based drug design, providing refinements to the molecular dynamic models and testable predictions about receptor-ligand interactions. This chapter will highlight recent preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating potential utility of D3 receptor-selective ligands in the treatment of addiction. In addition, new structure-based rational drug design strategies for D3 receptor-selective ligands that complement traditional small-molecule SAR to improve the selectivity and directed efficacy profiles are examined.

  10. Anticonvulsant activity of artificial sweeteners: a structural link between sweet-taste receptor T1R3 and brain glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Talevi, Alan; Enrique, Andrea V; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E

    2012-06-15

    A virtual screening campaign based on application of a topological discriminant function capable of identifying novel anticonvulsant agents indicated several widely-used artificial sweeteners as potential anticonvulsant candidates. Acesulfame potassium, cyclamate and saccharin were tested in the Maximal Electroshock Seizure model (mice, ip), showing moderate anticonvulsant activity. We hypothesized a probable structural link between the receptor responsible of sweet taste and anticonvulsant molecular targets. Bioinformatic tools confirmed a highly significant sequence-similarity between taste-related protein T1R3 and several metabotropic glutamate receptors from different species, including glutamate receptors upregulated in epileptogenesis and certain types of epilepsy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ligand Discovery from a Dopamine D3 Receptor Homology Model and Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Jens; Coleman, Ryan G.; Setola, Vincent; Irwin, John J.; Fan, Hao; Schlessinger, Avner; Sali, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    G-Protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are intensely studied as drug targets and for their role in signaling. With the determination of the first crystal structures, interest in structure-based ligand discovery has increased. Unfortunately, most GPCRs lack experimental structures. The determination of the D3 receptor structure, and a community challenge to predict it, enabled a fully prospective comparison of ligand discovery from a modeled structure versus that of the subsequently released crystal structure. Over 3.3 million molecules were docked against a homology model, and 26 of the highest ranking were tested for binding. Six had affinities from 0.2 to 3.1μM. Subsequently, the crystal structure was released and the docking screen repeated. Of the 25 compounds selected, five had affinities from 0.3 to 3.0μM. One of the novel ligands from the homology model screen was optimized for affinity to 81nM. The feasibility of docking screens against modeled GPCRs more generally is considered. PMID:21926995

  12. A simple structure-based model for the prediction of HIV-1 co-receptor tropism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 enters host cells through interaction of its V3 loop (which is part of the gp120 protein) with the host cell receptor CD4 and one of two co-receptors, namely CCR5 or CXCR4. Entry inhibitors binding the CCR5 co-receptor can prevent viral entry. As these drugs are only available for CCR5-using viruses, accurate prediction of this so-called co-receptor tropism is important in order to ensure an effective personalized therapy. With the development of next-generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to sequence representative subpopulations of the viral quasispecies. Results Here we present T-CUP 2.0, a model for predicting co-receptor tropism. Based on our recently published T-CUP model, we developed a more accurate and even faster solution. Similarly to its predecessor, T-CUP 2.0 models co-receptor tropism using information of the electrostatic potential and hydrophobicity of V3-loops. However, extracting this information from a simplified structural vacuum-model leads to more accurate and faster predictions. The area-under-the-ROC-curve (AUC) achieved with T-CUP 2.0 on the training set is 0.968±0.005 in a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. When applied to an independent dataset, T-CUP 2.0 has an improved prediction accuracy of around 3% when compared to the original T-CUP. Conclusions We found that it is possible to model co-receptor tropism in HIV-1 based on a simplified structure-based model of the V3 loop. In this way, genotypic prediction of co-receptor tropism is very accurate, fast and can be applied to large datasets derived from next-generation sequencing technologies. The reduced complexity of the electrostatic modeling makes T-CUP 2.0 independent from third-party software, making it easy to install and use. PMID:25120583

  13. Structure-activity relationships of receptor binding of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daiki; Oyunzul, Luvsandorj; Onoue, Satomi; Ito, Yoshihiko; Uchida, Shinya; Simsek, Rahime; Gunduz, Miyase Gozde; Safak, Chiat; Yamada, Shizuo

    2008-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate binding activity of synthesized 1,4-dihydropyridine (1,4-DHP) derivatives (Compounds 1--124) to 1,4-DHP calcium channel antagonist receptors in rat brain. Sixteen 1,4-DHP derivatives inhibited specific (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 binding in rat brain in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 value of 0.43 to 3.49 microM. Scatchard analysis revealed that compounds 54, 69, 85, like nifedipine, caused a significant increase in apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for (+)-[3H]PN 200-110, while compounds 68, 69 and 80 caused a significant decrease in maximal number of bindings sites (Bmax). These data suggest that compounds 68, 69 and 80 exert longer-acting antagonistic effects of 1,4-DHP receptors than compounds 54, 69 and 85. The structure-activity relationship study has revealed that 1) ester groups in 3- and 5-positions are the most effective, 2) the aryl group in the 4-position of 1,4-DHP ring is the basic requirement for optimal activity, 3) position and type of electron-withdrawing groups on phenyl group at position 4 would affect the receptor-binding activity. Furthermore, compound 58 exerted alpha1 receptor binding activity, being 1.6 times greater than 1,4-DHP receptors. Compounds 81, 84, 91, 94, 106, 108 and 109 showed significant binding of ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP) channel, and the binding activities of compounds 81, 84, 108 and 109 were 1.6--3.8 times greater than the binding activity for 1,4-DHP receptors. Compounds 91 and 106 had similar binding activity for K ATP channel and 1,4-DHP receptors. In conclusion, the present study has shown that novel 1,4-DHP derivatives exert relatively high binding affinity to 1,4-DHP receptors and has revealed new aspect of structure-activity relationships of 1,4-DHP derivatives, especially hexahydroquinoline derivatives.

  14. Structural Basis for Negative Cooperativity in Growth Factor Binding to an EGF Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2010-09-27

    Transmembrane signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involves ligand-induced dimerization and allosteric regulation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Crystallographic studies have shown how ligand binding induces dimerization of the EGFR extracellular region but cannot explain the high-affinity and low-affinity classes of cell-surface EGF-binding sites inferred from curved Scatchard plots. From a series of crystal structures of the Drosophila EGFR extracellular region, we show here how Scatchard plot curvature arises from negatively cooperative ligand binding. The first ligand-binding event induces formation of an asymmetric dimer with only one bound ligand. The unoccupied site in this dimer is structurally restrained, leading to reduced affinity for binding of the second ligand, and thus negative cooperativity. Our results explain the cell-surface binding characteristics of EGF receptors and suggest how individual EGFR ligands might stabilize distinct dimeric species with different signaling properties.

  15. Structures of the E. coli translating ribosome with SRP and its receptor and with the translocon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Co-translational protein targeting to membranes is a universally conserved process. Central steps include cargo recognition by the signal recognition particle and handover to the Sec translocon. Here we present snapshots of key co-translational-targeting complexes solved by cryo-electron microscopy at near-atomic resolution, establishing the molecular contacts between the Escherichia coli translating ribosome, the signal recognition particle and the translocon. Our results reveal the conformational changes that regulate the latching of the signal sequence, the release of the heterodimeric domains of the signal recognition particle and its receptor, and the handover of the signal sequence to the translocon. We also observe that the signal recognition particle and the translocon insert-specific structural elements into the ribosomal tunnel to remodel it, possibly to sense nascent chains. Our work provides structural evidence for a conformational state of the signal recognition particle and its receptor primed for translocon binding to the ribosome-nascent chain complex.

  16. Resistance to malaria through structural variation of red blood cell invasion receptors.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Ellen M; Band, Gavin; Busby, George B J; Kivinen, Katja; Le, Quang Si; Clarke, Geraldine M; Bojang, Kalifa A; Conway, David J; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Bougouma, Edith C; Mangano, Valentina D; Modiano, David; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Achidi, Eric; Apinjoh, Tobias O; Marsh, Kevin; Ndila, Carolyne M; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N; Drakeley, Chris; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Reyburn, Hugh; Riley, Eleanor; Kachala, David; Molyneux, Malcolm; Nyirongo, Vysaul; Taylor, Terrie; Thornton, Nicole; Tilley, Louise; Grimsley, Shane; Drury, Eleanor; Stalker, Jim; Cornelius, Victoria; Hubbart, Christina; Jeffreys, Anna E; Rowlands, Kate; Rockett, Kirk A; Spencer, Chris C A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2017-06-16

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum invades human red blood cells by a series of interactions between host and parasite surface proteins. By analyzing genome sequence data from human populations, including 1269 individuals from sub-Saharan Africa, we identify a diverse array of large copy-number variants affecting the host invasion receptor genes GYPA and GYPB We find that a nearby association with severe malaria is explained by a complex structural rearrangement involving the loss of GYPB and gain of two GYPB-A hybrid genes, which encode a serologically distinct blood group antigen known as Dantu. This variant reduces the risk of severe malaria by 40% and has recently increased in frequency in parts of Kenya, yet it appears to be absent from west Africa. These findings link structural variation of red blood cell invasion receptors with natural resistance to severe malaria. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Structures of the E. coli translating ribosome with SRP and its receptor and with the translocon

    PubMed Central

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Co-translational protein targeting to membranes is a universally conserved process. Central steps include cargo recognition by the signal recognition particle and handover to the Sec translocon. Here we present snapshots of key co-translational-targeting complexes solved by cryo-electron microscopy at near-atomic resolution, establishing the molecular contacts between the Escherichia coli translating ribosome, the signal recognition particle and the translocon. Our results reveal the conformational changes that regulate the latching of the signal sequence, the release of the heterodimeric domains of the signal recognition particle and its receptor, and the handover of the signal sequence to the translocon. We also observe that the signal recognition particle and the translocon insert-specific structural elements into the ribosomal tunnel to remodel it, possibly to sense nascent chains. Our work provides structural evidence for a conformational state of the signal recognition particle and its receptor primed for translocon binding to the ribosome–nascent chain complex. PMID:26804923

  18. Growth factor and co-receptor release by structural regulation of substrate metalloprotease accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Liseth M.; Hartmann, Monika; Schubach, Salome; Ma, Junzhi; Herrlich, Peter; Herrlich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Release of cytokines, growth factors and other life-essential molecules from precursors by a-disintegrin-and-metalloproteases (ADAMs) is regulated with high substrate-specificity. We hypothesized that this is achieved by cleavage-regulatory intracellular-domain (ICD)-modifications of the precursors. We show here that cleavage-stimuli-induced specific ICD-modifications cause structural substrate changes that enhance ectodomain sensitivity of neuregulin-1 (NRG1; epidermal-growth-factor) or CD44 (receptor-tyrosine-kinase (RTK) co-receptor) to chymotrypsin/trypsin or soluble ADAM. This inside-out signal transfer required substrate homodimerization and was prevented by cleavage-inhibitory ICD-mutations. In chimeras, regulation could be conferred to a foreign ectodomain, suggesting a common higher-order structure. We predict that substrate-specific protease-accessibility-regulation controls release of numerous ADAM substrates. PMID:27876763

  19. Structures of the E. coli translating ribosome with SRP and its receptor and with the translocon.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-25

    Co-translational protein targeting to membranes is a universally conserved process. Central steps include cargo recognition by the signal recognition particle and handover to the Sec translocon. Here we present snapshots of key co-translational-targeting complexes solved by cryo-electron microscopy at near-atomic resolution, establishing the molecular contacts between the Escherichia coli translating ribosome, the signal recognition particle and the translocon. Our results reveal the conformational changes that regulate the latching of the signal sequence, the release of the heterodimeric domains of the signal recognition particle and its receptor, and the handover of the signal sequence to the translocon. We also observe that the signal recognition particle and the translocon insert-specific structural elements into the ribosomal tunnel to remodel it, possibly to sense nascent chains. Our work provides structural evidence for a conformational state of the signal recognition particle and its receptor primed for translocon binding to the ribosome-nascent chain complex.

  20. Structurally divergent human T cell receptor. gamma. proteins encoded by distinct C. gamma. genes

    SciTech Connect

    Krangel, M.S.; Band, H.; Hata, S.; McLean, J.; Brenner, M.B.

    1987-07-03

    The human T cell receptor (TCR) ..gamma.. polypeptide occurs in structurally distinct forms on certain peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Complementary DNA clones representing the transcripts of functionally rearranged TCR ..gamma.. genes in these cells have been analyzed. The expression of a disulfide-linked and a nondisulfide-linked form of TCR ..gamma.. correlates with the use of the C..gamma..1 and C..gamma..2 constant-region gene segments, respectively. Variability in TCR ..gamma.. polypeptide and disulfide linkage is determined by the number of copies and the sequence of a repeated segment of the constant region. Thus, C..gamma..1 and C..gamma..2 are used to generate structurally distinct, yet functional, T3-associated receptor complexes on peripheral blood lymphocytes. Tryptic peptide mapping suggests that the T3-associated TCR ..gamma.. and delta peptides in the nondisulfide-linked form are distinct.

  1. The Structural Basis for the Function of Two Anti-VEGF Receptor 2 Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    M Franklin; E Navarro; Y Wang; S Patel; P Singh; Y Zhang; K Persaud; A Bari; H Griffith; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The anti-VEGF receptor 2 antibody IMC-1121B is a promising antiangiogenic drug being tested for treatment of breast and gastric cancer. We have determined the structure of the 1121B Fab fragment in complex with domain 3 of VEGFR2, as well as the structure of a different neutralizing anti-VEGFR2 antibody, 6.64, also in complex with VEGFR2 domain 3. The two Fab fragments bind at opposite ends of VEGFR2 domain 3; 1121B directly blocks VEGF binding, whereas 6.64 may prevent receptor dimerization by perturbing the domain 3:domain 4 interface. Mutagenesis reveals that residues essential for VEGF, 1121B, and 6.64 binding are nonoverlapping among the three contact patches.

  2. The Structural Basis for the Function of Two Anti-VEGF Receptor 2 Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Matthew C.; Navarro, Elizabeth C.; Wang, Yujie; Patel, Sheetal; Singh, Pinki; Zhang, Yi; Persaud, Kris; Bari, Amtul; Griffith, Heather; Shen, Leyi; Balderes, Paul; Kussie, Paul

    2011-10-28

    The anti-VEGF receptor 2 antibody IMC-1121B is a promising antiangiogenic drug being tested for treatment of breast and gastric cancer. We have determined the structure of the 1121B Fab fragment in complex with domain 3 of VEGFR2, as well as the structure of a different neutralizing anti-VEGFR2 antibody, 6.64, also in complex with VEGFR2 domain 3. The two Fab fragments bind at opposite ends of VEGFR2 domain 3; 1121B directly blocks VEGF binding, whereas 6.64 may prevent receptor dimerization by perturbing the domain 3:domain 4 interface. Mutagenesis reveals that residues essential for VEGF, 1121B, and 6.64 binding are nonoverlapping among the three contact patches.

  3. Insights into the structural basis of endogenous agonist activation of family B G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Maoqing; Gao, Fan; Pinon, Delia I; Miller, Laurence J

    2008-06-01

    Agonist drugs targeting the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) receptor represent important additions to the clinical management of patients with diabetes mellitus. In the current report, we have explored whether the recently described concept of a receptor-active endogenous agonist sequence within the amino terminus of the secretin receptor may also be applicable to the GLP1 receptor. If so, this could provide a lead for the development of additional small molecule agonists targeting this and other important family members. Indeed, the region of the GLP1 receptor analogous to that containing the active WDN within the secretin receptor was found to possess full agonist activity at the GLP1 receptor. The minimal fragment within this region that had full agonist activity was NRTFD. Despite having no primary sequence identity with the WDN, it was also active at the secretin receptor, where it had similar potency and efficacy to WDN, suggesting common structural features. Molecular modeling demonstrated that an intradomain salt bridge between the side chains of arginine and aspartate could yield similarities in structure with cyclic WDN. This directly supports the relevance of the endogenous agonist concept to the GLP1 receptor and provides new insights into the rational development and refinement of new types of drugs activating this important receptor.

  4. The dopamine D2 receptor dimer and its interaction with homobivalent antagonists: homology modeling, docking and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Jörg, Manuela; Capuano, Ben

    2016-09-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to G protein-coupled receptor complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding. For this purpose, we have developed and tested a multi-component protocol to model the inactive conformation of the dopamine D2 receptor dimer, suitable for interaction with homobivalent antagonists. Our approach was based on protein-protein docking, applying the Rosetta software to obtain populations of dimers as present in membranes with all the main possible interfaces. Consensus scoring based on the values and frequencies of best interfaces regarding four scoring parameters, Rosetta interface score, interface area, free energy of binding and energy of hydrogen bond interactions indicated that the best scored dimer model possesses a TM4-TM5-TM7-TM1 interface, which is in agreement with experimental data. This model was used to study interactions of the previously published dopamine D2 receptor homobivalent antagonists based on clozapine,1,4-disubstituted aromatic piperidines/piperazines and arylamidoalkyl substituted phenylpiperazine pharmacophores. It was found that the homobivalent antagonists stabilize the receptor-inactive conformation by maintaining the ionic lock interaction, and change the dimer interface by disrupting a set of hydrogen bonds and maintaining water- and ligand-mediated hydrogen bonds in the extracellular and intracellular part of the interface. Graphical Abstract Structure of the final model of the dopamine D2 receptor homodimer, indicating the distancebetween Tyr37 and Tyr 5.42 in the apo form (left) and in the complex with the ligand (right).

  5. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36.

    PubMed

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127-279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127-279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions.

  6. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36

    PubMed Central

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A.; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127–279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127–279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions. PMID:24348024

  7. Crystal Structure of the GerBC Component of a Bacillus Subtilis Spore Germinant Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Setlow, B; Setlow, P; Hao, B

    2010-01-01

    The nutrient germinant receptors (nGRs) of spores of Bacillus species are clusters of three proteins that play a critical role in triggering the germination of dormant spores in response to specific nutrient molecules. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C protein of the GerB germinant receptor, so-called GerBC, of Bacillus subtilis spores at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The GerBC protein adopts a previously uncharacterized type of protein fold consisting of three distinct domains, each of which is centered by a beta sheet surrounded by multiple alpha helices. Secondary-structure prediction and structure-based sequence alignment suggest that the GerBC structure represents the prototype for C subunits of nGRs from spores of all Bacillales and Clostridiales species and defines two highly conserved structural regions in this family of proteins. GerBC forms an interlocked dimer in the crystalline state but is predominantly monomeric in solution, pointing to the possibility that GerBC oligomerizes as a result of either high local protein concentrations or interaction with other nGR proteins in spores. Our findings provide the first structural view of the nGR subunits and a molecular framework for understanding the architecture, conservation, and function of nGRs.

  8. Structural Basis of Interaction Between Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator and its Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Barinka,C.; Parry, G.; Callahan, J.; Shaw, D.; Kuo, A.; Cines, B.; Mazar, A.; Lubkowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to its high-affinity receptor (uPAR) orchestrates uPAR interactions with other cellular components that play a pivotal role in diverse (patho-)physiological processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis, inflammation, and cancer metastasis. However, notwithstanding the wealth of biochemical data available describing the activities of uPAR, little is known about the exact mode of uPAR/uPA interactions or the presumed conformational changes that accompany uPA/uPAR engagement. Here, we report the crystal structure of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), which contains the three domains of the wild-type receptor but lacks the cell-surface anchoring sequence, in complex with the amino-terminal fragment of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (ATF), at the resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. We report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of free ATF. Our results provide a structural basis, represented by conformational changes induced in uPAR, for several published biochemical observations describing the nature of uPAR/uPA interactions and provide insight into mechanisms that may be responsible for the cellular responses induced by uPA binding.

  9. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-06-27

    Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled {mu}-opioid receptor ({mu}-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the mouse {mu}-OR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most G-protein-coupled receptors published so far, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the {mu}-OR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetrical dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction.

  10. The Polyomaviridae: Contributions of virus structure to our understanding of virus receptors and infectious entry

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, Ursula; Stehle, Thilo Atwood, Walter J.

    2009-02-20

    This review summarizes the field's major findings related to the characterization of polyomavirus structures and to the characterization of virus receptors and mechanisms of host cell invasion. The four members of the family that have received the most attention in this regard are the mouse polyomavirus (mPyV), the monkey polyomavirus SV40, and the two human polyomaviruses, JCV and BKV. The structures of both the mPyV and SV40 alone and in complex with receptor fragments have been solved to high resolution. The majority of polyomaviruses recognize terminal sialic acid in either an {alpha}2,3 linkage or an {alpha}2,6 linkage to the underlying galactose. Studies on virus structure, receptor utilization and mechanisms of entry have led to new insights into how these viruses interact in an active way with cells to ensure the nuclear delivery and expression of their genomes. Critical work on virus entry has led to the discovery of a pH neutral endocytic compartment that accepts cargo from caveolae and to novel roles for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) associated factors in virus uncoating and penetration of ER membranes. This review will summarize the major findings and compare and contrast the mechanisms used by these viruses to infect cells.

  11. X-ray structures of AMPA receptor-cone snail toxin complexes illuminate activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-08-29

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamic properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system, and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. We determined multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator, and orthosteric agonists, at 3.8 to 4.1 angstrom resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a straightjacket on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) "gating ring," restraining the domains via both intra- and interdimer cross-links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD "clamshells" is transduced into an irislike expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in pulling forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating.

  12. Structure--Function Studies on Receptor Activation of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Dai, Shuo; Rathod, Rachana; Hoff, Wouter; Xie, Aihua; Xie Collaboration; Hoff Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Biological signaling in cells starts with detection of stimuli from ever changing environment, results in relay of signal, and finishes with particular cellular response. Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) from a salt loving Halorhodospira halophila bacterium is a blue light photoreceptor protein for negative phototaxis and a structural prototype of PAS domain superfamily of signaling and regulatory proteins. Upon absorption of a blue photon by its negatively charged p-coumaric acid (pCA) chromophore, the receptor state (off-state) undergoes photocyclic process, leading to large amplitude protein quake that results in PYP receptor activation. To understand the structural basis of receptor activation we employ time-resolved FTIR spectroscopic techniques combined with site-specific mutation to search for a key residue involved in protein quake. We will discuss the strategies and experimental results in light of hydrogen bonding network, active site structure and protein quake in PYP. The signaling mechanism leaned from PYP may have implication to understand signal transduction in other proteins.

  13. Crystal structure of the µ-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist.

    PubMed

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Sunahara, Roger K; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I; Kobilka, Brian K; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-03-21

    Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled µ-opioid receptor (µ-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 Å crystal structure of the mouse µ-OR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most G-protein-coupled receptors published so far, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the µ-OR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetrical dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction.

  14. Structural determinants of activity at the GABAB receptor. A comparison of phosphoethanolamine and related GABA analogs.

    PubMed

    Klunk, W E; McClure, R J; Xu, C J; Pettegrew, J W

    1995-09-01

    Phosphoethanolamine is a phosphomonoester that is reduced in Alzheimer disease brain. Despite its close structural similarity to GABA and the GABAB partial agonist 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid, phosphoethanolamine binds very poorly to GABAB receptors (IC50 = 7.5 +/- 0.8 mM). In this study, we examined whether the marked decrease in binding affinity associated with the presence of an ester oxygen in place of the alpha-CH2 group of GABAergic compounds also occurred in sulfonates and used high resolution solution NMR and molecular mechanics calculations to determine the structural basis of this decrease in activity. The sulfonate analog of GABA, 3-amino-propylsulfonic acid, became > 2500-fold less potent when the alpha-CH2 was replaced by an ester oxygen. Structural studies showed that the active alpha-CH2 compounds (GABA, 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid, and 3-aminopropylsulfonic acid) prefer a fully extended conformation. The inactive compounds, phosphoethanolamine and ethanolamine-O-sulfate, exist in a gauche conformation around the C beta-C gamma bond. This study, which suggests conformational differences, may explain how PE can be so efficiently excluded from GABAB receptors, despite being present in millimolar concentrations in brain. Exclusion of phosphoethanolamine from GABAB receptors may be an important physiologic control mechanism in the regulation of inhibitory neurotransmission.

  15. Structural dynamics and energetics underlying allosteric inactivation of the cannabinoid receptor CB1

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Jonathan F.; Farrens, David L.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are surprisingly flexible molecules that can do much more than simply turn on G proteins. Some even exhibit biased signaling, wherein the same receptor preferentially activates different G-protein or arrestin signaling pathways depending on the type of ligand bound. Why this behavior occurs is still unclear, but it can happen with both traditional ligands and ligands that bind allosterically outside the orthosteric receptor binding pocket. Here, we looked for structural mechanisms underlying these phenomena in the marijuana receptor CB1. Our work focused on the allosteric ligand Org 27569, which has an unusual effect on CB1—it simultaneously increases agonist binding, decreases G-protein activation, and induces biased signaling. Using classical pharmacological binding studies, we find that Org 27569 binds to a unique allosteric site on CB1 and show that it can act alone (without need for agonist cobinding). Through mutagenesis studies, we find that the ability of Org 27569 to bind is related to how much receptor is in an active conformation that can couple with G protein. Using these data, we estimated the energy differences between the inactive and active states. Finally, site-directed fluorescence labeling studies show the CB1 structure stabilized by Org 27569 is different and unique from that stabilized by antagonist or agonist. Specifically, transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) movements associated with G-protein activation are blocked, but at the same time, helix 8/TM7 movements are enhanced, suggesting a possible mechanism for the ability of Org 27569 to induce biased signaling. PMID:26100912

  16. Receptor Polymorphism and Genomic Structure Interact to Shape Bitter Taste Perception.

    PubMed

    Roudnitzky, Natacha; Behrens, Maik; Engel, Anika; Kohl, Susann; Thalmann, Sophie; Hübner, Sandra; Lossow, Kristina; Wooding, Stephen P; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The ability to taste bitterness evolved to safeguard most animals, including humans, against potentially toxic substances, thereby leading to food rejection. Nonetheless, bitter perception is subject to individual variations due to the presence of genetic functional polymorphisms in bitter taste receptor (TAS2R) genes, such as the long-known association between genetic polymorphisms in TAS2R38 and bitter taste perception of phenylthiocarbamide. Yet, due to overlaps in specificities across receptors, such associations with a single TAS2R locus are uncommon. Therefore, to investigate more complex associations, we examined taste responses to six structurally diverse compounds (absinthin, amarogentin, cascarillin, grosheimin, quassin, and quinine) in a sample of the Caucasian population. By sequencing all bitter receptor loci, inferring long-range haplotypes, mapping their effects on phenotype variation, and characterizing functionally causal allelic variants, we deciphered at the molecular level how a subjects' genotype for the whole-family of TAS2R genes shapes variation in bitter taste perception. Within each haplotype block implicated in phenotypic variation, we provided evidence for at least one locus harboring functional polymorphic alleles, e.g. one locus for sensitivity to amarogentin, one of the most bitter natural compounds known, and two loci for sensitivity to grosheimin, one of the bitter compounds of artichoke. Our analyses revealed also, besides simple associations, complex associations of bitterness sensitivity across TAS2R loci. Indeed, even if several putative loci harbored both high- and low-sensitivity alleles, phenotypic variation depended on linkage between these alleles. When sensitive alleles for bitter compounds were maintained in the same linkage phase, genetically driven perceptual differences were obvious, e.g. for grosheimin. On the contrary, when sensitive alleles were in opposite phase, only weak genotype-phenotype associations were seen

  17. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors.

    PubMed

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane-solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane-solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor.

  18. Structure of the Ligand-Binding Domain of the EphB2 Receptor of 2 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldgur, Y.; Paavilainen, S; Nikolov, D; Himanen, J

    2009-01-01

    Eph tyrosine kinase receptors, the largest group of receptor tyrosine kinases, and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication regulating cell attachment, shape and mobility. Recently, several Eph receptors and ephrins have also been found to play important roles in the progression of cancer. Structural and biophysical studies have established detailed information on the binding and recognition of Eph receptors and ephrins. The initial high-affinity binding of Eph receptors to ephrin occurs through the penetration of an extended G-H loop of the ligand into a hydrophobic channel on the surface of the receptor. Consequently, the G-H loop-binding channel of Eph receptors is the main target in the search for Eph antagonists that could be used in the development of anticancer drugs and several peptides have been shown to specifically bind Eph receptors and compete with the cognate ephrin ligands. However, the molecular details of the conformational changes upon Eph/ephrin binding have remained speculative, since two of the loops were unstructured in the original model of the free EphB2 structure and their conformational changes upon ligand binding could consequently not be analyzed in detail. In this study, the X-ray structure of unbound EphB2 is reported at a considerably higher 2 A resolution, the conformational changes that the important receptor loops undergo upon ligand binding are described and the consequences that these findings have for the development of Eph antagonists are discussed.

  19. [Relationship between the crystal lattice structure and the biological action of some agonists of amino acid receptors].

    PubMed

    Kertser, L S; Baev, K V

    1992-01-01

    The crystal structures of glycine, taurine, GABA, beta-alanine were compared. The quantity and the accuracy of distances coincidence between nitrogen and oxygen atoms were used as a criterion of similarity of the crystalline structures. The conclusion is made about a correlation between crystalline structure of agonists and their effect on amino acid receptors. It is assumed that in case of a cooperative effect of agonist on the receptor a mutual arrangement of molecules on the receptor surface is similar to their arrangement in the agonist crystal.

  20. A Structural Model of the Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor in an Open Conformation.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Letizia; Malliavin, Thérèse E; Maragliano, Luca; Cottone, Grazia; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that regulate chemical transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Structural information is available at low resolution from open and closed forms of an eukaryotic receptor, and at high resolution from other members of the same structural family, two prokaryotic orthologs and an eukaryotic GluCl channel. Structures of human channels however are still lacking. Homology modeling and Molecular Dynamics simulations are valuable tools to predict structures of unknown proteins, however, for the case of human nAchRs, they have been unsuccessful in providing a stable open structure so far. This is due to different problems with the template structures: on one side the homology with prokaryotic species is too low, while on the other the open eukaryotic GluCl proved itself unstable in several MD studies and collapsed to a dehydrated, non-conductive conformation, even when bound to an agonist. Aim of this work is to obtain, by a mixing of state-of-the-art homology and simulation techniques, a plausible prediction of the structure (still unknown) of the open state of human α7 nAChR complexed with epibatidine, from which it is possible to start structural and functional test studies. To prevent channel closure we employ a restraint that keeps the transmembrane pore open, and obtain in this way a stable, hydrated conformation. To further validate this conformation, we run four long, unbiased simulations starting from configurations chosen at random along the restrained trajectory. The channel remains stable and hydrated over the whole runs. This allows to assess the stability of the putative open conformation over a cumulative time of 1 μs, 800 ns of which are of unbiased simulation. Mostly based on the analysis of pore hydration and size, we suggest that the obtained structure has reasonable chances to be (at least one of the possible) structures of the channel in the open conformation.

  1. The structure of cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 highlights structural Ig-fold versatility for receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Nemčovičová, Ivana; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2014-03-01

    The crystal structure of Human cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 was solved at 3.25 Å resolution. Here, a detailed analysis of its intimate dimerization interface and the biophysical properties of its receptor (TRAIL-R2 and CD155) binding interactions are presented. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of the innate immune system as they rapidly detect and destroy infected cells. To avoid immune recognition and to allow long-term persistence in the host, Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has evolved a number of genes to evade or inhibit immune effector pathways. In particular, UL141 can inhibit cell-surface expression of both the NK cell-activating ligand CD155 as well as the TRAIL death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2). The crystal structure of unliganded HCMV UL141 refined to 3.25 Å resolution allowed analysis of its head-to-tail dimerization interface. A ‘dimerization-deficient’ mutant of UL141 (ddUL141) was further designed, which retained the ability to bind to TRAIL-R2 or CD155 while losing the ability to cross-link two receptor monomers. Structural comparison of unliganded UL141 with UL141 bound to TRAIL-R2 further identified a mobile loop that makes intimate contacts with TRAIL-R2 upon receptor engagement. Superposition of the Ig-like domain of UL141 on the CD155 ligand T-cell immunoreceptor with Ig and ITIM domains (TIGIT) revealed that UL141 can potentially engage CD155 similar to TIGIT by using the C′C′′ and GF loops. Further mutations in the TIGIT binding site of CD155 (Q63R and F128R) abrogated UL141 binding, suggesting that the Ig-like domain of UL141 is a viral mimic of TIGIT, as it targets the same binding site on CD155 using similar ‘lock-and-key’ interactions. Sequence alignment of the UL141 gene and its orthologues also showed conservation in this highly hydrophobic (L/A)X{sub 6}G ‘lock’ motif for CD155 binding as well as conservation of the TRAIL-R2 binding patches, suggesting that these host–receptor

  2. Multiple conformational states in retrospective virtual screening - homology models vs. crystal structures: beta-2 adrenergic receptor case study.

    PubMed

    Mordalski, Stefan; Witek, Jagna; Smusz, Sabina; Rataj, Krzysztof; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2015-01-01

    Distinguishing active from inactive compounds is one of the crucial problems of molecular docking, especially in the context of virtual screening experiments. The randomization of poses and the natural flexibility of the protein make this discrimination even harder. Some of the recent approaches to post-docking analysis use an ensemble of receptor models to mimic this naturally occurring conformational diversity. However, the optimal number of receptor conformations is yet to be determined. In this study, we compare the results of a retrospective screening of beta-2 adrenergic receptor ligands performed on both the ensemble of receptor conformations extracted from ten available crystal structures and an equal number of homology models. Additional analysis was also performed for homology models with up to 20 receptor conformations considered. The docking results were encoded into the Structural Interaction Fingerprints and were automatically analyzed by support vector machine. The use of homology models in such virtual screening application was proved to be superior in comparison to crystal structures. Additionally, increasing the number of receptor conformational states led to enhanced effectiveness of active vs. inactive compounds discrimination. For virtual screening purposes, the use of homology models was found to be most beneficial, even in the presence of crystallographic data regarding the conformational space of the receptor. The results also showed that increasing the number of receptors considered improves the effectiveness of identifying active compounds by machine learning methods. Graphical abstractComparison of machine learning results obtained for various number of beta-2 AR homology models and crystal structures.

  3. Structure-based design of estrogen receptor-beta selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Manas, Eric S; Unwalla, Rayomand J; Xu, Zhang B; Malamas, Michael S; Miller, Chris P; Harris, Heather A; Hsiao, Chulai; Akopian, Tatos; Hum, Wah-Tung; Malakian, Karl; Wolfrom, Scott; Bapat, Ashok; Bhat, Ramesh A; Stahl, Mark L; Somers, William S; Alvarez, Juan C

    2004-11-24

    We present the structure-based optimization of a series of estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) selective ligands. X-ray cocrystal structures of these ligands complexed to both ERalpha and ERbeta are described. We also discuss how molecular modeling was used to take advantage of subtle differences between the two binding cavities in order to optimize selectivity for ERbeta over ERalpha. Quantum chemical calculations are utilized to gain insight into the mechanism of selectivity enhancement. Despite only two relatively conservative residue substitutions in the ligand binding pocket, the most selective compounds have greater than 100-fold selectivity for ERbeta relative to ERalpha when measured using a competitive radioligand binding assay.

  4. Extracellular regulation of type IIa receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases: mechanistic insights from structural analyses

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Charlotte H.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Aricescu, A. Radu

    2016-01-01

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) exhibit a wide repertoire of cellular signalling functions. In particular, type IIa RPTP family members have recently been highlighted as hubs for extracellular interactions in neurons, regulating neuronal extension and guidance, as well as synaptic organisation. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress of structural biology investigations into the architecture of type IIa RPTP ectodomains and their interactions with extracellular ligands. Structural insights, in combination with biophysical and cellular studies, allow us to begin to piece together molecular mechanisms for the transduction and integration of type IIa RPTP signals and to propose hypotheses for future experimental validation. PMID:25234613

  5. Switching agonist/antagonist properties of opiate alkaloids at the delta opioid receptor using mutations based on the structure of the orphanin FQ receptor.

    PubMed

    Meng, F; Wei, Q; Hoversten, M T; Taylor, L P; Akil, H

    2000-07-21

    In an earlier study, we have demonstrated that by mutating five amino acid residues to those conserved in the opioid receptors, the OFQ receptor could be converted to a functional receptor that bound many opioid alkaloids with nanomolar affinities. Surprisingly, when the reciprocal mutations, Lys-214 --> Ala (TM5), Ile-277 --> Val/His-278 --> Gln/Ile-279 --> Val (TM6), and Ile-304 --> Thr (TM7), are introduced in the delta receptor, neither the individual mutations nor their various combinations significantly reduce the binding affinities of opioid alkaloids tested. However, these mutations cause profound alterations in the functional characteristics of the mutant receptors as measured in guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding assays. Some agonists become antagonists at some constructs as they lose their ability to activate them. Some alkaloid antagonists are transformed into agonists at other constructs, but their agonistic effects can still be blocked by the peptide antagonist TIPP. Even the delta inverse agonist 7-benzylidenenaltrexone becomes an agonist at the mutant containing both the Ile-277 --> Val/His-278 --> Gln/Ile-279 --> Val and Ile-304 --> Thr mutations. Thus, although the mutated residues are thought to be part of the binding pocket, they are critically involved in the control of the delta receptor activation process. These findings shed light on some of the structural bases of ligand efficacy. They are also compatible with the hypothesis that a ligand may achieve high affinity binding in several different ways, each having different effects on receptor activation.

  6. Structural and functional characterization of an inositol polyphosphate receptor from cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, C C; Timerman, A P; Saito, A; Mayrleitner, M; Schindler, H; Fleischer, S

    1992-02-15

    An inositol polyphosphate receptor has been purified from bovine cerebellum which consists of three different polypeptides with Mr of 111,000, 102,000, and 52,000. Negative staining electron microscopy reveals globular-like structures 10-13 nm in diameter. The receptor has a Stokes radius of 400,000 daltons as determined by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. The receptor preparation binds inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, inositol hexaphosphate (or phytol), and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP4, IP6, and IP3, respectively) with submicromolar affinity (0.19, 0.15, and 0.54 microM, respectively) at conditions approximating physiological ionic strength and pH. The purified receptor preparation, when reconstituted into planar bilayers, displays ion channel activity, preferentially permeable to K+. Permeability ratios of the channel are PK+/PNa+ approximately 5 and PK+/PCl approximately 19. In symmetrical 100 mM KCl, the channel is characterized by long open times (minutes) with a conductance of 7.2 picosiemens. The channel is selectively modulated by IP4. That is, at 1 microM IP4, the mean open time decreased substantially to rapid flicker behavior and the channel is completely closed at 10 microM IP4. IP6 and IP3 did not modulate the channel under similar conditions. Thus, the channel appears to be an IP4-modulated K+ channel.

  7. Structural basis for a molecular allosteric control mechanism of cofactor binding to nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Osz, Judit; Brélivet, Yann; Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Cura, Vincent; Eiler, Sylvia; Ruff, Marc; Bourguet, William; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino

    2012-03-06

    Transcription regulation by steroid hormones, vitamin derivatives, and metabolites is mediated by nuclear receptors (NRs), which play an important role in ligand-dependent gene expression and human health. NRs function as homodimers or heterodimers and are involved in a combinatorial, coordinated and sequentially orchestrated exchange between coregulators (corepressors, coactivators). The architecture of DNA-bound functional dimers positions the coregulators proteins. We previously demonstrated that retinoic acid (RAR-RXR) and vitamin D3 receptors (VDR-RXR) heterodimers recruit only one coactivator molecule asymmetrically without steric hindrance for the binding of a second cofactor. We now address the problem of homodimers for which the presence of two identical targets enhances the functional importance of the mode of binding. Using structural and biophysical methods and RAR as a model, we could dissect the molecular mechanism of coactivator recruitment to homodimers. Our study reveals an allosteric mechanism whereby binding of a coactivator promotes formation of nonsymmetrical RAR homodimers with a 21 stoichiometry. Ligand conformation and the cofactor binding site of the unbound receptor are affected through the dimer interface. A similar control mechanism is observed with estrogen receptor (ER) thus validating the negative cooperativity model for an established functional homodimer. Correlation with published data on other NRs confirms the general character of this regulatory pathway.

  8. Development and validation of quantitative structure-activity relationship models for compounds acting on serotoninergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Zydek, Grażyna; Brzezińska, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study has been made on 20 compounds with serotonin (5-HT) receptor affinity. Thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) data and physicochemical parameters were applied in this study. RP2 TLC 60F(254) plates (silanized) impregnated with solutions of propionic acid, ethylbenzene, 4-ethylphenol, and propionamide (used as analogues of the key receptor amino acids) and their mixtures (denoted as S1-S7 biochromatographic models) were used in two developing phases as a model of drug-5-HT receptor interaction. The semiempirical method AM1 (HyperChem v. 7.0 program) and ACD/Labs v. 8.0 program were employed to calculate a set of physicochemical parameters for the investigated compounds. Correlation and multiple linear regression analysis were used to search for the best QSAR equations. The correlations obtained for the compounds studied represent their interactions with the proposed biochromatographic models. The good multivariate relationships (R(2) = 0.78-0.84) obtained by means of regression analysis can be used for predicting the quantitative effect of biological activity of different compounds with 5-HT receptor affinity. "Leave-one-out" (LOO) and "leave-N-out" (LNO) cross-validation methods were used to judge the predictive power of final regression equations.

  9. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Mace G.

    2017-01-01

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D) protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors. PMID:28061508

  10. Structural Analysis on the Pathologic Mutant Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Darrell E.; Suzuki, Shigeru; Mayama, Takafumi; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene mutations may cause familial or sporadic generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome. Most of the missense forms distribute in the ligand-binding domain and impair its ligand-binding activity and formation of the activation function (AF)-2 that binds LXXLL motif-containing coactivators. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to ligand-binding domain of pathologic GR mutants to reveal their structural defects. Several calculated parameters including interaction energy for dexamethasone or the LXXLL peptide indicate that destruction of ligand-binding pocket (LBP) is a primary character. Their LBP defects are driven primarily by loss/reduction of the electrostatic interaction formed by R611 and T739 of the receptor to dexamethasone and a subsequent conformational mismatch, which deacylcortivazol resolves with its large phenylpyrazole moiety and efficiently stimulates transcriptional activity of the mutant receptors with LBP defect. Reduced affinity of the LXXLL peptide to AF-2 is caused mainly by disruption of the electrostatic bonds to the noncore leucine residues of this peptide that determine the peptide's specificity to GR, as well as by reduced noncovalent interaction against core leucines and subsequent exposure of the AF-2 surface to solvent. The results reveal molecular defects of pathologic mutant receptors and provide important insights to the actions of wild-type GR. PMID:26745667

  11. Molecular and Structural Characterization of a Novel Escherichia coli Interleukin Receptor Mimic Protein.

    PubMed

    Moriel, Danilo G; Heras, Begoña; Paxman, Jason J; Lo, Alvin W; Tan, Lendl; Sullivan, Matthew J; Dando, Samantha J; Beatson, Scott A; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A

    2016-03-15

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a disease of extremely high incidence in both community and nosocomial settings. UTIs cause significant morbidity and mortality, with approximately 150 million cases globally per year. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of UTI and is generally treated empirically. However, the rapidly increasing incidence of UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant UPEC strains has led to limited available treatment options and highlights the urgent need to develop alternative treatment and prevention strategies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis to define the regulation, structure, function, and immunogenicity of recently identified UPEC vaccine candidate C1275 (here referred to as IrmA). We showed that the irmA gene is highly prevalent in UPEC, is cotranscribed with the biofilm-associated antigen 43 gene, and is regulated by the global oxidative stress response OxyR protein. Localization studies identified IrmA in the UPEC culture supernatant. We determined the structure of IrmA and showed that it adopts a unique domain-swapped dimer architecture. The dimeric structure of IrmA displays similarity to those of human cytokine receptors, including the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R), and interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R) binding domains, and we showed that purified IrmA can bind to their cognate cytokines. Finally, we showed that plasma from convalescent urosepsis patients contains high IrmA antibody titers, demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of IrmA. Taken together, our results indicate that IrmA may play an important role during UPEC infection. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), a disease of major significance to human health. Globally, the incidence of UPEC-mediated UTI is strongly associated with increasing antibiotic resistance, making this extremely common infection a major public health concern. In this report, we describe

  12. Quaternary structure of the yeast pheromone receptor Ste2 in living cells.

    PubMed

    Stoneman, Michael R; Paprocki, Joel D; Biener, Gabriel; Yokoi, Koki; Shevade, Aishwarya; Kuchin, Sergei; Raicu, Valerică

    2016-12-16

    Transmembrane proteins known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been shown to form functional homo- or hetero-oligomeric complexes, although agreement has been slow to emerge on whether homo-oligomerization plays functional roles. Here we introduce a platform to determine the identity and abundance of differing quaternary structures formed by GPCRs in living cells following changes in environmental conditions, such as changes in concentrations. The method capitalizes on the intrinsic capability of FRET spectrometry to extract oligomer geometrical information from distributions of FRET efficiencies (or FRET spectrograms) determined from pixel-level imaging of cells, combined with the ability of the statistical ensemble approaches to FRET to probe the proportion of different quaternary structures (such as dimers, rhombus or parallelogram shaped tetramers, etc.) from averages over entire cells. Our approach revealed that the yeast pheromone receptor Ste2 forms predominantly tetramers at average expression levels of 2 to 25 molecules per pixel (2.8·10(-6) to 3.5·10(-5)molecules/nm(2)), and a mixture of tetramers and octamers at expression levels of 25-100 molecules per pixel (3.5·10(-5) to 1.4·10(-4)molecules/nm(2)). Ste2 is a class D GPCR found in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the mating type a, and binds the pheromone α-factor secreted by cells of the mating type α. Such investigations may inform development of antifungal therapies targeting oligomers of pheromone receptors. The proposed FRET imaging platform may be used to determine the quaternary structure sub-states and stoichiometry of any GPCR and, indeed, any membrane protein in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interactions between membrane receptors in cellular membranes edited by Kalina Hristova.

  13. Structural Basis for Hormone Recognition by the Human CRFR2[alpha] G Protein-coupled Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Kuntal; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Xu, H. Eric; Pioszak, Augen A.

    2012-05-09

    The mammalian corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)/urocortin (Ucn) peptide hormones include four structurally similar peptides, CRF, Ucn1, Ucn2, and Ucn3, that regulate stress respo