Science.gov

Sample records for 8 hour ozone

  1. 8 HOUR OZONE DESIGN VALUE FOR 1998-2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ozone design value is based on the average of the annual 4th highest dailsy 8-hour maximum over a 3-year period (1998-2000) in this case. This is a human health based metric. Ozone causes respiratory illness in humans.

  2. 78 FR 47572 - Disapproval of State Implementation Plan; Infrastructure Requirements for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard; Montana AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... the Clean Air Act (CAA) for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) promulgated for ozone... Agency. (iii) The initials NAAQS mean or refer to National Ambient Air Quality Standards. (iv)...

  3. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  4. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  5. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? The... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of...

  6. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? The... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of...

  7. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? The... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of...

  8. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? The requirements for new source review for the 8-hour ozone standard are located in § 51.165 of this part....

  9. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  10. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  11. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  12. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  13. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  14. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  15. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  16. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  17. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  18. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  19. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  2. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2499 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.2499 Section 52.2499 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Washington § 52.2499 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On January 17, 2007,...

  4. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In General... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the requirements for an...

  5. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.908 What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection...

  6. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.908 What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection...

  7. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In General... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the requirements for an...

  8. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.908 What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection...

  9. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In General... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the requirements for an...

  10. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In General... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for an...

  11. 40 CFR 52.2499 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.2499 Section 52.2499 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Washington § 52.2499 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On January 17, 2007,...

  12. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  13. 40 CFR 52.2499 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.2499 Section 52.2499 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Washington § 52.2499 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On January 17, 2007,...

  14. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  15. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  16. 75 FR 68733 - Approval and Promulgation of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... Revision; State of New Jersey'' proposed April 23, 2010 (75 FR 21197) and final rulemaking August 3, 2010... Control Measure'' proposed July 22, 2010 (75 FR 42672); and (2) The maximum 4th highest daily 8-hour.... Table 1--Monitoring Data for 8-Hour Ozone in the Philadelphia Area 4th Max 8-hr Site ID...

  17. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  18. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  19. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  20. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  1. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  2. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  3. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  4. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  5. 78 FR 65877 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Georgia's ROP plan for the 1-hour ozone NAAQS for the Atlanta Area on April 26, 1999. See 64 FR 20196. \\3..., Paulding, and Rockdale. See 56 FR 56694, November 6, 1991. \\4\\ Seven additional ``ring'' counties were.... These additional counties are: Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, Hall, Newton, Spalding, and Walton. See 69...

  6. 78 FR 32135 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... the 1-hour ozone NAAQS for the Atlanta Area on April 26, 1999. See 64 FR 20196. \\3\\ The 13-County.... See 56 FR 56694, November 6, 1991. \\4\\ Seven additional ``ring'' counties were added to the original 1... counties include: Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, Hall, Newton, Spalding, and Walton. See 69 FR 23857, April...

  7. 78 FR 34965 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8... the request by Ohio to revise the Lima, Ohio 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance air quality...

  8. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection...

  9. 75 FR 57220 - Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New Source Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ..., e-mail address, and telephone and fax numbers. Questions concerning the August 24, 2010 (75 FR 51960... holding the public hearing was published in the Federal Register on August 24, 2010 (75 FR 51960), and is... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 51 RIN 2060-AP30 Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... dated replacement pages for the Montana Interstate Transport Rule Declaration. The new set of pages were sent as replacement for the set of undated pages submitted earlier with the February 12, 2007 Record...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... dated replacement pages for the Montana Interstate Transport Rule Declaration. The new set of pages were sent as replacement for the set of undated pages submitted earlier with the February 12, 2007 Record...

  12. 77 FR 43521 - Final Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 81 RIN 2060-AO96 Final Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: Classification of Areas That Were Initially Classified Under Subpart 1; Revision of the Anti-Backsliding Provisions To Address...

  13. 76 FR 10815 - Approval and Promulgation of Determination of Attainment for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... 12898 (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994). In addition, this proposed 8-hour ozone clean NAAQS data... that the area has attained the NAAQS during the 2008-2010 monitoring period. On March 27, 2008 (73 FR... by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4,...

  14. 75 FR 79302 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Dallas/Fort Worth 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... nonattainment area failed to attain the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS or... review of complete, quality assured and certified ambient air quality monitoring data for the 2007-2009 monitoring period that are available in the EPA Air Quality System (AQS) database. As a result of this...

  15. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... classified as moderate or higher under subpart 2 pursuant to § 51.903? An area classified as moderate or... area subject only to subpart 1 in accordance with § 51.902(b)? An area subject to § 51.902(b) shall be... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection...

  16. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918 Section 51.918 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1989 Section 52.1989 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Oregon § 52.1989 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS....

  18. 78 FR 34906 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... 1.36 Total 18.46 17.41 15.07 3.39 Table 2--Total NOX Emissions With MOVES2010a Mobile Emissions in... attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone standard effective June 15, 2007 (72 FR 27648), and MOBILE6.2-based...(c) of the CAA. See the official release of the MOVES2010 emissions model (75 FR 9411-9414)...

  19. 75 FR 47746 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Dallas/Fort Worth 1997 8-hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... is more protective than the previous 1-hour ozone standard (62 FR 38855) that was established by EPA in 1979. We revoked the 1-hour ozone standard effective June 15, 2005. See 40 CFR 50.9(b) and 69 FR...). See 69 FR 23857 (April 30, 2004).\\1\\ Ambient air quality monitoring data for the 3-year period...

  20. 77 FR 21690 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plan for 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone'', January 6, 2010 and 75 FR 2938 (January 19, 2010). On...-hour standard of 0.08 ppm \\1\\ (62 FR 33856). EPA revised the ozone standard after considering... standards by lowering the level for both to 0.075 ppm (73 FR 16436, Mar. 27, 2008). B. The Phoenix-Mesa...

  1. 76 FR 54412 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Baltimore 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... ambient air quality data for the 2009 ozone season. (See 76 FR 13289.) On June 4, 2010, EPA approved a..., and individuals with a pre-existing respiratory disease, such as asthma. On March 27, 2008 (73 FR... standard. B. The Baltimore Area On April 30, 2004 (69 FR 23951), EPA finalized its...

  2. Trends analyses of 30 years of ambient 8 hour ozone and precursor monitoring data in the South Central U.S.: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sather, Mark E; Cavender, Kevin

    2016-07-13

    In the last 30 years ambient ozone concentrations have notably decreased in the South Central U.S. Yet, current ambient ozone concentrations measured over the past three years 2013-2015 in this area of the U.S. are not meeting the U.S. 2015 8 hour ozone standard of 70 parts per billion (ppb). This paper provides an update on long-term trends analyses of ambient 8 hour ozone and ozone precursor monitoring data collected over the past 30 years (1986-2015) in four South Central U.S. cities, following up on two previously published reviews of 20 and 25 year trends for these cities. All four cities have benefitted from national ozone precursor controls put in place during the 1990s and 2000s involving cleaner vehicles (vehicle fleet turnover/replacement over time), cleaner fuels, cleaner gasoline and diesel engines, and improved inspection/maintenance programs for existing vehicles. Additional ozone precursor emission controls specific to each city are detailed in this paper. The controls have resulted in impressive ambient ozone and ambient ozone precursor concentration reductions in the four South Central U.S. cities over the past 30 years, including 31-70% ambient nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentration declines from historical peaks to the present, 43-72% volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration declines from historical peaks to the present, a related 45-76% VOC reactivity decline for a subset of VOC species from historical peaks to the present, and an 18-38 ppb reduction in city 8 hour ozone design value concentrations. A new challenge for each of the four South Central U.S. cities will be meeting the U.S. 2015 8 hour ozone standard of 70 ppb. PMID:27282109

  3. 77 FR 28423 - Final Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... addition to being available in the docket, an electronic copy of this notice is also available on the World... 13211: Actions That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use I. National Technology... rulemaking (74 FR 2936). \\1\\ 74 FR 2936, January 16, 2009. III. This Action A. Classification of 8-Hour...

  4. 76 FR 2829 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Adoption of 8-hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... NAAQS for ozone on March 27, 2008 (73 FR 16436). II. Summary of SIP Revision On September 27, 2010, the... Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information...); Does not have Federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August...

  5. 75 FR 8331 - Adequacy Status of the Cincinnati, Ohio/Indiana Submitted 8-Hour Ozone Redesignation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... submitted SIP budgets in our July 1, 2004, preamble starting at 69 FR 40038, and we used the information in... (NOx) as precursors to ozone in the Ohio and Indiana portions of the Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH/KY/IN... (tpd), for VOCs and NOx for the Ohio and Indiana portions of the Cincinnati, Ohio area are as...

  6. Eastern Texas Air Quality Forecasting System to Support TexAQS-II and 8-hour Ozone Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, D. W.

    2005-12-01

    The main objective of the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS-II) for 2005 and 2006 is to understand emissions and processes associated with the formation and transport of ozone and regional haze in Texas. The target research area is the more populated eastern half of the state, roughly from Interstate 35 eastward. Accurate meteorological and photochemical modeling efforts are essential to support this study and further enhance modeling efforts for establishing the State Implementation Plan (SIP) by Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). An air quality forecasting (AQF) system for Eastern Texas has been developed to provide these data and to further facilitate retrospective simulations to allow for model improvement and increased understanding of ozone episodes and emissions. We perform two-day air quality forecasting simulations with the 12-km Eastern Texas regional domain, and the 4-km Houston-Galveston area (HGA) domain utilizing a 48-CPU Beowulf Linux computer system. The dynamic boundary conditions are provided by the 36-km resolution conterminous US (CONUS) domain CMAQ simulations. Initial meteorological conditions are provided by the daily ETA forecast results. The results of individual runs are stored and made available to researchers and state and local officials via internet to study the patterns of air quality and its relationship to weather conditions and emissions. The data during the pre- and post-processing stages are in tens of gigabytes and must be managed efficiently during both the actual real-time and the subsequent computation periods. The nature of these forecasts and the time at which the initial data is available necessitates that models be executed within tight deadlines. A set of complex operational scripts is used to allow automatic operation of the data download, sequencing processors, performing graphical analysis, building database archives, and presenting on the web.

  7. A Procedure for Inter-Comparing the Skill of Regional-Scale Air Quality Model Simulations of Daily Maximum 8-Hour Ozone Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    An operational model evaluation procedure is described to quantitatively assess the relative skill among several regionalscale air quality models simulating various percentiles of the cumulative frequency distribution of observed daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations. Bootstrap ...

  8. 75 FR 43114 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard in the Baltimore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... quality standard (NAAQS). This extension is based in part on air quality data for the 4th highest daily 8..., EPA is approving the State's request as a direct final rule without prior proposal because the Agency... Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103. Copies of the State submittal are available at...

  9. 75 FR 43069 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard in the Baltimore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Nonattainment Area 4th Max 8-HR Site ID County/State Year (ppm) 24-003-0014 Anne Arundel, MD 2009 0.070 24-005.... Statutory and Executive Order Reviews Under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993), this... Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use'' (66 FR 28355 (May...

  10. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality... subsequently redesignated to nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, any absolute, fixed date applicable...

  11. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality... subsequently redesignated to nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, any absolute, fixed date applicable...

  12. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality... subsequently redesignated to nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, any absolute, fixed date applicable...

  13. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality... subsequently redesignated to nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, any absolute, fixed date applicable...

  14. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality... subsequently redesignated to nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, any absolute, fixed date applicable...

  15. 75 FR 10420 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: 1-Hour Ozone Extreme Area Plan for San Joaquin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... of Proposed Actions On July 14, 2009 at 74 FR 33933, EPA proposed to approve in part and disapprove...-hour ozone standard). 69 FR 20550 (April 15, 2004). Although we established a new 8-hour ozone standard...\\ See 62 FR 38856 (July 18, 1997). In 2008 we lowered the 8- hour ozone standard to 0.075 ppm. See 73...

  16. 77 FR 3720 - Determination of Failure To Attain the One-Hour Ozone Standard by 2007, Determination of Current...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ..., EPA reviewed ozone monitoring air quality data from the States, in accordance with 40 CFR 50.9, 40 CFR... Implement the 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard--Phase 1,'' referred to as the Phase 1 Rule... period). \\2\\ Final Rule to Implement the 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard--Phase 1,...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  2. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... designated nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS and for any area in a section 184 ozone transport region...) A section 182(f) NOX exemption granted for the 1-hour ozone standard does not relieve the area...

  3. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... designated nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS and for any area in a section 184 ozone transport region...) A section 182(f) NOX exemption granted for the 1-hour ozone standard does not relieve the area...

  4. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... designated nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS and for any area in a section 184 ozone transport region...) A section 182(f) NOX exemption granted for the 1-hour ozone standard does not relieve the area...

  5. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.915 What... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part...

  6. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.915 What... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part...

  7. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.915 What... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part...

  8. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.915 What... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part...

  9. Pulmonary Responses in Healthy Young Adults Exposed to Low Concentration of Ozone for 6.6 Hours with Mild Exercise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rational: Recent studies have shown small but significant decreases in lung function following a prolonged exposure (6.6 hour) of healthy young adults to levels of ozone (0.08 ppm) near the current 8 hour standard. It is unclear, however, if such effects may be extended to concen...

  10. 77 FR 36163 - Determinations of Failure To Attain the One-Hour Ozone Standard by 2007, Current Attainment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ...-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard--Phase 1, 69 FR 23951 (April 30, 2004). III. What... determining that the area previously failed to attain the one-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard... ozone monitoring data for 2008-2010. Quality-assured ozone monitoring data in the Air Quality System......

  11. PROPORTION OF MODERATELY EXERCISING INDIVIDUALS RESPONDING TO LOW-LEVEL, MULTI-HOUR OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to describe the proportion of moderately exercising individuals experiencing significant respiratory responses to low-level, multi-hour ozone exposure as a function of ozone concentration and exposure duration. ixty-eight healthy, nonsmoking adults, ...

  12. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part 51... nonattainment area subject only to title I, part D, subpart 1 of the Act in accordance with § 51.902(b), the... apply under the 8-hour NAAQS? 51.915 Section 51.915 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  13. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS? 51.913 Section 51.913 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... petition the Administrator for an exemption from NOX obligations under section 182(f) for any...

  14. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  15. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  16. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  17. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  18. Association between Diurnal Variation of Ozone Concentration and Stroke Occurrence: 24-Hour Time Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Myung-Hoon; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Kim, Young-Seo; Ko, Yong; Kim, Young-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Increasing ozone concentrations have been known to damage human health and ecosystems. Although ozone tends to display diurnal variation, most studies have reported only on the association between daily ozone concentrations and ischemic stroke occurrence on the same day, or with a 1-day lag. We investigated the effect of the diurnal variation of ozone on ischemic stroke occurrence during the same day. Methods We included a consecutive series of 1,734 patients from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2014, at a single tertiary hospital in Seoul, South Korea. We evaluated differences between temperature and pollutants at the time of stroke onset for each time interval and averaged those parameters across the 7-year study period. Results During the interval from 13:00 to 16:59, we found a positive association between ischemic stroke occurrence and ozone concentration relative to other time periods. Upper median ozone levels from 13:00 to 16:59 were positively correlated with ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.550; 95% confidence intervals, 1.220 to 1.970; P = <0.001) when compared with lower median levels. Conclusions The results show diurnal patterns of ischemic stroke occurrence based on upper and lower median ozone levels for a 24-hour period, which extends understanding of the association between stroke occurrence and environmental influences. PMID:27015421

  19. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. (c) EPA's authority under paragraph (b) of this section... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  20. 77 FR 64036 - Determination of Attainment of the 1-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ...EPA is determining that the Sacramento Metro 1-hour ozone nonattainment area (Sacramento Metro Area) has attained the revoked National Ambient Air Quality Standard (1-hour ozone NAAQS or standard), and to exclude certain 2008 data caused by wildfire exceptional events. These air quality determinations were proposed in conjunction with a proposed determination to terminate the State of......

  1. 78 FR 28497 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Canton-Massillon 1997 8-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone standard effective June 15, 2007, (72 FR 27648). MOBILE6.2-based budgets... the CAA. See the official release of the MOVES2010 emissions model (75 FR 9411-9414) for background... of MOVES2010 in March 2010 (75 FR 9411). Use of the MOVES model is required for regional...

  2. Reproducibility of the pulmonary function response of older men and women to a 2-hour ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bedi, J.F.; Horvath, S.M.; Drechsler-Parks, D.M.

    1988-08-01

    To test the reproducibility of the pulmonary function response to ozone exposure in older individuals, eight men and eight women, average age 62.8 years, participated in three 2-hour exposures to 0.45 ppm ozone at 23.3 C and 62.5 percent relative humidity. The first and second exposures were separated by an average time of 17.2 days, and 27.3 days separated the second and third exposures. Subjects alternated riding a bicycle ergometer for 20 minutes at an average minute ventilation of 26 liters BTPS (body temperature pressure, saturated), with 20-minute rest periods. Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV-1), and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of FVC (FEF 25-75%) were measured pre and post exposure. The reproducibility of individual pre-post changes were assessed by calculation of the best linear fit and correlation coefficients between exposures. For FVC and FEV-1, the slopes were significantly different from 1, and correlation coefficients not significantly different from zero, implying that older individuals may not respond consistently to similar ozone exposures.

  3. Comparison of TOMS, SBW & SBUV/2 Version 8 Total Column Ozone Data with Data from Groundstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labow, G. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data as well as SBUV and SBUV/2 data have been reprocessed with a new retrieval algorithm (Version 8) and an updated calibration procedure. An overview will be presented systematically comparing ozone values to an ensemble of Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers. The comparisons were made as a function of latitude, solar zenith angle, reflectivity and total ozone. Results show that the accuracy of the TOMS retrieval has been improved when aerosols are present in the atmosphere, when snow/ice and sea glint are present, and when ozone in the northern hemisphere is extremely low. TOMS overpass data are derived from the single TOMS best match measurement, almost always located within one degree of the ground station and usually made within an hour of local noon. The Version 8 Earth Probe TOMS ozone values have decreased by an average of about 1% due to a much better understanding of the calibration of the instrument. N-7 SBUV as well as the series of NOAA SBUV/2 column ozone values have also been processed with the Version 8 algorithm and have been compared to values from an ensemble of groundstations. Results show that the SBW column ozone values agree well with the groundstations and the datasets are useful for trend studies.

  4. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by the University of Alabama at Huntsville and NASA, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min temporal integration

  5. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air... determined that the Baton Rouge 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Under the provisions of 40 CFR 51.918 this determination...

  6. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air... determined that the Baton Rouge 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Under the provisions of 40 CFR 51.918 this determination...

  7. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air... determined that the Baton Rouge 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Under the provisions of 40 CFR 51.918 this determination...

  8. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air... determined that the Baton Rouge 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Under the provisions of 40 CFR 51.918 this determination...

  9. A direct sensitivity approach to predict hourly ozone resulting from compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standard.

    PubMed

    Simon, Heather; Baker, Kirk R; Akhtar, Farhan; Napelenok, Sergey L; Possiel, Norm; Wells, Benjamin; Timin, Brian

    2013-03-01

    In setting primary ambient air quality standards, the EPA's responsibility under the law is to establish standards that protect public health. As part of the current review of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS), the US EPA evaluated the health exposure and risks associated with ambient ozone pollution using a statistical approach to adjust recent air quality to simulate just meeting the current standard level, without specifying emission control strategies. One drawback of this purely statistical concentration rollback approach is that it does not take into account spatial and temporal heterogeneity of ozone response to emissions changes. The application of the higher-order decoupled direct method (HDDM) in the community multiscale air quality (CMAQ) model is discussed here to provide an example of a methodology that could incorporate this variability into the risk assessment analyses. Because this approach includes a full representation of the chemical production and physical transport of ozone in the atmosphere, it does not require assumed background concentrations, which have been applied to constrain estimates from past statistical techniques. The CMAQ-HDDM adjustment approach is extended to measured ozone concentrations by determining typical sensitivities at each monitor location and hour of the day based on a linear relationship between first-order sensitivities and hourly ozone values. This approach is demonstrated by modeling ozone responses for monitor locations in Detroit and Charlotte to domain-wide reductions in anthropogenic NOx and VOCs emissions. As seen in previous studies, ozone response calculated using HDDM compared well to brute-force emissions changes up to approximately a 50% reduction in emissions. A new stepwise approach is developed here to apply this method to emissions reductions beyond 50% allowing for the simulation of more stringent reductions in ozone concentrations. Compared to previous rollback methods, this

  10. 40 CFR 51.907 - For an area that fails to attain the 8-hour NAAQS by its attainment date, how does EPA interpret...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.907 For an area that... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false For an area that fails to attain the 8... the CAA? 51.907 Section 51.907 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  11. 40 CFR 51.907 - For an area that fails to attain the 8-hour NAAQS by its attainment date, how does EPA interpret...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.907 For an area that... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false For an area that fails to attain the 8... the CAA? 51.907 Section 51.907 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  12. A Comparison of TOMS Version 8 Total Column Ozone Data with Data from Groundstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labow, G. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data have been reprocessed with a new retrieval algorithm, (Version 8) and an updated calibration procedure. These data have been systematically compared to total ozone data from Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers for 73 individual ground stations. The comparisons were made as a function of latitude, solar zenith angle, reflectivity and total ozone. Results show that the accuracy of the TOMS retrieval'is much improved when aerosols are present in the atmosphere, when snow/ice and sea glint are present, and when ozone in the northern hemisphere is extremely low. TOMS overpass data are derived from the single TOMS best match measurement, almost always located within one degree of the ground station and usually made within an hour of local noon. The version 8 Earth Probe TOMS ozone values have decreased by an average of about 1% due to a much better understanding of the calibration of the instrument. The remaining differences between TOMS and ground stations suggest that there are still small errors in the TOMS retrievals. But if TOMS is used as a transfer standard to compare ground stations, the large station-to-station differences suggest the possibility of significant instrument errors at some ground stations.

  13. New classification scheme for ozone monitoring stations based on frequency distribution of hourly data.

    PubMed

    Tapia, O; Escudero, M; Lozano, Á; Anzano, J; Mantilla, E

    2016-02-15

    According to European Union (EU) legislation, ozone (O3) monitoring sites can be classified regarding their location (rural background, rural, suburban, urban) or based on the presence of emission sources (background, traffic, industrial). There have been attempts to improve these classifications aiming to reduce their ambiguity and subjectivity, but although scientifically sound, they lack the simplicity needed for operational purposes. We present a simple methodology for classifying O3 stations based on the characteristics of frequency distribution curves which are indicative of the actual impact of combustion sources emitting NO that consumes O3 via titration. Four classes are identified using 1998-2012 hourly data from 72 stations widely distributed in mainland Spain and the Balearic Islands. Types 1 and 2 present unimodal bell-shaped distribution with very low amount of data near zero reflecting a limited influence of combustion sources while Type 4 has a primary mode close to zero, showing the impact of combustion sources, and a minor mode for higher concentrations. Type 3 stations present bimodal distributions with the main mode in the higher levels. We propose a quantitative metric based on the Gini index with the objective of reproducing this classification and finding empirical ranges potentially useful for future classifications. The analysis of the correspondence with the EUROAIRNET classes for the 72 stations reveals that the proposed scheme is only dependent on the impact of combustion sources and not on climatic or orographic aspects. It is demonstrated that this classification is robust since in 87% of the occasions the classification obtained for individual years coincide with the global classification obtained for the 1998-2012 period. Finally, case studies showing the applicability of the new classification scheme for assessing the impact on O3 of a station relocation and performing a critical evaluation of an air quality monitoring network are

  14. Exposure of humans to ambient levels of ozone for 6. 6 hours causes cellular and biochemical changes in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, R.B.; McDonnell, W.F.; Mann, R.; Becker, S.; House, D.E.; Schreinemachers, D.; Koren, H.S. )

    1991-01-01

    An acute (2 h) exposure of humans to 0.4 ppm ozone initiates biochemical changes in the lung that result in the production of components mediating inflammation and acute lung damage as well as components having the potential to lead to long-term effects such as fibrosis. However, many people are exposed to lower levels of ozone than this, but for periods of several hours. Therefore, it is important to determine if a prolonged exposure to low levels of ozone is also capable of causing cellular and biochemical changes in the lung. Nonsmoking males were randomly exposed to filtered air and either 0.10 ppm ozone or 0.08 ppm ozone for 6.6 h with moderate exercise (40 liters/min). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 18 h after each exposure, and cells and fluid were analyzed. The BAL fluid of volunteers exposed to 0.10 ppm ozone had significant increases in neutrophils (PMNs), protein, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), fibronectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) compared with BAL fluid from the same volunteers exposed to filtered air. In addition, there was a decrease in the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize yeast via the complement receptor. Exposure to 0.08 ppm ozone resulted in significant increases in PMNs, PGE2, LDH, IL-6, alpha 1-antitrypsin, and decreased phagocytosis via the complement receptor. However, BAL fluid protein and fibronectin were no longer significantly elevated. We conclude that exposure of humans to as low a level as 0.08 ppm for 6.6 h is sufficient to initiate an inflammatory reaction in the lung.

  15. MUCOCILIARY CLEARANCE OF INHALED PARTICLES MEASURED AT TWO HOURS FOLLOWING OZONE EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mucociliary transport has been shown to increase during ozone exposure. his increase may have been due to a number of factors such as stimulation of muscarinic receptors, induction of cough, or a byproduct of inflammation. e exposed 15 healthy male and female on-smoking subjects,...

  16. RESPIRATORY RESPONSE OF HUMAN EXPOSED TO LOW LEVELS OF OZONE FOR 6.6 HOURS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent evidence suggests that prolonged exposures of exercising men to 0.08 ppm ozone (O3) result in significant decrements in lung function, induction of respiratory symptoms, and increases in nonspecif ic airway reactivity. he purpose of this study was to confirm or refute thes...

  17. The quantity of nursing care on wards working 8- and 12-hour shifts.

    PubMed

    Reid, N; Robinson, G; Todd, C

    1993-10-01

    Interest in 12-hour nursing shifts has been renewed in response to demands for improved cost-effectiveness in the NHS, but the effects of this shift on the delivery of patient care have been unclear. This paper describes the results of a repeated-measures study of 10 wards, using activity analysis to describe patterns of care under an 8-hour compared to a 12-hour shift system. Significant reductions in the amount of direct patient care were found under the 12-hour shift, with corresponding increases in unofficial work-breaks. It is suggested that these findings, which were consistent over all study wards and throughout the whole 12-hour day, demonstrate a "pacing" effect by nurses who face 12 hours on duty. Such a detrimental effect should be a major consideration when coming to any decision to implement a 12-hour shift. PMID:8225806

  18. A new differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington DC region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.) from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0-1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25% from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington DC area.

  19. A New Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Fluctuation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore - Washington D.C. Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99 N, 76.84 W, 57 meters ASL) from 400 m to 12 km AGL. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19 percent from 0-1.5 km, 10-18 percent from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25 percent from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore

  20. 75 FR 6570 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Louisiana; Baton Rouge 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... and the 1-hour ozone rulemakings cited therein. See 70 FR 71612 (November 29, 2005) and in the cases... its interpretation and practice with respect to the 1-hour ozone standard. See Phase 2 Rule, 70 FR... rulemakings cited in the Phase 2 8-Hour Ozone Implementation Rule, 70 FR 71644-71646 (November 29, 2005)....

  1. A mobile differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground-based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.), from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the DIAL technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm, with multiple receivers. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high-pressure hydrogen and deuterium, using helium as buffer gas. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range-resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange (STE) of ozone is shown, to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as to assess the validation and calibration of data. There was a low amount of aerosol aloft, and an iterative aerosol correction has been performed on the retrieved data, which resulted in less than a 3 ppb correction to the final ozone concentration. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0 to 1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5 to 3 km, and 11-25% from 3 to 12 km according to the relevant aerosol concentration aloft. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area.

  2. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Earth's surface. It shields us from the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is ... enough good ozone, people may get too much ultraviolet radiation. This may increase the risk of skin ...

  3. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactive form of oxygen. In the upper atmosphere, ozone forms a protective layer that shields us from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. At ground level, ozone is a harmful air pollutant and a primary ...

  4. A 4.8 hour periodicity in the spectra of Cyg X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Robinson-Saba, J. L.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The X-ray spectra from three observations of the X-ray binary Cyg X-3 by the cosmic X-ray spectroscopy experiment on OSO can be represented by power-law continua with strong iron line emission. Comparisons of spectra taken within the same observation at various phases of the 4.8 hour period reveal a relative excess of low energy X-ray emission near zero phase (i.e. the minimum) of the 4.8 hour modulation. In addition, the centroid of the line emission is observed to vary in phase with the 4.8 hour cycle. The possibility of persistent thermal X-ray emission from material surrounding the binary system is introduced in an effort to account for the observed effects.

  5. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Ozone is a gas. It can be good or bad, depending on where it is. "Good" ozone occurs naturally about 10 to 30 miles above ... the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is gone. Man-made chemicals have destroyed ...

  6. 40 CFR 52.2037 - Control strategy plans for attainment and rate-of-progress: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR 51.918, EPA has determined that Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has...-hour ozone standard of 40 CFR 50.9: the attainment demonstration and reasonably available control... 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  7. 40 CFR 52.2037 - Control strategy plans for attainment and rate-of-progress: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 51.918, EPA has determined that Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has...-hour ozone standard of 40 CFR 50.9: the attainment demonstration and reasonably available control... 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  8. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS...)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81, subpart C identifies the boundaries of areas and the area... obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by the State only...

  9. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS...)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81, subpart C identifies the boundaries of areas and the area... obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by the State only...

  10. Plasma total antioxidant status in horses after 8-hours of road transportation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 8-hour road transport on plasma total antioxidant status (PTAS) and general clinical appearance in horses. Findings The study was conducted on a group of 60 horses of different breeds aged from 4 to 10 years. Venous blood was collected and a clinical examination was performed immediately before loading horses onto trailers for an 8 hour transport (I), immediately after unloading them from the trailer (II), and after a subsequent 24 hour stall rest (III). The ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) was used to determine PTAS. The transportation significantly increased respiratory and heart rates. The average PTAS increased during the three subsequent samplings: I: 170 ± 77 (μmol/l) II: 204 ± 70 (μmol/l) III: 221 ± 74 (μmol/l). Conclusion Long-distance transport increased the PTAS horses, as well as respiratory and heart rates. PMID:23945316

  11. Pulmonary function and symptom responses after 6. 6-hour exposure to 0. 12 ppm ozone with moderate exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.; McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Episodes occasionally occur when ambient ozone (O/sub 3/) levels remain at or near 0.12 ppm for more than 6 h. Small decrements in lung function have been reported following 2-h exposures to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/. For short exposures to higher O/sub 3/ concentrations, lung function decrements are a function of exposure duration. Thus, we investigated the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ would result in progressively larger changes in respiratory function and symptoms over time. Ten nonsmoking males were exposed once to clean air and once to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ for 6.6 h. Exposures consisted of six 50-min exercise periods, each followed by 10-min rest and measurement; a 35-min lunch period followed by the third exercise period. Exercise ventilation averaged approximately 40 L/min. Forced expiratory and inspiratory spirometry and respiratory symptoms were measured prior to exposure and after each exercise. Airway reactivity to methacholine was determined after each exposure. After correcting for the air exposures, FEV 1.0 was found to decrease linearly during the O/sub 3/ exposure and was decreased by an average of 13.0 percent at the end of exposure. Decreases in FVC and FEF24-75% were also linear and averaged 8.3 and 17.4 percent, respectively, at the end of exposure. On forced inspiratory tests, the FIVC and FIV05 were decreased 12.6 and 20.7 percent, respectively. Increases in the symptom ratings of cough and pain on deep inspiration were observed with O/sub 3/ exposure but not with clean air. Airway reactivity to methacholine was approximately doubled following O/sub 3/ exposure.

  12. 75 FR 42672 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey; 8-hour Ozone Control Measures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... conditionally approved. See 74 FR 22837 (May 15, 2009). If EPA approves this proposed SIP revision, the RACT... Subchapter 24 occurred on January 25, 2006 (71 FR 4045). EPA had previously approved Subchapter 24 provisions... percent control. Subchapter 26 also regulates the VOC content/vapor pressure of surface-preparation...

  13. 75 FR 9781 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Atlanta, Georgia, 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... standard, was approved by EPA on March 6, 2008 (73 FR 12013). However, EPA inadvertently excluded Hall... this action. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews Under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4... Use'' (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001). This action merely corrects an inadvertent error of omission in...

  14. EMISSION INVENTORIES TO SUPPORT DEVELOPMENT OF PM2.5 AND 8-HOUR OZONE IMPLEMENTATION POLICIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The product will be a set of historical and projected emission inventories. The projected inventories will represent a number of alternative regulatory scenarios. Inventories will be in the form required by CMAQ/Models-3 and other air quality models, and will be accompanied by n...

  15. 78 FR 32222 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... 73 FR 16436. The current action, however, is being taken to address requirements under the earlier... Barrow, Bartow, Carroll, Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, Dekalb, Douglas, Fayette, Forsyth,...

  16. 78 FR 32613 - Disapproval of State Implementation Plan; Infrastructure Requirements for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... Order 13045: Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (62 FR 19885, April... Order 12898 (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994), establishes federal executive policy on environmental... 0.12 parts per million (ppm) to 0.08 ppm (62 FR 38856). By statute, SIPs meeting the requirements...

  17. 78 FR 34903 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Table 2--Total NOX Emissions With MOVES2010a Mobile Emissions in the Ohio portion of Wheeling West... effective June 15, 2007 (72 FR 27644). MOBILE6.2-based budgets for the Ohio portion of the area were... section 176(c) of the CAA. See the official release of the MOVES2010 emissions model (75 FR 9411-9414)...

  18. 75 FR 80340 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey; 8-Hour Ozone Control Measures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... approved. For additional information, see the proposed rulemaking published on July 22, 2010 (75 FR 42672... the Act and EPA's regulations. Administrative Correction On August 3, 2010, 75 FR 45483, EPA took... Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose...

  19. 75 FR 17915 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... keeping necessary to maintain the rule. The rule was proposed on June 2, 2003, (68 FR 32802) and promulgated in two Phases: Phase 1 published on April 30, 2004, (69 FR 23951) and Phase 2 published on November 29, 2005 (70 FR 71612). The preamble to the proposed and final regulations addressed...

  20. 78 FR 45188 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... the rule. The rule was proposed on June 2, 2003 (68 FR 32802), and promulgated in two Phases: Phase 1 published on April 30, 2004 (69 FR 23951), and Phase 2 published on November 29, 2005 (70 FR 71612). The... preamble to the final Phase 2 rule stated that an ICR would be prepared (70 FR 71692). The rule...

  1. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... requirement to submit a maintenance plan for purposes of paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81.... Control obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by...

  2. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... requirement to submit a maintenance plan for purposes of paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section. 40 CFR part 81.... Control obligations approved into the SIP pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 and 51.122 may be modified by...

  3. 77 FR 73570 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey and New York Ozone Attainment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... 8-hour ozone implementation rule, published on November 29, 2005 (70 FR 71612) (Phase 2 Rule... of the 2008 ozone NAAQS. \\2\\ See 73 FR 16436; March 27, 2008. For a detailed explanation of the... to address the requirements of the 1997 8-hour ozone standard: On July 17, 2008 (73 FR 41068),...

  4. Ozone concentration and pulmonary response relationships for 6. 6-hour exposures with five hours of moderate exercise to 0. 08, 0. 10, and 0. 12 ppm

    SciTech Connect

    Horstman, D.H.; Folinsbee, L.J.; Ives, P.J.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; McDonnell, W.F. )

    1990-11-01

    The magnitudes of pulmonary responses we previously observed (1) following 6.6-h exposures to 0.12 ppm ozone (O3) suggested that responses would also occur with similar exposures at lower O3 concentrations. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of pulmonary function decrements, respiratory discomfort, and increased airway reactivity to methacholine induced by exposure to O3 below 0.12 ppm. Separate 6.6-h chamber exposures to 0.00, 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 ppm O3 included six 50-min periods of moderate exercise (VE approximately equal to 39 L/min, HR approximately equal to 115 bpm, and VO2 approximately equal to 1.5 L/min). Each exercise period was followed by 10 min of rest. A 35-min lunch break was included midway through the exposure. Although not intended as an exact simulation, the overall duration, intensity, and metabolic requirements of the exercise performed were representative of a day of moderate to heavy work or play. Preexposure FEV1 averaged 4.39 L, and essentially no change (+0.03 L) occurred with exposure to 0.00 ppm O3. Significant decreases (p less than 0.01) of -0.31, -0.30, and -0.54 L were observed with exposures to 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 ppm, respectively. The provocative dose of methacholine required to increase airway resistance by 100% (PD100) was 58 cumulative inhalation units (CIU) following exposure to 0.00 ppm and was significantly reduced (p less than 0.01) to 37 CIU at 0.08, 31 CIU at 0.10, and 26 CIU at 0.12 ppm O3; reductions in PD100 are considered indicative of increases in nonspecific airway responsiveness.

  5. Ozone-concentration and pulmonary-response relationships for 6. 6-hour exposures with five hours of moderate exercise to 0. 08, 0. 10, and 0. 12 ppm

    SciTech Connect

    Horstman, D.H.; Folinsbee, L.J.; Ives, P.J.; Salaam, S.A.; McDonnell, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitudes of pulmonary responses the authors previously observed (1) following 6.6-h exposure to 0.12 ppm ozone (O{sub 3}) suggested that responses would also occur with similar exposures at lower O{sub 3} concentrations. The objective of the study was to determine the extent of pulmonary function decrements, respiratory discomfort, and increased airway reactivity to methacholine induced by exposure to O{sub 3} below 0.12 ppm. Separate 6.6-h chamber exposures to 0.00, 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 ppm O3 included six 50-min periods of moderate exercise (VE = 39 L/min, HR = 115 bpm, and VO2 = 1.5 L/min). Each exercise period was followed by 10 min of rest. A 35-min lunch break was included midway through the exposure. Although not intended as an exact simulation, the overall duration, intensity, and metabolic requirements of the exercise performed were representative of a day of moderate to heavy work or play. Preexposure FEV, averaged 4.39 L, and essentially no change (+0.03 L) occurred with exposure to 0.00 ppm O{sub 3}. Significant decreases (p<0.01) of -0.31, -0.30, and -0.54 L were observed with exposures to 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 ppm, respectively. The study concludes that exposure to O{sub 3} at levels often found in ambient air while engaged in activity representative of a typical day of moderate to heavy work or play induced clinically meaningful pulmonary responses.

  6. A Direct sensitivity approach to predict hourly ozone resulting from compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standard

    EPA Science Inventory

    In setting primary ambient air quality standards, the EPA’s responsibility under the law is to establish standards that protect public health. As part of the current review of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS), the US EPA evaluated the health exposure and ...

  7. The Version 8.6 SBUV Ozone Data Record: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Haffner, D.; Labow, Gordon J.; Flynn, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Under a NASA program to produce long-term data records from instruments on multiple satellites, data from a series of nine Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV and SBUV2) instruments have been re-processed to create a coherent ozone time series. Data from the BUV instrument on Nimbus 4, SBUV on Nimbus 7, and SBUV2 instruments on NOAA 9, 11, 14, 16, 17, 18, and 19 covering the period 1970-1972 and 1979-2011 were used to create a long-term data set. The goal is an ozone Earth Science Data Record - a consistent, calibrated ozone time series that can be used for trend analyses and other studies. In order to create this ozone data set, the radiances were adjusted and used to re-process the entire data records for each of the nine instruments. Inter-instrument comparisons during periods of overlap as well as comparisons with data from other satellite and ground-based instruments were used to evaluate the consistency of the record and make calibration adjustments as needed. Additional improvements in this version 8.6 processing included the use of the Brion, Daumont, and Malicet ozone cross sections, and a cloud-height climatology derived from Aura OMI measurements. Validation of the re-processed ozone shows that total column ozone is consistent with the Brewer Dobson network to within about 1 for the new time series. Comparisons with MLS, SAGE, sondes, and lidar show that ozone at individual levels in the stratosphere is generally consistent to within 5 percent.

  8. Line parameters for ozone hot bands in the 4.8-micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camy-Peyret, Claude; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy

    1990-01-01

    Line positions, intensities, and lower-state energies have been calculated for nine hot bands of (O-16)3 in the 4.8-micron spectral region using improved spectroscopic parameters deduced in recent high-resolution laboratory studies. The good quality of the hot-band parameters has been verified through comparisons of line-by-line simulations with 0.005/cm-resolution laboratory spectra of ozone. The present work and the line parameters calculated for the main bands by Pickett et al. (1988) provide a complete update of ozone spectroscopic parameters in the 4.8 micron region.

  9. Motor cortex excitability changes within 8 hours after ischaemic stroke may predict the functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Profice, P; Saturno, E; Pilato, F; Tonali, P

    1999-06-01

    Motor evoked potentials after magnetic transcranial stimulation and the excitability of the motor cortex to increasing magnetic stimulus intensities were evaluated in six patients with hemiparesis after ischaemic stroke within 8 hours after stroke. The latencies of motor evoked potentials were normal in all patients. After stimulation of the ischaemic hemisphere we obtained responses comparable with the contralateral ones in two patients (mean NIH score 2 (SD 0)) and this group was completely asymptomatic after 15 days (NIH score 0). In four patients the excitability of the motor cortex involved by the ischaemia was reduced and magnetic motor threshold was higher than that of the spared motor cortex. This finding was associated with a poor motor recovery and the NIH score after 15 days was unchanged (NIH score 1.75 (SD 1.5)). The present data suggest that the evaluation of the excitability of motor cortex may offer a mean of predicting functional outcome following stroke. PMID:10461555

  10. GOME Total Ozone and Calibration Error Derived Usign Version 8 TOMS Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Qin, W.; Ahn, C.; Gopalan, A.; Bhartia, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a hyper-spectral satellite instrument measuring the ultraviolet backscatter at relatively high spectral resolution. GOME radiances have been slit averaged to emulate measurements of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) made at discrete wavelengths and processed using the new TOMS Version 8 Ozone Algorithm. Compared to Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) techniques based on local structure in the Huggins Bands, the TOMS uses differential absorption between a pair of wavelengths including the local stiucture as well as the background continuum. This makes the TOMS Algorithm more sensitive to ozone, but it also makes the algorithm more sensitive to instrument calibration errors. While calibration adjustments are not needed for the fitting techniques like the DOAS employed in GOME algorithms, some adjustment is necessary when applying the TOMS Algorithm to GOME. Using spectral discrimination at near ultraviolet wavelength channels unabsorbed by ozone, the GOME wavelength dependent calibration drift is estimated and then checked using pair justification. In addition, the day one calibration offset is estimated based on the residuals of the Version 8 TOMS Algorithm. The estimated drift in the 2b detector of GOME is small through the first four years and then increases rapidly to +5% in normalized radiance at 331 nm relative to 385 nm by mid 2000. The lb detector appears to be quite well behaved throughout this time period.

  11. Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The author discusses the debate over whether concern about a hole in the ozone layer in Antarctic is real or science fiction. There is a growing consensus that efforts must be taken to protect the ozone layer. The issue now is not whether chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) should be controlled and regulated but how much and how soon. The United States has urged that the production of dangerous CFCs, and any other chemicals that affect the ozone layer, be restricted immediately to current levels and that their use be reduced 95 percent over the next decade. The American position was too strong for many European nations and the Japanese. Negotiations at an international conference on the matter broke down. The breakdown is due in part to a more acute concern for environmental matters in the United States than exists in many countries. Meanwhile CFCs are linked to another environmental problem that equally threatens the world - the Greenhouse Effect. The earth is in a natural warming period, but man could be causing it to become even warmer. The Greenhouse Effect could have a catastrophic impact on mankind, although nothing has been proven yet.

  12. INCREASED 8-HYDROXY GUANINE CONTENT OF CHLOROPLAST DNA FROM OZONE TREATED PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanism of ozone-mediated plant injury is not know but has been postulated to involve oxygen free radicals. Hydroxyl free radicals react with DNA causing formation of many products, one of which is 8-hydroxyguanine. By using high performance liquid chromatography with elect...

  13. Modal Sequencing in an 8-hour GMRT Observation of Pulsar B1822-09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, C.; Mitra, D.; Rankin, J.

    2012-12-01

    The research presented here examines an 8-hour observation of pulsar B1822-09, acquired with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. B1822-09 is known to exhibit two stable emission modes, the B mode, where the precursor (PC) “turns on”, and the Q mode, which is defined by interpulse (IP) emission. These emission modes are like pulsar “personalities.” Our analyses have shown that the pulsar's two modes are not as “pure” as previously thought, in that PC emission is sometimes seen in the B mode, IP emission in Q-mode intervals and near transitions PS and IP emission can occur simultaneously. Further, in this long observation, the Q mode shows periodic modulation near 46.6±1.0 rotation periods that modulates both the main pulse IP. We find indications that this represents a P3 associated with a subbeam carousel, and that its circulation time is thrice this value. Moreover, we detected a B-mode modulation at 70±3 that appears to have an odd-even character—thus both cycles are commensurate at around 140 rotation periods.

  14. 40 CFR 52.2125 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2125... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the...

  15. 40 CFR 52.1779 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1779... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2125 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2125... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2125 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2125... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1779 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1779... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1779 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1779... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the...

  20. [Radiance Simulation of BUV Hyperspectral Sensor on Multi Angle Observation, and Improvement to Initial Total Ozone Estimating Model of TOMS V8 Total Ozone Algorithm].

    PubMed

    Lü, Chun-guang; Wang, Wei-he; Yang, Wen-bo; Tian, Qing-iju; Lu, Shan; Chen, Yun

    2015-11-01

    New hyperspectral sensor to detect total ozone is considered to be carried on geostationary orbit platform in the future, because local troposphere ozone pollution and diurnal variation of ozone receive more and more attention. Sensors carried on geostationary satellites frequently obtain images on the condition of larger observation angles so that it has higher requirements of total ozone retrieval on these observation geometries. TOMS V8 algorithm is developing and widely used in low orbit ozone detecting sensors, but it still lack of accuracy on big observation geometry, therefore, how to improve the accuracy of total ozone retrieval is still an urgent problem that demands immediate solution. Using moderate resolution atmospheric transmission, MODT-RAN, synthetic UV backscatter radiance in the spectra region from 305 to 360 nm is simulated, which refers to clear sky, multi angles (12 solar zenith angles and view zenith angles) and 26 standard profiles, moreover, the correlation and trends between atmospheric total ozone and backward scattering of the earth UV radiation are analyzed based on the result data. According to these result data, a new modified initial total ozone estimation model in TOMS V8 algorithm is considered to be constructed in order to improve the initial total ozone estimating accuracy on big observation geometries. The analysis results about total ozone and simulated UV backscatter radiance shows: Radiance in 317.5 nm (R₃₁₇.₅) decreased as the total ozone rise. Under the small solar zenith Angle (SZA) and the same total ozone, R₃₁₇.₅ decreased with the increase of view zenith Angle (VZA) but increased on the large SZA. Comparison of two fit models shows: without the condition that both SZA and VZA are large (> 80°), exponential fitting model and logarithm fitting model all show high fitting precision (R² > 0.90), and precision of the two decreased as the SZA and VZA rise. In most cases, the precision of logarithm fitting

  1. DC-8 during takeoff in Kiruna, Sweden for the second flight of the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validatio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's DC-8 taking off from the Kiruna, Sweden, runway in January 2000. The weather at this town of 25,000, located north of the Arctic Circle, can be severe. Temperatures drop as low as 50 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. In December 1999, when the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) deployment began, there were 20 days of darkness. By mid-January 2000, there was 5 hours of daylight, while in mid-February this increased to nine hours per day. The population of Kiruna extended its hospitality to the SOLVE personnel. On January 22, 2000, the town hosted a dinner for the participants and media attending an open house at the Arena Arctica hangar. At the end of the SOLVE deployment, the airborne science team held an open house for the townspeople at the facility. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  2. AROTAL Ozone and Temperature Vertical Profile Measurements from the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Thomas J.; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Hoegy, Walter; Burris, John; Silbert, Donald; Heaps, William; Neuber, R.; Trepte, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    The AROTAL instrument (Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature and Aerosol Lidar) - a collaboration between scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and Langley Research Center - was flown on the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign during January and February, 2003. The flights were flown from the Arena Arctica in Kiruna, Sweden. We report measurements of temperature and ozone profiles showing approximately a 600 ppbv loss in ozone near 17.5 km, over the time frame of the aircraft campaign. Comparisons of ozone profiles from AROTAL are made with the SAGE III instrument.

  3. Pulmonary function and symptom responses after 6. 6-hour exposure to 0. 12-ppm ozone with moderate exercise (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.; Horstman, D.H.; McDonnell, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    Episodes occasionally occur when ambient ozone (O/sub 3/) levels remain at or near 0.12 ppm for more than 6 h. The hypothesis that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ would result in progressively larger changes in respiratory function and symptoms over time was tested. Ten nonsmoking males (18-35 yr) were exposed once to clear air (CA) and once to 0.12 pp, O/sub 3/ for 6.75 h. Exposures consisted of six 50-min exercise periods, each followed by 10-min rest and measurement; a 45-min lunch period followed the third exercise period. Exercise ventilation averaged approximately 40 1/min. Forced expiratory and inspiratory spirometry and respiratory symptoms were measured prior to exposure and after each exercise. Increases in the symptom ratings of cough and pain on deep inspiration were observed with O/sub 3/ exposure but not with CA. Airway reactivity to methacholine was approximately doubled following O/sub 3/ exposure. Spirometry results indicate that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ results in a marked increase in non-specific airway reactivity and progressive changes in respiratory function.

  4. The Validation of Version 8 Ozone Profiles: Is SBUV Ready for Prime Time?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, R. D.; Wellemeyer, C. G.; Ahn, C.

    2004-01-01

    Ozone profile data are now available from a series of BUV instruments - SBUV on Nimbus 7 and SBW/2 instruments on NOAA 9, NOAA 11, and NOAA 16. The data have been processed through the new version 8 algorithm, which is designed to be more accurate and, more importantly, to reduce the influence of the a priori on ozone trends. As a part of the version 8 reprocessing we have attempted to apply a consistent calibration to the individual instruments so that their data records can be used together in a time series analysis. Validation consists of examining not only the mean difference from external datasets (i.e trends) but also consistency in the interannual variability of the data. Here we validate the v8 BUV data through comparison with ECC sondes, lidar and microwave measurements, and with SAGE II and HALOE satellite data records. We find that individual profiles generally agree with external data sets within +/-10% between 30 hPa and 1 hPa (approx. 24 - 50 km) and frequently agree within +/-5%. The interannual variability of the BUV ozone time series agrees well with that of SAGE II . On the average, different B W instruments usually agree within +/-5% with each other, though the relative error increases near the ends of the Nimbus 7 and NOAA 16 data records as a result of instrument problems. The combined v8 BUV data sets cover the 1979-2003 time period giving daily global coverage of the ozone vertical distribution to better accuracy than has ever been possible before.

  5. Version 8 SBUV Ozone Profile Trends Compared with Trends from a Zonally Averaged Chemical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.; Frith, Stacey; Stolarski, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Linear regression trends for the years 1979-2003 were computed using the new Version 8 merged Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) data set of ozone profiles. These trends were compared to trends computed using ozone profiles from the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) zonally averaged coupled model. Observed and modeled annual trends between 50 N and 50 S were a maximum in the higher latitudes of the upper stratosphere, with southern hemisphere (SH) trends greater than northern hemisphere (NH) trends. The observed upper stratospheric maximum annual trend is -5.5 +/- 0.9 % per decade (1 sigma) at 47.5 S and -3.8 +/- 0.5 % per decade at 47.5 N, to be compared with the modeled trends of -4.5 +/- 0.3 % per decade in the SH and -4.0 +/- 0.2% per decade in the NH. Both observed and modeled trends are most negative in winter and least negative in summer, although the modeled seasonal difference is less than observed. Model trends are shown to be greatest in winter due to a repartitioning of chlorine species and the increasing abundance of chlorine with time. The model results show that trend differences can occur depending on whether ozone profiles are in mixing ratio or number density coordinates, and on whether they are recorded on pressure or altitude levels.

  6. DC-8 and ER-2 in Sweden for the Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This 48 second video shows Dryden's Airborne Science aircraft in Kiruna Sweden in January 2000. The DC-8 and ER-2 conducted atmospheric studies for the Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE).

  7. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption... How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) A person may petition the Administrator for an exemption from NOX obligations under section 182(f) for any...

  8. ER-2 #809 and DC-8 in Arena Arctica hangar in Kiruna, Sweden prior to the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Va

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA ER-2 # 809 and its DC-8 shown in Arena Arctica before the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). The two airborne science platforms were based north of the Arctic Circle in Kiruna, Sweden, during the winter of 2000 to study ozone depletion as part of SOLVE. A large hangar built especially for research, 'Arena Arctica' housed the instrumented aircraft and the scientists. Scientists have observed unusually low levels of ozone over the Arctic during recent winters, raising concerns that ozone depletion there could become more widespread as in the Antarctic ozone hole. The NASA-sponsored international mission took place between November 1999 and March 2000 and was divided into three phases. The DC-8 was involved in all three phases returning to Dryden between each phase. The ER-2 flew sample collection flights between January and March, remaining in Sweden from Jan. 9 through March 16. 'The collaborative campaign will provide an immense new body of information about the Arctic stratosphere,' said program scientist Dr. Michael Kurylo, NASA Headquarters. 'Our understanding of the Earth's ozone will be greatly enhanced by this research.' ER-2s bearing tail numbers 806 and 809 are used as airborne science platforms by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, an ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The

  9. 76 FR 28195 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Sunland Park 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... attainment of the 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) through the year 2014. The... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Sunland Park 1-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed...

  10. Defeathering of broiler carcasses subjected to delayed scalding 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours after slaughter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With implementation of farm slaughter, scalding and defeathering could be delayed for a minimum of 2 to 4 h. This research evaluated the potential for delaying scalding and defeathering up to 8 h after slaughter. Following 12 h feed withdrawal broilers were cooped and transported to the pilot plan...

  11. Behavioral changes in neonatal swine after an 8-hour rest during prolonged transportation.

    PubMed

    Williams, J L; Richert, B T; Marchant-Forde, J N; Eicher, S D

    2012-09-01

    Long distance transportation of weaned piglets (Sus scrofa) is increasingly common in the united states and may result in delayed eating, drinking, or normal social behaviors. A potential solution is a mid-journey rest (lairage). The objective of this study was to determine if a lairage altered behavior after a 16-h transport. Pigs that weighed approximately 18 kg each (n = 894) were housed in 16 pens with 8 pens per treatment. Lairaged pigs were transported for 8 h and given an 8-h rest with food and water, whereas control pigs were transported continuously for 16 h. The heaviest, the lightest, and 2 average-BW pigs relative to the average weight of the pen were observed by video recording for 24 h immediately before and after transport, and during d 6 and 13 after transport. Postures (lying, sitting, and standing) were recorded using 10-min-interval scan sampling, and behavioral categories included inactivity, activities (eating, drinking, alert, manipulating pen, rooting, and walking) and social interactions (aggression, belly nosing, playing, tail biting, and positive social behaviors). In both treatments, sitting occurred most before transport (P < 0.01) than at other times, but did not differ between treatments. Standing increased (time effect; P < 0.01) for both treatments immediately after transport through d 6, but returned to pre-transport values by d 13. In contrast, lying decreased (time effect; P < 0.01) after transport, but returned to above pre-transport values by d 13. Time effects were evident for activity (P < 0.01), pen manipulation (P = 0.05), rooting (P < 0.01), initiation of belly-nosing (P = 0.01), and receiving belly-nosing (P = 0.03); however, initiation of aggression did not differ for day (P = 0.19) or treatment (P = 0.56). Lairaged pigs initiated more (P = 0.05) play than continuously transported pigs, but no differences (P = 0.84) were seen in receipt of play behavior. Pigs that were to be transported for 16 h continuously walked less

  12. 40 CFR 52.2052 - Motor vehicle emissions budgets for Pennsylvania ozone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Pennsylvania ozone areas. 52.2052 Section 52.2052 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...) Pennsylvania § 52.2052 Motor vehicle emissions budgets for Pennsylvania ozone areas. (a) As of December 26... nitrogen oxides (NOX) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for the Lancaster 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

  13. 40 CFR 52.2043 - Control strategy for maintenance plans: ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: ozone. 52.2043 Section 52.2043 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Control strategy for maintenance plans: ozone. (a) As of December 26, 2013, EPA approves the following... (VOCs) for the Lancaster 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Area submitted by the Secretary of...

  14. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  15. 77 FR 8197 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: Nonattainment Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... set at a more stringent level. \\1\\ See 73 FR 16436. \\2\\ The secondary ozone standard, designed to... 1-hour ozone NAAQS, see 56 FR 56694. \\8\\ See 40 CFR Appendix I. \\9\\ Referred to as the Phase 1 Rule... the 1997 ozone NAAQS. (See 69 FR 23954). The Phase 1 rule also established comprehensive...

  16. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  17. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  18. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  19. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  20. Observation of gamma rays with a 4.8 hour periodicity from CYG X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Energetic (E35 MeV) Gamma rays were observed from Cyg X-3 with the SAS-2 Gamma ray telescope. They are modulated at the 4.8 sup h period observed in the X-ray and infrared regions, and within the statistical error are in phase with this emission. The flux above 100 MeV has an average value of (4.4 + or - 1.1)x 10 to the -6 power/sq cm/sec. If the distance to Cyg X-3 is 10 kpcs, this flux implies a luminosity of more than 10 to the 37th power ergs/s if the radiation is isotropic and about 10 to the 36th power ergs/s if the radiation is restricted to a cone of one steradian, as it might be in a pulsar.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  5. Lung Function and Inflammatory responses in healthy young adults exposed to 0.06 ppm Ozone for 6.6 hours

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to ozone causes a decrease in spirometric lung function and an increase in airway inflammation in healthy young adults at concentrations as low as 0.08 ppm close to the the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ground level ozone. Objectives: To test wheth...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  7. A 15,000-hour cyclic endurance test of an 8-centimeter-diameter electron bombardment mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakanishi, S.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory model 8 cm thruster with improvements to minimize ion chamber erosion and peeling of sputtered metal was subjected to a cyclic endurance test for 15,040 hours and 460 restarts. A charted history of several thruster operating variables and off-normal events are shown in 600-hour segments at three points in the test. The transient behavior of these variables during a typical start-stop cycle is presented. Finding of the post-test inspection confirmed most of the expected results. Charge exchange ions caused normal accelerator grid erosion. The workability of the various design features was substantiated, and attainable improvements in propellant utilization efficiency should significantly reduce accelerator erosion.

  8. 78 FR 25236 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New York; Infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ..., 2008, the submittal was determined to be complete for all elements except 110(a)(2)(C). 73 FR 16205... information? On July 18, 1997, EPA promulgated new and revised NAAQS for 8-hour ozone (62 FR 38856) and PM 2.5 (62 FR 38652). The ozone NAAQS is based on 8-hour average concentrations. The 8-hour averaging...

  9. Reactions of vitamin E and its model compound 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Liebler, D.C.; Matsumoto, Shigenobu; Matsuo, Mitsuyoshi; Iitaka, Yoichi

    1993-01-01

    Reaction of vitamin E [(R,R,R,)-{alpha}-tocopherol] with ozone in acetonitrile yielded {alpha}-tocopheryl quinone and its precursor 8{alpha}-hydroxytocopherone, which accounted for approximately 30% of the products at <50% {alpha}-tocopherol oxidation. In addition, two novel products were identified as epimers of 10-acetyl-7-(4{prime},8{prime},12{prime}-trimethyl tridecyl)-3,4,7-trimethyl-2-oxo - 1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]-deca-3,9-diene. These spiro products were formed in equal amounts in a combined yield of approximately 33% after complete {alpha}-tocpherol oxidation. Ozonation of the vitamin E model compound 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol yielded an analogous spiro product, 10-acetyl-3,4,7,7-tetramethyl-2-oxo-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]deca-3,9-diene, whose structure was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The spiro products may be formed by ozone addition to the chroman ring and subsequent rearrangement to ring-opened hydroxyacid products, which yield spiro products by ring closure due to dehydration. Novel spiro products formed by ozonation of vitamin E may be unique markers of ozone interaction with lipid structures that contain vitamin E. 39 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. OZONE CONCENTRATION-PULMONARY RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS FOR 6.6 HOUR EXPOSURES WITH 5 HOURS OF MODERATE EXERCISE TO 0.08, 0.10 AND 0.12 PPM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magnitudes of pulmonary responses we previously observed (1) following 6.6-h exposures to 0.12 ppm ozone (O3) suggested that responses would also occur with similar exposures at lower O3 concentrations. he objective of this study was to determine the extent of pulmonary funct...

  11. 40 CFR 52.2037 - Control strategy plans for attainment and rate-of-progress: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR 51.918, EPA has determined that Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has...-hour ozone standard of 40 CFR 50.9: the attainment demonstration and reasonably available control... Federal Register citations affecting § 52.2037, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears...

  12. Cerebral blood flow determination within the first 8 hours of cerebral infarction using stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.L.; Yonas, H.; Gur, D.; Latchaw, R.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow mapping with stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe/CT) was performed in conjunction with conventional computed tomography (CT) within the first 8 hours after the onset of symptoms in seven patients with cerebral infarction. Six patients had hemispheric infarctions, and one had a progressive brainstem infarction. Three patients with very low (less than 10 ml/100 g/min) blood flow in an anatomic area appropriate for the neurologic deficit had no clinical improvement by the time of discharge from the hospital; follow-up CT scans of these three patients confirmed infarction in the area of very low blood flow. Three patients with moderate blood flow reductions (15-45 ml/100 g/min) in the appropriate anatomic area had significant clinical improvement from their initial deficits and had normal follow-up CT scans. One patient studied 8 hours after stroke had increased blood flow (hyperemia) in the appropriate anatomic area and made no clinical recovery.

  13. Comparison of Temperature and Ozone Measured by the AROTEL Instrument on DC8 Overflights of Ny Aalesund during the SOLVE Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; McGee, Thomas J.; Burris, John F.; Heaps, William; Silbert, Donald; Sumnicht, Grant; Twigg, Laurence; Neuber, Roland

    2000-01-01

    The AROTEL instrument, deployed on the NASA DC-8 at Kiruna, Sweden for the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE), flew over the NDSC station operated by the Alfred Wegner Institute at Ny Aalesund, Spitsbergen. AROTEL ozone and temperature measurements made during near overflights of Ny Aalesund are compared with sonde ozone and temperature, and lidar ozone measurements from the NDSC station. Nine of the seventeen science flights during the December through March measurement period overflew near Ny Aalesund. Agreement of AROTEL with the ground-based temperature and ozone values at altitudes from just above the aircraft to about 30 km gives strong confidence in using AROTEL temperature and ozone mixing ratio to study the mechanisms of ozone loss in the winter arctic polar region.

  14. Evaluation of lightning-induced tropospheric ozone enhancements observed by ozone lidar and simulated by WRF/Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihua; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Newchurch, M. J.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Kuang, Shi; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold

    2015-08-01

    High spatial- and temporal-resolution ozone lidar profiles, in conjunction with ozonesonde and satellite observations, are well suited to characterize short-term ozone variations due to different physical and chemical processes, such as the impact of lightning-generated NOx (LNOx) on tropospheric ozone. This work presents the hourly variation of tropospheric-ozone profiles measured by an ozone lidar at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, on July 14, 18, and 27, 2011. These ozone lidar data are compared with two WRF/Chem simulations, one with lightning NO (LNO) emissions and the other without. On July 14, 2011, the ozone lidar observed an ozone laminar structure with elevated ozone concentrations of 65∼80 ppbv below 2 km, low ozone (50∼65) ppbv between 2 and 5 km, and high ozone up to 165 ppbv between 5 and 12 km AGL. WRF/Chem simulations, in conjunction with backward trajectory analysis, suggest that lightning events occurring within upwind regions resulted in an ozone enhancement of 28 ppbv at 7.5 km AGL over Huntsville. On July 27, LNO emissions were transported to Huntsville from upwind and account for 75% of NOx and an 8.3 ppbv of ozone enhancement at ∼10 km; the model overestimates ozone between 2.5 and 5 km AGL.

  15. Alertness, performance and off-duty sleep on 8-hour and 12-hour night shifts in a simulated continuous operations control room setting

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, T.L.

    1995-04-01

    A growing number of nuclear power plants in the United States have adopted routine 12-hr shift schedules. Because of the potential impact that extended work shifts could have on safe and efficient power plant operation, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded research on 8-hr and 12-hr shifts at the Human Alertness Research Center (HARC) in Boston, Massachusetts. This report describes the research undertaken: a study of simulated 8-hr and 12-hr work shifts that compares alertness, speed, and accuracy at responding to simulator alarms, and relative cognitive performance, self-rated mood and vigor, and sleep-wake patterns of 8-hr versus 12-hr shift workers.

  16. 75 FR 80420 - Reasonable Further Progress Requirements for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... discussion of EPA's rationale for applying this interpretation in the Phase 2 Rule, see 70 FR at 71647- 49... FR 71612, November 29, 2005). \\2\\ The memorandum is available on the EPA Technology and Transfer... approach for crediting reductions from outside nonattainment areas (``outside'' reductions). See 72...

  17. 76 FR 3838 - Approval and Promulgation of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... attainment date be extended to June 15, 2011. On November 9, 2010 (75 FR 68733), EPA proposed to approve New...).'' IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews Under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993...'' (66 FR 28355 (May 22, 2001)). This action merely finds that an area has qualified for a...

  18. 75 FR 68736 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard for the Delaware...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ...'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October... Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); Is not an economically significant regulatory action based on health or safety risks subject to Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997); ] Is...

  19. 76 FR 3840 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard for the Delaware...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ...'' (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001). This action merely approves state law as meeting Federal requirements and... November 9, 2010 (75 FR 68736), EPA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) for the States. The NPR... Executive Order Reviews A. General Requirements Under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4,...

  20. 76 FR 13289 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard in the Baltimore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 43114), EPA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) for the State of Maryland. The... Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001). This action merely approves State law as... 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993), this action is not a ``significant regulatory action''...

  1. 76 FR 2859 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Adoption of 8-hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Adoption... available on the Internet. If you ] submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that you include your name... statute. Certain other material, such as copyrighted material, is not placed on the Internet and will...

  2. 77 FR 35285 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Arizona; Attainment Plan for 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On April 11, 2012 (70 FR 21690), EPA proposed to approve the ``Eight... Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information...); Does not have Federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August...

  3. 75 FR 16456 - Adequacy Status of the Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX Maintenance Plan; 8-Hour Ozone Motor Vehicle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ...; Transportation Conformity Rule Amendments: Response to Court Decision and Additional Rule Changes'' (69 FR 40004... been made, pursuant to 40 CFR 93.104(e). See, 73 FR 4419 (January 24, 2008). Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401... motor vehicle emissions budgets (MVEB) in the Beaumont-Port Arthur, Texas (BPA) Redesignation...

  4. 78 FR 7429 - Adequacy Status of the Dallas-Fort Worth, TX Reasonable Further Progress 8-Hour Ozone Motor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ...: Response to Court Decision and Additional Rule Changes'' (69 FR 40004). Please note that an adequacy review..., pursuant to 40 CFR 93.104(e). See, 73 FR 4419 (January 24, 2008). Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq. Dated... are provided in Table 1: Table 1--Dallas-Fort Worth Reasonable Further Progress NOX and VOC MVEBs...

  5. 76 FR 28223 - Adequacy Status of the Baton Rouge, Louisiana Maintenance Plan 8-Hour Ozone Motor Vehicle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Additional Rule Changes'' (69 FR 40004). Please note that an adequacy review is separate from EPA's... the new MVEB if the demonstration has not already been made, pursuant to 40 CFR 93.104(e). See, 73 FR... ceiling for the regional transportation network. The MVEB is provided in Table 1: Table 1--Baton Rouge...

  6. 76 FR 33647 - Approval and Promulgation of Determination of Attainment for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    .... Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan nonattainment area on February 28, 2011 (76 FR 10815). A detailed discussion... that the area has attained the NAAQS during the 2008- 2010 monitoring period. On March 27, 2008 (73 FR... 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information collection burden under...

  7. 75 FR 9893 - Adequacy Determination for the Denver Metro Area and North Front Range 8-Hour Ozone Attainment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Implementation Plan (SIP) on June 18, 2009, by James B. Martin, Director, Colorado Department of Public Health...) which was promulgated August 15, 1997 (see 62 FR 43780). We described our process for determining the adequacy of submitted SIP MVEBs in our July 1, 2004 Transportation Conformity Rule Amendments (see 69...

  8. 75 FR 51960 - Proposed Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... (69 FR 23951, April 30, 2004). The rule further provides that an area remains subject to these... National Association of Manufacturers; and (3) the American Petroleum Institute, American Chemistry Council.... \\4\\ 70 FR 30592 (May 26, 2005). In the second reconsideration rulemaking, we proposed and...

  9. 75 FR 55977 - Adequacy Status of the Knoxville, TN 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan Motor Vehicle Emission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Additional Rule Changes'' (69 FR 40004). Please note that an adequacy review is separate from EPA's... made, pursuant to 40 CFR 93.104(e). See 73 FR 4419 (January 24, 2008). Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq... Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (DC Circuit) ruled that submitted SIPs cannot...

  10. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... satisfies 40 CFR 58.20(f) which requires the State to provide for the establishment and maintenance of... area has attaining data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582...

  11. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... satisfies 40 CFR 58.20(f) which requires the State to provide for the establishment and maintenance of... area has attaining data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582...

  12. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... satisfies 40 CFR 58.20(f) which requires the State to provide for the establishment and maintenance of... area has attaining data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582...

  13. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., into the Georgia State Implementation Plan. This submittal satisfies 40 CFR 58.20(f) which requires the... data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582...

  14. GSTM1 modulation of IL-8 expression in human epithelial cells exposed to ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the major air pollutant ozone can aggravate asthma and other lung diseases. Our recent study in humanvolunteers hasshown that the glutathione S-transferase Mu 1(GSTMI)-null genotype is associated with increased airway neutrophilic inflammation induced by inhaled ozone...

  15. Ozone trends in California`s South Coast Air Basin, 1976--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Cohanim, S.; Cassmassi, J.; Bassett, M.

    1998-12-31

    The South Coast Air Basin (Basin) of Southern California exhibits the worst air quality in the nation, as measured by the annual number of days exceeding the 1-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone. Hourly pollutant concentration data collected by the South Coast Air Quality Management District`s air monitoring network are compared to the existing 1-hour and new 8-hour federal ozone ambient air quality standards to depict ozone trends and compliance in the Basin. Results of trend analyses for the different areas of the Basin are presented for the 1-hour and 8-hour standards, and the relative stringency of the existing and new federal standards is examined. Based on an analysis of the effect of the recently adopted federal standard on ozone compliance in the Basin, ozone concentrations exceed the new federal 8-hour standard level more often than the existing 1-hour standard in most locations. However, examination of the trends in design values for the 1-hour and 8-hour ozone standards suggests that for most locations in the Basin the new standard probably should not be significantly more difficult to attain than the existing standard. The weather-adjusted ozone trend analysis in the Basin confirms the fact that the downtrends in ozone concentrations and number of days exceeding standards are real and independent of annual variation in weather. An analysis of weekday/weekend differences in exceedances for the existing 1-hour and new 8-hour ozone standards show a higher number of days exceeding both standards on weekends for most locations in the Basin, with differences being more evident in the 1990s than in the late 1970s and 1980s

  16. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND SYMPTOM RESPONSES AFTER 6.6-HOUR EXPOSURE TO 0.12 PPM OZONE WITH MODERATE EXERCISE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Episodes occasionally occur when ambient ozone (03) levels remain at or near 0.12 ppm for more than 6 h. The hypothesis that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm 03 would result in progressively larger changes in respiratory function and symptoms over time was tested. Ten nonsmoking ma...

  17. Hourly and seasonal variation in photosynthesis and stomatal conductance of soybean grown at future CO2 and ozone concentrations for three years under fully open air conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous controlled environment studies have suggested that elevation of atmospheric [CO2] to 550 ppm, the concentration anticipated for the year 2050, should increase leaf photosynthetic carbon assimilation (A) by ca. 40%. Simultaneously studies of the effects of tropospheric ozone concentration (...

  18. Extended workdays: Effects of 8-hour and 12-hour rotating shift schedules on test performance, subjective alertness, sleep patterns, and psychological variables

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, R.R.; Colligan, M.J.; Lewis, P.

    1986-06-01

    A newly instituted 3 to 4 day/12-hr rotating shift schedule was compared to the previous 5 to 7 day/8-hr schedule using standard laboratory-type measures of performance and alertness, and a questionnaire on sleep patterns and other personal habits. After seven months adaptation to the new schedule, a preliminary analysis indicates that there were some decrements in alertness, reductions in sleep, and disruptions of other personal activities during 12-hr workdays. Gastro-intestinal state improved during night shift, however, and increases in self-reported stress were reduced by the shortened workweek. These results are discussed in terms of trade-offs between longer workdays and shorter workweeks. It is emphasized that at this time no determination can be made of the extent of risk associated with these changes in alertness.

  19. Ozone dynamics and snow-atmosphere exchanges during ozone depletion events at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Boylan, Patrick; Johnson, Bryan; Oltmans, Sam; Fairall, Chris; Staebler, Ralf; Weinheimer, Andrew; Orlando, John; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Flocke, Frank; Frieß, Udo; Sihler, Holger; Shepson, Paul B.

    2012-10-01

    The behavior of lower atmospheric ozone and ozone exchanges at the snow surface were studied using a suite of platforms during the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snow (OASIS) Spring 2009 experiment at an inland, coastal site east of Barrow, Alaska. A major objective was to investigate if and how much chemistry at the snow surface at the site contributes to springtime ozone depletion events (ODEs). Between March 8 and April 16, seven ODEs, with atmospheric ozone dropping below 1.0 ppbv, were observed. The depth of the ozone-depleted layer was variable, extending from the surface to ˜200-800 m. ODEs most commonly occurred during low wind speed conditions with flow coming from the Arctic Ocean. Two high-sensitivity ozone chemiluminescence instruments were used to accurately define the remaining sub-ppbv ozone levels during ODEs. These measurements showed variable residual ODE ozone levels ranging between 0.010 and 0.100 ppbv. During the most extended ODE, when ozone remained below 1.0 ppbv for over 78 h, these measurements showed a modest ozone recovery or production in the early afternoon hours, resulting in increases in the ozone mixing ratio of 0.100 to 0.800 ppbv. The comparison between high-sensitivity ozone measurements and BrO measured by longpath differential absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) during ODEs indicated that at low ozone levels formation of BrO is controlled by the amount of available ozone. Measurements of ozone in air drawn from below the snow surface showed depleted ozone in the snowpack, with levels consistently remaining <6 ppbv independent of above-surface ambient air concentrations. The snowpack was always a sink of ozone. Ozone deposition velocities determined from ozone surface flux measurements by eddy covariance were on the order of 0.01 cm s-1, which is of similar magnitude as ozone uptake rates found over snow at other polar sites that are not subjected to ODEs. The results from these multiple platform measurements unequivocally show that snow

  20. Spatio-temporal modeling for real-time ozone forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Paci, Lucia; Gelfand, Alan E.; Holland, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The accurate assessment of exposure to ambient ozone concentrations is important for informing the public and pollution monitoring agencies about ozone levels that may lead to adverse health effects. High-resolution air quality information can offer significant health benefits by leading to improved environmental decisions. A practical challenge facing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is to provide real-time forecasting of current 8-hour average ozone exposure over the entire conterminous United States. Such real-time forecasting is now provided as spatial forecast maps of current 8-hour average ozone defined as the average of the previous four hours, current hour, and predictions for the next three hours. Current 8-hour average patterns are updated hourly throughout the day on the EPA-AIRNow web site. The contribution here is to show how we can substantially improve upon current real-time forecasting systems. To enable such forecasting, we introduce a downscaler fusion model based on first differences of real-time monitoring data and numerical model output. The model has a flexible coefficient structure and uses an efficient computational strategy to fit model parameters. Our hybrid computational strategy blends continuous background updated model fitting with real-time predictions. Model validation analyses show that we are achieving very accurate and precise ozone forecasts. PMID:24010052

  1. OZONE AND OTHER PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS. VOLUME 2 (CHAPTERS 8-15)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report deals primarily with the origins and effects of ozone and other photochemical oxidants. It is limited, more or less, to the problem of urban pollution and to such closely related topics as natural background in the earth's boundary layer. No consideration is given to t...

  2. Ozone reaction with interior building materials: Influence of diurnal ozone variation, temperature and humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, Donghyun; Gall, Elliott T.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Indoor ozone chemistry affects human exposure to ozone and reaction products that also may adversely affect health and comfort. Reactive uptake of ozone has been characterized for many building materials; however, scant information is available on how diurnal variation of ambient ozone influences ozone reaction with indoor surfaces. The primary objective of this study is to investigate ozone-surface reactions in response to a diurnally varying ozone exposure for three common building materials: ceiling tile, painted drywall, and carpet tile. A secondary objective is to examine the effects of air temperature and humidity. A third goal is to explore how conditioning of materials in an occupied office building might influence subsequent ozone-surface reactions. Experiments were performed at bench-scale with inlet ozone concentrations varied to simulate daytime (ozone elevated) and nighttime (ozone-free in these experiments) periods. To simulate office conditions, experiments were conducted at two temperatures (22 °C and 28 °C) and three relative humidity values (25%, 50%, 75%). Effects of indoor surface exposures were examined by placing material samples in an occupied office and repeating bench-scale characterization after exposure periods of 1 and 2 months. Deposition velocities were observed to be highest during the initial hour of ozone exposure with slow decrease in the subsequent hours of simulated daytime conditions. Daily-average ozone reaction probabilities for fresh materials are in the respective ranges of (1.7-2.7) × 10-5, (2.8-4.7) × 10-5, and (3.0-4.5) × 10-5 for ceiling tile, painted drywall, and carpet tile. The reaction probability decreases by 7%-47% across the three test materials after two 8-h periods of ozone exposure. Measurements with the samples from an occupied office reveal that deposition velocity can decrease or increase with time

  3. Effect of climate change on surface ozone over North America, Europe, and East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, Jordan L.; Prather, Michael J.; Josse, Beatrice; Naik, Vaishali; Horowitz, Larry W.; Zeng, Guang; Shindell, Drew T.; Faluvegi, Greg

    2016-04-01

    The effect of future climate change on surface ozone over North America, Europe, and East Asia is evaluated using present-day (2000s) and future (2100s) hourly surface ozone simulated by four global models. Future climate follows RCP8.5, while methane and anthropogenic ozone precursors are fixed at year 2000 levels. Climate change shifts the seasonal surface ozone peak to earlier in the year and increases the amplitude of the annual cycle. Increases in mean summertime and high-percentile ozone are generally found in polluted environments, while decreases are found in clean environments. We propose that climate change augments the efficiency of precursor emissions to generate surface ozone in polluted regions, thus reducing precursor export to neighboring downwind locations. Even with constant biogenic emissions, climate change causes the largest ozone increases at high percentiles. In most cases, air quality extreme episodes become larger and contain higher ozone levels relative to the rest of the distribution.

  4. Ozone enhances diesel exhaust particles (DEP)-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression in human airway epithelial cells through activation of nuclear factors- kappaB (NF-kappaB) and IL-6 (NF-IL6).

    PubMed

    Kafoury, Ramzi M; Kelley, James

    2005-12-01

    Ozone, a highly reactive oxidant gas is a major component of photochemical smog. As an inhaled toxicant, ozone induces its adverse effects mainly on the lung. Inhalation of particulate matter has been reported to cause airway inflammation in humans and animals. Furthermore, epidemiological evidence has indicated that exposure to particulate matter (PM[2.5-10]), including diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been correlated with increased acute and chronic respiratory morbidity and exacerbation of asthma. Previously, exposure to ozone or particulate matter and their effect on the lung have been addressed as separate environmental problems. Ozone and particulate matter may be chemically coupled in the ambient air. In the present study we determined whether ozone exposure enhances DEP effect on interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression in human airway epithelial cells. We report that ozone exposure (0.5 ppm x 1 hr) significantly increased DEP-induced IL-8 gene expression in A549 cells (117 +/- 19 pg/ml, n = 6, p < 0.05) as compared to cultures treated with DEP (100 microg/ml x 4 hr) alone (31 +/- 3 pg/ml, n = 6), or cultures exposed to purified air (24 +/- 6 pg/ml, n = 6). The increased DEP-induced IL-8 gene expression following ozone exposure was attributed to ozone-induced increase in the activity of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and NF-IL6. The results of the present study indicate that ozone exposure enhances the toxicity of DEP in human airway epithelial cells by augmenting IL-8 gene expression, a potent chemoattractant of neutrophils in the lung. PMID:16819095

  5. The effects of a roster schedule change from 8- to 12-hour shifts on health and safety in a mining operation.

    PubMed

    Baker, A; Heiler, K; Ferguson, S A

    2001-12-01

    The current study examined the impact on employee health and safety of changes to the roster system of an Australian coal mine. Absenteeism and incident frequency rate data were collected over a 33-month period that covered three different roster schedules, an 8-hour system, a 12-hour system and a 12-hour system incorporating unregulated overtime. The first change was implemented after consultation with the employee population, whereas the second was not. There were no significant negative effects of the 12-hour pattern, when compared to the 8-hour system. However, when unregulated and excessive overtime was introduced as part of the second round of changes, absenteeism rates were increased in one sector of the mine. The maintenance sector was subject to a significant increase in absenteeism rates, which may have been attributable to the excessive overtime required of the workers in that area. It is important that overtime be strictly monitored and that the employee population are involved in the process of roster change. PMID:14564860

  6. Understanding the effectiveness of precursor reductions in lowering 8-hr ozone concentrations--Part II. The eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Steven D; Blanchard, Charles L; Ziman, Stephen D

    2004-11-01

    Analyses of ozone (O3) measurements in conjunction with photochemical modeling were used to assess the feasibility of attaining the federal 8-hr O3 standard in the eastern United States. Various combinations of volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission reductions were effective in lowering modeled peak 1-hr O3 concentrations. VOC emissions reductions alone had only a modest impact on modeled peak 8-hr O3 concentrations. Anthropogenic NOx emissions reductions of 46-86% of 1996 base case values were needed to reach the level of the 8-hr standard in some areas. As NOx emissions are reduced, O3 production efficiency increases, which accounts for the less than proportional response of calculated 8-hr O3 levels. Such increases in O3 production efficiency also were noted in previous modeling work for central California. O3 production in some urban core areas, such as New York City and Chicago, IL, was found to be VOC-limited. In these areas, moderate NOx emissions reductions may be accompanied by increases in peak 8-hr O3 levels. The findings help to explain differences in historical trends in 1- and 8-hr O3 levels and have serious implications for the feasibility of attaining the 8-hr O3 standard in several areas of the eastern United States. PMID:15587557

  7. Near UV atmospheric absorption measurements from the DC-8 aircraft during the 1987 airborne Antarctic ozone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahner, A.; Jakoubek, R. O.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Mount, G. H.; Schmeltekopf, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    During the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment from 28 August to 30 September 1987 near UV zenith scattered sky measurements were made over Antarctic from the NASA DC-8 aircraft using a one third m spectrograph equipped with a diode-array detector. Scattered sky light data in the wavelength range 348 nm to 388 nm was spectrally analyzed for O3, NO2, OClO, and BrO column abundances. Slant column abudances of O3, NO2, OClO and BrO were determined, using a computer algorithm of non-linear and linear least square correlation of Antarctic scattered sky spectra to laboratory absorption cross section data. Using measured vertical electrochemical sonde ozone profiles from Palmer, Halley Bay, and the South Pole Stations the slant columns of O3 were converted into vertical column abundances. The vertical column amounts of NO2, OClO, and BrO were derived using vertical profiles calculated by a chemical model appropriate for Antarctica. NO2 vertical column abundances show steep latitudinal decrease with increasing latitude for all 13 flights carried out during the mission. In the regions where NO2 abudances are low, OClO and BrO were observed. The spatial and temporal vertical column abundances of these species are discussed in the context of the chemistry and dynamics in the antarctic polar vortex during the austral spring.

  8. Respiratory effects of two-hour exposure with intermittent exercise to ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide alone and in combination in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, J.

    1983-01-01

    Seven adult male healthy volunteer subjects were exposed to 0.15 ppm each of O/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ alone and in combination, with intermittent light exercise for two hours. Three of the 7 subjects developed cough during deep inspiration and one subject had chest pain during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone. Among the various indices of pulmonary function tests, specific airway conductane (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was the most sensitive index to examine the changes produced by the exposure to O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. Significant decrease of G/sub aw//V/sub tg/ in comparison with control measurements was observed in 6 of 7 subjects during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone, and in all subjects during exposures to the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. However, no significant enhancement of effect was observed in the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants, although a slightly greater decrease of airway resistance/volume of thoracic gas (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was observed for the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants than for O/sub 3/ alone.

  9. Microbiological evaluation of chicken carcasses in an immersion chilling system with water renewal at 8 and 16 hours.

    PubMed

    Souza, L C T; Pereira, J G; Spina, T L B; Izidoro, T B; Oliveira, A C; Pinto, J P A N

    2012-05-01

    Since 2004, Brazil has been the leading exporter of chicken. Because of the importance of this sector in the Brazilian economy, food safety must be ensured by control and monitoring of the production stages susceptible to contamination, such as the chilling process. The goal of this study was to evaluate changes in microbial levels on chicken carcasses and in chilling water after immersion in a chilling system for 8 and 16 h during commercial processing. An objective of the study was to encourage discussion regarding the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture Livestock and Food Supply regulation that requires chicken processors to completely empty, clean, and disinfect each tank of the chilling system after every 8-h shift. Before and after immersion chilling, carcasses were collected and analyzed for mesophilic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms, and Escherichia coli. Samples of water from the chilling system were also analyzed for residual free chlorine. The results do not support required emptying of the chiller tank after 8 h; these tanks could be emptied after 16 h. The results for all carcasses tested at the 8- and 16-h time points indicated no significant differences in the microbiological indicators evaluated. These data provide both technical and scientific support for discussing changes in federal law regarding the management of immersion chilling water systems used as part of the poultry processing line. PMID:22564950

  10. 30 CFR 48.8 - Annual refresher training of miners; minimum courses of instruction; hours of instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... miners who receive this training under 30 CFR 75.1504, the course shall include a review of the emergency... addition, except for miners who receive this training under 30 CFR 75.1504, the training for self-contained... environment. (8) Self-rescue and respiratory devices. The course shall include instruction and...

  11. Microbiology and evisceration efficiency of broiler carcasses slaughtered and held up to 8 hours postmortem prior to scalding and defeathering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The implementation of on farm slaughter could eliminate potential animal welfare issues associated with cooping, transport, dumping, and shackling live broilers. This research evaluated evisceration efficiency and the microbiological implications of delaying scalding and defeathering for up to 8 h a...

  12. Occurrence of ozone as a phytotoxicant in Kiev, Ukraine and in the Ukrainian Carpathian mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Bytnerowicz, A.; Manning, W.; Blum, O.; Popovicheva, L.

    1995-12-31

    Ogawa passive ozone samplers were established at the Central Botanic Garden in Kiev and in five forest locations in the Ukrainian Carpathian mountains in summer, 1995. An active ozone monitor (Thermo-Electron 49) was also established at the Botanic Garden, together with plants of ozone-sensitive (Bel-W3) and ozone-tolerant (Bel-B) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The highest average hourly ozone concentration monitored in Kiev was 84.4 ppb. From August to September, two-week average concentrations of ozone (Ogawa samplers) in the Carpathian forests ranged from 27.4--51.8 ppb. During a two-week exposure period, Bel-W3 tobacco plants in Kiev had foliar injury on leaf one as high as 62%, with only 13% for Bel-B. Ozone injury was found on a variety of indicator plants in Kiev and at three of the five passive sampler sites in the Carpathians.

  13. Comparison of Profile Total Ozone from SBUV (v8.6) with GOME-Type and Ground-Based Total Ozone for a 16-Year Period (1996 to 2011)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiou, E. W.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R. D.; Loyola, D. G.; Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Fioletov, V. E.; Van Roozendael, M.; Spurr, R.; Lerot, C.; Frith, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the comparison of the variability of total column ozone inferred from the three independent multi-year data records, namely, (i) Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Instrument (SBUV) v8.6 profile total ozone, (ii) GTO (GOME-type total ozone), and (iii) ground-based total ozone data records covering the 16-year overlap period (March 1996 through June 2011). Analyses are conducted based on area-weighted zonal means for 0-30degS, 0-30degN, 50-30degS, and 30-60degN. It has been found that, on average, the differences in monthly zonal mean total ozone vary between -0.3 and 0.8% and are well within 1 %. For GTO minus SBUV, the standard deviations and ranges (maximum minus minimum) of the differences regarding monthly zonal mean total ozone vary between 0.6-0.7% and 2.8-3.8% respectively, depending on the latitude band. The corresponding standard deviations and ranges regarding the differences in monthly zonal mean anomalies show values between 0.4-0.6% and 2.2-3.5 %. The standard deviations and ranges of the differences ground-based minus SBUV regarding both monthly zonal means and anomalies are larger by a factor of 1.4-2.9 in comparison to GTO minus SBUV. The ground-based zonal means demonstrate larger scattering of monthly data compared to satellite-based records. The differences in the scattering are significantly reduced if seasonal zonal averages are analyzed. The trends of the differences GTO minus SBUV and ground-based minus SBUV are found to vary between -0.04 and 0.1%/yr (-0.1 and 0.3DU/yr). These negligibly small trends have provided strong evidence that there are no significant time-dependent differences among these multiyear total ozone data records. Analyses of the annual deviations from pre-1980 level indicate that, for the 15-year period of 1996 to 2010, all three data records show a gradual increase at 30-60degN from -5% in 1996 to -2% in 2010. In contrast, at 50-30degS and 30degS- 30degN there has been a leveling off in the 15 years after

  14. Microporous carbon filters as catalysts for ozone decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, L.; Coutts, D.; Adams, R.; Shen, C.; Quintana, C.; Showalter, S.

    1995-02-01

    Ozone, an allotrope of oxygen, present in the upper atmosphere (ozonosphere) plays a critical role in radiative balance. However, ozone is a toxic gas with a pungent odor when present in the troposphere and is considered a health hazard. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established a maximum permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 0.1 ppM in an 8 hour period. There are many sources of exposure to ozone in the workplace. Ozone is generated by high voltage discharge wires found in laser printers and photocopiers. Other common uses for ozone include waste water treatment, medical and dental instrument sterilization, drinking water purification, industrial oxidation processes, bleaching, and as a bactericide in swimming pools. Carbon filters are often used to minimize worker exposure to ozone. When designing a filter to decompose unwanted ozone, there are three requirements for most commercial applications. The first requirement is that production costs of the filter be minimal. Many applications require large quantities of filters and may have to be changed out often. The relatively low PEL also requires the filters to have a very high ozone decomposition efficiency. Finally, current applications tend to use small, low power fans to move air through the filters. Low back pressure is required to prevent over heating and prevent buildup of the toxic and potentially explosive ozone. In this paper, we will discuss two porous carbon filters that satisfy all of these requirements.

  15. Characterizing the Vertical Processes of Ozone in Colorado's Front Range Using the GSFC Ozone DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, John T.; McGee, Thomas J.; Hoff, Raymond M.; Sumnicht, Grant; Twigg, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Although characterizing the interactions of ozone throughout the entire troposphere are important for health and climate processes, there is a lack of routine measurements of vertical profiles within the United States. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) has been developed and validated within the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet). Two scientifically interesting ozone episodes are presented that were observed during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER AQ) campaign at Ft. Collins, Colorado. The first case study, occurring between 22-23 July 2014, indicates enhanced concentrations of ozone at Ft. Collins during nighttime hours, which was due to the complex recirculation of ozone within the foothills of the Rocky Mountain region. Although quantifying the ozone increase aloft during recirculation episodes has been historically difficult, results indicate that an increase of 20 - 30 ppbv of ozone at the Ft. Collins site has been attributed to this recirculation. The second case, occurring between Aug 4-8th 2014, characterizes a dynamical exchange of ozone between the stratosphere and the troposphere. This case, along with seasonal model parameters from previous years, is used to estimate the stratospheric contribution to the Rocky Mountain region. Results suggest that a large amount of stratospheric air is residing in the troposphere in the summertime near Ft. Collins, CO. The results also indicate that warmer tropopauses are correlated with an increase in stratospheric air below the tropopause in the Rocky Mountain Region.

  16. 78 FR 21296 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey; Infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... 18, 1997, EPA promulgated new and revised NAAQS for 8-hour ozone (62 FR 38856) and PM 2.5 (62 FR.... EPA strengthened the 24-hour PM 2.5 NAAQS from 65 g/m\\3\\ to 35 g/m\\3\\ on October 17, 2006 (71 FR 61144).\\2\\ \\1\\ EPA issued a revised 8-hour ozone standard on March 27, 2008 (73 FR 16436). On September...

  17. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air...

  18. Which metric of ambient ozone to predict daily mortality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshammer, Hanns; Hutter, Hans-Peter; Kundi, Michael

    2013-02-01

    It is well known that ozone concentration is associated with daily cause specific mortality. But which ozone metric is the best predictor of the daily variability in mortality? We performed a time series analysis on daily deaths (all causes, respiratory and cardiovascular causes as well as death in elderly 65+) in Vienna for the years 1991-2009. We controlled for seasonal and long term trend, day of the week, temperature and humidity using the same basic model for all pollutant metrics. We found model fit was best for same day variability of ozone concentration (calculated as the difference between daily hourly maximum and minimum) and hourly maximum. Of these the variability displayed a more linear dose-response function. Maximum 8 h moving average and daily mean value performed not so well. Nitrogen dioxide (daily mean) in comparison performed better when previous day values were assessed. Same day ozone and previous day nitrogen dioxide effect estimates did not confound each other. Variability in daily ozone levels or peak ozone levels seem to be a better proxy of a complex reactive secondary pollutant mixture than daily average ozone levels in the Middle European setting. If this finding is confirmed this would have implications for the setting of legally binding limit values.

  19. New ozone standard in the U.S.A. applied to Mexico City metropolitan air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo A, H. Sosa E, R.; Sanchez A, P.; Jaimes P, M.

    1998-12-31

    The air quality of the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone (MCMZ) is recognized as one of the worst air pollution problems in the world. At the present, ozone is the most critical atmospheric pollutant in the area. According to the air quality data of the monitoring station at the University of Mexico, the ozone problem started in 1986. Mexican Ozone Air Quality Standard (MOAQS) specifies that a concentration of 0.11 ppm must not be exceeded more than one hour a day, one day a year in the term of three years. The Official Air Quality Data (RAMA) from 19 monitoring stations in the MCMZ coincides with the University station`s data, presenting the same atmospheric pollution problem. In the most critical sites the MOAQS is exceeded more than 1,300 hours in a year. Now, the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (EPA) is working to establish the new ozone standard. EPA is setting the standard at 0.08 ppm on an average of 8 hours, considering the 3 year average of the annual 4th highest daily maximum 8 hour ozone concentration. The purpose of this paper is to present the tendency and comparison between two standards (1 hour and 8 hours) of the ozone concentrations in the MCMZ, since 1986 to 1996. Although Mexico does not yet have the 8 hour standard for ozone, it is very important to analyze the existing air quality data with this new standard. In this way the aim is to protect the health of more than 20 million inhabitants in the MCMZ.

  20. 40 CFR 52.523 - Control strategy: Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)(2)(J). A FIP is currently in place and approved for Florida at 40 CFR 52.37 for these requirements... 52.523 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED.... EPA is disapproving portions of Florida's infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS...

  1. 40 CFR 52.523 - Control strategy: Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)(2)(J). A FIP is currently in place and approved for Florida at 40 CFR 52.37 for these requirements... 52.523 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED.... EPA is disapproving portions of Florida's infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS...

  2. SRC-mediated EGF Receptor Activation Regulates Ozone-induced Interleukin 8 Expression in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Human exposure to ozone (03) results in pulmonary function decrements and airway inflammation. The mechanisms underlying these adverse effects remain unclear. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation. ...

  3. Contribution of some ozone depleting substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs) on total column ozone growth at Srinagar (34°N, 74.8°E), India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, P. K.; Saha, D. K.; Sarkar, D.

    2013-02-01

    A critical analysis has been made on the contribution of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CH3Cl, CH3Br, CCl4, CH3CCl3, HCFCs, halons, WMO (World Meteorological Organization) minor constituents, CH4, N2O and water vapour to the variation of total column ozone (TCO) concentration at the station in Srinagar (34°N, 74.8°E), India from 1992 to 2003. With the implementation of Montreal Protocol, though the concentrations of CFC-11, CFC-113, CH3Cl, CH3Br, CCl4 and CH3CCl3 had decreased, the concentrations of CFC-12, HCFCs, halons, WMO minor constituents, CH4, N2O and water vapour had increased, as a result of which TCO had risen from 1992 to 2003 at the above station. The nature of yearly variations of concentrations of the above ozone depleting substances and GHGs as well as ozone has been presented. Possible explanations for build-up of TCO have also been offered.

  4. Solving the Tulsa ozone problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, K.K.; Wilson, J.D.; Gibeau, E.

    1998-12-31

    Local governments and interested parties in Tulsa, Oklahoma are planning actions to keep Tulsa in compliance with the ozone ambient air quality standard. Based on recent data Tulsa exceeds the new eight hour average national ambient air quality standard for ozone and occasionally exceeds the previous one hour standard. Currently, Tulsa is in attainment of the former one-hour ozone standard. The first planning step is to integrate the existing information about Tulsa`s ozone problem. Prior studies of Tulsa ozone are reviewed. Tulsa`s recent air quality and meteorological monitoring are evaluated. Emission inventory estimates are assessed. Factors identified with Tulsa`s ozone problem are the transport of ozone and precursor gases, a possible role for biogenic emissions, and a simplistic ozone forecasting method. The integration of information found that current air quality and meteorological monitoring is meager. Observations of volatile organic compounds and NO{sub y} are absent. Prior intensive studies in 1977 and 1985 are more than ten years old and lack relevance to today`s problem. Emission inventory estimates are scarce and uncertain. The current knowledge base was judged inadequate to properly characterize the present ozone problem. Actions are recommended to enlarge the information base to address Tulsa`s ozone problem.

  5. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent data set for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total data set of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regionally representative locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This data set is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily 8-hour average (MDA8), sum of means over 35 ppb (daily maximum 8-h; SOMO35), accumulated ozone exposure above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40), and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded data sets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi: 10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  6. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Act section 169A and 40 CFR 51.308(e) regarding Best Available Retrofit Technology and the requirements of 40 CFR 51.308(d)(2) and (d)(4)(v) regarding the calculation of baseline and natural conditions..., Kalmiopsis Wilderness Area, Mountain Lakes Wilderness Area, Gearhart Mountain Wilderness Area, Crater...

  7. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Act section 169A and 40 CFR 51.308(e) regarding Best Available Retrofit Technology and the requirements of 40 CFR 51.308(d)(2) and (d)(4)(v) regarding the calculation of baseline and natural conditions..., Kalmiopsis Wilderness Area, Mountain Lakes Wilderness Area, Gearhart Mountain Wilderness Area, Crater...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Act section 169A and 40 CFR 51.308(e) regarding Best Available Retrofit Technology and the requirements of 40 CFR 51.308(d)(2) and (d)(4)(v) regarding the calculation of baseline and natural conditions..., Kalmiopsis Wilderness Area, Mountain Lakes Wilderness Area, Gearhart Mountain Wilderness Area, Crater...

  9. Ozone-Initiated Chemistry in an Occupied Simulated AircraftCabin

    SciTech Connect

    Weschler, C.J.; Wisthaler, A.; Cowlind, S.; Tamas, G.; Strom-Tejsena, P.; Hodgson, A.T.; Destaillats, H.; Herrington, J.; Zhang,J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2007-07-01

    We have used multiple analytical methods to characterize the gas-phase products formed when ozone was added to cabin air during simulated 4-hour flights that were conducted in a reconstructed section of a B-767 aircraft containing human occupants. Two separate groups of 16 females were each exposed to four conditions: low air exchange (4.4 h-1), <2 ppb ozone; low air exchange, 61-64 ppb ozone; high air exchange (8.8 h-1), <2 ppb ozone; and high air exchange, 73-77 ppb ozone. The addition of ozone to the cabin air increased the levels of identified byproducts from {approx}70 to 130 ppb at the lower air exchange rate and from {approx}30 to 70 ppb at the higher air exchange rate. Most of the increase was attributable to acetone, nonanal, decanal, 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA), 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO), formic acid, and acetic acid, with 0.25-0.30 mol of quantified product volatilized per mol of ozone consumed. Several of these compounds reached levels above their reported odor thresholds. Most byproducts were derived from surface reactions with occupants and their clothing, consistent with the inference that occupants were responsible for the removal of >55% of the ozone in the cabin. The observations made in this study have implications for other indoor settings. Whenever human beings and ozone are simultaneously present, one anticipates production of acetone, nonanal, decanal, 6-MHO, geranyl acetone, and 4-OPA.

  10. Ozone trends: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staehelin, J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Appenzeller, C.; Eberhard, J.

    2001-05-01

    Ozone plays a very important role in our atmosphere because it protects any living organisms at the Earth's surface against the harmful solar UVB and UVC radiation. In the stratosphere, ozone plays a critical role in the energy budget because it absorbs both solar UV and terrestrial IR radiation. Further, ozone in the tropopause acts as a strong greenhouse gas, and increasing ozone trends at these altitudes contribute to climate change. This review contains a short description of the various techniques that provided atmospheric ozone measurements valuable for long-term trend analysis. The anthropogenic emissions of substances that deplete ozone (chlorine- and bromine-containing volatile gases) have increased from the 1950s until the second half of the 1980s. The most severe consequence of the anthropogenic release of ozone-depleting substances is the "Antarctic ozone hole." Long-term observations indicate that stratospheric ozone depletion in the southern winter-spring season over Antarctica started in the late 1970s, leading to a strong decrease in October total ozone means. Present values are only approximately half of those observed prior to 1970. In the Arctic, large ozone depletion was observed in winter and spring in some recent years. Satellite and ground-based measurements show no significant trends in the tropics but significant long-term decreasing trends in the northern and southern midlatitudes (of the order of 2-4% per decade in the period from 1970 to 1996 and an acceleration in trends in the 1980s). Ozone at northern midlatitudes decreased by -7.4±2% per decade at 40 km above mean sea level, while ozone loss was small at 30 km. Large trends were found in the lower stratosphere, -5.1±1.8% at 20 km and -7.3±4.6% at 15 km, where the bulk of the ozone resides. The possibility of a reduction in the observed trends has been discussed recently, but it is very hard to distinguish this from the natural variability. As a consequence of the Montreal Protocol

  11. AIRS Ozone Burden During Antarctic Winter: Time Series from 8/1/2005 to 9/30/2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of AIRS Ozone Burden During Antarctic Winter

    AIRS provides a daily global 3-dimensional view of Earth's ozone layer. Since AIRS observes in the thermal infrared spectral range, it also allows scientists to view from space the Antarctic ozone hole for the first time continuously during polar winter. This image sequence captures the intensification of the annual ozone hole in the Antarctic Polar Vortex.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Long-Term Exposure to Ozone and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2002 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoyang; Balluz, Lina S; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Wen, Xiao-Jun; Hao, Yongping; Qualters, Judith R

    2016-02-01

    Long-term exposure to ground-level ozone is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The association remains uncertain between long-term exposure to ozone and life expectancy. We assessed the associations between seasonal mean daily 8-hour maximum (8-hr max) ozone concentrations measured during the ozone monitoring seasons and life expectancy at birth in 3109 counties of the conterminous U.S. during 2002 to 2008. We used latent class growth analysis to identify latent classes of counties that had distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations over the 7-year period and used linear regression analysis to determine differences in life expectancy by ozone levels. We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct seasonal mean daily 8-hr max ozone concentrations and rates of change. When compared with the counties with the lowest ozone concentrations, the counties with the highest ozone concentrations had 1.7- and 1.4-year lower mean life expectancy in males and females (both P < 0.0001), respectively. The associations remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding effects of seasonal mean PM2.5 concentrations and other selected environmental, demographic, socio-economic, and health-related factors (both P < 0.0001). A 5 ppb higher ozone concentration was associated with 0.25 year lower life expectancy in males (95% CI: -0.30 to -0.19) and 0.21 year in females (95% CI: -0.25 to -0.17). We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations. Our findings suggest that long-term exposure to a higher ozone concentration may be associated with a lower life expectancy. PMID:26886595

  13. Long-Term Exposure to Ozone and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2002 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaoyang; Balluz, Lina S.; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Wen, Xiao-Jun; Hao, Yongping; Qualters, Judith R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Long-term exposure to ground-level ozone is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The association remains uncertain between long-term exposure to ozone and life expectancy. We assessed the associations between seasonal mean daily 8-hour maximum (8-hr max) ozone concentrations measured during the ozone monitoring seasons and life expectancy at birth in 3109 counties of the conterminous U.S. during 2002 to 2008. We used latent class growth analysis to identify latent classes of counties that had distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations over the 7-year period and used linear regression analysis to determine differences in life expectancy by ozone levels. We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct seasonal mean daily 8-hr max ozone concentrations and rates of change. When compared with the counties with the lowest ozone concentrations, the counties with the highest ozone concentrations had 1.7- and 1.4-year lower mean life expectancy in males and females (both P < 0.0001), respectively. The associations remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding effects of seasonal mean PM2.5 concentrations and other selected environmental, demographic, socio-economic, and health-related factors (both P < 0.0001). A 5 ppb higher ozone concentration was associated with 0.25 year lower life expectancy in males (95% CI: −0.30 to −0.19) and 0.21 year in females (95% CI: −0.25 to −0.17). We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations. Our findings suggest that long-term exposure to a higher ozone concentration may be associated with a lower life expectancy. PMID:26886595

  14. KINETICS MODEL AND OZONE ISOPLETH PLOTTING PACKAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Kinetics Model and Ozone Isopleth Plotting Package (OZIPP) computer program can be used to simulate ozone formation in urban atmospheres. OZIPP calculates maximum one-hour average ozone concentrations given a set of input assumptions about initial precursor concentrations, li...

  15. Fabrication of a SU-8-based polymer-enclosed channel with a penetrating UV/ozone-modified interior surface for electrokinetic separation of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Jung; Yang, Chung-Shi; Lan, Li-Hua; Wang, Pen-Cheng; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2010-11-01

    This paper introduces electrokinetic separation inside fully cross-linked epoxy-based polymer channels that were batch modified on the inner surfaces using a penetrating UV/ozone treatment from the outside. The treatment can employ either a 254 nm UV source in an ozone-rich environment or a stand-alone 172 nm UV source to directly generate C=O hydrophilic functional groups on the embedded polymer channel wall surfaces. Short-wavelength UV radiation was employed to break polymer surface bonds inside the channel. Ozone generated directly from air or supplied externally oxidized the reaction site on the activated polymer surface to generate the desired functional groups. An epoxy-based photoresist compound, SU-8 (MicroChem, MA), which is widely used in microfluidic systems, was employed to demonstrate the surface modification. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HRXPS) were employed to characterize the functional groups that formed after the UV/ozone surface modification and to confirm the formation of O-H functional groups from the phenol group covalently bonded to the SU-8 surface, attributed mostly to the surface hydrophilicity modification. Water contact angles on the modified surface ranged from 72° to 12° depending on the processing time, UV power and ozone concentration. These angles were retained for at least 4 weeks after the process. Finally, the inner wall surfaces of the SU-8-enclosed channels were successfully modified using this technology, and rapid water transportation and EOF pumping were visualized inside the channel after surface modification. Successful electrokinetic separation of 10 mM BSA and 10 mM anti-rabbit IgG labeled with FITC inside the channel was also carried out. The polymer channel revealed a surface charge density of 75% of the zeta potential on a microslide glass surface, indicating the potential for molecule separation using polymer channels instead of glass channels

  16. Evaluation of microporous carbon filters as catalysts for ozone decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, L.; Coutts, D.; Shen, C.; Adams, R.; Quintana, C.; Showalter, S.

    1994-12-31

    Ozone is produced in small quantities in photocopiers and laser printers in the workplace and large quantities in industrial waste water treatment facilities. Carbon filters are commonly used to decompose this unwanted ozone. The three most important factors in producing a filter for this purpose are flow properties, efficiency, and cost. Most ozone decomposition applications require very low back-pressure at modest flow rates. The tradeoff between the number of pores and the size of the pores will be discussed. Typical unfiltered emissions in the workplace are approximately 1 ppm. The maximum permissible exposure limit, PEL, for worker exposure to ozone is 0.1 ppm over 8 hours. Several methods have been examined to increase the efficiency of ozone decomposition. Carbon surfaces were modified with catalysts, the surface activated, and the surface area was increased, in attempts to decompose ozone more effectively. Methods to reduce both the processing and raw material costs were investigated. Several sources of microporous carbon were investigated as ozone decomposition catalysts. Cheaper processing routes including macropore templating, faster drying and extracting methods were also studied.

  17. Synoptic and meteorological drivers of extreme ozone concentrations over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Noelia Felipe; Sillmann, Jana; Schnell, Jordan L.; Rust, Henning W.; Butler, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The present work assesses the relationship between local and synoptic meteorological conditions and surface ozone concentration over Europe in spring and summer months, during the period 1998-2012 using a new interpolated data set of observed surface ozone concentrations over the European domain. Along with local meteorological conditions, the influence of large-scale atmospheric circulation on surface ozone is addressed through a set of airflow indices computed with a novel implementation of a grid-by-grid weather type classification across Europe. Drivers of surface ozone over the full distribution of maximum daily 8-hour average values are investigated, along with drivers of the extreme high percentiles and exceedances or air quality guideline thresholds. Three different regression techniques are applied: multiple linear regression to assess the drivers of maximum daily ozone, logistic regression to assess the probability of threshold exceedances and quantile regression to estimate the meteorological influence on extreme values, as represented by the 95th percentile. The relative importance of the input parameters (predictors) is assessed by a backward stepwise regression procedure that allows the identification of the most important predictors in each model. Spatial patterns of model performance exhibit distinct variations between regions. The inclusion of the ozone persistence is particularly relevant over Southern Europe. In general, the best model performance is found over Central Europe, where the maximum temperature plays an important role as a driver of maximum daily ozone as well as its extreme values, especially during warmer months.

  18. Real-Time Science on Social Media: The Example of Twitter in the Minutes, Hours, Days after the 2015 M7.8 Nepal Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, A.; Bossu, R.; Mazet-Roux, G.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific information on disasters such as earthquakes typically comes firstly from official organizations, news reports and interviews with experts, and later from scientific presentations and peer-reviewed articles. With the advent of the Internet and social media, this information is available in real-time from automated systems and within a dynamic, collaborative interaction between scientific experts, responders and the public. After the 2015 M7.8 Nepal earthquake, Twitter Tweets from earth scientists* included information, analysis, commentary and discussion on earthquake parameters (location, size, mechanism, rupture extent, high-frequency radiation, …), earthquake effects (distribution of felt shaking and damage, triggered seismicity, landslides, …), earthquake rumors (e.g. the imminence of a larger event) and other earthquake information and observations (aftershock forecasts, statistics and maps, source and regional tectonics, seismograms, GPS, InSAR, photos/videos, …).In the future (while taking into account security, false or erroneous information and identity verification), collaborative, real-time science on social media after a disaster will give earlier and better scientific understanding and dissemination of public information, and enable improved emergency response and disaster management.* A sample of scientific Tweets after the 2015 Nepal earthquake: In the first minutes: "mb5.9 Mwp7.4 earthquake Nepal 2015.04.25-06:11:25UTC", "Major earthquake shakes Nepal 8 min ago", "Epicenter between Pokhara and Kathmandu", "Major earthquake shakes Nepal 18 min ago. Effects derived from witnesses' reports". In the first hour: "shallow thrust faulting to North under Himalayas", "a very large and shallow event ... Mw7.6-7.7", "aftershocks extend east and south of Kathmandu, so likely ruptured beneath city", "Valley-blocking landslides must be a very real worry". In the first day: "M7.8 earthquake in Nepal 2hr ago: destructive in Kathmandu Valley and

  19. Effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate on polar lipids and Fatty acids in leaves of morning glory and kidney bean.

    PubMed

    Nouchi, I; Toyama, S

    1988-07-01

    To compare the effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on leaf lipids, fatty acids and malondialdehyde (MDA), morning glory (Pharbitis nil Choisy cv Scarlet O'Hara) and kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Gintebo) plants were exposed to either ozone (0.15 microliter per liter for 8 hours) or PAN (0.10 microliter per liter for up to 8 hours). Ozone increased phospholipids in morning glory and decreased in kidney bean at the initial stage (2-4 hours) of exposure, while it scarcely changed glycolipids, the unsaturated fatty acids, and MDA in both plants. A large reduction of glycolipids occurred 1 day after ozone exposure in both plants. PAN caused marked drops in phospholipids and glycolipids in kidney bean at relatively late stage (6-8 hours) of exposure, while it increased phosphatidic acid and decreased the unsaturated fatty acids, an increase which was accompanied by a large increase in MDA. These results suggest that ozone may not directly oxidize unsaturated fatty acids at the initial stage of exposure, but may alter polar lipid metabolism, particularly phospholipids. On the other hand, PAN may abruptly and considerably degrade phospholipids and glycolipids by peroxidation or hydrolysis at the late stage of exposure. The present study shows that ozone and PAN affect polar lipids in different manners. PMID:16666199

  20. A study of interferences in ambient ozone monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Kleindienst, T.E.; McIver, C.D.; Ollison, W.M.

    1997-12-31

    Recently proposed EPA revisions to the ozone ambient air quality standards change allowable ozone levels from 120 ppbv (1-hour average) to 70-90 ppbv (8-hour average). Accordingly, the relative importance of potential interferences in currently deployed ethylene-chemiluminescence and ultraviolet (UV) absorption monitors may be increased. UV absorption monitors predominate US monitoring networks and operate in a dual channel mode, requiring a scrubber to selectively remove ozone from other UV absorbing species. However, these scrubbers may also remove aromatic species with UV absorption coefficients at 254 run comparable to ozone that could constitute potential interferants. The interference potential for only a few of these compounds has been determined. Additional representative organic precursor species likely to be present under polluted conditions (e.g., C{sub 8}-C{sub 9} aromatic hydrocarbons and their nitroaromatic and phenolic derivatives) have been tested as UV interferants in this study. The removal and reentrainment of aromatic pollutants on ozone scrubbers used in UV monitors is highly dependent on the relative humidity in the system. Raising the temperature of the scrubber does not improve its interferant transmission under dry conditions and increases the retention of potential interferants under humid conditions. Reduced sulfur compounds such as CS{sub 2} do not appear to be interferants for the chemiluminescence monitor.

  1. Trends of ozone total columns and vertical distribution from FTIR observations at 8 NDACC stations around the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigouroux, C.; Blumenstock, T.; Coffey, M.; Errera, Q.; García, O.; Jones, N. B.; Hannigan, J. W.; Hase, F.; Liley, B.; Mahieu, E.; Mellqvist, J.; Notholt, J.; Palm, M.; Persson, G.; Schneider, M.; Servais, C.; Smale, D.; Thölix, L.; De Mazière, M.

    2014-09-01

    Ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements of solar absorption spectra can provide ozone total columns with a precision of 2%, but also independent partial column amounts in about four vertical layers, one in the troposphere and three in the stratosphere up to about 45 km, with a precision of 5-6%. We use eight of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Compososition Change (NDACC) stations having a long-term time series of FTIR ozone measurements to study the total and vertical ozone trends and variability, namely: Ny-Alesund (79° N), Thule (77° N), Kiruna (68° N), Harestua (60° N), Jungfraujoch (47° N), Izaña (28° N), Wollongong (34° S) and Lauder (45° S). The length of the FTIR time-series varies by station, but is typically from about 1995 to present. We applied to the monthly means of the ozone total and four partial columns a stepwise multiple regression model including the following proxies: solar cycle, Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Arctic and Antarctic Oscillation (AO/AAO), tropopause pressure (TP), equivalent latitude (EL), Eliassen-Palm flux (EPF), and volume of polar stratospheric clouds (VPSC). At the Arctic stations, the trends are found mostly negative in the troposphere and lower stratosphere, very mixed in the middle stratosphere, positive in the upper stratosphere due to a large increase in the 1995-2003 period, and non-significant when considering the total columns. The trends for mid-latitude and subtropical stations are all non-significant, except at Lauder in the troposphere and upper stratosphere, and at Wollongong for the total columns and the lower and middle stratospheric columns; at Jungfraujoch, the upper stratospheric trend is close to significance (+0.9 ± 1.0 % decade-1). Therefore, some signs of the onset of ozone mid-latitude recovery are observed only in the Southern Hemisphere, while a few more years seems to be needed to observe it at the northern mid

  2. Contributors to ozone episodes in three US/Mexico border twin-cities.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chune; Fernando, H J S; Yang, Jie

    2009-09-01

    The Process Analysis tools of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system together with back-trajectory analysis were used to assess potential contributors to ozone episodes that occurred during June 1-4, 2006, in three populated U.S.-Mexico border twin cities: San Diego/Tijuana, Imperial/Mexicali and El Paso/Ciudad Juárez. Validation of CMAQ output against surface ozone measurements indicates that the predictions are acceptable with regard to commonly recommended statistical standards and comparable to other reported studies. The mean normalized bias test (MNBT) and mean normalized gross error (MNGE) for hourly ozone fall well within the US EPA suggested range of +/-15% and 35%, respectively, except MNBT for El Paso. The MNBTs for maximum 8-h average ozone are larger than those for hourly ozone, but all the simulated maximum 8-h average ozone are within a factor of 2 of those measured in all three regions. The process and back-trajectory analyses indicate that the main sources of daytime ground-level ozone are the local photochemical production and regional transport. By integrating the effects of each process over the depth of the daytime planetary boundary layer (PBL), it is found that in the San Diego area (SD), chemistry and vertical advection contributed about 36%/48% and 64%/52% for June 2 and 3, respectively. This confirms the previous finding that high-altitude regional transport followed by fumigation contributes significantly to ozone in SD. The back-trajectory analysis shows that this ozone was mostly transported from the coastal area of southern California. For the episodes in Imperial Valley and El Paso, respectively, ozone was transported from the coastal areas of southern California and Mexico and from northern Texas and Oklahoma. PMID:19559465

  3. Ozone exposure : Areas of potential ozone risk for selected tree species in Austria.

    PubMed

    Loibl, W; Smidt, S

    1996-12-01

    Increased tropospheric ozone concentrations cause damage to both human health and the environment. To assess the exposure of forest areas and selected tree species to ozone, it is necessary to calculate the ozone exposure distribution. The present article describes the application of an ozone interpolation model to the calculation of the ozone exposure distribution in combination with forest inventory data.The exposure of forest regions to ozone was assessed by means of an AOT40 map (accumulated ozone exposure over a threshold of 40 ppb). The calculation was performed by hourly running of the model during the summer term and accumulation of the patterns that exceeded 40 ppb.The exposure of the primary Austrian tree species to ozone can be assessed due to the spatial relation of ozone exposure and tree species patterns. This spatial relation also allows the verification of assumptions concerning ozone-related tree damage. PMID:24233419

  4. The chemistry and diffusion of aircraft exhausts in the lower stratosphere during the first few hours after fly-by. [with attention to ozone depletion by SST exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilst, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the hydrogen-nitrogen-oxygen reaction systems in the lower stratosphere as they are initially perturbed by individual aircraft engine exhaust plumes was conducted in order to determine whether any significant chemical reactions occur, either among exhaust chemical species, or between these species and the environmental ozone, while the exhaust products are confined to intact plume segments at relatively high concentrations. The joint effects of diffusive mixing and chemical kinetics on the reactions were also studied, using the techniques of second-order closure diffusion/chemistry models. The focus of the study was on the larger problem of the potential depletion of ozone by supersonic transport aircraft exhaust materials emitted into the lower stratosphere.

  5. High Resolution Space-Time Ozone Modeling for Assessing Trends

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sujit K.; Gelfand, Alan E.; Holland, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of air pollution regulatory programs designed to improve ground level ozone concentrations is a topic of considerable interest to environmental managers. To aid this assessment, it is necessary to model the space-time behavior of ozone for predicting summaries of ozone across spatial domains of interest and for the detection of long-term trends at monitoring sites. These trends, adjusted for the effects of meteorological variables, are needed for determining the effectiveness of pollution control programs in terms of their magnitude and uncertainties across space. This paper proposes a space-time model for daily 8-hour maximum ozone levels to provide input to regulatory activities: detection, evaluation, and analysis of spatial patterns of ozone summaries and temporal trends. The model is applied to analyzing data from the state of Ohio which has been chosen because it contains a mix of urban, suburban, and rural ozone monitoring sites in several large cities separated by large rural areas. The proposed space-time model is auto-regressive and incorporates the most important meteorological variables observed at a collection of ozone monitoring sites as well as at several weather stations where ozone levels have not been observed. This problem of misalignment of ozone and meteorological data is overcome by spatial modeling of the latter. In so doing we adopt an approach based on the successive daily increments in meteorological variables. With regard to modeling, the increment (or change-in-meteorology) process proves more attractive than working directly with the meteorology process, without sacrificing any desired inference. The full model is specified within a Bayesian framework and is fitted using MCMC techniques. Hence, full inference with regard to model unknowns is available as well as for predictions in time and space, evaluation of annual summaries and assessment of trends. PMID:19759840

  6. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Plopper, C.G.; Hyde, D.M.; St. George, J.A.; Wilson, D.W.; Dungworth, D.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components.

  7. Effects of stratospheric ozone recovery on photochemistry and ozone air quality in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-04-01

    There has been significant stratospheric ozone depletion since the late 1970s due to ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). With the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. In this study, we examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). With a full recovery of the stratospheric ozone, the projected increases in ozone column range from 1% over the low latitudes to more than 10% over the polar regions. The sensitivity factor of troposphere ozone photolysis rate, defined as the percentage changes in surface ozone photolysis rate for 1% increase in stratospheric ozone column, shows significant seasonal variation but is always negative with absolute value larger than one. The expected stratospheric ozone recovery is found to affect the tropospheric ozone destruction rates much more than the ozone production rates. Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. The global average tropospheric OH decreases by 1.7%, and the global average lifetime of tropospheric ozone increases by 1.5%. The perturbations to tropospheric ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 0.8 ppbv in the remote areas. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 13% are found in the troposphere. The increased lifetimes of tropospheric ozone in response to stratospheric ozone recovery enhance the intercontinental transport of ozone and global pollution, in particular for the summertime. The global background ozone attributable to Asian emissions is calculated to increase by up to 15% or 0.3 ppbv in the Northern Hemisphere in response to the projected stratospheric ozone recovery.

  8. Tropospheric ozone in the vicinity of the ozone hole - 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Warren, Linda S.; Hypes, Warren D.; Tuck, Adrian F.; Kelly, Kenneth K.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on ozone measurements in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere over Antarctica, obtained by NASA DC-8 aircraft during the August/September 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The ozone mixing ratios as high as several hundred ppbv were measured, but in all cases these ratios were observed in pockets of upper atmospheric air, both in the vicinity of and away from the location of the ozone hole. The background ozone values in the surrounding troposphere were typically in the range of 20-50 ppbv. Correlation of tropospheric ozone observations with the boundaries of the ozone hole differed in the course of the experiment. During the August 28 - September 2 flights, encounters with ozone-rich air were limited, and the background tropospheric ozone appeared to decrease beneath the hole. For the later flights, and as the ozone hole deepened, the ozone-rich air was frequently observed in the vicinity of the hole, and the average ozone values at the flight altitude were frequently higher than the background values.

  9. 75 FR 2935 - Extension of Deadline for Promulgating Designations for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ..., 2008, EPA promulgated revised 8-hour primary and secondary ozone NAAQS (73 FR 16436; March 27, 2008... promulgation of a new or revised national ambient air quality standard for any pollutant under section 109, the... a national ambient air quality standard, the Administrator shall promulgate the designations of...

  10. 78 FR 9596 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey and New York Ozone Attainment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS during this monitoring period. See 77 FR 36163, 77 FR 47533, 77 FR 17341, and 74 FR 63993. EPA is aware that preliminary ambient air quality monitoring data for 2012 may... moderate nonattainment areas. On December 11, 2012 (77 FR 73570), EPA published a notice of...

  11. 78 FR 21302 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New York State Ozone Implementation Plan Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... outdoors, and individuals with a pre-existing respiratory disease, such as asthma. On April 30, 2004 (69 FR... a requirement to submit a demonstration of attainment. EPA notes that on December 7, 2009 (74 FR..., 2008 (73 FR 15672) EPA determined that Jefferson County attained the 8-hour ozone standard. On June...

  12. Improved Space-Time Forecasting of next Day Ozone Concentrations in the Eastern U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an urgent need to provide accurate air quality information and forecasts to the general public and environmental health decision-makers. This paper develops a hierarchical space-time model for daily 8-hour maximum ozone concentration (O3) data covering much of the easter...

  13. 77 FR 26950 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; California; Western Mojave Desert Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...'' nonattainment for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS.\\1\\ See 69 FR 23858, at 23884 (April 30, 2004) and 40 CFR 81.305... FR 29073, May 20, 2008), and reclassified the Sacramento Metro area from ``Serious'' to ``Severe-15'' nonattainment effective June 4, 2010 (75 FR 24409, May 5, 2010). \\3\\ CARB subsequently submitted a SIP...

  14. Ozone and ozone byproducts in the cabins of commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Clifford; Weschler, Charles J; Mohan, Kris; Vallarino, Jose; Spengler, John D

    2013-05-01

    The aircraft cabin represents a unique indoor environment due to its high surface-to-volume ratio, high occupant density, and the potential for high ozone concentrations at cruising altitudes. Ozone was continuously measured and air was sampled on sorbent traps, targeting carbonyl compounds, on 52 transcontinental U.S. or international flights between 2008 and 2010. The sampling was predominantly on planes that did not have ozone scrubbers (catalytic converters). Peak ozone levels on aircraft without catalytic convertors exceeded 100 ppb, with some flights having periods of more than an hour when the ozone levels were >75 ppb. Ozone was greatly reduced on relatively new aircraft with catalytic convertors, but ozone levels on two flights whose aircraft had older convertors were similar to those on planes without catalytic convertors. Hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO) were detected in the aircraft cabin at sub- to low ppb levels. Linear regression models that included the log transformed mean ozone concentration, percent occupancy, and plane type were statistically significant and explained between 18 and 25% of the variance in the mixing ratio of these carbonyls. Occupancy was also a significant factor for 6-MHO, but not the linear aldehydes, consistent with 6-MHO's formation from the reaction between ozone and squalene, which is present in human skin oils. PMID:23517299

  15. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.; Wmo Gaw, Epa Aqs, Epa Castnet, Capmon, Naps, Airbase, Emep, Eanet Ozone Datasets, All Other Contributors To

    2015-07-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent dataset for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total dataset of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regional background locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This dataset is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily eight-hour average (MDA8), SOMO35, AOT40, and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded datasets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi:10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  16. Effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate on polar lipids and fatty acids in leaves of morning glory and kidney bean. [Pharbitis nil; Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Nouchi, Isamu; Toyama, Susumu Ochanomizu Univ., Tokyo )

    1988-07-01

    To compare the effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on leaf lipids, fatty acids and malondialdehyde (MDA), morning glory (Pharbitis nil Choisy cv Scarlet O'Hara) and kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Gintebo) plants were exposed to either ozone (0.15 microliter per liter for 8 hours) or PAN (0.10 microliter per liter for up to 8 hours). Ozone increased phospholipids in morning glory and decreased in kidney bean at the initial stage (2-4 hours) of exposure, while it scarcely changed glycolipids, the unsaturated fatty acids, and MDA in both plants. A large reduction of glycolipids occurred 1 day after ozone exposure in both plants. PAN caused marked drops in phospholipids and glycolipids in kidney bean at relatively late stage (6-8 hours) of exposure, while it increased phosphatidic acid and decreased the unsaturated fatty acids, an increase which was accompanied by a large increase in MDA. These results suggest that ozone may not directly oxidize unsaturated fatty acids at the initial stage of exposure, but may alter polar lipid metabolism, particularly phospholipids. On the other hand, PAN may abruptly and considerably degrade phospholipids and glycolipids by peroxidation or hydrolysis at the late stage of exposure. The present study shows that ozone and PAN affect polar lipids in different manners.

  17. Ozone depletion during solar proton events in solar cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Jackman, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    Ozone profile data from the Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet Instrument on Nimbus 7 from 1979 to the present and clear cases of ozone destruction associated with five sudden proton events (SPEs) on June 7, 1979, August 21, 1979, October 13-14, 1981, July 13, 1982, and December 8, 1982 are found. During the SPE on July 13, 1982, the largest of this solar cycle, no depletion at all at 45 km is observed, but there is a 15 percent ozone depletion at 50 km increasing to 27 percent at 55 km, all at a solar zenith angle of 85 deg. A strong variation of the observed depletion with solar zenith angle is found, with maximum depletion occurring at the largest zenith angles (near 85 deg) decreasing to near zero for angles below about 70 deg. The observed depletion is short lived, disappearing within hours of the end of the SPE.

  18. Historical trends and ozone forecasting for urban regions of South Texas using statistical and heuristic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ronald K.

    . Ideally, the models should be developed using an optimum quantity of data and input parameters. Findings from this study indicate that only two years of data would be sufficient to develop a model instead of using large quantities of data. The analyses of trends in observed data is important to understand the ozone formation and identify the periods of high ozone concentrations in a region. Statistical Regression Analysis and Artificial Neural Networks models were developed to forecast high ozone episodes of Corpus Christi, San Antonio and Victoria. The predictive capabilities of these models were compared to determine their accuracy in forecasting daily maximum eight-hour ozone and peak one-hour ozone concentration by different model evaluation statistics. Results of the study indicated that both models were able to capture trends in ozone time series, but they were unable to accurately forecast peak ozone values. Between the two models, the performance of the Statistical Analysis model LR - RMSE averages ranged from 13.55 to 15.96 and the Artificial Neural Networks model MLP - RMSE averages ranged from 12.56 to 14.96, there seems to be very little difference in the forecasting capabilities. Also, it should be noted that according to forecasting skill proficiency, the 8-hour ozone standard provided the highest probability of detection of a high ozone forecast than did the 1-hour standard. There is still a degree of uncertainty associated with the result of the findings concerning the models ability to make accurate forecast. Previous studies have also noted that the difference in the performance superiority of one modeling technique over the other is suspect. Where the skill proficiency of one model fails the other may succeed and vice versa.

  19. Diagnosis of Photochemical Ozone Production Rates and Limiting Factors based on Observation-based Modeling Approach over East Asia: Impact of Radical Chemistry Mechanism and Ozone-Control Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Growth of tropospheric ozone, causing health and climate impacts, is concerned over East Asia, because emissions of precursors have dramatically increased. Photochemical production rates of ozone and limiting factors, primarily studied for urban locations, have been poorly assessed within a perspective of regional-scale air pollution over East Asia. We performed comprehensive observations of ozone precursors at several locations with regional representativeness and made such assessment based on the observation-based modeling approach. Here, diagnosis at Fukue Island (32.75°N, 128.68°E) remotely located in western Japan (May 2009) is highlighted, where the highest 10% of hourly ozone concentrations reached 72‒118 ppb during May influenced by Asian continental outflow. The average in-situ ozone production rate was estimated to be 6.8 ppb per day, suggesting that in-travel production was still active, while larger buildup must have occurred beforehand. Information on the chemical status of the air mass arriving in Japan is important, because it affects how further ozone production occurs after precursor addition from Japanese domestic emissions. The main limiting factor of ozone production was usually NOx, suggesting that domestic NOx emission control is important in reducing further ozone production and the incidence of warning issuance (>120 ppb). VOCs also increased the ozone production rate, and occasionally (14% of time) became dominant. This analysis implies that the VOC reduction legislation recently enacted should be effective. The uncertainty in the radical chemistry mechanism governing ozone production had a non-negligible impact, but the main conclusion relevant to policy was not altered. When chain termination was augmented by HO2-H2O + NO/NO2 reactions and by heterogeneous loss of HO2 on aerosol particle surfaces, the daily ozone production rate decreased by <24%, and the fraction of hours when the VOC-limited condition occurred varied from 14% to 13

  20. 77 FR 34810 - Determination of Failure To Attain by 2005 and Determination of Current Attainment of the 1-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ...EPA is issuing two separate and independent final determinations related to the Baltimore 1-hour ozone nonattainment area. First, EPA is determining that the Baltimore area previously failed to attain the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) by its applicable attainment deadline of November 15, 2005 (based on complete, quality-assured and certified ozone monitoring data......

  1. The influence of meteorological factors and biomass burning on surface ozone concentrations at Tanah Rata, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Ying Ying; Lim, Sze Fook; von Glasow, Roland

    2013-05-01

    The surface ozone concentrations at the Tanah Rata regional Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station, Malaysia (4°28‧N, 101°23‧E, 1545 m above Mean Sea Level (MSL)) from June 2006 to August 2008 were analyzed in this study. Overall the ozone mixing ratios are very low; the seasonal variations show the highest mixing ratios during the Southwest monsoon (average 19.1 ppb) and lowest mixing ratios during the spring intermonsoon (average 14.2 ppb). The diurnal variation of ozone is characterised by an afternoon maximum and night time minimum. The meteorological conditions that favour the formation of high ozone levels at this site are low relative humidity, high temperature and minimum rainfall. The average ozone concentration is lower during precipitation days compared to non-precipitation days. The hourly averaged ozone concentrations show significant correlations with temperature and relative humidity during the Northeast monsoon and spring intermonsoon. The highest concentrations are observed when the wind is blowing from the west. We found an anticorrelation between the atmospheric pressure tide and ozone concentrations. The ozone mixing ratios do not exceed the recommended Malaysia Air Quality Guidelines for 1-h and 8-h averages. Five day backward trajectories on two high ozone episodes in 07 August 2006 (40.0 ppb) and 24 February 2008 (45.7 ppb) are computed using the HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to investigate the origin of the pollutants and influence of regional transport. The high ozone episode during 07 August 2006 (burning season during southwest monsoon) is mainly attributed to regional transport from biomass burning in Sumatra, whereas favourable meteorological conditions (i.e. low relative humidity, high temperature and solar radiation, zero rainfall) and long range transport from Indo-China have elevated the ozone concentrations during 24 February 2008.

  2. The potential near-source ozone impacts of upstream oil and gas industry emissions.

    PubMed

    Olaguer, Eduardo P

    2012-08-01

    Increased drilling in urban areas overlying shale formations and its potential impact on human health through decreased air quality make it important to estimate the contribution of oil and gas activities to photochemical smog. Flares and compressor engines used in natural gas operations, for example, are large sources not only of NOx but also offormaldehyde, a hazardous air pollutant and powerful ozone precursor We used a neighborhood scale (200 m horizontal resolution) three-dimensional (3D) air dispersion model with an appropriate chemical mechanism to simulate ozone formation in the vicinity ofa hypothetical natural gas processing facility, based on accepted estimates of both regular and nonroutine emissions. The model predicts that, under average midday conditions in June, regular emissions mostly associated with compressor engines may increase ambient ozone in the Barnett Shale by more than 3 ppb beginning at about 2 km downwind of the facility, assuming there are no other major sources of ozone precursors. Flare volumes of 100,000 cubic meters per hour ofnatural gas over a period of 2 hr can also add over 3 ppb to peak 1-hr ozone somewhatfurther (>8 km) downwind, once dilution overcomes ozone titration and inhibition by large flare emissions of NOx. The additional peak ozone from the hypothetical flare can briefly exceed 10 ppb about 16 km downwind. The enhancements of ambient ozone predicted by the model are significant, given that ozone control strategy widths are of the order of a few parts per billion. Degrading the horizontal resolution of the model to 1 km spuriously enhances the simulated ozone increases by reducing the effectiveness of ozone inhibition and titration due to artificial plume dilution. PMID:22916444

  3. Role of neutrophilic inflammation in ozone-induced epithelial alterations in the nasal airways of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hye Youn

    Ozone is a principal oxidant air pollutant in photochemical smog. Epithelial cells lining the centriacinar region of lung and the proximal aspects of nasal passage are primary target sites for ozone-induced injury in laboratory animals. Acute exposure of rats to high ambient concentrations of ozone (e.g., 0.5 ppm) results in neutrophilic inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia and mucous cell metaplasia (MCM) in the nasal transitional epithelium (NTE) lining the proximal nasal airways. The principal purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of pre-metaplastic cellular responses, especially neutrophilic inflammation, in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced MCM in rat NTE. For this purpose, three specific hypotheses-based whole-animal inhalation studies were conducted. Male F344/N rats were exposed in whole-body inhalation chambers to 0 (filtered air) or 0.5 ppm ozone for 1-3 days (8 h/day). Histochemical, immunochemical, molecular and morphometric techniques were used to investigate the ozone-induced cellular and molecular events in the NTE. Two in vitro studies were also conducted to examine the effects of ozone-inducible cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF- a, and interleukin-6; IL-6) on mucin gene (rMuc-5AC) expression. Ozone induced a rapid increase of rMuc-5AC mRNA in nasal tissues within hours after the start of exposure. It preceded the appearance of MCM, and persisted with MCM. Ozone-induced neutrophilic inflammation accompanied the mucin gene upregulation, but was resolved when MCM first appeared in the NTE. Antibody-mediated depletion of circulating neutrophils attenuated ozone-induced MCM, although it did not affect the ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin mRNA upregulation. In another study, it was found that preexisting neutrophilic rhinitis induced by endotoxin augmented the ozone-induced MCM. However, pre-existing rhinitis did not alter the severity of ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin gene upregulation

  4. The 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment: the Nimbus-7 TOMS Data Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Ardanuy, Philip E.; Sechrist, Frank S.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Galimore, Reginald N.

    1988-01-01

    Total ozone data taken by the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) played a central role in the successful outcome of the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The near-real-time TOMS total ozone observations were suppled within hours of real time to the operations center in Punta Arenas, Chile, over a telecommunications network designed specifically for this purpose. The TOMS data preparation and method of transfer over the telecommunications links are reviewed. This atlas includes a complete set of the near-real-time TOMS orbital overpass data over regions around the Palmer Peninsula of Antarctica for the period of August 8 through September 29, 1987. Also provided are daily polar orthographic projections of TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere from August through November 1987. In addition, a chronology of the salient points of the experiment, along with some latitudinal cross sections and time series at locations of interest of the TOMS total ozone observations are presented. The TOMS total ozone measurements are evaluated along the flight tracks of each of the ER-2 and DC-8 missions during the experiment. The ozone hole is shown here to develop in a monotonic progression throughout late August and September. The minimum total ozone amount was found on 5 October, when its all-time lowest value of 109 DU is recorded. The hole remains well defined, but fills gradually from mid-October through mid-November. The hole's dissolution is observed here to begin in mid-November, when it elongates and begins to rotate. By the end of November, the south pole is no longer located within the ozone hole.

  5. Improving the Current Understanding of the Evolution and Vertical Processes of Tropospheric Ozone Using a Ground Based Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, John T.

    Although characterizing the interactions of ozone throughout the entire troposphere are important for health and climate processes, there is a lack of routine measurements of vertical profiles within the United States. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) has been developed and validated within the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet). Two scientifically interesting ozone episodes are presented that were observed during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER AQ) campaign at Ft. Collins, Colorado. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL measurements are analyzed alongside aircraft spirals over the lidar site, co-located ozonesonde launches, aerosol lidar profiles and other TOLNet ozone lidar profiles. In both case studies, back trajectories, meteorological maps, and comparisons to air quality models are presented to better explain the sources and evolution of ozone. The first case study, occurring between 22-23 July 2014, indicates enhanced concentrations of ozone at Ft. Collins during nighttime hours, which was due to the complex recirculation of ozone within the foothills of the Rocky Mountain region. Although quantifying the ozone increase aloft during recirculation episodes has been historically difficult, results indicate that an increase of 20 - 30 ppbv of ozone at the Ft. Collins site has been attributed to this recirculation. The second case, occurring between Aug 4-8th 2014, characterizes a dynamical exchange of ozone between the stratosphere and the troposphere. This case, along with seasonal model parameters from previous years, is used to estimate

  6. The Impact of Emission and Climate Change on Ozone in the United States under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Drake, John B.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liu, Yang

    2013-09-27

    Dynamical downscaling was applied in this study to link the global climate-chemistry model Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-Chem) with the regional models: Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ). Two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) were used to evaluate the climate impact on ozone concentrations in 2050s. Ozone concentrations in the lower-mid troposphere (surface to ~300 hPa), from mid- to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), show decreasing trends in RCP 4.5 between 2000s and 2050s, with the largest decrease of 4-10 ppbv occurring in the summer and the fall; and increasing trends (2-12 ppbv) in RCP 8.5 resulting from the increased methane emissions. In RCP 8.5, methane emissions increase by ~60% by the end of 2050s, accounting for more than 90% of ozone increases in summer and fall, and 60-80% in spring and winter. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, in the summer when photochemical reactions are the most active, the large ozone precursor emissions reduction leads to the greatest decrease of downscaled surface ozone concentrations, ranging from 6 to 10 ppbv. However, a few major cities show ozone increases of 3 to 7 ppbv due to weakened NO titration. Under the RCP 8.5 scenario, in winter, downscaled ozone concentrations increase across nearly the entire continental US in winter, ranging from 3 to 10 ppbv due to increased methane emissions and enhanced stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). More intense heat waves are projected to occur by the end of 2050s in RCP 8.5, leading to more than 8 ppbv of the maximum daily 8-hour daily average (MDA8) ozone during the heat wave days than other days; this indicates the dramatic impact heat waves exert on high frequency ozone events.

  7. Effect of exposures to ambient ozone on ventilatory lung function in children

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, I.T.; D'Arcy, J.B.; Gibbons, D.I.; Avol, E.L.; Gross, K.B. )

    1990-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the ventilatory capacity of children is affected by hourly concentrations of ozone inhaled during their daily activity. Over a 3-wk period children who were attending a summer camp in the San Bernardino mountains of California performed spirometry up to three times per day during their stay at the camp. Ozone, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, temperature, and relative humidity were measured continuously. Daily average measurements of total suspended particulate and the PM10 particulate fraction were also made. Hourly ozone concentrations at the time of testing varied between 20 and 245 ppb. Regressions of each individual's FEV1 and FVC supported the view that high ozone levels reduced these lung function parameters. The average regression coefficient for FEV1 on ozone was -0.39 ml/ppb (SEM = 0.12) and for FVC -0.44 ml/ppb (SEM = 0.15), both of which were significantly different from zero. Statistical allowance for temperature and humidity increased the magnitude of these slopes. Nitrogen dioxide never exceeded 40 ppb during the time of testing and averaged 13 ppb. Sulfur dioxide's highest measurement was 8 ppb and often was at the limit of detection. Neither NO2 nor SO2 was considered in the statistical modeling. Data were divided based on whether each subject had been exposed to levels of ozone in excess of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) during the several hours previous to being tested. Exposures exceeding the NAAQS indicated a significant negative relationship between ozone and FEV1, FVC, and PEFR. Data for nonexceedance periods did not indicate this negative relationship for any of the three lung function parameters, but it could not be determined if this was due to an absence of an ozone effect or to a combination of the increased variability and decreased size of this data subset.

  8. Tropospheric ozone in the vicinity of the ozone hole: 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, G.L.; Warren, L.S. ); Hypes, W.D. ); Tuck, A.F.; Kelly, K.K. ); Krueger, A.J. )

    1989-11-30

    Tropospheric ozone measurements over Antarctica aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft are summarized. As part of the August/September 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, the aircraft flew 13 missions covering a latitude of 53{degree}-90{degree}S, at altitudes to 13 km. Ozone mixing ratios as high as several hundred parts per billion by volume (ppbv) were measured, but in all cases these ratios were observed in pockets or patches of upper atmospheric air. These pockets were observed both in the vicinity of and away from the location of the ozone hole. At times, and as a result of these pockets, the ozone levels at the flight altitude of the aircraft, as averaged beneath the boundaries of the stratospheric ozone hole, were 2-3 times higher than background tropospheric values. The data suggest that the ozone-rich air seldom penetrated below about 9-km altitude. Background ozone values in the surrounding troposphere were typically in the range of 20-50 ppbv. Correlation of tropospheric ozone observations with the boundaries of the ozone hole differed during the experiment. During the early flights (August 28 through September 2), encounters with ozone-rich air were limited and background tropospheric ozone (at the flight altitude) appeared to decrease beneath the hole. For many of the later flights, and as the hole deepened, the reverse was noted, in that ozone-rich air was frequently observed in the vicinity of the hole and, as noted earlier, average ozone at the flight altitude was frequently higher than background values.

  9. The 1991 Antarctic ozone hole - TOMS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Schoeberl, Mark; Newman, Paul; Stolarski, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Antarctic springtime ozone decline, as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), was similar to those of earlier deep ozone hole years, 1987, 1989, and 1990. The minimum total ozone value was recorded on October 5, 1991 at 108 Dobson units near the South Pole. This was 8 DU lower than in any of the earlier years. Four of the last five years have exhibited an extensive, deep ozone hole. The area of the hole was about the same as in 1987, 1989, and 1990. The recovery of the low total ozone values occurred in mid-November as the polar vortex broke up.

  10. Comparative Effects of Gamma Irradiation and Ozone Treatment on Hygienic Quality of Korean Red Ginseng Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Myung-Woo; Yook, Hong-Sun; Kang, Il-Jun; Chung, Cha-Kwon; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Choi, Kang-Ju

    1998-06-01

    For the purpose of improving hygienic quality of Korean red ginseng powder, the comparative effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on the microbial and physicochemical properties were investigated. Gamma irradiation at 7.5 kGy resulted in sterilization of total aerobic bacteria, molds and coliforms below detective levels, while ozone treatment for 8 hours up to 18 ppm did not sufficiently eliminate the microorganisms of the red ginseng powder. Physicochemical properties including compositions of the red ginseng saponin (ginsenosides) and fatty acids, pH and hydrogen doanting activity were not significantly changed by gamma irradiation, whereas, ozone treatment caused significant changes in fatty acid compositions, TBA value, pH, acidity and hydrogen donating activity. The results from this study led us to conclude that gamma irradiation was more effective than ozone treatment both for the improvement of hygienic quality and for the maintenance of physicochemical quality of red ginseng powder.

  11. Ozone, ozone production rates and NO observations on the outskirts of Quito, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, M.

    2014-12-01

    Air quality measurements of ambient ozone, ozone production rates and nitrogen oxides, in addition to baseline meterology observations, are being taken at a recently built roof-top facility on the campus of Universidad San Francisco de Quito, in Ecuador. The measurement site is located in Cumbayá, a densely populated valley adjacent to the city of Quito. Time series of ozone and NO are being obtained with commercial air quality monitors. Rush-hour peaks of NO, above 100 ppb, have been observed, while daytime ozone levels are low. In addition, ozone production rates are being measured with the Ecuadorian version of the MOPS, Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor, originally built at Penn State University in 2010. NO and ozone observations and test results of measured ozone production rates will be presented.

  12. Ozone Air Quality Impacts of Shale Gas Development in South Texas Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Liao, K.

    2013-12-01

    Recent technological advances, mainly horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, and continued drilling in shale, have increased domestic production of oil and gas in the United State (U.S.). However, shale gas developments could also affect the environment and human health, particularly in areas where oil and gas developments are new activities. This study is focused on the impacts of shale gas developing activities on summertime ozone air quality in South Texas urban areas since many of them are already ozone nonattainment areas. We use an integrated approach to investigate the ozone air quality impact of the shale gas development in South Texas urban areas. They are: (1) satellite measurement of precursors, (2) observations of ground-level ozone concentrations, and (3) air mass trajectory modeling. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an important precursor to ozone formation, and summertime average tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) column densities measured by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ozone Monitoring Instrument increased in the South Texas shale area (i.e., the Eagle Ford Shale area) in 2011 and 2012 as compared to 2008-2010. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ground-level observations showed summertime average and peak ozone (i.e., the 4th highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone) concentrations slightly increased from 2010 to 2012 in Austin and San Antonio. However, the frequencies of peak ozone concentrations above the 75ppb ozone standard have been significantly increasing since 2011 in Austin and San Antonio. It is expected to increase the possibilities of violating the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for South Texas urban areas in the future. The results of trajectory modeling showed air masses transported from the southeastern Texas could reach Austin and San Antonio and confirmed that emissions from the Eagle Ford Shale area could affect ozone air quality in South Texas urban areas in 2011 and 2012

  13. Projections of Future Summertime Ozone over the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Pfister, G. G.; Walters, Stacy; Lamarque, J. F.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barth, Mary; Wong, John; Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy

    2014-05-05

    This study uses a regional fully coupled chemistry-transport model to assess changes in surface ozone over the summertime U.S. between present and a 2050 future time period at high spatial resolution (12 km grid spacing) under the SRES A2 climate and RCP8.5 anthropogenic pre-cursor emission scenario. The impact of predicted changes in climate and global background ozone is estimated to increase surface ozone over most of the U.S; the 5th - 95th percentile range for daily 8-hour maximum surface ozone increases from 31-79 ppbV to 30-87 ppbV between the present and future time periods. The analysis of a set of meteorological drivers suggests that these mostly will add to increasing ozone, but the set of simulations conducted does not allow to separate this effect from that through enhanced global background ozone. Statistically the most robust positive feedbacks are through increased temperature, biogenic emissions and solar radiation. Stringent emission controls can counteract these feedbacks and if considered, we estimate large reductions in surface ozone with the 5th-95th percentile reduced to 27-55 ppbV. A comparison of the high-resolution projections to global model projections shows that even though the global model is biased high in surface ozone compared to the regional model and compared to observations, both the global and the regional model predict similar changes in ozone between the present and future time periods. However, on smaller spatial scales, the regional predictions show more pronounced changes between urban and rural regimes that cannot be resolved at the coarse resolution of global model. In addition, the sign of the changes in overall ozone mixing ratios can be different between the global and the regional predictions in certain regions, such as the Western U.S. This study confirms the key role of emission control strategies in future air quality predictions and demonstrates the need for considering degradation of air quality with future

  14. Activation of transcription factor IL-6 (NF-IL-6) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) by lipid ozonation products is crucial to interleukin-8 gene expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kafoury, Ramzi M; Hernandez, Jazmir M; Lasky, Joseph A; Toscano, William A; Friedman, Mitchell

    2007-04-01

    Ozone (O(3)) is a major component of smog and an inhaled toxicant to the lung. O(3) rapidly reacts with the airway epithelial cell membrane phospholipids to generate lipid ozonation products (LOP). 1-Hydroxy-1-hydroperoxynonane (HHP-C9) is an important LOP, produced from the ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine. This LOP, at a biologically relevant concentration (100 microM), increases the activity of phospholipase C, nuclear factors-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and interleukin-6 (NF-IL-6) and the expression of the inflammatory gene, interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a cultured human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). The signaling pathways of ozone and its biologically-active products are as yet undefined. In the present study, we report that the HHP LOP, HHP-C9 (100 microM x 4 h), activated the expression of IL-8 (218 +/- 26% increase over control, n = 4, P < 0.01) through an apparent interaction between the two transcription factors, NF-kappaB and NF-IL-6. Transfection studies using luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that HHP-C9 induced a significant increase in NF-kappaB-DNA binding activity (37 +/- 7% increase over control, n = 6, P < 0.05). Inhibition of NF-kappaB showed a statistically significant but modest decrease in IL-8 release, which suggested a role for another transcription factor, NF-IL-6. Exposure of BEAS-2B cells to HHP-C9 induced a significant increase in the DNA binding activity of NF-IL-6 (45 +/- 11% increase over control, n = 6, P < 0.05). The results of the present study indicate that NF-IL-6 interacts with NF-kappaB in regulating the expression of IL-8 in cultured human airway epithelial cells exposed to LOP, the biological products of ozone in the lung. PMID:17366569

  15. Ozone fluxes over South-East Asian tropical rainforest and oil palm plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jennifer; Coyle, Mhairi; Helfter, Carole; Dorsey, James; Gallagher, Martin; Percival, Carl; Nemitz, Eiko; Fowler, David

    2010-05-01

    Ozone flux measurements were made over a South-East Asian tropical rainforest (April & June/July 2008) and an oil palm plantation (June 2008), as part of the NERC OP3 and ACES projects. Flux measurements over the rainforest were made at the Bukit Atur Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) tower, where ozone fluxes were measured by the gradient approach (concentrations at 30, 45, 60, 75 m) and by eddy-covariance (45 and 75 m). The hourly median flux at the forest site peaked before midday and did not differ greatly between Period 1 (P1, April, end of wet season) and Period 3 (P3, June/July, dry season). The periods were however clearly contrasted by the different levels of ambient ozone and concentrations were larger during P1 by about 50 %, with diurnal hourly medians ranging from 26 - 38 ?g m-3 in P1 versus 15 - 27 ?g m-3 in P3. Ozone deposition velocities were smaller during P1 than P3 and median daytime maxima of deposition velocity in P1 were 5 mm s-1 compared to 11 mm s-1 in P3. The magnitude of fluxes and deposition velocities are similar to those observed over the Amazon rainforest (Rummel et al., 2007), but the diurnal profile differs slightly as ozone concentrations showed a stronger diurnal amplitude in the Amazon. Fluxes from 45 and 75 m are compared and ozone flux divergence with height is investigated. Flux measurements at the oil palm plantation were made using the eddy covariance method for 8 days (4th to 11th June 2008). During this period concentrations were very small with a diurnal range of 0 - 7 ?g m-3, probably due to the combined effect of a low measurement height, low turbulence and O3 destruction by soil NO emissions. However, median deposition velocity was 5 mm s-1 indicating that the oil palms are an effective sink for ozone. The ozone flux will be decomposed into stomatal ozone uptake by the vegetation, estimated from conductance modelling, ozone destruction by VOC chemistry (estimated from the measured VOC concentrations) and ozone destruction

  16. A fully remote control cryogenless ozone precursor system with improved sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cardin, D.B.; Deschenes, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    In compliance with Title 1 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (1990 CAAA), hydrocarbons in the C2-C10 molecular weight range will be monitored to assess their contribution to ozone formation in approximately 35 cities which exceed current ozone standards during summer months. A cryogenless C2-C10 ``AUTOGC`` system is presented that exceeds the monitoring requirements specified in the technical assistance document for ozone precursor monitoring. Samples can be analyzed hourly or once every 3, 8, or 24 hours to provide as much resolution as necessary. Sampling frequency can be changed via modem to accommodate periods of high and low ozone concentrations. A benchtop 16-position manifold makes it possible to analyze other gas streams at programmed intervals, such as propane and hexane standards, retention time standards, and system blanks. Integration of the ambient air sample first into a canister allows standards and blanks to be run while continuing to analyze ambient air 24 hours per day. Access to the GC/FID and preconcentrator are possible via modem using a Windows{trademark} interface for data retrieval, verification of proper operation, and adjustment of method parameters. Data will be presented showing performance in determining ozone precursor concentrations in Los Angeles, California.

  17. Ozone-Induced Nasal Type 2 Immunity in Mice Is Dependent on Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lewandowski, Ryan; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Li, Ning; Van Dyken, Steven J; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that elevated ambient concentrations of ozone are associated with activation of eosinophils in the nasal airways of atopic and nonatopic children. Mice repeatedly exposed to ozone develop eosinophilic rhinitis and type 2 immune responses. In this study, we determined the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced eosinophilic rhinitis by using lymphoid-sufficient C57BL/6 mice, Rag2(-/-) mice that are devoid of T cells and B cells, and Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice that are depleted of all lymphoid cells including ILCs. The animals were exposed to 0 or 0.8 ppm ozone for 9 consecutive weekdays (4 h/d). Mice were killed 24 hours after exposure, and nasal tissues were selected for histopathology and gene expression analysis. ILC-sufficient C57BL/6 and Rag2(-/-) mice exposed to ozone developed marked eosinophilic rhinitis and epithelial remodeling (e.g., epithelial hyperplasia and mucous cell metaplasia). Chitinase-like proteins and alarmins (IL-33, IL-25, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also increased morphometrically in the nasal epithelium of ozone-exposed C57BL/6 and Rag2(-/-) mice. Ozone exposure elicited increased expression of Il4, Il5, Il13, St2, eotaxin, MCP-2, Gob5, Arg1, Fizz1, and Ym2 mRNA in C57BL/6 and Rag2(-/-) mice. In contrast, ozone-exposed ILC-deficient Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice had no nasal lesions or overexpression of Th2- or ILC2-related transcripts. These results indicate that ozone-induced eosinophilic rhinitis, nasal epithelial remodeling, and type 2 immune activation are dependent on ILCs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that ILCs play an important role in the nasal pathology induced by repeated ozone exposure. PMID:26559808

  18. 40 CFR 52.350 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.350 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.350 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, 1-hour ozone NAAQS Redesignation Request and...

  19. 40 CFR 52.350 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.350 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.350 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, 1-hour ozone NAAQS Redesignation Request and...

  20. 40 CFR 52.350 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.350 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.350 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, 1-hour ozone NAAQS Redesignation Request and...

  1. 40 CFR 52.350 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.350 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.350 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, 1-hour ozone NAAQS Redesignation Request and...

  2. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DELIVERED OZONE DOSE AND FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between delivered ozone dose and variability of pulmonary function response to ozone was investigated in 20 young, healthy non-smoking male volunteers. he subjects were exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone for one hour during which they walked on a treadmill at a speed and i...

  3. Unraveling the sources of ground level ozone in the Intermountain Western United States using Pb isotopes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, John N; Weiss-Penzias, Peter; Fine, Rebekka; McDade, Charles E; Trzepla, Krystyna; Brown, Shaun T; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-10-15

    Ozone as an atmospheric pollutant is largely produced by anthropogenic precursors and can significantly impact human and ecosystem health, and climate. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recently proposed lowering the ozone standard from 75 ppbv (MDA8 = Maximum Daily 8-Hour Average) to between 65 and 70 ppbv. This will result in remote areas of the Intermountain West that includes many U.S. National Parks being out of compliance, despite a lack of significant local sources. We used Pb isotope fingerprinting and back-trajectory analysis to distinguish sources of imported ozone to Great Basin National Park in eastern Nevada. During discrete Chinese Pb events (> 1.1 ng/m(3) & > 80% Asian Pb) trans-Pacific transported ozone was 5 ± 5.5 ppbv above 19 year averages for those dates. In contrast, concentrations during regional transport from the Los Angeles and Las Vegas areas were 15 ± 2 ppbv above the long-term averages, and those characterized by high-altitude transport 3 days prior to sampling were 19 ± 4ppbv above. However, over the study period the contribution of trans-Pacific transported ozone increased at a rate of 0.8 ± 0.3 ppbv/year, suggesting that Asian inputs will exceed regional and high altitude sources by 2015-2020. All of these sources will impact regulatory compliance with a new ozone standard, given increasing global background. PMID:25934382

  4. 78 FR 35764 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey; Infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... and revised NAAQS for 8-hour ozone (62 FR 38856) and PM 2.5 (62 FR 38652). EPA strengthened the 24-hour PM 2.5 NAAQS on October 17, 2006 (71 FR 61144). The 14 elements required to be addressed in... FR 55666). Additionally, this action does not address the requirements of section...

  5. The sensitivity of modeled ozone to the temporal distribution of point, area, and mobile source emissions in the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Patricia; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Ehrman, Sheryl H.

    Ozone remains one of the most recalcitrant air pollution problems in the US. Hourly emissions fields used in air quality models (AQMs) generally show less temporal variability than corresponding measurements from continuous emissions monitors (CEM) and field campaigns would imply. If emissions control scenarios to reduce emissions at peak ozone forming hours are to be assessed with AQMs, the effect of emissions' daily variability on modeled ozone must be understood. We analyzed the effects of altering all anthropogenic emissions' temporal distributions by source group on 2002 summer-long simulations of ozone using the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) v4.5 and the Carbon Bond IV (CBIV) chemical mechanism with 12 km resolution. We find that when mobile source emissions were made constant over the course of a day, 8-h maximum ozone predictions changed by ±7 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) in many urban areas on days when ozone concentrations greater than 80 ppbv were simulated in the base case. Increasing the temporal variation of point sources resulted in ozone changes of +6 and -6 ppbv, but only for small areas near sources. Changing the daily cycle of mobile source emissions produces substantial changes in simulated ozone, especially in urban areas at night; results suggest that shifting the emissions of NO x from day to night, for example in electric powered vehicles recharged at night, could have beneficial impacts on air quality.

  6. Hourly and seasonal variation in photosynthesis and stomatal conductance of soybean grown at future CO(2) and ozone concentrations for 3 years under fully open-air field conditions.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Carl J; Leakey, Andrew D B; Heady, Lindsey E; Morgan, Patrick B; Dohleman, Frank G; McGrath, Justin M; Gillespie, Kelly M; Wittig, Victoria E; Rogers, Alistair; Long, Stephen P; Ort, Donald R

    2006-11-01

    It is anticipated that enrichment of the atmosphere with CO(2) will increase photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C3 plants. Analysis of controlled environment studies conducted to date indicates that plant growth at concentrations of carbon dioxide ([CO(2)]) anticipated for 2050 ( approximately 550 micromol mol(-1)) will stimulate leaf photosynthetic carbon assimilation (A) by 20 to 40%. Simultaneously, concentrations of tropospheric ozone ([O(3)]) are expected to increase by 2050, and growth in controlled environments at elevated [O(3)] significantly reduces A. However, the simultaneous effects of both increases on a major crop under open-air conditions have never been tested. Over three consecutive growing seasons > 4700 individual measurements of A, photosynthetic electron transport (J(PSII)) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) were measured on Glycine max (L.) Merr. (soybean). Experimental treatments used free-air gas concentration enrichment (FACE) technology in a fully replicated, factorial complete block design. The mean A in the control plots was 14.5 micromol m(-2) s(-1). At elevated [CO(2)], mean A was 24% higher and the treatment effect was statistically significant on 80% of days. There was a strong positive correlation between daytime maximum temperatures and mean daily integrated A at elevated [CO(2)], which accounted for much of the variation in CO(2) effect among days. The effect of elevated [CO(2)] on photosynthesis also tended to be greater under water stress conditions. The elevated [O(3)] treatment had no statistically significant effect on mean A, g(s) or J(PSII) on newly expanded leaves. Combined elevation of [CO(2)] and [O(3)] resulted in a slightly smaller increase in average A than when [CO(2)] alone was elevated, and was significantly greater than the control on 67% of days. Thus, the change in atmospheric composition predicted for the middle of this century will, based on the results of a 3 year open-air field experiment, have smaller

  7. AASE-2 In-Situ Tracer Correlations of Methane Nitrous Oxide and Ozone as Observed Aboard the DC-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. E., Jr.; Sachse, G. W.; Anderson, B. E.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Walgea, J. G.; Ridley, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    We report in situ stratospheric measurements of CH4, N2O, and O3 obtained aboard the NASA DC-8 during the January-March 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II field campaign. These data demonstrate a strong linear correlation between N2O and CH4 in the lower stratosphere thus indicating that both species are effective tracers of stratospheric air motion. Measurements of both species on constant geometric height surfaces indicate that significant subsidence of the arctic stratospheric air mass occurred at DC-8 altitudes over the course of the AASE-II expedition. In addition, a widespread reduction in O3 mixing ratios (up to 20%) relative to these conserved tracers was also observed in the lower stratosphere in March a compared to January and February results.

  8. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  9. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  10. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  11. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  12. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, J. R.; Plopper, C. G.; Hyde, D. M.; St George, J. A.; Wilson, D. W.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components. These results demonstrate that exposure to low ambient concentrations of ozone, near the current. National Ambient Air Quality Standard, induces pulmonary lesions

  13. Reduction of date microbial load with ozone

    PubMed Central

    Farajzadeh, Davood; Qorbanpoor, Ali; Rafati, Hasan; Isfeedvajani, Mohsen Saberi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Date is one of the foodstuffs that are produced in tropical areas and used worldwide. Conventionally, methyl bromide and phosphine are used for date disinfection. The toxic side effects of these usual disinfectants have led food scientists to consider safer agents such as ozone for disinfection, because food safety is a top priority. The present study was performed to investigate the possibility of replacing common conventional disinfectants with ozone for date disinfection and microbial load reduction. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, date samples were ozonized for 3 and 5 hours with 5 and 10 g/h concentrations and packed. Ozonized samples were divided into two groups and kept in an incubator which was maintained at 25°C and 40°C for 9 months. During this period, every 3 month, microbial load (bacteria, mold, and yeast) were examined in ozonized and non-ozonized samples. Results: This study showed that ozonization with 5 g/h for 3 hours, 5 g/h for 5 hours, 10 g/h for 3 hours, and 10 g/h for 5 hours leads to about 25%, 25%, 53%, and 46% reduction in date mold and yeast load and about 6%, 9%, 76%, and 74.7% reduction in date bacterial load at baseline phase, respectively. Appropriate concentration and duration of ozonization for microbial load reduction were 10 g/h and 3 hours. Conclusion: Date ozonization is an appropriate method for microbial load reduction and leads to an increase in the shelf life of dates. PMID:24124432

  14. Cracking the Credit Hour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit hour. If…

  15. Forecasting Credit Hours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bivin, David; Rooney, Patrick Michael

    1999-01-01

    This study used Tobit analysis to estimate retention probabilities and credit hours at two universities. Tobit was judged as appropriate for this problem because it recognizes the lower bound of zero on credit hours and incorporates this bound into parameter estimates and forecasts. Models are estimated for credit hours in a single year and…

  16. Surface ozone in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, Joel D.; Theiss, Sandra; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Gertler, Alan; Schilling, Susan; Zielinska, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Surface ozone (O3) concentrations were measured in and around the Lake Tahoe Basin using both active monitors (2010) and passive samplers (2002, 2010). The 2010 data from active monitors indicate average summertime diurnal maxima of approximately 50-55 ppb. Some site-to-site variability is observed within the Basin during the well-mixed hours of 10:00 to 17:00 PST, but large differences between different sites are observed in the late evening and pre-dawn hours. The observed trends correlate most strongly with elevation, topography, and surface vegetation. High elevation sites with steeply sloped topography and drier ground cover experience elevated O3 concentrations throughout the night because they maintain good access to downward mixing of O3-rich air from aloft with smaller losses due to dry deposition. Low elevation sites with flat topography and more dense surface vegetation experience low O3 concentrations in the pre-dawn hours because of greatly reduced downward mixing coupled with enhanced O3 removal via efficient dry deposition. Additionally, very high average O3 concentrations were measured with passive samplers in the middle of the Lake in 2010. This latter result likely reflects diminished dry deposition to the surface of the Lake. High elevation Tahoe Basin sites with exposure to nocturnal O3-rich air from aloft experience daily maxima of 8-h average O3 concentrations that are frequently higher than concurrent maxima from the polluted upwind comparison sites of Sacramento, Folsom, and Placerville. Wind rose analyses of archived NAM 12 km meteorological data for the summer of 2010 suggest that some of the sampling sites situated near the shoreline may have experienced on-shore "lake breezes" during daytime hours and/or off-shore "land breezes" during the night. Back-trajectory analysis with the HYSPLIT model suggests that much of the ozone measured at Lake Tahoe results from the transport of "polluted background" air into the Basin from upwind

  17. Setting maximum emission rates from ozone emitting consumer appliances in the United States and Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Glenn; Shaughnessy, Richard; Shu, Shi

    2011-02-01

    A Monte Carlo analysis of indoor ozone levels in four cities was applied to provide guidance to regulatory agencies on setting maximum ozone emission rates from consumer appliances. Measured distributions of air exchange rates, ozone decay rates and outdoor ozone levels at monitoring stations were combined with a steady-state indoor air quality model resulting in emission rate distributions (mg h -1) as a function of % of building hours protected from exceeding a target maximum indoor concentration of 20 ppb. Whole-year, summer and winter results for Elizabeth, NJ, Houston, TX, Windsor, ON, and Los Angeles, CA exhibited strong regional differences, primarily due to differences in air exchange rates. Infiltration of ambient ozone at higher average air exchange rates significantly reduces allowable emission rates, even though air exchange also dilutes emissions from appliances. For Houston, TX and Windsor, ON, which have lower average residential air exchange rates, emission rates ranged from -1.1 to 2.3 mg h -1 for scenarios that protect 80% or more of building hours from experiencing ozone concentrations greater than 20 ppb in summer. For Los Angeles, CA and Elizabeth, NJ, with higher air exchange rates, only negative emission rates were allowable to provide the same level of protection. For the 80th percentile residence, we estimate that an 8-h average limit concentration of 20 ppb would be exceeded, even in the absence of an indoor ozone source, 40 or more days per year in any of the cities analyzed. The negative emission rates emerging from the analysis suggest that only a zero-emission rate standard is prudent for Los Angeles, Elizabeth, NJ and other regions with higher summertime air exchange rates. For regions such as Houston with lower summertime air exchange rates, the higher emission rates would likely increase occupant exposure to the undesirable products of ozone reactions, thus reinforcing the need for zero-emission rate standard.

  18. The Characteristics Improvement of Ozone Water Production by Multi-layer Electrodes at Water Electrolysis Cell by Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohba, Takahiro; Kusunoki, Hironobu; Sunakawa, Daisuke; Araki, Takuto; Onda, Kazuo

    Ozone is recently used for many purposes as an environmental friendly oxidant, so the ozone production device with high ozone concentration and low production energy is desired. One of the candidates for such device is the ozone water production by water electrolysis cell using the solid polymer electrolyte with PbO2 anode catalyst, which has merits to be compact and to produce high-concentration ozone water directly by the deionized water electrolysis. In this study, we have tested ozone water production by changing electrodes and electrolytes constitution in order to improve the ozone production performance. Tested two electrolytes are Nafion117 and a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) with Pt catalyst on cathode side of Nafion117. Tested two electrodes are mono-layer of Ti expanded metal and four different mesh layers of Ti expanded metal. Ozone water production tests are performed under long-term operations changing temperature and flow rate to optimize experimental conditions. The voltage-current characteristic for electrolysis cell have been improved significantly, when the electrode is four layers of Ti metal and the electrolyte is the MEA with Pt catalyst. The stable ozone water concentration has been obtained by operating the cell for about 8 hours. The optimum temperature and water flow rate for ozone water production are 25˜30° and 33L/h, respectively. Furthermore, the optimum overpotential was measured by a reference electrode at the cathode-side MEA, and the anode catalyst suitable for ozone water production was identified to be βPbO2 by the X ray diffraction pattern.

  19. Measurements of Nitric Acid and Aerosol Species Aboard the NASA DC-8 Aircraft During the SASS Ozone and Nitrogen Oxide Experiment (SONEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    1999-01-01

    The SASS Ozone and Nitrogen Oxides Experiment (SONEX) over the North Atlantic during October/November 1997 offered an excellent opportunity to examine the budget of total reactive nitrogen (NO(sub y)) in the upper troposphere (8 - 12 km altitude). The median measured NO(sub y) mixing ratio was 425 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). Two different methods were used to measure HNO3: (1) the mist chamber technique and, (2) chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Two merged data sets using these HNO3 measurements were used to calculate NO(sub y) by summing the reactive nitrogen species (a combination of measured plus modeled results) and comparing the resultant values to measured NO(sub y) (gold catalytic reduction method). Both comparisons showed good agreement in the two quantities (slope > 0.9 and r(exp 2) > 0.9). Thus, the total reactive nitrogen budget in the upper troposphere over the North Atlantic can be explained in a general manner as a simple mixture of NO(sub x). (NO + NO2), HNO3, and PAN. Median values of NO(sub x)/NO(sub y) were approximately equal to 0.25, HNO3/NO(sub y) were approximately equal to 0.35 and Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN)/NO(sub y) were approximately equal to 0. 17. Particulate NO3 and alkyl nitrates together composed <10 % of NO(sub y), while model estimated HNO4 averaged 12%.

  20. Measurements of Nitric Acid and Aerosol Species Aboard the NASA DC-8 Aircraft During the SASS OZone and Nitrogen Oxide Experiment (SONEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    1999-01-01

    The SASS Ozone and Nitrogen Oxides Experiment (SONEX) over the north Atlantic during October/November 1997 offered an excellent opportunity to examine the budget of total reactive nitrogen (NO(y)) in the upper troposphere (8 - 12 km altitude). The median measured NO(y) mixing ratio was 425 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). Two different methods were used to measure HNO3: (1) the mist chamber technique and, (2) chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Two merged data sets using these HNO3 measurements were used to calculate NO(y) by summing the reactive nitrogen species (a combination of measured plus modeled results) and comparing the resultant values to measured NO(y) (gold catalytic reduction method). Both comparisons showed good agreement in the two quantities (slope greater than 0.9 and r(sup 2) greater than 0.9). Thus, the total reactive nitrogen budget in the upper troposphere over the North Atlantic can be explained in a general manner as a simple mixture of NO(x). (NO + NO2), HNO3, and PAN. Median values of NO(x)/NO(y) were approx. = 0.25, HNO3/NO(y) approx. = 0.35 and PAN/NO(y) approx. = 0.17. Particulate NO3 and alkyl nitrates together composed less than 10% of NO(y), while model estimated HNO4 averaged 12%.

  1. Ozone variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duetsch, H. U.

    1983-09-01

    The annual and long-term variations in the atmospheric ozone layer were examined on the basis of 55 yr of data taken at Aroya, Switzerland and 25 yr of data gathered by the global ozone network. Attention was given to annual and biennial variations, which showed that the midlatitude peak concentration was affected by a quasi-biennial variation of the tropical stratospheric circulation. Smaller scale circulation patterns were dominant in the lower stratosphere, although an observed negative trend of the total ozone was equally distributed between the troposphere and 24 km altitude. The global ozone increase detected in the 1960s was possible due to general circulation alterations, but may also have been influenced by injection of NO(x) into the atmosphere during atomic bomb testing.

  2. CMAQ predictions of tropospheric ozone in the U.S. southwest: influence of lateral boundary and synoptic conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chune; Fernando, H J S; Hyde, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Phoenix, Arizona, has been an ozone nonattainment area for the past several years and it remains so. Mitigation strategies call for improved modeling methodologies as well as understanding of ozone formation and destruction mechanisms during seasons of high ozone events. To this end, the efficacy of lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) based on satellite measurements (adjusted-LBCs) was investigated, vis-à-vis the default-LBCs, for improving the predictions of Models-3/CMAQ photochemical air quality modeling system. The model evaluations were conducted using hourly ground-level ozone and NO(2) concentrations as well as tropospheric NO(2) columns and ozone concentrations in the middle to upper troposphere, with the 'design' periods being June and July of 2006. Both included high ozone episodes, but the June (pre-monsoon) period was characterized by local thermal circulation whereas the July (monsoon) period by synoptic influence. Overall, improved simulations were noted for adjusted-LBC runs for ozone concentrations both at the ground-level and in the middle to upper troposphere, based on EPA-recommended model performance metrics. The probability of detection (POD) of ozone exceedances (>75ppb, 8-h averages) for the entire domain increased from 20.8% for the default-LBC run to 33.7% for the adjusted-LBC run. A process analysis of modeling results revealed that ozone within PBL during bulk of the pre-monsoon season is contributed by local photochemistry and vertical advection, while the contributions of horizontal and vertical advections are comparable in the monsoon season. The process analysis with adjusted-LBC runs confirms the contributions of vertical advection to episodic high ozone days, and hence elucidates the importance of improving predictability of upper levels with improved LBCs. PMID:22227303

  3. Ozone, Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    In the early part of the 20th century, ground-based and balloon-borne measurements discovered that most of atmosphere's ozone is located in the stratosphere with highest concentrations located between 15 and 30 km (9,3 and 18.6 miles). For a long time, it was believed that tropospheric ozone originated from the stratosphere and that most of it was destroyed by contact with the earth's surface. Ozone, O3, was known to be produced by the photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, O2, a process that can only occur at wavelengths shorter than 242 nm. Because such short-wave-length radiation is present only in the stratosphere, no tropospheric ozone production is possible by this mechanism. In the 1940s, however, it became obvious that production of ozone was also taking place in the troposphere. The overall reaction mechanism was eventually identified by Arie Haagen-Smit of the California Institute of Technology, in highly polluted southern California. The copious emissions from the numerous cars driven there as a result of the mass migration to Los Angeles after World War 2 created the new unpleasant phenomenon of photochemical smog, the primary component of which is ozone. These high levels of ozone were injuring vegetable crops, causing women's nylons to run, and generating increasing respiratory and eye-irritation problems for the populace. Our knowledge of tropospheric ozone increased dramatically in the early 1950s as monitoring stations and search centers were established throughout southern California to see what could be done to combat this threat to human health and the environment.

  4. An automated ozone photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    A photometer capable of automatically measuring ozone concentration data to very high resolution during scientific research flights in the Earth's atmosphere was developed at NASA Ames Research Center. This instrument was recently deployed to study the ozone hole over Antarctica. Ozone is detected by absorbing 253.7-nm radiation from an ultraviolet lamp which shines through the sample of air and impinges on a vacuum phototube. A lower output from the phototube indicates more ozone present in the air sample. The photometer employs a CMOS Z80 microprocessor with an STD bus system for experiment control, data collection, and storage. Data are collected and stored in nonvolatile memory for experiments lasting up to 8 hr. Data are downloaded to a portable ground-support computer and processed after the aircraft lands. An independent single-board computer in the STD bus also calculates ozone concentration in real time with less resolution than the CMOS Z80 system, and sends this value to a cockpit meter to aid the pilot in navigation.

  5. Application of dynamic linear regression to improve the skill of ensemble-based deterministic ozone forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Pagowski, M O; Grell, G A; Devenyi, D; Peckham, S E; McKeen, S A; Gong, W; Monache, L D; McHenry, J N; McQueen, J; Lee, P

    2006-02-02

    Forecasts from seven air quality models and surface ozone data collected over the eastern USA and southern Canada during July and August 2004 provide a unique opportunity to assess benefits of ensemble-based ozone forecasting and devise methods to improve ozone forecasts. In this investigation, past forecasts from the ensemble of models and hourly surface ozone measurements at over 350 sites are used to issue deterministic 24-h forecasts using a method based on dynamic linear regression. Forecasts of hourly ozone concentrations as well as maximum daily 8-h and 1-h averaged concentrations are considered. It is shown that the forecasts issued with the application of this method have reduced bias and root mean square error and better overall performance scores than any of the ensemble members and the ensemble average. Performance of the method is similar to another method based on linear regression described previously by Pagowski et al., but unlike the latter, the current method does not require measurements from multiple monitors since it operates on individual time series. Improvement in the forecasts can be easily implemented and requires minimal computational cost.

  6. Spatial variations of ground level ozone concentrations in areas of different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsai-Yin; Young, Li-Hao; Wang, Chiu-Sen

    The spatial variation of ground level ozone concentrations was investigated for areas of three different scales: (1) an air quality management district (a region about 100×70 km 2) in northern Taiwan, (2) the neighborhood (about 2 km in radius) of an air quality monitoring station, and (3) an open field (about 400×600 m 2) surrounded by 3- and 4-story buildings in an elementary school. Analysis of data on hourly ozone concentration, obtained at 13 m above the ground at 21 monitoring stations in the air quality management district, showed that the stations downwind of the urban center in the district had significantly higher ozone concentrations. Measurements for 8-h average ozone concentrations at 1.5 m above the ground by passive samplers showed that, in a flat area about 2 km in radius, the ratios of the ozone concentration at open areas to that at the monitoring station (0.86-0.93) were significantly higher than those obtained at areas with higher traffic flow and density of buildings (0.60-0.68). For the open field in an elementary school, the 8-h average ozone concentrations at 1.5 m above the ground at sites less than 10 m from the nearest building were considerably lower than those at sites farther away from buildings. The results indicated that, in areas of small scales, the spatial distributions of ozone concentration were highly non-uniform and there were appreciable day-to-day variability in spatial distribution. Such variability should be taken into account in determining the extent to which an individual is exposed to ozone.

  7. Long-Term Ozone Exposure Attenuates 1-Nitronaphthalene–Induced Cytotoxicity in Nasal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myong Gyong; Wheelock, Åsa M.; Boland, Bridget; Plopper, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    1-Nitronaphthalene (1-NN) and ozone are cytotoxic air pollutants commonly found as components of photochemical smog. The mechanism of toxicity for 1-NN involves bioactivation by cytochrome P450s and subsequent adduction to proteins. Previous studies have shown that 1-NN toxicity in the lung is considerably higher in rats after long-term exposure to ozone compared with the corresponding filtered air–exposed control rats. The aim of the present study was to establish whether long-term exposure to ozone alters the susceptibility of nasal mucosa to the bioactivated toxicant, 1-NN. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air or 0.8 ppm ozone for 8 hours per day for 90 days, followed by a single treatment with 0, 12.5, or 50.0 mg/kg 1-NN by intraperitoneal injection. The results of the histopathologic analyses show that the nasal mucosa of rats is a target of systemic 1-NN, and that long-term ozone exposure markedly lessens the severity of injury, as well as the protein adduct formation by reactive 1-NN metabolites. The antagonistic effects were primarily seen in the nasal transitional epithelium, which corresponds to the main site of histologic changes attributed to ozone exposure (goblet cell metaplasia and hyperplasia). Long-term ozone exposure did not appear to alter susceptibility to 1-NN injury in other nasal regions. This study shows that long-term ozone exposure has a protective effect on the susceptibility of nasal transitional epithelium to subsequent 1-NN, a result that clearly contrasts with the synergistic toxicological effect observed in pulmonary airway epithelium in response to the same exposure regimen. PMID:17901409

  8. Amazon basin ozone and aerosol: Wet season observations

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, G.L.; Browell, E.V.; Warren, L.S.; Hudgins, C.H. )

    1990-09-20

    The tropical environment is recognized as having a major impact on global tropospheric chemistry. The data show that the wet season Amazon Basin is an effective sink for ozone and a net source for aerosols. Mixed layer ozone at 150-m altitude averaged 8.5 ppbv compared to about 18 ppbv at 3-km altitude. In addition, a negative ozone gradient (decreasing value to the surface) was observed within the mixed layer. The averaged wet season mixed layer ozone was about 7 ppbv lower than observed during the dry season. This is attributed to the enhanced convective activity associated with the wet season and the change in mixed layer photochemistry from net ozone production (dry season) to a net destruction (wet season). The net sink characteristics of the wet season mixed layer are seen throughout the troposphere of the Amazon Basin in that ozone (3- to 4-km altitude) is typically 15-25 ppbv as compared to dry season values of 30-35 ppbv. In terms of the aerosol source characteristics of the Amazon Basin, mixed layer aerosols (0.1- to 0.4-{mu}m diameter) are a factor of 5-10 higher than observed in the troposphere with mixed layer values of 100-200 aerosols/cm{sup 3}. Analyses of both tropospheric and mixed layer aerosol samples show aerosols which are multisource. Tropospheric samples have size distributions which are trimodal and show modes at aerosol diameters which suggest the aerosols are (1) of lifetimes <1 hour, (2) of lifetimes of days, and (3) mechanically generated elements (e.g., wind-blow dust). Mixed layer data show two of the three modes with no mode which represent aerosols with lifetimes of days.

  9. Hourly marginal emissions tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hourly marginal emissions tool is an excel workbook that estimates the hourly NOx, SO2 and CO2 emission reductions of energy efficiency and renewable energy policies and programs in the electric power sector. It will be based on EPA's proposed "Road map for Incorporating ene...

  10. Respiratory and behavioral effects of ozone on a lizard and a frog.

    PubMed

    Mautz, William J; Dohm, Michael R

    2004-11-01

    Ozone at concentrations found in urban air pollution is known to have significant physiological effects on humans and other mammals. Exposure of the lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis, to 0.6 ppm ozone for 4 h at 25 degrees C induced 1.6 degrees C of behavioral hypothermia immediately following exposure, but selected body temperature recovered to control 35.3 degrees C the next day. Lizards exposed at 35 degrees C to 0.6 ppm ozone for 4 h selected body temperatures 1.9 degrees C below controls after exposure, and the behavioral hypothermic response persisted and increased to 3.3 degrees C the following day. Four-hour exposures of the frog, Pseudacris cadaverina, to 0.2 to 0.8 ppm ozone resulted in concentration-dependent alterations of respiration including depression of lung ventilation and oxygen consumption and the adoption of a low profile posture that reduced the exposed body surface. Ozone levels in wilderness habitats downwind of urban sources can potentially have stressful physiological effects on wildlife. Defensive physiological and behavioral reactions to ozone exposure may interfere with routine activities, and oxidant air pollution may be in part responsible for observed wildlife population declines. PMID:15556394

  11. An assessment of ozone levels, UV radiation and their occupational health hazard estimation during photocopying operation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra Pratap; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Deepak; Punia, Monika; Kumar, Krishan; Jain, Vinod Kumar

    2014-06-30

    This study investigates the levels of ozone concentration along with an ultraviolet (UV) and visible spectral radiation at eight photocopy centers in an academic institute, Delhi. Sampling was done in two types of locations, i.e., basement photocopy centers (BPC) and ground floor photocopy centers (GPC) for 8h. Measurements of levels of ozone, UV and visible radiation were done by ozone analyzer, UV radiometer and Field spectra instrument, respectively. Results show that the hourly mean concentration of ozone was observed to be in the range of 1.8-10.0 ppb and 5.3-45.8 ppb for BPC and GPC, respectively. In terms UV radiations, energy lies between 5.0×10(-3) and 7.0×10(-3) mW/cm(2) for ultraviolet A (UVA), 1.0×10(-3) and 2.0×10(-3) mW/cm(2) for ultraviolet B (UVB) and 6.0×10(-3) and 8.0×10(-3) mW/cm(2) for ultraviolet C (UVC). Correlation between the UV radiations and ozone production observed was statistically insignificant. To know the health hazard occurred to the workers, the standard erythema dose (SED) value was calculated for emitting UV radiation. The SED was estimated to be in the range of 0.02-0.04 and 0.02-0.32 for direct and indirect methods which is less than the guideline prescribed by Commission Internationale del' Eclairage (CIE). In nutshell, person involved in photocopy operation for their livelihood must be trained and should have knowledge for the long term gradual build up health problems due to ozone and UV production from photocopier. The manufactures should be ultimated with the significant ozone production, so that photocopier machine can be redesigned. PMID:24857892

  12. Trends in ozone profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, H.; Aikin, A.; Barnes, R.; Chandra, S.; Cunnold, D.; Deluisi, J.; Gille, J. C.; Hudson, R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1989-01-01

    From an examination of the agreements and differences between different satellite instruments, it is difficult to believe that existing satellite instruments determine upper stratospheric ozone much better than 4 pct.; by extension, it probably would require at least a 4 pct. change to be reliably detected as a change. The best estimates of the vertical profiles of ozone change in the upper stratosphere between 1979 and 1986 are judged to be those given by the two SAGE satellite instruments. SAGE-2 minus SAGE-1 gives a much lower ozone reduction than that given by the archived Solar Backscatter UV data. The average SAGE profiles of ozone changes between 20 and 50 degs north and between 20 and 50 degs south are given. The SAGE-1 and SAGE-2 comparison gives an ozone reduction of about 4 pct. at 25 km over temperate latitudes. Five ground based Umkehr stations between 36 and 52 degs north, corrected for the effects of volcanic aerosols, report an ozone reduction between 1979 and 1987 at Umkehr layer 8 of 9 + or - 5 pct. The central estimate of upper stratospheric ozone reduction given by SAGE at 40 km is less than the central value estimated by the Umkehr method at layer 8.

  13. Intercomparison of ozone measurements over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margitan, J. J.; Farmer, C. B.; Toon, G. C.; Brothers, G. A.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.; Hypes, W.; Larsen, J. C.; Mccormick, M. P.; Krueger, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the abundances of ozone over Antarctica in August and September 1987 obtained during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment are intercompared. These measurements of ozone concentrations and total column abundance were obtained by three satellite instruments, two IR and one UV column-measuring instruments aboard the DC-8, one in situ DC-8, and two in situ ER-2 instruments, an upward looking lidar aboard the DC-8, and ozone sondes from four sites in Antarctica. This paper presents a summary of the ozone data, using the data and accuracies given by the individual investigators in the individual papers in this issue, without any attempt to critically review or evaluate the data. In general, very good agreement (within about 10-20 percent, limited by natural variability) among the various techniques was found, with no systematic biases detected. These observations confirm the low ozone amounts reported in the Antarctic stratosphere.

  14. Evidence of Entrainment Impacting Surface Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haman, C.; Lefer, B. L.; Morris, G. A.; Flynn, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary boundary layer dynamics, such as entrainment of the residual layer, can have profound impacts on gaseous species due to changes in turbulent mixing. The lifetime of sulfur dioxide permits us to measure downward mixing of gases from the residual layer into the mixing layer after sunrise. During the 2009 SHARP campaign, elevated levels of sulfur dioxide were found during the morning hours at the Moody Tower (29.92°, -95.34°, 75 m AGL) measurement site on 19 May (22.9 ppbv), 20 May (35.7 ppbv), and 30 May (double peak: 18.7 and 13.8 ppbv). Easterly to east-southeasterly winds persisted between 1.8 and 3.2 ms-1 during these sulfur dioxide events. The Moody Tower site is west-southwest of the Houston Ship Channel Industrial Complex, a major source of sulfur dioxide. Dual ozone and sulfur dioxide balloon sonde profiles show a peak in sulfur dioxide just above the stable nocturnal inversion on days with similar meteorological conditions (e.g. 64 ppbv at 430 m on 30 May). As the nocturnal inversion begins to erode after sunrise, turbulent mixing increases and entrainment from the residual layer begins. An aerosol lidar used to determine mixing heights indicated the surface inversion breakup at approximately 1000 CDT on 19 May and 0845 CDT on 20 May. Corresponding peaks in sulfur dioxide immediately follow inversion erosion. The entrainment rate of sulfur dioxide can often be used to differentiate between increases in surface ozone due to photochemistry and downward mixing. Twenty-nine morning ozonesondes were launched between 2004 and 2010, fifteen of which were coincident with continuous mixing height measurements. The median integrated morning residual layer ozone was 57.5 ppbv*km for all sondes, which is substantial when compared to 81.0 ppbv*km of integrated afternoon fully developed boundary layer ozone. To reduce the importance of the horizontal ozone advection and ozone production terms, this study focused on the data between 0300 and 1000 CDT. Similarly

  15. 12 hour shifts the Nambour Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    2007-08-01

    Union members have a lengthy history of campaigning for fair working hours and conditions. The success of such campaigns has led to the implementation of the eight hour working day and the 40 hour and then 38 hour week as industrial standards. More recently though, calls for greater flexibility in their shift arrangements by nurses at Nambour Hospital have led to a voluntary 12 hour shift being implemented in their Intensive Care Unit. While union members are protective of their hard won gains in achieving reduced working hours through the 8 hour day--ICU nurses at Nambour Hospital say the voluntary 12 hour shift initiative goes a way in addressing their work/life balance issues. PMID:17879604

  16. Ozone transport commission developments

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    On September 27, 1994, the states of the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) signed an important memorandum of understanding (MOU) agreeing to develop a regional strategy for controlling stationary sources of nitrogen oxide emissions. Specifically, the states of the Ozone Transport Region, OTR, agreed to propose regulations for the control of NOx emissions from boilers and other indirect heat exchangers with a maximum gross heat input rate of at least 250 million BTU per hour. The Ozone Transport Region was divided into Inner, Outer and Northern Zones. States in the Outer Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions by 55%. States in the Inner Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions 65%. Facilities in both zones have the option to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million Btu by May 1, 1999. This option provides fairness for the gas-fired plants which already have relatively low NOx emissions. Additionally, States in the Inner and Outer Zones agreed to reduce their NOx emissions by 75% or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.15 pounds per million BTU by May 1, 2003. The Northern Zone States agree to reduce their rate of NOx emissions by 55% from base year levels by May 1, 2003, or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million BTU. As part of this MOU, States also agreed to develop a regionwide trading mechanism to provide a cost-effective mechanism for implementing the reductions.

  17. Ozone concentrations in air flowing into New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksic, Nenad; Kent, John; Walcek, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Ozone (O3) concentrations measured at Pinnacle State Park (PSPNY), very close to the southern border of New York State, are used to estimate concentrations in air flowing into New York. On 20% of the ozone season (April-September) afternoons from 2004 to 2015, mid-afternoon 500-m back trajectories calculated from PSPNY cross New York border from the south and spend less than three hours in New York State, in this area of negligible local pollution emissions. One-hour (2p.m.-3p.m.) O3 concentrations during these inflowing conditions were 46 ± 13 ppb, and ranged from a minimum of 15 ppb to a maximum of 84 ppb. On average during 2004-2015, each year experienced 11.8 days with inflowing 1-hr O3 concentrations exceeding 50 ppb, 4.3 days with O3 > 60 ppb, and 1.5 days had O3 > 70 ppb. During the same period, 8-hr average concentrations (10a.m. to 6p.m.) exceeded 50 ppb on 10.0 days per season, while 3.9 days exceeded 60 ppb, and 70 ppb was exceeded 1.2 days per season. Two afternoons of minimal in-state emission influences with high ozone concentrations were analyzed in more detail. Synoptic and back trajectory analysis, including comparison with upwind ozone concentrations, indicated that the two periods were characterized as photo-chemically aged air containing high inflowing O3 concentrations most likely heavily influenced by pollution emissions from states upwind of New York including Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Ohio. These results suggest that New York state-level attempts to comply with National Ambient Air Quality Standards by regulating in-state O3 precursor NOx and organic emissions would be very difficult, since air frequently enters New York State very close to or in excess of Federal Air Quality Standards.

  18. The Impact of Meteorology on Ozone Levels in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiss, Sandra

    The Lake Tahoe Basin is located on the California-Nevada border and occasionally experiences elevated levels of ozone exceeding the 70 ppb California Air Resources Board (CARB) ambient air quality standard (8-hour average). Previous studies indicate that both the local generation of ozone in the Basin and long-range transport from out-of-Basin sources are important in contributing to ozone exceedances, but little is known about the impact of meteorology on the distribution of ozone source regions. In order to develop a better understanding of the factors affecting ozone levels and sources in the Lake Tahoe Basin, this study combines observational data from a 2010 and 2012 summer field campaigns, HYSPLIT back trajectories, and WRF model output to examine the meteorological influences of ozone transport in the topographically complex Lake Tahoe Basin. Findings from the field work portions of this study include enhanced background ozone levels at higher elevations, the local circulation pattern of lake breezes occurring at Lake level sites, and an indication that ozone precursors are coming off the Lake. Our analysis also showed that if transport of ozone does occur, it is more likely to come from the San Joaquin Valley to the south rather than originate in the large cities to the west, such as Sacramento and San Francisco. Analysis of modeled PBL schemes as compared with observational data showed that the ACM2 PBL scheme best represented the geographical domain. The ACM2 PBL scheme was then used to show wind circulation patterns in the Lake Tahoe Basin and concluded that there is decent vertical mixing over the Basin and no indication of ozone transport from the west however some indication of transport from the east. Overall this study concludes that transport from the west is less significant than transport from the south and east, and that transport only influences ozone values at higher elevations. Within the Basin itself (at lower elevations), local factors

  19. High concentration of surface ozone observed along the Khumbu Valley Nepal April 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G. W. K.; Semple, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    Increasing air pollution in Southeast Asia has the potential for dramatic impacts on the population and climate in relatively pristine regions such as the Himalaya. Recent measurements near Mount Everest indicate the presence of elevated levels of ozone at elevations from 5000m to 9000m that are the result of both the long-range transport of tropospheric pollutants from Southeast Asia as well as the descent of ozone-rich stratospheric air. Here we report on the first surface ozone concentration transect in the Mount Everest region. The data collected at elevations from 2900m to 5200m indicate an increase in concentration with height as well as 8-hour average exposures in excess of 140ppb. Satellite data and meteorological diagnostics suggest a stratospheric source for the high levels observed. The majority of values observed exceed guidelines for human exposure and therefore are of a magnitude to suggest that they are of physiological relevance.

  20. TROP OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activity Area (F01) The NRMRL tropospheric ozone research program is both coordinated with the research efforts of others and planned to achieve the most important unmet research needs that draw upon its unique expertise. For example, NRMRL emissions research in this area is co...

  1. Ozone-Induced Type 2 Immunity in Nasal Airways. Development and Lymphoid Cell Dependence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chee Bing; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Brooks, Phillip T; Brandenberger, Christina; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Nault, Rance; Zacharewski, Timothy R; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation exposures to ozone commonly encountered in photochemical smog cause airway injury and inflammation. Elevated ambient ozone concentrations have been epidemiologically associated with nasal airway activation of neutrophils and eosinophils. In the present study, we elucidated the temporal onset and lymphoid cell dependency of eosinophilic rhinitis and associated epithelial changes in mice repeatedly exposed to ozone. Lymphoid cell-sufficient C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0 or 0.5 parts per million (ppm) ozone for 1, 2, 4, or 9 consecutive weekdays (4 h/d). Lymphoid cell-deficient, Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice were similarly exposed for 9 weekdays. Nasal tissues were taken at 2 or 24 hours after exposure for morphometric and gene expression analyses. C57BL/6 mice exposed to ozone for 1 day had acute neutrophilic rhinitis, with airway epithelial necrosis and overexpression of mucosal Ccl2 (MCP-1), Ccl11 (eotaxin), Cxcl1 (KC), Cxcl2 (MIP-2), Hmox1, Il1b, Il5, Il6, Il13, and Tnf mRNA. In contrast, 9-day ozone exposure elicited type 2 immune responses in C57BL/6 mice, with mucosal mRNA overexpression of Arg1, Ccl8 (MCP-2), Ccl11, Chil4 (Ym2), Clca1 (Gob5), Il5, Il10, and Il13; increased density of mucosal eosinophils; and nasal epithelial remodeling (e.g., hyperplasia/hypertrophy, mucous cell metaplasia, hyalinosis, and increased YM1/YM2 proteins). Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice exposed to ozone for 9 days, however, had no nasal pathology or overexpression of transcripts related to type 2 immunity. These results provide a plausible paradigm for the activation of eosinophilic inflammation and type 2 immunity found in the nasal airways of nonatopic individuals subjected to episodic exposures to high ambient ozone. PMID:26203683

  2. Scientific basis of the national ambient air quality standards for ozone: How do new discoveries and other concerns modify public health risks and expected benefits?

    SciTech Connect

    Vostal, J.J.; Heuss, J.M.; Paul, R.T.; Pezda, S.A.; Ball, J.C.; Wimette, H.J.

    1999-07-01

    The US EPA, in their recent review of the ozone NAAQS, acknowledged that substantial uncertainties exist with respect to the determination of public health risks due to ambient ozone. In particular, the uncertainties focus on considerable differences of opinion among scientists for the possible health effects at ozone levels near the new 8-hr. ozone National Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 0.08 ppm. Information on health or vegetation effects of low ambient ozone levels has been scarce, or extrapolated from studies using levels that are substantially above the new standard level. Uncertainties fall into three categories: (1) the extent of the adversity of public health endpoints; (2) the probability of adverse exposures; and (3) the impact of background levels on the achievability of the new standard. More specifically: (A) Public health effects of low ozone levels have thus far depended primarily on compromised pulmonary function as the biological endpoint of the greatest clinical significance. However, research data published after the standard was promulgated show that the ozone-induced effects represent more a physiological defense mechanism than an adverse effect of low ambient ozone concentrations. In light of these new findings, the alleged ozone action represents only a decline in pulmonary function test performance and not in the vital function of the lungs. This new interpretation not only eliminates the adverse character of pulmonary function decrements, but also largely modifies the proposed estimates of public health risks. (B) Public health risk assessments have indicated that even with compliance of the 1-hour ozone standard, the chances for US populations to encounter an adverse ozone exposure have been practically eliminated.

  3. Mars Ozone Mapping with MAVEN IUVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, F.; Montmessin, F.; Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J.; Jain, S.; Stewart, I. F.; Stiepen, A.; Chaffin, M.; McClintock, W. E.; Lo, D.; Clarke, J. T.; Holsclaw, G.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ozone (O3) on Mars is a product of the CO2 photolysis by ultraviolet radiation. It is destroyed with a timescale of less than ~1 hour during the day by the H, OH, and HO2 radicals. This tight coupling between O3 and HOx species makes ozone a sensitive tracer of the odd hydrogen chemistry that stabilizes the CO2 atmosphere of Mars, and ozone measurements offer a powerful constraint for photochemical models. Ozone is also expected to be anti-correlated to water vapour, the source of hydrogen radicals HOx. At high latitudes in winter, the absence of H2O prevents the production of HOx and the chemical lifetime of ozone may increase up to several days. In these conditions, the ozone column abundance usually reaches its largest values of the Martian year and ozone turns into a measurable tracer of the polar vortex dynamics. The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is one of nine science instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft. In the apoapse imaging phase, the spacecraft motion carries the IUVS lines-of-sight across the Martian disk while the scan mirror is used to make transverse swaths. This observation mode allows mapping the ozone vertically-integrated column from its signature in the solar ultraviolet flux backscattered by the surface and the atmosphere. This paper will present an overview of the first year of ozone mapping by IUVS. We will describe in particular the last Mars northern winter (2015) when the largest ozone columns have been observed since the beginning of the MAVEN mission. The data will be compared to prior Earth-based observations and to the SPICAM and MARCI ozone datasets. We will also test our quantitative understanding of the Martian ozone by comparing the IUVS observations to our three-dimensional model with photochemistry.

  4. Correlation of DIAL Ozone Observations with Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Kuang, Shi; Koshak, William J.; Newchurch, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to see whether ozone maxima measured by the DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) instrument in Huntsville, AL may be traced back to lightning events occurring 24-48 hours beforehand. The methodology is to start with lidar measurements of ozone from DIAL. The HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model is then used to determine the origin of these ozone maxima 24-48 hours prior. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are used to examine the presence/absence of lightning along the trajectory. This type of analysis suggests that lightning-produced NOx may be responsible for some of the ozone maxima over Huntsville.

  5. Correlation of DIAL Ozone Observations with Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Kuang, Shi; Koshak, William J.; Newchurch, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to see whether ozone maxima measured by the DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) instrument in Huntsville, AL may be traced back to lightning events occurring 24- 48 hours beforehand. The methodology is to start with lidar measurements of ozone from DIAL as well as ozonesonde measurements. The HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model is then used to determine the origin of these ozone maxima 24-48 hours prior. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are used to examine the presence/absence of lightning along the trajectory. This type of analysis suggests that lightning-produced NOx may be responsible for some of the ozone maxima over Huntsville.

  6. Interpretation of ozone temperature correlations. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, R. B.; Douglass, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    Correlations between ozone and temperature are commonly used to investigate the photochemical and dynamical aspects of satellite-derived ozone data. In this paper, the dynamical contributions to the ozone temperature correlations are examined using simple analytic and numerical models. It is shown that the phase differences between ozone and temperature waves caused by dynamical forcing can mimic the phase relationships predicted for photochemical equilibrium. Furthermore, the dynamical contribution to the phase relationship between ozone and temperature waves is routinely significant for chemistry time scales of approximately 0.5 days and is potentially important for time scales as short as 2 hours during stratospheric warmings. The model results are highly relevant to the analysis of the limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere and solar backscatter ultraviolet data taken during the winter of 1979.

  7. The Antarctic Ozone Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For…

  8. Ozone and aircraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cabin ozone problem is discussed. Cabin ozone in terms of health effects, the characteristics of ozone encounters by aircraft, a brief history of studies to define the problem, corrective actions taken, and possible future courses of action are examined. It is suggested that such actions include avoiding high ozone concentrations by applying ozone forecasting in flight planning procedures.

  9. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  10. 78 FR 48373 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria County; 1997 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... County; 1997 8-Hour Ozone Section 110 (a)(1) Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Section 110(a)(1) of the Federal Clean Air Act (CAA), EPA's rules, and is consistent with EPA's guidance. EPA is approving the revisions pursuant to section 110 of the CAA. DATES: Written comments should...

  11. Treatment of soft drink process wastewater by ozonation, ozonation-H₂O₂ and ozonation-coagulation processes.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, M A; Roa-Morales, G; Barrera-Díaz, C; Balderas-Hernández, P

    2012-01-01

    In this research, we studied the treatment of wastewater from the soft drink process using oxidation with ozone. A scheme composed of sequential ozonation-peroxide, ozonation-coagulation and coagulation-ozonation treatments to reduce the organic matter from the soft drink process was also used. The samples were taken from the conventional activated sludge treatment of the soft drink process, and the experiments using chemical oxidation with ozone were performed in a laboratory using a reactor through a porous plate glass diffuser with air as a feedstock for the generation of ozone. Once the sample was ozonated, the treatments were evaluated by considering the contact time, leading to greater efficiency in removing colour, turbidity and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The effect of ozonation and coagulant coupled with treatment efficiency was assessed under optimal conditions, and substantial colour and turbidity removal were found (90.52% and 93.33%, respectively). This was accompanied by a 16.78% reduction in COD (initial COD was 3410 mg/L). The absorbance spectra of the oxidised products were compared using UV-VIS spectroscopy to indicate the level of oxidation of the wastewater. We also determined the kinetics of decolouration and the removal of turbidity with the best treatment. The same treatment was applied to the sample taken from the final effluent of the activated sludge system, and a COD removal efficiency of 100% during the first minute of the reaction with ozone was achieved. As a general conclusion, we believe that the coagulant polyaluminum chloride - ozone (PAC- ozone) treatment of wastewater from the manufacturing of soft drinks is the most efficient for removing turbidity and colour and represents an advantageous option to remove these contaminants because their removal was performed in minutes compared to the duration of traditional physical, chemical and biological processes that require hours or days. PMID:22217079

  12. 24-hour care programs.

    PubMed

    Hergenrader, R

    1996-06-01

    Twenty-four-hour care programs, which combine group health programs with workers' compensation and disability benefits, hold considerable potential for cost savings and greater efficiency. This article explains these programs and uses a care history to show the savings they can achieve. PMID:10157798

  13. Earth's Endangered Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panofsky, Hans A.

    1978-01-01

    Included are (1) a discussion of ozone chemistry; (2) the effects of nitrogen fertilizers, fluorocarbons, and high level aircraft on the ozone layer; and (3) the possible results of a decreasing ozone layer. (MR)

  14. Ozone crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Roan, S.

    1989-01-01

    The author presents an account of the depletion of the atmosphere's ozone layer since the discovery of the phenomenon 15 years ago. The book recounts the flight to ban chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and describes the science, the people, and the politics involved, up to the March 1988 international treaty restricting CFC production. It surveys the media's coverage, describes the struggle for remedies, and offers a prognosis for the future.

  15. Ozone loss rates calculated along ER-2 flight tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D.M. )

    1991-03-20

    Local ozone loss rates due to the ClO+ClO and BrO+ClO cycles are calculated using ClO, pressure, and temperature from in-situ aircraft measurements and representative BrO mixing ratios. Ozone loss during the vertical profiles executed by the ER-2 near 72{degree}S usually extended over a deep altitude range rather than reaching a maximum at the top of the profiles. This is due to the strong pressure dependence of the rate determining steps. In the Antarctic, very high ozone loss rates (>5{center dot}10{sup 6} cm{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}) were observed at altitudes with potential temperatures below 400 K, where advective exchange is likely to be much more rapid than at higher altitudes. On September 22, 1987, the ER-2 measured an ozone loss rate of aboutn 2.8 Dobson units (DU) per 12 sunlit hours in the 350-400 K range and 2.0 DU in the 400-450 K range near 72{degree}S. Rapid ozone loss in the Arctic did not extend below 400 K in the available data. The calculated average loss rate, which is nonlinear, in general depends on the order in which the terms are averaged. Loss rates calculated by averaging the ClO, pressure and temperature for up to 2,400 s (about 500 km) generally agree with the average of the local loss rate to within one percent except at the edge of the vortex, where the difference can be up to 30%. Adiabatic temperature and pressure effects nearly cancel. Thermal decomposition of Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2} was not important along sunlit portions of ER-2 flight tracks if equilibrium is assumed between ClO and Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The effect of recalibration of the ClO data on the calculated loss rates is discussed.

  16. Statistical evaluation of the impact of shale gas activities on ozone pollution in North Texas.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; John, Kuruvilla

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, substantial growth in shale gas exploration and production across the US has changed the country's energy outlook. Beyond its economic benefits, the negative impacts of shale gas development on air and water are less well known. In this study the relationship between shale gas activities and ground-level ozone pollution was statistically evaluated. The Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) area in north-central Texas was selected as the study region. The Barnett Shale, which is one the most productive and fastest growing shale gas fields in the US, is located in the western half of DFW. Hourly meteorological and ozone data were acquired for fourteen years from monitoring stations established and operated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The area was divided into two regions, the shale gas region (SGR) and the non-shale gas (NSGR) region, according to the number of gas wells in close proximity to each monitoring site. The study period was also divided into 2000-2006 and 2007-2013 because the western half of DFW has experienced significant growth in shale gas activities since 2007. An evaluation of the raw ozone data showed that, while the overall trend in the ozone concentration was down over the entire region, the monitoring sites in the NSGR showed an additional reduction of 4% in the annual number of ozone exceedance days than those in the SGR. Directional analysis of ozone showed that the winds blowing from areas with high shale gas activities contributed to higher ozone downwind. KZ-filtering method and linear regression techniques were used to remove the effects of meteorological variations on ozone and to construct long-term and short-term meteorologically adjusted (M.A.) ozone time series. The mean value of all M.A. ozone components was 8% higher in the sites located within the SGR than in the NSGR. These findings may be useful for understanding the overall impact of shale gas activities on the local and regional ozone

  17. Ozone dose-response relationships for spring oilseed rape and broccoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, Maarten; Op de Beeck, Maarten; De Temmerman, Ludwig; Guisez, Yves; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Vandermeiren, Karine

    2011-03-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an important air pollutant with known detrimental effects for several crops. Ozone effects on seed yield, oil percentage, oil yield and 1000 seed weight were examined for spring oilseed rape ( Brassica napus cv. Ability). For broccoli ( Brassica oleracea L. cv. Italica cv. Monaco) the effects on fresh marketable weight and total dry weight were studied. Current ozone levels were compared with an increase of 20 and 40 ppb during 8 h per day, over the entire growing season. Oilseed rape seed yield was negatively correlated with ozone dose indices calculated from emergence until harvest. This resulted in an R2 of 0.24 and 0.26 ( p < 0.001) for the accumulated hourly O 3 exposure over a threshold of 40 ppb (AOT40) and the phytotoxic ozone dose above a threshold of 6 nmol m -2 s -1 (POD 6) respectively. Estimated critical levels, above which 5% yield reduction is expected, were 3.7 ppm h and 4.4 mmol m -2 respectively. Our results also confirm that a threshold value of 6 nmol s -1 m -2 projected leaf area, as recommended for agricultural crops (UNECE, Mills, 2004), can indeed be applied for spring oilseed rape. The reduction of oilseed rape yield showed the highest correlation with the ozone uptake during the vegetative growth stage: when only the first 47 days after emergence were used to calculate POD 6, R2 values increased up to 0.476 or even 0.545 when the first 23 days were excluded. The highest ozone treatments, corresponding to the future ambient level by 2100 (IPCC, Meehl et al., 2007), led to a reduction of approximately 30% in oilseed rape seed yield in comparison to the current ozone concentrations. Oil percentage was also significantly reduced in response to ozone ( p < 0.001). As a consequence oil yield was even more severely affected by elevated ozone exposure compared to seed yield: critical levels for oil yield dropped to 3.2 ppm h and 3.9 mmol m -2. For broccoli the applied ozone doses had no effect on yield.

  18. 16 CFR 0.3 - Hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hours. 0.3 Section 0.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.3 Hours. Principal and field offices are open on each business day from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m....

  19. 47 CFR 0.403 - Office hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Office hours. 0.403 Section 0.403 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION General Information General § 0.403 Office hours. The main offices of the Commission are open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday...

  20. 16 CFR 0.3 - Hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hours. 0.3 Section 0.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.3 Hours. Principal and field offices are open on each business day from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m....

  1. 47 CFR 0.403 - Office hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Office hours. 0.403 Section 0.403 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION General Information General § 0.403 Office hours. The main offices of the Commission are open from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday...

  2. Sunrise ozone destruction found in the sub-tropical marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Ippei; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    A new mechanism of ozone loss is found in the sub-tropical marine boundary layer over the north Pacific. This ozone destruction occurs just after sunrise (hereafter Sunrise Ozone Destruction, SOD) and is commonly found throughout the year. SOD is a predominant ozone loss mechanism in winter, which takes place after sunrise in a few hours with 1∼2 ppbv of ozone depletion for 40∼50 ppbv of background ozone, while, in summer, SOD is weaker than in winter with small ozone depletion for 10∼20 ppbv of background ozone. In summer, daytime ozone destruction (hereafter, DOD) associated with UV photolysis and subsequent HOx reaction is more active. Since DOD is not active in early morning, SOD should be a new ozone loss mechanism. After demonstrating the observational findings, halogen chemistry associated with sea-salt aerosols is described as a possible mechanism.

  3. Tropospheric ozone production regions and the intercontinental origins of surface ozone over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derwent, Richard G.; Utembe, Steven R.; Jenkin, Michael E.; Shallcross, Dudley E.

    2015-07-01

    Ozone tagged labelling schemes have been implemented in a global Lagrangian chemistry-transport model to identify the intercontinental origins of surface ozone in Europe. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange gave rise to between 3 and 5 ppb across Europe, whereas the mid-latitudes of the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific Ocean region contributed 6-8 ppb. Surface ozone levels of 10-16 ppb were associated with the mid-latitudes of North America and the North Atlantic Ocean regions. Appreciable intercontinental ozone production occurred downwind of continental regions and above the surface layer. Intercontinental ozone formation and transport from tropical regions contributed about 4 ppb and was much less efficient compared with that from mid-latitudes. There were approaching 60 chemical processes driving intercontinental ozone formation, of which the HO2 + NO, CH3O2 + NO and CH3COO2 + NO reactions were the most important. Ozone production appeared to be driven by OH oxidation of secondary reaction products rather than the oxidation of primary emitted VOCs. The largest intercontinental ozone contributions amounted to about 20 ppb from North America to European baseline stations, 14 ppb from Asia to North American baseline stations and 10 ppb from Asia to European baseline stations. It is possible that changing intercontinental ozone production and transport could have led to seasonal ozone trends and shifts in seasonal cycles at northern hemisphere mid-latitude baseline ozone monitoring stations.

  4. Ozone and Ozone By-Products in the Cabins of Commercial Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Clifford; Weschler, Charles J.; Mohan, Kris; Vallarino, Jose; Spengler, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The aircraft cabin represents a unique indoor environment due to its high surface-to-volume ratio, high occupant density and the potential for high ozone concentrations at cruising altitudes. Ozone was continuously measured and air was sampled on sorbent traps, targeting carbonyl compounds, on 52 transcontinental U.S. or international flights between 2008 and 2010. The sampling was predominantly on planes that did not have ozone scrubbers (catalytic converters). Peak ozone levels on aircraft without catalytic convertors exceeded 100 ppb, with some flights having periods of more than an hour when the ozone levels were > 75ppb. Ozone was greatly reduced on relatively new aircraft with catalytic convertors, but ozone levels on two flights whose aircraft had older convertors were similar to those on planes without catalytic convertors. Hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO) were detected in the aircraft cabin at sub- to low ppb levels. Linear regression models that included the log transformed mean ozone concentration, percent occupancy and plane type were statistically significant and explained between 18 and 25% of the variance in the mixing ratio of these carbonyls. Occupancy was also a significant factor for 6-MHO, but not the linear aldehydes, consistent with 6-MHO’s formation from the reaction between ozone and squalene, which is present in human skin oils. PMID:23517299

  5. MBBR evaluation for oil refinery wastewater treatment, with post-ozonation and BAC, for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Schneider, E E; Cerqueira, A C F P; Dezotti, M

    2011-01-01

    This work evaluated the performance of a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) in the treatment of an oil refinery wastewater. Also, it investigated the possibility of reuse of the MBBR effluent, after ozonation in series with a biological activated carbon (BAC) column. The best performance of the MBBR was achieved with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 hours, employing a bed to bioreactor volume ratio (V(B)/V(R)) of 0.6. COD and N-NH₄(+) MBBR effluent concentrations ranged from 40 to 75 mg L⁻¹ (removal efficiency of 69-89%) and 2 to 6 mg L⁻¹ (removal efficiency of 45-86%), respectively. Ozonation carried out for 15 min with an ozone concentration of 5 mg L⁻¹ was able to improve the treated wastewater biodegradability. The treatment performance of the BAC columns was practically the same for ozonated and non ozonated MBBR effluents. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content of the columns of the activated carbon columns (CAG) was in the range of 2.1-3.8 mg L⁻¹, and the corresponding DOC removal efficiencies were comprised between 52 and 75%. The effluent obtained at the end of the proposed treatment presented a quality, which meet the requirements for water reuse in the oil refinery. PMID:21245566

  6. Who is more affected by ozone pollution? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Michelle L; Zanobetti, Antonella; Dominici, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    Ozone is associated with adverse health; however, less is known about vulnerable/sensitive populations, which we refer to as sensitive populations. We systematically reviewed epidemiologic evidence (1988-2013) regarding sensitivity to mortality or hospital admission from short-term ozone exposure. We performed meta-analysis for overall associations by age and sex; assessed publication bias; and qualitatively assessed sensitivity to socioeconomic indicators, race/ethnicity, and air conditioning. The search identified 2,091 unique papers, with 167 meeting inclusion criteria (73 on mortality and 96 on hospitalizations and emergency department visits, including 2 examining both mortality and hospitalizations). The strongest evidence for ozone sensitivity was for age. Per 10-parts per billion increase in daily 8-hour ozone concentration, mortality risk for younger persons, at 0.60% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40, 0.80), was statistically lower than that for older persons, at 1.27% (95% CI: 0.76, 1.78). Findings adjusted for publication bias were similar. Limited/suggestive evidence was found for higher associations among women; mortality risks were 0.39% (95% CI: -0.22, 1.00) higher than those for men. We identified strong evidence for higher associations with unemployment or lower occupational status and weak evidence of sensitivity for racial/ethnic minorities and persons with low education, in poverty, or without central air conditioning. Findings show that some populations, especially the elderly, are particularly sensitive to short-term ozone exposure. PMID:24872350

  7. SPECIES COMPARISON OF ACUTE INHALATION TOXICITY OF OZONE AND PHOSGENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison of the concentration-response effects of inhaled ozone (O3) in different species of laboratory animals was made in order to better understand the influence of the choice of species in inhalation studies of this gas. The effect of 4 hour exposure to ozone (O3) at conc...

  8. Aerosol effect on Umkehr ozone profiles using Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, M. J.; Cunnold, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    This study examines 1211 cases of coincident ozone profiles derived from 1164 Umkehrs and 928 Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) profiles within 1000 km and 12 hours between October 1984 and April 1989 to study the stratospheric-aerosol effect on Umkehr ozone profiles. Because of the close correspondence of stratospheric aerosol optical depth at the SAGE II-measured 0.525-micrometer wavelength and the extrapolated 0.32 Umkehr wavelength determined in this study we use the 0.525-micrometer data to determine the aerosol effect on Umkehr profiles. At the 95% confidence level, we find the following errors to the Umkehr ozone amounts: in Umkehr layer 9 (-2.9 +/- 2.1), layer 8 (-2.3 +/- 1.1), layer 7 (0.1 +/- 1.1), layer 6 (2.2 +/- 1.0), layer 5 (-1.5 +/- 0.8), and layer 4 (-2.4 +/- 1.7) in percent ozone amount per 0.01 stratospheric aerosol optical depth. These results agree with previous theoretical and empirical studies within their respective error bounds in layers 9, 8, and 7. The results in layers 6, 5, and 4 differ significantly from those in previous works. Using only those eight stations with more than 47 coincidences results in mean aerosol effects that are not significantly different from the 14-station results. Because SAGE II and Umkehr produce different ozone retrievals in layer 9 and because the intralayer correlation of SAGE II ozone and aerosol in layer 9 is nonzero, one must exercise some caution in attributing the entire SAGE II-Umkehr difference in this layer to an aerosol effect.

  9. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of EPA's ozone implementation rule (see 40 CFR 51.918), this determination suspends the reasonable... Polystyrene Resins. (b)-(e) (f) Attainment Determination. (1) EPA is determining that the 1-hour...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of EPA's ozone implementation rule (see 40 CFR 51.918), this determination suspends the reasonable... Polystyrene Resins. (b)-(e) (f) Attainment Determination. (1) EPA is determining that the 1-hour...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1683 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of EPA's ozone implementation rule (see 40 CFR 51.918), this determination suspends the reasonable... Polystyrene Resins. (b)-(e) (f) Attainment Determination. (1) EPA is determining that the 1-hour...

  12. Ozone nonattainment under the Clean Air Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Technology, Environment and Aviation of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, July 8, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The hearing addresses ozone nonattainment under the Clean Air Act. Southeastern Wisconsin is a designated ozone non-attainment area under amendments to the Act of 1990. Preliminary results of a Lake Michigan Ozone study seem to indicate that much of the pollution causing high levels of ozone come from several hundred miles away. The witnesses examine plans to cope with this situation. Statements of government and industry officials are included along with documents submitted for the record.

  13. Ozone Hole Over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) show the progressive depletion of ozone over Antarctica from 1979 to 1999. This 'ozone hole' has extended to cover an area as large as 10.5 million square miles in September 1998. The previous record of 10.0 million square miles was set in 1996. The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year between late August and early October. Regions with higher levels of ozone are shown in red. NASA and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Ozone holes of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form during the next few years, scientists hope to see a reduction in ozone loss as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are gradually reduced. Credit: Images by Greg Shirah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  14. Detection of stratospheric ozone intrusions by windprofiler radars.

    PubMed

    Hocking, W K; Carey-Smith, T; Tarasick, D W; Argall, P S; Strong, K; Rochon, Y; Zawadzki, I; Taylor, P A

    2007-11-01

    Stratospheric ozone attenuates harmful ultraviolet radiation and protects the Earth's biosphere. Ozone is also of fundamental importance for the chemistry of the lowermost part of the atmosphere, the troposphere. At ground level, ozone is an important by-product of anthropogenic pollution, damaging forests and crops, and negatively affecting human health. Ozone is critical to the chemical and thermal balance of the troposphere because, via the formation of hydroxyl radicals, it controls the capacity of tropospheric air to oxidize and remove other pollutants. Moreover, ozone is an important greenhouse gas, particularly in the upper troposphere. Although photochemistry in the lower troposphere is the major source of tropospheric ozone, the stratosphere-troposphere transport of ozone is important to the overall climatology, budget and long-term trends of tropospheric ozone. Stratospheric intrusion events, however, are still poorly understood. Here we introduce the use of modern windprofiler radars to assist in such transport investigations. By hourly monitoring the radar-derived tropopause height in combination with a series of frequent ozonesonde balloon launches, we find numerous intrusions of ozone from the stratosphere into the troposphere in southeastern Canada. On some occasions, ozone is dispersed at altitudes of two to four kilometres, but on other occasions it reaches the ground, where it can dominate the ozone density variability. We observe rapid changes in radar tropopause height immediately preceding these intrusion events. Such changes therefore serve as a valuable diagnostic for the occurrence of ozone intrusion events. Our studies emphasize the impact that stratospheric ozone can have on tropospheric ozone, and show that windprofiler data can be used to infer the possibility of ozone intrusions, as well as better represent tropopause motions in association with stratosphere-troposphere transport. PMID:17994096

  15. The impact of observing characteristics on the ability to predict ozone under varying polluted photochemical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, P. D.; Bowman, K. W.; Henze, D. K.; Attié, J.-L.; Marécal, V.

    2015-09-01

    errors of lower than 5 ppbv (parts per billion by volume). Further, only observing intervals of 3 h or shorter were able to consistently achieve ozone prediction errors of 5 ppbv or lower across all photochemical regimes. Making observations closer to the prediction period and either in the morning or afternoon rush hour periods made greater improvements for ozone prediction: 0.2-0.3 ppbv for the morning rush hour and from 0.3 to 0.8 ppbv for the afternoon compared to only 0-0.1 ppbv for other times of the day. Finally, we made two complementary analyses that show that our conclusions are insensitive to the assumed diurnal emission cycle and to the choice of which VOC species emission to estimate using our framework. These questions will address how different types of observing platform, e.g. geostationary satellites or ground monitoring networks, could support future air quality research and forecasting.

  16. Cellular kinetics in the lungs of aging Fischer 344 rats after acute exposure to ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, R.; Adamson, I. Y.

    1995-01-01

    Lung repair in aging Fischer 344 male rats was investigated after an acute inhalation exposure to ozone. Adult (9-month-old) and senescent (24-month-old) rats were exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone for a single period of 6 hours, and thereafter studied over 5 days of recovery in clean air. The animals were given intraperitoneal injections of colchicine and [3H]thymidine, 4 hours and 1.5 hours before termination, respectively. The lungs were inflated with glutaraldehyde, and tissue samples were embedded in epoxy resin for electron microscopy, or in glycol methacrylate for light-microscopic autoradiography. Exposure to ozone produced epithelial injury in alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles, later reflected by the transient increase in mitotic activity of nonciliated bronchiolar cells and alveolar type 2 cells. The increase in metaphase-arrested cells and [3H]thymidine-labeled cells in bronchioles followed similar time courses, ie, maximal at days 1.5 to 2, and subsiding by day 3. In the alveoli, type 1 cell necrosis was observed early after exposure (6 hours recovery), without notable structural changes in the interstitial and endothelial compartments. The increased mitotic activity in the alveolar septa was mostly due to proliferation of epithelial type 2 cells, which was maximal at day 1.5, and of interstitial cells, maximal at day 2.5. The magnitude of the mitotic responses of nonciliated bronchiolar cells, alveolar type 2 cells and interstitial cells was highest (+50%) in the lungs of senescent rats. Although the cellular events during repair are essentially similar in both age groups, the results indicate that senescent rats have a significantly higher level of initial injury from inhalation of ozone than adult animals. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7717445

  17. 77 FR 12673 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; South Coast; Attainment Plan for 1997 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... the Los Angeles-South Coast Air Basin Area (South Coast).\\1\\ See 76 FR 57872. California developed... FR 23951 (April 30, 2004) and and codified at 40 CFR part 51, subpart Z (8-hour ozone implementation... commitments by both the District and CARB to certain measures and emissions reductions.\\5\\ See 76 FR 57872....

  18. 78 FR 37122 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New York; Infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is approving certain elements of New York's State Implementation Plan (SIP) revisions submitted to demonstrate that the State meets the requirements of section 110(a)(1) and (2) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) for the 1997 8- hour ozone and the 1997 and 2006 fine particulate matter (PM2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Section......

  19. Impacts of seasonal and regional variability in biogenic VOC emissions on surface ozone in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    SciTech Connect

    Situ, S.; Guenther, Alex B.; Wang, X. J.; Jiang, X.; Turnipseed, A.; Wu, Z.; Bai, J.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-05

    In this study, the BVOC emissions in November 2010 over the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in southern China have been estimated by the latest version of a Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission model (MEGAN v2.1). The evaluation of MEGAN performance at a representative forest site within this region indicates MEGAN can estimate BVOC emissions reasonably well in this region except overestimating isoprene emission in autumn for reasons that are discussed in this manuscript. Along with the output from MEGAN, the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to estimate the impacts of BVOC emissions on surface ozone in the PRD region. The results show BVOC emissions increase the daytime ozone peak by *3 ppb on average, and the max hourly impacts of BVOC emissions on the daytime ozone peak is 24.8 ppb. Surface ozone mixing ratios in the central area of Guangzhou- Foshan and the western Jiangmen are most sensitive to BVOC emissions BVOCs from outside and central PRD influence the central area of Guangzhou-Foshan and the western Jiangmen significantly while BVOCs from rural PRD mainly influence the western Jiangmen. The impacts of BVOC emissions on surface ozone differ in different PRD cities, and the impact varies in different seasons. Foshan and Jiangmen being most affected in autumn, result in 6.0 ppb and 5.5 ppb increases in surface ozone concentrations, while Guangzhou and Huizhou become more affected in summer. Three additional experiments concerning the sensitivity of surface ozone to MEGAN input variables show that surface ozone is more sensitive to landcover change, followed by emission factors and meteorology.

  20. PV Hourly Simulation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Jesse; Metzger, Ian

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple general building characteristics and usage information to calculate the energy and cost benefits of solar PV. This tool conducts and complex hourly simulation of solar PV based primarily on the area available on the rooftop. It uses a simplified efficiency calculation method and real panel characteristics. It includes a detailed rate structure to account for time-of-use rates, on-peak and off-peak pricing, and multiple rate seasons. This tool includes the option for advanced system design inputs if they are known. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, incentives and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  1. PV Hourly Simulation Tool

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple general building characteristics and usage information to calculate the energy and cost benefits of solar PV. This tool conducts and complex hourly simulation of solar PV based primarily on the area available on the rooftop. It uses a simplified efficiency calculation method and real panel characteristics. It includes a detailed rate structure to account for time-of-use rates, on-peak and off-peak pricing, and multiple rate seasons. This tool includes themore » option for advanced system design inputs if they are known. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, incentives and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  2. Ozone loss rates in the Arctic winter stratosphere during 1994-2000 derived from POAM II/III and ILAS observations: Implications for relationships among ozone loss, PSC occurrence, and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Yukio; Sugita, Takafumi; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative chemical ozone loss rates at the 475 K isentropic surface inside the Arctic polar vortex are evaluated for six winters (January through March) using a satellite-based Match technique. Satellite observational data are taken from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) II for 1994-1996, the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) for 1997, and the POAM III for 1999-2000. The largest ozone loss rates were observed in the end of January 1995 (˜50 ± 20 ppbv d-1), February 1996 (˜40-50 ± 15 ppbv d-1), February 1997 (˜40 ± 8 ppbv d-1), January 2000 (˜60 ± 30 ppbv d-1), and early March 2000 (˜40 ± 10 ppbv d-1). The probability of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) existence is estimated using aerosol extinction coefficient data from POAM II/III and ILAS. Ozone loss and the PSC probability are strongly correlated and an absolute increase of 10% in the PSC probability is found to amplify the chemical ozone loss rate during Arctic winter by approximately 25 ± 6 ppbv per day or 3.2 ± 0.7 ppbv per sunlit hour. Relationships between average Arctic winter ozone loss rates and various PSC- and temperature-related indices are investigated, including the area of polar vortex that is colder than the threshold temperature for PSC existence (APSC), the PSC formation potential (PFP), and the potential for activation of chlorine (PACl). Of these three, PACl provides the best proxy representation of interannual variability in Arctic ozone loss at the 475 K level. Large ozone loss occurred primarily for air masses that experienced low temperatures between 187 K and 195 K within the previous 10 days and the ozone loss rates clearly increase with decreasing the minimum temperature. The particularly large ozone losses of ˜9 ± 3 ppbv per sunlit hour in February 1996 and January 2000 were associated with low minimum temperatures of 187-189 K, simultaneously with high PSC probabilities.

  3. Hourly differences in air pollution and risk of respiratory disease in the elderly: a time-stratified case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown adverse effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on respiratory disease outcomes; however, few studies examined this association on an hourly time scale. We evaluated the associations between hourly changes in air pollution and the risk of respiratory disease in the elderly, using the time of the emergency call as the disease onset for each case. Methods We used a time-stratified case-crossover design. Study participants were 6,925 residents of the city of Okayama, Japan, aged 65 or above who were taken to hospital emergency rooms between January 2006 and December 2010 for onset of respiratory disease. We calculated city-representative hourly average concentrations of air pollutants from several monitoring stations. By using conditional logistic regression models, we estimated odds ratios per interquartile-range increase in each pollutant by exposure period prior to emergency call, adjusting for hourly ambient temperature, hourly relative humidity, and weekly numbers of reported influenza cases aged ≥60. Results Suspended particulate matter (SPM) exposure 24 to <72 hours prior to the onset and ozone exposure 48 to <96 hours prior to the onset were associated with the increased risk of respiratory disease. For example, following one interquartile-range increase, odds ratios were 1.05 (95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.09) for SPM exposure 24 to <48 hours prior to the onset and 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.23) for ozone exposure 72 to <96 hours prior to the onset. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) exposure 0 to <24 hours prior to onset was associated with the increased risk of pneumonia and influenza: odds ratio was 1.07 per one interquartile-range increase (95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.14). Elevated risk for pneumonia and influenza of SO2 was observed at shorter lags (i.e., 8–18 hours) than the elevated risks for respiratory disease of SPM or ozone. Overall, the effect estimates for chronic obstructive

  4. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  5. Effect of inhaled ozone on lung histamine in conscious guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, R.L.; Gold, W.M.

    1987-04-01

    The effect of short-term ozone (O/sub 3/) exposure on pulmonary mast cell function was examined. Guinea pigs were continuously exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ for 2, 4, and 8 hr. O/sub 3/ exposure produced a significant decrease in lung histamine concentration. Two-hour exposure to O/sub 3/ caused a 22.4 +/- 7.0% decrease in lung histamine concentration compared with controls. Ozone exposures of 4 and 8 hr caused lung histamine concentrations to decrease by 43.7 +/- 7.7 and 49.0 +/- 7.5%, respectively, without significant changes in lung water or protein, or evidence of cytotoxicity. These results suggest that O/sub 3/ or its metabolites affect pulmonary mast cell function by stimulating the release of histamine from the lung.

  6. Meteorological Simulations of Ozone Episode Case Days during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.J.; Costigan, K.; Muller, C.; Wang, G.

    1999-02-01

    Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13,1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were petiormed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1,2,4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11-13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawirisonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. We found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.

  7. Meteorological simulations of ozone episode case days during the 1996 Paso del Norte ozone study

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.J.; Costigan, K.; Muller, C.; Wang, G.

    1999-07-01

    Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13, 1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were performed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1, 2, 4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11--13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawinsonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. The authors found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.

  8. Ozone production in four major cities of China: sensitivity to ozone precursors and heterogeneous processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L. K.; Wang, T.; Gao, J.; Ding, A. J.; Zhou, X. H.; Blake, D. R.; Wang, X. F.; Saunders, S. M.; Fan, S. J.; Zuo, H. C.; Zhang, Q. Z.; Wang, W. X.

    2013-10-01

    Despite a large volume of research over a number of years, our understandings of the key precursors that control tropospheric ozone production and the impacts of heterogeneous processes remain incomplete. In this study, we analyze measurements of ozone and its precursors made at rural/suburban sites downwind of four large Chinese cities - Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Lanzhou. At each site the same measurement techniques were utilized and a photochemical box model based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (v3.2) was applied, to minimize uncertainties in comparison of the results due to differences in methodology. All four cities suffered from severe ozone pollution. At the rural site of Beijing, export of the well-processed urban plumes contributed to the extremely high ozone levels (up to an hourly value of 286 ppbv), while the pollution observed at the suburban sites of Shanghai, Guangzhou and Lanzhou was characterized by intense in-situ ozone production. The major anthropogenic hydrocarbons were alkenes and aromatics in Beijing and Shanghai, aromatics in Guangzhou, and alkenes in Lanzhou. The ozone production was found to be in a VOCs-limited regime in both Shanghai and Guangzhou, and a mixed regime in Lanzhou. In Shanghai, the ozone formation was most sensitive to aromatics and alkenes, while in Guangzhou aromatics were the predominant ozone precursors. In Lanzhou, either controlling NOx or reducing emissions of olefins from the petrochemical industry would mitigate the local ozone production. The potential impacts of several heterogeneous processes on the ozone formation were assessed. The hydrolysis of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5), uptake of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) on particles, and surface reactions of NO2 forming nitrous acid (HONO) present considerable sources of uncertainty in the current studies of ozone chemistry. Further efforts are urgently required to better understand these processes and refine atmospheric models.

  9. Immunosuppression of pulmonary natural killer activity by exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, G.R.; Keyes, L.L.; Stutzman, J.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. Pulmonary natural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity of continuous ozone exposure. Continuous ozone exposures at 1.0 ppm were performed for 23.5 hours per day for either 1, 5, 7, or 10 consecutive days. Pulmonary immune function was assessed by measuring natural killer (NK) activity from whole-lung homogenates of male Fischer-344 rats. Results of this study indicated that continuous ozone exposure for 1, 5, or 7 days resulted in a significant decrease in pulmonary NK activity. This suppressed pulmonary NK activity returned to control levels after continuous exposure to ozone for 10 days. The suppressed pulmonary NK response was thus attenuated and returned to normal values in the continued presence of ozone gas. This attenuation process is dynamic, complex, and doubtless involves several cell types and/or products of these cells. Pulmonary NK activity was also suppressed at 0.5 ppm ozone, but not at 0.1 ppm ozone, following 23.5 hours of exposure. NK activity is important for defense against viral, bacterial, and neoplastic disease. The depressed NK activity resulting from continuous ozone exposure could therefore result in a compromised ability to defend against pulmonary diseases.

  10. A study on the effects of ozone dosage on dissolved-ozone flotation (DOF) process performance.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Jin, Pengkang; Wang, Xiaochang

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved-ozone flotation (DOF) is a tertiary wastewater treatment process, which combines ozonation and flotation. In this paper, a pilot-scale DOF system fed by secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in China was used to study the effect of ozone dosage on the DOF process performance. The results show that an ozone dosage could affect the DOF performance to a large extent in terms of color and organic matter removal as well as disinfection performance. The optimal color and organic matter removal was achieved at an ozone dosage of 0.8 mg/l. For disinfection, significant improvement in performance could be achieved only when the organic matter removal was optimal. The optimal ozone dosage of at least 1.6 mg/l was put forward, in this case, in order to achieve the optimal color, turbidity, organic matter and disinfection performance. PMID:25945861

  11. [Ozone source apportionment at urban area during a typical photochemical pollution episode in the summer of 2013 in the Yangtze River Delta].

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Li, Li; Huang, Cheng; An, Jing-yu; Yan, Ru-sha; Huang, Hai-ying; Wang, Yang-jun; Lu, Qing; Wang, Qian; Lou, Sheng-rong; Wang, Hong-li; Zhou, Min; Tao, Shi-kang; Qiao, Li-ping; Chen, Ming-hua

    2015-01-01

    With the fast development of urbanization, industrialization and mobilization, the air pollutant emissions with photochemical reactivity become more obvious, causing a severe photochemical pollution with the characteristics of high ozone concentration. However, the ozone source identification is very complicated due to the high non linearity between ozone and its precursors. Thus, ways to reduce ozone is still not clear. A high ozone pollution episode occurred during July, 2013, which lasted for a long period, with large influence area and high intensity. In this paper, we selected this episode to do a case study with the application of ozone source apportionment technology(OSAT) coupled within the CAMx air quality model. In this study, 4 source regions(including Shanghai, north Zhejiang, South Jiangsu and long range transport), 7 source categories (including power plants, industrial process, industrial boilers and kilns, residential, mobile source, volatile source and biogenic emissions) are analyzed to study their contributions to surface O3 in Shanghai, Suzhou and Zhejiang. Results indicate that long range transport contribution to the surface ozone in the YRD is around 20 x 10(-9) - 40 x 10(-9) (volume fraction). The O3 concentrations can increased to 40 x 10(-9) - 100 x 10(-9) (volume fraction) due to precursors emissions in Shanghai, Jiangsu and Zhejiang. As for the regional contribution to 8 hour ozone, long range transport constitutes 42.79% +/- 10.17%, 48.57% +/- 9.97% and 60.13% +/- 7.11% of the surface ozone in Shanghai, Suzhou and Hangzhou, respectively. Regarding the high O3 in Shanghai, local contribution is 28.94% +/- 8.49%, north Zhejiang constitutes 19.83% +/- 10.55%. As for surface O3 in Suzhou, the contribution from south Jiangsu is 26.41% +/- 6.80%. Regarding the surface O3 in Hangzhou, the major regional contributor is north Zhejiang (29.56% +/- 8.33%). Contributions from the long range transport to the daily maximum O3 concentrations are

  12. Influence of the ozone profile above Madrid (Spain) on Brewer estimation of ozone air mass factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; López, M.; Costa, M. J.; Serrano, A.; Bortoli, D.; Bañón, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; Silva, A. M.

    2009-08-01

    The methodology used by Brewer spectroradiometers to estimate the ozone column is based on differential absorption spectroscopy. This methodology employs the ozone air mass factor (AMF) to derive the total ozone column from the slant path ozone amount. For the calculating the ozone AMF, the Brewer algorithm assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height of 22 km. However, for a real specific site the ozone presents a certain profile, which varies spatially and temporally depending on the latitude, altitude and dynamical conditions of the atmosphere above the site of measurements. In this sense, this work address the reliability of the mentioned assumption and analyses the influence of the ozone profiles measured above Madrid (Spain) in the ozone AMF calculations. The approximated ozone AMF used by the Brewer algorithm is compared with simulations obtained using the libRadtran radiative transfer model code. The results show an excellent agreement between the simulated and the approximated AMF values for solar zenith angle lower than 75°. In addition, the relative differences remain lower than 2% at 85°. These good results are mainly due to the fact that the altitude of the ozone layer assumed constant by the Brewer algorithm for all latitudes notably can be considered representative of the real profile of ozone above Madrid (average value of 21.7±1.8 km). The operational ozone AMF calculations for Brewer instruments are limited, in general, to SZA below 80°. Extending the usable SZA range is especially relevant for Brewer instruments located at high mid-latitudes.

  13. Identifying and forecasting deep stratospheric ozone intrusions over the western United States from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Cooper, O. R.; Langford, A. O.; Pan, L.; Liu, X.; Reddy, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that deep stratospheric ozone intrusions can episodically enhance ground-level ozone above the health-based standard over the western U.S. in spring. Advanced warning of incoming intrusions could be used by state agencies to inform the public about poor air quality days. Here we explore the potential for using total ozone retrievals (version 5.2, level 3) at twice daily near global coverage from the AIRS instrument aboard the NASA Aqua satellite to identify stratospheric intrusions and forecast the eventual surface destination of transported stratospheric ozone. The method involves the correlation of AIRS daily total ozone columns at each 1ox1o grid box ~1-3 days prior to stratospheric enhancements to daily maximum 8-hour average ozone at a selected surface site using datasets from April to June in 2003-2011. The surface stratospheric enhancements are estimated by the GFDL AM3 chemistry-climate model which includes full stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and is nudged to reanalysis winds. Our earlier work shows that the model presents deep stratospheric intrusions over the Western U.S. consistently with observations from AIRS, surface networks, daily ozone sondes, and aircraft lidar available in spring of 2010 during the NOAA CalNex field campaign. For the 15 surface sites in the U.S. Mountain West considered, a correlation coefficient of 0.4-0.7 emerges with AIRS ozone columns over 30o-50oN latitudes and 125o-105oW longitudes - variability in the AIRS column within this spatial domain indicates incoming intrusions. For each "surface receptor site", the spatial domain can narrow to an area ~5ox5o northwest of the individual site, with the strong correlation (0.5-0.7) occurring when the AIRS data is lagged by 1 day from the AM3 stratospheric enhancements in surface air. The spatial pattern of correlations is consistent with our process-oriented understanding developed from case studies of extreme intrusions. Surface observations

  14. Initial field evaluation of the Harvard active ozone sampler for personal ozone monitoring.

    PubMed

    Geyh, A S; Roberts, P T; Lurmann, F W; Schoell, B M; Avol, E L

    1999-01-01

    Assessing personal exposure to ozone has only been feasible recently with the introduction of passive ozone samplers. These devices are easy to use, but changes in air velocity across their collection surfaces can affect performance. The Harvard active ozone sampler (AS) was developed in response to problems with the passive methods. This active sampler has been tested extensively as a microenvironmental sampler. To test for personal sampling, 40 children attending summer day-camp in Riverside, California wore the active ozone sampler for approximately 2.6 h on July 19 and 21, 1994, when ozone concentrations were about 100 ppb and 140 ppb, respectively. The children spent 94-100% of the sampling period outside, staying within a well-defined area while participating in normal camp activities. Ambient ozone concentrations across this area were monitored by two UV photometric ozone monitors. The active sampler was worn in a small backpack that was also equipped with a passive ozone sampler. Device precision, reported as the percent difference between duplicate pairs of samplers, was +/- 3.7% and +/- 4.2% for the active and passive samplers, respectively. The active sampler measured, on average, 94.5 +/- 8.2% of the ambient ozone while the passive samplers measured, on average, 124.5 +/- 18.8%. The samplers were worn successfully for the entire sampling period by all participating children. PMID:10321353

  15. Measurements and modelling of ozone in the Mediterranean MBL: an investigation of the importance of ship emissions to local ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedgecock, I. M.; Gencarelli, C. N.; Sch{ü}rmann, G. J.; Sprovieri, F.; Pirrone, N.

    2012-07-01

    Elevated concentrations of ground level ozone are both hazardous to human health and detrimental to agricultural production. The Mediterranean Basin, due to its position under the descending branch of the Hadley Cell circulation during the summer months, enjoys periods of stable, sunny and warm weather which provide ideal conditions for the production of ozone. The presence of major population centres and numerous industrialised areas in the coastal zone result in both a continual supply of ozone precursor compounds and also a significant number of people to suffer the consequences of high ozone concentrations. Using the WRF/Chem model validated with data obtained from seven oceanographic measurement campaigns, performed between 2000 and 2010, aboard the Italian Research Council's R. V. Urania, and also from a number of EMEP monitoring stations located around the Mediterranean Basin, the importance of emissions from maritime traffic in the region has been investigated. The model results indicate that over large areas of the Mediterranean emissions from shipping contribute between 5 and 10 ppb to the ground level O3 daily average concentration during the summer. The contribution to the hourly average O3 is up to 40 ppb in some particularly busy shipping lanes. Importantly the results suggest that in a number of coastal areas the contribution from ship emissions to the local O3 concentration can make the difference between complying with the EU Air Quality standard of a maximum 8 h mean of 120 μg m-3 and exceeding it.

  16. Influence of synoptic patterns on surface ozone variability over the eastern United States from 1980 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, L.; Mickley, L. J.; Tai, A. P. K.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the effect of synoptic-scale weather patterns on observed maximum daily 8-hour average (MDA8) surface ozone over the eastern United States during 1980-2012 in summer (June-August, JJA). Zonally averaged, the relative standard deviation (SD) of daily MDA8 JJA ozone shows a bimodal structure, with peaks at 28-32 and 40-45° N, and we show that those regions are most influenced by the variability in daily weather. We apply empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) to understand the causes of this structure. The first three leading EOF patterns explain 53 % of the total variance in detrended surface ozone, displaying (1) a widespread response of ozone in the eastern United States associated with north-south movement of jet wind latitude, (2) a north-south pattern linked to the Bermuda High system when its west boundary is located along the east coast, and (3) an east-west pattern characteristic of a westward extension of the Bermuda High and an enhanced Great Plains low level jet (GPLLJ). The northern peak of ozone relative SD can be explained by polar jet activity, while the southern peak appears related to variability in the Bermuda High and GPLLJ. We define a new metric polar jet frequency as the total number of days the jet traverses the Midwest and northeast each summer. In the Midwest and northeast, we find that the correlation coefficient r between detrended mean JJA MDA8 ozone and the polar jet frequency ranges between -0.76 and -0.93 over 1980-2012 depending on the time period selected, suggesting that polar jet frequency could provide a simple metric to predict ozone variability in future climate regimes. In the southeast, the influence of the Bermuda High on mean JJA MDA8 ozone depends on the location of its west edge. For those summers when the average position of the west edge is located west of ~ 85.4° W, a westward shift in the Bermuda High west edge increases ozone in the southeast by ~ 1 ppbv deg-1 in longitude. For all summers, a northward

  17. Spatial patterns of tropospheric ozone in the Mount Rainier region of the Cascade Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brace, S.; Peterson, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Few data exist on tropospheric ozone concentrations in rural and wildland areas of western Washington, U.S.A. We measured tropospheric ozone in Mount Rainier National Park and the Puget Sound region of Washington using electronic analyzers and passive samplers during the summers of 1994 and 1995. Electronic analyzers recorded hourly ozone concentrations from five locations between Seattle and Mount Rainier. Ozone concentrations generally increased with distance from Seattle, with maximum hourly concentrations recorded at Enumclaw (319 m elevation, 50 km SE of Seattle). Paradise (1650 m elevation, 100 km SE of Seattle) had the highest monthly mean concentration of all sites measured with analyzers. Diurnal patterns on high-ozone days indicate that concentrations at Paradise remain near 60 ppbv throughout the day, whereas ozone concentrations closer to Seattle had higher peaks during the afternoon but dropped to near zero at night. Passive ozone samplers were used to measure weekly average ozone exposures in four river drainages within Mount Rainier National Park, across an elevation gradient (420 a??2100 m). In most drainages, ozone levels increased with elevation, with highest average weekly ozone exposure (47 ppbv) recorded at 2100 m. Ozone concentrations are significantly higher in the western portion of the park, indicating that ozone exposure varies considerably over short distances. These data provide a reference point for air quality in western Washington and indicate that intensive sampling is necessary to quantify spatial patterns of tropospheric ozone in mountainous regions.

  18. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  19. Ozone Gardens for the Citizen Scientist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, Margaret; Reilly, Gay; Rodjom, Abbey; Malick, Emily

    2016-01-01

    NASA Langley partnered with the Virginia Living Museum and two schools to create ozone bio-indicator gardens for citizen scientists of all ages. The garden at the Marshall Learning Center is part of a community vegetable garden designed to teach young children where food comes from and pollution in their area, since most of the children have asthma. The Mt. Carmel garden is located at a K-8 school. Different ozone sensitive and ozone tolerant species are growing and being monitored for leaf injury. In addition, CairClip ozone monitors were placed in the gardens and data are compared to ozone levels at the NASA Langley Chemistry and Physics Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE) site in Hampton, VA. Leaf observations and plant measurements are made two to three times a week throughout the growing season.

  20. Variational data assimilation for the optimized ozone initial state and the short-time forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soon-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyeok; Lee, Soon-Hwan; Lee, Hwa Woon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we apply the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation to optimize initial ozone state and to improve the predictability of air quality. The numerical modeling systems used for simulations of atmospheric condition and chemical formation are the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model . The study area covers the capital region of South Korea, where the surface measurement sites are relatively evenly distributed. The 4D-Var code previously developed for the CMAQ model is modified to consider background error in matrix form, and various numerical tests are conducted. The results are evaluated with an idealized covariance function for the appropriateness of the modified codes. The background error is then constructed using the NMC method with long-term modeling results, and the characteristics of the spatial correlation scale related to local circulation is analyzed. The background error is applied in the 4D-Var research, and a surface observational assimilation is conducted to optimize the initial concentration of ozone. The statistical results for the 12-hour assimilation periods and the 120 observatory sites show a 49.4% decrease in the root mean squred error (RMSE), and a 59.9% increase in the index of agreement (IOA). The temporal variation of spatial distribution of the analysis increments indicates that the optimized initial state of ozone concentration is transported to inland areas by the clockwise-rotating local circulation during the assimilation windows. To investigate the predictability of ozone concentration after the assimilation window, a short-time forecasting is carried out. The ratios of the RMSE with assimilation versus that without assimilation are 8% and 13% for the +24 and +12 hours, respectively. Such a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy is obtained solely by using the optimized initial state. The potential improvement in ozone prediction for

  1. Residency Work-Hours Reform

    PubMed Central

    Nuckols, Teryl K; Escarce, José J

    2005-01-01

    Background In response to proposed federal legislation, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education limited resident work-hours in July 2003. The cost may be substantial but, if successful, the reform might lower preventable adverse event costs in hospital and after discharge. Objectives This study sought to estimate the reform's net cost in 2001 dollars, and to determine the reduction in preventable adverse events needed to make reform cost neutral from teaching hospital and societal perspectives. Design Cost analysis using published literature and data. Net costs were determined for 4 reform strategies and over a range of potential effects on preventable adverse events. Results Nationwide, transferring excess work to task-tailored substitutes (the lowest-level providers appropriate for noneducational tasks) would cost $673 million; mid-level providers would cost $1.1 billion. Reform strategies promoting adverse events would increase net teaching hospital and societal costs as well as mortality. If task-tailored substitutes decrease events by 5.1% or mid-level providers decrease them by 8.5%, reform would be cost neutral for society. Events must fall by 18.5% and 30.9%, respectively, to be cost neutral for teaching hospitals. Conclusions Because most preventable adverse event costs occur after discharge, a modest decline (5.1% to 8.5%) in them might make residency work-hours reform cost neutral for society but only a much larger drop (18.5% to 30.9%) would make it cost neutral for teaching hospitals, unless additional funds are allocated. Future research should evaluate which reform approaches prevent adverse events and at what cost. PMID:16191130

  2. Ozone in the free atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C. (Editor); Prasad, S. S. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The present book provides a summary of the state of scientific knowledge of stratospheric and free tropospheric ozone as it exists at the beginning of 1983. Ozone photochemistry in the stratosphere is discussed, taking into account fundamental molecular properties, the absorption spectrum of ozone, photodissociation, ozone formation and destruction in the upper atmosphere, the photochemistry of odd-hydrogen, the photochemistry of odd-nitrogen, the photochemistry of odd-chlorine, and photochemistry-temperature coupling. The observed distribution of atmospheric ozone and its variations are considered along with ozone transport, ozone in the troposphere, stratospheric ozone perturbations, and climatic and biological effects. Attention is given to the techniques of observing atmospheric ozone, horizontal-vertical ozone transport and conservative quantities, measurements of tropospheric ozone, the tropospheric ozone budget, ozone models, natural ozone variations, and anthropogenic ozone perturbations.

  3. The interpretation of SAGE II ozone measurements in the lower mesosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.C.A.

    1989-01-01

    SAGE II observations of ozone at sunrise and sunset (solar zenith angle=90{degree}) at approximately the same tropical latitude and on the same day exhibit larger concentrations at sunrise than at sunset between 55 km and 65 km altitude. Because of rapid conversion of atomic oxygen to ozone at sunset and the reverse at sunrise, the onion peeling assumption of constant ozone in the SAGE II retrievals is invalid in this altitude range. The observations are compared against predictions from a one-dimensional model by deriving simulated ozone profiles obtained by applying the onion peel procedure to model results. Good agreement between the observed and modeled sunrise/sunset ratios is then obtained. The results indicate that the SAGE II ozone retrievals overestimate by a factor of 1.3 at sunrise and 1.1 at sunset at 65 km (for example). Between 55 and 60 km altitude the Chapman reactions produce an adequate simulation of the sunrise and sunset ratio, but between 60 and 65 km this ratio is affected by the destruction of O{sub x} by HO{sub x} during the first part of the night. SAGE II ozone profiles between 60 and 65 km altitude thus provide information on mesospheric HO{sub x} chemistry not only through profiles averages but also through the sunrise/sunset ratio. The observations, for example, indicate an OH concentration at 65 km altitude in the tropics an hour after dark of approximately 8x10{sup 6} cm{sup {minus}3}.

  4. Nonstationary effects in ozone generation by barrier discharges in N2/O2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zosimov, A. V.; Lunin, V. V.; Samoilovich, V. G.; Abramovskaya, E. A.; Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Poroykov, A. Yu.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Voloshin, D. G.

    2016-08-01

    The yield of ozone in barrier discharges in oxygen-nitrogen mixtures containing 0.001 to 40% of nitrogen is investigated experimentally. Phenomena of the nonstationarity of processes of ozone generation that differ from the known ozone-zero phenomenon (OZP) apparent in the reduced efficiency of ozone generation in very high purity oxygen at long periods (from hours to tens of hours) of ozonator operation are found. It is established that the characteristic times (from minutes to tens of minutes) of ozone attaining stationary values after changes in the discharge parameters indicate slow adjustment of the surface condition of insulators and thus the heterogeneous decay of ozone to more rapidly changing flows of neutral and charged particles from gas discharge plasma on the surfaces of dielectrics. The possibility of such a scenario is confirmed using a new analytical approach and numerical calculations of the plasma-chemical kinetics of N2/O2 mixtures presented in the accompanying theoretical study.

  5. Indoor ozone concentrations: Ventilation rate impacts and mechanisms of outdoor concentration attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Cano-Ruiz, J.A.; Modera, M.P.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1992-07-01

    The classification of outdoor (ambient) air as fresh for the purposes of ventilation is not always appropriate, particularly in urban areas. In many cities of the world, urban air frequently violates health-based air quality standards due to high ozone concentrations. The degree of protection from exposure to ozone offered by the indoor environment depends on the relationship between indoor and outdoor ozone levels. Existing concentration data indicates that indoor/outdoor ozone ratios range between 10 and 80%. This paper analyzes several of the key issues influencing indoor ozone concentrations, including: (1) the degree of penetration of outdoor ozone indoors, (2) removal within the indoor environment (removal at surfaces and within air distribution systems), and (3) the correlation in time between outdoor ozone levels and ventilation rates. A model for calculating the degree of ozone removal in typical building leaks and air distribution systems is described and applied to a range of typical cases. This model indicates that the degree of removal is minimal for most wooden building cracks, but could be significant in leaks in concrete or brick structures, and is strongly dependent on the lining material for air distribution systems. Indoor ozone exposure estimates based on hourly outdoor ozone monitoring data and hour-by-hour weather-based simulations of infiltration rates and building operation are reported for a few residential scenarios. These estimates serve as a basis for exploring the impact of energy-efficient ventilation strategies on indoor ozone exposures.

  6. The role of refinery flaring events and bay breezes on a high surface ozone episode during the Houston, Texas DISCOVER-AQ field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Fried, A.; Pickering, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    The highest observed surface ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area in 2013 occurred on September 25, which coincided with the Texas DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. Surface ozone was elevated throughout the Houston metropolitan area with maximum 8-hour average ozone peaking along the western shore of Galveston Bay, reaching 124 ppbv, almost 50 ppbv above the current EPA standard of 75 ppbv. The NASA P-3B aircraft observed plumes from refinery flares west and northwest of Galveston Bay that were transported over the water. Continental air pollution from the north was transported into the Houston metropolitan area where it mixed with locally generated emissions. A bay breeze circulation formed causing pollutants that were transported out over the water in the morning to recirculate back inland where they mixed with freshly emitted pollution near the bay breeze convergence zone. The highest surface ozone concentrations were reported near the bay breeze front. This ozone episode will be presented using measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and a CMAQ model simulation with integrated source apportionment, which tracks the contribution of emissions source groups and regions on ozone concentrations.

  7. Ozone Trend Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The detection of anthropogenic disturbances in the Earth's ozone layer was studied. Two topics were addressed: (1) the level at which a trend in total ozoning is detected by existing data sources; and (2) empirical evidence in the prediction of the depletion in total ozone. Error sources are identified. The predictability of climatological series, whether empirical models can be trusted, and how errors in the Dobson total ozone data impact trend detectability, are discussed.

  8. Ozone Layer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  9. 2001 OZONE DESIGN VALUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is generated by a complex atmoshperic chemical process. Industrial and automobile pollutants in the form of oxides of nitrogen and hydrocarbons react in the atmosphere when air is stagnant and temperatures are high to form ozone. Ozone is known to cause adverse health eff...

  10. 2020 OZONE DESIGN VALUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is generated by a complex atmoshperic chemical process. Industrial and automobile pollutants in the form of oxides of nitrogen and hydrocarbons react in the atmosphere when air is stagnant and temperatures are high to form ozone. Ozone is known to cause adverse health eff...

  11. OZONE BYPRODUCT FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ozone for water treatment has been increasing as ozone has great potential for degrading water pollutants and inactivating viruses, Giardia cysts, and Cryptosporidium oocysts. Although it appears that ozone generates less undesirable disinfection by-products (DBPs) th...

  12. Ozone Antimicrobial Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is a potent germicide that has been used extensively for water purification. In Europe, 90 percent of the municipal water systems are treated with ozone, and in France, ozone has been used to treat drinking water since 1903. However, there is limited information on the bioc...

  13. High Concentration of Surface Ozone Observed along the Khumbu Valley Nepal April 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semple, J.; Moore, K.

    2009-12-01

    Increasing air pollution in Southeast Asia has the potential for dramatic impacts on the population and climate in relatively pristine regions such as the Himalaya. Recent measurements near Mount Everest indicate the presence of elevated levels of ozone at elevations from 5000m to 9000m that are the result of both the long-range transport of tropospheric pollutants from Southeast Asia as well as the descent of ozone-rich stratospheric air. Here we report on the first surface ozone concentration transect in the Mount Everest region. The data collected at elevations from 2900m to 5200m indicate an increase in concentration with height as well as 8-hour average exposures in excess of 140ppb. Satellite data and meteorological diagnostics suggest a stratospheric source for the high levels observed. The majority of values observed exceed guidelines for human exposure and therefore are of a magnitude to suggest that they are of physiological relevance. Potential vorticity (PVU-shading and contours) and horizontal wind (vectors-m/s) from the ERA-I Reanalysis on the 330K potential temperature surface at 06 UTC (approximately noon local time) on April 12 2007 showing the tropopause fold that resulted in the high surface ozone concentration observed along the Khumbu Valley near Mount Everest. The 1 PVU contour is indicated by the thin black line. The Tibetan Plateau is indicated as is the location of Mount Everest by the ‘+’.

  14. [Hour of decision].

    PubMed

    Ourlanis, B

    1974-01-01

    Governments have the ability and right to control birthrates, as shown by Russia and by Czechoslovakia, the latter having increased its growth from 14.9% in 1968 to 19.2% in 1973, chiefly by helping women raise children while working. Developing countries, now freed from feudalism and colonialism, will be able to lower their growth by similar means, i.e., by liberating women. Control of birthrates began in the 19th century in Finland and France at which time the author estimates 1% of the world's couples were using contraception. About 8% of the world, a large portion of Russia and western Europe, used contraception in the beginning of the 20th century. In mid-20th century 25% of the world, and in the 3rd quarter about 45% of the world, was planning births. Even if all couples plan births, by the end of the century governments will also have to convince them to limit numbers of births if the population problem is to be solved. Simultaneously, better grains and other means (such as those used in Russia to increase yield 28% in 5 years) will have to be introduced to feed growing numbers. The solution must not interfere with individual or national freedom. The demographic policy must also continue to lower infant and adult death rates. PMID:12257582

  15. Quantifying Ozone Production throughout the Boundary Layer from High Frequency Tethered Profile Measurements during a High Ozone Episode in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, C. W.; Johnson, B.; Schnell, R. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Cullis, P.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.; Windell, J.; McClure-Begley, A.; Helmig, D.; Petron, G.

    2015-12-01

    During the Uinta Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) in Jan - Feb 2013, 735 tethered ozonesonde profiles were obtained at 3 sites including during high wintertime photochemical ozone production events that regularly exceeded 125 ppb. High resolution profiles of ozone and temperature with altitude, measured during daylight hours, showed the development of approximately week long high ozone episodes building from background levels of ~40 ppb to >150 ppb. The topography of the basin combined with a strong temperature inversion trapped oil and gas production effluents in the basin and the snow covered surface amplified the sun's radiation driving the photochemical ozone production at rates up to 13 ppb/hour in a cold layer capped at 1600-1700 meters above sea level. Beginning in mid-morning, ozone mixing ratios throughout the cold layer increased until late afternoon. Ozone mixing ratios were generally constant with height indicating that ozone production was nearly uniform throughout the depth of the cold pool. Although there was strong diurnal variation, ozone mixing ratios increased during the day more than decreased during the night, resulting in elevated levels the next morning; an indication that nighttime loss processes did not compensate for daytime production. Even though the 3 tethersonde sites were at elevations differing by as much as 140 m, the top of the high ozone layer was nearly uniform in altitude at the 3 locations. Mobile van surface ozone measurements across the basin confirmed this capped structure of the ozone layer; the vehicle drove out of high ozone mixing ratios at an elevation of ~1900 meters above sea level, above which free tropospheric ozone mixing ratios of ~50 ppb were measured. Exhaust plumes from a coal-fired power plant in the eastern portion of the basin were intercepted by the tethersondes. The structure of the profiles clearly showed that effluents in the plumes were not mixed downward and thus did not contribute precursor nitrogen

  16. The origin of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, V.

    2006-05-01

    Highest atmospheric ozone production rates can be found at around 30 km in the tropical stratosphere, leading to ozone mixing ratios of about 10 ppmv. Those stratospheric air masses are then transported to extra-tropical latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. This is considered the main mechanism to generate mid- and high latitude ozone. By applying the climate-chemistry models E39/C and MAECHAM4/CHEM, this view is investigated in more detail. The origin of ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere is analysed, by incorporating a diagnostics ("marked ozone origin tracers") into the models, which allows to identify the origin of ozone. In most regions the simulated local ozone concentration is dominated by local ozone production, i.e. less than 50% of the ozone at higher latitudes of the stratosphere is produced in the tropics, which conflicts with the idea that the tropics are the global source for stratospheric ozone. Although episodic stratospheric intrusions occur basically everywhere, the main ozone stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange is connected to exchange processes at the sub-tropical jet-stream. The simulated tropospheric influx of ozone amounts to 420 Tg per year, and originates in the Northern Hemisphere from the extra-tropical stratosphere, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere a re-circulation of tropical tropospheric ozone contributes most to the influx of ozone into the troposphere. In the model E39/C, the upper troposphere of both hemispheres is clearly dominated by tropical tropospheric ozone (40%-50%) except for northern summer hemisphere, where the tropospheric contribution (from the tropics as well as from the Northern Hemisphere) does not exceed 20%.

  17. INFLUENCE OF VERTICAL RESOLUTION ON THE DIURNAL OZONE CONCENTRATIONS IN A REGIONAL PHOTOCHEMICAL MODEL: A PRELIMINARY STUDY WITH WINDOW RADM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation studies of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) with surface measurement have revealed positive bias (overprediction) of surface ozone (O3) concentration during nighttime hours and negative bias (underprediction) during daytime hours by the model, especially in ru...

  18. Decadal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Yung, Y L; Zurek, R W

    1996-04-20

    Ozone column amounts obtained by the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) in the southern polar region are analyzed during late austral winter and spring (days 240-300) for 1980-1991 using area-mapping techniques and area-weighted vortex averages. The vortex here is defined using the -50 PVU (1 PVU = 1.0 x 10(-6) K kg-1 m2 s-1) contour on the 500 K isentropic surface. The principal results are: (1) there is a distinct change after 1985 in the vortex-averaged column ozone depletion rate during September and October, the period of maximum ozone loss, and (2) the vortex-averaged column ozone in late August (day 240) has dropped by 70 Dobson units (DU) in a decade due to the loss in the dark and the dilution effect. The mean ozone depletion rate in the vortex between day 240 and the day of minimum vortex-averaged ozone is about 1 DU d-1 at the beginning of the decade, increasing to about 1.8 DU d-1 by 1985, and then apparently saturating thereafter. The vortex-average column ozone during September and October has declined at the rate of 11.3 DU yr-1 (3.8%) from 1980 to 1987 (90 DU over 8 years) and at a smaller rate of 2 DU yr-1 (0.9%) from 1987 to 1991 (10 DU over 5 years, excluding the anomalous year 1988). We interpret the year-to-year trend in the ozone depletion rate during the earlier part of the decade as due to the rise of anthropogenic chlorine in the atmosphere. The slower trend at the end of the decade indicates saturation of ozone depletion in the vortex interior, in that chlorine amounts in the mid-1980s were already sufficiently high to deplete most of the ozone in air within the isolated regions of the lower-stratospheric polar vortex. In subsequent years, increases in stratospheric chlorine may have enhanced wintertime chemical loss of ozone in the south polar vortex even before major losses during the Antarctic spring. PMID:11539364

  19. Remedial Process Optimization and Green In-Situ Ozone Sparging for Treatment of Groundwater Impacted with Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, J.

    2012-12-01

    A former natural gas processing station is impacted with TPH and BTEX in groundwater. Air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/AVE) remediation systems had previously been operated at the site. Currently, a groundwater extraction and treatment system is operated to remove the chemicals of concern (COC) and contain the groundwater plume from migrating offsite. A remedial process optimization (RPO) was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of historic and current remedial activities and recommend an approach to optimize the remedial activities. The RPO concluded that both the AS/SVE system and the groundwater extraction system have reached the practical limits of COC mass removal and COC concentration reduction. The RPO recommended an in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) study to evaluate the best ISCO oxidant and approach. An ISCO bench test was conducted to evaluate COC removal efficiency and secondary impacts to recommend an application dosage. Ozone was selected among four oxidants based on implementability, effectiveness, safety, and media impacts. The bench test concluded that ozone demand was 8 to 12 mg ozone/mg TPH and secondary groundwater by-products of ISCO include hexavalent chromium and bromate. The pH also increased moderately during ozone sparging and the TDS increased by approximately 20% after 48 hours of ozone treatment. Prior to the ISCO pilot study, a capture zone analysis (CZA) was conducted to ensure containment of the injected oxidant within the existing groundwater extraction system. The CZA was conducted through a groundwater flow modeling using MODFLOW. The model indicated that 85%, 90%, and 95% of an injected oxidant could be captured when a well pair is injecting and extracting at 2, 5, and 10 gallons per minute, respectively. An ISCO pilot test using ozone was conducted to evaluate operation parameters for ozone delivery. The ozone sparging system consisted of an ozone generator capable of delivering 6 lbs/day ozone through two ozone

  20. Chlorophyll fluorescence quenching during ozone exposure of leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris (pinto)

    SciTech Connect

    Guralnick, L.J. ); Miller, R.; Heath, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    During ozone exposure, observations have noted an initial decrease in CO{sub 2} uptake followed by a decrease in stomatal conductance. We examined this response utilizing the technique of fluorescence quenching. Fourteen day old plants were exposed to 0.3 ul/l ozone for 1 hour. Fluorescence quenching was monitored using the Hanstech modulated fluorescence system. This enabled us to measure changes in photochemical quenching (qQ) and non-photochemical quenching (qE) in control and ozone treated plants. Results have indicated no differences in qQ and qE between ozone treated and control plants. We are initiating further studies utilizing different ozone levels.

  1. Overview of ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenberg, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    The potential impact of the pulp and paper industry on the environment may be reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone. The reactivity of ozone coupled with the heterogeneity of pulp allows many types of reactions to occur during pulp bleaching. Ozone cleaves the aromatic rings and side chain double bonds in lignin in Criegee-type mechanisms. Activated carbon-hydrogen bonds are fragmented in lignin side chains, as well as Cl carbons of {beta}-glycosides, by way of a 1,3 dipolar insertion forming a hydrotrioxide intermediate. Ozone also attacks carbohydrates at acetal oxygens, depolymerizing at the glycosidic bond. Unsaturated sites are ozonated before aliphatic sites resulting in a predominance of lignin reactions over carbohydrate reactions until lignin is substantially removed from the pulp. Important factors in the successful application of ozone bleaching include minimizing ozone decomposition and other secondary reactions, reducing exposure of cellulose to high concentrations of ozone and radicals, and promoting uniform exposure of ozone to lignin. The quantity of chlorinated organic compounds in effluents can be drastically reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone; less organochlorine is formed and there can be greater recycle of bleach plant wastes back to the recovery cycle. Recycling of bleach plant waste also reduces total organic loading in the effluent. The toxicity of ozone filtrates is variable compared to conventional filtrates and depends on several parameters including bleaching conditions, biological treatment, and target organisms.

  2. Lower tropospheric ozone and aerosol measurements at a coastal mountain site in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, A.; Faloona, I. C.; Lighthall, D.; Wexler, A. S.; Cliff, S. S.; Conley, S. A.; Zhao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing concern over the impacts of exogenous air pollution in California's Central Valley has prompted the establishment of a coastal, high altitude monitoring site at the Chews Ridge Observatory (1550 m) approximately 30 km east of Point Sur in Monterey County, operated by the Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy. Eighteen months of ozone and aerosol measurements are presented in the context of long-range transport and its potential impact on surface air quality in the southern San Joaquin Valley. Moreover, several ozone surveys have been conducted by aircraft upwind, over the Pacific Ocean, and downwind, over the Central Valley, to characterize horizontal and vertical transport across the coastal mountains. Diurnal variations present at Chews Ridge indicate the formation of a convective boundary layer on the ridge during the daytime leading to a 6-8 ppb decrease in ozone accompanied by a rise in specific humidity of 2-3 g/kg due to coupling with the forest. During the nighttime, the sampled air masses are representative of free tropospheric conditions which have not been significantly influenced by either local emissions nor convective coupling to the surface. The maximum daily 8-hour average ozone concentration at Chews Ridge is used in lagged correlation analysis with two sites in the San Joaquin Valley, Fresno and Arvin, to de-emphasize the influence of locally produced, diurnally cycled ozone. The correlation coefficients (~0.60) peak between 9-21 hour lag and tend to decorrelate completely within 4-5 days. These and other analyses along with data provided by the aircraft sampling are used to provide a deeper understanding of ozone transport into the San Joaquin Valley. Aerosol size is measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer and composition is analyzed with an 8-stage rotating drum impactor whose substrates are characterized by X-ray fluorescence. Various elemental ratios and back trajectory calculations are used to infer the temporal

  3. Ozone and the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the stratospheric ozone is effective in absorbing almost all radiation below 300 nm at heights below 300 km. The distribution of global ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, and the latitudinal variations of the total ozone column over four seasons are considered. The theory of the ozone layer production is discussed together with catalytic reactions for ozone loss and the mechanisms of ozone transport. Special attention is given to the anthropogenic perturbations, such as SST exhaust gases and freon gas from aerosol cans and refrigerators, that may cause an extensive destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer and thus have a profound impact on the world climate and on life.

  4. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  5. Intercomparison of ozone measurements over Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Margitan, J.J.; Farmer, C.B.; Toon, G.C. ); Brothers, G.A. ); Browell, E.V.; Gregory, G.L.; Hypes, W.; Larsen, J.C.; McCormick, M.P. ); Cariolle, D. ); Coffey, M.T.; Mankin, W. ); Farman, J.C. ); Harder, J.W.; Mount, G.H.; Ravishankara, A.R.; Schemeltekopf, A.L.; Tuck, A.F. ); Hofmann, D.J. ); Ismail, S.; Kooi, S. ); Jakoubek, R.O.; Proffitt, M.H.; Wahner, A.; Watterson, I. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder ); Komhyr, W. (NOAA Air Resources La

    1989-11-30

    Measurements of the abundances of ozone over Antarctic in August and September 1987 obtained during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment are intercompared. These measurements of ozone concentrations and total column abundance were obtained by three satellite instruments, two IR and one UV column-measuring instruments aboard the DC-8, one in situ DC-8, and two in situ ER-2 instruments, an upward looking lidar aboard the DC-8, and ozonesondes from four sites in Antarctica. Given the natural variability of ozone in the Antarctic and the fact that the data were not truly coincident spatially and temporally, this intercomparison is suitable only for identifying gross disparities among the techniques, rather than confirming the accuracies as rigorously as is normally done in an intercomparison. This paper presents a summary of the ozone data, using the data and accuracies given by the individual investigators in the individual papers in this issue, without any attempt to critically review or evaluate the data. In general, very good agreement (within about 10-20%, limited by natural variability) among the various techniques was found, with no systematic biases detected. These observations confirm the low ozone amounts reported in the Antarctic stratosphere.

  6. Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectrometer observations of the 1993 ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Newman, P. A.; Mcpeters, R.; Krueger, A. J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Seftor, C. J.; Torres, O.; Jaross, G.; Cebula, R. P.; Larko, D.

    1995-01-01

    The development of the springtime (September-November) Antarctic ozone hole was observed by the Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectromter (TOMS) to result in the lowest ozone value, 85 DU (Dobson units) on October 8, 1993, ever measured by TOMS. During late September and early October the region of extremely low ozone values was centered on the geographical pole between 85 deg S and 90 deg S. The geographical extent of the ozone hole region, the area within the 220-DU contour, reached a maximum during the first week in October at a near-circular area covering 24 x 10(exp 6) sq km reaching to the southern tip of South America. This approximately matched the 1992 area record. After the maximum area was reached in early October, the 1993 ozone hole region was significantly larger than during 1992 throughout the remainder of the month of October. The very low ozone values over the Antarctic continent have been confirmed by independent ground-based data. Unlike 1992, the formation of the 1993 Antarctic ozone hole does not coincide with unusually low ozone values observed over most of the globe for the past 2 years. The most recent ozone data from Meteor 3/TOMS show that there has been a recovery at all latitudes from the extraordinarily low values observed during 1992 and part of 1993 after the June 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. Meteor 3/TOMS is described and compared with Nimbus 7/TOMS during the 1991 to May 1993 overlap period. Observations of the 1992 ozone hole are presented from both instruments and are shown to agree within 5 DU.

  7. Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectrometer observations of the 1993 ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.R.; Newman, P.A.; Mcpeters, R.; Krueger, A.J.; Bhartia, P.K.; Seftor, C.J.; Torres, O.; Jaross, G.; Cebula, R.P.; Larko, D. |

    1995-02-01

    The development of the springtime (September-November) Antarctic ozone hole was observed by the Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectromter (TOMS) to result in the lowest ozone value, 85 DU (Dobson units) on October 8, 1993, ever measured by TOMS. During late September and early October the region of extremely low ozone values was centered on the geographical pole between 85 deg S and 90 deg S. The geographical extent of the ozone hole region, the area within the 220-DU contour, reached a maximum during the first week in October at a near-circular area covering 24 x 10(exp 6) sq km reaching to the southern tip of South America. This approximately matched the 1992 area record. After the maximum area was reached in early October, the 1993 ozone hole region was significantly larger than during 1992 throughout the remainder of the month of October. The very low ozone values over the Antarctic continent have been confirmed by independent ground-based data. Unlike 1992, the formation of the 1993 Antarctic ozone hole does not coincide with unusually low ozone values observed over most of the globe for the past 2 years. The most recent ozone data from Meteor 3/TOMS show that there has been a recovery at all latitudes from the extraordinarily low values observed during 1992 and part of 1993 after the June 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. Meteor 3/TOMS is described and compared with Nimbus 7/TOMS during the 1991 to May 1993 overlap period. Observations of the 1992 ozone hole are presented from both instruments and are shown to agree within 5 DU.

  8. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  9. Direct ozone production rate measurements and their use in assessing ozone source and receptor regions for Houston in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, Bianca C.; Brune, William H.; Lefer, Barry L.; Miller, David O.; Martins, Douglas K.

    2015-08-01

    Mitigating ozone pollution involves reducing ozone production and relies on complex air-quality models to design reduction strategies and determine their effectiveness. However, modeled ozone does not always agree with observations. A complementary approach is to measure the ozone production rate directly, leading to the development of the Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS). Two improved second-generation MOPSv2s were deployed for NASA's DISCOVER-AQ field campaign in September 2013 at the University of Houston, 5 km south of downtown, and Smith Point, at the mouth of the Houston Ship Channel. Median September P(O3) was low, consistent with the observed ambient ozone. The MOPSv2s provided statistically similar results when they were compared for 8 day sat the University of Houston. October measurements yielded a median ozone production rate of 27 ± 11 ppbv hr-1, falling within the range of calculated P(O3) from prior Houston field campaigns in 2006 and 2009. Additionally, diurnal patterns are similar to model-derived ozone production from these previous campaigns. An advection analysis for a high ozone event on 25 September 2013 indicates that the Houston site was in a local ozone source region, while Smith Point ozone was likely enhanced by transport from other areas.

  10. Observations of ozone depletion associated with solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Jackman, C. H.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    Ozone profiles from the solar proton events (SPE) of January and September 1971 and August 1972 were obtained after the backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) measured radiances were corrected for the direct effects of protons on the instrument. The SPE of August 1972 produced an ozone depletion of 15% at 42 km that persisted for one month in both northern and southern polar regions. This long recovery time indicates that NO(x) was produced in a quantity sufficient to alter the ozone chemistry. The two SPE in 1971 were of moderate size, but produced ozone depletions of 10-30% at 50 km with a 36 hour recovery time. This rapid recovery is consistent with the assumption that HO(x) is responsible for altering the ozone chemistry (Weeks et al., 1972). The magnitude of the observed depletion, however, exceeds that predicted by the chemical models.

  11. The Swedish duty hour enigma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Swedish resident duty hour limit is regulated by Swedish and European legal frameworks. With a maximum average of 40 working hours per week, the Swedish duty hour regulation is one of the most restrictive in the world. At the same time, the effects of resident duty hour limits have been neither debated nor researched in the Swedish context. As a result, little is known about the Swedish conceptual framework for resident duty hours, their restriction, or their outcomes: we call this “the Swedish duty hour enigma.” This situation poses a further question: How do Swedish residents themselves construct a conceptual framework for duty hour restrictions? Methods A case study was conducted at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm – an urban, research-intensive hospital setting. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 34 residents currently in training in 6 specialties. The empirical data analysis relied on theoretical propositions and was conducted thematically using a pattern-matching technique. The interview guide was based on four main topics: the perceived effect of duty hour restrictions on (1) patient care, (2) resident education, (3) resident well-being, and (4) research. Results The residents did not perceive the volume of duty hours to be the main determinant of success or failure in the four contextual domains of patient care, resident education, resident well-being, and research. Instead, they emphasized resident well-being and a desire for flexibility. Conclusions According to Swedish residents’ conceptual framework on duty hours, the amount of time spent on duty is not a proxy for the quality of resident training. Instead, flexibility, organization, and scheduling of duty hours are considered to be the factors that have the greatest influence on resident well-being, quality of learning, and opportunities to attain the competence needed for independent practice. PMID:25559074

  12. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    dissolution equilibrium, and then decomposed to {le} 100 Parts per Million (ppm) oxalate. Since AOP technology largely originated on using ultraviolet (UV) light as a primary catalyst, decomposition of the spent oxalic acid, well exposed to a medium pressure mercury vapor light was considered the benchmark. However, with multi-valent metals already contained in the feed, and maintenance of the UV light a concern; testing was conducted to evaluate the impact from removing the UV light. Using current AOP terminology, the test without the UV light would likely be considered an ozone based, dark, ferrioxalate type, decomposition process. Specifically, as part of the testing, the impacts from the following were investigated: (1) Importance of the UV light on the decomposition rates when decomposing 1 wt% spent oxalic acid; (2) Impact of increasing the oxalic acid strength from 1 to 2.5 wt% on the decomposition rates; and (3) For F-area testing, the advantage of increasing the spent oxalic acid flowrate from 40 L/min (liters/minute) to 50 L/min during decomposition of the 2.5 wt% spent oxalic acid. The results showed that removal of the UV light (from 1 wt% testing) slowed the decomposition rates in both the F & H testing. Specifically, for F-Area Strike 1, the time increased from about 6 hours to 8 hours. In H-Area, the impact was not as significant, with the time required for Strike 1 to be decomposed to less than 100 ppm increasing slightly, from 5.4 to 6.4 hours. For the spent 2.5 wt% oxalic acid decomposition tests (all) without the UV light, the F-area decompositions required approx. 10 to 13 hours, while the corresponding required H-Area decompositions times ranged from 10 to 21 hours. For the 2.5 wt% F-Area sludge, the increased availability of iron likely caused the increased decomposition rates compared to the 1 wt% oxalic acid based tests. In addition, for the F-testing, increasing the recirculation flow rates from 40 liter/minute to 50 liter/minute resulted in an

  13. Technical note: Examining ozone deposition over seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Kang, Daiwen; Foley, Kristen; Schwede, Donna; Gantt, Brett; Mathur, Rohit

    2016-09-01

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over sea-water and can be influenced by chemical interactions at the air-water interface. Here, we examine the effect of chemical interactions of iodide, dimethylsulfide, dissolved organic carbon, and bromide in seawater on ozone deposition. We perform a series of simulations using the hemispheric Community Multiscale Air Quality model for summer months in the Northern Hemisphere. Our results suggest that each chemical interaction enhances the ozone deposition velocity and decreases the atmospheric ozone mixing ratio over seawater. Iodide enhances the median deposition velocity over seawater by 0.023 cm s-1, dissolved organic carbon by 0.021 cm s-1, dimethylsulfide by 0.002 cm s-1, and bromide by ∼0.0006 cm s-1. Consequently, iodide decreases the median atmospheric ozone mixing ratio over seawater by 0.7 ppb, dissolved organic carbon by 0.8 ppb, dimethylsulfide by 0.1 ppb, and bromide by 0.02 ppb. In a separate model simulation, we account for the effect of dissolved salts in seawater on the Henry's law constant for ozone and find that it reduces the median deposition velocity by 0.007 cm s-1 and increases surface ozone mixing ratio by 0.2 ppb. The combined effect of these processes increases the median ozone deposition velocity over seawater by 0.040 cm s-1, lowers the atmospheric ozone mixing ratio by 5%, and slightly improves model performance relative to observations.

  14. Is the Office Hour Obsolete?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Susan

    2013-01-01

    A colleague can't make a coffee date at a time the author proposes because it would conflict with his office hour. No student has actually made an appointment with him during the hour, but he is committed to being in his office as promised in case someone drops by. The author's reaction to her colleague's faithfulness to his posted office hour…

  15. Breast milk intake: 12 hour versus 24 hour assessment.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho, M; Pittard, W

    1982-11-01

    Letter to the editor commenting on "Clinical and field studies of human lactation: methodological considerations," by Brown et al. The point is made that in test-weighing infants to estimate breast milk intake, culture related breastfeeding practices must be studied before a 12 hour test period is used to estimate intake for a complete 24 hour period. In western cultures milk intake between 7 am and 7 pm was found to differ significantly from intake between 7 pm and 7 am, whereas in a Bangladesh study milk intake during the 2 12 hour periods was comparable. PMID:7137079

  16. A passive sampler for atmospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.; Hisham, M.W.M. )

    1992-02-01

    A simple, cost-effective passive sampler has been developed for the determination of atmospheric ozone. This passive sampler is based on a colorant which fades upon reaction with ozone, whose concentration can be determined by reflectance measurement of the color change. Direct, on-site measurements are possible, and no chemical analyses are needed. Sampler design and validation studies have been carried out and included quantitative determination of color change vs exposure time (1-8 days), color change vs. ozone concentration (30-350 ppb), and response to changes in sampler configuration that modify the passive sampling rate. With indigo carmine as the colorant, the detection limits are 30 ppb. day and 120 ppb. day using a plastic grid and Teflon filter, respectively, as diffusion barriers. Interferences from nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and peroxyacetyl nitrate are 15, 4 and 16%, respectively, thus resulting in a negligible bias when measuring ozone in ambient air.

  17. Hourly Data Flow, Concentration of Hourly RINEX Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowers, D.; Habrich, H.

    2000-01-01

    The program RNXDIFF makes use of subroutines of the Bernese GPS Software to get the content of each data field and successively compares the fields of the daily files with that of the concatenated hourly files.

  18. Rebound of Antarctic ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salby, Murry; Titova, Evgenia; Deschamps, Lilia

    2011-05-01

    Restrictions on CFCs have led to a gradual decline of Equivalent Effective Stratospheric Chlorine (EESC). A rebound of Antarctic ozone, however, has remained elusive, masked by large interannual changes that dominate its current evolution. A positive response of ozone is not expected to emerge for at least 1-2 decades, possibly not for half a century. We show that interannual changes of the Antarctic ozone hole are accounted for almost perfectly by changes in dynamical forcing of the stratosphere. The close relationship enables dynamically-induced changes of ozone to be removed, unmasking the climate signal associated with CFCs. The component independent of dynamically-induced changes exhibits a clear upward trend over the last decade - the first signature of a rebound in Antarctic ozone. It enables ozone to be tracked relative to CFCs and other changes of climate.

  19. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  20. Role of Methane in Antarctic Stratospheric Ozone Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Natalia; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Palmeiro, Froila

    2014-05-01

    Observational and modeling studies have shown the impact of changes in Antarctic stratospheric ozone on tropospheric climate in austral spring and summer. In the future, effects of increasing greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances oppose each other. Projections show potential impact of ozone recovery on precipitation, carbon uptake in the Southern Hemisphere ocean, Antarctic ice sheets and Southern Hemisphere sea ice. In order to quantify properly the tropospheric impacts of ozone recovery, future Antarctic ozone changes in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere region and the role (if any) of increasing greenhouse gases in ozone recovery need to be evaluated. To do so, we use the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Earth System Model, CESM, with the high-top version of the atmospheric component, CESM(WACCM), which is a fully coupled chemistry climate model. Three climate change scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) of 3 simulations each from 2005 to 2065 are analyzed. In scenario RCP2.6, the largest ozone recovery is simulated in October and November at 50hPa and it is followed by the largest response in temperature in November and December at 70hPa. While the response in RCP4.5 in ozone and temperature is almost identical to that in RCP2.6 in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region, scenario RCP8.5 shows significantly stronger ozone recovery and warming than the other two scenarios, particularly in November and December at 70hPa in ozone and 100hPa in temperature. We show that this is due to larger amounts of methane in RCP8.5 compared to the other two scenarios, which reduces catalytic ozone loss locally. Differences across scenarios in advection of ozone from the source region in the tropical stratosphere do not play a significant role.

  1. Ozone flow visualization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Stedman, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques using ozone for tracing gas flows are proposed whereby ozone is detected through its strong absorption of ultraviolet light, which is easily made visible with fluorescent materials, or through its reaction with nitric oxide to form excited nitrogen dioxide, which in relaxing emits detectable light. It is shown that response speeds in the kHz range are possible with an ultraviolet detection system for initial ozone concentrations of about 1%.

  2. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Processes that may be responsible for the thinning in the ozone layer above the South Pole are described. The chlorine catalytic cycle which destroys ozone is described, as are the major types of reactions that are believed to interfere with this cycle by forming chlorine reservoirs. The suspected contributions of polar stratospheric clouds to these processes are examined. Finally, the possibility that the ozone hole may be due more to a shift in atmospheric dynamics than to chemical destruction is addressed.

  3. Ozone from Wildfires: Peering through the Smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, D. A.; Baylon, P.; Wigder, N. L.; Collier, S.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, Q.; Alvarado, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    In the western US, many areas are near the current air quality standard for O3. Yet there is substantial inter-annual variability (IAV) in the number of days that exceed the O3 air quality threshold (currently 75 ppbv for an 8-hour average). We propose that wildfires are the dominant cause for this IAV. However there are large uncertainties around O3 production from wildfires due to numerous complicating factors. Ozone formation in wildfire plumes differs substantially from urban O3 production in several ways: substantial variations in the emissions, much larger aerosol loadings, a much greater variety of reactive and oxygenated VOCs, rapid and substantial formation of PAN and very different sources of HOx in the plume. These factors make it challenging to model wildfire impacts on photochemistry in the usual way. In this presentation we will show examples of three common situations based on data from the Mt. Bachelor Observatory: Rapid O3 formation (within one day) in a wildfire plume. Slow, but substantial, O3 formation (over days to a week) in a wildfire plume. No detectable O3 formation in a wildfire plume. We will interpret these results with respect to the observed NOy mixing ratios, the photochemical environment, the combustion efficiency, the plume transport and other factors and suggest some key experiments and modeling studies that can help further our understanding of wildfire O3 production.

  4. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  5. Stratospheric Ozone in the Post-CFC Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, F.; Stolarski, R. S.; Newman, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Vertical and latitudinal changes in the stratospheric ozone in the post-chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) era are investigated using simulations of the recent past and the 21st century with a coupled chemistry-climate model. Model results reveal that, in the 2060s when the stratospheric halogen loading is projected to return to its 1980 values, the extratropical column ozone is significantly higher than that in 1975-1984, but the tropical column ozone does not recover to 1980 values. Upper and lower stratospheric ozone changes in the post-CFC era have very different patterns. Above 15 hPa ozone increases almost latitudinally uniformly by 6 Dobson Unit (DU), whereas below 15 hPa ozone decreases in the tropics by 8 DU and increases in the extratropics by up to 16 DU. The upper stratospheric ozone increase is a photochemical response to greenhouse gas induced strong cooling, and the lower stratospheric ozone changes are consistent with enhanced mean advective transport due to a stronger Brewer-Dobson circulation. The model results suggest that the strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation plays a crucial role in ozone recovery and ozone distributions in the post-CFC era.

  6. Stratospheric ozone in the post-CFC era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Stolarski, R. S.; Newman, P. A.

    2008-12-01

    Vertical and latitudinal changes in the stratospheric ozone in the post-chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) era are investigated using simulations of the recent past and the 21st century with a coupled chemistry-climate model. Model results reveal that, in the 2060s when the stratospheric halogen loading is projected to return to its 1980 values, the extratropical column ozone is significantly higher than that in 1975-1984, but the tropical column ozone does not recover to 1980 values. Upper and lower stratospheric ozone changes in the post-CFC era have very different patterns. Above 15 hPa ozone increases almost latitudinally uniformly by 6 Dobson Unit (DU), whereas below 15 hPa ozone decreases in the tropics by 8 DU and increases in the extratropics by up to 16 DU. The upper stratospheric ozone increase is a photochemical response to greenhouse gas induced strong cooling, and the lower stratospheric ozone changes are consistent with enhanced mean advective transport due to a stronger Brewer-Dobson circulation. The model results suggest that the strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation plays a crucial role in ozone recovery and ozone distributions in the post-CFC era.

  7. Stratospheric ozone in the post-CFC era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Stolarski, R. S.; Newman, P. A.

    2009-03-01

    Vertical and latitudinal changes in the stratospheric ozone in the post-chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) era are investigated using simulations of the recent past and the 21st century with a coupled chemistry-climate model. Model results reveal that, in the 2060s when the stratospheric halogen loading is projected to return to its 1980 values, the extratropical column ozone is significantly higher than that in 1975-1984, but the tropical column ozone does not recover to 1980 values. Upper and lower stratospheric ozone changes in the post-CFC era have very different patterns. Above 15 hPa ozone increases almost latitudinally uniformly by 6 Dobson Unit (DU), whereas below 15 hPa ozone decreases in the tropics by 8 DU and increases in the extratropics by up to 16 DU. The upper stratospheric ozone increase is a photochemical response to greenhouse gas induced strong cooling, and the lower stratospheric ozone changes are consistent with enhanced mean advective transport due to a stronger Brewer-Dobson circulation. The model results suggest that the strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation plays a crucial role in ozone recovery and ozone distributions in the post-CFC era.

  8. Stratospheric Ozone in the Post-CFC Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Solarski, Richard S.; Newman, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Vertical and latitudinal changes in the stratospheric ozone in the post-chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) era are investigated using simulations of the recent past and the 21st century with a coupled chemistry-climate model. Model results reveal that, in the 2060s when the stratospheric halogen loading is projected to return to its 1980 values, the extratropical column ozone is significantly higher than that in 1975-1984, but the tropical column ozone does not recover to 1980 values. Upper and lower stratospheric ozone changes in the post- CFC era have very different patterns. Above 15 hPa ozone increases almost latitudinally uniformly by 6 Dobson Unit (DU), whereas below 15 hPa ozone decreases in the tropics by 8 DU and increases in the extratropics by up to 16 DU. The upper stratospheric ozone increase is a photochemical response to greenhouse gas induced strong cooling, and the lower stratospheric ozone changes are consistent with enhanced mean advective transport due to a stronger Brewer-Dobson circulation. The model results suggest that the strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation plays a crucial role in ozone recovery and ozone distributions in the post-CFC era.

  9. Compact airborne lidar for tropospheric ozone: description and field measurements.

    PubMed

    Ancellet, G; Ravetta, F O

    1998-08-20

    An airborne lidar has been developed for tropospheric ozone monitoring. The transmitter module is based on a solid-state Nd:YAG laser and stimulated Raman scattering in deuterium to generate three wavelengths (266, 289, and 316 nm) that are used for differential ozone measurements. Both analog and photon-counting detection methods are used to produce a measurement range up to 8 km. The system has been flown on the French Fokker 27 aircraft to perform both lower tropospheric (0.5-4-km) and upper tropospheric (4-12-km) measurements, with a 1-min temporal resolution corresponding to a 5-km spatial resolution. The vertical resolution of the ozone profile can vary from 300 to 1000 m to accommodate either a large-altitude range or optimum ozone accuracy. Comparisons with in situ ozone measurements performed by an aircraft UV photometer or ozone sondes and with ozone vertical profiles obtained by a ground-based lidar are presented. The accuracy of the tropospheric ozone measurements is generally better than 10-15%, except when aerosol interferences cannot be corrected. Examples of ozone profiles for different atmospheric conditions demonstrate the utility of the airborne lidar in the study of dynamic or photochemical mesoscale processes that control tropospheric ozone. PMID:18286036

  10. CAFS ozone column data for validation of the AURA ozone products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetter, R.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; Hall, S. R.; Froidevaux, L.; Bhartia, P. K.; Kroon, M.

    2005-12-01

    Highly resolved UV and Visible actinic flux measurements were taken by the CCD Actinic Flux Spectrometer (CAFS) instrument (R. Shetter, NCAR) on board of the WB-57 aircraft as part of the Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaign in Texas in 2004. The algorithm was developed and field-tested to derive partial ozone column products from the CAFS measurements. An intensive data set of partial ozone columns measured along the tracks of the Aura satellite has been provided for the first-round satellite validation. Preliminary analysis of the CAFS measurements revealed that small corrections to the instrument-weighted solar spectrum data were required. On its second deployment in January 2005, the CAFS instrument was flown on board of the DC-8 aircraft as part of the Polar AVE campaign. Partial ozone column data above 12 km were derived under the difficult conditions of low-sun and high ozone variability. The tropospheric ozone climatology (McPeters et al, 2004) was used for the unaccounted lower part of the ozone column below the aircraft altitude. The set of combined CAFS and climatological data was successfully used for validation of the OMI total ozone column under low-sun conditions (solar zenith angle larger than 80-degrees). Prior to the third AVE campaign in June of 2005, the CAFS instrument was modified to reduce sensitivity of the measurement to the variability of scattered light over inhomogeneous background. New look-up tables were developed and CAFS measurements have been analyzed. The preliminary results suggest that the measurement has become more sensitive to the aircraft roll and pitch movements. We will present results of the OMI total ozone column validation at different atmospheric conditions including a large range of total ozone columns and solar zenith angles, multiple altitudes, and underlying surface albedo. The MLS/Aura ozone profiles have been derived for the last three AVE campaigns. The co-incidental MLS ozone profiles were integrated above

  11. An automated ozone photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    A photometer capable of automatically measuring ozone concentration data to very high resolution during scientific research flights in the earth's atmosphere was developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. This instrument was recently deployed to study the ozone hole over Antarctica. Ozone is detected by absorbing 253.7-nm radiation from an ultraviolet lamp which shines through the sample of air and impinges on a vacuum phototube. A lower output from the phototube indicates more ozone present in the air sample. The photometer employs a CMOS 280 control, data collection, and storage.

  12. Evaluation of the United States National Air Quality Forecast Capability experimental real-time predictions in 2010 using Air Quality System ozone and NO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, T.; Kim, H.-C.; Lee, P.; Tong, D.; Pan, L.; Tang, Y.; Huang, J.; McQueen, J.; Tsidulko, M.; Stajner, I.

    2013-05-01

    The National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC) project provides the US with operational and experimental real-time ozone predictions using two different versions of the three-dimensional Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System. Routine evaluation using near-real-time AIRNow ozone measurements through 2011 showed better performance of the operational ozone predictions. In this work, quality-controlled and -assured Air Quality System (AQS) ozone and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) observations are used to evaluate the experimental predictions in 2010, with a view towards their improvement. It is found that both ozone and NO2 are overestimated over the contiguous US (CONUS), with annual biases of +5.6 ppbv and +5.1 ppbv, respectively. The annual root mean square errors (RMSEs) are 15.4 ppbv for ozone and 13.4 ppbv for NO2. For both species the over-predictions are most pronounced in the summer. The locations of the AQS monitoring sites are also utilized to stratify comparisons by the degree of urbanization. Comparisons for six predefined US regions show the highest annual biases for ozone predictions in Southeast (+10.5 ppbv) and for NO2 in the Lower Middle (+8.1 ppbv) and Pacific Coast (+7.1 ppbv) regions. The spatial distributions of the NO2 biases in July and August show distinctively high values in Los Angeles, Houston, and New Orleans areas. In addition to the standard statistics metrics, daily maximum eight-hour ozone categorical statistics are calculated using the current US ambient air quality standard (75 ppbv) and another lower threshold (70 ppbv). Using the 75 ppbv standard, the hit rate and proportion of correct over CONUS for the entire year are 0.64 and 0.96, respectively. Summertime biases show distinctive weekly patterns for ozone and NO2. Diurnal comparisons show that ozone overestimation is most severe in the morning, from 07:00 to 10:00 local time. For NO2, the morning predictions agree with the AQS observations reasonably well, but

  13. Using reflectance and photography to detect ozone damage to cantaloupe plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Rodriguez, R. R.; Thomas, C. E.; Bowen, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Laboratory and field reflectance measurements showed that ozone-damaged cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) leaves had lower water contents and higher reflectance than nondamaged leaves. Cantaloupe plants with lightly, severely, and very severely ozone-damaged leaves were distinguishable from nondamaged plants by reflectance measurements in the 1.35-2.5-micron near-IR water absorption band. Ozone-damaged leaf areas were detected photographically 16 hours before the damage was visible.

  14. Column ozone measurements from Palmer Station, Antarctica: Variations during the Austral Springs of 1988 and 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, D. ); Frederick, J.E. )

    1990-08-20

    The National Science Foundation scanning spectroradiometer at Palmer Station, Antarctica (64{degree}-46{prime}S, 64{degree}04{prime}W), provides hourly ground-based measurements of solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance. In addition to defining the UV radiation environment of the region, these measurements allow the derivation of the column density of atmospheric ozone above the station nearly every daylight hour. This hourly time resolution, not generally available from other methods of monitoring Antarctic ozone abundances, enables the detection of large and rapid changes in total column ozone and UV surface irradiance associated with the dynamics of the polar vortex. Column ozone abundance is derived from a ratio of measured irradiances at 300 and 313.5 nanometers (nm) by means of theoretical calculation of this ratio as a function of total ozone amount. Noontime ozone abundances over Palmer Station obtained from this method agree with those obtained by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument aboard Nimbus 7 to within about 10% throughout the austral spring of 1988. Ozone recovery at Palmer Station, associated with the breakup of the polar vortex as indicated by TOMS satellite ozone observations, occurred rapidly within a 24-hour period beginning in midafternoon on November 15. Over the Antarctic Peninsula, the 1989 ozone depletion was slightly greater than in 1988, the minimum noontime ozone abundances over Palmer Station as measured by the spectroradiometer being 194 and 166 Dobson units for October 14, 1988, and October 14, 1989, respectively. The 1989 ozone depletion however ended by November 5 over the Antarctic Peninsula, 10 days earlier than the 1988 event.

  15. Ozone decay on stainless steel and sugarcane bagasse surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza-Corrêa, Jorge A.; Oliveira, Carlos; Amorim, Jayr

    2013-07-01

    Ozone was generated using dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure to treat sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production. It was shown that interaction of ozone molecules with the pretreatment reactor wall (stainless steel) needs to be considered during bagasse oxidation in order to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. The decomposition coefficients for ozone on both materials were determined to be (3.3 ± 0.2) × 10-8 for stainless steel and (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-7 for bagasse. The results have indicated that ozone decomposition has occurred more efficiently on the biomass material.

  16. Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (Pre-Flight)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The first segment of this video gives an overview of the Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, an international effort using balloon payloads, ground based instruments, and airborne instruments to study ozone depletion and the hole in the ozone over Antarctica which occurs every spring. False color imagery taken from NASA's Nimbus 7 satellite which documents daily changes in ozone is also shown. The second segment of this video shows actual take-off and flight footage of the two aircraft used in the experiment: the DC-8 Flying Laboratory and the high flying ER-2.

  17. Indoor/outdoor ozone concentrations at a contemporary art gallery

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, T.D.; Ramer, B.; Kaspyzok, G.; Delany, A.C.

    1984-02-01

    Ozone concentrations were measured both inside and outside the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, near a small city in rural eastern England, during a three-week period in summer. The inside concentration was typically 70 +/- 10% of the outside concentration during the period of expected maximum outside levels. During the period of observation the maximum outside ozone levels have been well in excess of 120 ppb. The relatively high indoor/outdoor ozone ratio is a function of the Centre's design, its internal geometry, and its ventilation system. Conventional art galleries and museums experience much lower indoor ozone exposure. The measured indoor ozone levels imply deleterious effects on the gallery exhibits and an enhanced ozone exposure may have to be considered in the design of modern galleries and museums. 8 references.

  18. Atlas of TOMS ozone data collected during the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE), 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larko, David E.; Uccellini, Louis W.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1986-01-01

    Data from the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) instrument aboard the Nimbus-7 satellite were collected daily in real time during the GALE (Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment) from January 15 through March 15, l986. The TOMS ozone data values were processed into GEMPAK format and transferred from the Goddard Space Flight Center to GALE operations in Raleigh-Durham, NC, in as little as three hours for use, in part, to direct aircraft research flights recording in situ measurements of ozone and water vapor in areas of interest. Once in GEMPAK format, the ozone values were processed into gridded form using the Barnes objective analysis scheme and contour plots of the ozone created. This atlas provides objectively analyzed contour plots of the ozone for each of the sixty days of GALE as well as four-panel presentations of the ozone analysis combined on the basis of GALE Intensive Observing Periods (IOP's).

  19. The ozone layer is recovering in mid-latitudes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casiccia, Claudio; Zamorano, Felix; Viana, Roberta; Paes Lema, Neusa; Quel, Eduardo; Wolfram, Elian

    2010-05-01

    During the recent decades there has been an increasing concern related to ozone layer and solar ultraviolet radiation, UV-B (280-320 nm), reaching the surface of the earth. The Antarctic Ozone Hole (AOH) is a phenomenon of strong ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere, this is a consequence of heterogeneous chemical reactions and dynamical processes which enhance ozone losses by reactions with chlorine. Punta Arenas (53.0S,70.9W) is the southernmost city in Chile with a population of approximately 120000. Due to its location, well within the area affected by the Antarctic Ozone Hole. Systematic observation of ozone and UV-B with a Brewer spectrophotometer have been made in order study during the ozone hole conditions. In addition, the vertical distribution using ozosonde has been investigated during campaigns in spring time and in 2009 started regularly ECC-ozonesonde measurements, also since 2002 measurements of the ozone vertical distribution using Umkehr technique have been carry out. Intercomparisons with different ozone measurement platforms were presented. Particularly we compared a DIAL ozone vertical profile in Rio Gallegos (Argentina) with an ozonesonde measurement launched in Punta Arenas. The results were in good agreement over the 16-32 km altitude range. Also, here we present measurements of column ozone, vertical distribution of ozone and ultraviolet radiation UV-B made in Punta Arenas and Magallanes region to period 1992-2009. To analyze the behavior of the stratospheric ozone layer over Magallanes was used the reference AVE-CLI-TOMS minus twice the standard deviation of the reference mean (TOMS;1978-1987, mean monthly - 2SD). The number of days per year shows an interesting cycle of 8 to 10 years, but monthly variations did not show a significant decrease, especially during September-October period.

  20. Ozone selectively inhibits growth of human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, F.; Kao, M.S.; Lee, S.C.; Hagar, W.L.; Sweet, W.E.

    1980-08-01

    The growth of human cancer cells from lung, breast, and uterine tumors was selectively inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by ozone at 0.3 to 0.8 part per million of ozone in ambient air during 8 days of culture. Human lung diploid fibroblasts served as noncancerous control cells. The presence of ozone at 0.3 to 0.5 part per million inhibited cancer cell growth 40 and 60 percent, respectively. The noncancerous lung cells were unaffected at these levels. Exposure to ozone at 0.8 part per million inhibited cancer cell growth more than 90 percent and control cell growth less than 50 percent. Evidently, the mechanisms for defense against ozone damage are impaired in human cancer cells.

  1. Alternative ozone metrics and daily mortality in Suzhou: the China Air Pollution and Health Effects Study (CAPES).

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunxue; Yang, Haibing; Guo, Shu; Wang, Zongshuang; Xu, Xiaohui; Duan, Xiaoli; Kan, Haidong

    2012-06-01

    Controversy remains regarding the relationship between various metrics of ozone (O(3)) and mortality. In China, the largest developing country, there have been few studies investigating the acute effect of O(3) on death. We used three exposure metrics of O(3) (1-hour maximum, maximum 8-hour average and 24-hour average) to examine its short-term association with daily mortality in Suzhou, China. We used a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) with penalized splines to analyze the mortality, O(3), and covariate data. We examined the association by season, age group, sex and educational level. We found that the current level of O(3) in Suzhou is associated with death rates from all causes and cardiovascular diseases. Among various metrics of O(3), maximum 8-hour average and 1-hour maximum concentrations seem to be more strongly associated with increased mortality rate compared to 24-hour average concentrations. Using maximum 8-hour average, an inter-quartile range increase of 2-day average O(3) (lag 01) corresponds to 2.15% (95%CI, 0.36 to 3.93), 4.47% (95%CI, 1.43 to 7.51), -1.85% (95%CI, -6.91 to 3.22) increase in all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality, respectively. The associations between O(3) and daily mortality appeared to be more evident in the cool season than in the warm season. In conclusion, maximum 8-hour average and 1-hour maximum concentrations of O(3) are associated with daily mortality in Suzhou. Our analyses strengthen the rationale for further limiting levels of O(3) pollution in the city. PMID:22521098

  2. CONTENDING WITH SPACE-TIME INTERACTION IN THE SPATIAL PREDICTION OF POLLUTION: VANCOUVER'S HOURLY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we describe an approach for predicting average hourly concentrations of ambient PM10 in Vancouver. We know our solution also applies to hourly ozone fields and believe it may be quite generally applicable. We use a hierarchal Bayesian approach. At the primary ...

  3. Estimating the national public health burden associated with exposure to ambient PM2.5 and ozone.

    PubMed

    Fann, Neal; Lamson, Amy D; Anenberg, Susan C; Wesson, Karen; Risley, David; Hubbell, Bryan J

    2012-01-01

    Ground-level ozone (O(3)) and fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) are associated with increased risk of mortality. We quantify the burden of modeled 2005 concentrations of O(3) and PM(2.5) on health in the United States. We use the photochemical Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model in conjunction with ambient monitored data to create fused surfaces of summer season average 8-hour ozone and annual mean PM(2.5) levels at a 12 km grid resolution across the continental United States. Employing spatially resolved demographic and concentration data, we assess the spatial and age distribution of air-pollution-related mortality and morbidity. For both PM(2.5) and O(3) we also estimate: the percentage of total deaths due to each pollutant; the reduction in life years and life expectancy; and the deaths avoided according to hypothetical air quality improvements. Using PM(2.5) and O(3) mortality risk coefficients drawn from the long-term American Cancer Society (ACS) cohort study and National Mortality and Morbidity Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS), respectively, we estimate 130,000 PM(2.5) -related deaths and 4,700 ozone-related deaths to result from 2005 air quality levels. Among populations aged 65-99, we estimate nearly 1.1 million life years lost from PM(2.5) exposure and approximately 36,000 life years lost from ozone exposure. Among the 10 most populous counties, the percentage of deaths attributable to PM(2.5) and ozone ranges from 3.5% in San Jose to 10% in Los Angeles. These results show that despite significant improvements in air quality in recent decades, recent levels of PM(2.5) and ozone still pose a nontrivial risk to public health. PMID:21627672

  4. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the requirements for this area to submit... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the requirements for this area to submit... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville...

  6. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the requirements for this area to submit... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville...

  7. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends the requirements for this area to submit... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville...

  8. EXTENT OF OZONE'S REACTION WITH ISOLATED AQUATIC FULVIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of North Carolina aquatic fulvic acid were ozonated in a neutral buffer at several ozone/carbon ratios, and the reaction mixtures were characterized by using total organic carbon (TOC) and UV-visible absorbance analysis, XAD-8 chromatography, and ultrafiltration. Results ...

  9. DISTRIBUTION OF INJURY AND MICRODOSIMETRY OF OZONE IN THE VENTILATORY UNIT OF THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of ozone-induced injury across the ventilatory unit was determined and compared to a predicted distribution of ozone dose across the some units in order to evaluate dose-response relationships. prague Dawley rats were exposed to either 0.98 ppm ozone 8 hr/day for...

  10. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  11. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  12. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  13. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  14. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  15. Ozone Exposure-Response in Field Grown Soybean: Characterizing Intraspecific Variability of Physiology and Biochemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop losses due to rising tropospheric ozone concentrations ([ozone]) in 2000 were estimated to cost $1.8 to $3.9 billion in the U.S. and $3.0 to $5.5 billion in China, and are expected to grow with the predicted 25% increase in background [ozone] over the next 30 to 50 years. This challenge provide...

  16. A New SBUV Ozone Profile Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Under NASA's MEaSUREs program for creating long term multi-instrument data sets, our group at Goddard has re-processed ozone profile data from a series of SBUV instruments. We have processed data from the Nimbus 7 SBUV instrument (1979-1990) and data from SBUV/2 instruments on NOAA-9 (1985-1998), NOAA-11 (1989-1995), NOAA-16 (2001-2010), NOAA-17 (2002-2010), and NOAA-18 (2005-2010). This reprocessing uses the version 8 ozone profile algorithm but now uses the Brion, Daumont, and Malicet (BMD) ozone cross sections instead of the Bass and Paur cross sections. The new cross sections have much better resolution, and extended wavelength range, and a more consistent temperature dependence. The re-processing also uses an improved cloud height climatology based on the Raman cloud retrievals of OMI. Finally, the instrument-to-instrument calibration is set using matched scenes so that ozone diurnal variation in the upper stratosphere does not alias into the ozone trands. Where there is no instrument overlap, SAGE and MLS are used to estimate calibration offsets. Preliminary analysis shows a more coherent time series as a function of altitude. The net effect on profile total column ozone is on average an absolute reduction of about one percent. Comparisons with ground-based systems are significantly better at high latitudes.

  17. The 1991 WMO ozone sonde intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, James B.; Mcelroy, C. Thomas; Fast, Hans; Oltmans, Sam J.; Lathrop, Jeff A.; Kyro, Esko; Paukkunen, Ari; Claude, Hans J.; Kohler, Ulf; Sreedharan, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The WMO ozone sonde intercomparison was held at Vanscoy, Saskatchewan from May 13 to May 24, 1991. The purpose of the intercomparison is to evaluate the performance of various ozone sonde types used operationally in the Global Ozone Observing System and to ensure that the accuracy and precision of the measurements are sufficient to detect long-term trends in stratospheric ozone. The intercomparison was sponsored by WMO and hosted by the Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) of Canada. It was attended by scientists from six countries: Canada, Finland, Germany, India, Japan and USA. A total of 10 balloon payloads were launched each carrying 7 or 8 sondes for a total of 67 successful ozone sonde flights. The payloads were carried to altitudes between 35 and 40 km where the flights terminated by balloon burst. Results of the profile measurements made during the series of the profile measurements made during the series of flight are used to determine statistically meaningful evaluations of the different sonde types. A description of the payload and the different ozone sondes is given. Preliminary results of the profile measurements and an evaluation of the performance of the sonde types are presented.

  18. Lidar-derived Correlations Between Lower-tropospheric Column and Surface Ozone: Implications for Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Kirgis, G.; Choukulkar, A.; Brewer, A.; Banta, R. M.; Weickmann, A. M.; Sandberg, S.; Olson, E.

    2015-12-01

    One of the data products that will be provided by the TEMPO satellite mission is 0-2 km ozone column concentration. To make inferences about surface air quality from this data product, the relationship between lower-tropospheric column and surface ozone concentrations and their diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations have to be well understood. To characterize these relationships, we have used ozone profile observations obtained with NOAA's truck-based, scanning TOPAZ ozone lidar from several recent field campaigns including Discover-AQ Houston and Colorado, the Uintah Basin Wintertime Ozone Study (UBWOS), and the Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS). The TOPAZ lidar is ideally suited for this kind of study because it provides ozone profiles from about 15 m above ground level (AGL) up to 3 km AGL at high spatial and temporal resolution. We have used the lidar observations closest to the ground as a proxy for surface ozone and compared them to the 0-2 km AGL average column ozone concentrations measured with the lidar. Results from the Discover-AQ Colorado campaign show that in the afternoon, when the boundary layer (BL) was deep and well mixed, ozone column and surface concentrations agreed quite well. However, during the morning hours, ozone column concentrations were significantly higher than those at the surface, because ozone was depleted in a shallow surface layer due to titration and deposition, whereas ozone levels in the residual layer aloft remained moderately high. The analysis of column and surface ozone correlations using ozone lidar observations from the Discover-AQ Houston, UBWOS and LVOS campaigns is currently underway. The results from these studies will provide additional insights into the relationship between column and surface ozone, in particular their variation as a function of measurement location and season, and their dependence on BL processes such as mixed layer height evolution, land-sea breeze circulation, and terrain-induced flows.

  19. The seasonal variation of the Hough modes of the tidal components of ozone heating evaluated from Aura/MLS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiyao; Smith, Anne; Jiang, Guoying; Yuan, Wei; Gao, Hong

    The global distribution of atmospheric ozone from Aug. 2004 to Dec. 2008 observed by Aura/MLS is used to calculate the variation of the ozone heating rate with the local time. The heating rates are calculated using the Strobel/Zhu parameterized model. The harmonic components of the heating rate, which include the daily mean, the 24-hour, the 12-hour, the 8-hour and the 6-hour periodicities are calculated. Each harmonic component of the heating is then decomposed into Hough modes. And the annual (AO), semiannual (SAO), and quasi-biennial (QBO) periodicities of each Hough mode are presented. The results show that, for the diurnal component, the majority of the O3 heating goes into the symmetric (1,-2), (1,1) and (1,-4) modes. The largest propagating mode (1,1) and the largest trapped mode (1,-2) have obvious SAO signatures near the stratopause. The forcing of the propagating (1,1) mode by ozone heating is larger during solstices than during equinoxes. The strongest annual vari-ation takes place in the (1,-1) mode. For the semi-diurnal and ter-diurnal components, the majority of the O3 heating goes into the several initial symmetric modes, such as, (2,2), (2,4), (2,6), (3,3), and (3,5). These modes have obvious SAO signatures near the stratopause. The strongest annual variation takes place in the asymmetric modes, such as, (2,3), (2,5), (2,7), (3,4), (3,6), and (3,8). New parameterizations of these components of the heating rate, which covers the vertical range from 10 km to 70 km, are developed based on the seasonal variations in each Hough mode.

  20. The role of bay breezes and regional transport on a high surface ozone episode during the Houston, Texas DISCOVER-AQ field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Pickering, K. E.; Estes, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The highest observed surface ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area in 2013 occurred on September 25, which coincided with the Texas DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. Surface ozone was elevated throughout the Houston metropolitan area. Maximum 8-hour average ozone peaked along the western shore of Galveston Bay, reaching 124 ppbv, almost 50 ppbv above the current EPA standard of 75 ppbv, at La Porte Sylvan Beach. Continental air pollution from the north and northeast was transported into the Houston metropolitan area where it mixed with locally generated emissions. A bay breeze circulation formed causing pollutants that were transported out over the water in the morning to recirculate back inland where they mixed with freshly emitted pollution near the bay breeze convergence zone. The highest surface ozone concentrations were reported near the bay breeze front at La Porte Sylvan Beach. This ozone episode will be presented using measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and WRF and CMAQ model simulations.

  1. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Pavan S.; Bortoli, D.; Salgado, R.; Antón, M.; Costa, M. J.; Silva, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    To study tropospheric ozone variability over the Iberian Peninsula (IP), NASA Langley TOR data have been analyzed for the 1979-2005 period. The maximum tropospheric ozone concentration over the entire IP was found in June (˜41 DU) and a minimum in December (˜29 DU). However the maximum tropospheric ozone concentration was found over West Atlantic Coast (WAC) (˜44 DU), followed by Mediterranean Coast (MC) (˜42 DU), North Atlantic Coast (NAC) (˜41 DU), Central Iberian Peninsula (CIP) (˜40 DU) and Pyrenees Mountain Range (PMR) (˜39 DU) during June-July. The high concentration of tropospheric ozone in July over the Atlantic Ocean near IP is due to the presence of Azores anticyclone and related photochemistry and dynamics, and affects the observed higher tropospheric ozone concentration over WAC zone. Strong seasonal cycle in tropospheric ozone concentration has been observed with large variation over NAC (˜49%), followed by WAC (˜48%) and MC (˜41%) compared to CIP and PMR (˜38%) zones. When the data are compared over the IP for the two periods (1979-1993 and 1997-2005), a systematic increase in the number of months with higher tropospheric ozone concentration has been observed during the second period with respect to the first. These increases are almost 8% to 24% over NAC, 6% to 17% over WAC, 5% to 24% over CIP, 6% to 23% over MC and 13% to 18% over PMR, zones. It has been observed that topography, climatology and population density distribution plays a crucial role in the variability of tropospheric ozone concentration over the IP.

  2. Ozone inhibition of photosynthesis in Chlorella sorokiniana

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, R.L.; Frederick, P.E.; Chimiklis, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of Chlorella sorokiniana (07-11-05) to ozone inhibits photosynthesis. In this study, the effects of ozone on O/sub 2/ evolution and fluorescence yields are used to characterize this inhibition. At an ozone dose of about 3 micromoles delivered to 2 x 10/sup 9/ cells, the photosynthetic rate of the cells is inhibited 50%, as indicated by a decrease in bicarbonate-stimulated O/sub 2/ evolution (control rate, 1.4 +- 0.3 x 10/sup -15/ moles per cell per minute). Normal patterns of chlorophyll fluorescence are also altered. Upon continuous exposure to ozone (3.5 x 10/sup -7/ moles O/sub 3/ per minute), three stages of change in relative fluorescence yields are observed: (a) a rise in variable yield with no corresponding change in nonvariable yield (after 1-2 minutes), which was interpreted to be a shift in the energy flow pathway; (b) a decline in variable yield with a slight rise in nonvariable yield (requiring 3-5 minutes), interpreted to be a blockage in the CO/sub 2/ fixation pathways; and (c) complete blockage of variable yield with a concurrent decline in nonvariable yield (8-10 minutes), interpreted to be a destruction of the pigment system. The timing of each stage depended upon the ozone concentration and its delivery rate to the cell suspension. These results are compared with ozone-induced decline in photosynthesis and leaf water potential changes reported for other plant systems. Evidence is also presented to suggest that ozone effects on the photosynthetic processes are attributable to ionic imbalances brought about by ozone interaction with the plasmalemma rather than a direct effect on the chloroplast. 25 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  3. 40 CFR 52.2037 - Control strategy plans for attainment and rate-of-progress: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour ozone standard of 40 CFR 50.9: the attainment demonstration and reasonably available control... affecting § 52.2037, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... and rate-of-progress: Ozone. 52.2037 Section 52.2037 Protection of Environment...

  4. OZONE EFFECTS ON ALPHA-1-PROTEINASE INHIBITOR IN VIVO: BLOOD PLASMA INHIBITORY ACTIVITY IS UNCHANGED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possible oxidative inactivation of human blood plasma alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (PI) by inhaled ozone was assessed. Eleven male volunteers (non-smokers) were exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone for four hours on two consecutive days and ten control subjects were exposed to air under ...

  5. DURATION OF INCREASED PULMONARY FUNCTION SENSITIVITY TO AN INITIAL OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metabolic and pulmonary function effects were investigated in 6 non-smoking, young adults who were exposed for 2 hours (22 deg. WBGT) to: (1) Filtered air (FA), (2) 0.45 ppm ozone (DAY), and (3) Two days later to a second exposure to 0.45 ppm ozone exposure (DAY2). The subjec...

  6. Diurnal variations of stratospheric ozone measured by ground-based microwave remote sensing at the Mauna Loa NDACC site: measurement validation and GEOSCCM model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, A.; Boyd, I. S.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Bhartia, P. K.; Frith, S. M.; Kramarova, N. A.; Connor, B. J.; Bodeker, G. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Shiotani, M.; Sakazaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    There is presently renewed interest in diurnal variations of stratospheric and mesospheric ozone for the purpose of supporting homogenization of records of various ozone measurements that are limited by the technique employed to being made at certain times of day. We have made such measurements for 18 yr using a passive microwave remote sensing technique at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii, which is a primary station in the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). We have recently reprocessed these data with hourly time resolution to study diurnal variations. We inspected differences between pairs of the ozone spectra (e.g. day and night) from which the ozone profiles are derived to determine the extent to which they may be contaminated by diurnally varying systematic instrumental or measurement effects. These are small, and we have reduced them further by selecting data that meet certain criteria that we established. We have calculated differences between profiles measured at different times: morning-night, afternoon-night, and morning-afternoon and have intercompared these with like profiles derived from Aura-MLS, UARS-MLS, SMILES, and SBUV/2 measurements. Differences between averages of coincident profiles are typically <1.5% of typical nightime values over most of the covered altitude range with some exceptions. We calculated averages of ozone values for each hour from the Mauna Loa microwave data, and normalized these to the average for the first hour after midnight for comparison with corresponding values calculated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We found that the measurements and model output mostly agree to better than 1.5% of the midnight value, with one noteworthy exception: the measured morning-night values are significantly (2-3%) higher than the modeled ones from 3.2 to 1.8 hPa (~39-43 km), and there is evidence that the measured values are increasing compared to the modeled values

  7. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  8. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  9. Surface Ozone in Kiev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavrina, A. V.; Mikulskaya, I. A.; Kiforenko, S. I.; Blum, O. B.; Sheminova, V. A.; Veles, A. A.

    The study of total ozone over Kiev and its concentration changes with height in the troposphere has been made on the base of ground-based observations with the infrared Fourier-spectrometer in the Main Astronomical Observatory of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (MAO NASU) as part of ESA-NIVR-KNMI project no 2907 "OMI validation by ground based remote sensing: ozone columns and atmospheric profiles "(2005-2008) [1,2,4]. Ground-level ozone in Kiev for an episode of its high concentrations in August 2000 was also simulated with the model of urban air pollution UAM-V [5,6]. In 2008 the satellite data Aura-OMI on profiles of ozone in the atmosphere OMO3PR became available (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/ Aura/data-holdings/OMI/ omo3pr_v003.shtml). They include ozone content in the lower layer of the atmosphere, beginning from 2005, which can be used to evaluate the ground-level ozone in all cities of Ukraine. The comparison of the data of ozone air pollution in Kiev (ozone - the pollutant of the first class of danger) and medical statistics data of of respiratory system (RS) diseases of the city population was carried out with the package "Statistica". A regression analysis, prognostic regression modelling, and retrospective prognosis of the epidemiological situation with respect to RS pathologies in Kiev in 2000-2006 were performed.

  10. Ozone and temperature trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Fioletov, Vitali; Bishop, Lane; Godin, Sophie; Bojkov, Rumen D.; Kirchhoff, Volker; Chanin, Marie-Lise; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Chu, William

    1991-01-01

    An update of the extensive reviews of the state of knowledge of measured ozone trends published in the Report of the International Ozone Trends Panel is presented. The update contains a review of progress since these reports, including reviewing of the ozone records, in most cases through March 1991. Also included are some new, unpublished reanalyses of these records including a complete reevaluation of 29 stations located in the former Soviet Union. The major new advance in knowledge of the measured ozone trend is the existence of independently calibrated satellite data records from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAG) instruments. These confirm many of the findings, originally derived from the Dobson record, concerning northern mid-latitude changes in ozone. We now have results from several instruments, whereas the previously reported changes were dependent on the calibration of a single instrument. This update will compare the ozone records from many different instruments to determine whether or not they provide a consistent picture of the ozone change that has occurred in the atmosphere. The update also briefly considers the problem of stratospheric temperature change. As in previous reports, this problem received significantly less attention, and the report is not nearly as complete. This area needs more attention in the future.

  11. Saving Our Ozone Shield.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacoste, Beatrice

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and continued use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as related to stratospheric ozone depletion. Presents the characteristics of CFCs conducive to the chemical reaction with ozone, the history of CFC use and detection of related environmental problems, health hazards, and alternatives to CFC use. (MCO)

  12. Four Summers of Ozone Profiles Over Beltsville, MD: A Study of Free-Tropospheric and Boundary Layer Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; Thompson, A. M.; Ryan, W. F.; Taubman, B. F.; Joseph, E.; Voemel, H.; Bojkov, B.; McQueen, J.

    2007-12-01

    A total of over 75 ozonesonde launches were made in Beltsville, MD during the summers of 2004 through 2007 as part of 4 different field campaigns; INTEX Ozonesonde Network Study 2004 (IONS-04, http://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/intex/ions.html), Howard/NCAS ozonesondes for MDE (Maryland Department of the Environment) Pollution Episodes (http://www.physics1.howard.edu), and the Water Vapor Validation Experiment - Satellite/Sondes 2006 & 2007 (WAVES, http://ecotronics.com/lidar-misc/WAVES.htm). These profiles were used to characterize variability in sources of tropospheric ozone. On average, free-tropospheric ozone was composed of the following: 10% regional convection and lightning-derived NO, 25% stratospheric ozone, with the balance (~65%) a mixture of aged air of indeterminate origin and recently advected ozone. A separate analysis of local emission and boundary layer ozone was performed. The data from 2005 and 2006 includes both nighttime and daytime launches, permitting an investigation between planetary boundary layer processes and surface ozone. In nighttime profiles with above average column ozone in the residual layer, daily maximum 1 hr and 8 hr average surface ozone values were roughly 10 to 15 ppbv greater than days with below average column ozone in the residual layer. These results, as well as vertical profiles, were compared to the NOAA/EPA Operational Air Quality Model forecasts for Beltsville. The model showed a highly negative bias for maximum 1 hr ozone values, but only a slightly negative bias for maximum 8 hr ozone values on days with above average residual layer ozone.

  13. Evaluation of a twelve-hour/day shift schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.M.; Swaim, D.J.

    1986-06-18

    In April 1985, the operating crews at the Fast Flux Test Facility near Richland, Washington, changed their rotating shift schedule from an 8-hour to a 12-hour a day work schedule. The primary purpose of the change was to reduce the attrition of operators by increasing their job satisfaction. Eighty-four percent of the operators favored the change. A program was established to evaluate the effects on plant performance, operator alertness, attrition, sleep, health, job satisfaction, and off-the-job satisfaction. Preliminary results from that evaluation program indicate that the 12-hour shift schedule is a reasonable alternative to an 8-hour schedule at this facility.

  14. Observing trends in total ozone and extreme ozone events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-05-01

    The ozone layer in the stratosphere has been recovering since the 1989 Montreal Protocol reduced the use of ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons. Fitzka et al. observed trends in total ozone levels and the vertical distribution of ozone at Hoher Sonnblick, a mountain in Austria, from 1994 to 2011.

  15. Predicting hours of care needed.

    PubMed

    Disler, P B; Roy, C W; Smith, B P

    1993-02-01

    This study investigated whether the number of hours of care needed by a person with disability could be predicted by his or her score on the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) or the Edinburgh Rehabilitation Status Scale (ERSS). Seventy-five subjects (age range, 19 to 65), from a variety of residential services, with neurological disabilities, were visited by an experienced observer to estimate the number of hours of care per week required, from whatever source, for the subject to manage adequately. A second observer, blind to the observations of the first, assessed the subjects' FIM and ERSS scores by interview with the subjects and their carers. Wide ranges of scores on both scales suggested that subjects with many different dependency levels were surveyed, confirmed by "required care hours" varying between 0 and 168 per week (median 18). Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.36 for ERSS (p < 0.002) and -0.39 for FIM (p < 0.001). Analysis of the scattergrams identified three aberrant cases. Investigation of these showed they each had a high level of dependency due to supervision rather than physical care; exclusion of these cases resulted in much stronger correlations for the remaining 72 cases (ERSS, 0.61; FIM, -0.76). Both ERSS and FIM correlate well with hours of care required, but their association with hours of supervision is poor. PMID:8431096

  16. Interannual Variability in Baseline Ozone and Its Relationship to Surface Ozone in the Western U.S.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Pao M; Jaffe, Daniel A; Pierce, R Bradley; Gustin, Mae S

    2016-03-15

    Baseline ozone refers to observed concentrations of tropospheric ozone at sites that have a negligible influence from local emissions. The Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) was established in 2004 to examine baseline air masses as they arrive to North America from the west. In May 2012, we observed an O3 increase of 2.0-8.5 ppbv in monthly average maximum daily 8-hour average O3 mixing ratio (MDA8 O3) at MBO and numerous other sites in the western U.S. compared to previous years. This shift in the O3 distribution had an impact on the number of exceedance days. We also observed a good correlation between daily MDA8 variations at MBO and at downwind sites. This suggests that under specific meteorological conditions, synoptic variation in O3 at MBO can be observed at other surface sites in the western U.S. At MBO, the elevated O3 concentrations in May 2012 are associated with low CO values and low water vapor values, consistent with transport from the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS). Furthermore, the Real-time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS) analyses indicate that a large flux of O3 from the UT/LS in May 2012 contributed to the observed enhanced O3 across the western U.S. Our results suggest that a network of mountaintop observations, LiDAR and satellite observations of O3 could provide key data on daily and interannual variations in baseline O3. PMID:26882468

  17. Recent Results of Ambient Ozone Monitoring in Southern Sierra Nevada and White Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, J. D.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Cisneros, R.; Schweizer, D.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient ozone has been monitored in the southern Sierra Nevada and White Mountains of California as 2-week average concentrations with Ogawa passive samplers and as 1-hour average concentrations with 2B Technologies UV absorption monitors. Our summer season investigations have included: (1) an elevational transect (1,237 to 4,342 masl) consisting of 5 sites in the White Mountains (2009 -2014); (2) a west to east southern Sierra Nevada transect consisting of 9 sites at elevations between 510 and 3,490 masl (2012 and 2013); and (3) two sites at the Devils Postpile National Monument at 2,130 masl (2007 - 2014). In the White Mountains average ozone concentrations increased with elevation, reaching the highest values at White Mountain Summit. A strongly pronounced diurnal distribution of ozone was observed at the low elevation site in Bishop (OVS), with low values at night and in the early morning and highest concentrations during mid-day. High elevation sites (Crooked Creek, Barcroft Station and Summit) were characterized by flat ozone curves with similar concentrations during daytime and nighttime, typically around 50 ppb. During the 2013 summer season, two-week averages from passive samplers ranged from 32 to 60 ppb for all White Mountains sites with the highest values at the Summit and the lowest at OVS. Along the southern Sierra Nevada transect, average concentrations in summer 2013 ranged from 36.5 to 54.0 ppb with the highest value recorded at the highest elevation eastern site, Piute Pass, and the lowest at low-elevation and western Shaver Lake site. Prather, Mountain Rest and Shaver Lake sites had the most exceedances of 8 h federal health standard of 75 ppb and the California health standard of 70 ppb. The Devils Postpile site was characterized by low ozone concentrations at night and in the early morning, and late afternoon maxima. In 2007 and 2008 the ozone values measured at Devils Postpile occasionally exceeded the federal health standard, with more

  18. Estimating contribution of wildland fires to ambient ozone levels in National Parks in the Sierra Nevada, California.

    PubMed

    Preisler, Haiganoush K; Zhong, Shiyuan Sharon; Esperanza, Annie; Brown, Timothy J; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Tarnay, Leland

    2010-03-01

    Data from four continuous ozone and weather monitoring sites operated by the National Park Service in Sierra Nevada, California, are used to develop an ozone forecasting model and to estimate the contribution of wildland fires on ambient ozone levels. The analyses of weather and ozone data pointed to the transport of ozone precursors from the Central Valley as an important source of pollution in these National Parks. Comparisons of forecasted and observed values demonstrated that accurate forecasts of next-day hourly ozone levels may be achieved by using a time series model with historic averages, expected local weather and modeled PM values as explanatory variables. Results on fire smoke influence indicated occurrence of significant increases in average ozone levels with increasing fire activity. The overall effect on diurnal ozone values, however, was small when compared with the amount of variability attributed to sources other than fire. PMID:19914752

  19. Potential Source Regions for Elevated Ozone Events in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahura, Alexander; Nuterman, Roman; Petrova, Irina

    2010-05-01

    In our study, three Danish measurement sites having the longest time-series of ozone measurements (with a time resolution of 1 hour and starting in early 1990s) records were selected - Ulborg (DK31; 56.28°N, 8.43°E) and Frederiksborg (DK32; 55.97°N, 12.33°E) and Lille Valby (DK41; 55.69°N, 12.13°E) located on Jutland Peninsula and Zealand Island of Denmark, respectively. The measurements with high ozone level (threshold as 150 µg/m3) were selected accounting in total for more than 500 cases for these 3 locations. Note, that among these, 42 (for DK41) and 59 (for DK31 and DK32) cases showed very high ozone concentrations (i.e. above 180 µg/m3). For all these cases, at first, the trajectory modelling approach was applied in order to estimate atmospheric transport pathway of air mass arrival at the measurement sites and potential source regions from where the elevated ozone level can be associated. In our study the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) model using REANALYSIS meteorological dataset (global, 1948-present) was run to calculate a set of backward trajectories (in with duration of 5 day backward in time and arriving at altitude of 100 m) and divide into groups with respect to potential source regions and dominating atmospheric transport pathways using cluster analysis technique. Analyzing distribution of trajectories (associated with elevated ozone concentrations measured at the Danish sites) as a function of the sector and pathway for the atmospheric transport, the percentage of trajectories had varied among 3 locations and ranged between 11-18% (from the eastern sector), 6-13% (from SW), 10-22% (S), 7-22% (SE), 25-39% (NW), 7-13% (N); with some trajectories having no clear identification. Among trajectories there are those passing through inland (i.e. through the Baltic States, Russia, Poland, Germany, France, Benelux and Scandinavian countries) as well water areas (i.e. transport from the Atlantic Ocean, Baltic

  20. The Hole in the Ozone Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamers, Jeanne S.; Jacob, Anthony T.

    This document contains information on the hole in the ozone layer. Topics discussed include properties of ozone, ozone in the atmosphere, chlorofluorocarbons, stratospheric ozone depletion, effects of ozone depletion on life, regulation of substances that deplete the ozone layer, alternatives to CFCs and Halons, and the future of the ozone layer.…