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Sample records for 7xxx series aluminum

  1. Approaches for mechanical joining of 7xxx series aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäckel, M.; Grimm, T.; Landgrebe, D.

    2016-10-01

    This paper shows a numerical and experimental analysis of the different problems occurring during or after the conventional self-pierce riveting with semi-tubular and solid rivets of the high strength aluminum alloy EN AW-7021 T4. Furthermore this paper describes different pre-process methods by which the fracture in the high strength aluminum, caused by the self-pierce riveting processes, can be prevented and proper joining results are achieved. On this basis, the different approaches are compared regarding joint strength.

  2. Effects of aging condition on the fracture toughness of 2XXX and 7XXX series aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the effects of matrix aging condition (i.e., matrix temper) on the fracture toughness of 2XXX and 7XXX Al matrix alloys reinforced with SiC particulates, and the results are compared with the mechanical behavior. Fracture toughness testing was conducted on fatigue precracked bend specimens, and fracture surfaces were examined using SEM. Results revealed dramatic differences in the effect of matrix microstructure on the fracture properties of the two composite series. In the 7XXX material, the toughness values decreased from the underaged (UA) condition to the overaged (OA) condition by approximately 40 percent, while in the 2XXX series composite, the effect of matrix microstructure was marginal. In the 7XXX series composites, a transition in fracture mode from particle cracking (in UA) to matrix and linear-interface failure (in OA) was observed, while the 2XXX series composite failed predominantly by particle cracking.

  3. The influence of microstructure and strength on the fracture mode and toughness of 7XXX series aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Laughlin, David E.

    1982-03-01

    The effects of microstructure and strength on the fracture toughness of ultra high strength aluminum alloys have been investigated. For this study three ultra high purity compositions were chosen and fabricated into 1.60 mm (0.063 inches) sheet in a T6 temper providing a range of yield strengths from 496 MPa (72 ksi) to 614 MPa (89 ksi). These alloys differ only in the volume fraction of the fine matrix strengthening precipitates (G. P. ordered + η' ). Fracture toughness data were generated using Kahn-type tear tests, as well as R-curve and J c analyses performed on data from 102 mm wide center cracked tension panel tests. Consistent with previous studies, it has been demonstrated that the toughness decreases as the yield strength is increased by increasing the solute content. Concomitant with this decrease in toughness, a transition in fracture mode was observed from predominantly transgranular dimpled rupture to predominantly intergranular dimpled rupture. Both quantitative fractography and X-ray microanalysis clearly demonstrate that fracture initiation for the two fracture modes occurred by void formation at the Cr-dispersoids ( E-phase). In the case of intergranular fracture, void coalescence was facilitated by the grain boundary η precipitates. The difference in fracture toughness behavior of these alloys has been shown to be dependent on the coarseness of matrix slip and the strength differential between the matrix and precipitate free zone (σM-σPFZ). A new fracture mechanism has been proposed to explain the development of the large amounts of intergranular fracture observed in the low toughness alloys.

  4. Investigation of the structure/property relationship of spray-formed 7XXX series high-strength aluminum alloys and their metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma-Judd, Malavika M.

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify the structure/property relationship of spray formed 7XXX series alloys. High solute, ultra-high strength 7XXX series aluminum alloys with solute contents close to equilibrium solid solubility limits of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu system have been produced by rapid solidification using spray deposition. The process yields massive preforms directly from the liquid state. Various elements, including chromium, manganese, silver, zirconium and scandium, were incorporated to produce a variety of microstructures and mechanical properties. SiC particulate was added to these same alloy compositions to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs). The resulting extruded products in the T6 and T7 conditions were evaluated and compared. Under peak-aged conditions in the unreinforced materials, strengths in excess of 860 MPa were achieved, with one alloy exceeding 900 MPa. Apart from the elongation to failure, the mechanical properties of the composite materials were equal to or superior to those of their unreinforced counterparts. The superior strength properties of the spray formed alloys were attributed to two major substructures with different scale; nanometer sized eta ' metastable precipitates and slightly larger, but finely distributed dispersoids. The large volume fraction of plate-like eta' precipitates (average size 58A, ranging up to 73 A in diameter) were identified as having a hexagonal structure with lattice parameters a = 0.488 nm and c = 1.376. The remarkable strengthening is predominantly attributed to precipitation hardening. The enhanced mechanical properties of the MMC materials are attributed to the increased dislocation density, and thus, a higher concentration of structural particles compared to the unreinforced materials. Higher gas-to-metal ratios of 4.45, as opposed to lower gas-to-metal ratios of 1.95 produced a refined grain structure with an evenly distributed second phase. In both unreinforced and MMC materials

  5. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of various modified 7XXX series spray formed alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Mala M.

    2008-01-15

    Microstructural analysis was conducted on the second phase constituent particles in various modified 7XXX series alloys produced by spray forming. High gas-to-metal ratios of 4.45, as opposed to low gas-to-metal ratios of 1.95, were found to produce a more refined grain structure with an evenly distributed second phase. To elucidate the influence of Zn, Cr, Cu and Zr additions on the microstructure, five different alloy compositions were chosen. The microstructure after extrusion and aging was studied using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The coarse constituent particles were found to be Al{sub 6}(MnFe) and Al{sub 7}Cu{sub 2}Fe. Two different types of dispersoids were identified; fine, of the L1{sub 2} type (Al{sub 3}Zr) and larger dispersoids of the Al{sub 18}Mg{sub 3}Cr{sub 2} compound referred to as the E-Phase. Room temperature mechanical properties of spray formed Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys were investigated in the T6 and T7 aged condition. Variations in structural particle concentration were found based on aging and composition type.

  6. Evaluation of 7XXX-series aluminum alloys for the W87 aft support ring

    SciTech Connect

    Mahin, K.W.

    1985-03-01

    The study showed that the tensile properties of both 7075-T6 and 7050-T73651 decreased significantly after holding the alloys for any length of time at temperatures greater than 500/sup 0/F. After a 2-min hold at 575/sup 0/F, the yield strengths of 7075-T6 and 7050-T73651 were 217 MPa (31.5 ksi) and 245 MPa (35.6 ksi), respectively. There did not appear to be a significant difference in the mechanical properties between 7075-T6 and 7050-T6. Time at temperature appeared to be a critical parameter. Cycling the microstructure to 575/sup 0/F or above with no hold at temperature caused considerably less degradation in mechanical properties than a 2-min hold at temperature in all cases. Above 650/sup 0/F, both the ultimate tensile strength and the yield strength of the alloys reached a minimum of around 310 MPa (45 ksi) and 138 MPa (20 ksi), respectively. Evidence of a continuous grain boundary film of eta phase precipitates was found in the 7075-T6 alloy after a typical 575/sup 0/F thermal cycle. The presence of this grain boundary precipitate indicated a potential sensitivity of this alloy to stress corrosion cracking. Although the general environment for the aft support ring is controlled, the ring is expected to be under tension after assembly and exposure to small amounts of water vapor will probably occur. The conditions of stress, moisture, and susceptible microstructure increase the likelihood of stress corrosion cracking.

  7. Effects of Purity Level on the Mechanical Properties of 7000-Series Aluminums

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    grorh rate properties were not affected in a systematic manner. Stress corrosion cracking tests showed there does not appear to be a corrosion problem...Aluminum Extrusions 30 26 Stress Corrosion Test Results for 7XXX-T7351i Aluminum Extrusions 31 ix AFWAL-TR-80-4079 SECTION I INTRODUCTION Aluminum... STRESS CORROSION CRACKING Stress corrosion cracking test results for the seven extrusions are presented in Table 26. It can be observed that most of the

  8. Frequency-dependent environmental fatigue crack propagation in the 7XXX alloy/aqueous chloride system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasem, Zuhair Mattoug

    The need to predict the fatigue performance of aging aerospace structures has focused interest on environmentally assisted cracking in thick-section damage-tolerant aluminum alloys (AA). The objective of this research is to characterize and understand the time-dependent processes that govern environmental fatigue crack propagation (EFCP) in 7XXX series aluminum alloys exposed to an aggressive environment. Results are utilized to identify the rate-controlling step in growth enhancement in order to develop a mechanistic model describing the time dependency of EFCP. Aluminum alloy 7075, tested in the sensitive (SL) orientation and exposed to aqueous chloride solution, is studied. Da/dNcrit for different D K levels depends on 1/√fcrit, as predicted by process zone hydrogen-diffusion-limited crack growth modeling. A model based on hydrogen diffusion controlled growth is modified to include a stress-dependent critical hydrogen concentration normalized with the crack tip hydrogen concentration (Ccrit/CS). It is proposed that da/dNcrit for a given D K and R corresponds to the distance ahead of the crack tip where the local tensile stress associated with Kmax is maximum. The reversed plasticity estimate of this location equals da/dNcrit for two aging conditions of 7075 (SL)/NaCl at R = 0.1. The EFCP dependencies on alloy microstructure (T6 vs. T7), crack orientation (SL vs. LT), and stress ratio are measured and interpreted based on their effect on da/dN crit and fcrit as well as environmental closure. Chromate addition to the chloride solution eliminates the environmental acceleration of crack growth and reduces corrosion-product induced closure. In chromate-inhibited solution, the frequency dependence of EFCP in 7075 (SL) is unique. Da/dN is reduced at moderate and low frequencies to a value similar to crack growth rate in moist air, probably due to formation of a passive film which inhibits hydrogen uptake. Inhibition is mitigated by increasing frequency or increasing

  9. The effect of retrogression and reaging on the properties of the 7249 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Said, Omar S.; Frazier, William E.; Lee, Eui W.

    2003-01-01

    The retrogression and reaging (RRA) heat-treatment process and recent developments in high-strength 7xxx series aluminum alloys are summarized in this article. The results of experimental work indicate that RRA 7249 aluminum has the strength equivalent to or greater than 7249-T6 and superior corrosion resistance. This work is the result of collaborative efforts between the U.S. Navy and Loyola Marymount University.

  10. Age Hardening Kinetics in 7xxx Type (Al-Mg-Zn) Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vevecka-Priftaj, A.; Lamani, E.; Fjerdingen, J.; Langsrud, Y.; Gjoennes, J.; Hansen, V.

    2007-04-23

    Age hardening in industrial 7xxx alloys at the temperature 100 deg. and 150 deg. C up to 144 hrs, after solid solution treatments at 450 deg. and 550 deg. C, has been followed by measurements of Vickers hardness, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of silicon on phase and kinetic of age hardening zones and precipitates has been studied. High iron and silicon content increase the number of primary particle in the alloy. Size distribution of {eta}'-precipitates has been determined.

  11. Microstructure refinement of commercial 7xxx aluminium alloys solidified by the electromagnetic vibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Tamura, T.; Omura, N.; Murakami, Y.; Tada, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines the microstructure refinement of commercial 7xxx aluminium alloys solidified by the electromagnetic vibration technique (EMV) as a function of vibration frequency, f. The microstructure evolution reveals that at the low frequency of f = 62.5 Hz, the solidified microstructure is coarse and with the increase of vibration frequency to f = 500 Hz, the grain size becomes the finest and further increase of frequency to f = 2000 Hz results in coarsening of microstructures. The refinement mechanism is clarified when considering the significant difference in electrical resistivities of the solid and the liquid in mushy zone, in which both phases coexist and subject to vibration. The frequency-dependent refinement behaviour is revealed when the displacement of the mobile solid and sluggish liquid is taken into account during solidification. In contrast to 3xxx aluminium alloys, no giant compounds have been discerned in the present 7xxx alloy regardless of the solidification condition. The formation of crystalline twin is briefly discussed when considering the vibration condition.

  12. A Comparison of Microstructure and Properties of Equivalent Strength Ingot Metallurgy and Powder Metallurgy 7XXX Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    Aeronautical Laboratories, AISC 24180207 Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Materials Laboratory...the project, for the sug- gestion of the project itself, for valuable discussions during the course of the enterprise, and for the loan of...rapidly to failure in a mode dependent only upon static stress conditions. The material properties which control the first two of these transitions have

  13. The strain rate sensitivity and constitutive equations including damage for the superplastic behaviour of 7xxx aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Boude, Serge; Giraud, Eliane; Dal Santo, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Superplasticity is a characteristic of certain materials, in particular aluminium alloys, whereby very large deformations (up to 1000 %) can be obtained before fracture under certain conditions. Superplastic forming is therefore the process of deforming a flange under these conditions by applying a variable pressure. The final geometry is obtained when the flange takes the form of a die. In order to deform a material superplastically, the temperature of the material should be approximately a half of the absolute melting point of the material and the strain rate (or flow stress) should remain within a certain range. The most important issues concerning the industrial process are the prediction of the final thickness distribution and the computation of the optimal pressure law to maintain superplastic conditions. Finite element simulations make these predictions possible for industrial components. To ensure the precision of the simulations, it is important to have good knowledge of the material behaviour in the superplastic domain: rheological parameters, grain size, damage law, etc. This paper presents an experimental analysis of the superplastic behaviour of a 7xxx aluminium alloy used for aeronautic applications. The parameters of the constitutive equations (including damage) are identified by using tensile tests, spherical bulging tests and numerical simulations [1, 2]. The performance of the proposed laws [1, 3, and 4] is tested using axisymmetrical geometries with complex shapes by the comparison of numerical simulations and bulge tests.

  14. Processing and Composition Effects on the Fracture Behavior of Spray-Formed 7XXX Series Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. M.; Ziemian, C. W.; Eden, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    The fracture properties of high-strength spray-formed Al alloys were investigated, with consideration of the effects of elemental additions such as zinc, manganese, and chromium and the influence of the addition of SiC particulate. Fracture resistance values between 13.6 and 25.6 MPa (m)1/2 were obtained for the monolithic alloys in the T6 and T7 conditions, respectively. The alloys with SiC particulate compared well and achieved fracture resistance values between 18.7 and 25.6 MPa (m)1/2. The spray-formed materials exhibited a loss in fracture resistance ( K I) compared to ingot metallurgy 7075 alloys but had an improved performance compared to high-solute powder metallurgy alloys of similar composition. Characterization of the fracture surfaces indicated a predominantly intergranular decohesion, possibly facilitated by the presence of incoherent particles at the grain boundary regions and by the large strength differential between the matrix and precipitate zone. It is believed that at the slip band-grain boundary intersection, particularly in the presence of large dispersoids and/or inclusions, microvoid nucleation would be significantly enhanced. Differences in fracture surfaces between the alloys in the T6 and T7 condition were observed and are attributed to inhomogeneous slip distribution, which results in strain localization at grain boundaries. The best overall combination of fracture resistance properties were obtained for alloys with minimum amounts of chromium and manganese additions.

  15. Weldability of 2219-T851 and 2519-T87 Aluminum Armor Alloys for Use in Army Vehicle Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Thomas D. Wolfe and Steven A. Gedeon S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION N•AME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM FLEMENT PROJECT. TASK AREA ...the desired configur- ation and then impacting the welded area (direct hit on the weld for flat plates, and 2 inches from the weld for a corner joint...whereas in the 7XXX series the copper remains in a relatively uniform distribucion . Also, no discrete particles of Al-Zn-Mg are found in 7XXX series

  16. Hydrogen-environment-assisted cracking of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium(copper) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, George Aloysius, Jr.

    There is strong evidence to indicate that hydrogen embrittlement plays a significant, if not controlling, role in the environmentally assisted cracking of 7XXX series aluminum alloys. In order to better understand hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC), crack growth rate tests in the K-independent stage II crack growth regime were conducted on fracture mechanics specimens of an Al-6.09Zn-2.14Mg-2.19Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant (Al-6.87Zn-2.65Mg-0.06Cu). Crack growth rate tests were performed in 90% relative humidity (RH) air between 25 and 90°C to assure hydrogen embrittlement control. The underaged, peak aged, and overaged tempers were investigated. Hydrogen uptake in humid air, hydrogen diffusion, and hydrogen trapping were investigated for each temper. Lastly, near crack tip hydrogen concentration depth profiles were analyzed via nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) using a liquid gallium, focused ion beam sputtering source (FIB/SIMS). The results of this study help explain and quantify empirically known trends concerning HEAC resistance and also establish new findings. In the copper bearing alloy, overaged tempers are more resistant but not immune to HEAC. Humid air is an aggressive environment for Al-Zn-Mg alloys because water vapor reacts with bare aluminum to produce high surface concentrations of hydrogen. This occurs in all tempers. Hydrogen diffuses from the near surface region to the high triaxial stress region ahead of the crack tip and collects at the high angle grain boundaries. The combination of tensile stress and high hydrogen concentration at the grain boundaries then causes intergranular fracture. Crack extension bares fresh metal and the process of hydrogen production, uptake, diffusion to the stressed grain boundary, and crack extension repeats. One reason increased degree of aging improves HEAC resistance in copper bearing 7XXX series alloys is that volume lattice and effective

  17. Analysis of Particle-Stimulated Nucleation (PSN)-Dominated Recrystallization for Hot-Rolled 7050 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Khaled F.; Long, Zhengdong; Field, David P.

    2017-04-01

    In 7xxx series aluminum alloys, the constituent large and small second-phase particles present during deformation process. The fraction and spatial distribution of these second-phase particles significantly influence the recrystallized structure, kinetics, and texture in the subsequent treatment. In the present work, the Monte Carlo Potts model was used to model particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN)-dominated recrystallization and grain growth in high-strength aluminum alloy 7050. The driving force for recrystallization is deformation-induced stored energy, which is also strongly affected by the coarse particle distribution. The actual microstructure and particle distribution of hot-rolled plate were used as an initial point for modeling of recrystallization during the subsequent solution heat treatment. Measurements from bright-field TEM images were performed to enhance qualitative interpretations of the developed microstructure. The influence of texture inhomogeneity has been demonstrated from a theoretical point of view using pole figures. Additionally, in situ annealing measurements in SEM were performed to track the orientational and microstructural changes and to provide experimental support for the recrystallization mechanism of PSN in AA7050.

  18. On Microstructural Control of Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth in 7000-Series Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-02

    crack growth rate behavior for different microstruc - tural conditions in aluminum alloys is also in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the...34 .. . -~ Introduction ! A number of recent studies have been conducted to ascertain the influence of microstructure on fatigue crack growth behavior in aluminum...161. The da/dN data, obtained over a very broad spectrum of ,K, characterize the near-threshold growth-rate behavior unusually well. Predictions of

  19. Time-dependent corrosion fatique crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mark E.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research is to characterize environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth for the susceptible short-longitudinal orientation of aluminum alloy 7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution. This work is necessary in order to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA-FLAGRO (NASGRO). This effort concentrates on determining relevant inputs to a superposition model in order to more accurately model environmental fatigue crack propagation.

  20. Prediction of stable tearing and fracture of a 2000-series aluminum alloy plate using a CTOA criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Dawicke, D.S.; Piascik, R.S.; Newman, J.C. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    Accurate predictions of stable tearing in a 7.6-mm-thick 2000-series aluminum alloy were made using the critical crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) criterion. The predictions were verified through a comparison of experimental and analytical results. A two-dimensional, elastic-plastic finite element analysis was used to simulate the fracture behavior of a 102-mm-wide C(T) specimen. The analysis determined that a critical crack-tip opening angle ({Psi}{sub c} = 5{degree}) resulted in good correlation with the experimental load against crack opening displacement data. This angle was compared to surface and microtopography CTOA measurements. The angle obtained from the finite element simulation was used to predict the fracture behavior of tests conducted on 102-mm-wide M(T), 305-mm-wide M(T), and 152-mm-wide C(T) specimens. The two-dimensional, elastic-plastic finite element analysis predicted the maximum loads of the 102-mm-wide M(T), 305-mm-wide M(T), and 152-mm-wide C(T) within 3, 4, and 8% of the experimental results, respectively.

  1. Modeling time-dependent corrosion fatigue crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mark E.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted with the susceptible S-L orientation of AA7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution, to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO. This environment enhances da/dN by five to ten-fold compared to fatigue in moist air. Time-based crack growth rates from quasi-static load experiments are an order of magnitude too small for accurate linear superposition prediction of da/dN for loading frequencies above 0.001 Hz. Alternate methods of establishing da/dt, based on rising-load or ripple-load-enhanced crack tip strain rate, do not increase da/dt and do not improve linear superposition. Corrosion fatigue is characterized by two regimes of frequency dependence; da/dN is proportional to f(exp -1) below 0.001 Hz and to F(exp 0) to F(exp -0.1) for higher frequencies. Da/dN increases mildly both with increasing hold-time at K(sub max) and with increasing rise-time for a range of loading waveforms. The mild time-dependence is due to cycle-time-dependent corrosion fatigue growth. This behavior is identical for S-L nd L-T crack orientations. The frequency response of environmental fatigue in several 7000 series alloys is variable and depends on undefined compositional or microstructural variables. Speculative explanations are based on the effect of Mg on occluded crack chemistry and embritting hydrogen uptake, or on variable hydrogen diffusion in the crack tip process zone. Cracking in the 7075/NaCl system is adequately described for life prediction by linear superposition for prolonged load-cycle periods, and by a time-dependent upper bound relationship between da/dN and delta K for moderate loading times.

  2. 76 FR 30650 - Aluminum Extrusions from the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... forms, produced by an extrusion process, made from aluminum alloys having metallic elements corresponding to the alloy series designations published by The Aluminum Association commencing with the numbers... subject merchandise made from aluminum alloy with an Aluminum Association series designation...

  3. Fine Grain Aluminum Superplasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    time at elevated temperature for 7475 aluminum alloy 5 2 Optical micrographs of 7075 aluminum alloy after exposure to 5160C (960oF) for times...applied to Al-Zn-Mg-Cu ( 7075 Al) alloy. Subsequent developments by Waldman et al. (refs. 8-11) resulted in the demonstration that 7000 series alloys...a number of aluminum alloys. With such a fine grain structure, high temperature deformation character- istics approaching superplastic behavior

  4. Development and Processing Improvement of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys-Development of AL-Cu-Mg-Ag Alloy (2139)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Alex; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bales, Thomas T.

    2007-01-01

    This final report supplement in presentation format describes a comprehensive multi-tasked contract study to continue the development of the silver bearing alloy now registered as aluminum alloy 2139 by the Aluminum Association. Two commercial scale ingots were processed into nominal plate gauges of two, four and six inches, and were extensively characterized in terms of metallurgical and crystallographic structure, and resulting mechanical properties. This report includes comparisons of the property combinations for this alloy and 2XXX and 7XXX alloys more widely used in high performance applications. Alloy 2139 shows dramatic improvement in all combinations of properties, moreover, the properties of this alloy are retained in all gauge thicknesses, contrary to typical reductions observed in thicker gauges of the other alloys in the comparison. The advancements achieved in this study are expected to result in rapid, widespread use of this alloy in a broad range of ground based, aircraft, and spacecraft applications.

  5. Friction stir welding process and material microstructure evolution modeling in 2000 and 5000 series of aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalavarthy, Harshavardhan

    Interactions between the rotating and advancing pin-shaped tool (terminated at one end with a circular-cylindrical shoulder) with the clamped welding-plates and the associated material and heat transport during a Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process are studied computationally using a fully-coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis. To surmount potential numerical problems associated with extensive mesh distortions/entanglement, an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation was used which enabled adaptive re-meshing (to ensure the continuing presence of a high-quality mesh) while allowing full tracking of the material free surfaces. To demonstrate the utility of the present computational approach, the analysis is applied to the cases of same-alloy FSW of two Aluminum-alloy grades: (a) AA5083 (a solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened/stabilized Al-Mg-Mn alloy); and (b) AA2139 (a precipitation hardened quaternary Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy). Both of these alloys are currently being used in military-vehicle hull structural and armor systems. In the case of non-age-hardenable AA5083, the dominant microstructure evolution processes taking place during FSW are extensive plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization of highly-deformed material subjected to elevated temperatures approaching the melting temperature. To account for the competition between plastic-deformation controlled strengthening and dynamic-recrystallization induced softening phenomena during the FSW process, the original Johnson-Cook strain- and strain-rate hardening and temperature-softening material strength model is modified in the present work using the available recrystallization-kinetics experimental data. In the case of AA2139, in addition to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, precipitates coarsening, over-aging, dissolution and re-precipitation had to be also considered. Limited data available in the open literature pertaining to the kinetics of the aforementioned

  6. Effect of the determination method of the material parameters on the accuracy of forming limit analyses for 5000 series aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoyama, Tomoyuki; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Barlat, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The effect of the method used to determine the material parameters of a yield function on the accuracy of the forming limit strains predicted using the Marciniak-Kuczyński-type (M-K) forming limit analysis for a 5000 series aluminum alloy sheet is investigated. A tube subjected to tension-expansion loading under linear paths in the first quadrant of the stress space are performed to measure the multiaxial plastic deformation behavior and the forming limit strains of the test material. The anisotropic parameters and the exponent of the Yld2000-2d yield function (Barlat et al, 2003) are optimized to approximate the contours of the plastic work and/or the directions of the plastic strain rates. The M-K analyses are performed using the different model identifications based on the Yld2000-2d yield function. It is concluded that the yield function best capturing both the plastic work contours and the directions of the plastic strain rates leads to the most accurate predicted forming limit strains.

  7. RE(AuAl2)nAl2(AuxSi1-x)2: a new homologous series of quaternary intermetallics grown from aluminum flux.

    PubMed

    Latturner, Susan E; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2008-03-17

    The combination of early rare earth metals (La- to Gd and Yb), gold, and silicon in molten aluminum results in the formation of intermetallic compounds with four related structures, forming a new homologous series: RE[AuAl2]nAl2(AuxSi(1-x))2, with x approximately 0.5 for most of the compound and n = 0, 1, 2, and 3. Because of the highly reducing nature of the Al flux, rare earth oxides instead of metals can also be used in these reactions. These compounds grow as large plate-like crystals and have tetragonal structure types that can be viewed as intergrowths of the BaAl4 structure and antifluorite-type AuAl2 layers. REAuAl2Si materials form with the BaAl4 structure type in space group I4/mmm (cell parameters for the La analogue are a = 4.322(2) A, c = 10.750(4) A, and Z = 2). REAu2Al4Si forms in a new ordered superstructure of the KCu4S3 structure type, with space group P4/nmm and cell parameters of the La analogue of a = 6.0973(6) A, c = 8.206(1) A, and Z = 2. REAu3Al6Si forms in a new I4/mmm symmetry structure type with cell parameters of a = 4.2733(7) A, c = 22.582(5) A, and Z = 2 for RE = Eu. The end member of the series, REAu4Al8Si, forms in space group P4/mmm with cell parameters for the Yb analogue of a = 4.2294(4) A, c = 14.422(2) A, and Z = 1. New intergrowth structures containing two different kinds of AuAl2 layers were also observed. The magnetic behavior of all these compounds is derived from the RE ions. Comparison of the susceptibility data for the europium compounds indicates a switch from 3-D magnetic interactions to 2-D interactions as the size of the AuAl2 layer increases. The Yb ions in YbAu(2.91)Al(6)Si(1.09) and YbAu(3.86)Al(8)Si(1.14) are divalent at high temperatures.

  8. Full-Field Strain Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Titanium Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    microstructural uniformity and mechanical properties [2]. Typical FSW tools for aluminum are made from tool steel and can have fairly elaborate geometries...2]. Much has been accomplished in characterizing FSW joints in 2XXX and 7XXX series aluminum alloys for aerospace use, but little published...roughly two thirds higher than aluminum . The tensile stiffness of titanium sheet is between that of steel and aluminum , but titanium’s strength

  9. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  10. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  11. Calorimetric studies of 7000 series aluminum alloys. I - Matrix precipitate characterization of 7075. II - Comparison of 7075, 7050, and RX720 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiasi, R.; Adler, P. N.

    1977-01-01

    Correlation between differential scanning calorimetry and high temperature transmission electron microscopy for the characterization of preexisting matrix precipitates in the highest-strength and overaged tempers of 7075 aluminum was demonstrated. The solid state reactions undergone by these tempers in the 20-500 C temperature range were elucidated and expressed in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. The dissolution parameters for each phase are distinguishable and serve as guidelines for a rapid characterization of the matrix microstructure of these alloys.

  12. Aluminum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents three problems based on the price of aluminum designed to encourage students to be cooperative and to use an investigative approach to learning. Students collect and synthesize information, analyze results, and draw conclusions. (AIM)

  13. 76 FR 323 - Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Amended Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... which are shapes and forms, produced by an extrusion process, made from aluminum alloys having metallic elements corresponding to the alloy series designations published by The Aluminum Association commencing...). Specifically, the subject merchandise made from aluminum alloy with an Aluminum Association series...

  14. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  15. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  16. Design for aluminum recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article describes the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles and the need to recycle to benefit further growth of aluminum applications by assuring an economical, high-quality source of metal. The article emphasizes that coordination of material specifications among designers can raise aluminum scrap value and facilitate recycling. Applications of aluminum in automobile construction are discussed.

  17. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  18. Deformation and fracture of a particle-reinforced aluminum alloy composite: Part I. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. B.; Majumdar, B. S.; Miracle, D. B.

    2000-03-01

    Mechanical tests were performed on a powder-metallurgically processed 7093/SiC/15p discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) composite in different heat-treatment conditions, to determine the influence of matrix characteristics on the composite response. The work-hardening exponent and the strain to failure varied inversely to the strength, similar to monolithic Al alloys, and this dependence was independent of the dominant damage mode. The damage consisted of SiC particle cracks, interface and near-interface debonds, and matrix rupture inside intense slip bands. Fracture surfaces revealed particle fracture-dominated damage for most of the heat-treatment conditions, including an overaged (OA) condition that exhibited a combination of precipitates at the interface and a precipitate-free zone (PFZ) in the immediate vicinity. In the highly OA conditions and in a 450°C as-rolled condition, when the composite strength became less than 400 MPa, near-interface matrix rupture became dominant. A combination of a relatively weak matrix and a weak zone around the particle likely contributed to this damage mode over that of particle fracture. Fracture-toughness tests show that it is important to maintain a proper geometry and testing procedure to obtain valid fracture-toughness data. Overaged microstructures did reveal a recovery of fracture toughness as compared to the peak-aged (PA) condition, unlike the lack of toughness recovery reported earlier for a similar 7XXX (Al-Zn-Cu-Mg)—based DRA. The PA material exhibited extensive localization of damage and plasticity. The low toughness of the DRA in this PA condition is explored in detail, using fractography and metallography. The damage and fracture micromechanisms formed the basis for modeling the strength, elongation, toughness, and damage, which are described in Part II of this work.

  19. Corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This new handbook presents comprehensive coverage of the corrosion behavior of aluminum and aluminum alloys, with emphasis on practical information about how to select and process these materials in order to prevent corrosion attack. Described are the characteristics of these materials and the influences of composition, mechanical working, heat treatment, joining methods, microstructure, and environmental variables on their corrosion.

  20. ALUMINUM-CONTAINING POLYMERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, *POLYMERIZATION, *POLYMERS, ACRYLIC RESINS, ALKYL RADICALS, CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, COPOLYMERIZATION, LIGHT TRANSMISSION, STABILITY, STYRENES, TRANSPARENT PANELS.

  1. Aluminum and Young Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests a variety of ways in which aluminum and aluminum foil can be used in elementary and junior high art classes: relief drawing and rubbing; printing; repousse; sculpture; mobiles; foil sculpture; and three dimensional design. Sources of aluminum supplies are suggested. (SJL)

  2. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  3. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  4. 75 FR 5692 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-200C and -200F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... structural integrity of the affected 7075 series aluminum alloy upper deck floor beam upper chords on... adequate to ensure the structural integrity of the affected 7075 series aluminum alloy upper deck...

  5. Aluminum recycling in the United States in 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plunkert, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    As one of a series of reports on metals recycling, this report discusses the flow of aluminum from production through its uses with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap) in 2000. This materials flow study includes a description of aluminum supply and demand factors for the United States to illustrate the extent of aluminum recycling and to identify recycling trends. Understanding the system of materials flow from source to ultimate disposition can assist in improving the management of natural resources in a manner that is compatible with sound environmental practices. In 2000, the old scrap recycling efficiency for aluminum was estimated to be 42 percent. Almost 60 percent of the aluminum that was recycled in 2000 came from new scrap, and the recycling rate was estimated to be 36 percent. The principal source of old scrap was recycled aluminum beverage cans.

  6. Aluminum: Recycling of Aluminum Dross/Saltcake

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    As this NICE3 publication details, the objective of this project is to commercialize the process technology to eliminate all landfill waste associated with black dross and saltcake generated from aluminum recycling in the United States.

  7. Flat growth of 7075, 7475, 7050 and 7049 aluminum alloy plate in stress corrosion environments: 2-year marine atmosphere results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    Marine atmospheric exposure of smooth and precracked specimens from 7075, 7475, 7050 and 7049 plates support the conclusion that for a given strength level, the short transverse stress corrosion resistance of 7050-T7X and 7049-T7X is superior to that of 7075-T7X. The threshold stress intensity (K sub Iscc) for these alloys is about 25 MPa square root m at a yield strength of about 460 MPa; the corresponding yield strength level for 7075-T7X at this SCR level is about 425 MPa. Additional tests on two lots of high-toughness 7475 plate indicate that this alloy is capable of achieving K sub Iscc values of about 35 MPa square root m at yield strengths of 400-450 MPa. Precracked specimens from all these 7XXX-series alloys are subject to self loading from corrosion product wedging. This effect causes stress corrosion cracks to continue growing at very low apparent stress intensities, and should therefore be considered a potential driving force for stress corrosion in design and materials selection.

  8. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  9. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  10. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  11. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  12. MTBE OXIDATION BY BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum, prepared by sulfating zero-valent aluminum with sulfuric acid, has a dual functionality of simultaneously decomposing both reductively- and oxidatively-degradable contaminants. In this work, the use of bifunctional aluminum for the degradation of methyl te...

  13. High energy density aluminum battery

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  14. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  15. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are…

  16. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  17. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  18. Cast Aluminum Bonding Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    fabricated using P?-’r;est11 bur)ld II19 te(hnll I Oly with 6 cIsL nqs. The cast a lumi num alloy used was A357 . The sur- face preparation was phosphoric acid...from a cast aluminum alloy designated A357 . The bonding surfaces of the adherends were prepared using PAA. One primer and two adhesives considered...System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 18 11 Bond Area of 350°F Adhesive System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 19 vi LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 A357 Chemical

  19. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  20. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  1. Walnut Hulls Clean Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Hulls inflict minimal substrate damage. Walnut hulls found to be best abrasive for cleaning aluminum surfaces prior to painting. Samples blasted with walnut hulls showed no compressive stress of surface.

  2. Aluminum doped zinc oxide for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, G. B.; Hinds, S.; Sargent, E. H.; Tsang, S. W.; Mordoukhovski, L.; Lu, Z. H.

    2009-05-25

    Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) was grown via magnetron sputtering as a low-cost alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) for organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Postdeposition ozone treatment resulted in devices with lower series resistance, increased open-circuit voltage, and power conversion efficiency double that of devices fabricated on untreated AZO. Furthermore, cells fabricated using ozone treated AZO and standard ITO displayed comparable performance.

  3. Aluminum powder applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gurganus, T.B.

    1995-08-01

    Aluminum powders have physical and metallurgical characteristics related to their method of manufacture that make them extremely important in a variety of applications. They can propel rockets, improve personal hygiene, increase computer reliability, refine exotic alloys, and reduce weight in the family sedan or the newest Air Force fighter. Powders formed into parts for structural and non-structural applications hold the key to some of the most exciting new developments in the aluminum future.

  4. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  5. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  6. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    SciTech Connect

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  7. Fatal aluminum phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Anger, F; Paysant, F; Brousse, F; Le Normand, I; Develay, P; Gaillard, Y; Baert, A; Le Gueut, M A; Pepin, G; Anger, J P

    2000-03-01

    A 39-year-old man committed suicide by ingestion of aluminum phosphide, a potent mole pesticide, which was available at the victim's workplace. The judicial authority ordered an autopsy, which ruled out any other cause of death. The victim was discovered 10 days after the ingestion of the pesticide. When aluminum phosphide comes into contact with humidity, it releases large quantities of hydrogen phosphine (PH3), a very toxic gas. Macroscopic examination during the autopsy revealed a very important asphyxia syndrome with major visceral congestion. Blood, urine, liver, kidney, adrenal, and heart samples were analyzed. Phosphine gas was absent in the blood and urine but present in the brain (94 mL/g), the liver (24 mL/g), and the kidneys (41 mL/g). High levels of phosphorus were found in the blood (76.3 mg/L) and liver (8.22 mg/g). Aluminum concentrations were very high in the blood (1.54 mg/L), brain (36 microg/g), and liver (75 microg/g) compared to the usual published values. Microscopic examination revealed congestion of all the organs studied and obvious asphyxia lesions in the pulmonary parenchyma. All these results confirmed a diagnosis of poisoning by aluminum phosphide. This report points out that this type of poisoning is rare and that hydrogen phosphine is very toxic. The phosphorus and aluminum concentrations observed and their distribution in the different viscera are discussed in relation to data in the literature.

  8. Sensitization of Naturally Aged Aluminum 5083 Armor Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-29

    susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of 5XXX series aluminum alloys by mass loss after exposure to nitric acid (NAMLT Test)”, ASTM G-67-04. [6...67 nitric acid mass-loss values were 19 to 25 mg/cm2. The transmission electron microscopy microstructure of the sample was found to be consistent...5XXX Series Aluminum Alloys by Mass Loss after Exposure to Nitric Acid “ was used as an assessment of the degree of sensitization (DOS) of the alloy.[5

  9. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  10. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  11. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  12. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  13. REMOVAL OF ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, J.H.

    1959-08-25

    A process is presented for dissolving aluminum jackets from uranium fuel elements without attack of the uranium in a boiling nitric acid-mercuric nitrate solution containing up to 50% by weight of nitrtc acid and mercuric nitrate in a concentration of between 0.05 and 1% by weight.

  14. Markets for recovered aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The study describes the operation of the markets for scrap aluminum as an example of how recycling markets are structured, what factors influence the supply of and demand for materials, what projections can be made about recycling markets, and how government policies to increase recycling may affect these markets.

  15. Building an aluminum car

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1994-05-01

    This article examines the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles to decrease weight and consequently increase fuel economy. The topics of the article include federal fuel economy goals, the development of optimum body structure and manufacturing techniques, comparison with steel, cost of materials, weight reduction and recycling of materials.

  16. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    DOEpatents

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  17. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  18. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  19. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  20. Bonding aluminum beam leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    Report makes it relatively easy for hybrid-circuit manufacturers to convert integrated circuit chips with aluminum bead leads. Report covers: techniques for handling tiny chips; proper geometries for ultrasonic bonding tips; best combinations of pressure, pulse time, and ultrasonic energy for bonding; and best thickness for metal films to which beam leads are bonded.

  1. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Aluminum Doped Boron Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    Anionic boron clusters have been shown to be planar or quasi-planar up to B21- from a series of combined photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical studies. All these boron clusters consist of a peripheral ring characterized by strong two-center-two-electron (2c-2e) B-B bonds and one or more interior atoms. The propensity for planarity is due to σ - and π -electron delocalizations throughout the molecular plane, giving rise to concepts of σ - and π -aromaticity. The quasi-planarity, on the other hand, can be mechanical in nature - the circumference of the cluster is too small to fit the inner atoms - even for doubly aromatic clusters. Two questions arise: firstly, can isoelectronic substitution by a single aluminum atom on the outer ring enhance the planarity of quasi-planar structures, and, secondly, can the interior boron atoms be replaced by aluminum? A series of aluminum isoelectronic substitution of boron clusters have been investigated ranging from B7- to B12-. Aluminum turns out to avoid the central position in the all these clusters and enhance the planarity of AlB6- and AlB11- clusters by expanding the peripheral ring. References: [1] C. Romanescu, A. P. Sergeeva, W. L. Li, A. I. Boldyrev and L. S. Wang, {J. Am. Chem. Soc}. {133} (22), 8646-8653 (2011) [2] T. R. Galeev, C. Romanescu, W. L. Li, L. S. Wang and A. I. Boldyrev, {J. Chem. Phys.} {135}, (8) 104301 (2011) [3] W. L. Li, C. Romanescu, T. R. Galeev, L. S. Wang and A. I. Boldyrev, {J. Phys. Chem. A} {115} (38), 10391-10397 (2011)

  2. SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1958-02-25

    This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

  3. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  4. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major

  5. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  6. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  7. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  8. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  9. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  10. 75 FR 27966 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400 and 747-400D Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... certain Model 747-400 and 747-400D series airplanes. This proposed AD would ] require installing aluminum... November 4, 2009. The service bulletin describes procedures for installing aluminum gutter reinforcing... drip shield aluminum gutter, in accordance with Work Package 1 of the Accomplishment Instructions...

  11. Mineral of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plunkert, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum is the second most abundant metallic element in Earth’s crust after silicon. Even so, it is a comparatively new industrial metal that has been produced in commercial quantities for little more than 100 years. Aluminum is lightweight, ductile, malleable and corrosion resistant, and is a good conductor of heat and electricity. Weighing about one-third as much as steel or copper per unit of volume, aluminum is used more than any other metal except iron. Aluminum can be fabricated into desired forms and shapes by every major metalworking technique to add to its versatility.

  12. Silicon diffusion in aluminum for rear passivated solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Urrejola, Elias; Peter, Kristian; Plagwitz, Heiko; Schubert, Gunnar

    2011-04-11

    We show that the lateral spread of silicon in a screen-printed aluminum layer increases by (1.50{+-}0.06) {mu}m/ deg. C, when increasing the peak firing temperature within an industrially applicable range. In this way, the maximum spread limit of diffused silicon in aluminum is predictable and does not depend on the contact area size but on the firing temperature. Therefore, the geometry of the rear side pattern can influence not only series resistance losses within the solar cell but the process of contact formation itself. In addition, too fast cooling lead to Kirkendall void formations instead of an eutectic layer.

  13. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  14. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  15. Analysis and Test of Deep Flaws in Thin Sheets of Aluminum and Titanium. Volume 2: Crack Opening Displacement and Stress-Strain Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Static fracture tests were performed on surface flawed specimens of aluminum and titanium alloys. A simulated proof overload cycle was applied prior to all of the cyclic tests. Variables included in each test series were flaw shapes and thickness. Additionally, test temperature was a variable for the aluminum test series. The crack opening displacement and stress-strain data obtained are presented.

  16. Aluminum nitride grating couplers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Siddhartha; Doerr, Christopher R; Piazza, Gianluca

    2012-06-10

    Grating couplers in sputtered aluminum nitride, a piezoelectric material with low loss in the C band, are demonstrated. Gratings and a waveguide micromachined on a silicon wafer with 600 nm minimum feature size were defined in a single lithography step without partial etching. Silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) was used for cladding layers. Peak coupling efficiency of -6.6 dB and a 1 dB bandwidth of 60 nm have been measured. This demonstration of wire waveguides and wideband grating couplers in a material that also has piezoelectric and elasto-optic properties will enable new functions for integrated photonics and optomechanics.

  17. Characterization of ultradispersed aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.L.; Maienschein, J.L.; Swansiger, R.W.; Garcia, F.; Darling, D.H.

    1994-12-08

    Samples of ultradispersed Al were received, which were produced by electrically exploding Al wires in argon. These samples comprised very small particles that were not significantly oxidized and that were stable in air. Particle morphology were studied with SE, micropycnometry, and gas adsorption surface area. Composition were determined using various techniques, as were thermal stability and reaction exotherms. The inexplicable reports of an Al-Ar compound and of an exothermic reaction were not confirmed. The material is a stable, nonoxidized, small-particle, highly reactive form of aluminum that is of interest in energetic materials formulations.

  18. Environmental fatigue in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit similar environmental fatigue crack growth characteristics compared to conventional 2000 series alloys and are more resistant to environmental fatigue compared to 7000 series alloys. The superior fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 is due to crack closure caused by tortuous crack path morphology and crack surface corrosion products. At high R and reduced closure, chemical environment effects are pronounced resulting in accelerated near threshold da/dN. The beneficial effects of crack closure are minimized for small cracks resulting in rapid growth rates. Limited data suggest that the 'chemically small crack' effect, observed in other alloy system, is not pronounced in Al-Li alloys. Modeling of environmental fatigue in Al-Li-Cu alloys related accelerated fatigue crack growth in moist air and salt water to hydrogen embrittlement.

  19. Chemistry and electrochemistry of environment-assisted cracking of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium-copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Kevin Richard

    2001-11-01

    The mechanism of environment-assisted cracking (EAC) of 7xxx-series alloys is unclear, involving uncertain contributions of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and anodic dissolution (AD). Fundamental understanding of the EAC mechanism is lacking in part because the role of the crack environment is not well understood. The objective of this research was to characterize and understand the role of the crack chemistry and electrochemistry during aqueous EAC of AA 7050. The crack environment can differ significantly from bulk conditions. Cations, produced by AD, hydrolyze causing local acidification; anions from the bulk electrolyte concentrate within the crack to maintain charge neutrality; ohmic potential drop results from ion migration and diffusion. A positive correlation exists between da/dt and [Al3+]Tip in chromate-chloride electrolyte wherein tip dissolution dominates flank corrosion in establishing the crack chemistry. Tip pH was 2 to 4 and determined by the reaction Al3+ + H 2O = AlOH2+ + H+. The tip potential (ETip) was approximately -0.90 VSCE and independent of EApp . The low ETip and pH promote H+ reduction, generating atomic and molecular H. Hydrogen bubbles restrict ion movement, substantially increasing the effective crack resistance over bulk conditions. Absorbed atomic hydrogen facilitates HE. The spontaneous transition from slow, incubation to high-rate da/dt coincides with the establishment of a critical aggressive tip chemistry and tip depolarization. Development of the critical occluded chemistry necessary for accelerated da/dt is a competitive process between opposing forces: AD, hydrolysis and migration promote an aggressive environment whereas diffusion reduces concentration gradients, thereby retarding the formation of an aggressive chemistry. Quantitative assessment of the contribution of tip dissolution to crack advance is hindered by a lack of knowledge of two key parameters: the tip corrosion front height and the effective crack conductivity

  20. Welding the four most popular aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, B.

    1994-02-01

    The fact that business is good in aluminum welding is a sure sign that more manufacturers and fabricators are using GMA and GTA welding to build new products out of this lightweight nonferrous metal. Among the most widely specified weldable grades are Alloys 6061, 5083, 5052 and 5454. A rundown on these four alloys, including properties and selected applications, is provided. Any company working with aluminum for the first time needs to know something about these four alloys. Alloys of copper-magnesium-silicon combination, of which 6061 is one, are heat-treatable. The three 5XXX series alloys, on the other hand, are nonheat-treatable. According to P.B. Dickerson, consultant, Lower Burrell, Pa., 5083, because of its high magnesium content, is the easiest of the four alloys to arc weld. Dickerson put the cut-off point in weldability at 3.5% magnesium. To prevent cracking, he added, both 6061 and 5052 require much more filler metal than do the other two alloys. Alloy 6061 consists of 0.25Cu, 0.6Si, 1.0Mg, and 0.20Cr. The main applications for 6061 aluminum are structural, architectural, automotive, railway, marine and pipe. It has good formability, weldability, corrosion resistance and strength. Although the 6XXX series alloys are prone to hot cracking, this condition can be readily overcome by correct choice of joint design and electrode. The most popular temper for 6061 is T6, although the -T651, -T4, and -F temper are also popular. The -T651 temper is like a -T6 temper, only it has received some final stretch hardening. The -T4 temper has been solution heat-treated and quenched. The -F temper is in the as-fabricated condition.

  1. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  2. The Benefits of Aluminum Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses benefits of aluminum windows for college construction and renovation projects, including that aluminum is the most successfully recycled material, that it meets architectural glass deflection standards, that it has positive thermal energy performance, and that it is a preferred exterior surface. (EV)

  3. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  4. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  5. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  6. Wettability of Aluminum on Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Sarina; Tang, Kai; Kvithyld, Anne; Tangstad, Merete; Engh, Thorvald Abel

    2011-12-01

    The wettability of molten aluminum on solid alumina substrate has been investigated by the sessile drop technique in a 10-8 bar vacuum or under argon atmosphere in the temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K (1000 °C to 1400 °C). It is shown that the reduction of oxide skin on molten aluminum is slow under normal pressures even with ultralow oxygen potential, but it is enhanced in high vacuum. To describe the wetting behavior of the Al-Al2O3 system at lower temperatures, a semiempirical calculation was employed. The calculated contact angle at 973 K (700 °C) is approximately 97 deg, which indicates that aluminum does not wet alumina at aluminum casting temperatures. Thus, a priming height is required for aluminum to infiltrate a filter. Wetting in the Al-Al2O3 system increases with temperature.

  7. Material characterization and finite element simulations of aluminum alloy sheets during non-isothermal forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan

    The utilization of more non-ferrous materials is one of the key factors to succeed out of the constantly increasing demand for lightweight vehicles in automotive sector. Aluminum-magnesium alloys have been identified as the most promising substitutions to the conventional steel without significant compromise in structural stiffness and strength. However, the conventional forming methods to deform the aluminum alloy sheets are either costly or insufficient in formability which limit the wide applications of aluminum alloy sheets. A recently proposed non-isothermal hot stamping approach, which is also referred as Hot Blank - Cold Die (HB-CD) stamping, aims at fitting the commercial grade aluminum alloy sheets, such as AA5XXX and AA7XXX, into high-volume and cost-effective production for automotive sector. In essence, HB-CD is a mutation of the conventional hot stamping approach for boron steel (22MnB5) which deforms the hot blank within the cold tool set. By elevating the operation temperature, the formability of aluminum alloy sheets can be significantly improved. Meanwhile, heating the blank only and deforming within the cold tool sets allow to reduce the energy and time consumed. This research work aims at conducting a comprehensive investigation of HB-CD with particular focuses on material characterization, constitutive modeling and coupled thermo-mechanical finite element simulations with validation. The material properties of AA5182-O, a popular commercial grade of aluminum alloy sheet in automotive sector, are obtained through isothermal tensile testing at temperatures from 25° to 300°, covering a quasi-static strain-rate range (0.001--0.1s-1). As the state-of-the-art non-contact strain measurement technique, digital image correlation (DIC) system is utilized to evaluate the stress-strain curves as well as to reveal the details of material deformation with full-field and multi-axis strain measurement. Material anisotropy is characterized by extracting the

  8. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  9. Aluminum: Industry of the future

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    For over a century, the US aluminum industry has led the global market with advances in technology, product development, and marketing. Industry leaders recognize both the opportunities and challenges they face as they head into the 21st century, and that cooperative R and D is key to their success. In a unique partnership, aluminum industry leaders have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to focus on innovative technologies that will help to strengthen the competitive position of the US aluminum industry and, at the same time, further important national goals. This industry-led partnership, the Aluminum Industry of the Future, promotes technologies that optimize the use of energy and materials in operations and reduce wastes and energy-related emissions. Led by The Aluminum Association, industry leaders began by developing a unified vision of future market, business, energy, and environmental goals. Their vision document, Partnerships for the Future, articulates a compelling vision for the next 20 years: to maintain and grow the aluminum industry through the manufacture and sale of competitively priced, socially desirable, and ecologically sustainable products. Continued global leadership in materials markets will require the combined resources of industry, universities, and government laboratories. By developing a unified vision, the aluminum industry has provided a framework for the next step in the Industries of the Future process, the development of a technology roadmap designed to facilitate cooperative R and D.

  10. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  11. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples.

  12. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  13. Non-Chromate Aluminum Pretreatments, Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    September 2004 78 ALUMINUM AL2024-T3 ALUMINUM AL7075 -T6 PNL ID 4 Control 5...ALUMINUM - AL2024-T3 192 ALUMINUM - AL7075 -T6 112 Table 5.13: AMCOM – NAVAIR PANEL TEST MATRIX OCTOBER 2003 NCAP Phase II Interim Report

  14. 75 FR 70689 - Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division; Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... Employment and Training Administration Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum- Greenwood... Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC, Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division, including on- site leased... are engaged in the production of aluminum alloy forgings. Information shows that on July 28,...

  15. High Power Selective Laser Melting (HP SLM) of Aluminum Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, D.; Schleifenbaum, H.; Heidrich, S.; Meiners, W.; Bültmann, J.

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is one of the Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies that enables the production of light weight structured components with series identical mechanical properties without the need for part specific tooling or downstream sintering processes, etc. Especially aluminum is suited for such eco-designed components due to its low weight and superior mechanical and chemical properties. However, SLM's state-of-the-art process and cost efficiency is not yet suited for series-production. In order to improve this efficiency it is indispensable to increase the build rate significantly. Thus, aluminum is qualified for high build rate applications using a new prototype machine tool including a 1 kW laser and a multi-beam system.

  16. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  17. Low-pressure Structural Modification of Aluminum Hydride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    pressure release. 15. SUBJECT TERMS High - pressure , Diamond anvil cell, aluminum hydride 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...loaded into the diamond anvil cell using a specialized high - pressure gas loading system (18). The in-situ pressure within the diamond anvil cell was...Visible Absorption Study of AlH3. Journal of Physics: Conference Series 2010, 215, 012047. 18. Jayaraman, A. Diamond Anvil Cell and High -

  18. Ballistic Evaluation of 7085 Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    tempers of aluminum alloy (AA) 7085 produced by Alcoa. The tempers included a high-strength variant, 7085-T7E01, for utilization as an appliqué against...temper. The V50 was then compared to other ballistic-grade aluminum alloys , namely AA7039 and AA2139. The results of these tests were used to derive... alloy 7085-T7E01 and 7085-T7E02. ......................................1 Table 2. Chemistry of AAs, weight-percent ranges

  19. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  20. Optomechanics of Single Aluminum Nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Su, Man-Nung; Dongare, Pratiksha D; Chakraborty, Debadi; Zhang, Yue; Yi, Chongyue; Wen, Fangfang; Chang, Wei-Shun; Nordlander, Peter; Sader, John E; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2017-04-12

    Aluminum nanostructures support tunable surface plasmon resonances and have become an alternative to gold nanoparticles. Whereas gold is the most-studied plasmonic material, aluminum has the advantage of high earth abundance and hence low cost. In addition to understanding the size and shape tunability of the plasmon resonance, the fundamental relaxation processes in aluminum nanostructures after photoexcitation must be understood to take full advantage of applications such as photocatalysis and photodetection. In this work, we investigate the relaxation following ultrafast pulsed excitation and the launching of acoustic vibrations in individual aluminum nanodisks, using single-particle transient extinction spectroscopy. We find that the transient extinction signal can be assigned to a thermal relaxation of the photoexcited electrons and phonons. The ultrafast heating-induced launching of in-plane acoustic vibrations reveals moderate binding to the glass substrate and is affected by the native aluminum oxide layer. Finally, we compare the behavior of aluminum nanodisks to that of similarly prepared and sized gold nanodisks.

  1. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  2. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-07-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO(4), coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management.

  3. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO4, coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management. PMID:21887030

  4. Thermotransport in liquid aluminum-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A thermotransport study was made on a series of liquid aluminum-copper alloys which contained from trace amounts to 33 weight percent copper. The samples in the form of narrow capillaries were held in known temperature gradient of thermotransport apparatus until the stationary state was reached. The samples were analyzed for the concentration of copper along the length. Copper was observed to migrate to the colder regions in all the samples. The heat of transport, Q*, was determined for each composition from a plot of concentration of copper versus reciprocal absolute temperature. The value of Q* is the highest at trace amounts of copper (4850 cal/gm-atom), but decreases with increasing concentration of copper and levels off to 2550 cal/gm-atom at about 25 weight percent copper. The results are explained on the basis of electron-solute interaction and a gas model of diffusion.

  5. Assiniboine Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Minerva

    This series of illustrated booklets presents 13 Indian stories in a bilingual format of English and Assiniboine, an Indian tribal language. Written on the first grade level, the stories have the following titles: (1) "Orange Tree in Lodgepole"; (2) "Pretty Flower"; (3) Inktomi and the Rock"; (4) "Inktomi and the…

  6. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Aluminum Alloys in Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holroyd, N. J. Henry; Scamans, G. M.

    2013-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu (AA7xxx) aluminum alloys exposed to saline environments at temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) has been reviewed with particular attention to the influences of alloy composition and temper, and bulk and local environmental conditions. Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rates at room temperature for peak- and over-aged tempers in saline environments are minimized for Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys containing less than ~8 wt pct Zn when Zn/Mg ratios are ranging from 2 to 3, excess magnesium levels are less than 1 wt pct, and copper content is either less than ~0.2 wt pct or ranging from 1.3 to 2 wt pct. A minimum chloride ion concentration of ~0.01 M is required for crack growth rates to exceed those in distilled water, which insures that the local solution pH in crack-tip regions can be maintained at less than 4. Crack growth rates in saline solution without other additions gradually increase with bulk chloride ion concentrations up to around 0.6 M NaCl, whereas in solutions with sufficiently low dichromate (or chromate), inhibitor additions are insensitive to the bulk chloride concentration and are typically at least double those observed without the additions. DCB specimens, fatigue pre-cracked in air before immersion in a saline environment, show an initial period with no detectible crack growth, followed by crack growth at the distilled water rate, and then transition to a higher crack growth rate typical of region 2 crack growth in the saline environment. Time spent in each stage depends on the type of pre-crack ("pop-in" vs fatigue), applied stress intensity factor, alloy chemistry, bulk environment, and, if applied, the external polarization. Apparent activation energies ( E a) for SCC growth in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys exposed to 0.6 M NaCl over the temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) for under-, peak-, and over-aged low-copper-containing alloys (<0.2 wt pct) are typically ranging from

  8. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  9. Aluminum industry applications for OTEC

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.S.; Leshaw, D.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Sprouse, A.M.; Thiagarajan, V.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the program is to study the integration issues which must be resolved to realize the market potential of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power for the aluminum industry. The study established, as a baseline, an OTEC plant with an electrical output of 100 MWe which would power an aluminum reduction plant. The reduction plant would have a nominal annual output of about 60,000 metric tons of aluminum metal. Three modes of operation were studied, viz: 1. A reduction plant on shore and a floating OTEC power plant moored offshore supplying energy by cable. 2. A reduction plant on shore and a floating OTEC power plant at sea supplying energy by means of an ''energy bridge.'' 3. A floating reduction plant on the same platform as the OTEC power plant. For the floating OTEC/aluminum plantship, three reduction processes were examined. 1. The conventional Hall process with prebaked anodes. 2. The drained cathode Hall cell process. 3. The aluminum chloride reduction process.

  10. Study on effects of powder and flake chemistry and morphology on the properties of Al-Cu-Mg-X-X-X powder metallurgy advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, P. J.; Lederich, R. J.; Oneal, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted: (1) to develop rapid solidification processed (RSP) dispersoid-containing Al-3Cu-2Li-1Mg-0.2Zr alloys as substitutes for titanium alloys and commercial 2XXX aluminum alloys for service to at least 150 C; and (2) to develop RSP Al-4Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloys as substitutes for high-strength commercial 7XXX alloys in ambient-temperature applications. RSP Al-3Cu-2Li-1Mg-0.2Zr alloys have density-normalized yield stresses at 150 C up to 52% larger than that of 2124-T851 and up to 30% larger than that of Ti-6Al-4V. Strength at 150 C in these alloys is provided by thermally stable delta' (Al3Li), T1 (Al2LiCu), and S' (Al2CuMg) precipitates. Density-normalized yield stresses of RSP Al-3Cu-2Li-1Mg-0.2Zr alloys are up to 100% larger than that of 2124-T851 and equivalent to that of Al-8Fe-4Ce at 260 C. Strength in the RSP alloys at 260 C is provided by incoherent dispersoids and subboundary constituent particles such as T1 and S. The RSP alloys are attractive substitutes in less than or = 100-h exposures for 2xxx and Al-4Fe-Ce alloys up to 260 C and for titanium alloys up to 150 C. RSP Al-4Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloys have ambient-temperature yield and ultimate tensile stresses similar to that of 7050-T7651, and are 14% less dense. RSP Al-4Li-0.5Cu-1.5Mg-0.2Zr has a 20% higher specific yield stress, 40% higher specific elastic modulus, and superior corrosion resistance compared to the properties of 7050-T7651. Strength in the Al-4Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy class is primarily provided by the substructure and delta' precipitates and is independent of Cu:Mg ratio. Improvements in fracture toughness and transverse-orientation properties in both alloy classes depend on improved melt practices to eliminate oxide inclusions which are incorporated into the consolidated forms.

  11. Friction-Stir Welding of Aluminum For the Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Clyde S.; Smelser, Jerry W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is developing and characterizing the friction stir welding process for the Space Shuttle and other space programs. This revolutionary process, invented and patented by The Weld Institute in England, offers tremendous advantages for joining aluminum for high performance applications. It is particularly suited for advanced aluminum-lithium alloys, such as 2195, the primary structural alloy used in the External Tank. The friction stir welding process joins metals with minimal heat input, resulting in high-strength joints with high ductility. It is a simple process to demonstrate using a common milling machine for sample parts, but relatively expensive to implement on large-scale hardware, due to the high cost of tooling needed to handle the high forging pressures characteristic of the process. Recent developments at the Marshall Space Flight Center have demonstrated friction stir welding on linear joints up to 5 meters (15 ft.), with material thickness ranging between 2.5 mm and 16.5 mm (0.100" to 0.650"). High efficiency weld joints have been produced in aluminum from the 2000, 5000, and 6000 series alloy systems. A "retractable pin tool" system was patented by MSFC that allows use of friction stir welding for joints with changing material thickness, and with less rigid tooling than previously considered. This presentation will describe the details of alloys welded to-date and technical advances under development at MSFC. These developments could have substantial benefit to industrial applications for welding aluminum.

  12. Temperature Controlled Laser Joining of Aluminum to Galvanized Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Daniel; Simon, Jörg; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Bezençon, Cyrille; Bassi, Corrado

    Reliable joining of 6000 series aluminum alloy to galvanized steel is a challenge for current manufacturing technologies. To control and limit the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, mixing of both metals in liquid state has to be avoided. It has been shown that laser weld-brazing is a possible process. Thereby the aluminum and zinc layer of the galvanized steel are molten and the steel remains solid during the process. In addition, to avoid zinc degassing, the aluminum melt bath temperature has to be below zinc boiling temperature of 907°C. To meet these requirements a temperature controlled laser process was developed, allowing to join the two materials without flux and filler material. The thickness of the intermetallic layer shows a dependency on the set temperature used to control the process. At optimum set temperature the thickness of intermetallic phases can be limited to about 5 μm. Tensile strengths of the joints of up to 75% of the aluminum base material were achieved.

  13. Rechargeable Aluminum-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Liu, Hansan; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Gilbert M

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reports on the development of rechargeable aluminum-ion batteries. A possible concept of rechargeable aluminum/aluminum-ion battery based on low-cost, earth-abundant Al anode, ionic liquid EMImCl:AlCl3 (1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloroaluminate) electrolytes and MnO2 cathode has been proposed. Al anode has been reported to show good reversibility in acid melts. However, due to the problems in demonstrating the reversibility in cathodes, alternate battery cathodes and battery concepts have also been presented. New ionic liquid electrolytes for reversible Al dissolution and deposition are needed in the future for replacing corrosive EMImCl:AlCl3 electrolytes.

  14. PREPARATION OF DIBASIC ALUMINUM NITRATE

    DOEpatents

    Gresky, A.T.; Nurmi, E.O.; Foster, D.L.; Wischow, R.P.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-04-01

    A method is given for the preparation and recovery of basic aluminum nltrates having an OH: Al ratio of at least two, comprising two steps. First, metallic aluminum is dissolved in aqueous Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, in the presence of a small quantity of elemental or ionic mercury, to increase its Al: NO/sub 3/ ratio into the range 1 to 1.2. The resulting aqueous solution is then added to an excess of a special organic solvent, typically a mixture of five parts methanol and six parts diethyl ether, whereupon the basic aluminum nitrate, e.g. Al/sub 6/(OH)/sub 13/-(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/, recoverably precipitates.

  15. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  16. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    DOE PAGES

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; ...

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as amore » function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.« less

  17. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  18. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

  19. The effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yougen; Lu, Lingbin; Roesky, Herbert W.; Wang, Laiwen; Huang, Baiyun

    Aluminum is an ideal material for batteries, due to its excellent electrochemical performance. Herein, the effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery, as an additive for aluminum alloy and electrolytes, has been studied. The results show that zinc can decrease the anodic polarization, restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate.

  20. Mineral resource of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E. Lee

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on aluminum, a mineral resource which is described as the third-most abundant element in Earth's crust. According to the article, aluminum is the second-most used metal. Hans Christian Oersted, a Danish chemist, was the first to isolate aluminum in the laboratory. Aluminum is described as lightweight, corrosion-resistant and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat.

  1. RECOVERY OF ALUMINUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.; Higgins, I.R.

    1962-11-20

    A method is given for recovertng aluminum values from aqueous solutions containing said values together with fission products. A mixture of Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ is added to a solution containing aluminum and fission products. The resulting aluminum-containing supernatant is then separated from the fission product-bearing metal oxide precipitate and is contacted with a cation exchange resin. The aluminum sorbed on the resin is then eluted and recovered. (AEC)

  2. Blood aluminum levels as a function of aluminum intake from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Turnquest, E.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H. )

    1991-04-01

    Questions regarding the health effects of aluminum are still unanswered. The speciation, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity of aluminum are not well understood. Furthermore, no animal or human studies of aluminum absorption have been reported using drinking water as the source of aluminum. The following experiment attempted to reach a better understanding of the bioavailability of aluminum from drinking water. Its objective was to determine whether or not increased aluminum ingestion from drinking water would be reflected in increased serum and whole blood aluminum levels in the baboon experimental model.

  3. 76 FR 23490 - Aluminum tris (O

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    .... Also, EPA is revoking the tolerances for aluminum tris (O-ethylphosphonate) on pineapple fodder and... aluminum tris (O-ethylphosphonate) on pineapple fodder and forage because they are not considered to be... for aluminum tris (O-ethylphosphonate) on pineapple fodder and forage because they are not...

  4. 75 FR 80527 - Aluminum Extrusions From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... COMMISSION Aluminum Extrusions From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... retarded, by reason of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of aluminum extrusions... contained in Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Preliminary Determination...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  9. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  18. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely used as a source of niacin...

  20. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  3. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  5. Capillarity in isothermal infiltration of alumina fiber preforms with aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, V.J.; Mortensen, A. . Dept. of Materials Science); Compton, L.M. )

    1994-10-01

    Models derived in petroleum engineering and soil science for flow of two immiscible fluids in a porous medium are extended to the infiltration of ceramic preforms by a liquid metal. SAFFIL alumina fiber preforms are infiltrated with an aluminum matrix in a series of interrupted unidirectional and isothermal experiments at various low applied pressures, to measure profiles of the volume fraction of metal along the length of the preforms. Comparison of experimental data with theory reveals the existence of a pressure-dependent incubation time for wetting of the alumina preforms by molten aluminum at 973 K. If this incubation time is taken into account, experimental curves of metal distribution are well predicted by theory, confirming the validity of the models after initiation of flow.

  6. Aluminum alloys with improved strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiasi, R.; Adler, P.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical strength and stress corrosion of new BAR and 7050 alloys that include Zn instead of Cr have been studied and compared with those of 7075 aluminum alloy. Added mechanical strength of new alloys is attributed to finer grain size of 5 to 8 micrometers, however, susceptibility to stress corrosion attack is increased.

  7. Ballistic Evaluation of 6055 Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    alloy ( AA ) 6055-T651 produced by Alcoa as part of a Defense Acquisition Challenge Program. Ballistic evaluation was performed using armor-piercing...indicating the number of plates tested ............1 Table 2 Chemistry of AAs , weight-percent ranges .............................................2...aluminum alloy ( AA ) 6055, granting it full commercial availability as rolled plate from Davenport, Iowa. AA6055 remains under patent protection and is

  8. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  9. Aluminum-induced granulomas in a tattoo

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, N.; Lyberg, T.; Hensten-Pettersen, A.

    1989-05-01

    A patient who developed localized, granulomatous reactions in a tattoo is described. With the use of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis, both aluminum and titanium particles were found in the involved skin sections. Intradermal provocation testing with separate suspensions of aluminum and titanium induced a positive response only in the case of aluminum. Examination by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis of the provoked response established aluminum as the only nonorganic element present in the test site tissue. This is the first report of confirmed aluminum-induced, delayed-hypersensitivity granulomas in a tattoo.

  10. Decarbonization process for carbothermically produced aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Bruno, Marshall J.; Carkin, Gerald E.; DeYoung, David H.; Dunlap, Sr., Ronald M.

    2015-06-30

    A method of recovering aluminum is provided. An alloy melt having Al.sub.4C.sub.3 and aluminum is provided. This mixture is cooled and then a sufficient amount of a finely dispersed gas is added to the alloy melt at a temperature of about 700.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. The aluminum recovered is a decarbonized carbothermically produced aluminum where the step of adding a sufficient amount of the finely dispersed gas effects separation of the aluminum from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates by flotation, resulting in two phases with the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates being the upper layer and the decarbonized aluminum being the lower layer. The aluminum is then recovered from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates through decanting.

  11. Complex foamed aluminum parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings

    SciTech Connect

    Simancik, F.; Schoerghuber, F.

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of complex shaped aluminum foam parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings has been investigated. The foamed samples were prepared by injection of the foam into sand molds. It turned out that sound castings can be produced if the foam core is properly preheated and/or surface treated before casting. The effect of the foam core on the performance of the casting was evaluated by in compression testing and by measuring structural damping. The gain in the related properties turned out to be much higher than the weight increase of the casting due to the presence of the core. The weight increase may be partially offset through a reduction of the wall-thickness of the shell.

  12. Reactively Deposited Aluminum Oxide and Fluoropolymer Filled Aluminum Oxide Protective Coatings for Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Hunt, Jason

    1995-01-01

    Reactive ion beam sputter deposition of aluminum simultaneous with low energy arrival of oxygen ions at the deposition surface enables the formation of highly transparent aluminum oxide films. Thick (12 200 A), adherent, low stress, reactively deposited aluminum oxide films were found to provide some abrasion resistance to polycarbonate substrates. The reactively deposited aluminum oxide films are also slightly more hydrophobic and more transmitting in the UV than aluminum oxide deposited from an aluminum oxide target. Simultaneous reactive sputter deposition of aluminum along with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Teflon) produces fluoropolymer-filled aluminum oxide films which are lower in stress, about the same in transmittance, but more wetting than reactively deposited aluminum oxide films. Deposition properties, processes and potential applications for these coatings will be discussed.

  13. Aluminum Alloys--Industrial Deformable, Sintered and Light Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-30

    thin film on the particles of the highly dispersed aluminum powder when it is ground in spherical mills in a nitrogen atmosphere in which the...principal elements, certain small admixtures are introduced into the alloys, which have a considerable effect on the decay kinetics of the oversaturated...strengthened by the insoluble dispersed alumina particles. Fine grinding of the original powder provides the dispersion of the oxide films and particles

  14. Modeling dissolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Tracie Lee

    2005-07-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are used in many aspects of modern life, from soda cans and household foil to the automobiles and aircraft in which we travel. Aluminum alloy systems are characterized by good workability that enables these alloys to be economically rolled, extruded, or forged into useful shapes. Mechanical properties such as strength are altered significantly with cold working, annealing, precipitation-hardening, and/or heat-treatments. Heat-treatable aluminum alloys contain one or more soluble constituents such as copper, lithium, magnesium, silicon and zinc that individually, or with other elements, can form phases that strengthen the alloy. Microstructure development is highly dependent on all of the processing steps the alloy experiences. Ultimately, the macroscopic properties of the alloy depend strongly on the microstructure. Therefore, a quantitative understanding of the microstructural changes that occur during thermal and mechanical processing is fundamental to predicting alloy properties. In particular, the microstructure becomes more homogeneous and secondary phases are dissolved during thermal treatments. Robust physical models for the kinetics of particle dissolution are necessary to predict the most efficient thermal treatment. A general dissolution model for multi-component alloys has been developed using the front-tracking method to study the dissolution of precipitates in an aluminum alloy matrix. This technique is applicable to any alloy system, provided thermodynamic and diffusion data are available. Treatment of the precipitate interface is explored using two techniques: the immersed-boundary method and a new technique, termed here the "sharp-interface" method. The sharp-interface technique is based on a variation of the ghost fluid method and eliminates the need for corrective source terms in the characteristic equations. In addition, the sharp-interface method is shown to predict the dissolution behavior of precipitates in aluminum

  15. 75 FR 69403 - Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Preliminary Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ...\\ In the Initiation Notice, the Department notified parties of the application process by which.... The process requires exporters and producers to submit a separate-rate status application (``SRA'') \\4... process, made from aluminum alloys having metallic elements corresponding to the alloy series...

  16. The Role of Stress in the Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    50 Figure 42. Crack Orientations for Rolled Plate Material . From [18] ................................53 xi LIST OF TABLES...Increasing transverse stability allows the ship to be operated in higher sea states that would normally prohibit the safe operation of the ship. This...alloying addition in 5000 series aluminum is magnesium, which gives the material good specific strength and general corrosion properties and is also

  17. Industrial capability to chem-mill aluminum alloy 2219 in T-37 and T-87

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milewski, C., Jr.; Chen, K. C. S.

    1979-01-01

    Procedures and chemical baths were developed for chem-milling aluminum alloy 2219. Using a series of sample etchings, it was found that good etching results could be obtained by using 'white plastic for porcelain repair (toluol, xylol, and petroleum distillates)' on top of cellosolve acetate as resist coatings and ferric chloride as on etchant.

  18. The use of primary dross from the aluminum industry for manufacturing aluminum sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    The use of primary dross as a source for aluminum ion in the manufacture of aluminum sulfate offers opportunities for an inexpensive raw material. The aluminum sulfate industry in the US is a mature market with numerous small plants operating close to major users. The majority of manufacturers use either bauxite or aluminum oxide trihydrate as a source for the aluminum ion. However, using process technology developed and patented by IWC, the oxides are removed from primary dross for use in manufacturing aluminum sulfate prior to metal recovery. This process offers the benefit of reducing costs for metal recovery. This paper discusses some of the methodology used in this process.

  19. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the self- sustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...removal. An eCPX peptide display library was grown and induced as described in the paragraph above. After rinsing samples briefly in PBS, the aluminum

  20. Electrically Conductive Anodized Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Trung Hung

    2006-01-01

    Anodized aluminum components can be treated to make them sufficiently electrically conductive to suppress discharges of static electricity. The treatment was conceived as a means of preventing static electric discharges on exterior satin-anodized aluminum (SAA) surfaces of spacecraft without adversely affecting the thermal-control/optical properties of the SAA and without need to apply electrically conductive paints, which eventually peel off in the harsh environment of outer space. The treatment can also be used to impart electrical conductivity to anodized housings of computers, medical electronic instruments, telephoneexchange equipment, and other terrestrial electronic equipment vulnerable to electrostatic discharge. The electrical resistivity of a typical anodized aluminum surface layer lies between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 13) Omega-cm. To suppress electrostatic discharge, it is necessary to reduce the electrical resistivity significantly - preferably to < or = 10(exp 9) Omega-cm. The present treatment does this. The treatment is a direct electrodeposition process in which the outer anodized surface becomes covered and the pores in the surface filled with a transparent, electrically conductive metal oxide nanocomposite. Filling the pores with the nanocomposite reduces the transverse electrical resistivity and, in the original intended outer-space application, the exterior covering portion of the nanocomposite would afford the requisite electrical contact with the outer-space plasma. The electrical resistivity of the nanocomposite can be tailored to a value between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 12) Omega-cm. Unlike electrically conductive paint, the nanocomposite becomes an integral part of the anodized aluminum substrate, without need for adhesive bonding material and without risk of subsequent peeling. The electrodeposition process is compatible with commercial anodizing production lines. At present, the electronics industry uses expensive, exotic

  1. Carbothermal synthesis of aluminum nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, L.D. )

    1988-07-01

    A synthetic route is described for making carbothermally reduced powders from colloidal oxide precursors trapped in a polymer matrix. The entrapping resin, which is formed by polymerization of a monomer dissolved in the colloid, serves both to minimize particle agglomeration during reaction and as the source of carbon for reduction. Following reduction, the remaining carbon matrix is removed by oxidation. This strategy was used to synthesize aluminum nitride powder via trapping of colloidal alumina in poly(furfuryl alcohol) resin.

  2. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Recycling of aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshinori; Izawa, Norihisa; Kuramasu, Yukio

    1999-03-01

    Separation of matrix metals in composites was tried on alumina short fiber-reinforced aluminum and 6061 alloy composites and SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite for recycling. It is possible to separate molten matrix metals from fibers in the composites using fluxes that are used for melt treatment to remove inclusions. About 50 vol pct of the matrix metals was separated from the alumina short fiber-reinforced composites. The separation ratio of the matrix from the SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite was low and about 20 vol pct. The separation mechanism was discussed thermodynamically using interface free energies. Since the flux/fiber interface energy is smaller than the aluminum/fiber interface energy, the replacement of aluminum with fluxes in composites takes place easily. Gases released by the decomposition of fluxes act an important role in pushing out the molten matrix metal from the composite. The role was confirmed by the great amount cavity formed in the composite after the matrix metal flowed out.

  4. Response to Thermal Exposure of Ball-Milled Aluminum-Borax Powder Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel

    2013-04-01

    Aluminum-borax powder mixtures were ball milled and heated above 873 K (600 °C) to produce Al-B master alloys. Ball-milled powder blends reveal interpenetrating layers of deformed aluminum and borax grains that are increasingly refined with increasing milling time. Thermal exposure of the ball-milled powder blends facilitates a series of thermite reactions between these layers. Borax, dehydrated during heating, is reduced by Al, and B thus generated reacts with excess Al to produce AlB2 particles dispersed across the aluminum grains starting at 873 K (600 °C). AlB2 particles start to form along the interface of the aluminum and borax layers. Once nucleated, these particles grow readily to become hexagonal-shaped crystals that traverse the aluminum grains with increasing temperatures as evidenced by the increase in the size as well as in the number of the AlB2 particles. Ball milling for 1 hour suffices to achieve a thermite reaction between borax and aluminum. Ball milling further does not impact the response of the powder blend to thermal exposure. The nucleation-reaction sites are multiplied, however, with increasing milling time and thus insure a higher number of smaller AlB2 particles. The size of the AlB2 platelets may be adjusted with the ball milling time.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks at Superplastic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Richard W.; Vetrano, John S.; Smith, Mark T.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2002-10-06

    This paper describes an investigation of the mechanical properties of weld material in aluminum tailor welded blanks (TWB) at superplastic temperatures and discusses the potential application of TWBs in superplastic forming operations. Aluminum TWBs consist of multiple sheet materials of different thickness or alloy that are butt-welded together into a single, variable thickness blank. To evaluate the performance of the weld material in TWBs, a series of tensile tests were conducted at superplastic temperatures with specimens that contained weld material in the gage area. The sheet material used in the study was Sky 5083 aluminum alloy, which was joined to produce the TWBs by gas tungsten arc welding using an AA5356 filler wire. The experimental results show that, in the temperature range of 500?C to 550?C and at strain rates ranging from 10-4 sec-1 to 10-2 sec-1, the weld material has a higher flow stress and lower ductility than the monolithic sheet material. The weld material exhibited elongations of 40% to 60% under these conditions, whereas the monolithic sheet achieved 220% to 360% elongation. At the same temperatures and strain rates, the weld material exhibited flow stresses 1.3 to 4 times greater than the flow stress in the monolithic sheet. However, the weld material did show a substantial increase in the strain rate sensitivity and ductility when compared to the same material formed at room temperature.

  6. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  7. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  8. Tetrahydrofurfuryloxide derivatives of alkyl aluminum species.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Avilucea, Gabriel; Bunge, Scott D.; Alam, Todd Michael; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Cherry, Brian Ray; Tissot, Ralph George, Jr.; Segall, Judith M.

    2004-12-01

    Tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (H-OTHF) was successfully reacted with a series of aluminum alkyls (AlR{sub 3}) to yield compounds of the general formula [R{sub 2}Al({mu}-OTHF)]{sub 2} where R = CH{sub 3} (1), CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3} (2), and CH{sub 2}CH(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} (3). Further, reactivity studies showed that the alkyls for 1 were easily exchanged, forming compounds of the general formula [Me(OR)Al({mu}-OTHF)]{sub 2} where OR = OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(Me){sub 2}-2,6 (4), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(CMe{sub 3}){sub 2}-2,6 (5a), and OSi(C{sub 6}H5){sub 3} (6). For 5a, reflux temperatures were required to get the full exchange; otherwise the asymmetric derivative [Me(OR)Al({mu}-OTHF){sub 2}AlMe{sub 2}] (5b) was isolated. The bulk powders of 1-6 were found to be in agreement with the crystal structures on the basis of elemental analyses and multinuclear solid state NMR studies. Multinuclear solution state NMR studies indicate that the alkyl OTHF derivatives have cis/trans isomers due to the chiral proton on the OTHF ligand.

  9. Damage areas on selected LDEF aluminum surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Atkinson, Dale R.; Allbrooks, Martha K.; Watts, Alan J.; Hennessy, Corey J.; Wagner, John D.

    1993-01-01

    With the U.S. about to embark on a new space age, the effects of the space environment on a spacecraft during its mission lifetime become more relevant. Included among these potential effects are degradation and erosion due to micrometeoroid and debris impacts, atomic oxygen and ultraviolet light exposure as well as material alteration from thermal cycling, and electron and proton exposure. This paper focuses on the effects caused by micrometeoroid and debris impacts on several LDEF aluminum plates from four different bay locations: C-12, C-10, C-01, and E-09. Each plate was coated with either a white, black, or gray thermal paint. Since the plates were located at different orientations on the satellite, their responses to the hypervelocity impacts varied. Crater morphologies range from a series of craters, spall zones, domes, spaces, and rings to simple craters with little or no spall zones. In addition, each of these crater morphologies is associated with varying damage areas, which appear to be related to their respective bay locations and thus exposure angles. More than 5% of the exposed surface area examined was damaged by impact cratering and its coincident effects (i.e., spallation, delamination and blow-off). Thus, results from this analysis may be significant for mission and spacecraft planners and designers.

  10. Fabrication of Porous Aluminum Using Gases Intrinsically Contained in Aluminum Alloy Die Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Utsunomiya, Takao

    2009-06-01

    Closed-cell porous aluminum was fabricated using gases intrinsically contained in aluminum alloy die castings without using a blowing agent. By incorporating the friction stir processing technique, porous aluminum with a porosity of more than 50 pct was successfully obtained at a holding temperature of 923 to 948 K and a holding time of 10 minutes. This proposed die-casting route has high potential for fabricating porous aluminum at a low cost by a higher productivity process.

  11. Aluminum-stabilized NB3SN superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Scanlan, Ronald M.

    1988-01-01

    An aluminum-stabilized Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

  12. Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, E. Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding wrought 4047, 1100, 3003, 2219, 5052, 5086, 5456, and 6061 and cast A356 aluminum alloys to cast A356 aluminum alloy in restrained annular weld joints was investigated. The welds were 12.7 mm (0.375 in.) and 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter with approximately 0.30 mm (0.012 in.) penetration. This investigation determined 4047 aluminum alloy to be the optimum alloy for autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding to cast A356 aluminum alloy. This report describes the investigation and its results.

  13. Electrical Resistivity of Aluminum and Manganese.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Aluminum Alloys ,’ J. Pliys. Soc. lpu., JIM(3, 684-91 (1975). 57 26Srivastava* S.K., ’Model Pseudopotentials and Eiectron4c Properties ...1965). 6 3Powell, R.W.. Tye, R.P., and Metcalf, S.C.. ’Molten Aluminum and an Aluminum Alloy .’ in 3rd Symposium on Thermophvsical Properties (Gratch, S...Transport Properties of Commercial Metals and Alloys . II. Aluminums ,’ J. Appl. Phys., Ul(3), 496-503 (1960). 73Bedgcock, F.T., Muir, W.B., and Wallingford,

  14. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  15. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum... aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? (a) Use equation 1 of...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  17. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  18. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  19. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  20. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum... aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? (a) Use equation 1 of...

  1. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum... aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? (a) Use equation 1 of...

  2. An Automatic Washing Machine to Remove Aluminum From Astronomical Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitelli, Valentina

    Cleaning of large astronomical mirrors, before aluminization, required in the past a large amount of manual operations on the surface. With very large mirrors, 8 meter or more, manual operations become time consuming, expensive and often dangerous, both for mirror surface and operators. A fully automated procedure is thus mandatory when handling large mirrors. To this aim we experimented on a small scale (60 cm) an automatic procedure, free from any manual contact with the mirror, capable of removing old aluminum and leaving a clean, wet surface ready for a successful new aluminization. First we manually treated small borosilicate mirrors, obtained from the LBT primary mirror glass batch, with different sequences of chemicals, commonly used to this purpose. These small mirrors were checked with a Wyko interferometer before and after treating, to trace change in roughness of the surface. Quality and stability of the new aluminum deposition after cleaning was also checked. The washing machine prototype is composed by a water proof box on rigid PVC with a moving arm, a pump and a series of tanks containing the used chemicals. All the adopted components can be used with acids and other corrosive fluids. The machine is designed to hold the mirror in vertical position. An arm with 10 cm spaced nozzles moves up and down in front of the mirror spraying the adopted chemicals in a defined sequence. A pump forces the liquid through the circuit. After the washing, the mirror is left, protected from the dust in the washing machine, for about 2 hours to drip the water, then is moved into the vacuum pump to check the final result of aluminizing the cleaned surface. A homogeneous layer of aluminum follows only after a careful cleaning, otherwise a fast oxidize process, or a inhomogeneous aluminum coating appear. Scaling times, fluxes and costs from this experiment to large size mirrors leads to realistic, affordable figures.

  3. Aluminum reclamation from dross. (Latest citations from the Aluminum Industry Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning aluminum reclamation from dross. Topics include dross treatment technology, the environmental benefits of aluminum recovery from dross, and the economics of aluminum reclamation in dross processing systems. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  4. Fretting of Nickel-Chromium-Aluminum Alloys at Temperatures to 816 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of four nickel-based alloys containing 10 percent and 20 percent chromium in combination with 2 percent and 5 percent aluminum were fretted in dry air at temperatures to 816 C. At all temperatures, the alloys showed far less fretting wear than did high-purity nickel. This was attributed to the formation of protective oxide films on the alloys, the result of the selective oxidation of the alloy constituents. Increasing the aluminum concentration reduced fretting wear at all temperatures. Increasing the chromium concentration from 10 percent to 20 percent resulted in decreased fretting wear at 23 and 540 C, but increased fretting wear at 650 and 816 C.

  5. A mathematical model to predict the strength of aluminum alloys subjected to precipitation hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, F.S.; Sheikh, A.K.; Rashid, M.

    1999-06-01

    A number of alloys, notably most of the aluminum alloys, can be heat treated by aging. This aging due to time-dependent precipitation hardening increases the strength and hardness as well as modifying other mechanical properties. Precipitation hardening has been a popular strengthening mechanism for many decades; therefore, extensive information is available in literature about the precipitation-hardening response of various series of aluminum alloys. The age-hardening response of these alloys is usually represented in graphical form as plotted between property changes and aging time for different temperatures. In designing a suitable precipitation-hardening strategy, one can refer to these graphs. However, for automatic control of aging furnaces, as well as for decision making regarding optimal selection of aging conditions (time/temperature combination), it is desirable to express these relationships in a formal mathematical structure. A mathematical model is developed in this article for widely used heat treatable aluminum alloys used in the extrusion industry. This model is a condensed representation of all {sigma} = f(T,t) curves in different series of aluminum alloys, and the parameters of this model characterize the various compositions of the alloys in the series.

  6. Evaluation and Characterization of In-Line Annealed Continuous Cast Aluminum Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Subodh K. Das

    2006-01-17

    This R&D program will develop optimized, energy-efficient thermo-mechanical processing procedures for in-line annealing of continuously cast hot bands of two 5000 series aluminum alloys (5754 and 5052). The implementation of the R&D will result in the production of sheet with improved formability at high levels of productivity consistency and quality. The proposed R&D involves the following efforts: (1) Design and build continuous in-line annealing equipment for plant-scale trials; (2) Carry out plant-scale trials at Commonwealth Aluminum Corp.'s (CAC) plant in Carson; (3) Optimize the processing variables utilizing a metallurgical model for the kinetics of microstructure and texture evolution during thermo-mechanical processing; (4) Determine the effects of processing variables on the microstructure, texture, mechanical properties, and formability of aluminum sheet; (5) Develop design parameters for commercial implementation; and (6) Conduct techno-economic studies of the recommended process equipment to identify impacts on production costs. The research and development is appropriate for the domestic industry as it will result in improved aluminum processing capabilities and thus lead to greater application of aluminum in various industries including the automotive market. A teaming approach is critical to the success of this effort as no single company alone possesses the breadth of technical and financial resources for successfully carrying out the effort. This program will enable more energy efficient aluminum sheet production technology, produce consistent high quality product, and have The proposal addresses the needs of the aluminum industry as stated in the aluminum industry roadmap by developing new and improved aluminum processes utilizing energy efficient techniques. The effort is primarily related to the subsection on Rolling and Extrusion with the R&D to address energy and environmental efficiencies in aluminum manufacturing and will provide

  7. Aluminum core structures brazed without use of flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Aluminum alloy face sheets are brazed to aluminum alloy honeycomb cores without using corrosive flux by means of one or three methods. The completed brazed structure has the high-strength characteristics of heat treated aluminum alloys.

  8. Cast Aluminum Primary Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    ABSTRAC R A A A357 cast aluminum alloy forward fuselage pressure bulkhead has been developed and manufactured for the AMST-YC-14 aircraft. This work...urring in castings. Test coupons were! removed from castings containing defU-ts and subjected to repeated loads. The shift of the S-N curve for A357 ...selected for the casting is A357 . The cast bulkhead (Fig 2) measures approximately 2.29 m (7.5 ft) by 1.37 m (4.5 ft). It is designed to replace the

  9. Cryomilled Aluminum Stabilized by Diamondoid Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maung, Khinlay

    Nanocrystalline aluminum powder with an average grain size of 22nm was prepared via cryomilling. Hot Isostatic Pressing was used to consolidate the powder followed by hot extrusion to homogenize the consolidated material. The high homologous temperature processes tend to increase the average grain diameter beyond the nanoscle classification, which is less than 100 nm. Diamantane was added during cryomilling to enhance the thermal stability in nanocrystalline aluminum. The thermal stability test data show that aluminum reinforced with 1 wt% diamantane exhibit two to three fold better thermal stability than non-reinforced aluminum when annealed at 773K (0.84 Tm) for ten hours. A similar trend is shown for the samples consolidated at 693K. This finding is explained through Burke's model for grain growth in materials containing secondary particles to inhibit grain boundary motion. The mechanical properties of cryomilled aluminum stabilized by 0.5 wt% and 1 wt% diamantane particles are compared with cryomilled commercial purity (CP) aluminum with no diamantane after high strain rate deformation (trap extrusion). The grain size of cryomilled CP aluminum is 0.6 to 1.2 times larger than the samples containing diamantane. In contrast to Hall-petch predictions, cryomilled aluminum with diamantane has relatively lower flow stress while demonstrating a 2.7-3.7 time higher ductility compared to cryomilled CP aluminum. Possible reasons for this behavior are suggested in mechnical property section. A combination of higher temperature and pressure resulted in formation of Aluminum tris (Al(C9H6NO)3) precipitates from diamantane in the cryomilled aluminum matrix. The precipitates were formed during trap extrusion process but only seen in samples containing 1 wt% diamantane and HIP'ed at 521°C. Therefore, the HIP'ng temperature plays an important role in formation of these precipitates.

  10. INTERIOR VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO LABORATORY, SHOWING HANDHAMMERED ALUMINUM DOORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO LABORATORY, SHOWING HAND-HAMMERED ALUMINUM DOORS AND MARBLE. NOTE ALUMINUM LIGHT FIXTURE - Alcoa Research Laboratory, Freeport Road, New Kensington, Westmoreland County, PA

  11. Nanostructure of aluminum oxide inclusion and formation of hydrogen bubbles in molten aluminum.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianmin; Li, Dezhi; Kang, Minglong; He, Huan; Hu, Zhiliu

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen in molten aluminum is one of the major factors that lead to pore formation in the solidification process of aluminum castings. Previous research showed that aluminum oxide inclusion had a close correlation with the hydrogen content in molten aluminum. Though some researchers thought there must have been a relationship between surface morphology of the inclusion and hydrogen concentration in molten aluminum, very few documents have reported on the surface property of aluminum oxide inclusion. In the present work, AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) was first used to investigate surface morphology of aluminum oxide inclusion in molten aluminum. It was found that there were a large number of nanoscale micropores on the surface of aluminum oxide inclusion. The interior of the micropores was approximated as a tapered shape. These micropores were thought to be helpful to heterogeneous nucleation for hydrogen atoms aggregation because they provided necessary concentration fluctuation and energy undulation for the growth of hydrogen bubbles. Based on the nanostructure observed on the surface of aluminum oxide inclusion, a theoretical model was developed to describe the hydrogen pore formation in aluminum casting under the condition of heterogeneous nucleation.

  12. Improved dual flow aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.; Licht, S.L.; Matthews, D.

    1993-11-30

    A novel dual flow battery configuration is provided comprising an aqueous hydrogen peroxide catholyte, an aqueous anolyte, a porous solid electrocatalyst capable of reducing said hydrogen peroxide and separating said anolyte, and an aluminum anode positioned within said anolyte. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode.

  13. Improved dual flow aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Catherine; Licht, Stuart L.; Matthews, Donna

    1993-11-01

    A novel dual flow battery configuration is provided comprising an aqueous hydrogen peroxide catholyte, an aqueous anolyte, a porous solid electrocatalyst capable of reducing said hydrogen peroxide and separating said anolyte, and an aluminum anode positioned within said anolyte. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode.

  14. Aluminum induced proteome changes in tomato cotyledons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotyledons of tomato seedlings that germinated in a 20 µM AlK(SO4)2 solution remained chlorotic while those germinated in an aluminum free medium were normal (green) in color. Previously, we have reported the effect of aluminum toxicity on root proteome in tomato seedlings (Zhou et al. J Exp Bot, 20...

  15. RECOVERY OF METAL USING ALUMINUM DISPLACEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of typical metals (Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni) from printed circuit and metal finishing waste streams was evaluated using displacement with aluminum. he metal is recovered as non-hazardous metal particles and can be recycled by smelting. n acceptable aluminum metal configuration ...

  16. Study of stress corrosion in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummer, S. B.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminum alloys was investigated using electrochemical, mechanical, and electron microscopic techniques. The feasibility of detecting stress corrosion damage in fabricated aluminum alloy parts by nondestructive testing was investigated using ultrasonic surface waves and eddy currents.

  17. Recovery of aluminum from composite propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, G. C. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Aluminum was recovered from solid rocket propellant containing a small amount of oxidizer by depolymerizing and dissolving propellant binders (containing functional or hydrolyzable groups in a solution of sodium methoxide) in an alcohol solvent optionally containing an aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbon co-solvent. The solution was filtered to recover substantially all the aluminum in active form.

  18. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  19. Virus inactivation in aluminum and polyaluminum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Sakuma, Satoru; Gojo, Takahito; Mamiya, Teppei; Suzuoki, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takanobu

    2003-11-15

    Inorganic aluminum salts, such as aluminum sulfate, are coagulants that cause small particles, such as bacteria and viruses as well as inorganic particles, to destabilize and combine into larger aggregates. In this investigation, batch coagulation treatments of water samples spiked with Qbeta, MS2, T4, and P1 viruses were conducted with four different aluminum coagulants. The total infectious virus concentration in the suspension of floc particles that eventually formed by dosing with coagulant was measured after the floc particles were dissolved by raising the pH with an alkaline beef extract solution. The virus concentrations were extremely reduced after the water samples were dosed with aluminum coagulants. Viruses mixed with and adsorbed onto preformed aluminum hydroxide floc were, however, completely recovered after the floc dissolution. These results indicated that the aluminum coagulation process inactivates viruses. Virucidal activity was most prominent with the prehydrolyzed aluminum salt coagulant, polyaluminum chloride (PACl). Virucidal activity was lower in river water than in ultrapure water--natural organic matter in the river water depressed the virucidal activity. Mechanisms and kinetics of the virus inactivation were discussed. Our results suggest that intermediate polymers formed during hydrolysis of the aluminum coagulants sorbed strongly to viruses, either rendering them inactive or preventing infectivity.

  20. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  1. SOLID STATE BONDING OF THORIUM WITH ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Storchhelm, S.

    1959-12-01

    A method is described for bonding thorium and aluminum by placing clean surfaces of thorium and aluminum in contact with each other and hot pressing the metals together in a protective atmosphere at a temperature of about 375 to 575 deg C and at a pressure of at least 10 tsi to effect a bond.

  2. Aluminum low temperature smelting cell metal collection

    DOEpatents

    Beck, Theodore R.; Brown, Craig W.

    2002-07-16

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte in an electrolytic cell having an anodic liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having an anodic bottom and walls including at least one end wall extending upwardly from the anodic bottom, the anodic liner being substantially inert with respect to the molten electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes is provided and disposed vertically in the electrolyte. A plurality of cathodes is disposed vertically in the electrolyte in alternating relationship with the anodes. The anodes are electrically connected to the anodic liner. An electric current is passed through the anodic liner to the anodes, through the electrolyte to the cathodes, and aluminum is deposited on said cathodes. Oxygen bubbles are generated at the anodes and the anodic liner, the bubbles stirring the electrolyte. Molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes into a tubular member positioned underneath the cathodes. The tubular member is in liquid communication with each cathode to collect the molten aluminum therefrom while excluding electrolyte. Molten aluminum is delivered through the tubular member to a molten aluminum reservoir located substantially opposite the anodes and cathodes. The molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes and delivered to the reservoir while avoiding contact of the molten aluminum with the anodic bottom.

  3. Environmental effects on aluminum fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Shepic, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The sustained load stress corrosion cracking (SCC) threshold for aluminum alloy 214 was determined using smooth (sigma sub TH) and precracked (K sub ISCC) specimens, and cyclic load growth behavior in 3.5% NaCl salt solution was studied. The relationship between K sub ISCC and sigma sub TH was also studied. The work showed that 2124-T851 aluminum alloy in plate gage has a moderately high resistance to stress corrosion attack. Experimental results showed that no SCC occurred in the longitudinal and long transverse directions in any of the tests. Some SCC was found by smooth tests in the short transverse direction, and the data were confirmed by two test methods-sigma sub TH = 275 MN/sq m (40 ksi). No SCC was found from compact specimen tests in any direction: surface flaw and center notch specimens evaluated in the short transverse direction exhibited SCC. The data indicate that stress corrosion behavior is defect, size, and stress dependent, but not entirely in accordance with a stress intensity controlled mechanism.

  4. Cast Aluminum Alloys for High Temperature Applications Using Nanoparticles Al2O3 and Al3-X Compounds (X = Ti, V, Zr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of nanoparticles Al2O3 and Al3-X compounds (X = Ti, V, Zr) on the improvement of mechanical properties of aluminum alloys for elevated temperature applications is presented. These nanoparticles were selected based on their low cost, chemical stability and low diffusions rates in aluminum at high temperatures. The strengthening mechanism at high temperature for aluminum alloy is based on the mechanical blocking of dislocation movements by these nanoparticles. For Al2O3 nanoparticles, the test samples were prepared from special Al2O3 preforms, which were produced using ceramic injection molding process and then pressure infiltrated by molten aluminum. In another method, Al2O3 nanoparticles can also be homogeneously mixed with fine aluminum powder and consolidated into test samples through hot pressing and sintering. With the Al3-X nanoparticles, the test samples are produced as precipitates from in-situ reactions with molten aluminum using conventional permanent mold or die casting techniques. It is found that cast aluminum alloy using nanoparticles Al3-X is the most cost effective method to produce high strength aluminum alloys for high temperature applications in comparison to nanoparticles Al2O3. Furthermore, significant mechanical properties retention in high temperature environment could be achieved with Al3-X nanoparticles, resulting in tensile strength of nearly 3 times higher than most 300- series conventional cast aluminum alloys tested at 600 F.

  5. Optimization of Aluminum Anodization Conditions for the Fabrication of Nanowires by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucsko, Viola

    2005-01-01

    Anodized alumina nanotemplates have a variety of potential applications in the development of nanotechnology. Alumina nanotemplates are formed by oxidizing aluminum film in an electrolyte solution.During anodization, aluminum oxidizes, and, under the proper conditions, nanometer-sized pores develop. A series of experiments was conducted to determine the optimal conditions for anodization. Three-micrometer thick aluminum films on silicon and silicon oxide substrates were anodized using constant voltages of 13-25 V. 0.1-0.3M oxalic acid was used as the electrolyte. The anodization time was found to increase and the overshooting current decreased as both the voltage and the electrolyte concentrations were decreased. The samples were observed under a scanning electron microscope. Anodizing with 25V in 0.3M oxalic acid appears to be the best process conditions. The alumina nanotemplates are being used to fabricate nanowires by electrodeposition. The current-voltage characteristics of copper nanowires have also been studied.

  6. Trends in the global aluminum fabrication industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subodh; Yin, Weimin

    2007-02-01

    The aluminum fabrication industry has become more vital to the global economy as international aluminum consumption has grown steadily in the past decades. Using innovation, value, and sustainability, the aluminum industry is strengthening its position not only in traditional packaging and construction applications but also in the automotive and aerospace markets to become more competitive and to face challenges from other industries and higher industrial standards. The aluminum fabrication industry has experienced a significant geographical shift caused by rapid growth in emerging markets in countries such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Market growth and distribution will vary with different patterns of geography and social development; the aluminum industry must be part of the transformation and keep pace with market developments to benefit.

  7. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  8. Aluminum-based metal-air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Martinez, Jose Antonio Bautista

    2016-01-12

    Provided in one embodiment is an electrochemical cell, comprising: (i) a plurality of electrodes, comprising a fuel electrode that comprises aluminum and an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the aluminum is oxidized at the fuel electrode and oxygen is reduced at the air electrode, and (ii) an ionically conductive medium, comprising an organic solvent; wherein during non-use of the cell, the organic solvent promotes formation of a protective interface between the aluminum of the fuel electrode and the ionically conductive medium, and wherein at an onset of the discharge mode, at least some of the protective interface is removed from the aluminum to thereafter permit oxidation of the aluminum during the discharge mode.

  9. 75 FR 34982 - Aluminum Extrusions from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Postponement of Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Aluminum Extrusions from the People's Republic of China: Notice of... countervailing duty investigation of aluminum extrusions from the People's Republic of China. See Aluminum..., Benada Aluminum of Florida, Inc., William L. Bonnell Company, Inc., Frontier Aluminum Corporation,...

  10. Orbital fabrication of aluminum foam and apparatus therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for producing foamed aluminum in space comprising the steps of: heating aluminum until it is molten; applying the force of gravity to the molten aluminum; injecting gas into the molten aluminum to produce molten foamed aluminum; and allowing the molten foamed aluminum to cool to below melting temperature. The apparatus for carrying out this invention comprises: a furnace which rotates to simulate the force of gravity and heats the aluminum until it is molten; a door on the furnace, which is opened for charging the aluminum into the furnace, closed for processing and opened again for removal of the foamed aluminum; a gas injection apparatus for injecting gas into the molten aluminum within the furnace; and an extraction apparatus adjacent the door for removing the foamed aluminum from the furnace.

  11. Adsorption of dissolved aluminum on sapphire-c and kaolinite: implications for points of zero charge of clay minerals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the impact of dissolved aluminum on interfacial properties of two aluminum bearing minerals, corundum and kaolinite. The effect of intentionally adding dissolved aluminum on electrokinetic potential of basal plane surfaces of sapphire was studied by streaming potential measurements as a function of pH and was complemented by a second harmonic generation (SHG) study at pH 6. The electrokinetic data show a similar trend as the SHG data, suggesting that the SHG electric field correlates to zeta-potential. A comparable study was carried out on kaolinite particles. In this case electrophoretic mobility was measured as a function of pH. In both systems the addition of dissolved aluminum caused significant changes in the charging behavior. The isoelectric point consistently shifted to higher pH values, the extent of the shift depending on the amount of aluminum present or added. The experimental results imply that published isoelectric points of clay minerals may have been affected by this phenomenon. The presence of dissolved aluminum in experimental studies may be caused by particular pre-treatment methods (such as washing in acids and subsequent adsorption of dissolved aluminum) or even simply by starting a series of measurements from extreme pH (causing dissolution), and subsequently varying the pH in the very same batch. This results in interactions of dissolved aluminum with the target surface. A possible interpretation of the experimental results could be that at low aluminum concentrations adatoms of aluminum (we will refer to adsorbed mineral constituents as adatoms) can form at the sapphire basal plane, which can be rather easily removed. Simultaneously, once the surface has been exposed to sufficiently high aluminum concentration, a visible change of the surface is seen by AFM which is attributed to a surface precipitate that cannot be removed under the conditions employed in the current study. In conclusion, whenever pre-treatment or the

  12. Textures, microstructures, anisotropy and formability of aluminum-manganese-magnesium and aluminum-magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiantao

    In this dissertation work, the microstructure and texture evolution of continuous cast (CC) and direct chill (DC) cast Al-Mn-Mg (AA 3105 and AA 3015) and Al-Mg (AA 5052) alloys during cold rolling and annealing are systematically investigated. Macrotexture analyses were based on three-dimensional orientation distribution functions (ODFs) calculated from incomplete pole figures from X-ray diffraction by using arbitrarily defined cell (ADC) and series expansion methods. A new technique, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), was adopted for microtexture and mesotexture investigation. The anisotropy and formability of Al-Mn-Mg and Al-Mg alloys are correlated to the texture results. For aluminum alloys studied in this work, a stronger Cube orientation is observed in DC hot band than in CC hot band after complete recrystallization. alpha and beta fibers become well developed beyond 50% cold rolling in both CC and DC aluminum alloys. The highest intensity along the beta fiber (skeleton line) is located between the Copper and the S orientations in both materials after high cold rolling reductions. In both CC and DC aluminum alloys, a cell structure develops with the indication of increasing CSL Sigma1 boundaries during the early stages of cold rolling. There is no evidence of the development of twin boundaries (Sigma3, Sigma9, Sigma27a & 27b) in either CC or DC aluminum alloys when the cold rolling reductions are less than 40%. The R and Cube textures are dominant recrystallization texture components in CC and DC AA 5052 alloys. The volume fraction of the Cube component is increased by increasing cold rolling reduction and annealing temperature but not by increasing annealing time while the volume fraction of the R component is only increased by increasing cold rolling reduction. Stronger Cube and R orientations are found at the surface layer than at half-thickness layer of cold rolled hot bands after annealing. The Cube and P textures are dominant recrystallization

  13. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.A.; Scott, J.W.

    1984-11-06

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 80/sup 0/ C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V.

  14. The biological speciation and toxicokinetics of aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    DeVoto, E; Yokel, R A

    1994-01-01

    This review discusses recent literature on the chemical and physiological factors that influence the absorption, distribution, and excretion of aluminum in mammals, with particular regard to gastrointestinal absorption and speciation in plasma. Humans encounter aluminum, a ubiquitous yet highly insoluble element in most forms, in foods, drinking water, and pharmaceuticals. Exposure also occurs by inhalation of dust and aerosols, particularly in occupational settings. Absorption from the gut depends largely on pH and the presence of complexing ligands, particularly carboxylic acids, with which the metal can form absorbable neutral aluminum species. Uremic animals and humans experience higher than normal body burdens of aluminum despite increased urinary clearance of the metal. In plasma, 80-90% of aluminum binds to transferrin, an iron-transport protein for which receptors exist in many tissue. The remaining fraction of plasma aluminum takes the form of small-molecule hydroxy species and small complexes with carboxylic acids, phosphate, and, to a much lesser degree, amino acids. Most of these species have not been observed in vivo but are predicted from equilibrium models derived from potentiometric methods and NMR investigations. These models predict that the major small-molecule aluminum species under plasma conditions are charged and hence unavailable for uptake into tissues. PMID:9738208

  15. Aluminum Rayleigh Taylor Strength Measurements and Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lindquist, M J; Cavallo, R M; Lorenz, K T; Pollaine, S M; Remington, B A; Raevsky, V A

    2007-01-10

    A traditional approach to the study of material strength has been revitalized at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF). Rayleigh Taylor strength experiments have long been utilized to measure the material response of metals at high pressure and strain rates. A modulated (sinusoidal or sawtooth perturbation) surface is shocklessly (quasi-isentropically) accelerated by a high explosive (HE) driver, and radiography is used to measure the perturbation amplitude as a function of time. The Aluminum T-6061 targets are designed with several sets of two-dimensional sawtooth perturbations machined on the loading surface. The HE driver was designed to reach peak pressures in the range of 200 to 300 kbar and strain rates in the range of 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. The standard constitutive strength models, Steinberg-Guinan (SG) [1], Steinberg-Lund (SL) [2], Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) [3], Johnson-Cooke (JC) [4], and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) [5], have been calibrated by traditional techniques: (Hopkinson-Bar, Taylor impact, flyer plate/shock-driven experiments). The VNIIEF experimental series accesses a strain rate regime not attainable using traditional methods. We have performed a detailed numerical study with a two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics computer code containing several constitutive strength models to predict the perturbation growth. Results show that the capabilities of the computational methodology predict the amplitude growth to within 5 percent of the measured data, thus validating both the code and the strength models under the given conditions and setting the stage for credible future design work using different materials.

  16. Decontamination and reuse of ORGDP aluminum scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

    1996-12-01

    The Gaseous Diffusion Plants, or GDPs, have significant amounts of a number of metals, including nickel, aluminum, copper, and steel. Aluminum was used extensively throughout the GDPs because of its excellent strength to weight ratios and good resistance to corrosion by UF{sub 6}. This report is concerned with the recycle of aluminum stator and rotor blades from axial compressors. Most of the stator and rotor blades were made from 214-X aluminum casting alloy. Used compressor blades were contaminated with uranium both as a result of surface contamination and as an accumulation held in surface-connected voids inside of the blades. A variety of GDP studies were performed to evaluate the amounts of uranium retained in the blades; the volume, area, and location of voids in the blades; and connections between surface defects and voids. Based on experimental data on deposition, uranium content of the blades is 0.3%, or roughly 200 times the value expected from blade surface area. However, this value does correlate with estimated internal surface area and with lengthy deposition times. Based on a literature search, it appears that gaseous decontamination or melt refining using fluxes specific for uranium removal have the potential for removing internal contamination from aluminum blades. A melt refining process was used to recycle blades during the 1950s and 1960s. The process removed roughly one-third of the uranium from the blades. Blade cast from recycled aluminum appeared to perform as well as blades from virgin material. New melt refining and gaseous decontamination processes have been shown to provide substantially better decontamination of pure aluminum. If these techniques can be successfully adapted to treat aluminum 214-X alloy, internal and, possibly, external reuse of aluminum alloys may be possible.

  17. Formability analysis of aluminum alloy sheets at elevated temperatures with numerical simulation based on the M-K method

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheriasl, Reza; Ghavam, Kamyar; Worswick, Michael

    2011-05-04

    The effect of temperature on formability of aluminum alloy sheet is studied by developing the Forming Limit Diagrams, FLD, for aluminum alloy 3000-series using the Marciniak and Kuczynski technique by numerical simulation. The numerical model is conducted in LS-DYNA and incorporates the Barlat's YLD2000 anisotropic yield function and the temperature dependant Bergstrom hardening law. Three different temperatures; room temperature, 250 deg. C and 300 deg. C, are studied. For each temperature case, various loading conditions are applied to the M-K defect model. The effect of the material anisotropy is considered by varying the defect angle. A simplified failure criterion is used to predict the onset of necking. Minor and major strains are obtained from the simulations and plotted for each temperature level. It is demonstrated that temperature improves the forming limit of aluminum 3000-series alloy sheet.

  18. Domestic aluminum resources: dilemmas of development

    SciTech Connect

    Staats, E.B.

    1980-07-17

    Concerns about supply disruptions and price gouging that could endanger aluminum production in the United States have spurred research in this country on processes to manufacture aluminum from ores other than bauxite. The United States has no large bauxite deposits but it has plentiful resources of other aluminum ores if the technology can be developed to use them economically. Sources of aluminium include alunite, anorthosite, dawsonite, and clay/acid. Miniplants for clay/nitric acid and clay/hydrochloric acid, gas-induced crystallization have been constructed.

  19. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Scott, D.G.

    1984-06-25

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal 10 borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  20. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  1. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Scott, Donald G.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  2. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip for Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. McHugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; J.-P. Delplanque; S. B. Johnson

    2005-02-01

    Spray rolling is a novel strip casting technology in which molten aluminum alloy is atomized and deposited into the roll gap of mill rolls to produce aluminum strip. A combined experimental/modeling approach has been followed in developing this technology with active participation from industry. The feasibility of this technology has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale and it is currently being scaled-up. This paper provides an overview of the process and compares the microstructure and properties of spray-rolled 2124 aluminum alloy with commercial ingot-processed material

  3. Study of crevice-galvanic corrosion of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Loess, R. E.; Mori, S.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion effects of aluminum-copper and aluminum-nickel couples in oxygenated distilled water, and aluminum alloys in oxygenated copper sulfate solution were studied. One of each of the couples had a water tight seal, and showed no substantial corrosion, and of the unsealed couples, only the aluminum-copper developed corrosion.

  4. Explosive welding technique for joining aluminum and steel tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Silver sheet is wrapped around aluminum portion of joint. Mylar powder box is wrapped over silver sheet. Explosion welds silver to aluminum. Stainless-steel tube is placed over silver-aluminum interface. Mylar powder box, covered with Mylar tape, is wrapped around steel member. Explosion welds steel to silver-aluminum interface.

  5. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  6. 49 CFR 229.51 - Aluminum main reservoirs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aluminum main reservoirs. 229.51 Section 229.51... Aluminum main reservoirs. (a) Aluminum main reservoirs used on locomotives shall be designed and fabricated as follows: (1) The heads and shell shall be made of Aluminum Association Alloy No. 5083-0,...

  7. 49 CFR 178.505 - Standards for aluminum drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for aluminum drums. 178.505 Section 178...-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.505 Standards for aluminum drums. (a) The following are the identification codes for aluminum drums: (1) 1B1 for a non-removable head aluminum drum;...

  8. 49 CFR 229.51 - Aluminum main reservoirs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aluminum main reservoirs. 229.51 Section 229.51... Aluminum main reservoirs. (a) Aluminum main reservoirs used on locomotives shall be designed and fabricated as follows: (1) The heads and shell shall be made of Aluminum Association Alloy No. 5083-0,...

  9. 49 CFR 229.51 - Aluminum main reservoirs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aluminum main reservoirs. 229.51 Section 229.51... Aluminum main reservoirs. (a) Aluminum main reservoirs used on locomotives shall be designed and fabricated as follows: (1) The heads and shell shall be made of Aluminum Association Alloy No. 5083-0,...

  10. 49 CFR 178.505 - Standards for aluminum drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for aluminum drums. 178.505 Section 178...-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.505 Standards for aluminum drums. (a) The following are the identification codes for aluminum drums: (1) 1B1 for a non-removable head aluminum drum;...

  11. 49 CFR 178.505 - Standards for aluminum drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for aluminum drums. 178.505 Section 178... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.505 Standards for aluminum drums. (a) The following are the identification codes for aluminum drums: (1) 1B1 for a non-removable head aluminum...

  12. 49 CFR 229.51 - Aluminum main reservoirs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum main reservoirs. 229.51 Section 229.51... Aluminum main reservoirs. (a) Aluminum main reservoirs used on locomotives shall be designed and fabricated as follows: (1) The heads and shell shall be made of Aluminum Association Alloy No. 5083-0,...

  13. 49 CFR 229.51 - Aluminum main reservoirs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aluminum main reservoirs. 229.51 Section 229.51... Aluminum main reservoirs. (a) Aluminum main reservoirs used on locomotives shall be designed and fabricated as follows: (1) The heads and shell shall be made of Aluminum Association Alloy No. 5083-0,...

  14. 49 CFR 178.505 - Standards for aluminum drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for aluminum drums. 178.505 Section 178...-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.505 Standards for aluminum drums. (a) The following are the identification codes for aluminum drums: (1) 1B1 for a non-removable head aluminum drum;...

  15. 49 CFR 178.505 - Standards for aluminum drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for aluminum drums. 178.505 Section 178...-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.505 Standards for aluminum drums. (a) The following are the identification codes for aluminum drums: (1) 1B1 for a non-removable head aluminum drum;...

  16. A simple aluminum gasket for use with both stainless steel and aluminum flanges

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique has been developed for making aluminum wire seal gaskets of various sizes and shapes for use with both stainless steel and aluminum alloy flanges. The gasket material used is 0.9999 pure aluminum, drawn to a diameter of 3 mm. This material can be easily welded and formed into various shapes. A single gasket has been successfully used up to five times without baking. The largest gasket tested to date is 3.5 m long and was used in the shape of a parallelogram. Previous use of aluminum wire gaskets, including results for bakeout at temperatures from 20 to 660{degree}C, is reviewed. A search of the literature indicates that this is the first reported use of aluminum wire gaskets for aluminum alloy flanges. The technique is described in detail, and the results are summarized. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  17. 46 CFR 148.255 - Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum silicon containing more than 30% but less than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum... SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.255 Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum silicon containing more than 30% but less than 90% silicon. (a) This section applies...

  18. 46 CFR 148.255 - Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum silicon containing more than 30% but less than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum... SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.255 Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum silicon containing more than 30% but less than 90% silicon. (a) This section applies...

  19. 46 CFR 148.255 - Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum silicon containing more than 30% but less than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum... SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.255 Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum silicon containing more than 30% but less than 90% silicon. (a) This section applies...

  20. 46 CFR 148.255 - Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum silicon containing more than 30% but less than...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum... SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.255 Ferrosilicon, aluminum ferrosilicon, and aluminum silicon containing more than 30% but less than 90% silicon. (a) This section applies...

  1. Aluminum recovery as a product with high added value using aluminum hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    David, E; Kopac, J

    2013-10-15

    The samples of hazardous aluminum solid waste such as dross were physically and chemically characterized. A relationship between density, porosity and metal content of dross was established. The paper also examines the chemical reactions involving aluminum dross in landfill and the negative consequences. To avoid environmental problems and to recovery the aluminum, a processing method was developed and aluminum was recovered as an added value product such as alumina. This method refers to a process at low temperature, in more stages: acid leaching, purification, precipitation and calcination. At the end of this process aluminum was extracted, first as Al(3+) soluble ions and final as alumina product. The composition of the aluminum dross and alumina powder obtained were measured by applying the leaching tests, using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and chemical analysis. The mineralogical composition of aluminum dross samples and alumina product were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the morphological characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The method presented in this work allows the use of hazardous aluminum solid waste as raw material to recover an important fraction from soluble aluminum content as an added value product, alumina, with high grade purity (99.28%).

  2. Aluminum hydroxide nanoparticles show a stronger vaccine adjuvant activity than traditional aluminum hydroxide microparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinran; Aldayel, Abdulaziz M; Cui, Zhengrong

    2014-01-10

    Aluminum hydroxide is used as a vaccine adjuvant in various human vaccines. Unfortunately, despite its favorable safety profile, aluminum hydroxide can only weakly or moderately potentiate antigen-specific antibody responses. When dispersed in an aqueous solution, aluminum hydroxide forms particulates of 1-20μm. There is increasing evidence that nanoparticles around or less than 200nm as vaccine or antigen carriers have a more potent adjuvant activity than large microparticles. In the present study, we synthesized aluminum hydroxide nanoparticles of 112nm. Using ovalbumin and Bacillus anthracis protective antigen protein as model antigens, we showed that protein antigens adsorbed on the aluminum hydroxide nanoparticles induced a stronger antigen-specific antibody response than the same protein antigens adsorbed on the traditional aluminum hydroxide microparticles of around 9.3μm. The potent adjuvant activity of the aluminum hydroxide nanoparticles was likely related to their ability to more effectively facilitate the uptake of the antigens adsorbed on them by antigen-presenting cells. Finally, the local inflammation induced by aluminum hydroxide nanoparticles in the injection sites was milder than that induced by microparticles. Simply reducing the particle size of the traditional aluminum hydroxide adjuvant into nanometers represents a novel and effective approach to improve its adjuvanticity.

  3. Aluminum exclusion and aluminum tolerance in woody plants

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Ivano; Sperisen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The aluminum (Al) cation Al3+ is highly rhizotoxic and is a major stress factor to plants on acid soils, which cover large areas of tropical and boreal regions. Many woody plant species are native to acid soils and are well adapted to high Al3+ conditions. In tropical regions, both woody Al accumulator and non-Al accumulator plants occur, whereas in boreal regions woody plants are non-Al accumulators. The mechanisms of these adaptations can be divided into those that facilitate the exclusion of Al3+ from root cells (exclusion mechanisms) and those that enable plants to tolerate Al3+ once it has entered the root and shoot symplast (internal tolerance mechanisms). The biochemical and molecular basis of these mechanisms have been intensively studied in several crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis. In this review, we examine the current understanding of Al3+ exclusion and tolerance mechanisms from woody plants. In addition, we discuss the ecology of woody non-Al accumulator and Al accumulator plants, and present examples of Al3+ adaptations in woody plant populations. This paper complements previous reviews focusing on crop plants and provides insights into evolutionary processes operating in plant communities that are widespread on acid soils. PMID:23781222

  4. Polytetrafluoroethylene-Impregnated Anodization For Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1990-01-01

    Technical memorandum describes experiments on ability of two commercial coatings and of standard hard anodization to protect aluminum against corrosion. Both commercial coatings, Polylube and Tufram, polytetrafluoroethylene-impregnated anodizations. Standard hard-anodized coating found to provide greatest protection.

  5. The Cleaning of Aluminum Frame Assembly Units

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T H

    2001-05-16

    The Brulin immersion and the precision cleaning experiments have shown that neither the Brulin solution nor the precision cleaning in AstroPak causes the smut formation on aluminum surfaces. The acid-bath cleaning in GTC is the primary source of the smut formation. The current GTC acid formulation etches the aluminum matrix quite aggressively, but does not appear to appreciably attack the Si particles. Therefore, this acid-bath cleaning will leave the cast-aluminum part surfaces with many protruded Si particles, which could potentially cause smut problems in the cleaning process down-stream. To ensure the removal of all loose Si particles from the cast-aluminum parts, it is necessary to physically hand-wipe and vigorously wash the acid-bath cleaned surfaces. Furthermore, the casting porosity in alloy A356 could be another source in causing high swipe readings in the FAU parts.

  6. The pro-oxidant activity of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2004-02-01

    Aluminum, a non-redox-active metal is, nevertheless, a pro-oxidant both in in vitro preparations and in vivo. It facilitates both superoxide- and iron-driven biological oxidation by mechanisms that remain to be resolved. More than 10 years ago Fridovich and colleagues suggested that the facilitation of superoxide-driven biological oxidation by aluminum was due to an interaction between the metal and the superoxide radical anion (Free Radic. Biol. Med. 13: 79-81; 1992). This thesis has been examined herein and it is concluded that much, if not all, of the pro-oxidant activity of aluminum might be explained by the formation of an aluminum superoxide semireduced radical ion.

  7. ALUMINUM NITRIDE AS A HIGH TEMPERATURE TRANSDUCER

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D. A.; Tittmann, B. R.; Kropf, M. M.

    2010-02-22

    The high temperature capabilities of bulk single crystal aluminum nitride are investigated experimentally. Temperatures in excess of 1100 deg. Celsius are obtained and held for eight hours. Variation in the performance of single crystal samples is demonstrated.

  8. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  9. Solution Potentials Indicate Aluminum-Alloy Tempers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Report discusses use of solution potential as measure of temper of aluminum alloys. Technique based on fact that different tempers or heat treatments exhibit different solution potentials as function of aging time.

  10. Respiratory Disorders in Aluminum Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Søyseth, Vidar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Summarizing the knowledge status, including the morphology, possible etiological factors, and clinical expression of aluminum potroom asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease related to aluminum potroom exposure. Methods: A review of the literature from the last two decades as it appears in PubMed. Results: There is substantial evidence for the existence of potroom asthma, although the incidence seems to decline over the last 10 years. Increased mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and longitudinal decline in forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration has been shown in aluminum potroom workers. Morphological manifestations in bronchial biopsies and the inflammatory markers NO and eosinophils in airway tissue and blood are consistent with asthma in general. The causative agent(s) is (are) not known. Conclusions: Reduction of exposure and cessation of smoking seem to be the major preventive measures to avoid respiratory disorders in the aluminum industry. PMID:24806727

  11. Interpretation of aluminum-alloy weld radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duren, P. C.; Risch, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Report proposes radiographic terminology standardization which allows scientific interpretation of radiographic films to replace dependence on individual judgement and experience. Report includes over 50 photographic pages where radiographs of aluminum welds with defects are compared with prepared weld sections photomacrographs.

  12. Aluminum Company of America, Massena, NY

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alcoa, Inc. has owned and operated an aluminum product manufacturing facility called Alcoa West facility in the Town of Massena, New York, since 1903. In connection with its past operations at the facility, Alcoa released hazardous substances, including

  13. PROCESS OF ELECTROPLATING METALS WITH ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Schickner, W.C.

    1960-04-26

    A process of electroplating aluminum on metals from a nonaqueous bath and a novel method of pretreating or conditioning the metal prior to electrodeposition of the aluminum are given. The process of this invention, as applied by way of example to the plating of uranium, comprises the steps of plating the uranium with the barrier inetal, immersing the barrier-coated uranium in fatty acid, and electrolyzing a water-free diethyl ether solution of aluminum chloride and lithium hydride while making the uranium the cathode until an aluminum deposit of the desired thickness has been formed. According to another preferred embodiment the barrier-coated uranium is immersed in an isopropyl alcohol solution of sterato chromic chloride prior to the fatty acid treatment of this invention.

  14. Mixed ether bath for electrodeposition of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, K.

    1969-01-01

    Anisole added to the bath mixture improves Brenner aluminum plating bath technique. Mixture has lower bath vapor-pressure and the electro-deposits obtained have greater physical strength than deposits from the Brenner bath.

  15. Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1999-03-30

    During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

  16. Ultrahigh-Efficiency Aluminum Production Cells

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    This factsheet describes a research project to develop a commercially viable inert anode aluminum electrolysis cell technology. Accompanying enabling technologies will also be developed, including a wetted cathode design and a novel low-temperature electrolyte.

  17. Cluster model of aluminum dense vapor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomkin, A. L.; Shumikhin, A. S.

    2009-08-01

    The chemical model of aluminum vapor plasma, that take into account the formation of neutral and charged clusters, is suggested. Caloric and thermal equations of state and composition of plasma were received using the available information about properties of metal clusters. It is shown, that aluminum vapors are clusterized with decrease of temperature and with increase of density. Pressure dependence on internal energy is calculated and comparison with experimental data is made. The important role of aluminum clusters, especially in an initial phase of the metals vapor heating, is demonstrated. It is shown, that the region of plasma clusterization in gaseous phase agree with known literature data for binodal of vapor-liquid transition from gaseous region. Suggested cluster model may be used to forecast the location of metal vapors binodal. The conductivity of aluminum vapor plasma was calculated. The satisfactory agreement with available experimental data is received.

  18. Macrodeformation Twins in Single-Crystal Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, F.; Wang, L.; Fan, D.; Bie, B. X.; Zhou, X. M.; Suo, T.; Li, Y. L.; Chen, M. W.; Liu, C. L.; Qi, M. L.; Zhu, M. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Deformation twinning in pure aluminum has been considered to be a unique property of nanostructured aluminum. A lingering mystery is whether deformation twinning occurs in coarse-grained or single-crystal aluminum at scales beyond nanotwins. Here, we present the first experimental demonstration of macrodeformation twins in single-crystal aluminum formed under an ultrahigh strain rate (˜106 s-1 ) and large shear strain (200%) via dynamic equal channel angular pressing. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the frustration of subsonic dislocation motion leads to transonic deformation twinning. Deformation twinning is rooted in the rate dependences of dislocation motion and twinning, which are coupled, complementary processes during severe plastic deformation under ultrahigh strain rates.

  19. Dry machinability of aluminum alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Shareef, I.; Natarajan, M.; Ajayi, O. O.; Energy Technology; Department of IMET

    2005-01-01

    Adverse effects of the use of cutting fluids and environmental concerns with regard to cutting fluid disposability is compelling industry to adopt Dry or near Dry Machining, with the aim of eliminating or significantly reducing the use of metal working fluids. Pending EPA regulations on metal cutting, dry machining is becoming a hot topic of research and investigation both in industry and federal research labs. Although the need for dry machining may be apparent, most of the manufacturers still consider dry machining to be impractical and even if possible, very expensive. This perception is mainly due to lack of appropriate cutting tools that can withstand intense heat and Built-up-Edge (BUE) formation during dry machining. The challenge of heat dissipation without coolant requires a completely different approach to tooling. Special tooling utilizing high-performance multi-layer, multi-component, heat resisting, low friction coatings could be a plausible answer to the challenge of dry machining. In pursuit of this goal Argonne National Labs has introduced Nano-crystalline near frictionless carbon (NFC) diamond like coatings (DLC), while industrial efforts have led to the introduction of composite coatings such as titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN), tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) and others. Although, these coatings are considered to be very promising, they have not been tested either from tribological or from dry machining applications point of view. As such a research program in partnership with federal labs and industrial sponsors has started with the goal of exploring the feasibility of dry machining using the newly developed coatings such as Near Frictionless Carbon Coatings (NFC), Titanium Aluminum Nitride (TiAlN), and multi-layer multicomponent nano coatings such as TiAlCrYN and TiAlN/YN. Although various coatings are under investigation as part of the overall dry machinability program, this extended abstract deals with a systematic investigation of dry

  20. Development of Low Cost, High Performance AlZn4.5Mg1 Alloy 7020

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Zn makes aluminum solid solutions of Cu-free 7XXX alloys more electrochemically active and susceptible to galvanic corrosion [21]. The highest level... Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum Alloys,” Aluminum Alloys Their Physical and Mechanical Properties, Vol. III, eds. E.A. Starke, Jr. and T.H. Sanders... Corrosion Susceptibility of Aluminum Alloy 7020 Welded Sheets,” Corrosion Science, Vol. 25, No. 11, pp. 999-1018 (1985). [28] Reboul, M.C. and J. Bouvaist

  1. Correlation between shear punch and tensile data for neutron-irradiated aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.L.; Edwards, D.J.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1995-04-01

    This work was performed to determine whether shear punch and tensile data obtained on neutron irradiated aluminum alloys exhibited the same type of relationship as had been seen in other work and to assess the validity of extrapolating the results to proton-irradiated alloys. This work was also meant to be the first of a series of similar test matrices designed to determine whether the shear punch/tensile relationship varied or was the same for different alloy classes.

  2. FABRICATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.

    1959-12-15

    A process is presented for producing a workable article of a uranium- aluminum alloy in which the uranium content is between 14 and 70% by weight; aluminum powder and powdered UAl/sub 2/, UAl/sub 3/, UAl/sub 5/, or UBe/sub 9/ are mixed, and the mixture is compressed into the shape desired and sintered at between 450 and 600 deg C.

  3. Tin soldering of aluminum and its alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, Gino

    1921-01-01

    A method is presented for soldering aluminum to other metals. The method adopted consists of a galvanic application to the surface of the light-metal parts to be soldered, of a layer of another metal, which, without reacting electrolytically on the aluminum, adheres strongly to the surface to which it is applied, and is, on the other hand, adapted to receive the soft solder. The metal found to meet the criteria best was iron.

  4. Automobile bodies: Can aluminum be an economical alternative to steel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Richard; Clark, Joel; Kelkar, Ashish

    2001-08-01

    Although the use of aluminum in cars has been increasing for the past two decades, progress has been limited in developing aluminum auto bodies. In fact, most aluminum substitution has come in the form of castings and forgings in the transmission, wheels, etc. Car manufacturers have developed all-aluminum cars with two competing designs: conventional unibody and the spaceframe. However, aluminum is far from being a material of choice for auto bodies. The substitution of aluminum for steel is partly influenced by regulatory pressures to meet fuel efficiency standards by reducing vehicle weight, and to meet recycling standards. The key obstacles are the high cost of primary aluminum as compared to steel and added fabrication costs of aluminum panels. Both the aluminum and the automotive industries have attempted to make aluminum a cost-effective alternative to steel. This paper analyzes the cost of fabrication and assembly of four different aluminum car body designs, making comparisons with conventional steel designs at current aluminum prices and using current aluminum fabrication technology. It then attempts to determine if aluminum can be an alternative to steel at lower primary aluminum prices, and improved fabrication processes.

  5. Transfer and transport of aluminum in filtration unit.

    PubMed

    Wen-dong, Wang; Hong-wei, Yang; Hua-zhang, Zhao; Zhan-peng, Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum salt coagulants were used prevalently in various water works. In this article, the effects of filtration on residual aluminum concentration and species distribution were researched by determining the concentration of different aluminum species before and after single layer filter, double layer filter, and membrane filtration units. In the research, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used to separate colloidal and soluble aluminum, ion exchange chromatography (IEC) was used to separate organic and inorganic aluminum, and inductivity coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the aluminum concentration. The results showed that the rapid filtration process had the ability of removing residual aluminum from coagulant effluent water, and that double layer filtration was more effective in residual aluminum removal than single layer filtration, while nano filtration was more effective than micro filtration. It was found that when the residual aluminum concentration was below 1 mg/L in sediment effluent, the residual aluminum concentration in treated water was above 0.2 mg/L. The direct rapid filtration process mainly removed the suspended aluminum. The removal of soluble and colloidal aluminum was always less than 10% and the natural small particles that adsorbed the amount of soluble or small particles aluminum on their surface were difficult to be removed in this process. Micro filtration and nano filtration were good technologies for removing aluminum; the residual aluminum concentration in the effluent was less than 0.05 mg/L.

  6. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Neurologic syndrome in 25 workers from an aluminum smelting plant

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.M.; Longstreth, W.T. Jr.; Rosenstock, L.; Claypoole, K.H.; Brodkin, C.A.; Townes, B.D. )

    1992-07-01

    This article expands on an earlier series of three patients with a neurologic syndrome, who had all worked in an aluminum smelting plant. Twenty-five symptomatic workers from the same plant were referred for a standardized evaluation, including completion of a health questionnaire, neurologic examination, and neuropsychologic evaluation. An exposure index was calculated for each worker based on level and duration of exposure in the potroom, where exposures were the greatest. This index was correlated with symptoms, signs, and neuropsychologic test scores. Twenty-two (88%) of the patients reported frequent loss of balance, and 21 (84%) reported memory loss. Neurologic examination revealed signs of incoordination in 21 (84%) of the patients. Neuropsychologic test results showed preservation in certain spheres of functioning, such as verbal IQ, with substantial impairment in others, particularly memory functioning. On memory tests, 70% to 75% showed mild or greater impairment. The majority (17 of 19 tested, or 89%) showed depression on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. The exposure index was significantly correlated with signs and symptoms of incoordination. This study and others in humans and animals support the existence of a syndrome characterized by incoordination, poor memory, impairment in abstract reasoning, and depression. Aluminum exposure in the potroom seems the most likely cause.

  8. Shear Strength of Aluminum Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Dattatraya P.; Vaughan, Brian A. M.; Proud, William G.

    2007-06-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a transparent, polycrystalline cubic spinel. The results of investigations^1-4 on shock response of AlON permit determination of the equation of state, and shear strength retained under shock compression. Whereas the values of the HEL of AlON holds no surprises, the inelastic response of AlON reported in Ref. 1-4 differ significantly and is stress dependent. The results of Ref. 1-2 show that AlON retains a shear strength of 3 to 4 GPa when shocked up to around 20 GPa, but the results of Ref, 3-4 seem to suggest a possible loss of shear strength when shocked to 16 GPa and beyond. Our analysis examines the observed differences in the inelastic response of AlON reported in these four studies . 1. J. U. Cazamias, et. al., in Fundamental Issues and Applications of Shock-Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena, Eds. Staudhammer, Murr, and Meyers, Elsevier, NY, 173 (2001). 2. B. A. M. Vaughn, et.al., Shock Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, Report SP/1092 (2001) 3. T. Sekine, et.al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 4803 (2003). 4. T. F. Thornhill, et.al., Shock Compression of Matter-2005, Eds. Furnish, Elert, Russell, White, AIP, NY, 143 (2006).

  9. Unusual dicationic trimetallic aluminum chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Munoz-Hernandez, M.-A.; Wei, P.; Atwood, D. A.

    2000-09-01

    The bimetallic compounds, L(AlMeCl) 2 with L=Salpen(tBu) ( N, N'-1,3-propylenenebis(3,5-di- tert-butylsalicylideneimine), Salben(tBu) ( N, N'-1,4-butylenebis(3,5-di- tert-butylsalicylideneimine)) and Salhen(tBu) ( N, N'-1,6 hexylenebis(3,5-di- tert-butylsalicylideneimine)) form the unusual trimetallic dicationic complexes, {[Salpen( tBu) ∗] 2(AlCl) 3]} 2+[GaCl 4] -[GaMe 2Cl 2] - ( 1), {[Salben( tBu) ∗] 2(AlCl) 3]} 2+[GaCl 4] -[GaMe 2Cl 2] - ( 2) and {[Salhen( tBu) ∗] 2(AlCl) 3]} 2+[GaCl 4] -[GaMe 2Cl 2] - ( 3) when combined with GaCl 3 in toluene. In their formation, the ligands of the compounds undergo a unique dealkylation reaction to lose one tBu group from each ligand (marked with an asterisk). These compounds are a new and unique class of aluminum cations. The compounds were characterized by Mp, analyses, IR, 1H NMR, and in the case of 1 and 2, by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry.

  10. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  11. Nanostructures Using Anodic Aluminum Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valmianski, Ilya; Monton, Carlos M.; Pereiro, Juan; Basaran, Ali C.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2013-03-01

    We present two fabrication methods for asymmetric mesoscopic dot arrays over macroscopic areas using anodic aluminum oxide templates. In the first approach, metal is deposited at 45o to the template axis to partially close the pores and produce an elliptical shadow-mask. In the second approach, now underway, nanoimprint lithography on a polymer intermediary layer is followed by reactive ion etching to generate asymmetric pore seeds. Both these techniques are quantified by an analysis of the lateral morphology and lattice of the pores or dots using scanning electron microscopy and a newly developed MATLAB based code (available for free download at http://ischuller.ucsd.edu). The code automatically provides a segmentation of the measured area and the statistics of morphological properties such as area, diameter, and eccentricity, as well as the lattice properties such as number of nearest neighbors, and unbiased angular and radial two point correlation functions. Furthermore, novel user defined statistics can be easily obtained. We will additionally present several applications of these methods to superconducting, ferromagnetic, and organic nanostructures. This work is supported by AFOSR FA9550-10-1-0409

  12. Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution Of Sludge Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.T.; Hamm, B.A.; Pike, J.A.

    2008-07-01

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. The sludge is currently being stabilized in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) through a vitrification process immobilizing the waste in a borosilicate glass matrix for long-term storage in a federal repository. Without additional treatment, the existing volume of sludge would produce nearly 8000 canisters of vitrified waste. Aluminum compounds, along with other non-radioactive components, represent a significant portion of the sludge mass currently planned for vitrification processing in DWPF. Removing the aluminum from the waste stream reduces the volume of sludge requiring vitrification and improves production rates. Treating the sludge with a concentrated sodium hydroxide (caustic) solution at elevated temperatures (>90 deg. C) to remove aluminum is part of an overall sludge mass reduction effort to reduce the number of vitrified canisters, shorten the life cycle for the HLW system, and reduce the risk associated with the long term storage of radioactive wastes at SRS. A projected reduction of nearly 900 canisters will be achieved by performing aluminum dissolution on six targeted sludge batches; however, a project to develop and install equipment will not be ready for operation until 2013. The associated upgrades necessary to implement a high temperature process in existing facilities are costly and present many technical challenges. Efforts to better understand the characteristics of the sludge mass and dissolution kinetics are warranted to overcome these challenges. Opportunities to further reduce the amount of vitrified waste and increase production rates should also be pursued. Sludge staged in Tank 51 as the next sludge batch for feed to DWPF consisted

  13. Method of manufacturing a niobium-aluminum-germanium superconductive material

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John L.; Pickus, Milton R.; Douglas, Kent E.

    1980-01-01

    A method for manufacturing flexible Nb.sub.3 (Al,Ge) multifilamentary superconductive material in which a sintered porous niobium compact is infiltrated with an aluminum-germanium alloy and thereafter deformed and heat treated in a series of steps at different successively higher temperatures preferably below 1000.degree. C. to produce filaments composed of Nb.sub.3 (Al,G3) within the compact. By avoiding temperatures in excess of 1000.degree. C. during the heat treatment, cladding material such as copper can be applied to facilitate a deformation step preceding the heat treatment and can remain in place through the heat treatment to also serve as a temperature stabilizer for supeconductive material produced. Further, these lower heat treatment temperatures favor formation of filaments with reduced grain size and, hence with more grain boundaries which in turn increase the current-carrying capacity of the superconductive material.

  14. The Weathering of Aluminum Alloy Sheet Materials Used in Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutchler, Willard

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the corrosion of aluminum alloy sheet materials used in aircraft. It has for its purpose to study the causes of corrosion embrittlement in duralumin-type alloys and the development of methods for its elimination. The report contains results, obtained in an extensive series of weather-exposure tests, which reveal the extent to which the resistance of the materials to corrosion was affected by variable factors in their heat treatment and by the application of various surface protective coatings. The results indicate that the sheet materials are to be regarded as thoroughly reliable, from the standpoint of their permanence in service, provided proper precautions are taken to render them corrosion-resistant.

  15. Modal and Impact Dynamics Analysis of an Aluminum Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Wendy B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents analyses for the modal characteristics and impact response of an all-aluminum cylinder. The analyses were performed in preparation for impact tests of the cylinder at The Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) at the NASA Langley Research Center. Mode shapes and frequencies were computed using NASTRAN and compared with existing experimental data to assess the overall accuracy of the mass and stiffness of the finite element model. A series of non-linear impact analyses were then performed using MSC Dytran in which the weight distribution on the floor and the impact velocity of the cylinder were varied. The effects of impact velocity and mass on the rebound and gross deformation of the cylinder were studied in this investigation.

  16. Mapping the global flow of aluminum: from liquid aluminum to end-use goods.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Jonathan M; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-02

    Demand for aluminum in final products has increased 30-fold since 1950 to 45 million tonnes per year, with forecasts predicting this exceptional growth to continue so that demand will reach 2-3 times today's levels by 2050. Aluminum production uses 3.5% of global electricity and causes 1% of global CO2 emissions, while meeting a 50% cut in emissions by 2050 against growing demand would require at least a 75% reduction in CO2 emissions per tonne of aluminum produced--a challenging prospect. In this paper we trace the global flows of aluminum from liquid metal to final products, revealing for the first time a complete map of the aluminum system and providing a basis for future study of the emissions abatement potential of material efficiency. The resulting Sankey diagram also draws attention to two key issues. First, around half of all liquid aluminum (~39 Mt) produced each year never reaches a final product, and a detailed discussion of these high yield losses shows significant opportunities for improvement. Second, aluminum recycling, which avoids the high energy costs and emissions of electrolysis, requires signification "dilution" (~ 8 Mt) and "cascade" (~ 6 Mt) flows of higher aluminum grades to make up for the shortfall in scrap supply and to obtain the desired alloy mix, increasing the energy required for recycling.

  17. Advantages of Oxide Films as Bases for Aluminum Pigmented Surface Coatings for Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R W; Mutchler, W H

    1931-01-01

    Both laboratory and weather-exposure corrosion tests showed conclusively that the protection afforded by aluminum pigmented spar varnish coatings applied to previously anodized aluminum surfaces was greatly superior to that afforded by the same coatings applied to surfaces which had simply been cleaned free from grease and not anodized.

  18. The viability of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Jae Ko, Yeon; Zhang, Xinxing; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu; Schnoeckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Jena, Puru; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu; Kandalam, Anil K. E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu

    2014-03-28

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have investigated the extent to which the aluminum moieties within selected magnesium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Magnesium-aluminum cluster anions were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, photoelectron spectra of Mg{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −} (m, n = 1,6; 2,5; 2,12; and 3,11) were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on these four stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for the cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra). Calculations revealed that, unlike the cases of recently reported sodium-aluminum clusters, the formation of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters was limited in most cases by weak charge transfer between the magnesium atoms and their aluminum cluster moieties. Only in cases of high magnesium content, e.g., in Mg{sub 3}Al{sub 11} and Mg{sub 2}Al{sub 12}{sup −}, did the aluminum moieties exhibit Zintl anion-like characteristics.

  19. Lead exposure from aluminum cookware in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Weidenhamer, Jeffrey D; Kobunski, Peter A; Kuepouo, Gilbert; Corbin, Rebecca W; Gottesfeld, Perry

    2014-10-15

    Blood lead levels have decreased following the removal of lead from gasoline in most of the world. However, numerous recent studies provide evidence that elevated blood lead levels persist in many low and middle-income countries around the world at much higher prevalence than in the more developed countries. One potential source of lead exposure that has not been widely investigated is the leaching of lead from artisanal aluminum cookware, which is commonly used in the developing world. Twenty-nine samples of aluminum cookware and utensils manufactured by local artisans in Cameroon were collected and analyzed for their potential to release lead during cooking. Source materials for this cookware included scrap metal such as engine parts, radiators, cans, and construction materials. The lead content of this cookware is relatively low (<1000 ppm by X-ray fluorescence), however significant amounts of lead, as well as aluminum and cadmium were released from many of the samples using dilute acetic acid extractions at boiling and ambient temperatures. Potential exposures to lead per serving were estimated to be as high as 260 μg, indicating that such cookware can pose a serious health hazard. We conclude that lead, aluminum and cadmium can migrate from this aluminum cookware during cooking and enter food at levels exceeding recommended public health guidelines. Our results support the need to regulate lead content of materials used to manufacture these pots. Artisanal aluminum cookware may be a major contributor to lead poisoning throughout the developing world. Testing of aluminum cookware in other developing countries is warranted.

  20. Experimental study of void formation during aluminum solidification in reduced gravity. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis Paul, III

    1993-01-01

    Void formation due to volumetric shrinkage and liquid/vapor reorientation during aluminum solidification was observed in real time by using a radiographic viewing system in normal and reduced gravity. An end-chill directional solidification furnace with water quench was designed and constructed to solidify aluminum samples during the approximately 16 sec of reduced gravity (+/-0.02g) achieved by flying an aircraft through a parabolic trajectory. In the first series of tests the aluminum was contained in a vacuum sealed, pyrolytic boron nitride crucible. An ullage space was present during each test. Void formation was recorded for two cases: a nonwetting system, and a wetting system where wetting occurred between the aluminum and the crucible lid. The void formation in the nonwetting case was similar in normal and reduced gravity, with a single vapor cavity forming at the top of the crucible. In the wetting case during reduced gravity surface tension caused two voids to form in the top corners of the crucible, but during normal gravity only one large void formed across the top. In the second series of tests the aluminum was contained in a pyrolytic boron nitride crucible that was placed in a stainless steel container and sealed in an environment of argon plus 4 percent hydrogen. An ullage space was present during each test. Void formation was recorded for two cases: a nonwetting system, and a wetting system where wetting occurred between the aluminum and one side wall and the lid. The void for nation in the nonwetting case was similar in normal and reduced gravity, with a single vapor cavity forming at the top of the crucible, although the meniscus became more convex in reduced gravity. In the wetting case the aluminum did not climb up the corners in 1g, and one large symmetric void resulted at the top when the aluminum had solidified. In the wetting case during reduced gravity the molten aluminum was drawn up the wetted wall and partially across the lid by a

  1. Progress in Aluminum Electrolysis Control and Future Direction for Smart Aluminum Electrolysis Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Tianshuang; Li, Jie; Yang, Shuai; Zou, Zhong

    2016-10-01

    The industrial aluminum reduction cell is an electrochemistry reactor that operates under high temperatures and highly corrosive conditions. However, these conditions have restricted the measurement of key control parameters, making the control of aluminum reduction cells a difficult problem in the industry. Because aluminum electrolysis control systems have a significant economic influence, substantial research has been conducted on control algorithms, control systems and information systems for aluminum reduction cells. This article first summarizes the development of control systems and then focuses on the progress made since 2000, including alumina concentration control, temperature control and electrolyte molecular ratio control, fault diagnosis, cell condition prediction and control system expansion. Based on these studies, the concept of a smart aluminum electrolysis plant is proposed. The frame construction, key problems and current progress are introduced. Finally, several future directions are discussed.

  2. Progress in Aluminum Electrolysis Control and Future Direction for Smart Aluminum Electrolysis Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Tianshuang; Li, Jie; Yang, Shuai; Zou, Zhong

    2017-02-01

    The industrial aluminum reduction cell is an electrochemistry reactor that operates under high temperatures and highly corrosive conditions. However, these conditions have restricted the measurement of key control parameters, making the control of aluminum reduction cells a difficult problem in the industry. Because aluminum electrolysis control systems have a significant economic influence, substantial research has been conducted on control algorithms, control systems and information systems for aluminum reduction cells. This article first summarizes the development of control systems and then focuses on the progress made since 2000, including alumina concentration control, temperature control and electrolyte molecular ratio control, fault diagnosis, cell condition prediction and control system expansion. Based on these studies, the concept of a smart aluminum electrolysis plant is proposed. The frame construction, key problems and current progress are introduced. Finally, several future directions are discussed.

  3. Methods for both coating a substrate with aluminum oxide and infusing the substrate with elemental aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-11-01

    Methods of aluminizing the surface of a metal substrate. The methods of the present invention do not require establishment of a vacuum or a reducing atmosphere, as is typically necessary. Accordingly, aluminization can occur in the presence of oxygen, which greatly simplifies and reduces processing costs by allowing deposition of the aluminum coating to be performed, for example, in air. Embodiments of the present invention can be characterized by applying a slurry that includes a binder and powder granules containing aluminum to the metal substrate surface. Then, in a combined step, a portion of the aluminum is diffused into the substrate and a portion of the aluminum is oxidized by heating the slurry to a temperature greater than the melting point of the aluminum in an oxygen-containing atmosphere.

  4. Unification and Infinite Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyendekkers, J. V.; Shannon, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    Some infinite series are analysed on the basis of the hypergeometric function and integer structure and modular rings. The resulting generalized functions are compared with differentiation of the "mother" series. (Contains 1 table.)

  5. Wastewater sludge dewaterability enhancement using hydroxyl aluminum conditioning: Role of aluminum speciation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bingdi; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Qiandi; Huang, Yangrui; Meng, Chenrui; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-11-15

    Chemical conditioning is one of the most important processes for improve the performance of sludge dewatering device. Aluminum salt coagulant has been widely used in wastewater and sludge treatment. It is generally accepted that pre-formed speciation of aluminum salt coagulants (ASC) has an important influence on coagulation/flocculation performance. In this study, the interaction mechanisms between sludge particles and aluminum salt coagulants with different speciation of hydroxy aluminum were investigated by characterizing the changes in morphological and EPS properties. It was found that middle polymer state aluminum (Alb) and high polymer state aluminum (Alc) performed better than monomer aluminum and oligomeric state aluminum (Ala) in reduction of specific resistance to filtration (SRF) and compressibility of wastewater sludge due to their higher charge neutralization and formed more compact flocs. Sludge was significantly acidified after addition Ala, while pH was much more stable under Alb and Alc conditioning due to their hydrolysis stability. The size of sludge flocs conditioned with Alb and Alc was small but flocs structure was denser and more compact, and floc strength is higher, while that formed from Ala is relatively large, but floc structure was loose, floc strength is relatively lower. Scanning environmental microscope analysis revealed that sludge flocs conditioned by Alb and Alc (especially PAC2.5 and Al13) exhibited obvious botryoidal structure, this is because sludge flocs formed by Alb and Alc were more compact and floc strength is high, it was easy generated plentiful tiny channels for water release. In addition, polymeric aluminum salt coagulant (Alb, Alc) had better performance in compressing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) structure and removing sticky protein-like substances from soluble EPS fraction, contributing to improvement of sludge filtration performance. Therefore, this study provides a novel solution for improving sludge

  6. Deposition behavior of residual aluminum in drinking water distribution system: Effect of aluminum speciation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Baoyou; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Mingquan; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Finished drinking water usually contains some residual aluminum. The deposition of residual aluminum in distribution systems and potential release back to the drinking water could significantly influence the water quality at consumer taps. A preliminary analysis of aluminum content in cast iron pipe corrosion scales and loose deposits demonstrated that aluminum deposition on distribution pipe surfaces could be excessive for water treated by aluminum coagulants including polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In this work, the deposition features of different aluminum species in PACl were investigated by simulated coil-pipe test, batch reactor test and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The deposition amount of non-polymeric aluminum species was the least, and its deposition layer was soft and hydrated, which indicated the possible formation of amorphous Al(OH)3. Al13 had the highest deposition tendency, and the deposition layer was rigid and much less hydrated, which indicated that the deposited aluminum might possess regular structure and self-aggregation of Al13 could be the main deposition mechanism. While for Al30, its deposition was relatively slower and deposited aluminum amount was relatively less compared with Al13. However, the total deposited mass of Al30 was much higher than that of Al13, which was attributed to the deposition of particulate aluminum matters with much higher hydration state. Compared with stationary condition, stirring could significantly enhance the deposition process, while the effect of pH on deposition was relatively weak in the near neutral range of 6.7 to 8.7.

  7. High strength cast aluminum alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschitz, Edward A.

    The goal of this research was to understand how chemistry and processing affect the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength cast aluminum alloys. Two alloy systems were investigated including the Al-Cu-Ag and the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu systems. Processing variables included solidification under pressure (SUP) and heat treatment. This research determined the range in properties that can be achieved in BAC 100(TM) (Al-Cu micro-alloyed with Ag, Mn, Zr, and V) and generated sufficient property data for design purposes. Tensile, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue testing were performed. CuAl2 and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallics were identified as the ductility limiting flaws. A solution treatment of 75 hours or longer was needed to dissolve most of the intermetallic CuAl 2. The Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic was unaffected by heat treatment. These results indicate that faster cooling rates, a reduction in copper concentration and a reduction in iron concentration might increase the ductility of the alloy by decreasing the size and amount of the intermetallics that form during solidification. Six experimental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu series alloys were produced. Zinc concentrations of 8 and 12wt% and Zn/Mg ratios of 1.5 to 5.5 were tested. Copper was held constant at 0.9%. Heat treating of the alloys was optimized for maximum hardness. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu samples were solution treated at 441°C (826°F) for 4 hours before ramping to 460°C (860°F) for 75 hours and then aged at 120°C (248°F) for 75 hours. X-ray diffraction showed that the age hardening precipitates in most of these alloys was the T phase (Mg32Zn 31.9Al17.1). Tensile testing of the alloys showed that the best mechanical properties were obtained in the lowest alloy condition. Chilled Al-8.2Zn-1.4Mg-0.9Cu solidified under pressure resulted in an alloy with a yield strength of 468MPa (68ksi), tensile strength of 525MPa (76ksi) and an elongation of 9%.

  8. Geometric Series via Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Infinite series is a challenging topic in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum for many students. In fact, there is a vast literature in mathematics education research on convergence issues. One of the most important types of infinite series is the geometric series. Their beauty lies in the fact that they can be evaluated explicitly and that…

  9. Brazing of dispersion-strengthened aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerneklett, B.; Grong, O.; Anisdahl, L.; Hellum, E.; Sande, V.

    1996-03-01

    In recent years, the use of rapid solidification powder metallurgy has made it possible to develop a new family of aluminum alloys exhibiting unique properties. One of these materials, dispersion-strengthened (DS) aluminum, is currently being produced for commercial purposes at Raufoss Technology AS, Norway. Dispersion-strengthened aluminum derives its high strength from nanoscale AlN particles embedded in an aluminum matrix. DS Al is expected to be well suited as construction material for high-temperature applications where weight reductions are of particular concern. The present investigation has focused on the wetting behavior of DS aluminum under conditions applicable to brazing. The results from the Sessile drop experiments show that a eutectic Al-Si brazing alloy will completely wet the base metal both under high-vacuum conditions and in controlled argon atmospheres, provided that the partial pressure of oxygen is sufficiently low. The main problem appears to be the stability of the matrix grain structure. In general, the process of grain erosion and coarsening can be controlled by restricting the supply of the brazing alloy so that only a small metal volume is exposed to erosion. In addition, there is a great potential for reducing the thermodynamic driving force of the erosion reaction by proper adjustments of the brazing alloy composition and/or the brazing temperature. Sill, grain boundary liquidation may be a problem which, in turn, may require additions of surface active elements to the filler metal to control the wetting behavior.

  10. Relationship of aluminum to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Perl, D P

    1985-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive degenerative brain disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the development of large numbers of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques in the brain. Aluminum salts may be used experimentally to produce lesions which are similar, but not identical, to the neurofibrillary tangle. Although some studies have reported increased amounts of aluminum in the brains of Alzheimer's disease victims, these bulk analysis studies have been difficult to replicate and remain controversial. Using scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry, we have investigated this question on the cellular level. We have identified abnormal accumulations of aluminum within neurons derived from Alzheimer's disease patients containing neurofibrillary tangles. Similar accumulations have been detected in the numerous neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons seen in the brains of the indigenous native population of the island of Guam who suffer from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism with dementia. Epidemiologic evidence strongly suggests a causal role for local environmental conditions relating to availability of aluminum, calcium, and magnesium. In view of the fact that a major consequence of acid rain is the liberation of large amounts of aluminum in bioavailable forms, concerns are raised about possible human health risks of this environmental phenomenon. PMID:4076080

  11. Aluminum Alloy and Article Cast Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy, which has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 14 - 25.0, Copper 5.5 - 8.0, Iron 0.05 - 1.2, Magnesium 0.5 - 1.5, Nickel 0.05 - 0.9, Manganese 0.05 - 1.0, Titanium 0.05 - 1.2, Zirconium 0.05 - 1.2, Vanadium 0.05 - 1.2, Zinc 0.05 - 0.9, Phosphorus 0.001 - 0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10 - 25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4 - 15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2, crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix and containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  12. Graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying; Trainer, Daniel J.; Chen, Ke

    2016-10-01

    We report a development of graphene tunnel junctions made by chemical vapor deposition grown graphene and sputtered aluminum insulating by an in-situ grown aluminum oxide. The thin oxide layer formed in between the metal layer and the two-dimensional material is a crucial part of a tunnel junction. We characterized surface morphology of oxide layers and studied tunneling spectra of lead and silver tunnel junctions to estimate the quality of the aluminum oxide. The Brinkman-Rowell-Dynes model was applied to fit the conductance-voltage plots to calculate the thickness of oxide layers. Junctions with graphene both on bottom and on top were fabricated and their tunneling properties were characterized after exposure to air for weeks to test time stability. Furthermore, the resistances of graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide formed naturally and in an oxygen atmosphere were studied. Our results demonstrate that in-situ aluminum oxide is an effective barrier for graphene tunnel junctions. The methods of barrier formation enable the realization of more tunnel devices and circuits based on graphene.

  13. Fracture mechanics correlation of boron/aluminum coupons containing stress risers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adsit, N. R.; Waszczak, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of boron/aluminum near stress risers has been studied and reported. This effort was directed toward defining the tensile behavior of both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). The material used was 5.6-mil boron in 6061 aluminum, consolidated using conventional diffusion bonding techniques. Mechanical properties are reported for both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum, which serve as control data for the fracture mechanics predictions. Three different flawed specimen types were studied. In each case the series of specimens remained geometrically similar to eliminate variations in finite size correction factors. The fracture data from these tests were reduced using two techniques. They both used conventional LEFM methods, but the existence of a characteristic flaw was assumed in one case and not the other. Both the data and the physical behavior of the specimens support the characteristic flaw hypothesis. Cracks were observed growing slowly in the (0/ plus or minus 45) laminates, until a critical crack length was reached at which time catastrophic failure occurred.

  14. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The... an aluminum ore....

  15. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The... an aluminum ore....

  16. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The... an aluminum ore....

  17. Roll Casting of Aluminum Alloy Clad Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, R.; Tsuge, H.; Haga, T.; Watari, H.; Kumai, S.

    2011-01-17

    Casting of aluminum alloy three layers of clad strip was tried using the two sets of twin roll casters, and effects of the casting parameters on the cladding conditions were investigated. One twin roll caster was mounted on the other twin roll caster. Base strip was 8079 aluminum alloy and overlay strips were 6022 aluminum alloy. Effects of roll-load of upper and lower casters and melt temperature of the lower caster were investigated. When the roll-load of the upper and lower caster was large enough, the overlay strip could be solidified and be connected. The overlay strip could be connected when the melt of the overlay strip cast by the lower caster was low enough. Sound three layers of clad strip could be cast by proper conditions.

  18. Aluminum-based hot carrier plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Tao; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum has recently arisen as an excellent alternative plasmonic material due to its tunability, low optical loss, and CMOS compatibility. However, its use in optoelectronic applications has been limited due to Al oxidation. Herein, we report a semiconductor-free aluminum hot carrier device that exploits the self-terminating oxidation to create an interface barrier for high performance metal-insulator-transparent conducting oxide devices. We find a 300% enhancement of the responsivity compared to similarly reported Au-based devices, resulting in a responsivity up to ˜240 nA/W, and a clear dependence of the open-circuit voltage on incident photon energy. We show that further improvement can be obtained by coupling to plasmonic modes of a metal-insulator-metal structure composed of a nanowire array adjacent to a thin aluminum film, increasing light absorption by a factor of three and enabling tunability of the hot carrier response for improved device performance.

  19. Water based adhesive primers on aluminum substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wightman, J.P.; Mori, S.

    1996-12-31

    The number of aluminum alloy bonding applications has been increasing recently in the automobile industry. Primer coating of aluminum substrates is one of the main processes used to promote bond performance. Solvent based organic primers have been used for a long time but environmental regulations now require the substitution of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by alternate materials such as water based adhesive primers. However, the bond strengths obtained with many water based primers are generally lower than for solvent based ones. Water based primers which have some reactive functional groups have been proposed recently but such primers require special treatment. This paper describes a study conducted to optimize bond strength using a water based adhesive as a primer in the adhesive bonding of anodized aluminum.

  20. Improved aluminum coatings for the ultraviolet

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.F.; LaDelfe, P.; Ochoa, E.

    1981-01-01

    Highly reflective aluminum coatings or aluminum coatings with dielectric overcoats are frequently used in the ultraviolet. The reflectance values published by Hass and his group are generally accepted for this uv region. We have produced evaporated aluminum coatings for a wide range of deposition conditions and none of our coatings exhibit the Hass reflectance characteristics. The reflectance of our coatings appear to be independent of the evaporation pressure and deposition time or rate. Our coatings do not have the characteristic decrease in reflectance with decreasing wavelength. Our main attention has been focused on the origin of a reflectance dip for each of our coatings near 300 nm. This dip has apparently not been reported before and does not appear to be due to adsorbed layers on the film or due to trapped impurities within the film.

  1. Combined surface modification of commercial aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu; Lopatin, I.; Akhmadeev, Yu; Petrikova, E.; Teresov, A.; Shugurov, V.; Tolkachev, O.; Koval, N.

    2017-01-01

    The paper analyzes research data on the structure and properties of surface layers of commercially pure A7-grade aluminum subjected to treatment that combines deposition of a thin metal film, intense pulsed electron beam irradiation, and nitriding in low-pressure arc plasma. The analysis shows that the combined method of surface modification provides the formation of a multilayer structure with submicro- and nano-sized phases in the material through a depth of up to 40 μm, allowing a manifold increase in its surface microhardness and wear resistance (up to 4 and 9 times, respectively) compared to the material core. The main factors responsible for the high surface strength are the saturation of the aluminum lattice with nitrogen atoms and the formation of nano-sized particles of aluminum nitride and iron aluminides.

  2. NASA-427: A New Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center researchers have developed a new, stronger aluminum alloy, ideal for cast aluminum products that have powder or paint-baked thermal coatings. With advanced mechanical properties, the NASA-427 alloy shows greater tensile strength and increased ductility, providing substantial improvement in impact toughness. In addition, this alloy improves the thermal coating process by decreasing the time required for heat treatment. With improvements in both strength and processing time, use of the alloy provides reduced materials and production costs, lower product weight, and better product performance. The superior properties of NASA-427 can benefit many industries, including automotive, where it is particularly well-suited for use in aluminum wheels.

  3. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  4. Aluminum phosphate ceramics for waste storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D

    2014-06-03

    The present disclosure describes solid waste forms and methods of processing waste. In one particular implementation, the invention provides a method of processing waste that may be particularly suitable for processing hazardous waste. In this method, a waste component is combined with an aluminum oxide and an acidic phosphate component in a slurry. A molar ratio of aluminum to phosphorus in the slurry is greater than one. Water in the slurry may be evaporated while mixing the slurry at a temperature of about 140-200.degree. C. The mixed slurry may be allowed to cure into a solid waste form. This solid waste form includes an anhydrous aluminum phosphate with at least a residual portion of the waste component bound therein.

  5. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  6. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  7. Reducing aluminum dust explosion hazards: case study of dust inerting in an aluminum buffing operation.

    PubMed

    Myers, Timothy J

    2008-11-15

    Metal powders or dusts can represent significant dust explosion hazards in industry, due to their relatively low ignition energy and high explosivity. The hazard is well known in industries that produce or use aluminum powders, but is sometimes not recognized by facilities that produce aluminum dust as a byproduct of bulk aluminum processing. As demonstrated by the 2003 dust explosion at aluminum wheel manufacturer Hayes Lemmerz, facilities that process bulk metals are at risk due to dust generated during machining and finishing operations [U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, Investigation Report, Aluminum Dust Explosion Hayes Lemmerz International, Inc., Huntington, Indiana, Report No. 2004-01-I-IN, September 2005]. Previous studies have shown that aluminum dust explosions are more difficult to suppress with flame retardants or inerting agents than dust explosions fueled by other materials such as coal [A.G. Dastidar, P.R. Amyotte, J. Going, K. Chatrathi, Flammability limits of dust-minimum inerting concentrations, Proc. Saf. Progr., 18-1 (1999) 56-63]. In this paper, an inerting method is discussed to reduce the dust explosion hazard of residue created in an aluminum buffing operation as the residue is generated. This technique reduces the dust explosion hazard throughout the buffing process and within the dust collector systems making the process inherently safer. Dust explosion testing results are presented for process dusts produced during trials with varying amounts of flame retardant additives.

  8. Properties Data for Adhesion and Surface Chemistry of Aluminum: Sapphire-Aluminum, Single-Crystal Couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Pohlchuck, Bobby; Whitle, Neville C.; Hector, Louis G., Jr.; Adams, Jim

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and surface chemistry of single-crystal aluminum in contact with single-crystal sapphire (alumina). Pull-off force (adhesion) measurements were conducted under loads of 0. I to I mN in a vacuum of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) at room temperature. An Auger electron spectroscopy analyzer incorporated directly into an adhesion-measuring vacuum system was primarily used to define the chemical nature of the surfaces before and after adhesion measurements. The surfaces were cleaned by argon ion sputtering. With a clean aluminum-clean -sapphire couple the mean value and standard deviation of pull-off forces required to separate the surfaces were 3015 and 298 micro-N, respectively. With a contaminated aluminum-clean sapphire couple these values were 231 and 241 micro-N. The presence of a contaminant film on the aluminum surface reduced adhesion by a factor of 13. Therefore, surfaces cleanliness, particularly aluminum cleanliness, played an important role in the adhesion of the aluminum-sapphire couples. Pressures on the order of 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) maintained a clean aluminum surface for only a short time (less then 1 hr) but maintained a clean sapphire surface, once it was achieved, for a much longer time.

  9. The Effect of Anodic Oxide Films on the Nickel-Aluminum Reaction in Aluminum Braze Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadgell, Colin A.; Wells, Mary A.; Corbin, Stephen F.; Colley, Leo; Cheadle, Brian; Winkler, Sooky

    2017-01-01

    The influence of an anodic oxide surface film on the nickel-aluminum reaction at the surface of aluminum brazing sheet has been investigated. Samples were anodized in a barrier-type solution and subsequently sputtered with nickel. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and metallography were used as the main investigative techniques. The thickness of the anodic film was found to control the reaction between the aluminum substrate and nickel coating. Solid-state formation of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases occurred readily when a relatively thin oxide film (13 to 25 nm) was present, whereas intermetallic formation was suppressed in the presence of thicker oxides ( 60 nm). At an intermediate oxide film thickness of 35 nm, the Al3Ni phase formed shortly after the initiation of melting in the aluminum substrate. Analysis of DSC traces showed that formation of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases changed the melting characteristics of the aluminum substrate, and that the extent of this change can be used as an indirect measure of the amount of nickel incorporated into the intermetallic phases.

  10. Air-Impregnated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Layers for Enhancing the Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chanyoung; Lee, Junghoon; Sheppard, Keith; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2015-10-13

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layers were fabricated on aluminum substrates with systematically varied pore diameters (20-80 nm) and oxide thicknesses (150-500 nm) by controlling the anodizing voltage and time and subsequent pore-widening process conditions. The porous nanostructures were then coated with a thin (only a couple of nanometers thick) Teflon film to make the surface hydrophobic and trap air in the pores. The corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate was evaluated by a potentiodynamic polarization measurement in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution (saltwater). Results showed that the hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the aluminum substrate compared to a hydrophilic oxide layer of the same nanostructures, to bare (nonanodized) aluminum with only a natural oxide layer on top, and to the latter coated with a thin Teflon film. The hydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer with the largest pore diameter and the thickest oxide layer (i.e., the maximized air fraction) resulted in the best corrosion resistance with a corrosion inhibition efficiency of up to 99% for up to 7 days. The results demonstrate that the air impregnating the hydrophobic nanopores can effectively inhibit the penetration of corrosive media into the pores, leading to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance.

  11. The Effect of Anodic Oxide Films on the Nickel-Aluminum Reaction in Aluminum Braze Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadgell, Colin A.; Wells, Mary A.; Corbin, Stephen F.; Colley, Leo; Cheadle, Brian; Winkler, Sooky

    2017-03-01

    The influence of an anodic oxide surface film on the nickel-aluminum reaction at the surface of aluminum brazing sheet has been investigated. Samples were anodized in a barrier-type solution and subsequently sputtered with nickel. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and metallography were used as the main investigative techniques. The thickness of the anodic film was found to control the reaction between the aluminum substrate and nickel coating. Solid-state formation of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases occurred readily when a relatively thin oxide film (13 to 25 nm) was present, whereas intermetallic formation was suppressed in the presence of thicker oxides ( 60 nm). At an intermediate oxide film thickness of 35 nm, the Al3Ni phase formed shortly after the initiation of melting in the aluminum substrate. Analysis of DSC traces showed that formation of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases changed the melting characteristics of the aluminum substrate, and that the extent of this change can be used as an indirect measure of the amount of nickel incorporated into the intermetallic phases.

  12. Anodization process produces opaque, reflective coatings on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Opaque, reflective coatings are produced on aluminum articles by an anodizing process wherein the anodizing bath contains an aqueous dispersion of finely divided insoluble inorganic compounds. These particles appear as uniformly distributed occlusions in the anodic deposit on the aluminum.

  13. Performance comparison: Aluminum electrolytic and solid tantalum capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthornthwaite, B. G.; Piper, J.; Holland, H. W.

    1981-01-01

    Several key electrical and environmental parameters of latest technology aluminum electrolytic and solid tantalum capacitors were evaluated in terms of price fluctuations of tantalum metal. Performance differences between solid tantalums and aluminum electrolytics are examined.

  14. [Aluminum induces chromosome aberrations in wheat root meristem cells].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, N V; Synzynys, B I; Koz'min, G V

    2001-12-01

    The yield and pattern of chromosome structure aberrations in wheat seedlings treated with aluminum nitrate and aluminum sulfate at various concentrations have been determined by the anaphase method. Aluminum has a genotoxic effect causing genome, chromatid, and chromosome aberrations in apical root meristem cells. The relationship between the total yield of structural mutations and the aluminum concentration follows a bell-shaped curve. The mutagenic activity of aluminum nitrate peaks at 10(-3) mg/ml, which is twice as high as the permissible concentration limit (PCL) of aluminum in potable water. The maximum of the mutagenic activity of aluminum sulfate is observed at 5 x 10(-4) mg/ml, i.e., one PCL. Tap water boiled for 2 h in an aluminum vessel has virtually no genotoxic effect on wheat cells.

  15. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE INTO ALUMINUM CITY TERRACE ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE INTO ALUMINUM CITY TERRACE ALONG EAST HILL DRIVE. BUILDING 1 ON RIGHT, BUILDING 2 ON LEFT, FACING EAST. - Aluminum City Terrace, East Hill Drive, New Kensington, Westmoreland County, PA

  16. Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, R.O.; Keller, R.; Yao, N.P.

    Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (A1S) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

  17. Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, Raouf O.; Keller, Rudolf; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1981-01-01

    Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (AlS) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

  18. Surface alloying of silicon into aluminum substrate.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.

    1998-10-28

    Aluminum alloys that are easily castable tend to have lower silicon content and hence lower wear resistance. The use of laser surface alloying to improve the surface wear resistance of 319 and 320 aluminum alloys was examined. A silicon layer was painted onto the surface to be treated. A high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiberoptic beam delivery was used to carry out the laser surface treatment to enhance the silicon content. Process parameters were varied to minimize the surface roughness from overlap of the laser beam treatment. The surface-alloyed layer was characterized and the silicon content was determined.

  19. Aluminum-oxygen batteries for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niksa, Marilyn J.; Wheeler, Douglas J.

    1987-01-01

    An aluminum oxygen fuel cell is under development. Several highly efficient cell designs were constructed and tested. Air cathodes catalyzed with cobalt tetramethoxy porphorin have demonstrated more than 2000 cycles in intermittant use conditions. Aluminum alloys have operated at 4.2 kWH/kg at 200 mA/sq cm. A novel separator device, an impeller fluidizer was coupled with the battery to remove the solid hydrargillite discharge product. A 60 kW, 720 kWH battery system is projected to weigh about 2200 lbs., for an energy density of 327 WH lb.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum-alloy Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, Wm C

    1936-01-01

    The development of metal construction for aircraft has created a need for accurate and detailed information regarding the strength of riveted joints in aluminum-alloy structures. To obtain this information the National Bureau of Standards in cooperation with the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics is investigating the strength of riveted joints in aluminum alloys. The strength of riveted joints may be influenced by the form of the head, the ratio of the rivet diameter to the sheet thickness, the driving stress, and other factors. This note gives the results of tests to develop the riveting technique for test specimens and to determine the effects of these factors.

  1. Aluminum plasmonic metamaterials for structural color printing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Gao, Jie; Stan, Liliana; Rosenmann, Daniel; Czaplewski, David; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-06-01

    We report a structural color printing platform based on aluminum plasmonic metamaterials supporting near perfect light absorption and narrow-band spectral response tunable across the visible spectrum to realize high-resolution, angle-insensitive color printing with high color purity and saturation. Additionally, the fabricated metamaterials can be protected by a transparent polymer thin layer for ambient use with further improved color performance. The demonstrated structural color printing with aluminum plasmonic metamaterials offers great potential for relevant applications such as security marking and information storage.

  2. Summary of Repair Techniques for Aluminum Bridging.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    OCT 82 CERL-TR-M-324 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 13/8 NL mEEEimuinuIEEBI-EEIIIIIE 111-2 11112.2~ 111L25 nu 111I. M RO f PIHULL]TIN 7[ ..k contrutio of Enginrs ...aluminum bridging. A literature search was conducted to identify the various aluminum repair processes available. The merits of each method as a field...Army C’onsfruclion EnPrincering Restarch A literature search was conducted to assess various L.a jratorv I(’I.RIl, 1I’P. welding and joining repair

  3. Differential diagnosis between secondary hyperparathyroidism and aluminum intoxication in uremic patients: Usefulness of /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnaert, P.; Van Hooff, I.; Schoutens, A.; Bergmann, P.; Fuss, M.; Dratwa, M.; Vienne, A.; Pasteels, J.L.; van Geertruyden, J.; Vanherweghem, J.L.

    1989-03-01

    Forty-one patients in chronic end-stage renal failure and 4 patients with a functioning kidney transplant presented with spontaneous hypercalcemia or intolerance to vitamin D3 sterols and/or oral calcium supplements. Bone iliac crest biopsy with aluminum staining and Tc-pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy with determination of Fogelman score were performed in all cases. Two patients had aluminum-induced osteomalacia (AL O). Thirty-eight biopsies showed renal osteodystrophy (secondary hyperparathyroidism or various combinations of osteitis fibrosa and osteomalacia): 19 with positive staining for aluminum (RO + AL) and 19 without aluminum deposits (RO). The series also comprised 2 cases of pure osteomalacia (OM), 2 cases of osteoporosis (OP), and 1 case of osteoporosis with aluminum accumulation (OP + AL). Mean Fogelman score in RO patients (9.1 +/- 0.3) was significantly higher than in all other categories (5.9 +/- 0.5 for RO + AL, and scores ranging from 0 to 8 in the last 7 patients, p less than 0.01). Patients with massive aluminum accumulation in bone (greater than 75% of the total trabecular surface) showed no or very low uptake of the isotope by the skeleton. Fogelman scores of 9 or higher were always associated with histological secondary hyperparathyroidism. /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy is helpful to distinguish aluminum intoxication from secondary hyperparathyroidism in uremic patients.

  4. The Mechanical Properties of ALCA PlusTM Cast Aluminum Amplifier Top Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P; Gourdin, W H; Sanchez, R J; Shen, T H

    2002-06-27

    The amplifier top plates are monolithic, cast aluminum structures from which the amplifier frame assembly units (FAUs), and the line-replaceable flash lamp units (LRUs) inside them, are hung on the support rails in the laser bays. When fully assembled, each plate must support a static weight of 10,600 or 16,000 pounds, depending upon whether two or three loaded FAUs are attached. The top plates are fabricated from ''ALCA Plus{trademark}'', a zinc-containing aluminum casting alloy similar in composition to some standard alloys in the 7000-series. For electrical reasons, all of the plate with the exception of the support ''ears'', is encased in epoxy as shown in Figure 1. The nominal chemistry of the aluminum alloy is summarized in Table 1 and the nominal mechanical characteristics are summarized in Table 2. For comparison, wrought alloys of similar composition in the 7000-series have ultimate strengths of approximately 33-76 ksi and elongations of 11-17%, depending upon the temper.

  5. New developments in aluminum for aircraft and automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petit, Jocelyn I.

    1994-01-01

    A common bond for the aircraft and automobile industry is the need for cost-efficient, lightweight structures such as provided by aluminum based materials. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and cover the following: new developments in aluminum for aircraft and automobiles; forces shaping future automotive materials needs; aluminum strength/weakness versus competitive materials; evolution of aluminum aerospace alloys; forces shaping future aircraft materials needs; fiber/metal structural laminates; and property requirements for jetliner and military transport applications.

  6. Aluminum base alloy powder metallurgy process and product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A metallurgical method including cooling molten aluminum particles and consolidating resulting solidified particles into a multiparticle body, wherein the improvement comprises the provision of greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn. Aluminum containing greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn.

  7. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. Glazkova, Elena A. Svarovskaya, Natalia V. Bakina, Olga V. Kazantsev, Sergey O. Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-27

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  8. Method And Reactor For Production Of Aluminum By Carbothermic Reduction Of Alumina

    DOEpatents

    Aune, Jan Arthur; Johansen, Kai

    2004-10-19

    A hollow partition wall is employed to feed carbon material to an underflow of a carbothermic reduction furnace used to make aluminum. The partition wall divides a low temperature reaction zone where aluminum oxide is reacted with carbon to form aluminum carbide and a high temperature reaction zone where the aluminum carbide and remaining aluminum oxide are reacted to form aluminum and carbon monoxide.

  9. Comparison of the kinetic laws of the dissolution of bauxite and aluminum and iron(III) oxides and hydroxides in hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gololobova, E. G.; Gorichev, I. G.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Kozlov, K. V.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of the temperature and concentration of a hydrochloric acid solution on the dissolution kinetics of aluminum and iron(III) oxides and hydroxides and a natural sample of aluminum-containing raw materials, bauxite, is studied. The rate W of the transition of iron(III) ions from bauxite is higher than the rate of aluminum ion transition. The dependence of the fraction of a dissolved solid phase on time τ of dissolution of the oxides and hydroxides is determined, α = 1 — exp(- Asinh( Wτ)). The solubility of iron(III) chloride increases and that of aluminum chloride decreases as the HCl concentration increases. An empirical equation is proposed for the description of the dependence of the process rate on a series of parameters,.

  10. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2

  11. Esophagobronchial fistula - A rare complication of aluminum phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Sumeet; Rastogi, Rajul; Agarwal, Ajay; Jindal, Gaurav

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide is a systemic lethal poison. Fistulous communication between esophagus and airway tract (esophagorespiratory fistula) has rarely been reported in the survivors of aluminum phosphide poisoning. We report a case of benign esophagobronchial fistula secondary to aluminum phosphide poisoning, which to best of our knowledge has not been reported in the medical literature.

  12. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate....

  14. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  15. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  18. Metallography of Aluminum and Its Alloys : Use of Electrolytic Polishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquet, Pierre A

    1955-01-01

    Recent methods are described for electropolishing aluminum and aluminum alloys. Numerous references are included of electrolytic micrographic investigations carried out during the period 1948 to 1952. A detailed description of a commercial electrolytic polishing unit, suitable for micrographic examination of aluminum and its alloys, is included.

  19. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    95] K. Kimapong1, T. Watanabe, Effect of welding process parameters on mechanical property of FSW lap joint between aluminum alloy and steel ...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. 1 UNCLASSIFIED Welding of aluminum alloys to steels : an overview M. Mazar...welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels . The microstructural development, mechanical properties and application of the joints are discussed

  20. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    and around particle inclusions within the WZ. In the case of FSW aluminum to steel , the structure often seen is one of steel particles dispersed...the microstructure and mechanical performance of dissimilar FSWs between aluminum and steel , this study focuses on the characterization of the...MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FRICTION STIR WELDED ALUMINUM - STEEL JOINTS By ERIN ELIZABETH PATTERSON A thesis submitted in

  1. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be enclosed by the vessel's hull structure or a separate steel cover. (b) The steel cover...

  2. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be enclosed by the vessel's hull structure or a separate steel cover. (b) The steel cover...

  3. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be enclosed by the vessel's hull structure or a separate steel cover. (b) The steel cover...

  4. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be enclosed by the vessel's hull structure or a separate steel cover. (b) The steel cover...

  5. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be enclosed by the vessel's hull structure or a separate steel cover. (b) The steel cover...

  6. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  9. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  10. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate....

  11. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  12. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate....

  14. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  15. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  16. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  17. 75 FR 34482 - Certain Aluminum Extrusions From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... COMMISSION Certain Aluminum Extrusions From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... reason of imports from China of certain aluminum extrusions, provided for in subheadings 7604.21, 7604.29... Commerce by the Aluminum Extrusions Fair Trade Committee \\2\\ and the United Steel, Paper and...

  18. 76 FR 29007 - Certain Aluminum Extrusions From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Aluminum Extrusions From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... certain aluminum extrusions from ] China other than finished heat sinks, provided for in subheadings 7604... by Aluminum Extrusions Fair Trade Committee and the United Steel, Paper and Forestry,...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  20. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate....

  4. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  6. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate....

  7. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  9. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  12. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate....

  13. [Science and Technology and Recycling: Instructional Materials on Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aluminum Association, New York, NY.

    Educational materials on the manufacture and use of aluminum are assembled in this multi-media unit for use by junior high and secondary school students. Student booklets and brochures include: "The Story of Aluminum,""Uses of Aluminum,""Independent Study Guide for School Research Projects,""Questions and Answers…

  14. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  15. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  16. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  17. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  1. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 582.1781 Section 582.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate. (b) Conditions...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sodium sulfate. 582.1131 Section 582.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  5. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  6. 21 CFR 182.1131 - Aluminum sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sodium sulfate. 182.1131 Section 182.1131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1131 Aluminum sodium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sodium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  8. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  9. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate....

  10. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  11. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 582.1129 Section 582.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  15. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  16. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  17. 21 CFR 182.1129 - Aluminum potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum potassium sulfate. 182.1129 Section 182.1129 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1129 Aluminum potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum potassium sulfate....

  18. 21 CFR 182.1781 - Sodium aluminum phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium aluminum phosphate. 182.1781 Section 182.1781 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1781 Sodium aluminum phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium aluminum phosphate....

  19. Two hundred years of aluminum ... or is it aluminium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvande, Halvor

    2008-08-01

    Two hundred years ago the word aluminum was used for the first time when a new metal was produced by the English chemist Sir Humphry Davy. Later work has shown that this metal was not pure, but rather an aluminum-iron alloy. This article commemorates the anniversary of aluminum production with a look back at the metal’s origins.

  20. Thermophysical Properties of Matter - The TPRC Data Series. Volume 9. Thermal Radiative Properties - Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    34Validity of the Drude Theory for Silver, Gold, and Aluminum in the Infrared," from Optical Properties and Electronic Structure of Metals and Alloys (F...Comprehensive Compilation of Data by the Thermophysical Properties Research Center (TPRC), Purdue University Y. 8. Touloukian , Series Editor C. Y. Ho, Series...Volume 6. Specific Heat-Nonmetallic Liquids and Gases Volume 7. Thermal Radiative Properties -Metallic Elements and Alloys Volume 8. Thermal Radiative

  1. Thermophysical Properties of Matter - The TPRC Data Series. Volume 3. Thermal Conductivity - Nonmetallic Liquids and Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-01-01

    Compilation of Data by the Thermophysical Properties Research Center (TPRC), Purdue University Y. 8. Touloukian , Series Editor C. Y. Ho, Series...Properties Research Center (TPRC) of Purdue University, under the leadership of its founder. Professor Y. S. Touloukian . began to develop a...1 Page Material Name Vol. Page Alumina + Mullite 2 3221 Aluminum alloys (specific types) (continued) Ulumina fused brick 2 897 2014 (same as

  2. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    DOEpatents

    Buckles, Robert A.; Booth, Rex; Yen, Boris T.

    2004-06-29

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  3. Fourier Series Operating Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnow, Milton L.

    1961-01-01

    This report presents a computer program for multiplying, adding, differentiating, integrating, "barring" and scalarly multiplying "literal" Fourier series as such, and for extracting the coefficients of specified terms.

  4. Damping measurements of laminated composite materials and aluminum using the hysteresis loop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovich, H.; Govich, D.; Grunwald, A.

    2015-10-01

    The damping characteristics of composite laminates made of Hexply 8552 AGP 280-5H (fabric), used for structural elements in aeronautical vehicles, have been investigated in depth using the hysteresis loop method and compared to the results for aluminum specimens (2024 T351). It was found that the loss factor, η, obtained by the hysteresis loop method is linearly dependent only on the applied excitation frequency and is independent of the preloading and the stress amplitudes. For the test specimens used in the present tests series, it was found that the damping of the aluminum specimens is higher than the composite ones for longitudinal direction damping, while for bending vibrations the laminates exhibited higher damping values.

  5. Optimal control of an aluminum casting furnace: Part II. Fuel optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, R. T.; Ouellet, R.

    1990-06-01

    In this second of a two-article series, the simplified model of the aluminum casting furnace presented in Part I is used to solve a fuel-optimal control problem. Basically a Lagrange problem with equality and inequality constraints, it is formulated through variational calculus into a two-point boundary-value problem with known initial and final conditions and specified final time. It yields an optimal solution with a time-vary ing fuel flow rate that gives 10.9 pct fuel economy over the conventional nonoptimal constant fuel flow rate. This shows that variational calculus can be used to solve optimal control problems for the aluminum casting furnace and for other similar thermal systems commonly encountered in the metallurgical industry.

  6. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  7. Weldable aluminum alloy has improved mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerlund, R. W.

    1966-01-01

    Weldable aluminum alloy has good resistance to stress-corrosion cracking, shows unchanged strength and formability after storage at room temperature, and can be pre-aged, stretched, and aged. Since toxic fumes of cadmium oxide are evolved when the new alloy is welded, adequate ventilation must be provided.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy; Kramer, Keith; Liu, Xinye

    2000-01-01

    An aluminum oxide film is deposited on a heated substrate by CVD from one or more alkylaluminum alkoxide compounds having composition R.sub.n Al.sub.2 (OR').sub.6-n, wherein R and R' are alkyl groups and n is in the range of 1 to 5.

  9. UV fluorescence enhancement from nanostructured aluminum materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Danielle E.; Dean, Nathan; Poston, Pete E.; Blair, Steve; Harris, Joel M.

    2016-09-01

    Interest in label-free detection of biomolecules has given rise to the need for UV plasmonic materials. DNA bases and amino acid residues have electronic resonances in the UV which allow for sensitive detection of these species by surface-enhanced UV fluorescence spectroscopy. Electrochemical roughening has been used extensively to generate plasmonically-active metal surfaces that produce localized enhancement of excitation and emission of electromagnetic radiation from surface-bound molecules. Electrochemically roughened gold and silver surfaces produce enhancement in the visible and near-IR regions, but to the best of our knowledge, application of this technique for producing UV-enhancing substrates has not been reported. Using electropolishing of aluminum, we are able to generate nanostructured surfaces that produce enhanced spectroscopic detection of molecules in the UV. Aluminum is a natural choice for substrate composition as it exhibits a relatively large quality factor in the UV. We have fabricated electropolished aluminum films with nanometer scale roughness and have studied UV-excited fluorescence enhancement from submonolayer coverage of tryptophan on these substrates using a UV-laser based spectrometer. Quantitative dosing by dip-coating was used to deposit known surface concentrations of the aromatic amino acid tryptophan, so that fluorescence enhancement could be evaluated. Compared to a dielectric substrate (surface-oxidized silicon), we observe a 180-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence emitted by tryptophan on electropolished aluminum under photobleaching conditions, allowing detection of sub-monolayer coverages of molecules essential for development of biosensor technologies.

  10. Properties of air-aluminum thermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Gleizes, A.; Riquel, G.

    2012-07-01

    We present the calculation and the main results of the properties of air-aluminum thermal plasmas, useful for complete modelling of arc systems involving aluminum contacts. The properties are calculated assuming thermal equilibrium and correspond to the equilibrium composition, thermodynamic functions, transport coefficients including diffusion coefficients and net emission coefficient representing the divergence of the radiative flux in the hottest plasma regions. The calculation is developed in the temperature range between 2000 and 30 000 K, for a pressure range from 0.1 to 1 bar and for several metal mass proportions. As in the case of other metals, the presence of aluminum vapours has a strong influence on three properties at intermediate temperatures: the electron number density, the electrical conductivity and the net emission coefficient. Some comparisons with other metal vapour (Cu, Fe and Ag) properties are made and show the original behaviour for Al-containing mixtures: mass density at high temperatures is low due to the low Al atomic mass; high electrical conductivity at T < 10 000 K due to low ionization potential (around 2 V less for Al than for the other metals); very strong self-absorption of ionized aluminum lines, leading to a net emission coefficient lower than that of pure air when T > 10 000 K, in contrast to copper or iron radiation.

  11. Optical properties of ALON (aluminum oxynitride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, T. M.; Bernstein, S. D.; Maguire, E. A.; Tustison, R. W.

    1998-06-01

    The optical properties of ALON (aluminum oxynitride) are presented. Optical scatter and index of refraction, and absorption of several different compositions of ALON are compared. The temperature dependence of emissivity of ALON was measured in the temperature range 46°C to 1200°C.

  12. Aluminum oxynitride's resistance to impact and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Edward A.; Rawson, James K.; Tustison, Randal W.

    1994-09-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a polycrystalline ceramic material useful for windows, domes, and other optical elements. It is transparent in the visible to mid-wavelength infrared. Data is presented on the affects of impacts with sand and water particles on polished surfaces. Velocities up to 690 m/sec were used.

  13. Study of corrosion of 1100 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Loess, R. E.; Mori, S.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion of 1100 aluminum in oxygen-saturated water at 70 degrees C under experimental conditions was studied, emphasizing effects of exposure interruption, the number of specimens, and the refreshment rate. A logarithmic equation was derived to express the corrosion rate.

  14. Molybdate Coatings for Protecting Aluminum Against Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; MacDowell, Louis G.

    2005-01-01

    Conversion coatings that comprise mixtures of molybdates and several additives have been subjected to a variety of tests to evaluate their effectiveness in protecting aluminum and alloys of aluminum against corrosion. Molybdate conversion coatings are under consideration as replacements for chromate conversion coatings, which have been used for more than 70 years. The chromate coatings are highly effective in protecting aluminum and its alloys against corrosion but are also toxic and carcinogenic. Hexavalent molybdenum and, hence, molybdates containing hexavalent molybdenum, have received attention recently as replacements for chromates because molybdates mimic chromates in a variety of applications but exhibit significantly lower toxicity. The tests were performed on six proprietary formulations of molybdate conversion coatings, denoted formulations A through F, on panels of aluminum alloy 2024-T3. A bare alloy panel was also included in the tests. The tests included electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), measurements of corrosion potentials, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  15. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for aluminum 2219 alloy is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and joining techniques is developed.

  16. Treating poultry litter with aluminum sulfate (alum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a USDA/ARS factsheet on how to treat poultry litter with aluminum sulfate (alum) to reduce ammonia emissions. Over half of the nitrogen excreted from chickens is lost to the atmosphere as ammonia before the manure is removed from the poultry houses. Research has shown that additions of alu...

  17. Precipitation hardening in aluminum alloy 6022

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, W.F.; Laughlin, D.E.

    1999-03-05

    Although the precipitation process in Al-Mg-Si alloys has been extensively studied, the understanding of the hardening process is still incomplete, since any change in composition, processing and aging practices, etc., could affect the precipitation hardening behavior. In this paper, hardness measurements, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy have been utilized to study the precipitation hardening behavior in aluminum alloy 6022.

  18. Weldability of extruded aluminum-alumina composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, S.A.; Lane, C.; Altshuller, B.

    1994-12-31

    Acceptable procedure were developed for welding the following types of aluminum particle-reinforced aluminum: 6061/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/10p-T6, 6061/Al{sub x}/O{sub 3}20p-T6, and 7005Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/10p-T6,. Automated and manual procedures were developed and using both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), with a cold wire feed, and gas metal arc welding (GMAW). The effect of welding procedures on porosity, reinforcing particulate distribution, and mechanical properties was determined. Postweld heat treatment and microhardness testing were used to understand the effect of the welded microstructure on the strength and ductility of the joint. Fracture surfaces and transverse microsections of mechanical test specimens were examined to determine the origins and mechanisms of failure. Cleanliness of the joint and weld wire were found to be essential to eliminate porosity. Based on these experimentally determined data, general guidelines for welding aluminum oxide particle-reinforced aluminum composites are proposed. Discussion includes proper selection of weld joint geometry, filler metals, travel speed, voltage, and current ranges. These parameters are compared to those used in an actual production environment for composite products. Distinctions between welding these composites and others produced via powder metallurgy or with silicon carbide reinforcements are also discussed.

  19. Large stable aluminum optics for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukobratovich, Daniel; Schaefer, John P.

    2011-09-01

    Aluminum mirrors offer the advantages of lower cost, shorter fabrication time, more rugged mounting, and same material athermalization when compared to classical glass mirrors. In the past these advantages were offset by controversial dimensional stability and high surface scatter, limiting applications to IR systems. Raytheon developed processes to improve long term stability, and reduce surface scatter. Six 380 mm aperture aluminum mirrors made using these processes showed excellent stability, with figure changes of less than 0.01 wave RMS(1 wave = 633 nm) when cycled 10 times between -51 and +71 deg. C. The VQ process developed at ELCAN reduces surface scatter in bare aluminum mirrors to below 20 angstroms RMS, and has been used in thousands of production mirrors up to 300 mm aperture. These processes were employed in the fabrication of two lightweight single arch 600 mm aluminum mirrors. The two mirrors were produced in four months, with a mounted surface figure of 0.22 waves RMS and surface roughness of 20 angstroms. Mounted fundamental frequency was 218 Hz, and no figure distortion was observed at preload levels four times higher than design. Subsequently the mirrors performed well when subjected to severe environmental loadings in a Raytheon test system. This technology is being extended to ultra-lightweight sandwich mirrors, which are competitive with other material technologies used in advanced aerospace applications such as high-altitude UAV surveillance systems and satellite optics.

  20. Low absorptance porcelain-on-aluminum coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, H.

    1979-01-01

    Porcelain thermal-control coating for aluminum sheet and foil has solar absorptance of 0.22. Specially formulated coating absorptance is highly stable, changing only 0.03 after 1,000 hours of exposure to simulated sunlight and can be applied by standard commercial methods.

  1. High Energy Density aluminum/oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell, an example of which is the metal/air cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, with high energy and power densities, environmentally acceptable and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum/oxygen system is currently under development for a prototype unmanned, undersea vehicle (UUV) for the US navy and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys, and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from 5 to 150 mA/cm 2 have been identified, such materials being essential to realize mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 h in a large scale, half-cell system.

  2. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-11-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  3. Major and Minor Constituents of Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    sample alloys obtained by both techniques. Keywords: Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy(ICP-AES).... absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy are used for the determination of major magnesium, lithium, copper, zinc...An accurate analysis of aluminum alloys is required for quality control and characterization purposes. The two analytical techniques atomic

  4. Absorptive coating for aluminum solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.; Parr, A.

    1979-01-01

    Method for coating forming coating of copper oxide from copper component of sheet aluminum/copper alloy provides strong durable solar heat collector panels. Copper oxide coating has solar absorption characteristics similar to black chrome and is much simpler and less costly to produce.

  5. Development of gallium aluminum phosphide electroluminescent diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicotka, R. J.; Lorenz, M. R.; Nethercot, A. H.; Pettit, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Work done on the development of gallium aluminum phosphide alloys for electroluminescent light sources is described. The preparation of this wide band gap semiconductor alloy, its physical properties (particularly the band structure, the electrical characteristics, and the light emitting properties) and work done on the fabrication of diode structures from these alloys are broadly covered.

  6. Aluminum doping improves silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Aluminum doped silicon solar cells with resistivities in the 10- to 20-ohm centimeter range have broad spectral response, high efficiency and long lifetimes in nuclear radiation environments. Production advantages include low material rejection and increased production yields, and close tolerance control.

  7. Polymer gel electrolytes for application in aluminum deposition and rechargeable aluminum ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao -Guang; Fang, Youxing; Jiang, Xueguang; Yoshii, Kazuki; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Dai, Sheng

    2015-10-22

    Polymer gel electrolyte using AlCl3 complexed acrylamide as functional monomer and ionic liquids based on acidic mixture of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMImCl) and AlCl3 as plasticizer has been successfully prepared for the first time by free radical polymerization. Aluminum deposition is successfully obtained with a polymer gel membrane contianing 80 wt% ionic liquid. As a result, the polymer gel membranes are also good candidates for rechargeable aluminum ion batteries.

  8. Polymer gel electrolytes for application in aluminum deposition and rechargeable aluminum ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Xiao -Guang; Fang, Youxing; Jiang, Xueguang; ...

    2015-10-22

    Polymer gel electrolyte using AlCl3 complexed acrylamide as functional monomer and ionic liquids based on acidic mixture of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMImCl) and AlCl3 as plasticizer has been successfully prepared for the first time by free radical polymerization. Aluminum deposition is successfully obtained with a polymer gel membrane contianing 80 wt% ionic liquid. As a result, the polymer gel membranes are also good candidates for rechargeable aluminum ion batteries.

  9. Aluminum recycling in the automotive industry. (Latest citations from the Aluminum Industry Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning design and development of processes to recycle aluminum from automobiles. Scrap separation, shredding, and processing are covered including new equipment. Aluminum market information is included with respect to material selection for automobiles and new products developed from recycled material. References also discuss changes in automobile design to increase recycling oppertunities. (Contains a minimum of 107 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Scanning Photoacoustic Microscopy of Aluminum with Aluminum Oxide, Roughness Standards, and Rubber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-10

    nickel-based ( 713C ) alloy turbine blade (Fig. 20), differences between the coated and uncoated regions are clearly evident. In Figs. 21-25, we present...aluminum alloy . A detailed description is given in Ref. 7. 3. Composite optical and SPAM micrographs of a 400 x 14 400 point region of an aluminum... alloy containing fatigue cracks which are apparently smaller in length than our present detection capability (0 30Pm). A detailed description is given in

  11. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations § 63.5753 How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of...

  12. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations § 63.5753 How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of...

  13. Investigation of Methods for Selectively Reinforcing Aluminum and Aluminum-Lithium Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Alexa, Joel A.; Messick, Peter L.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that selective reinforcement offers the potential to significantly improve the performance of metallic structures for aerospace applications. Applying high-strength, high-stiffness fibers to the high-stress regions of aluminum-based structures can increase the structural load-carrying capability and inhibit fatigue crack initiation and growth. This paper discusses an investigation into potential methods for applying reinforcing fibers onto the surface of aluminum and aluminum-lithium plate. Commercially-available alumina-fiber reinforced aluminum alloy tapes were used as the reinforcing material. Vacuum hot pressing was used to bond the reinforcing tape to aluminum alloy 2219 and aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 base plates. Static and cyclic three-point bend testing and metallurgical analysis were used to evaluate the enhancement of mechanical performance and the integrity of the bond between the tape and the base plate. The tests demonstrated an increase in specific bending stiffness. In addition, no issues with debonding of the reinforcing tape from the base plate during bend testing were observed. The increase in specific stiffness indicates that selectively-reinforced structures could be designed with the same performance capabilities as a conventional unreinforced structure but with lower mass.

  14. Aluminum and aluminum alloys as sources of hydrogen for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Lluís; Macanás, Jorge; Muñoz, Maria; Casado, Juan

    Production of hydrogen using aluminum and aluminum alloys with aqueous alkaline solutions is studied. This process is based on aluminum corrosion, consuming only water and aluminum which are cheaper raw materials than other compounds used for in situ hydrogen generation, such as chemical hydrides. In principle, this method does not consume alkali because the aluminate salts produced in the hydrogen generation undergo a decomposition reaction that regenerates the alkali. As a consequence, this process could be a feasible alternative for hydrogen production to supply fuel cells. Preliminary results showed that an increase of base concentration and working solution temperature produced an increase of hydrogen production rate using pure aluminum. Furthermore, an improvement of hydrogen production rates and yields was observed varying aluminum alloys composition and increasing their reactive surface, with interesting results for Al/Si and Al/Co alloys. The development of this idea could improve yields and reduce costs in power units based on fuel cells which use hydrides as raw material for hydrogen production.

  15. Development of perfluorocarbon (PFC) primary standards for monitoring of emissions from aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, G; Chu, P; Dolin, E; Marks, J; Howard, T; Lytle, M; McKenzie, L; Altman, D

    2001-08-01

    An EPA Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership (VAIP) program has been formed to help US primary producers focus on reducing the emissions of two perfluorocarbons (PFCs), tetrafluoromethane (CF4) and hexafluoroethane (C2F6), during the production of aluminum. To ensure comparability of measurements over space and time, traceability to national sources was desirable. Hence, the EPA approached the NIST to develop a suite of primary standards to cover a mole fraction (concentration) range of 0.1 to 1400 micromol mol(-1) for CF4 and 0.01 to 150 micromol mol(-1) of C2F6. A total of eight gravimetric PFC gas standards were prepared with relative expanded uncertainties of < or = 0.52% (approximately 95% confidence level). These primary standards were ultimately used to assign values to a series of secondary gas standards at three mole-fraction levels with relative expanded uncertainties ranging from +/- 0.7% to 5.3% (approximately 95% confidence level). This series of secondary standards was used within the aluminum industry to calibrate instruments used to make emission measurements. Assignment of values to the secondary standards was performed by use of gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Real time pot-line and stack samples from a local aluminum plant were also obtained and sub-samples sent to each participating facility for analysis. The data generated from each facility were sent to NIST for analysis. The maximum difference between the NIST and individual facilities' values for the same sub-sample was +/- 26%.

  16. FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

    2008-12-17

    Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved

  17. Fourier Series Optimization Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This note discusses the introduction of Fourier series as an immediate application of optimization of a function of more than one variable. Specifically, it is shown how the study of Fourier series can be motivated to enrich a multivariable calculus class. This is done through discovery learning and use of technology wherein students build the…

  18. Welfare. Opposing Viewpoints Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozic, Charles P., Ed.; Winters, Paul A., Ed.

    Books in the Opposing Viewpoints Series present debates about current issues that can be used to teach critical reading and thinking skills. The opinions expressed in the selections in each series title examine many different aspects of a single issue. Detractors of the welfare system have long argued that the system promotes dependency. They…

  19. SERI Wind Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Noun, R. J.

    1983-06-01

    The SERI Wind Energy Program manages the areas or innovative research, wind systems analysis, and environmental compatibility for the U.S. Department of Energy. Since 1978, SERI wind program staff have conducted in-house aerodynamic and engineering analyses of novel concepts for wind energy conversion and have managed over 20 subcontracts to determine technical feasibility; the most promising of these concepts is the passive blade cyclic pitch control project. In the area of systems analysis, the SERI program has analyzed the impact of intermittent generation on the reliability of electric utility systems using standard utility planning models. SERI has also conducted methodology assessments. Environmental issues related to television interference and acoustic noise from large wind turbines have been addressed. SERI has identified the causes, effects, and potential control of acoustic noise emissions from large wind turbines.

  20. Process of electrolysis and fractional crystallization for aluminum purification

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; Bowman, Kenneth A.; Mazgaj, Robert M.; Cochran, C. Norman

    1983-10-25

    A method for purifying aluminum that contains impurities, the method including the step of introducing such aluminum containing impurities to a charging and melting chamber located in an electrolytic cell of the type having a porous diaphragm permeable by the electrolyte of the cell and impermeable to molten aluminum. The method includes further the steps of supplying impure aluminum from the chamber to the anode area of the cell and electrolytically transferring aluminum from the anode area to the cathode through the diaphragm while leaving impurities in the anode area, thereby purifying the aluminum introduced into the chamber. The method includes the further steps of collecting the purified aluminum at the cathode, and lowering the level of impurities concentrated in the anode area by subjecting molten aluminum and impurities in said chamber to a fractional crystallization treatment wherein eutectic-type impurities crystallize and precipitate out of the aluminum. The eutectic impurities that have crystallized are physically removed from the chamber. The aluminum in the chamber is now suited for further purification as provided in the above step of electrolytically transferring aluminum through the diaphragm.

  1. Process of electrolysis and fractional crystallization for aluminum purification

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, R.K.; Bowman, K.A.; Mazgaj, R.M.; Cochran, C.N.

    1983-10-25

    A method is described for purifying aluminum that contains impurities, the method including the step of introducing such aluminum containing impurities to a charging and melting chamber located in an electrolytic cell of the type having a porous diaphragm permeable by the electrolyte of the cell and impermeable to molten aluminum. The method includes further the steps of supplying impure aluminum from the chamber to the anode area of the cell and electrolytically transferring aluminum from the anode area to the cathode through the diaphragm while leaving impurities in the anode area, thereby purifying the aluminum introduced into the chamber. The method includes the further steps of collecting the purified aluminum at the cathode, and lowering the level of impurities concentrated in the anode area by subjecting molten aluminum and impurities in said chamber to a fractional crystallization treatment wherein eutectic-type impurities crystallize and precipitate out of the aluminum. The eutectic impurities that have crystallized are physically removed from the chamber. The aluminum in the chamber is now suited for further purification as provided in the above step of electrolytically transferring aluminum through the diaphragm. 2 figs.

  2. The low current domain of the aluminum/sulfur battery

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Hwang, J.; Light, T.S.; Dillon, R.

    1997-03-01

    A variety of factors including solution-phase modification, aluminum composition, temperature, and anolyte volume, modify anodic behavior in the approach to the low current density domain of the aluminum/sulfur battery. A relatively low level [0.4% Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} by weight in the anolyte] of mercury provides an amalgam film on the aluminum anode which minimizes the parasitic chemical consumption of aluminum anode which aluminum, providing anodic faradaic efficiencies in excess of 80%. Anodic overpotential losses are high for aluminum immersed in mercury-containing electrolytes. However, at lower current densities, their absolute magnitude is several hundred millivolts or smaller and does not substantially impair the cell potential. Aluminum/sulfur battery discharge times up to several hundred hours are demonstrated for 0.2 mA/cm{sup 2} current density cells.

  3. Effects of Aluminum Foil Packaging on Elemental Analysis of Bone.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lyniece; Christensen, Angi M

    2016-03-01

    Burned skeletal material is often very fragile and at high risk for fragmentation during packaging and transportation. One method that has been suggested to protect bones in these cases is to carefully wrap them in aluminum foil. Traces of aluminum, however, are known to transfer from foil packaging materials to food products. If such transfer occurs between aluminum foil and bones, it could interfere with subsequent chemical, elemental and isotopic analyses, which are becoming more common in forensic anthropological investigations. This study examined aluminum levels in bones prior to and following the use of aluminum foil packaging and storage for a 6-week period. Results indicate no significant change in the detected levels of aluminum (p > 0.05), even when packaged in compromised foil and exposed to elevated temperatures. Aluminum foil can therefore continue to be recommended as a packaging medium without affecting subsequent chemical examinations.

  4. Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Heaton, Richard C.; Jamriska, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

  5. Aluminum Target Dissolution in Support of the Pu-238 Program

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H

    2014-09-01

    Selection of an aluminum alloy for target cladding affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the caustic dissolution step, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. We present a study to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal alloy, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. These data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Temperature logging during the transients has been investigated as a means to generate kinetic and mass transport data on the dissolution process. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  6. Issues for conversion coating of aluminum alloys with hydrotalcite

    SciTech Connect

    Drewien, C.A.; Buchheit, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Hydrotalcite coatings on aluminum alloys are being developed for corrosion protection of aluminum in aggressive saline environments. Coating bath composition, surface pretreatment, and alloying elements in aluminum all influence the performance of these coatings during salt spray testing. The coating bath, comprised of lithium carbonate, requires aging by dissolution of aluminum into the bath in order to grow corrosion resistant coatings. Coatings formed in non- aged baths do not perform well in salt spray testing. The alloying elements in aluminum alloys, especially copper, influence the coating growth and formation leading to thin coatings. The effect of the alloy elements is to limit the supply of aluminum to the coating/electrolyte interface and hinder growth of hydrotalcite upon aluminum alloys.

  7. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  8. Time Series Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, J.

    With the generation of long, precise, and finely sampled time series the Age of Digital Astronomy is uncovering and elucidating energetic dynamical processes throughout the Universe. Fulfilling these opportunities requires data effective analysis techniques rapidly and automatically implementing advanced concepts. The Time Series Explorer, under development in collaboration with Tom Loredo, provides tools ranging from simple but optimal histograms to time and frequency domain analysis for arbitrary data modes with any time sampling. Examples of application of these tools for automated time series discovery will be given.

  9. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... barium or flavoring in the barium intestinal obstruction Seek care right away If you have any of the following symptoms after an upper GI series, seek medical attention right away: fever no bowel movement ...

  10. Lower GI Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... GI series. • an allergic reaction to the barium. • bowel obstruction—partial or complete blockage of the small or large intestine. Although rare, bowel obstruction can be a life-threatening condition that requires ...

  11. Calcium citrate without aluminum antacids does not cause aluminum retention in patients with functioning kidneys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Wabner, C. L.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Copley, J. B.; Pak, L.; Poindexter, J. R.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that calcium citrate might enhance aluminum absorption from food, posing a threat of aluminum toxicity even in patients with normal renal function. We therefore measured serum and urinary aluminum before and following calcium citrate therapy in patients with moderate renal failure and in normal subjects maintained on constant metabolic diets with known aluminum content (967-1034 mumol/day, or 26.1-27.9 mg/day, in patients and either 834 or 1579 mumol/day, or 22.5 and 42.6 mg/day, in normal subjects). Seven patients with moderate renal failure (endogenous creatinine clearance of 43 ml/min) took 50 mmol (2 g) calcium/day as effervescent calcium citrate with meals for 17 days. Eight normal women received 25 mmol (1 g) calcium/day as tricalcium dicitrate tablets with meals for 7 days. In patients with moderate renal failure, serum and urinary aluminum were normal before treatment at 489 +/- 293 SD nmol/l (13.2 +/- 7.9 micrograms/l) and 767 +/- 497 nmol/day (20.7 +/- 13.4 micrograms/day), respectively. They remained within normal limits and did not change significantly during calcium citrate treatment (400 +/- 148 nmol/l and 600 +/- 441 nmol/day, respectively). Similarly, no significant change in serum and urinary aluminum was detected in normal women during calcium citrate administration (271 +/- 59 vs 293 +/- 85 nmol/l and 515 +/- 138 vs 615 +/- 170 nmol/day, respectively). In addition, skeletal bone aluminum content did not change significantly in 14 osteoporotic patients (endogenous creatinine clearance of 68.5 ml/min) treated for 24 months with calcium citrate, 10 mmol calcium twice/day separately from meals (29.3 +/- 13.9 ng/mg ash bone to 27.9 +/0- 10.4, P = 0.727). In them, histomorphometric examination did not show any evidence of mineralization defect. Thus, calcium citrate given alone without aluminum-containing drugs does not pose a risk of aluminum toxicity in subjects with normal or functioning kidneys, when it is administered on an

  12. Effects of aluminum and zirconia contents on the reaction bonded aluminum oxide process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheedy, Paul Martin

    The effects of aluminum and ZrO2 contents on the reaction and sintering of reaction bonded aluminum oxide (RBAO) were investigated. It was apparent that ZrO2-containing RBAO powders with higher initial aluminum contents (>45 vol%) were increasingly more difficult to react and sinter. During oxidation in air, samples often underwent a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction which led to catastrophic failure. This reaction and cracking behavior was more pronounced with increasing aluminum and ZrO2 contents of the powders. Subsequently, it was shown that the SHS reaction was actually two combustion phenomena: a thermal explosion reaction on the surface of the sample between aluminum and oxygen, which (in ZrO2-containing samples) triggered a self propagating aluminothermic reduction of ZrO2, forming Al2O3 and Al 3Zr. Therefore, methods for controlling the rate of the initial oxidation reaction were effective since both SHS reactions were prevented. Despite the use of controlled firing, initial samples with increasing aluminum contents proved difficult to densify. It was found that in all RBAO samples (regardless of ZrO2 content), the reactively formed Al 2O3 underwent the gamma to alpha-Al2O 3 transformation, which resulted in the development of a vermicular microstructure. In ZrO2-containing RBAO samples, this transformation was inhibited and occurred concurrently with the start of densification. In addition, the start of bulk shrinkage in these samples was delayed and the densification rates were decreased in comparison to samples without ZrO 2. This ultimately resulted in a decrease in the limiting density to which ZrO2-containing RBAO samples could be sintered. Surprisingly, in samples without ZrO2, increasing the aluminum content did not appear to have any effects upon the densification behavior of RBAO. In examining RBAO samples with similar aluminum contents but increasing ZrO2 contents, it became apparent that the grain growth inhibiting

  13. [Analysis of tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake in foods by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiding; Chang, Cuilan; Guo, Qilei; Cao, Hong; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2014-04-01

    A novel analytical method for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was studied. The pigments contained in the color lakes were successfully separated from the aluminum matrix in the pre-treatment process, which included the following steps: dissolve the color lakes in 0.1 mol/L H2SO4, adjust the pH of the solution to 5.0, then mix it with the solution of EDTA x 2Na and heat it in a water bath, then use polyamide powder as the stationary phase of solid phase extraction to separate the pigments from the solution, and finally elute the pigments with 0.1 mol/L NaOH. The CZE conditions systematically optimized for tartrazine aluminum lake were: 48.50 cm of a fused silica capillary with 40.00 cm effective length and 50 microm i. d., the temperature controlled at 20.0 degrees C, 29.0 kV applied, HPO4(2-)-PO4(3-) (0.015 mol/L, pH 11.45) solution as running buffer, detection at 263 nm. The conditions for sunset yellow aluminum lake were: the same capillary and temperature, 25.0 kV applied, HPO4(2-)-PO4(3-) (0.025 mol/L, pH 11.45) solution as running buffer, detection at 240 nm. The limits of detection were 0.26 mg/L and 0.27 mg/L, and the linear ranges were 0.53-1.3 x 10(2) mg/L and 0.54-1.4 x 10(2) mg/L for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake, respectively. The RSDs were 4.3% and 5.7% (run to run, n = 6), 5.6% and 6.0% (day to day, n = 6) for tartrazine aluminum lake and sunset yellow aluminum lake, respectively. Further developments for this method could make it a routinely used method analyzing color lakes in foods.

  14. Heterogeneous reaction of ozone with aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    Rates and collision efficiencies for ozone decomposition on aluminum oxide surfaces were determined. Samples were characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction, particle size, and chemical analysis. Collision efficiencies were found to be between 2 times 10 to the -10 power and 2 times 10 to the -9 power. This is many orders of magnitude below the value of 0.000001 to 0.00001 needed for appreciable long-term ozone loss in the stratosphere. An activation energy of 7.2 kcal/mole was found for the heterogeneous reaction between -40 C and 40 C. Effects of pore diffusion, outgassing and treatment of the aluminum oxide with several chemical species were also investigated.

  15. Nonlinear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, M.-J.; Herakovich, C. T.; Becker, W.; Aboudi, J.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results obtained for unidirectional boron/aluminum subjected to combined loading using off-axis tension, compression and Iosipescu shear specimens are correlated with a nonlinear micromechanics model. It is illustrated that the nonlinear response in the principal material directions is markedly influenced by the different loading modes and different ratios of the applied stress components. The observed nonlinear response under pure and combined loading is discussed in terms of initial yielding, subsequent hardening, stress-interaction effects and unloading-reloading characteristics. The micromechanics model is based on the concept of a repeating unit cell representative of the composite-at-large and employs the unified theory of Bodner and Partom to model the inelastic response of the matrix. It is shown that the employed micromechanics model is sufficiently general to predict the observed nonlinear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum with good accuracy.

  16. Aluminum recycling—An integrated, industrywide approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subodh K.; Green, John A. S.; Kaufman, J. Gilbert; Emadi, Daryoush; Mahfoud, M.

    2010-02-01

    The aluminum industry is a leading proponent of global sustainability and strongly advocates the use of recycled metal. As the North American primary aluminum industry continues to move offshore to other geographic areas such as Iceland and the Middle East, where energy is more readily available at lower cost, the importance of the secondary (i.e., recycled metal) market in the U.S. will continue to increase. The purpose of this paper is to take an integrated, industry-wide look at the recovery of material from demolished buildings, shredded automobiles, and aging aircraft, as well as from traditional cans and other rigid containers. Attempts will be made to assess how the different alloys used in these separate markets can be recycled in the most energy-efficient manner.

  17. Generation and structural characterization of aluminum cyanoacetylide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, Carlos; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Cernicharo, José; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2014-09-01

    Combined spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations bring to light a first investigation of a metallic cyanoacetylide, AlC3N, using laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. This molecule was synthesized in a supersonic expansion by the reaction of aluminum vapour with C3N, produced from solid aluminum rods and BrCCCN in a newly constructed ablation-heating nozzle device. A set of accurate rotational and 27Al and 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of the rotational spectrum and compared with those predicted in a high-level ab initio study, conducting to the assignment of the observed species to linear AlCCCN. We have searched for this species towards the carbon-rich evolved star IRC + 10216 but only an upper limit to its abundance has been obtained.

  18. Generation and structural characterization of aluminum cyanoacetylide

    SciTech Connect

    Cabezas, Carlos; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L. E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Cernicharo, José

    2014-09-14

    Combined spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations bring to light a first investigation of a metallic cyanoacetylide, AlC{sub 3}N, using laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. This molecule was synthesized in a supersonic expansion by the reaction of aluminum vapour with C{sub 3}N, produced from solid aluminum rods and BrCCCN in a newly constructed ablation-heating nozzle device. A set of accurate rotational and {sup 27}Al and {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of the rotational spectrum and compared with those predicted in a high-level ab initio study, conducting to the assignment of the observed species to linear AlCCCN. We have searched for this species towards the carbon-rich evolved star IRC + 10216 but only an upper limit to its abundance has been obtained.

  19. Cratering Equations for Zinc Orthotitanate Coated Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James; Christiansen, Eric; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Ryan, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    The final STS-125 servicing mission (SM4) to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May of 2009 saw the return of the 2nd Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC2) aboard the shuttle Discovery. This hardware had been in service on HST since it was installed during the SM1 mission in December of 1993 yielding one of the longest low Earth orbit exposure times (15.4 years) of any returned space hardware. The WFPC2 is equipped with a 0.8 x 2.2 m radiator for thermal control of the camera electronics (Figure 1). The space facing surface of the 4.1 mm thick aluminum radiator is coated with Z93 zinc orthotitanate thermal control paint with a nominal thickness of 0.1 0.2 mm. Post flight inspections of the radiator panel revealed hundreds of micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) impact craters ranging in size from less than 300 to nearly 1000 microns in diameter. The Z93 paint exhibited large spall areas around the larger impact sites (Figure 2) and the craters observed in the 6061-T651 aluminum had a different shape than those observed in uncoated aluminum. Typical hypervelocity impact craters in aluminum have raised lips around the impact site. The craters in the HST radiator panel had suppressed crater lips, and in some cases multiple craters were present instead of a single individual crater. Humes and Kinard observed similar behavior after the WFPC1 post flight inspection and assumed the Z93 coating was acting like a bumper in a Whipple shield. Similar paint behavior (spall) was also observed by Bland2 during post flight inspection of the International Space Station (ISS) S-Band Antenna Structural Assembly (SASA) in 2008. The SASA, with similar Z93 coated aluminum, was inspected after nearly 4 years of exposure on the ISS. The multi-crater phenomena could be a function of the density, composition, or impact obliquity angle of the impacting particle. For instance, a micrometeoroid particle consisting of loosely bound grains of material could be responsible for creating the

  20. Aluminum nanocomposites for elevated temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonovo, C.; Apelian, D.; Makhlouf, M. M.

    2011-02-01

    Aluminum casting alloys conventionally used in the automotive and aerospace industries (i.e., Al-Zn-Mg, and Al-Cu-Mg systems) are able to achieve excellent tensile strength at room temperature. At high temperatures, such alloys lose dimensional stability and their mechanical properties rapidly degrade. Aluminum-based nanocomposites show the potential for enhanced performance at high temperatures. The manufacturing process, however, is difficult; a viable and effective method for large-scale applications has not been developed. In the current study, an innovative and cost-effective approach has been adopted to manufacture Al/AlN composites. A nitrogen-bearing gas is injected into the melt and AlN particles synthesize in-situ via chemical reaction. In a preliminary stage, a model able to predict the amount of reinforcement formed has been developed. AlN dispersoids have been succesfully synthesized in the matrix and the model has been experimentally validated.

  1. Generation and structural characterization of aluminum cyanoacetylide

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas, Carlos; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Cernicharo, José; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Combined spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations bring to light a first investigation of a metallic cyanoacetylide, AlC3N, using laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. This molecule was synthesized in a supersonic expansion by the reaction of aluminum vapour with C3N, produced from solid aluminum rods and BrCCCN in a newly constructed ablation-heating nozzle device. A set of accurate rotational and 27Al and 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of the rotational spectrum and compared with those predicted in a high-level ab initio study, conducting to the assignment of the observed species to linear AlCCCN. We have searched for this species towards the carbon-rich evolved star IRC + 10216 but only an upper limit to its abundance has been obtained. PMID:25217914

  2. Fabrication of aluminum-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    A screening, optimization, and evaluation program is reported of unidirectional carbon-aluminum composites. During the screening phase both large diameter monofilament and small diameter multifilament reinforcements were utilized to determine optimum precursor tape making and consolidation techniques. Difficulty was encountered in impregnating and consolidating the multifiber reinforcements. Large diameter monofilament reinforcement was found easier to fabricate into composites and was selected to carry into the optimization phase in which the hot pressing parameters were refined and the size of the fabricated panels was scaled up. After process optimization the mechanical properties of the carbon-aluminum composites were characterized in tension, stress-rupture and creep, mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermal aging, thermal expansion, and impact.

  3. Time Series Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas

    The key, central objectives of the proposed Time Series Explorer project are to develop an organized collection of software tools for analysis of time series data in current and future NASA astrophysics data archives, and to make the tools available in two ways: as a library (the Time Series Toolbox) that individual science users can use to write their own data analysis pipelines, and as an application (the Time Series Automaton) providing an accessible, data-ready interface to many Toolbox algorithms, facilitating rapid exploration and automatic processing of time series databases. A number of time series analysis methods will be implemented, including techniques that range from standard ones to state-of-the-art developments by the proposers and others. Most of the algorithms will be able to handle time series data subject to real-world problems such as data gaps, sampling that is otherwise irregular, asynchronous sampling (in multi-wavelength settings), and data with non-Gaussian measurement errors. The proposed research responds to the ADAP element supporting the development of tools for mining the vast reservoir of information residing in NASA databases. The tools that will be provided to the community of astronomers studying variability of astronomical objects (from nearby stars and extrasolar planets, through galactic and extragalactic sources) will revolutionize the quality of timing analyses that can be carried out, and greatly enhance the scientific throughput of all NASA astrophysics missions past, present, and future. The Automaton will let scientists explore time series - individual records or large data bases -- with the most informative and useful analysis methods available, without having to develop the tools themselves or understand the computational details. Both elements, the Toolbox and the Automaton, will enable deep but efficient exploratory time series data analysis, which is why we have named the project the Time Series Explorer. Science

  4. A Positron Annihilation Study of Corrosion of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloy by NaOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. C.; Zhai, T.; Coleman, P. G.

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion of fully-annealed pure aluminum and a continuous-cast AA2037 aluminum alloy (solutionized and water quenched) in a 1M NaOH solution for various periods of time were analyzed with positron beam-based Doppler broadening spectroscopy. By varying the energy of the incident positron beam, corrosion-induced defects at different depths from the surface were detected. It was found that the Doppler-broadened annihilation line-width parameter was significantly increased near the surface of pure aluminum after corrosion, probably due to the interaction between positrons and nanometer-sized voids formed near the aluminum surface during corrosion. Examination by atomic force microscopy indicated that many pits were formed on the aluminum surface after corrosion. In contrast, a significant decrease in the line-width parameter was observed in AA2037 alloy after corrosion and interpreted as being caused by copper enrichment at the metal-oxide interface during corrosion; such enrichment at large cavity sites was confirmed by energy dispersion spectrometry.

  5. Anodizing And Sealing Aluminum In Nonchromated Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmons, John R.; Kallenborn, Kelli J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved process for anodizing and sealing aluminum involves use of 5 volume percent sulfuric acid in water as anodizing solution, and 1.5 to 2.0 volume percent nickel acetate in water as sealing solution. Replaces process in which sulfuric acid used at concentrations of 10 to 20 percent. Improved process yields thinner coats offering resistance to corrosion, fatigue life, and alloy-to-alloy consistency equal to or superior to those of anodized coats produced with chromated solutions.

  6. Processing of 2090 Aluminum Alloy for Superplasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    behavior has now been extensively documented in Al-Mg alloys, with elongations in excess of 1,000 percent obtained in many cases in these alloys. The...crucial. Characteristics of superplastic behavior include a fine grain size (two to five microns), a strain rate sensitivity coefficient m > 0.3, 1 I| and...seven to eight percent less and demonstrates ten percent higher stiffness than 7075 aluminum, an alloy it was designed to replace. This is due to the

  7. The Delayed Fracture of Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    if necessary and Identify by block number) aluminum alloys, stress - corrosion cracking, oxide film, Auger electron spectroscopy, Auger depth profiling...revere Ide If r ecester’ nd Ientify by block number). b -. ,h 0 unJaInenta mechanZsm of stress - corrosion cracking (SCC) has been studied for high-purity...these specimens is not intergranular. Fracture appears to have originated through pitting corrosion , which caused local stress concentration leading to

  8. Thermomechanical Properties of Center-Reinforced Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    hybrid material, CentrAl (Center-reinforced Aluminum), under monotonic thermo-mechanical loading and dynamic mechanical loading. Mechanical behavior...established characteristics of the individual constituent materials. Monotonic and dynamic tests were conducted on coupon-level specimens of CentrAl...using standardized testing procedures. Static tests to measure modulus , strength, and blunt notch (open-hole) strength were conducted at three

  9. Trivalent Chromium Solutions for Sealing Anodized Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-20

    the comparatively innocuous trivalent form before acid , chromic acid , oxalic acid , sulfophthalic acid , boric disposal. This method is expensive and...or had only faint anodized aluminum substrates by immersion in a mildly traces of corrosion . All 7075-T6 panels provided with acid solution containing...alloy panels wereP 10 anodized in 15% (weight) sulfuric acid solution for 30 To produce improved corrosion resistance on anod- minutes at 21 C. at 18

  10. Fast Reactions of Aluminum - A Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-21

    mass spectrometry. Methane kas determined by gas -liquid chromotography , While still hot and under va6dum, phe omb was washed with Water. These washinswte...Metal - Liquid Water Interaction ...... 4 Solid Aluminum-Water Reaction ............ .............. 5 Metal- Gas Reaction 7...Witte, "Explosive Interaction of Molten Metals Injected Into Water," Nucl. Sc. and Eng., 48, 387-396, 1972. 4. M. Epstein, "Thermal Fragmentation - A Gas

  11. Aluminum ion-containing polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Taylor, L. T.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A meta-oriented aromatic diamine is reacted with an aromatic dianhydride and an aluminum compound in the presence of a water or lower alkanol miscible ether solvent to produce an intermediate polyamic acid. The polyamic acid is then converted to the thermally stable, metal ion-filled polyimide by heating in the temperature range of 300 C to produce a flexible, high temperature adhesive.

  12. Chromate Conversion Coating of Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-10

    a sodium sulfate-nitric acid solution sometimes used to clean aluminum prior to spotwelding. Immersion times were varied in the chromate-sulfate...Good results were also obtained with sodium sulfate-nitric acid and an 8 minute treatment in one non-chromete proprietary solution. Average resis...molybdate or tungstate salts with the ferricyanide ion considered to be the most effective accelerator. Water for Bath Make-Up and Rinsing It is very

  13. Degassing of Aluminum Alloys Using Ultrasonic Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, T. T.; Han, Q.; Xu, H.

    2006-06-01

    The research was intended to lead to a better fundamental understanding of the effect of ultrasonic energy on the degassing of liquid metals and to develop practical approaches for the ultrasonic degassing of alloys. The goals of the project described here were to evaluate core principles, establish a quantitative basis for the ultrasonic degassing of aluminum alloy melts, and demonstrate the application of ultrsaonic processing during ingot casting and foundry shape casting.

  14. Thermal Response of an Additive Manufactured Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tong; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, Hsin; Ozpineci, Burak; Ayers, Curtis William

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the impacts of abnormal thermal property introduced by additive manufacture has been analysis based on simulation and experiment of a 3D printed liquid-cooled heat sink. Comparisons to the heat sink with identical geometry and conventionally manufactured by Aluminum 6061 are presented. Micro-structure analysis is implemented and solutions to eliminate the impacts by different manufacture methods are proposed.

  15. Intelligent control of vacuum aluminum brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, G.; Pai, D.M.; Badgley, S.

    1995-06-01

    Vacuum brazing is a versatile modern day metal joining method. It usually includes vacuum producing, heating and residual gas analyzing systems. When used to join aluminum parts, the quality of the brazed joint is highly dependent on the residual gases in the vacuum, especially the residual oxygen and water vapor in the vacuum chamber which affect the formation of oxides. These vacuum environment brazing contaminants are reduced during the out-gassing processes of degassing and desorption during heating under vacuum. Exceeding the boundary limits of these contaminants causes unacceptable flow of braze filler in the joints during the brazing process. Identification of the quality control boundary for vacuum brazing of aluminum alloy makes computer control of vacuum brazing quality for aluminum alloys possible. The present study utilizes a residual gas analyzer (RGA) to monitor the partial pressures of residual gases during brazing. These data are transported to computer through the RS-232 interface port on the RGA, and used in real time to monitor the brazing quality by an algorithm based on the quality control boundary. If the quality is bad, the computer will send a ``hold`` signal to the heating system via another Rs-232 port until the environment is reestablished within the acceptable boundary.

  16. Gating of Permanent Molds for Aluminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-011D13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was to determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings. Equipment and procedure for real time X-Ray radiography of molten aluminum flow into permanent molds have been developed. Other studies have been conducted using water flow and behavior of liquid aluminum in sand mold using real time photography. This investigation utilizes graphite molds transparent to X-Rays making it possible to observe the flow pattern through a number of vertically oriented grating systems. These have included systems that are choked at the base of a rounded vertical sprue and vertical gating systems with a variety of different ingates into the bottom of a mold cavity. These systems have also been changed to include gating systems with vertical and horizontal gate configurations. Several conclusions can be derived from this study. A sprue-well, as designed in these experiments, does not eliminate the vena contracta. Because of the swirling at the sprue-base, the circulating metal begins to push the entering metal stream toward the open runner mitigating the intended effect of the sprue-well. Improved designs of

  17. Biaxial deformation in high purity aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    Livescu, V.; Bingert, J. F.; Liu, C.; ...

    2015-09-25

    The convergence of multiple characterization tools has been applied to investigate the relationship of microstructure on damage evolution in high purity aluminum. The extremely coarse grain size of the disc-shaped sample provided a quasi-two dimensional structure from which the location of surface-measured features could be inferred. In particular, the role of pre-existing defects on damage growth was accessible due to the presence of casting porosity in the aluminum. Micro tomography, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation were applied to interrogate the sample in three dimensions. Recently micro-bulge testing apparatus was used to deform the pre-characterized disc of aluminum inmore » biaxial tension, and related analysis techniques were applied to map local strain fields. Subsequent post-mortem characterization of the failed sample was performed to correlate structure to damaged regions. We determined that strain localization and associated damage was most strongly correlated with grain boundary intersections and plastic anisotropy gradients between grains. Pre-existing voids played less of an apparent role than was perhaps initially expected. Finally, these combined techniques provide insight to the mechanism of damage initiation, propagation, and failure, along with a test bed for predictive damage models incorporating anisotropic microstructural effects.« less

  18. On the dissolution of iridium by aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Hewson, John C.

    2009-08-01

    The potential for liquid aluminum to dissolve an iridium solid is examined. Substantial uncertainties exist in material properties, and the available data for the iridium solubility and iridium diffusivity are discussed. The dissolution rate is expressed in terms of the regression velocity of the solid iridium when exposed to the solvent (aluminum). The temperature has the strongest influence in the dissolution rate. This dependence comes primarily from the solubility of iridium in aluminum and secondarily from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient. This dissolution mass flux is geometry dependent and results are provided for simplified geometries at constant temperatures. For situations where there is negligible convective flow, simple time-dependent diffusion solutions are provided. Correlations for mass transfer are also given for natural convection and forced convection. These estimates suggest that dissolution of iridium can be significant for temperatures well below the melting temperature of iridium, but the uncertainties in actual rates are large because of uncertainties in the physical parameters and in the details of the relevant geometries.

  19. Sonolytic desorption of mercury from aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    He, Ziqi; Traina, Samuel J; Bigham, Jerry M; Weavers, Linda K

    2005-02-15

    As discrete particles and/or as coatings on other mineral surfaces in natural systems, aluminum (hydr)oxides are efficient sinks for Hg(II). Ultrasound at 20 kHz was applied to enhance the desorption of Hg(II) from aluminum oxide particles (5.0 micromol of Hg g(-1)). Results showed that at short times ultrasound enhanced Hg(II) release at pH 4.0 compared to both that from hydrodynamic mixing and that expected on the basis of the Hg(II) sorption isotherm. The higher the input power of sonication, the higher the desorption of Hg(II). However, with longer times, much less desorption occurred by ultrasound than by hydrodynamic mixing, with mass balance measurements demonstrating that the desorbed Hg(II) was resorbed back to the particles. The particles were characterized to explore the mechanism for resorption of Hg(II) by prolonged sonication. No surface area change was observed even though ultrasound dramatically reduced the particle size and changed the surface morphology. Although a decrease in the point of zero charge (PZC) due to sonication was observed, it was excluded as the primary mechanism for Hg(II) resorption. Hg(II) occlusion by aluminum hydroxide precipitation was supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results and the formation of solutions supersaturated with AI. Experiments on presonicated particles verified the occlusion theory by ruling out the effects of the surface area and PZC.

  20. Oxide-assisted laser surfacing of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoepp, E. E.; Kerr, Hugh W.

    1996-04-01

    CO2 laser processing has been carried out on pure aluminum substrates for travel speeds from 0.3 to 6.1 mm/s, using laser powers of about 100 W or 300 W, with various preplaced single or mixed powders including CoO, NiO, SiO2, Fe2O3 or TiO2 usually combined with enough aluminum powder to permit complete reduction of the oxides. The 100 W laser experiments included low, normal and high gravity experiments. The resulting tracks were tested qualitatively for scratch resistance, and examined metallographically. Two types of surfacing were observed; continuous oxide layers produced by melting and an oxidation- reduction reaction of the original oxides with aluminum, and alloying of the substrate by elements reduced by the reaction. Low gravity experiments produced more uniform thicknesses and generally less cracking in the continuous oxides than normal or high gravity experiments. Alloying of the substrate ranged from almost 100% intermetallic layers at low laser powers and low travel speeds to complex mixtures and bands of different phases, depending on the temporal stability of the process, the powder composition and thickness, the laser power and travel speed. Optimization of the process could provide useful wear resistant coatings in a space environment.