Science.gov

Sample records for 8-12 hz activity

  1. An Activities Supplement to the Curriculum Guide for Speech Communication--Grades 8-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieb-Brilhart, Barbara, Comp.

    This curriculum activities supplement is the result of a graduate seminar at the University of Nebraska (Omaha), held in 1972. It is an addition to "A Curriculum Guide for Speech Communication--Grades 8-12," developed in 1971 (ED 066 776). The activities are structured according to the contract system, whereby each student selects his own projects…

  2. [Cerebral hemodynamics in children of 8-12 years old with alterations of the motor activity of central origin].

    PubMed

    Holovchenko, I V; Haĭdaĭ, M I

    2013-01-01

    In children with altered physical activity there is a lack of brain blood supply, which is the most pronounced in the system of the vertebral arteries right hemisphere, and a low volume speed of blood flow in the internal carotid artery and in the system of the vertebral arteries. Children of the main group have a decreased venous outflow from the cavity of the skull, which is accompanied by altered venous circulation in the sinuses of the brain. It is established that in the system of the vertebral arteries a hemispheric asymmetry of growth in the right hemisphere is observed, in contrast to the left hemisphere, indicators of vascular tone of arterial and venous type of small caliber. Children with altered physical activity have higher values of indicators of venous outflow, than the children of the control group, and they have better venous outflow from the carotid system and a slightly worse with vertebro-basilar. PMID:24400562

  3. Increased Alpha (8-12 Hz) Activity during Slow Wave Sleep as a Marker for the Transition from Implicit Knowledge to Explicit Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during…

  4. Electroacupuncture at 2/100 Hz Activates Antinociceptive Spinal Mechanisms Different from Those Activated by Electroacupuncture at 2 and 100 Hz in Responder Rats

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Josie Resende Torres; da Silva, Marcelo Lourenço; Prado, Wiliam Alves

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of intrathecal injection of desipramine and fluoxetine (selective inhibitors of norepinephrine and 5-HT uptake, resp.), thiorphan and neostigmine (inhibitors of enkephalinase and acetylcholinesterase, resp.), gabapentin (a GABA releaser), and vigabatrin (an inhibitor of GABA-transaminase) on the antinociception induced by 2 Hz, 100 Hz, or 2/100 Hz electroacupuncture (EA) applied bilaterally to the Zusanli (ST36) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) acupoints using the rat tail-flick test. We show that 2 Hz EA antinociception lasts longer after the administration of drugs that increase the spinal availability of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, or GABA; 100 Hz EA antinociception lasts longer after drug that increases the spinal availability of norepinephrine; 2/100 Hz EA antinociception lasts longer after drugs that increase the spinal availability of endogenous opioids or GABA. We conclude that the antinociceptive effect of 2/100 Hz EA is different from the synergistic effect of alternate stimulation at 2 and 100 Hz because the effect of the former is not changed by increasing the spinal availability of serotonin and lasts longer after the administration of vigabatrin. The combination of EA with drugs that increase the availability of spinal neurotransmitters involved in the modulation of nociceptive inputs may result in a synergistic antinociceptive effect in the rat tail-flick test. PMID:24159340

  5. 47 CFR 8.12 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Formal complaints. 8.12 Section 8.12 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.12 Formal complaints. Any person may file a formal complaint alleging a violation of the rules in this part....

  6. 47 CFR 8.12 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Formal complaints. 8.12 Section 8.12 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.12 Formal complaints. Any person may file a formal complaint alleging a violation of the rules in this part....

  7. 47 CFR 8.12 - Formal complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Formal complaints. 8.12 Section 8.12 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.12 Formal complaints. Any person may file a formal complaint alleging a violation of the rules in this part....

  8. 15 CFR 8.12 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hearings. 8.12 Section 8.12 Commerce... Compliance § 8.12 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by... hearing, or (2) advise the recipient or other party that the matter in question has been set down...

  9. 15 CFR 8.12 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearings. 8.12 Section 8.12 Commerce... Compliance § 8.12 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by... hearing, or (2) advise the recipient or other party that the matter in question has been set down...

  10. 47 CFR 8.12 - Formal Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Formal Complaints. 8.12 Section 8.12 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRESERVING THE OPEN INTERNET § 8.12 Formal Complaints. Any person may file a formal complaint alleging a violation of the rules in this part....

  11. 22 CFR 8.12 - Financial records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Financial records. 8.12 Section 8.12 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 8.12 Financial records. Accurate records will be kept by the responsible committee office of all operating and salary costs of a...

  12. 22 CFR 8.12 - Financial records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Financial records. 8.12 Section 8.12 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 8.12 Financial records. Accurate records will be kept by the responsible committee office of all operating and salary costs of a...

  13. 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields do not affect human lymphocyte activation and proliferation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capri, Miriam; Mesirca, Pietro; Remondini, Daniel; Carosella, Simona; Pasi, Sara; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio; Bersani, Ferdinando

    2004-12-01

    In the last 30 years, an increasing public concern about the possible harmful effects of electromagnetic fields generated by power lines and domestic appliances has pushed the scientific community to search for a correct and comprehensive answer to this problem. In this work the effects of exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields, with a magnetic flux density of 0.05 mT and 2.5 mT (peak values), were studied on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from healthy young and elderly donors. Cell activation and proliferation were investigated by using flow cytometry techniques and 3H-TdR incorporation assays, respectively. The results obtained indicated that exposure to the fields altered neither DNA synthesis nor the capacity of lymphocytes to enter the activation phase and progress into the cell cycle. Thus, the conclusions are that two important functional phases of human lymphocytes, such as activation and proliferation, are not affected by exposures to 50 Hz magnetic fields similar to those found under power lines.

  14. Functional Brain Activity Relates to 0-3 and 3-8 Hz Force Oscillations in Essential Tremor.

    PubMed

    Neely, Kristina A; Kurani, Ajay S; Shukla, Priyank; Planetta, Peggy J; Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Goldman, Jennifer G; Corcos, Daniel M; Okun, Michael S; Vaillancourt, David E

    2015-11-01

    It is well-established that during goal-directed motor tasks, patients with essential tremor have increased oscillations in the 0-3 and 3-8 Hz bands. It remains unclear if these increased oscillations relate to activity in specific brain regions. This study used task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare the brain activity associated with oscillations in grip force output between patients with essential tremor, patients with Parkinson's disease who had clinically evident tremor, and healthy controls. The findings demonstrate that patients with essential tremor have increased brain activity in the motor cortex and supplementary motor area compared with controls, and this activity correlated positively with 3-8 Hz force oscillations. Brain activity in cerebellar lobules I-V was reduced in essential tremor compared with controls and correlated negatively with 0-3 Hz force oscillations. Widespread differences in brain activity were observed between essential tremor and Parkinson's disease. Using functional connectivity analyses during the task evidenced reduced cerebellar-cortical functional connectivity in patients with essential tremor compared with controls and Parkinson's disease. This study provides new evidence that in essential tremor 3-8 Hz force oscillations relate to hyperactivity in motor cortex, 0-3 Hz force oscillations relate to the hypoactivity in the cerebellum, and cerebellar-cortical functional connectivity is impaired. PMID:24962992

  15. Early diet affects the development of 3-6 Hz EEG activity in infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This longitudinal study investigated whether diet affects brain physiological functions during infancy. Power spectra (3-6 Hz) of electroencephalographic signals (high density recordings) in the bilateral prefrontal, frontal, central, parietal, occipital, anterior temporal, mid-temporal, and posteri...

  16. 40 CFR 8.12 - Coordination of reviews from other Parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coordination of reviews from other Parties. 8.12 Section 8.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF NONGOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN ANTARCTICA § 8.12 Coordination of reviews from...

  17. Evidence for genetic regulation of the human parieto-occipital 10-Hz rhythmic activity.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Elina; Renvall, Hanna; Kujala, Jan; Hakosalo, Osmo; Illman, Mia; Vihla, Minna; Leinonen, Eira; Salmelin, Riitta; Kere, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Several functional and morphological brain measures are partly under genetic control. The identification of direct links between neuroimaging signals and corresponding genetic factors can reveal cellular-level mechanisms behind the measured macroscopic signals and contribute to the use of imaging signals as probes of genetic function. To uncover possible genetic determinants of the most prominent brain signal oscillation, the parieto-occipital 10-Hz alpha rhythm, we measured spontaneous brain activity with magnetoencephalography in 210 healthy siblings while the subjects were resting, with eyes closed and open. The reactivity of the alpha rhythm was quantified from the difference spectra between the two conditions. We focused on three measures: peak frequency, peak amplitude and the width of the main spectral peak. In accordance with earlier electroencephalography studies, spectral peak amplitude was highly heritable (h(2)  > 0.75). Variance component-based analysis of 28 000 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers revealed linkage for both the width and the amplitude of the spectral peak. The strongest linkage was detected for the width of the spectral peak over the left parieto-occipital cortex on chromosome 10 (LOD = 2.814, nominal P < 0.03). This genomic region contains several functionally plausible genes, including GRID1 and ATAD1 that regulate glutamate receptor channels mediating synaptic transmission, NRG3 with functions in brain development and HRT7 involved in the serotonergic system and circadian rhythm. Our data suggest that the alpha oscillation is in part genetically regulated, and that it may be possible to identify its regulators by genetic analyses on a realistically modest number of samples. PMID:27306141

  18. Waste-to-Energy Laboratory. Grades 8-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAZWRAP, The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program.

    This brochure contains an activity for grades 8-12 students that focuses on the reuse of waste as an energy source by burning and converting it into energy. For this experiment students construct a calorimeter from simple recyclable material. The calorimeter is used to measure the amount of energy stored in paper and yard waste that could be used…

  19. [Variable magnetic field of 8 Hz corrects the opioid system activity in mollusks behind the ferromagnetic screening].

    PubMed

    Temur'iants, N A; Kostiuk, A S

    2014-01-01

    The three phases of mollusk nociception alteration as a result of extended ferromagnetic screening combined with exposure to a variable magnetic field of 8 Hz correlated with phase changes in the opioid system activity (OSA) deduced from the naloxone action on the thermal avoidance response. On phase I, OSA inactivation was inhibited and, consequently, hyperalgesia progression was expedited. On phase II, OSA rose so that naloxone annulled completely the antinociceptive effect produced by the ferromagnetic screening. On phase III, OSA declined progressively, as naloxone merely reduced the antinociceptive effect because of apparently, growing OSA tolerance to the ferromagnetic screening. Phase I was absent when mollusks were exposed to the ferromagnetic screening and variable magnetic field; however, OSA changes on phases II and III were present. It was concluded that the variable magnetic field of 8 Hz can be used for correcting changes in the opioid system activity in mollusks behind the ferromagnetic screening. PMID:25163338

  20. Circadian locomotor activity of Musca flies: Recording method and effects of 10 Hz square-wave electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, W.; Hellrung, W.; Johnsson, A.

    1996-05-01

    Musca domestica flies that were exposed to a uniform vertical 10 Hz electric square-wave field of 1 kVm{sup {minus}1} changed the period length of their circadian locomotor activity rhythm. Under constant conditions, the clock of short-period flies was slowed down by the field, whereas the clock of long-period flies either was affected only scarcely (experiments at about 19 C) or ran faster (experiments at 25 C). It the field was applied for only 12 h daily, then 30--40% of the flies were synchronized. Thus, the field could function as a weak Zeitgeber (synchronizer). If the field was increased to 10 kVm{sup {minus}1}, then 50--70% of the flies were synchronized. Flies avoided becoming active around the onset of the 12 h period of exposure to a 10 Hz field. The results of these experiments are discussed with respect to similar experiments by Wever on the effects of exposure to a 10 Hz field on the circadian system of man.

  1. Effects of intermittent 60-Hz high voltage electric fields on metabolism, activity, and temperature in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbergy, R.S; Duffy, P.H.; Sacher, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Transient effects of 100-kV/m extremely low frequency electric fields were studied in the white footed deermouse, Peromyscus leucopus. Gross motor activity, carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption, and core body temperature were monitored before, during, and after intermittent field exposures (four hour-long exposures, at one-hour intervals). Thirty-four mice were exposed in cages with plastic floors floating above ground potential, and 21 mice were exposed in cages with grounded metal floor plates. The first field exposure produced an immediate, transient increase of activity and gas measures during the inactive phase of the circadian cycle. All measures returned to baseline levels before the second exposure and were not significantly changed throughout the remainder of the exposures. The rapid habituation of field-induced arousal suggests that significant metabolic changes will not be measured in experiments in which the interval between exposure and measurement is greater than two hours.

  2. 42 CFR 8.12 - Federal opioid treatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal opioid treatment standards. 8.12 Section 8.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Certification and Treatment Standards § 8.12 Federal opioid treatment standards. (a) General. OTPs...

  3. 41 CFR 51-8.12 - Fee schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Fee schedule. 51-8.12 Section 51-8.12 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... MATERIALS § 51-8.12 Fee schedule. (a) This schedule sets forth fees to be charged for processing...

  4. Effects of a 60 Hz Magnetic Field Exposure Up to 3000 μT on Human Brain Activation as Measured by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Alexandre; Modolo, Julien; Brown, Samantha; Roberston, John; Thomas, Alex W.

    2015-01-01

    Several aspects of the human nervous system and associated motor and cognitive processes have been reported to be modulated by extremely low-frequency (ELF, < 300 Hz) time-varying Magnetic Fields (MF). Due do their worldwide prevalence; power-line frequencies (60 Hz in North America) are of particular interest. Despite intense research efforts over the last few decades, the potential effects of 60 Hz MF still need to be elucidated, and the underlying mechanisms to be understood. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to characterize potential changes in functional brain activation following human exposure to a 60 Hz MF through motor and cognitive tasks. First, pilot results acquired in a first set of subjects (N=9) were used to demonstrate the technical feasibility of using fMRI to detect subtle changes in functional brain activation with 60 Hz MF exposure at 1800 μT. Second, a full study involving a larger cohort of subjects tested brain activation during 1) a finger tapping task (N=20), and 2) a mental rotation task (N=21); before and after a one-hour, 60 Hz, 3000 μT MF exposure. The results indicate significant changes in task-induced functional brain activation as a consequence of MF exposure. However, no impact on task performance was found. These results illustrate the potential of using fMRI to identify MF-induced changes in functional brain activation, suggesting that a one-hour 60 Hz, 3000 μT MF exposure can modulate activity in specific brain regions after the end of the exposure period (i.e., residual effects). We discuss the possibility that MF exposure at 60 Hz, 3000 μT may be capable of modulating cortical excitability via a modulation of synaptic plasticity processes. PMID:26214312

  5. Slow modulations of high-frequency activity (40-140-Hz) discriminate preictal changes in human focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Rojas, C; Valderrama, M; Fouad-Ahmed, A; Feldwisch-Drentrup, H; Ihle, M; Teixeira, C A; Sales, F; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Adam, C; Dourado, A; Charpier, S; Navarro, V; Le Van Quyen, M

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that some seizures are preceded by preictal changes that start from minutes to hours before an ictal event. Nevertheless an adequate statistical evaluation in a large database of continuous multiday recordings is still missing. Here, we investigated the existence of preictal changes in long-term intracranial recordings from 53 patients with intractable partial epilepsy (in total 531 days and 558 clinical seizures). We describe a measure of brain excitability based on the slow modulation of high-frequency gamma activities (40-140 Hz) in ensembles of intracranial contacts. In prospective tests, we found that this index identified preictal changes at levels above chance in 13.2% of the patients (7/53), suggesting that results may be significant for the whole group (p < 0.05). These results provide a demonstration that preictal states can be detected prospectively from EEG data. They advance understanding of the network dynamics leading to seizure and may help develop novel seizure prediction algorithms. PMID:24686330

  6. 42 CFR 8.12 - Federal opioid treatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Federal opioid treatment standards. 8.12 Section 8... CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Certification and Treatment Standards § 8.12 Federal opioid treatment standards. (a) General. OTPs must provide treatment in accordance with the standards in this section...

  7. 42 CFR 8.12 - Federal opioid treatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal opioid treatment standards. 8.12 Section 8... CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Certification and Treatment Standards § 8.12 Federal opioid treatment standards. (a) General. OTPs must provide treatment in accordance with the standards in this section...

  8. 30 Hz-linewidth, diode-laser-pumped, Nd:GGG nonplanar ring oscillators by active frequency stabilisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, T.; Nilsson, A. C.; Fejer, M. M.; Farinas, A. D.; Gustafson, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne linewidth of less than 30 Hz for the beatnote between the outputs of two 282 THz Nd:GGG nonplanar ring oscillators (NPROs) is reported. The lasers were independently locked to adjacent axial modes of a high-finesse interferometer. The remnant frequency noise appears to be dominated by free spectral range fluctuations in the reference interferometer rather than by residual laser noise.

  9. SOCIAL DEFEAT, A PARADIGM OF DEPRESSION IN RATS THAT ELICITS 22-kHz VOCALIZATIONS, PREFERENTIALLY ACTIVATES THE CHOLINERGIC SIGNALING PATHWAY IN THE PERIAQUEDUCTAL GRAY

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, Roger A.; Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Otto, Nigel J.; Panksepp, Jaak; Moskal, Joseph R.

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiles in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) of adult Long-Evans rats as a function of a stressful social defeat in inter-male fighting encounters were examined. This social subordination model mimics prototypical behavioral changes that parallel aspects of clinical depression, has been postulated to simulate early changes in the onset of depression in the losers, and has been successfully utilized for the evaluation of antidepressant activity. 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) have been shown to reflect negative emotional states akin to anxiety and depression. Social defeat is the most robust and reliable method of eliciting these calls. The PAG has been shown to be a key brain region for the generation of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations, and 22-kHz USVs have been shown to be controlled by the mesolimbic cholinergic system. In this present study we examined gene expression changes in the PAG of social subordinate rats compared to dominant rats (that do not exhibit 22-kHz USVs). We found that social defeat significantly altered the genes associated with cholinergic synaptic transmission in the PAG. The most robust of these were the increased expression of the β2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2) and the T-subunit of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) in the subordinate animals. These changes were corroborated by qRT-PCR and found to be exclusive to the PAG compared to seven other brain regions examined. These data suggest that cholinergic transmission in the PAG is involved in the generation of 22-kHz USVs and provide potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of affective disorders. PMID:17452055

  10. Effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on the activity of hsp70 promoter: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-De la Fuente, Abraham O.; Alcocer-González, Juan M.; Heredia-Rojas, J. Antonio; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E.; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A.; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to EMFs (electromagnetic fields) results in a number of important biological changes, including modification of genetic expression. We have investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal EMFs at a magnetic flux density of 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labelled as pEMF (EMF plasmid). This gene construct contains the specific sequences for the induction of hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) expression by EMFs, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was electrotransferred into quadriceps muscles of BALB/c mice that were later exposed to EMFs. Increased luciferase expression was observed in mice exposed to EMFs 2 h daily for 7 days compared with controls (P<0.05). These data along with other reports in the literature suggest that EMFs can have far-reaching effects on the genome. PMID:23124775

  11. Effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on the activity of hsp70 promoter: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham O; Alcocer-González, Juan M; Antonio Heredia-Rojas, J; Balderas-Candanosa, Isaías; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2009-03-01

    We have evaluated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields (MF) at 8 and 8 microT on expression of the luciferase gene contained in a gene construct labelled as Electromagnetic Field-plasmid (pEMF). The vector included the hsp70 promotor containing the 3 nCTCTn sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by magnetic fields, as well as the reporter of the luciferase gene. We also replicated the study of Lin et al. [Lin H, Blank M, Rossol-Haseroth K, Goodman R. Regulating genes with electromagnetic response elements. J Cell Biochem 2001;81(1):143-48]. The pEMF plasmid was transfected into HeLa and BMK16 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). An increased luciferase expression was found in both the cells exposed to MF and TS compared with their control groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the combined effect of MF and TS was also analyzed. A synergistic effect between two factors was observed for this co-exposure condition in terms of luciferase gene expression. PMID:18957326

  12. Medial frontal ∼4-Hz activity in humans and rodents is attenuated in PD patients and in rodents with cortical dopamine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Krystal L.; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Kingyon, Johnathan R.; Cavanagh, James F.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal control of action is a highly conserved and critical mammalian behavior. Here, we investigate the neuronal basis of this process using an interval timing task. In rats and humans, instructional timing cues triggered spectral power across delta and theta bands (2–6 Hz) from the medial frontal cortex (MFC). Humans and rodents with dysfunctional dopamine have impaired interval timing, and we found that both humans with Parkinson's disease (PD) and rodents with local MFC dopamine depletion had attenuated delta and theta activity. In rodents, spectral activity in this range could functionally couple single MFC neurons involved in temporal processing. Without MFC dopamine, these neurons had less functional coupling with delta/theta activity and less temporal processing. Finally, in humans this 2- to 6-Hz activity was correlated with executive function in matched controls but not in PD patients. Collectively, these findings suggest that cue-evoked low-frequency rhythms could be a clinically important biomarker of PD that is translatable to rodent models, facilitating mechanistic inquiry and the development of neurophysiological biomarkers for human disease. PMID:26133799

  13. In vitro studies on the influence of L-ascorbic acid 2-[3,4-dihydro- 2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-6yl-hy drogen phosphate] potassium salt on lipid peroxidation and phospholipase A2 activity.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Y; Yoshida, K; Sakaue, T; Okumura, A

    1992-09-01

    The effects of L-ascorbic acid 2-[3,4-dihydro-2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2- (4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-6yl-hydrogen phosphate] potassium salt (EPC-K1, CAS 127061-56-7), a new compound for ischemia-reperfusion injuries, on lipid peroxidation and phospholipase A2 activity were studied in vitro using rat brain homogenates and human plasma. EPC-K1 inhibited phospholipase A2 activity in human plasma in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 7.3 x 10(-4) mol/l), whereas a mixture of alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid did not exhibit this effect. In rat brain homogenates, EPC-K1 also inhibited lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 2.3 x 10(-6) mol/l). alpha-Tocopherol was less active than EPC-K1. These properties of EPC-K1 suggest that EPC-K1 may prove useful in the treatment of ischemia-reperfusion injuries. PMID:1445471

  14. Geophysical variables and behavior: LXXXV. Sudden infant death, bands of geomagnetic activity, and pc1 (0.2 to 5 HZ) geomagnetic micropulsations.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, R P; Persinger, M A

    1999-04-01

    Pc1s (continuous pulsations) within the geomagnetic field, whose durations are about 30 minutes but which can reoccur several times nightly, are observed during periods when global geomagnetic activity is very low (less than 10 nT). The hypothesis that these 0.2 to 5 Hz synchronized micropulsations or hydromagnetic emissions might stimulate physical chemical cascades within the brain that precipitate the sudden death in infants was tested by correlational analysis for a two-year period (1960-1961) for Ontario. Results were consistent with the hypothesis that the monthly incidences of these unexpected deaths, pcl micropulsations and geomagnetic activity less than 10 nT displayed a shared source of variance. Implications are discussed. PMID:10483626

  15. Effect of 60 Hz magnetic fields on the activation of hsp70 promoter in cultured INER-37 and RMA E7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Rojas, J Antonio; Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham Octavio; Alcocer González, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2010-10-01

    It has been reported that 50-60 Hz magnetic fields (MF) with flux densities ranging from microtesla to millitesla are able to induce heat shock factor or heat shock proteins in various cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal MF at 8 and 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labeled as electromagnetic field-plasmid (pEMF). This gene construct contains the specific sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by MF, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was transfected into INER-37 and RMA E7 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). Cells that received the MF or TS treatments and their controls were processed according to the luciferase assay system for evaluate luciferase activity. An increased luciferase gene expression was observed in INER-37 cells exposed to MF and TS compared with controls (p < 0.05), but MF exposure had no effect on the RMA E7 cell line. PMID:20835776

  16. Direct recordings in human cortex reveal the dynamics of gamma-band [50-150 Hz] activity during pursuit eye movement control.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Julien; Lebranchu, Pierre; Jerbi, Karim; Kahane, Philippe; Orban, Guy; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe; Berthoz, Alain

    2012-10-15

    The time course of neural activity in human brain regions involved in mediating pursuit eye movements is unclear. To address this question, we recorded intracerebral electroencephalography activity in eight epileptic patients while they performed a pursuit task that dissociates reactive, predictive and inhibited pursuits. A sustained gamma band (50-150 Hz) activity corresponding to pursuit maintenance was observed in the pursuit (and not saccade) area of the frontal eye field (FEF), in the ventral intraparietal sulcus (VIPS) and in occipital areas. The latency of gamma increase was found to precede target onset in FEF and VIPS, suggesting that those areas could also be involved during pursuit preparation/initiation. During pursuit inhibition, a sustained gamma band response was observed within prefrontal areas (pre-supplementary-motor-area, dorso-lateral prefrontal and frontopolar cortex). This study describes for the first time the dynamics of the neural activity in four areas of the pursuit system, not previously available in humans. These findings provide novel timing constraints to current models of the human pursuit system and establish the relevance of direct recordings to precisely relate eye movement behavior with neural activity in humans. PMID:22819950

  17. Induction of genomic instability, oxidative processes, and mitochondrial activity by 50Hz magnetic fields in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Jukka; Liimatainen, Anu; Juutilainen, Jukka; Naarala, Jonne

    2014-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that exposure to 50Hz magnetic fields (MF) increases the risk of childhood leukemia, but there is no mechanistic explanation for carcinogenic effects. In two previous studies we have observed that a 24-h pre-exposure to MF alters cellular responses to menadione-induced DNA damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular changes that must occur already during the first 24h of exposure to MF, and to explore whether the MF-induced changes in DNA damage response can lead to genomic instability in the progeny of the exposed cells. In order to answer these questions, human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed to a 50-Hz, 100-μT MF for 24h, followed by 3-h exposure to menadione. The main finding was that MF exposure was associated with increased level of micronuclei, used as an indicator of induced genomic instability, at 8 and 15d after the exposures. Other delayed effects in MF-exposed cells included increased mitochondrial activity at 8d, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and lipid peroxidation at 15d after the exposures. Oxidative processes (ROS production, reduced glutathione level, and mitochondrial superoxide level) were affected by MF immediately after the exposure. In conclusion, the present results suggest that MF exposure disturbs oxidative balance immediately after the exposure, which might explain our previous findings on MF altered cellular responses to menadione-induced DNA damage. Persistently elevated levels of micronuclei were found in the progeny of MF-exposed cells, indicating induction of genomic instability. PMID:24374227

  18. [The dynamics of the high-frequency components of brain electrical activity (up to 200 Hz) during learning reflects the functional mosaic structure of the neocortex].

    PubMed

    Dumenko, V N; Kozlov, M K; Kulikov, M A

    1996-01-01

    The study was aimed to reveal frequency ranges of correlated changes of power spectral densities of the brain electrical activity (EA) including the high-frequency components (HFC) in dogs (4 animals) by means of factor analysis technique. Spectral densities of EA in different cortical areas and olfactory bulb were factored. Relationships between the structure of the selected factors both by the parts of the total variance determined by them and their frequency loads suggest the regional and individual EA differences. In the process of learning (elaboration of motor skill of pressing the food-dispenser pedal with a forepaw) the factor organization of the EA became substantially more complicated, mainly, in the HFC-range (40-170 Hz). This was manifested in formation of narrower frequency subbands of the HFC each of which being highly loaded (0.7-0.8) by one of the factors. The evidence obtained by means of the FA was completely verified using original version of cluster analysis. PMID:8984810

  19. 10 Hz flicker improves recognition memory in older people

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan; Ramaswamy, Deepa; Oulhaj, Abderrahim

    2006-01-01

    Background 10 Hz electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha rhythms correlate with memory performance. Alpha and memory decline in older people. We wished to test if alpha-like EEG activity contributes to memory formation. Flicker can elicit alpha-like EEG activity. We tested if alpha-frequency flicker enhances memory in older people. Pariticpants aged 67–92 identified short words that followed 1 s of flicker at 9.0 Hz, 9.5 Hz, 10.0 Hz, 10.2 Hz, 10.5 Hz, 11.0 Hz, 11.5 Hz or 500 Hz. A few minutes later, we tested participants' recognition of the words (without flicker). Results Flicker frequencies close to 10 Hz (9.5–11.0 Hz) facilitated the identification of the test words in older participants. The same flicker frequencies increased recognition of the words more than other frequencies (9.0 Hz, 11.5 Hz and 500 Hz), irrespective of age. Conclusion The frequency-specificity of flicker's effects in our participants paralleled the power spectrum of EEG alpha in the general population. This indicates that alpha-like EEG activity may subserve memory processes. Flicker may be able to help memory problems in older people. PMID:16515710

  20. Project EAGLE (Early Academic Gifted Learning Experience): A Program for Gifted and Talented Students (Grades K-3)--Kindergarten Activity Booklets: Xanthus; Zhack; and Activity Pages H-Z.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkoski, Kay

    Three activity booklets are presented for implementing Project EAGLE, an enrichment program for gifted and talented kindergarten children. The first activity booklet contains a poem by J. D. Evans titled "In Search of the Xanthus," which describes the search for an imaginary beast that leaves an "X" on the spot where it used to be. The second…

  1. Active frequency stabilization of a 1.062-micron, Nd:GGG, diode-laser-pumped nonplanar ring oscillator to less than 3 Hz of relative linewidth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, T.; Gustafson, E. K.; Byer, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the frequency stabilization of two diode-laser-pumped ring lasers that are independently locked to the same high-finesse interferometer. The relative frequency stability is measured by locking the lasers one free spectral range apart and observing the heterodyne beat note. The resultant beat note width of 2.9 Hz is consistent with the theoretical system noise-limited linewidth and is approximately 20 times that expected for shot-noise-limited performance.

  2. Creating curricular change: needs in grades 8 12 earth science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Steven K.; Vitek, John D.; Giardino, John R.; McQueen, Kay C.

    2002-10-01

    The realization that we do not control nature is often associated with devastating loss of life and property. Apparently, humans do not learn from their mistakes, because human tragedies seem to happen repeatedly and minimal modification of human behavior appears to transpire. Because people do not understand the dynamic nature of Earth and Earth processes, specific education to understand and to comprehend the cause and effect of a dynamic earth is needed. The strong economic base and a high literacy rate within the USA should contribute to the ability of the K-12 educational system to create more appropriate human behavior and response to processes shaping Earth. Today major efforts are underway in government agencies, professional societies, universities and by individuals to change what and how students learn about the environment. Curricular reform has been established as new national standards for what students should learn in science in grades K-12. Just having standards, however, does not guarantee implementation, improved teaching by teachers, or increased understanding by students. Science faculties must accept the challenge to provide the pedagogical education for K-12 teachers; teachers must be trained and empowered to implement change; this change must ripple throughout the entire K-12 system. Workshops and innovative materials to support renovations in the curricula are essential to affect change. The World Wide Web will be a major help in information dissemination. However, for success to be achieved, local involvement is fundamental. People with expertise about Earth can have the greatest impact on effecting change by helping neighbors acquire knowledge of the dynamic environment of Earth. The same people (namely you) must become pro-active in K-12 education.

  3. 40 CFR 8.12 - Coordination of reviews from other Parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Parties. 8.12 Section 8.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL... Party prepared in accordance with Article 2 of Annex I and any decisions taken in consequence thereof... State shall make a copy of the list of IEEs prepared in accordance with Article 2 and any...

  4. 7 CFR 319.8-12 - From the West Coast of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false From the West Coast of Mexico. 319.8-12 Section 319.8... Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-12 From the West Coast of Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of the West Coast of Mexico and of Northwest Mexico from infestations...

  5. 7 CFR 319.8-12 - From the West Coast of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false From the West Coast of Mexico. 319.8-12 Section 319.8... Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-12 From the West Coast of Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of the West Coast of Mexico and of Northwest Mexico from infestations...

  6. 7 CFR 319.8-12 - From the West Coast of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false From the West Coast of Mexico. 319.8-12 Section 319.8... Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-12 From the West Coast of Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of the West Coast of Mexico and of Northwest Mexico from infestations...

  7. 7 CFR 319.8-12 - From the West Coast of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false From the West Coast of Mexico. 319.8-12 Section 319.8... Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-12 From the West Coast of Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of the West Coast of Mexico and of Northwest Mexico from infestations...

  8. 7 CFR 319.8-12 - From the West Coast of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false From the West Coast of Mexico. 319.8-12 Section 319.8... Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-12 From the West Coast of Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of the West Coast of Mexico and of Northwest Mexico from infestations...

  9. 100-Hz Electroacupuncture but not 2-Hz Electroacupuncture is Preemptive Against Postincision Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcelo Lourenço; Silva, Josie Resende Torres; Prado, Wiliam Alves

    2016-08-01

    Preemptive analgesia involves introducing an analgesic before noxious stimulation. Electroacupuncture (EA) activates descending mechanisms that modulate nociceptive inputs into the spinal dorsal horn. This study evaluated whether preoperative EA is more effective than postoperative EA in reducing incision pain in rats. The nociceptive threshold to mechanical stimulation was utilized to examine the effects of an intraperitoneal injection of saline (0.1 mL/kg) or naloxone (1 mg/kg) on antinociception induced by a 20-minute period of 2-Hz or 100-Hz EA applied to the Zusanli (ST36) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) acupoints before surgical incision, or 10 minutes after or 100 minutes after surgical incision of the hind paw. The extent of mechanical hyperalgesia after the incision was significantly attenuated by the application of 100-Hz EA preoperatively, but not by its application at 10 minutes or 100 minutes postoperatively. By contrast, 2-Hz EA was effective against postoperative hyperalgesia when applied 10 minutes or 100 minutes after surgery but not when it was applied preoperatively. Only the effect of 2-Hz EA applied 10 minutes after surgery was sensitive to naloxone. The present study showed for the first time that 100-Hz EA, but not 2-Hz EA, exerts a nonopioidergic preemptive effect against postincision pain in rats. PMID:27555225

  10. HgCdTe infrared linear arrays for 3-5- and 8-12-μm wavelength regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darchuk, Sergey D.; Derkach, Yurii P.; Kononenko, Yu. G.; Petryakov, V. A.; Reva, Vladimir P.; Sizov, Fiodor F.; Tetyorkin, Vladimir V.

    1995-11-01

    Hg1-xCdxTe (x approximately equal to 0.205, 0.27) 64 photodiode hybrid linear arrays for spectral regions (lambda) approximately equal to 3 - 5 and 8 - 12 micrometer have been designed. The p+-n-diodes were As-diffused n-type indium doped single crystals (n approximately equal to (2 - 5) 1015 cm-3) delineated with standard wet photolithography technique. Surface leakage current at T equals 80 K seems to be the dominant current mechanism for the diodes with no passivation coating. At higher temperatures the generation-recombination mechanism was found to be the principal one. Diodes had mean detectivity values D* (10.5 micrometer, 500, 1) approximately equal to 2 1010 and D* (6.0 micrometer, 500, 1) approximately equal to 6 1010 cm Hz1/2W-1 at 80 K. The arrays were interconnected to silicon direct injection readout devices with CCD multiplexers which consist of input circuits, shift register and output circuits. The dynamical range was estimated to be of the order of 60 dB at T equals 80 K. The two-phase p-channel CCD shift register was designed with clock frequency operation $less than or equal to 5 MHz. Transfer efficiency without fat zero was 0.99985 at 1.0 MHz frequency. The control interface based on 16-channel, 10-bit A/D converter was developed for computer data recording and signal processing.

  11. Child Labor Is Not Cheap: A Unit for Grades 8-12 and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Amy; Sommers, Meredith, Ed.

    This 3-lesson unit of study for grades 8-12 and adults considers the 250 million children who spend most of their day on the job, despite efforts to regulate or eliminate the practice of child labor. The unit focuses primarily on export-oriented businesses in the Americas. This focus serves as a starting point to understanding other forms of…

  12. Local Optogenetic Induction of Fast (20-40 Hz) Pyramidal-Interneuron Network Oscillations in the In Vitro and In Vivo CA1 Hippocampus: Modulation by CRF and Enforcement of Perirhinal Theta Activity.

    PubMed

    Dine, Julien; Genewsky, Andreas; Hladky, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T; Deussing, Jan M; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Chen, Alon; Eder, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiological processes that can cause theta-to-gamma frequency range (4-80 Hz) network oscillations in the rhinal cortical-hippocampal system and the potential connectivity-based interactions of such forebrain rhythms are a topic of intensive investigation. Here, using selective Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expression in mouse forebrain glutamatergic cells, we were able to locally, temporally precisely, and reliably induce fast (20-40 Hz) field potential oscillations in hippocampal area CA1 in vitro (at 25°C) and in vivo (i.e., slightly anesthetized NEX-Cre-ChR2 mice). As revealed by pharmacological analyses and patch-clamp recordings from pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in vitro, these light-triggered oscillations can exclusively arise from sustained suprathreshold depolarization (~200 ms or longer) and feedback inhibition of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as being mandatory for prototypic pyramidal-interneuron network (P-I) oscillations. Consistently, the oscillations comprised rhythmically occurring population spikes (generated by pyramidal cells) and their frequency increased with increasing spectral power. We further demonstrate that the optogenetically driven CA1 oscillations, which remain stable over repeated evocations, are impaired by the stress hormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, 125 nM) in vitro and, even more remarkably, found that they are accompanied by concurrent states of enforced theta activity in the memory-associated perirhinal cortex (PrC) in vivo. The latter phenomenon most likely derives from neurotransmission via a known, but poorly studied excitatory CA1→PrC pathway. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of a prototypic (CRF-sensitive) P-I gamma rhythm generator in area CA1 and suggest that CA1 P-I oscillations can rapidly up-regulate theta activity strength in hippocampus-innervated rhinal networks, at least in the PrC. PMID:27199662

  13. Local Optogenetic Induction of Fast (20–40 Hz) Pyramidal-Interneuron Network Oscillations in the In Vitro and In Vivo CA1 Hippocampus: Modulation by CRF and Enforcement of Perirhinal Theta Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dine, Julien; Genewsky, Andreas; Hladky, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Deussing, Jan M.; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Chen, Alon; Eder, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiological processes that can cause theta-to-gamma frequency range (4–80 Hz) network oscillations in the rhinal cortical-hippocampal system and the potential connectivity-based interactions of such forebrain rhythms are a topic of intensive investigation. Here, using selective Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expression in mouse forebrain glutamatergic cells, we were able to locally, temporally precisely, and reliably induce fast (20–40 Hz) field potential oscillations in hippocampal area CA1 in vitro (at 25°C) and in vivo (i.e., slightly anesthetized NEX-Cre-ChR2 mice). As revealed by pharmacological analyses and patch-clamp recordings from pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in vitro, these light-triggered oscillations can exclusively arise from sustained suprathreshold depolarization (~200 ms or longer) and feedback inhibition of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as being mandatory for prototypic pyramidal-interneuron network (P-I) oscillations. Consistently, the oscillations comprised rhythmically occurring population spikes (generated by pyramidal cells) and their frequency increased with increasing spectral power. We further demonstrate that the optogenetically driven CA1 oscillations, which remain stable over repeated evocations, are impaired by the stress hormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, 125 nM) in vitro and, even more remarkably, found that they are accompanied by concurrent states of enforced theta activity in the memory-associated perirhinal cortex (PrC) in vivo. The latter phenomenon most likely derives from neurotransmission via a known, but poorly studied excitatory CA1→PrC pathway. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of a prototypic (CRF-sensitive) P-I gamma rhythm generator in area CA1 and suggest that CA1 P-I oscillations can rapidly up-regulate theta activity strength in hippocampus-innervated rhinal networks, at least in the PrC. PMID:27199662

  14. Temperature dependence of intensities of the 8-12 micron bands of CFCl3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanes, R.; Silvaggio, P. M.; Boese, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute intensities of the 8-12 micron bands from Freon 11 (CFCl3) were measured at temperatures of 294 and 216 K. Intensities of the bands centered at 798, 847, 934, and 1082 per cm are all observed to depend on temperature. The temperature dependence for the 847 and 1082 per cm fundamental regions is attributed to underlying hot bands; for the nu2 + nu5 combination band (934 per cm), the observed temperature dependence is in close agreement with theoretical prediction. The implication of these results on atmospheric IR remote-sensing is briefly discussed.

  15. Enhancement of Cortical Network Activity in vitro and Promotion of GABAergic Neurogenesis by Stimulation with an Electromagnetic Field with a 150 MHz Carrier Wave Pulsed with an Alternating 10 and 16 Hz Modulation.

    PubMed

    Gramowski-Voß, Alexandra; Schwertle, Hans-Joachim; Pielka, Anna-Maria; Schultz, Luise; Steder, Anne; Jügelt, Konstantin; Axmann, Jürgen; Pries, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, various stimuli were identified capable of enhancing neurogenesis, a process which is dysfunctional in the senescent brain and in neurodegenerative and certain neuropsychiatric diseases. Applications of electromagnetic fields to brain tissue have been shown to affect cellular properties and their importance for therapies in medicine is recognized. In this study, differentiating murine cortical networks on multiwell microelectrode arrays were repeatedly exposed to an extremely low-electromagnetic field (ELEMF) with alternating 10 and 16 Hz frequencies piggy backed onto a 150 MHz carrier frequency. The ELEMF exposure stimulated the electrical network activity and intensified the structure of bursts. Further, the exposure to electromagnetic fields within the first 28 days in vitro of the differentiation of the network activity induced also reorganization within the burst structure. This effect was already most pronounced at 14 days in vitro after 10 days of exposure. Overall, the development of cortical activity under these conditions was accelerated. These functional electrophysiological changes were accompanied by morphological ones. The percentage of neurons in the neuron glia co-culture was increased without affecting the total number of cells, indicating an enhancement of neurogenesis. The ELEMF exposure selectively promoted the proliferation of a particular population of neurons, evidenced by the increased proportion of GABAergic neurons. The results support the initial hypothesis that this kind of ELEMF stimulation could be a treatment option for specific indications with promising potential for CNS applications, especially for degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. PMID:26236278

  16. Coherent 40-Hz Oscillation Characterizes Dream State in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo; Ribary, Urs

    1993-03-01

    Magnetic recording from five normal human adults demonstrates large 40-Hz coherent magnetic activity in the awake and in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep states that is very reduced during delta sleep (deep sleep characterized by delta waves in the electroencephalogram). This 40-Hz magnetic oscillation has been shown to be reset by sensory stimuli in the awake state. Such resetting is not observed during REM or delta sleep. The 40 Hz in REM sleep is characterized, as is that in the awake state, by a fronto-occiptal phase shift over the head. This phase shift has a maximum duration of thickapprox12-13 msec. Because 40-Hz oscillation is seen in wakefulness and in dreaming, we propose it to be a correlate of cognition, probably resultant from coherent 40-Hz resonance between thalamocortical-specific and nonspecific loops. Moreover, we proposed that the specific loops give the content of cognition, and a nonspecific loop gives the temporal binding required for the unity of cognitive experience.

  17. Estimation of broadband emissivity (8-12 um) from ASTER data by using RM-NN.

    PubMed

    Mao, K B; Ma, Y; Shen, X Y; Li, B P; Li, C Y; Li, Z L

    2012-08-27

    Land surface window emissivity is a key parameter for estimating the longwave radiative budget. The combined radiative transfer model (RM) with neural network (NN) algorithm is utilized to directly estimate the window (8-12 um) emissivity from the brightness temperature of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) with 90 m spatial resolution. Although the estimation accuracy is very high when the broadband emissivity is estimated from AST05 (ASTER Standard Data Product) by using regression method, the accuracy of AST05 is about ± 0.015 for 86 spectra which is determined by the atmosphere correction for ASTER 1B data. The MODTRAN 4 is used to simulate the process of radiance transfer, and the broadband emissivity is directly estimated from the brightness temperature of ASTER 1B data at satellite. The comparison analysis indicates that the RM-NN is more competent to estimate broadband emissivity than other method when the brightness temperatures of band 11, 12, 13, 14 are made as input nodes of dynamic neural network. The estimation average accuracy is about 0.009, and the estimation results are not sensitive to instrument noise. The RM-NN is applied to extract broadband emissivity from an image of ASTER 1B data in China, and the comparison against a classification based multiple bands with 15 m spatial resolution shows that the estimation results from RM-NN are very good. PMID:23037062

  18. Nonperiodic optical flickering in HZ Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, T. J.; Nather, R. E.; Vanden Bout, P. A.

    1974-01-01

    High-speed simultaneous dual-channel photometry of HZ Her and a nearby comparison star reveal nonperiodic optical flickering in the HZ Her system on a time scale of 15 to 300 sec. The amplitude of the flickering appears to be correlated with orbital phase. Optical emission from a hot spot in a disk of material around the X-ray source cannot account for the flickering.

  19. Audiogram of the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) from 2 Hz to 9 kHz.

    PubMed

    Hill, Evan M; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Rickye S; Heffner, Henry E

    2014-10-01

    The pure-tone thresholds of four domestic female chickens were determined from 2 Hz to 9 kHz using the method of conditioned suppression/avoidance. At a level of 60 dB sound pressure level (re 20 μN/m(2)), their hearing range extends from 9.1 Hz to 7.2 kHz, with a best sensitivity of 2.6 dB at 2 kHz. Chickens have better sensitivity than humans for frequencies below 64 Hz; indeed, their sensitivity to infrasound exceeds that of the homing pigeon. However, when threshold testing moved to the lower frequencies, the animals required additional training before their final thresholds were obtained, suggesting that they may perceive frequencies below 64 Hz differently than higher frequencies. PMID:25092127

  20. Electrical stimulation of the frontal cortex enhances slow-frequency EEG activity and sleepiness.

    PubMed

    D'Atri, A; De Simoni, E; Gorgoni, M; Ferrara, M; Ferlazzo, F; Rossini, P M; De Gennaro, L

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to enhance the spontaneous slow-frequency EEG activity during the resting state using oscillating transcranial direct currents (tDCS) with a stimulation frequency that resembles the spontaneous oscillations of sleep onset. Accordingly, in this preliminary study, we assessed EEG after-effects of a frontal oscillatory tDCS with different frequency (0.8 vs. 5Hz) and polarity (anodal, cathodal, and sham). Two single-blind experiments compared the after effects on the resting EEG of oscillatory tDCS [Exp. 1=0.8Hz, 10 subjects (26.2±2.5years); Exp. 2=5Hz, 10 subjects (27.4±2.4years)] by manipulating its polarity. EEG signals recorded (28 scalp derivations) before and after stimulation [slow oscillations (0.5-1Hz), delta (1-4Hz), theta (5-7Hz), alpha (8-12Hz), beta 1 (13-15Hz) and beta 2 (16-24Hz)] were compared between conditions as a function of polarity (anodal vs. cathodal vs. sham) and frequency of stimulation (0.8 vs. 5Hz). We found a significant relative enhancement of the delta activity after the anodal tDCS at 5Hz compared to that at 0.8Hz. This increase, even though not reaching the statistical significance compared to sham, is concomitant to a significant increase of subjective sleepiness, as assessed by a visual analog scale. These two phenomena are linearly related with a regional specificity, correlations being restricted to cortical areas perifocal to the stimulation site. We have shown that a frontal oscillating anodal tDCS at 5Hz results in an effective change of both subjective sleepiness and spontaneous slow-frequency EEG activity. These changes are critically associated to both stimulation polarity (anodal) and frequency (5Hz). However, evidence of frequency-dependence seems more unequivocal than evidence of polarity-dependence. PMID:26964682

  1. Are the 1/3-Octave Band 63- and 125-Hz Noise Levels Predictive of Vessel Activity? The Case in the Cres-Lošinj Archipelago (Northern Adriatic Sea, Croatia).

    PubMed

    Picciulin, Marta; Sebastianutto, Linda; Fortuna, Caterina Maria; Mackelworth, Peter; Holcer, Draško; Gospić, Nikolina Rako

    2016-01-01

    A 3-years sea ambient-noise (SAN) monitoring was carried out in the Cres-Lošinj Archipelago (Croatia), where a bottlenose dolphin population is threatened by unregulated nautical tourism. A total of 540 5-min SAN samples were collected and analyzed in an Indicator 11.2.1 (Marine Strategy Framework Directive) perspective. The 1/3-octave band center frequencies of 63 and 125 Hz (re 1 μPa.rms) proved to be predictive of local predominant ship type over time. However, the noisiest band level was centered on 200 Hz. We therefore suggest measuring a wider frequency band than those requested in Indicator 11.2.1. PMID:26611038

  2. Preferential expression of the systemic lupus erythematosus-associated idiotype 8.12 in sera containing monoclonal immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Livneh, A; Preud'Homme, J L; Solomon, A; Diamond, B

    1987-12-01

    The 8.12 idiotype defines a population of anti-DNA antibodies present in the serum of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. As part of our studies to elucidate the genetic origin and structural features of anti-DNA antibodies, we examined monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)-containing sera from 706 patients for expression of the 8.12 idiotype. We found 41 such sera to have significant 8.12 reactivity (greater than 4 SD above the mean of normal controls) and demonstrated that in 24 of these sera (8 IgM, 14 IgG, and 2 IgA) this reactivity could be localized to the monoclonal protein. In addition, 12 of the 8.12-reactive monoclonal Ig (11 IgG and 1 IgA) bind dsDNA. In the other 17 sera, the 8.12 reactivity could be attributed to polyclonal antibody. These findings provide further evidence that the serum monoclonal Ig frequently express the antigenic and idiotypic reactivities of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these data support the contention that anti-DNA specificity may result from somatic diversification of germ-line Ig gene sequences. PMID:3119715

  3. Quantification of Interictal Neuromagnetic Activity in Absence Epilepsy with Accumulated Source Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jing; Tenney, Jeffrey R; Korman, Abraham M; Leiken, Kimberly; Rose, Douglas F; Harris, Elana; Yuan, Weihong; Horn, Paul S; Holland, Katherine; Loring, David W; Glauser, Tracy A

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant brain activity in childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) during seizures has been well recognized as synchronous 3 Hz spike-and-wave discharges on electroencephalography. However, brain activity from low- to very high-frequency ranges in subjects with CAE between seizures (interictal) has rarely been studied. Using a high-sampling rate magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, we studied ten subjects with clinically diagnosed but untreated CAE in comparison with age- and gender-matched controls. MEG data were recorded from all subjects during the resting state. MEG sources were assessed with accumulated source imaging, a new method optimized for localizing and quantifying spontaneous brain activity. MEG data were analyzed in nine frequency bands: delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (12-30 Hz), low-gamma (30-55 Hz), high-gamma (65-90 Hz), ripple (90-200 Hz), high-frequency oscillation (HFO, 200-1,000 Hz), and very high-frequency oscillation (VHFO, 1,000-2,000 Hz). MEG source imaging revealed that subjects with CAE had higher odds of interictal brain activity in 200-1,000 and 1,000-2,000 Hz in the parieto-occipito-temporal junction and the medial frontal cortices as compared with controls. The strength of the interictal brain activity in these regions was significantly elevated in the frequency bands of 90-200, 200-1,000 and 1,000-2,000 Hz for subjects with CAE as compared with controls. The results indicate that CAE has significantly aberrant brain activity between seizures that can be noninvasively detected. The measurements of high-frequency neuromagnetic oscillations may open a new window for investigating the cerebral mechanisms of interictal abnormalities in CAE. PMID:25359158

  4. Miniature pulse tube cooler at 100HZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Houlei; Xu, Nana; Yin, Chuanlin; Cai, Jinghui; Liang, Jingtao

    2012-06-01

    Miniature pulse tube coolers operating at 100Hz have been designed and manufactured. The regenerator is designed by REGEN 3.2, and the inertance tube is simulated by DeltaE. An in-line prototype is manufactured according to the theoretical design parameters initially. On that basis, a coaxial cooler is developed and with double inlet it gains higher cooling performance.

  5. Thomson Scattering at 250 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, William; den Hartog, D. J.; Morton, L. A.; MST Team

    2015-11-01

    The fast Thomson scattering diagnostic on the MST Reversed-Field Pinch experiment now measures electron temperature at rates of up to 250 kHz, allowing for single shot analysis of phenomena that previously required ensembles of measurements from many shots. Recent laser upgrades include the addition of a second Nd:glass amplifier (giving a total of six amplifiers including four Nd:YAG stages) and optimization of neodymium doping levels within the glass amplifier stages to reduce thermal defocusing. The master-oscillator power-amplifier laser system operates in a pulse-burst mode where the laser generates multiple pulses per flashlamp firing and these bursts of laser pulses are repeated multiple times. When optimizing for the largest number of laser pulses, the laser produces up to 30 pulses at a rate of 100 kHz per burst repeated up to 4 times every 2 ms for a total of 120 temperature measurements per MST discharge. When optimizing for fastest pulsing rate, the laser can produce 8 pulses at 250 kHz within a single burst. A laser system upgrade currently underway is replacement of the diode-pumped pulsed Nd:YVO4 master oscillator with a CW laser chopped by an acoustic-optic modulator; this upgrade may enable pulsing rates faster than 250 kHz. This work is supported by the US DOE and NSF.

  6. Sounds in the Ocean at 1-100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, William S. D.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Andrew, Rex K.; Odom, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

  7. Sounds in the ocean at 1-100 Hz.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, William S D; Stafford, Kathleen M; Andrew, Rex K; Odom, Robert I

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them. PMID:23876176

  8. Career Education Program, 1980-1981, Columbia County School System. Teacher Guide, Grades 8-12. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Central Savannah River Area Cooperative Educational Services Agency, Thomson, GA.

    This guide contains a variety of materials to help teachers for grades 8-12 (specifically those in the Columbia County School System, Georgia) infuse career education into their classrooms. Contents include both school system-specific and general information: (1) brief discussion of career education; (2) listing of nine student outcome objectives;…

  9. An Exercise in Using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Hazard Ranking System: A Simulation. Grades 8-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAZWRAP, The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program.

    The educational objective of this exercise is for students to use a risk assessment tool to evaluate a hazardous release site and for students in grades 8-12 to increase their experience with geology, aquifers, soils, land use, pollution, data analysis, and map concepts. Students use background information on hazardous materials, the Environmental…

  10. Effect of level, duration, and inter-pulse interval of 1-2 kHz sonar signal exposures on harbor porpoise hearing.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Hoek, Lean; Gransier, Robin; Rambags, Martijn; Claeys, Naomi

    2014-07-01

    Safety criteria for underwater low-frequency active sonar sounds produced during naval exercises are needed to protect harbor porpoise hearing. As a first step toward defining criteria, a porpoise was exposed to sequences consisting of series of 1-s, 1-2 kHz sonar down-sweeps without harmonics (as fatiguing noise) at various combinations of average received sound pressure levels (SPLs; 144-179 dB re 1 μPa), exposure durations (1.9-240 min), and duty cycles (5%-100%). Hearing thresholds were determined for a narrow-band frequency-swept sine wave centered at 1.5 kHz before exposure to the fatiguing noise, and at 1-4, 4-8, 8-12, 48, 96, 144, and 1400 min after exposure, to quantify temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) and recovery of hearing. Results show that the inter-pulse interval of the fatiguing noise is an important parameter in determining the magnitude of noise-induced TTS. For the reported range of exposure combinations (duration and SPL), the energy of the exposure (i.e., cumulative sound exposure level; SELcum) can be used to predict the induced TTS, if the inter-pulse interval is known. Exposures with equal SELcum but with different inter-pulse intervals do not result in the same induced TTS. PMID:24993225

  11. The Exploration of Mars. Educational Brief: Planetary Science, Grades 8-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This booklet gives a history of human observations of Mars, including observations made from U.S. unmanned spacecraft. Also included is a discussion, "Encountering a New World: How to Explore a Planet," which contains classroom discussion questions and four classroom activities. The classroom activities include: (1) How to explore a planet; (2)…

  12. RHIC 10 Hz global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, R.; Arnold, L.; Carboni, L.; Cerniglia, P; Curcio, A.; DeSanto, L.; Folz, C.; Ho, C.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.; Karl, R.; Luo, Y.; Liu, C.; MacKay, W.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Popken, P.; Przybylinski, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Schoenfeld, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weston, A.; White, J.; Ziminski, P.; Zimmerman, P.

    2011-03-28

    Vibrations of the cryogenic triplet magnets at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are suspected to be causing the horizontal beam perturbations observed at frequencies around 10 Hz. Several solutions to counteract the effect have been considered in the past, including a local beam feedback system at each of the two experimental areas, reinforcing the magnet base support assembly, and a mechanical servo feedback system. However, the local feedback system was insufficient because perturbation amplitudes outside the experimental areas were still problematic, and the mechanical solutions are very expensive. A global 10 Hz orbit feedback system consisting of 36 beam position monitors (BPMs) and 12 small dedicated dipole corrector magnets in each of the two 3.8 km circumference counter-rotating rings has been developed and commissioned in February 2011. A description of the system architecture and results with beam will be discussed.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging at frequencies below 1 kHz.

    PubMed

    Hilschenz, Ingo; Körber, Rainer; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Fedele, Tommaso; Albrecht, Hans-Helge; Mario Cassará, Antonino; Hartwig, Stefan; Trahms, Lutz; Haase, Jürgen; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Within the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) community the trend is going to higher and higher magnetic fields, ranging from 1.5 T to 7 T, corresponding to Larmor frequencies of 63.8-298 MHz. Since for high-field MRI the magnetization increases with the applied magnetic field, the signal-to-noise-ratio increases as well, thus enabling higher image resolutions. On the other hand, MRI is possible also at ultra-low magnetic fields, as was shown by different groups. The goal of our development was to reach a Larmor frequency range of the low-field MRI system corresponding to the frequency range of human brain activities ranging from near zero-frequency (near-DC) to over 1 kHz. Here, first 2D MRI images of phantoms taken at Larmor frequencies of 100 Hz and 731 Hz will be shown and discussed. These frequencies are examples of brain activity triggered by electrostimulation of the median nerve. The method will allow the magnetic fields of the brain currents to influence the magnetic resonance image, and thus lead to a direct functional imaging modality of neuronal currents. PMID:22898690

  14. The 10 Hz Frequency: A Fulcrum For Transitional Brain States

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Mahaffey, S.; Urbano, F. J.; Phillips, C.

    2016-01-01

    A 10 Hz rhythm is present in the occipital cortex when the eyes are closed (alpha waves), in the precentral cortex at rest (mu rhythm), in the superior and middle temporal lobe (tau rhythm), in the inferior olive (projection to cerebellar cortex), and in physiological tremor (underlying all voluntary movement). These are all considered resting rhythms in the waking brain which are “replaced” by higher frequency activity with sensorimotor stimulation. That is, the 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is replaced on the one hand by lower frequencies during sleep, or on the other hand by higher frequencies during volition and cognition. The 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is proposed as the natural frequency of the brain during quiet waking, but is replaced by higher frequencies capable of permitting more complex functions, or by lower frequencies during sleep and inactivity. At the center of the transition shifts to and from the resting rhythm is the reticular activating system, a phylogenetically preserved area of the brain essential for preconscious awareness.

  15. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 4 of 4; Flight Days 8 - 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video, Part 4 of 4, shows footage of crew activities from flight days 8 through 12 of STS-109. The crew included: Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, Richard Linnehan, James Newman, Michael Massimino, Mission Speicalists. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476). The primary activity on flight day 8 was an EVA (extravehicular activity) by Grunsfeld and Linnehan to install a cryocooler and radiator for the NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer) on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Before returning to Columbia's airlock, the astronauts, with a cloudy background, hold onto the orbiter and offer their thoughts on the significance of their mission, the HST, and spaceflight. Footage from flight day 9 includes the grappling, unbearthing, and deployment of the HST from Columbia, and the crew coordinating and videotaping Columbia's departure. Flight day 10 was a relatively inactive day, and flight day 11 includes a checkout of Columbia's aerodynamic surfaces. Columbia landed on flight day 12, which is covered by footage of the crew members speaking during reentry, and their night landing, primarily shown through the orbiter's head-up display. The video includes numerous views of the HST, as well as views of the the Galapagos Islands, Madagascar, and Southern Africa with parts of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, and part of the coast of Chile. The pistol grip space tool is shown in use, and the crew answers two messages from the public, including a message to Massimino from the Fire Department of New York.

  16. Photometry of the old nova HZ Pup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanelli, Tomas; Abbott, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This study of the old nova HZ Pup involved obtaining image data, removing the instrumental signature, performing photometry on the stellar images present, and generating light curves. Relative photometry between the target star and other stars in the image was used to remove atmospheric effects. A periodogram of this light curve shows the historically known periodicity close to 20 minutes. However, other periodicities are also present and it is not clear from the data which are real and which are artifacts of the sampling. These data will be combined with data from other telescopes collected contemporaneously in order to resolve this ambiguity.

  17. On-Going Frontal Alpha Rhythms Are Dominant in Passive State and Desynchronize in Active State in Adult Gray Mouse Lemurs.

    PubMed

    Infarinato, Francesco; Rahman, Anisur; Del Percio, Claudio; Lamberty, Yves; Bordet, Regis; Richardson, Jill C; Forloni, Gianluigi; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus; Lopez, Susanna; Aujard, Fabienne; Babiloni, Claudio; Pifferi, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is considered a useful primate model for translational research. In the framework of IMI PharmaCog project (Grant Agreement n°115009, www.pharmacog.org), we tested the hypothesis that spectral electroencephalographic (EEG) markers of motor and locomotor activity in gray mouse lemurs reflect typical movement-related desynchronization of alpha rhythms (about 8-12 Hz) in humans. To this aim, EEG (bipolar electrodes in frontal cortex) and electromyographic (EMG; bipolar electrodes sutured in neck muscles) data were recorded in 13 male adult (about 3 years) lemurs. Artifact-free EEG segments during active state (gross movements, exploratory movements or locomotor activity) and awake passive state (no sleep) were selected on the basis of instrumental measures of animal behavior, and were used as an input for EEG power density analysis. Results showed a clear peak of EEG power density at alpha range (7-9 Hz) during passive state. During active state, there was a reduction in alpha power density (8-12 Hz) and an increase of power density at slow frequencies (1-4 Hz). Relative EMG activity was related to EEG power density at 2-4 Hz (positive correlation) and at 8-12 Hz (negative correlation). These results suggest for the first time that the primate gray mouse lemurs and humans may share basic neurophysiologic mechanisms of synchronization of frontal alpha rhythms in awake passive state and their desynchronization during motor and locomotor activity. These EEG markers may be an ideal experimental model for translational basic (motor science) and applied (pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions) research in Neurophysiology. PMID:26618512

  18. The effect of 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on corticomuscular coherence

    PubMed Central

    Wach, Claudia; Krause, Vanessa; Moliadze, Vera; Paulus, Walter; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Synchronous oscillatory activity at alpha (8–12 Hz), beta (13–30 Hz), and gamma (30–90 Hz) frequencies is assumed to play a key role for motor control. Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) represents an established measure of the pyramidal system's integrity. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) offers the possibility to modulate ongoing oscillatory activity. Behaviorally, 20 Hz tACS in healthy subjects has been shown to result in movement slowing. However, the neurophysiological changes underlying these effects are not entirely understood yet. The present study aimed at ascertaining the effects of tACS at 10 and 20 Hz in healthy subjects on CMC and local power of the primary sensorimotor cortex. Neuromagnetic activity was recorded during isometric contraction before and at two time points (2–10 min and 30–38 min) after tACS of the left primary motor cortex (M1), using a 306 channel whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system. Additionally, electromyography (EMG) of the right extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle was measured. TACS was applied at 10 and 20 Hz, respectively, for 10 min at 1 mA. Sham stimulation served as control condition. The data suggest that 10 Hz tACS significantly reduced low gamma band CMC during isometric contraction. This implies that tACS does not necessarily cause effects at stimulation frequency. Rather, the findings suggest cross-frequency interplay between alpha and low gamma band activity modulating functional interaction between motor cortex and muscle. PMID:24009573

  19. 4-Hz oscillations synchronize prefrontal-amygdala circuits during fear behavior.

    PubMed

    Karalis, Nikolaos; Dejean, Cyril; Chaudun, Fabrice; Khoder, Suzana; Rozeske, Robert R; Wurtz, Hélène; Bagur, Sophie; Benchenane, Karim; Sirota, Anton; Courtin, Julien; Herry, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Fear expression relies on the coordinated activity of prefrontal and amygdala circuits, yet the mechanisms allowing long-range network synchronization during fear remain unknown. Using a combination of extracellular recordings, pharmacological and optogenetic manipulations, we found that freezing, a behavioral expression of fear, temporally coincided with the development of sustained, internally generated 4-Hz oscillations in prefrontal-amygdala circuits. 4-Hz oscillations predict freezing onset and offset and synchronize prefrontal-amygdala circuits. Optogenetic induction of prefrontal 4-Hz oscillations coordinates prefrontal-amygdala activity and elicits fear behavior. These results unravel a sustained oscillatory mechanism mediating prefrontal-amygdala coupling during fear behavior. PMID:26878674

  20. Environmental and Pharmacological Modulation of Amphetamine-Induced 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rippberger, Henrike; van Gaalen, Marcel M.; Schwarting, Rainer K.W.; WÖhr, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Rats emit high-frequency 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) in appetitive situations like social interactions. Drugs of abuse are probably the most potent non-social elicitors of 50-kHz USV, possibly reflecting their euphorigenic properties. Psychostimulants induce the strongest elevation in 50-kHz USV emission, particularly amphetamine (AMPH), either when applied systemically or locally into the nucleus accumbens (Nacc). Emission of AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV depends on test context, such as the presence of conspecifics, and can be manipulated pharmacologically by targeting major neurotransmitter systems, including dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5-HT), but also protein kinase C (PKC) signaling. Several D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, as well as typical and atypical antipsychotics block the AMPH-induced elevation in 50-kHz USV. Inhibiting D1 and D2 receptors in the Nacc abolishes AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV, indicating a key role for this brain area. NA neurotransmission also regulates AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV emission given that α1 receptor antagonists and α2 receptor agonists exert attenuating effects. Supporting the involvement of the 5-HT system, AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV are attenuated by 5-HT2C receptor activation, whereas 5-HT2C receptor antagonism leads to the opposite effect. Finally, treatment with lithium, tamoxifen, and myricitrin was all found to result in a complete abolishment of the AMPH-induced increase in 50-kHz USV, suggesting the involvement of PKC signaling. Neurotransmitter systems involved in AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV emission only partially overlap with other AMPH-induced behaviors like hyperlocomotion. The validity of AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV as a preclinical model for neuropsychiatric disorders is discussed, particularly with relevance to altered drive and mood seen in bipolar disorder. PMID:26411764

  1. Hearing thresholds of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) for sweeps (1-2 kHz and 6-7 kHz bands) mimicking naval sonar signals.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Hoek, Lean; de Jong, Christ A F

    2011-05-01

    The distance at which active naval sonar signals can be heard by harbor porpoises depends, among other factors, on the hearing thresholds of the species for those signals. Therefore the hearing sensitivity of a harbor porpoise was determined for 1 s up-sweep and down-sweep signals, mimicking mid-frequency and low-frequency active sonar sweeps (MFAS, 6-7 kHz band; LFAS, 1-2 kHz band). The 1-2 kHz sweeps were also tested with harmonics, as sonars sometimes produce these as byproducts of the fundamental signal. The hearing thresholds for up-sweeps and down-sweeps within each sweep pair were similar. The 50% detection threshold sound pressure levels (broadband, averaged over the signal duration) of the 1-2 kHz and 6-7 kHz sweeps were 75 and 67 dB re 1 μPa(2), respectively. Harmonic deformation of the 1-2 kHz sweeps reduced the threshold to 59 dB re 1 μPa(2). This study shows that the presence of harmonics in sonar signals can increase the detectability of a signal by harbor porpoises, and that tonal audiograms may not accurately predict the audibility of sweeps. LFAS systems, when designed to produce signals without harmonics, can operate at higher source levels than MFAS systems, at similar audibility distances for porpoises. PMID:21568440

  2. Primary calibration system for vibration transducers from 0.4 Hz to 160 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C. D.; Ripper, G. P.; Dias, R. S.; Teixeira, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a system developed at the Vibration Laboratory of Inmetro, which is used for primary calibration of vibration transducers by the fringe counting method. This system includes a vibration exciter, a Michelson interferometer, a data acquisition board, a band-pass filter, a universal counter and a software for measurement automation. It allows the laboratory to perform calibrations in accordance with the international standard ISO 16063-11 in the frequency range from 0.4 Hz to 160 Hz. Some experimental results are presented herein.

  3. Excellent results of HA coating on a grit-blasted stem: 245 patients followed for 8-12 years.

    PubMed

    Reikerås, Olav; Gunderson, Ragnhild B

    2003-04-01

    We report the outcome of a grit-blasted titanium stem designed for press-fit insertion and entirely plasma sprayed with HA. During the years 1988-1993, we performed 323 primary total hip replacements in 276 patients (189 women) with a HA-coated prosthesis. Their mean age was 48 (15-79) years. During the follow-up, 12 patients died. 19 other patients did not attend the follow-up examination, but had no major symptoms according to telephone interviews and written replies. Thus, 245 patients (291 hips) were followed for a mean of 10 (8-12) years with radiographic and clinical examinations. Only 1 stem was revised due to mechanical failure. None were revised because of infection. Osteolysis was significantly associated with wear, and wear was significantly associated with the size of the femoral head. We found a small amount of proximal bone loss (37/291) and a low incidence of distal hypertrophy of the bone (23/291). These observations indicate an essentially physiological weight distribution from the stem to the femoral bone. The changes in the bone confirmed that the femoral component was well fixed in asymptomatic patients. To conclude, we found excellent 8-12-year results with a fully HA-coated femoral prosthesis designed for press-fit insertion. PMID:12807319

  4. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  5. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  6. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  7. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  8. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  9. Thomson scattering at 250 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, W. C.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Several upgrades have been applied to the high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering diagnostic on the MST experiment, having increased the rate and number of electron temperature measurements. The detector portion of the Thomson scattering system requires 1.5-2.0 J, 10-20 ns laser pulses at 1064 nm. A high-repetition-rate laser produces suitable pulses for short 3-4 pulse bursts with only 3 μs pulse spacing. Alternatively, the laser timing can be optimized to maximize the number of pulses in a single burst, producing up to 44 pulses at a rate of 100 kHz. The laser follows a master oscillator, power amplifier architecture. Upgrades to the laser include: a new acousto-optic modulator chopped CW laser based master oscillator, a sixth power amplifier, optimized Nd doping within Nd:glass amplifiers via optical modeling of the pump chamber, and a yet to be installed new cavity reflector. Additionally, a new long wavelength filter has been added to the Thomson scattering diagnostic's polychromator based detector, allowing possible detection of net electron drift.

  10. The auditory transient 40-Hz response is insensitive to changes in stimulus features.

    PubMed

    Tiitinen, H; Sinkkonen, J; May, P; Näätänen, R

    1994-12-30

    Ten subjects were presented with tone pips occasionally interspersed with deviant tone pips of a higher frequency. The transient 40-Hz response was insensitive to change in qualitative stimulus features. In contrast, stimulus changes elicited a later and slower event-related potential, the mismatch negativity (MMN). As a response to changes in stimulus features implies the existence of a memory system, and because changes in qualitative stimulus aspects do not activate the generator mechanisms underlying the 40-Hz response, the 40-Hz response can be dissociated from memory mechanisms. Furthermore, the analysis of phase-locked (synchronous) and non-phase-locked (asynchronous) responses revealed that the 40-Hz response might be caused by the synchronization of already active oscillators. PMID:7703412

  11. Discovery of 1-5 Hz flaring at high luminosity in SAX J1808.4-3658

    SciTech Connect

    Bult, Peter; Van der Klis, Michiel

    2014-07-10

    We report the discovery of a 1-5 Hz X-ray flaring phenomenon observed at >30 mCrab near peak luminosity in the 2008 and 2011 outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 in observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. In each of the two outbursts this high luminosity flaring is seen for ∼3 continuous days and switches on and off on a timescale of 1-2 hr. The flaring can be seen directly in the light curve, where it shows sharp spikes of emission at quasi-regular separation. In the power spectrum it produces a broad noise component, which peaks at 1-5 Hz. The total 0.05-10 Hz variability has a fractional rms amplitude of 20%-45%, well in excess of the 8%-12% rms broadband noise usually seen in power spectra of SAX J1808.4-3658. We perform a detailed timing analysis of the flaring and study its relation to the 401 Hz pulsations. We find that the pulse amplitude varies proportionally with source flux through all phases of the flaring, indicating that the flaring is likely due to mass density variations created at or outside the magnetospheric boundary. We suggest that this 1-5 Hz flaring is a high mass accretion rate version of the 0.5-2 Hz flaring which is known to occur at low luminosity (<13 mCrab), late in the tail of outbursts of SAX J1808.4-3658. We propose the dead-disk instability, previously suggested as the mechanism for the 0.5-2 Hz flaring, as a likely mechanism for the high luminosity flaring reported here.

  12. Rheological properties in discotic liquid crystalline phases of 2,3,7,8,12,13-hexa(n-tetradecanoyloxy)truxene.

    PubMed

    Negita, Keishi; Kawano, Chiharu; Moriya, Keiichi

    2004-08-01

    Measurements of rheological properties, including the electrorheological effect, are made in liquid crystalline phases, discotic nematic (ND) and discotic disordered rectangular columnar (Drd) phases, of 2,3,7,8,12,13-hexa(n-tetradecanoyloxy)truxene. It is found that the fluidity of the ND phase is Newtonian and an application of high electric field perpendicular to the flow direction (velocity gradient direction) causes a decrease of the viscosity. These results indicate that a flow alignment of the director occurs with its orientation near the velocity gradient direction and the signs of the Leslie coefficients alpha2 and alpha3 are positive. From the temperature dependence of alpha2, instability of the flow alignment structure in ND and Drd phases is also discussed. PMID:15447504

  13. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report, Scan and activity data for experiments 4 and 4A, [July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1992-11-02

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon surrogate for the human. Baboon social groups were scanned and electronically monitored during Experiments IV and IVA. The social scan, form that the technicians used to identify baboon locations and proximity to other baboons: was used to gain a simple snapshot of the position of the baboons in their cage. The scans were taken hourly every morning and evening for a total of eight scans per side per day. This report covers in detail the scan and activity data-gathering process. A set of appendices is attached which include printouts of the data sets and adjunct material pertinent to interpreting the data. The supporting material is comprised of calendars and listings of major events that occurred during the scan and activity data collection.

  14. Narrow-band 5 kHz hiss observed in the vicinity of the plasmapause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondoh, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Murakami, T.

    1981-01-01

    Latitudinal distributions of narrow-band 5 kHz hisses have been statistically obtained by using VLF electric field data received from the ISIS-1 and -2 at Syowa station, Antarctica and Kashima station, Japan, in order to study an origin of the narrow-band 5 kHz hisses which are often observed on the ground in mid- and low-latitudes. The result shows that the narrow-band 5 kHz hiss occurs most frequently at geomagnetically invariant latitudes from 55 to 63 deg, which are roughly the plasmapause latitudes at various geomagnetic activities, both in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The narrow-band 5 kHz hiss seems to be generated by the cyclotron instabilities of several keV to a few ten keV electrons for the most feasible electron density of 10 to 1000 per cu cm in the vicinity of the equatorial plasmapause.

  15. Multiscale magnetosheath turbulence model from mHz to kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Navin; Narita, Yasuhito

    2015-04-01

    We construct a nonlinear whistler wave model under the influence of the ponderomotive force to explain the energy spectra and the waveforms observed in loin roar waves in Earth's magnetosheath region. We use the two-fluid approach to derive the model equations governing the dynamics of ion-acoustic and whistler waves propagating along the ambient magnetic field. On the account of ponderomotive force, nonlinearity arises in the dynamics of ion-acoustic wave which modify the background number density under the steady state condition. Whistler wave nonlinearly interacts with the ion-acoustic wave while propagating through the density inhomogeneity created by the ponderomotive force, and gets modulated and forms localized structures in the magnetic field. Furthermore, we develop a semi-analytical numerical method to compute the magnetic energy spectrum of whistler wave and investigate the spectral features of the spectrum. The magnetic field spectrum shows a spectral break accompanied by the steepening of the spectrum with a spectral index -3.2 at higher wave numbers. In the recent past, the magnetic field fluctuations with the occurrence of lion roar waves are widely investigated in the frequency range from 20 to 1000 Hz in Earth's magnetosheath. The observed lion roar waves show a broadband turbulence spectrum with the spectral slope about -4.5. The present model develop a concept on multiscale magnetosheath turbulence in which turbulence at low frequencies (mHz) is dominated by mirror mode, however at high frequencies (kHz) it is mainly due to the nonlinear whistler waves and the whistler turbulence is embedded inside the mirror mode.

  16. Kainate-induced network activity in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, R; Hojo, Y; Mukai, H; Hashizume, M; Murakoshi, T

    2016-06-14

    Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays a pivotal role in higher order processing of cognition, attention and emotion. The network oscillation is considered an essential means for integration of these CNS functions. The oscillation power and coherence among related areas are often dis-regulated in several psychiatric and pathological conditions with a hemispheric asymmetric manner. Here we describe the network-based activity of field potentials recorded from the superficial layer of the mouse ACC in vitro using submerged type recordings. A short activation by kainic acid administration to the preparation induced populational activities ranging over several frequency bands including theta (3-8Hz), alpha (8-12Hz), beta (13-30Hz), low gamma (30-50Hz) and high gamma (50-80Hz). These responses were repeatable and totally abolished by tetrodotoxin, and greatly diminished by inhibitors of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABAA receptor or gap-junctions. These observations suggest that the kainate-induced network activity can be a useful model of the network oscillation in the ACC circuit. PMID:26993576

  17. A cis-regulatory site downregulates PTHLH in translocation t(8;12)(q13;p11.2) and leads to Brachydactyly Type E

    PubMed Central

    Maass, Philipp G.; Wirth, Jutta; Aydin, Atakan; Rump, Andreas; Stricker, Sigmar; Tinschert, Sigrid; Otero, Miguel; Tsuchimochi, Kaneyuki; Goldring, Mary B.; Luft, Friedrich C.; Bähring, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-like hormone (PTHLH) is an important chondrogenic regulator; however, the gene has not been directly linked to human disease. We studied a family with autosomal-dominant Brachydactyly Type E (BDE) and identified a t(8;12)(q13;p11.2) translocation with breakpoints (BPs) upstream of PTHLH on chromosome 12p11.2 and a disrupted KCNB2 on 8q13. We sequenced the BPs and identified a highly conserved Activator protein 1 (AP-1) motif on 12p11.2, together with a C-ets-1 motif translocated from 8q13. AP-1 and C-ets-1 bound in vitro and in vivo at the derivative chromosome 8 breakpoint [der(8) BP], but were differently enriched between the wild-type and BP allele. We differentiated fibroblasts from BDE patients into chondrogenic cells and found that PTHLH and its targets, ADAMTS-7 and ADAMTS-12 were downregulated along with impaired chondrogenic differentiation. We next used human and murine chondrocytes and observed that the AP-1 motif stimulated, whereas der(8) BP or C-ets-1 decreased, PTHLH promoter activity. These results are the first to identify a cis-directed PTHLH downregulation as primary cause of human chondrodysplasia. PMID:20015959

  18. Long-term underwater sound measurements in the shipping noise indicator bands 63Hz and 125Hz from the port of Falmouth Bay, UK.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J K; Blondel, Ph; Godley, B J; Pikesley, S K; Witt, M J; Johanning, L

    2016-09-15

    Chronic low-frequency anthropogenic sound, such as shipping noise, may be negatively affecting marine life. The EU's Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) includes a specific indicator focused on this noise. This indicator is the yearly average sound level in third-octave bands with centre frequencies at 63Hz and 125Hz. These levels are described for Falmouth Bay, UK, an active port at the entrance to the English Channel. Underwater sound was recorded for 30min h(-1) over the period June 2012 to November 2013 for a total of 435days. Mean third-octave levels were louder in the 125-Hz band (annual mean level of 96.0dB re 1μPa) than in the 63-Hz band (92.6dB re 1 μPa). These levels and variations are assessed as a function of seasons, shipping activity and wave height, providing comparison points for future monitoring activities, including the MSFD and emerging international regulation. PMID:27393210

  19. Design studies for the LCLS 120 Hz RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.Y.; Pjerov, S.; Woodle, M.

    2000-11-01

    A preliminary design studies were carried out at Brookhaven National Laboratory for a photocathode RF gun injection system for LCLS 120 Hz operation. The starting point for the design is 50 Hz BNL Gun IV developed by a BNL/KEK/SHI collaboration. The basic parameters of the 120 Hz gun is discussed in this report. The complete photocathode RF gun injection system is described for a 120 Hz operation. The injector system includes photocathode RF gun, emittance compensation solenoid magnet, laser system and laser beam delivery system, and electron beam diagnostics. The basic design parameters, mechanical modification and the performance will be presented in this report.

  20. Beyond 10 J/ 2 Hz LUCIA current status with cryogenic amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucianetti, A.; Novo, T.; Vincent, B.; Albach, D.; Chanteloup, J.-C.

    2011-06-01

    More than 10 Joules at 2 Hz were recently obtained from the LUCIA laser system based on diode-pumped Yb:YAG active mirrors. This achievement is the result of careful management of both Amplified Spontaneous Emission and thermal effects in laser amplifiers. Future developments including a cryogenically-cooled active mirror are also presented.

  1. BOLD fractional contribution to resting-state functional connectivity above 0.1 Hz.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyuan E; Glover, Gary H

    2015-02-15

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) spontaneous signals from resting-state (RS) brains have typically been characterized by low-pass filtered timeseries at frequencies ≤ 0.1 Hz, and studies of these low-frequency fluctuations have contributed exceptional understanding of the baseline functions of our brain. Very recently, emerging evidence has demonstrated that spontaneous activities may persist in higher frequency bands (even up to 0.8 Hz), while presenting less variable network patterns across the scan duration. However, as an indirect measure of neuronal activity, BOLD signal results from an inherently slow hemodynamic process, which in fact might be too slow to accommodate the observed high-frequency functional connectivity (FC). To examine whether the observed high-frequency spontaneous FC originates from BOLD contrast, we collected RS data as a function of echo time (TE). Here we focus on two specific resting state networks - the default-mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN), and the major findings are fourfold: (1) we observed BOLD-like linear TE-dependence in the spontaneous activity at frequency bands up to 0.5 Hz (the maximum frequency that can be resolved with TR=1s), supporting neural relevance of the RSFC at a higher frequency range; (2) conventional models of hemodynamic response functions must be modified to support resting state BOLD contrast, especially at higher frequencies; (3) there are increased fractions of non-BOLD-like contributions to the RSFC above the conventional 0.1 Hz (non-BOLD/BOLD contrast at 0.4-0.5 Hz is ~4 times that at <0.1 Hz); and (4) the spatial patterns of RSFC are frequency-dependent. Possible mechanisms underlying the present findings and technical concerns regarding RSFC above 0.1 Hz are discussed. PMID:25497686

  2. Morphological analysis on the coherence of kHz QPOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Chang, H. K.; Zhang, C. M.; Wang, D. H.; Chen, L.; Qu, J. L.; Song, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    We take the recently published data of twin kHz quasi-period oscillations (QPOs) in neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) as the samples, and investigate the morphology of the samples, which focuses on the quality factor, peak frequency of kHz QPOs, and try to infer their physical mechanism. We notice that: (1) The quality factors of upper kHz QPOs are low (2˜20 in general) and increase with the kHz QPO peak frequencies for both Z and Atoll sources. (2) The distribution of quality factor versus frequency for the lower kHz QPOs are quite different between Z and Atoll sources. For most Z source samples, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are low (usually lower than 15) and rise steadily with the peak frequencies except for Sco X-1, which drop abruptly at the frequency of about 750 Hz. While for most Atoll sources, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are very high (from 2 to 200) and usually have a rising part, a maximum and an abrupt drop. (3) There are three Atoll sources (4U 1728-34, 4U 1636-53 and 4U 1608-52) of displaying very high quality factors for lower kHz QPOs. These three sources have been detected with the spin frequencies and sidebands, in which the source with higher spin frequency presents higher quality factor of lower kHz QPOs and lower difference between sideband frequency and lower kHz QPO frequency.

  3. The effects of morphine and morphine conditioned context on 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalisation in rats.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Adam; Taracha, Ewa; Szyndler, Janusz; Krząścik, Paweł; Lehner, Małgorzata; Maciejak, Piotr; Skórzewska, Anna; Płaźnik, Adam

    2012-04-15

    The 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalisations (USVs) that are emitted by rats are dependent on activity of dopaminergic neurons projecting from the ventral tegmental area to the limbic and cortical structures. According to many experimental data, emission of the 50 kHz USV reflects a positive emotional state. The appetitive calls are also emitted in response to the administration of drugs of abuse, e.g., cocaine or amphetamine (AMPH), or in a reply to a positively conditioned context. However, there is no strong evidence in the literature that morphine can also modulate 50 kHz USVs. The aim of this paper is to study the effects of morphine and morphine-conditioned context on 50 kHz USVs, using spontaneously or drug-modulated 50 kHz USVs. Our results showed that acute administration of morphine to rats after withdrawal period inhibited the emission of 50 kHz USVs. The stimulating effect of morphine-conditioned context on 50 kHz USVs appeared on the post-withdrawal challenge day immediately before drug injection, 14 days after the last episode of morphine-induced context conditioning. The context-induced 50 kHz USVs can be used as a sensitive test for drug dependency. The current study also shows that 50 kHz USVs can be useful tool for studying the mechanisms of long lasting central effects of morphine. PMID:22326697

  4. Participation in life situations of 8-12 year old children with cerebral palsy: cross sectional European study

    PubMed Central

    Fauconnier, Jérôme; Dickinson, Heather O; Beckung, Eva; Marcelli, Marco; McManus, Vicki; Michelsen, Susan I; Parkes, Jackie; Parkinson, Kathryn N; Thyen, Ute; Arnaud, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate how involvement in life situations (participation) in children with cerebral palsy varies with type and severity of impairment and to investigate geographical variation in participation. Design Cross sectional study. Trained interviewers visited parents of children with cerebral palsy; multilevel multivariable regression related participation to impairments, pain, and sociodemographic characteristics. Setting Eight European regions with population registers of children with cerebral palsy; one further region recruited children from multiple sources. Participants 1174 children aged 8-12 with cerebral palsy randomly selected from the population registers, 743 (63%) joined in the study; the further region recruited 75 children. Main outcome measure Children’s participation assessed by the Life-H questionnaire covering 10 main areas of daily life. Scoring ignored adaptations or assistance required for participation. Results Children with pain and those with more severely impaired walking, fine motor skills, communication, and intellectual abilities had lower participation across most domains. Type of cerebral palsy and problems with feeding and vision were associated with lower participation for specific domains, but the sociodemographic factors examined were not. Impairment and pain accounted for up to a sixth of the variation in participation. Participation on all domains varied substantially between regions: children in east Denmark had consistently higher participation than children in other regions. For most participation domains, about a third of the unexplained variation could be ascribed to variation between regions and about two thirds to variation between individuals. Conclusions Participation in children with cerebral palsy should be assessed in clinical practice to guide intervention and assess its effect. Pain should be carefully assessed. Some European countries facilitate participation better than others, implying some countries

  5. Hydrogen bond network fluctuations in small (H2O)n clusters (n=8-12-24)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masella, Michel; Flament, Jean-Pierre

    1999-09-01

    Molecular dynamic studies of three (H2O)n clusters (n=8-12-24) were performed using our recently developed many-body model TCPE [J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9105 (1997)] in the microcanonical ensemble. The trajectories were analyzed using a new structural local index derived from one of the many-body energetic term of TCPE. In the energy domain where the clusters are in a liquidlike state, a dynamical equilibrium is theoretically predicted to exist among molecules in the PHB1 and the PHB2 state (i.e., among molecules which one of their protons is involved in one hydrogen bond, the PHB1 state, and molecules which both of their protons are involved in two hydrogen bonds, the PHB2 state). The enthalpy and entropy changes corresponding to that equilibrium for the three clusters range from 0.75 to 1.10 kcal mol-1 and from -7 to -3.8 cal mol-1 K-1. Such an equilibrium between two species of hydrogen bonded molecules could be related to that experimentally observed in the case of liquid water at ambient conditions. In particular, the entropy changes corresponding to PHB2/PHB1 equilibrium in the case of the three clusters are very close to those experimentally reported for liquid water (about 6.6±0.5 cal mol-1 K-1), suggesting that the equilibrium observed in the case of liquid water could correspond to a PHB2/PHB1 equilibrium. The analysis of hydrogen bond networks in terms of PHBm states appears thus to be an encouraging way in characterising the dynamical properties of water systems.

  6. The validation and comparison of the GOCI aerosol optical thickness products: a case study of Tianjin 8.12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lingling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hui; Jiang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    COMSGOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) is the first geostationary ocean color satellite in the world launched by South Korea in June 2010, which includes eight bands from the visible to the infrared band. GOCI aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 555nm was retrieved by atmospheric radiative transfer model based on two-stream approximation algorithm. Due to GOCI without near infrared band and has a high solar elevation angle, solar zenith angle must be recalibrated to solve the earth system albedo, and the surface reflectance solved by quack atmospheric correction and recalculated backward scatter coefficient. Evaluation of GOCIAOT with AERONET measurements showed that the average error becomes 0.107 from the original 0.393, that means GOCI aerosol optical thickness can be more accurately with the advanced two-stream approximation. Taking the eastern China in 3 and 4 December 2013 for example, comparing the GOCIAOT at 555nm, MODISAOT retrievals at 550nm, NPPAOT at 550nm and AERONET data products indicated that: take the AERONET data as reference, the error of three kinds of satellite data can be ordered as following: MODISAOT< GOCIAOT< NPPAOT and the GOCI-MODIS shows a bias of 0.02917 with the GOCI-NPP. GOCIAOT is 0.05714 generally bigger than that of MODISAOT. NPP-GOCI deviation is 0.10253. The deficiency of MODIS is its low spatial resolution and the high concentration of AOT will be mistaken for a cloud area. However, GOCI can well reflect the concentration and distribution of aerosols. Therefore, GOGI can provide real-time dynamic monitoring on China Eastern atmospheric environment and the accurate time event information of haze for each process can be obtained. Finally, applied GOCI to the "8.12 Tianjin bombings" and to monitor the migration and dispersion of pollutant.

  7. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  8. 40 Hz auditory steady state response to linguistic features of stimuli during auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Yan, Zheng; Gao, Xiao-rong

    2013-10-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) may reflect activity from different regions of the brain, depending on the modulation frequency used. In general, responses induced by low rates (≤40 Hz) emanate mostly from central structures of the brain, and responses from high rates (≥80 Hz) emanate mostly from the peripheral auditory nerve or brainstem structures. Besides, it was reported that the gamma band ASSR (30-90 Hz) played an important role in working memory, speech understanding and recognition. This paper investigated the 40 Hz ASSR evoked by modulated speech and reversed speech. The speech was Chinese phrase voice, and the noise-like reversed speech was obtained by temporally reversing the speech. Both auditory stimuli were modulated with a frequency of 40 Hz. Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with hallucination symptom participated in the experiment. Results showed reduction in left auditory cortex response when healthy subjects listened to the reversed speech compared with the speech. In contrast, when the patients who experienced auditory hallucinations listened to the reversed speech, the auditory cortex of left hemispheric responded more actively. The ASSR results were consistent with the behavior results of patients. Therefore, the gamma band ASSR is expected to be helpful for rapid and objective diagnosis of hallucination in clinic. PMID:24142731

  9. Harmonics of 60 Hz in power systems caused by geomagnetic disturbances. [Manitoba

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, K.; Oguti, T.; Watanabe, T.; Tsuruda, K.; Kokubun, S.; Horita, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous VLF/ULF observations carried out near Winnipeg, Manitoba show that geomagnetic disturbances control the behavior of harmonics of 60 Hz man-made electric power. The harmonics of 60 Hz detected by the VLF receiver are at multiples of 180 Hz, indicating that they originated from a 3 phase ac power system. Under geomagnetically quiet conditions, only odd harmonics of 70 Hz were detected. In disturbed conditions, both odd and even harmonics were excited. The strength of each harmonic changed concurrently with geomagnetic pulsation (ULF) activity. These findings seem to indicate that a portion of telluric currents shunted into the power line system through the neutrals of the Y-connected transformers give rise to a dc bias to the transformer core materials and that it distorts their hysteresis loops, activating harmonics of 60 Hz power. A mathematical proof is given that a hysteresis loop having a point of symmetry generates odd harmonics only, whereas loops lacking in point-symmetry generally give rise to both odd and even harmonics. A general formula was obtained to calculate the strength of each harmonic based on the shape of the hysteresis loop.

  10. Modulation of the ∽20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm to passive movement and tactile stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Parkkonen, Eeva; Laaksonen, Kristina; Piitulainen, Harri; Parkkonen, Lauri; Forss, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Background Integration of afferent somatosensory input with motor-cortex output is essential for accurate movements. Prior studies have shown that tactile input modulates motor-cortex excitability, which is reflected in the reactivity of the ∽20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm. ∽20-Hz rebound is connected to inhibition or deactivation of motor cortex whereas suppression has been associated with increased motor cortex activity. Although tactile sense carries important information for controlling voluntary actions, proprioception likely provides the most essential feedback for motor control. Methods To clarify how passive movement modulates motor-cortex excitability, we studied with magnetoencephalography (MEG) the amplitudes and peak latencies of suppression and rebound of the ∽20-Hz rhythm elicited by tactile stimulation and passive movement of right and left index fingers in 22 healthy volunteers. Results Passive movement elicited a stronger and more robust ∽20-Hz rebound than tactile stimulation. In contrast, the suppression amplitudes did not differ between the two stimulus types. Conclusion Our findings suggest that suppression and rebound represent activity of two functionally distinct neuronal populations. The ∽20-Hz rebound to passive movement could be a suitable tool to study the functional state of the motor cortex both in healthy subjects and in patients with motor disorders. PMID:25874163

  11. Auditory filter shapes at 8 and 10 kHz.

    PubMed

    Shailer, M J; Moore, B C; Glasberg, B R; Watson, N; Harris, S

    1990-07-01

    Auditory filter shapes were derived from notched-noise masking data at center frequencies of 8 kHz (for three spectrum levels, N0 = 20, 35, and 50 dB) and 10 kHz (N0 = 50 dB). In order to minimize variability due to earphone placement, insert earphones (Etymotic Research ER2) were used and individual earmolds were made for each subject. These earphones were designed to give a flat frequency response at the eardrum for frequencies up to 14 kHz. The filter shapes were derived under the assumption that a frequency-dependent attenuation was applied to all stimuli before reaching the filter; this attenuation function was estimated from the variation of absolute threshold with frequency for the three youngest normally hearing subjects in our experiments. At 8 kHz, the mean equivalent rectangular bandwidths (ERBs) of the filters derived from the individual data for three subjects were 677, 637, and 1011 Hz for N0 = 20, 35, and 50 dB, respectively. The filters at N0 = 50 dB were roughly symmetrical, while, at the lower spectrum levels, the low-frequency skirt was steeper than the high-frequency skirt. The mean ERB at 10 kHz was 957 Hz. At this frequency, the filters for two subjects were steeper on the high-frequency side than the low-frequency side, while the third subject showed a slight asymmetry in the opposite direction. PMID:2380442

  12. Emergence of a 600-Hz buzz UP state Purkinje cell firing in alert mice.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Prigogine, C; Cheron, J; Márquez-Ruiz, J; Traub, R D; Dan, B

    2014-03-28

    Purkinje cell (PC) firing represents the sole output from the cerebellar cortex onto the deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Here, we explored the different modes of PC firing in alert mice by extracellular recording. We confirm the existence of a tonic and/or bursting and quiescent modes corresponding to UP and DOWN state, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of a novel 600-Hz buzz UP state of firing characterized by simple spikes (SS) of very small amplitude. Climbing fiber (CF) input is able to switch the 600-Hz buzz to the DOWN state, as for the classical UP-to-DOWN state transition. Conversely, the CF input can initiate a typical SS pattern terminating into 600-Hz buzz. The 600-Hz buzz was transiently suppressed by whisker pad stimulation demonstrating that it remained responsive to peripheral input. It must not be mistaken for a DOWN state or the sign of PC inhibition. Complex spike (CS) frequency was increased during the 600-Hz buzz, indicating that this PC output actively contributes to the cerebello-olivary loop by triggering a disinhibition of the inferior olive. During the 600-Hz buzz, the first depolarizing component of the CS was reduced and the second depolarizing component was suppressed. Consistent with our experimental observations, using a 559-compartment single-PC model - in which PC UP state (of about -43mV) was obtained by the combined action of large tonic AMPA conductances and counterbalancing GABAergic inhibition - removal of this inhibition produced the 600-Hz buzz; the simulated buzz frequency decreased following an artificial CS. PMID:24440752

  13. The effect of multidrug resistance modulator HZ08 on pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of adriamycin in xenograft-nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Feng, Yidong; Darshika, Kodithuwakku Nandani; Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yahui; Fang, Weirong; Li, Yunman; Huang, Wenlong

    2015-01-23

    To overcome MDR (multidrug resistance) of cancer mediated by P-gp (P-glycoprotein) has become a key strategy to improve the survival rate in clinic. Therefore, it is imperative to develop advanced modulators that have no side effects or interactions with cytotoxic drugs. HZ08, which acts as a P-gp inhibitor, shows a notable reverse effect with low cytotoxicity in vitro. Based on the previous results, the goal of this experiment is to elucidate the effect of HZ08 on pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of adriamycin in tumor-bearing nude mice. Several criterions and methods, such as tumor weight and volume, in vivo imaging, western blot, immunohistochemistry as well as ATPase hydrolysis assay were selected to evaluate the reversing activity and mechanism of HZ08 on MDR; Furthermore, fluorescence detection assay was applied to determine the distribution of adriamycin in the blood and tissues. This study revealed that HZ08 potentiated the anti-tumor activity of adriamycin but with little effect on the expression of P-gp in vivo. Adriamycin accumulation in tumor was enhanced by HZ08 via ATPase activity inhibition. In addition, HZ08 did not alter the pharmacokinetic characteristic of adriamycin in plasma or tissues. In conclusion, HZ08 showed dramatic MDR reversing activity and had no influence on the pharmacokinetics of adriamycin. PMID:25459530

  14. Deficits in the 30-Hz auditory steady-state response in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Gong, Qin; Wu, Fei

    2016-10-19

    The auditory steady-state response (ASSR) is an auditory evoked potential that occurs in response to periodically presented auditory stimuli. The ASSR has drawn attention as a biomarker of psychiatric disorders owing to its connection with neural oscillations as well as its easy and noninvasive recording. Abnormalities in the γ band ASSR have been found consistently in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, although major depressive disorder (MDD) is also part of the common psychiatric diseases, the relationship between the ASSR and MDD has not been characterized sufficiently. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine the ASSRs from patients with MDD and compare them with those from healthy control (HC) participants. The experiment was designed to obtain the ASSRs elicited by 20-, 30-, and 40-Hz click trains. Patients and HCs were evaluated separately. The response power and phase synchronization were measured at each stimulation frequency. Patients with MDD showed significantly reduced ASSR power for 30-Hz stimuli compared with HC participants, whereas no significant differences in the power were observed at 20 and 40 Hz for patients with MDD. In addition, no significant difference in the phase synchronization was observed for 20-, 30-, and 40-Hz stimuli. Conclusively, patients with MDD were characterized by deficits in 30-Hz ASSR power, which may be associated with spontaneous γ activity dysfunction. The present findings suggest that ASSR could potentially be used as a biomarker for MDD. PMID:27563737

  15. The 40-Hz auditory steady-state response: a selective biomarker for cortical NMDA function.

    PubMed

    Sivarao, Digavalli V

    2015-05-01

    When subjected to a phasic input, sensory cortical neurons display a remarkable ability to entrain faithfully to the driving stimuli. The entrainment to rhythmic sound stimuli is often referred to as the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) and can be captured using noninvasive techniques, such as scalp-recorded electroencephalography (EEG). An ASSR to a driving frequency of approximately 40 Hz is particularly interesting in that it shows, in relative terms, maximal power, synchrony, and synaptic activity. Moreover, the 40-Hz ASSR has been consistently found to be abnormal in schizophrenia patients across multiple studies. The nature of the reported abnormality has been less consistent; while most studies report a deficit in entrainment, several studies have reported increased signal power, particularly when there are concurrent positive symptoms, such as auditory hallucinations. However, the neuropharmacological basis for the 40-Hz ASSR, as well as its dysfunction in schizophrenia, has been unclear until recently. On the basis of several recent reports, it is argued that the 40-Hz ASSR represents a specific marker for cortical NMDA transmission. If confirmed, the 40-Hz ASSR may be a simple and easy-to-access pharmacodynamic biomarker for testing the integrity of cortical NMDA neurotransmission that is robustly translational across species. PMID:25809615

  16. Low frequency, ca. 40 Hz, pulse trains recorded in the humpback whale assembly in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Darling, James D

    2015-11-01

    During studies of humpback whale song and social sounds in Hawaii, bouts of low frequency (ca. 40 Hz) pulses were periodically recorded. One example was made near an active group of eight adults (included 22 bouts, 2-13 s long, over 90 min); another close to an adult male-female pair (12 bouts, 9-93 s long, over 22 min). The mean peak and center frequencies (39 to 40 Hz) and bandwidth (13 Hz) were similar in both, but the organization of the pulses differed. Song components, social sounds, bubble trains, or other species do not provide a ready explanation for this sound. PMID:26627813

  17. Startle response of captive North Sea fish species to underwater tones between 0.1 and 64 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Heul, Sander van der; Verboom, Willem C; Jennings, Nancy; Veen, Jan van der; de Haan, Dick

    2008-06-01

    World-wide, underwater background noise levels are increasing due to anthropogenic activities. Little is known about the effects of anthropogenic noise on marine fish, and information is needed to predict any negative effects. Behavioural startle response thresholds were determined for eight marine fish species, held in a large tank, to tones of 0.1-64 kHz. Response threshold levels varied per frequency within and between species. For sea bass, the 50% reaction threshold occurred for signals of 0.1-0.7 kHz, for thicklip mullet 0.4-0.7 kHz, for pout 0.1-0.25 kHz, for horse mackerel 0.1-2 kHz and for Atlantic herring 4 kHz. For cod, pollack and eel, no 50% reaction thresholds were reached. Reaction threshold levels increased from approximately 100 dB (re 1 microPa, rms) at 0.1 kHz to approximately 160 dB at 0.7 kHz. The 50% reaction thresholds did not run parallel to the hearing curves. This shows that fish species react very differently to sound, and that generalisations about the effects of sound on fish should be made with care. As well as on the spectrum and level of anthropogenic sounds, the reactions of fish probably depend on the context (e.g. location, temperature, physiological state, age, body size, and school size). PMID:18295877

  18. Does greater low frequency EEG activity in normal immaturity and in children with epilepsy arise in the same neuronal network?

    PubMed

    Michels, L; Bucher, K; Brem, S; Halder, P; Lüchinger, R; Liechti, M; Martin, E; Jeanmonod, D; Kröll, J; Brandeis, D

    2011-03-01

    Greater low frequency power (<8 Hz) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) at rest is normal in the immature developing brain of children when compared to adults. Children with epilepsy also have greater low frequency interictal resting EEG activity. Whether these power elevations reflect brain immaturity due to a developmental lag or the underlying epileptic pathophysiology is unclear. The present study addresses this question by analyzing spectral EEG topographies and sources for normally developing children and children with epilepsy. We first compared the resting EEG of healthy children to that of healthy adults to isolate effects related to normal brain immaturity. Next, we compared the EEG from 10 children with generalized cryptogenic epilepsy to the EEG of 24 healthy children to isolate effects related to epilepsy. Spectral analysis revealed that global low (delta: 1-3 Hz, theta: 4-7 Hz), medium (alpha: 8-12 Hz) and high (beta: 13-25 Hz) frequency EEG activity was greater in children without epilepsy compared to adults, and even further elevated for children with epilepsy. Topographical and tomographic EEG analyses showed that normal immaturity corresponded to greater delta and theta activity at fronto-central scalp and brain regions, respectively. In contrast, the epilepsy-related activity elevations were predominantly in the alpha band at parieto-occipital electrodes and brain regions, respectively. We conclude that lower frequency activity can be a sign of normal brain immaturity or brain pathology depending on the specific topography and frequency of the oscillating neuronal network. PMID:20820898

  19. ESTIMATION OF LAND SURFACE WINDOW (8-12 MICROMETER) EMISSIVITY FROM MULTISPECTRAL THERMAL INFRARED REMOTE SENSING - A CASE STUDY IN A PART OF SAHARA DESERT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface window emissivity is an important parameter for estimating the longwave radiative budget. This study focuses on estimating the window (8-12 micrometer) emissivity from the waveband emissivities of the five thermal infrared channels of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflect...

  20. Activation and tremor of the shoulder muscles to the demands of an archery task.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiu-Jenq; Hung, Cheng-Ju; Yang, Ching-Ching; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chou, Feng-Ching; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2010-02-01

    Physiological tremor and strength during the maintenance of shoulder position occur during a precision aiming task, such as archery. It is unclear how positions for precision demands affect physiological tremor and associated muscular activities. The purpose of this study was to assess the tremor amplitude and muscular activities of the shoulder between the various positions for precision demands. Ten males (age 21.9 +/- 2.0 years) participated in the study. Electromyography (EMG) was quantified on eight humeral/scapular muscles. The tremor was measured by the acceleration component of a motion tracking sensor in the 3-7 Hz and 8-12 Hz frequency bands. Participants simulated six preparatory archery shooting positions (3 arm angles x 2 arm draw positions) and performed isometric contractions. The relative root mean square (RMS) amplitudes of the shoulder muscles were significantly greater for the full drawing position compared with the partial position (humeral muscles: P = 0.011; scapular muscles: P = 0.026). In the full drawing position, increased humeral/scapular muscle EMG amplitude was moderately associated with an increased power spectrum of 8-12/3-7 Hz tremor in humerus/scapula motion (R = 0.43-0.57). To minimize fluctuations in high strength muscle performance, 90 degrees of elevation in the full drawing position may be a suitable position for demands in archery. In addition, scapular muscle amplitude is important for stability to reduce humerus tremor during archery performance. PMID:20432134

  1. Threshold received sound pressure levels of single 1-2 kHz and 6-7 kHz up-sweeps and down-sweeps causing startle responses in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Steen, Nele; Gransier, Robin; Wensveen, Paul J; de Jong, Christ A F

    2012-03-01

    Mid-frequency and low-frequency sonar systems produce frequency-modulated sweeps which may affect harbor porpoises. To study the effect of sweeps on behavioral responses (specifically "startle" responses, which we define as sudden changes in swimming speed and/or direction), a harbor porpoise in a large pool was exposed to three pairs of sweeps: a 1-2 kHz up-sweep was compared with a 2-1 kHz down-sweep, both with and without harmonics, and a 6-7 kHz up-sweep was compared with a 7-6 kHz down-sweep without harmonics. Sweeps were presented at five spatially averaged received levels (mRLs; 6 dB steps; identical for the up-sweep and down-sweep of each pair). During sweep presentation, startle responses were recorded. There was no difference in the mRLs causing startle responses for up-sweeps and down-sweeps within frequency pairs. For 1-2 kHz sweeps without harmonics, a 50% startle response rate occurred at mRLs of 133 dB re 1 μPa; for 1-2 kHz sweeps with strong harmonics at 99 dB re 1 μPa; for 6-7 kHz sweeps without harmonics at 101 dB re 1 μPa. Low-frequency (1-2 kHz) active naval sonar systems without harmonics can therefore operate at higher source levels than mid-frequency (6-7 kHz) active sonar systems without harmonics, with similar startle effects on porpoises. PMID:22423727

  2. NASA Rat Acoustic Tolerance Test 1994-1995: 8 kHz, 16 kHz, 32 kHz Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mele, Gary D.; Holley, Daniel C.; Naidu, Sujata

    1996-01-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to chronic applied sound (74 to 79 dB, SPL) with octave band center frequencies of either 8, 16 or 32 kHz for up to 60 days. Control cages had ambient sound levels of about 62 dB (SPL). Groups of rats (test vs. control; N=9 per group) were euthanized after 0. 5. 14, 30, and 60 days. On each euthanasia day, objective evaluation of their physiology and behavior was performed using a Stress Assessment Battery (SAB) of measures. In addition, rat hearing was assessed using the brain stem auditory evoked potential (BAER) method after 60 days of exposure. No statistically significant differences in mean daily food use could be attributed to the presence of the applied test sound. Test rats used 5% more water than control rats. In the 8 kHz and 32 kHz tests this amount was statistically significant(P less than .05). This is a minor difference of questionable physiological significance. However, it may be an indication of a small reaction to the constant applied sound. Across all test frequencies, day 5 test rats had 6% larger spleens than control rats. No other body or organ weight differences were found to be statistically significant with respect to the application of sound. This spleen effect may be a transient adaptive process related to adaptation to the constant applied noise. No significant test effect on differential white blood cell counts could be demonstrated. One group demonstrated a low eosinophil count (16 kHz experiment, day 14 test group). However this was highly suspect. Across all test frequencies studied, day 5 test rats had 17% fewer total leukocytes than day 5 control rats. Sound exposed test rats exhibited 44% lower plasma corticosterone concentrations than did control rats. Note that the plasma corticosterone concentration was lower in the sound exposed test animals than the control animals in every instance (frequency exposure and number of days exposed).

  3. 1-J operation of monolithic composite ceramics with Yb:YAG thin layers: multi-TRAM at 10-Hz repetition rate and prospects for 100-Hz operation.

    PubMed

    Divoky, Martin; Tokita, Shigeki; Hwang, Sungin; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Kan, Hirofumi; Lucianetti, Antonio; Mocek, Tomas; Kawanaka, Junji

    2015-03-15

    Experimental amplification of 10-ns pulses to energy of 1 J at repetition rate of 10-100 Hz in cryogenic multipass total-reflection active-mirror (TRAM) amplifier is reported for the first time. By using a monolithic multi-TRAM, which is a YAG ceramic composite with three thin Yb:YAG active layers, efficient energy extraction was achieved without parasitic lasing. A detailed measurement of output characteristics of the laser amplifier is presented; results are discussed and compared with numerical calculations. PMID:25768130

  4. Magnetic field tomography of coherent thalamocortical 40-Hz oscillations in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Ribary, U.; Lado, F.; Mogilner, A.; Llinas, R. ); Ioannides, A.A.; Singh, K.D.; Hasson, R.; Bolton, J.P.R. )

    1991-12-15

    This paper introduces the use of magnetic field tomography (MFT), a noninvasive technique based on distributed source analysis of magnetoencephalography data, which makes possible three-dimensional reconstruction of dynamic brain activity in humans. MFT has a temporal resolution better than 1 msec and a spatial accuracy of 2-5 mm at the cortical level, which deteriorates to 1-3 cm at depths of 6 cm or more. MFT is used here to visualize the origin of a spatiotemporally organized pattern of coherent 40-Hz electrical activity. This coherence, initially observed during auditory input, was proposed to be generated by recurrent corticothalamic oscillation. In support of this hypothesis, the authors illustrate well-defined 40-Hz coherence between cortical-subcortical sites with a time shift that is consistent with thalamocortical conduction times. Studies on Alzheimer patients indicate that, while a similar activity pattern is present, the cortical component is reduced in these subjects.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 8-12, 2015, Arlington, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-10-01

    The fiscal year 2015 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  6. DFNA8/12 Caused by TECTA Mutations is the Most Identified Subtype of Non-syndromic Autosomal Dominant Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Michael S.; Morín, Matías; Meyer, Nicole C.; Mayo, Fernando; Modamio-Hoybjor, Silvia; Mencía, Angeles; Olavarrieta, Leticia; Morales-Angulo, Carmelo; Nishimura, Carla J.; Workman, Heather; DeLuca, Adam P.; del Castillo, Ignacio; Taylor, Kyle R.; Tompkins, Bruce; Goodman, Corey W.; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Van Wesemael, Maarten; Lachlan, K.; Shearer, A. Eliot; Braun, Terry A.; Huygen, Patrick L.M.; Kremer, Hannie; Van Camp, Guy; Moreno, Felipe; Casavant, Thomas L.; Smith, Richard J.H.; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of DFNA8/DFNA12 (DFNA8/12), a type of autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), is unknown as comprehensive population-based genetic screening has not been conducted. We therefore completed unbiased screening for TECTA mutations in a Spanish cohort of 372 probands from ADNSHL families. Three additional families (Spanish, Belgian and English) known to be linked to DFNA8/12 were also included in the screening. In an additional cohort of 835 American ADNSHL families, we preselected 73 probands for TECTA screening based on audiometric data. In aggregate, we identified 23 TECTA mutations in this process. Remarkably 20 of these mutations are novel, more than doubling the number of reported TECTA ADNSHL mutations from 13 to 33. Mutations lie in all domains of the α-tectorin protein, including those for the first time identified in the entactin domain, the vWFD1, vWFD2 and vWFD3 repeats, and the D1-D2 and TIL2 connectors. While the majority are private mutations, four of them – p.Cys1036Tyr, p.Cys1837Gly, p.Thr1866Met and p.Arg1890Cys – were observed in more than one unrelated family. For two of these mutations founder effects were also confirmed. Our data validate previously observed genotype-phenotype correlations in DFNA8/12 and introduce new correlations. Specifically, mutations in the N-terminal region of α-tectorin (entactin domain, vWFD1 and vWFD2) lead to mid frequency NSHL, a phenotype previously associated only with mutations in the ZP domain. Collectively, our results indicate that DFNA8/12 hearing loss is a frequent type of ADNSHL. PMID:21520338

  7. Synthesis and unusual properties of the first 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octabromo-5,10,15,20-tetraalkylporphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON,NORA Y.; MEDFORTH,CRAIG J.; NURCO,DANIEL J.; JIA,SONG-LING; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.; SMITH,KEVIN M.

    2000-03-06

    The new perhalogenated porphyrin 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octabromo-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(trifluoromethyl)porphinato-nickel(II) exhibits several striking features, including an extremely ruffled macrocycle with a very short Ni-N distance, an unusually red-shifted optical spectrum, and, surprisingly, hindered rotation of the meso-trifluoromethyl substituents ({Delta}G{sub 278}{sup +} = 47 kJ/mol).

  8. Coherent neocortical 40-Hz oscillations are not present during REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Castro, Santiago; Falconi, Atilio; Chase, Michael H; Torterolo, Pablo

    2013-04-01

    During cognitive processes there are extensive interactions between various regions of the cerebral cortex. Oscillations in the gamma frequency band (≈40 Hz) of the electroencephalogram (EEG) are involved in the binding of spatially separated but temporally correlated neural events, which results in a unified perceptual experience. The extent of these interactions can be examined by means of a mathematical algorithm called 'coherence', which reflects the 'strength' of functional interactions between cortical areas. The present study was conducted to analyse EEG coherence in the gamma frequency band of the cat during alert wakefulness (AW), quiet wakefulness (QW), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Cats were implanted with electrodes in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortices to monitor EEG activity. Coherence values within the gamma frequency (30-100 Hz) from pairs of EEG recordings were analysed. A large increase in coherence occurred between all cortical regions in the 30-45 Hz frequency band during AW compared with the other behavioral states. As the animal transitioned from AW to QW and from QW to NREM sleep, coherence decreased to a moderate level. Remarkably, there was practically no EEG coherence in the entire gamma band spectrum (30-100 Hz) during REM sleep. We conclude that functional interactions between cortical areas are radically different during sleep compared with wakefulness. The virtual absence of gamma frequency coherence during REM sleep may underlie the unique cognitive processing that occurs during dreams, which is principally a REM sleep-related phenomenon. PMID:23406153

  9. Deficits in high- (>60 Hz) gamma-band oscillations during visual processing in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Christine; Wibral, Michael; Sun, Limin; Rivolta, Davide; Singer, Wolf; Maurer, Konrad; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have focused on abnormal temporal coordination of neural activity. Oscillations in the gamma-band range (>25 Hz) are of particular interest as they establish synchronization with great precision in local cortical networks. However, the contribution of high gamma (>60 Hz) oscillations toward the pathophysiology is less established. To address this issue, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data from 16 medicated patients with chronic schizophrenia and 16 controls during the perception of Mooney faces. MEG data were analysed in the 25–150 Hz frequency range. Patients showed elevated reaction times and reduced detection rates during the perception of upright Mooney faces while responses to inverted stimuli were intact. Impaired processing of Mooney faces in schizophrenia patients was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in spectral power between 60–120 Hz (effect size: d = 1.26) which was correlated with disorganized symptoms (r = −0.72). Our findings demonstrate that deficits in high gamma-band oscillations as measured by MEG are a sensitive marker for aberrant cortical functioning in schizophrenia, suggesting an important aspect of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:23532620

  10. Observations of the radio noise background in the frequency range 150-180 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, S. H.; Kelly, F. J.; Waltman, W. B.; Odenwald, S.

    1985-05-01

    Observations were made of the radio noise background in the frequency range 150-180 kHz to provide reference data for the design of the ground wave emergency network system. These observations were undertaken at Nanjemoy, Maryland, during early summer 1983 and included 41 days of data recording. The noise environment was found to be dominated by impulsive thunderstorm noise. A typical nighttime mean noise power spectral density was 1×10-15 W m-2 Hz-1 (noise factor of 107 dB above kT0), while a typical daytime level was at least 14 dB quieter. However, the daytime level was at times significantly higher, especially during the presence of a local thunderstorm front. During local thunderstorm activity, impulses with peak power spectral density of 1×10-14 W m-2 Hz-1 were observed frequently, while the most energetic pulse detected during our monitoring period had a peak power spectral density of 6.8×10-14 W m-2 Hz-1 (Fa = 125 dB). Sample amplitude probability distributions and time probability distributions are presented for day/quiet, night, and thunderstorm conditions. Agreement with the mean noise level predictions of CCIR report 322 is satisfactory within the accuracy limits of the CCIR data.

  11. Phasic Dopamine Release in the Nucleus Accumbens in Response to Pro-Social 50 kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tose, Amanda; Wanat, Matthew J.; Hart, Andrew S.; Hollon, Nick G.; Phillips, Paul E.M.; Schwarting, Rainer K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) that are thought to serve as situation-dependent affective signals and accomplish important communicative functions. In appetitive situations, rats produce 50 kHz USVs, whereas 22 kHz USVs occur in aversive situations. Reception of 50 kHz USVs induces social approach behavior, while 22 kHz USVs lead to freezing behavior. These opposite behavioral responses are paralleled by distinct brain activation patterns, with 50 kHz USVs, but not 22 kHz USVs, activating neurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). The NAcc mediates appetitive behavior and is critically modulated by dopaminergic afferents that are known to encode the value of reward. Therefore, we hypothesized that 50 kHz USVs, but not 22 kHz USVs, elicit NAcc dopamine release. While recording dopamine signaling with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, freely moving rats were exposed to playback of four acoustic stimuli via an ultrasonic speaker in random order: (1) 50 kHz USVs, (2) 22 kHz USVs, (3) time- and amplitude-matched white noise, and (4) background noise. Only presentation of 50 kHz USVs induced phasic dopamine release and elicited approach behavior toward the speaker. Both of these effects, neurochemical and behavioral, were most pronounced during initial playback, but then declined rapidly with subsequent presentations, indicating a close temporal relationship between the two measures. Moreover, the magnitudes of these effects during initial playback were significantly correlated. Collectively, our findings show that NAcc dopamine release encodes pro-social 50 kHz USVs, but not alarming 22 kHz USVs. Thus, our results support the hypothesis that these call types are processed in distinct neuroanatomical regions and establish a functional link between pro-social communicative signals and reward-related neurotransmission. PMID:25100595

  12. Loading frequencies up to 20Hz as an alternative to accelerate fatigue strength tests in a Y-TZP ceramic.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Sara; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Freitas, Mariana; Kleverlaan, Cornelis Johannes; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; May, Liliana Gressler

    2016-08-01

    Considering the interest of the research community in the fatigue behavior of all-ceramic restorations and the time consumed in low-frequency cyclic fatigue tests, this study aimed to investigate the influence of the loading frequency on the zirconia fatigue strength. The biaxial flexural fatigue strength of Y-TZP discs was determined by the staircase approach after 500,000 cycles. The investigated frequencies were 2Hz (control-simulation of the chewing activity; n=20), 10Hz (n=20), 20Hz (n=20), and 40Hz (n=21). The fatigue strength data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey׳s test (α=0.05). Pearson coefficient (r) was calculated to assess the existence of a correlation between fatigue strength and loading frequency. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the relative amount of monoclinic phase under each fatigue test condition. The fatigue strength was significantly higher for 40Hz group (630.7±62.1MPa) and did not differ among the groups 2Hz (550.3±89.7MPa), 10Hz (574.0±47MPa) and 20Hz (605.1±30.7MPa). Pearson correlation coefficient indicated a significantly moderate correlation (r=0.57) between fatigue strength and loading frequency. The percentage of monoclinic phase was similar among the groups. Therefore, the use of loading frequencies up to 20Hz seems a good alternative to expedite the cycling strength fatigue tests in polycrystalline ceramics without significantly changing the fatigue behavior showed by zirconia in tests employing the frequency of the masticatory cycle. PMID:26849030

  13. Behavioral and prenatal effects of 60-Hz fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Purpose was to determine possible neural, behavioral, and reproductive effects of low-intensity 60-Hz electric fields on mammals (rats) exposed in-utero. The tests used shortly after birth included negative geotaxis, the acoustic startle response, surface righting, in-air righting, cliff avoidance, emotionality, and swimming endurance. Variations between the exposed and control groups are discussed. 9 tables. (DLC)

  14. A 40-Hz Auditory Potential Recorded from the Human Scalp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galambos, Robert; Makeig, Scott; Talmachoff, Peter J.

    1981-04-01

    Computer techniques readily extract from the brainwaves an orderly sequence of brain potentials locked in time to sound stimuli. The potentials that appear 8 to 80 msec after the stimulus resemble 3 or 4 cycles of a 40-Hz sine wave; we show here that these waves combine to form a single, stable, composite wave when the sounds are repeated at rates around 40 per sec. This phenomenon, the 40-Hz event-related potential (ERP), displays several properties of theoretical and practical interest. First, it reportedly disappears with surgical anesthesia, and it resembles similar phenomena in the visual and olfactory system, facts which suggest that adequate processing of sensory information may require cyclical brain events in the 30- to 50-Hz range. Second, latency and amplitude measurements on the 40-Hz ERP indicate it may contain useful information on the number and basilar membrane location of the auditory nerve fibers a given tone excites. Third, the response is present at sound intensities very close to normal adult thresholds for the audiometric frequencies, a fact that could have application in clinical hearing testing.

  15. Circuit measures hysteresis loop areas at 30 Hz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C.; Spilo, D.

    1967-01-01

    Analog circuit measures hysteresis loop areas as a function of time during fatigue testing of specimens subjected to sinusoidal tension-compression stresses at a frequency of Hz. When the sinusoidal stress signal is multiplied by the strain signal, the dc signal is proportional to hysteresis loop area.

  16. EFFECTS OF 60-HZ FIELDS ON HUMAN HEALTH PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Specific results of research on the effects of exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields have often been contradictory and difficult to replicate. The study reported here used quantitative exercise testing techniques to evaluate whether increases in metabolism, caused by mod...

  17. Evaluation of the economic burden of Herpes Zoster (HZ) infection

    PubMed Central

    Panatto, Donatella; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rizzitelli, Emanuela; Bonanni, Paolo; Boccalini, Sara; Icardi, Giancarlo; Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the economic burden of Herpes Zoster (HZ) infection. The review was conducted in accordance with the standards of the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses” guidelines. The following databases were accessed: ISI/Web of Knowledge (WoS), MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, ProQuest, the Cochrane Library and EconLit. Specific literature on health economics was also manually inspected. Thirty-three studies were included. The quality of the studies assessed in accordance with the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist was good. All studies evaluated direct costs, apart from one which dealt only with indirect costs. Indirect costs were evaluated by 12 studies. The economic burden of HZ has increased over time. HZ management and drug prescriptions generate the highest direct costs. While increasing age, co-morbidities and drug treatment were found to predict higher direct costs, being employed was correlated with higher indirect costs, and thus with the onset age of the disease. Despite some differences among the selected studies, particularly with regard to indirect costs, all concur that HZ is a widespread disease which has a heavy social and economic burden. PMID:25483704

  18. 14 J/2 Hz Yb3+:YAG diode pumped solid state laser chain.

    PubMed

    Gonçalvès-Novo, Thierry; Albach, Daniel; Vincent, Bernard; Arzakantsyan, Mikayel; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-14

    The Lucia laser chain is a Diode Pumped Solid State Laser system based on Yb3+ doped YAG disks used in an active mirror scheme. Front-end and amplifier stages are presented with recent energetic performances (14 J/2 Hz) achieved with improved pumping and extraction architectures. Emphasis is given on the crucial role of ASE and thermal mitigation considerations in engineering the amplifier head. PMID:23388979

  19. Separation of circadian and wake duration-dependent modulation of EEG activation during wakefulness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Wyatt, J. K.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    The separate contribution of circadian rhythmicity and elapsed time awake on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during wakefulness was assessed. Seven men lived in an environmental scheduling facility for 4 weeks and completed fourteen 42.85-h 'days', each consisting of an extended (28.57-h) wake episode and a 14.28-h sleep opportunity. The circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin desynchronized from the 42.85-h day. This allowed quantification of the separate contribution of circadian phase and elapsed time awake to variation in EEG power spectra (1-32 Hz). EEG activity during standardized behavioral conditions was markedly affected by both circadian phase and elapsed time awake in an EEG frequency- and derivation-specific manner. The nadir of the circadian rhythm in alpha (8-12 Hz) activity in both fronto-central and occipito-parietal derivations occurred during the biological night, close to the crest of the melatonin rhythm. The nadir of the circadian rhythm of theta (4.5-8 Hz) and beta (20-32 Hz) activity in the fronto-central derivation was located close to the onset of melatonin secretion, i.e. during the wake maintenance zone. As time awake progressed, delta frequency (1-4.5 Hz) and beta (20-32 Hz) activity rose monotonically in frontal derivations. The interaction between the circadian and wake-dependent increase in frontal delta was such that the intrusion of delta was minimal when sustained wakefulness coincided with the biological day, but pronounced during the biological night. Our data imply that the circadian pacemaker facilitates frontal EEG activation during the wake maintenance zone, by generating an arousal signal that prevents the intrusion of low-frequency EEG components, the propensity for which increases progressively during wakefulness.

  20. Null polarimetry near shot noise limit at 1 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dechao; Xie, Boya; Feng, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    We describe the principle and report on the realization of a null polarimeter with two demonstrated features: (1) the sensitivity of the system is near shot noise limit and (2) quasi-stationary signals at 1 Hz can be measured without signal modulation. The achieved single-pass sensitivity is 7 × 10-9 rad/ √{ Hz } with a pair of Glan-Taylor polarizers, which should be of great interest for experiments such as observation of vacuum magnetic birefringence and search for new particles. The system is brought near its shot noise limit by appropriate polarization control and coherent heterodyne detection of light, resulting in a sensitivity improvement by two orders of magnitude in comparison with the case of no control on light polarization.

  1. 10-Hz kilowatt-class dye laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimek, Daniel E.; Aldag, Henry R.

    1993-06-01

    Textron Defense Systems (Formerly Avco Research Laboratory) has developed a kilowatt class dye laser. The device is a transverse flow, flashlamp pumped laser that operates at greater than 100 Joules per pulse, and at a repetition rate up to 10 Hz. Operating at 10 Hz, an average power of 1.04 kW was obtained at 585 nm using rhodamine 590 in a methanol/water solvent mixture. The output power was increased to 1.4 kW by adding the triplet quencher cyclooctatetraene to the solution. Under these conditions, the measured efficiency (average laser pulse energy/energy stored in flashlamp capacitors) was 1.8%. A limited series of experiments using alternative dyes was also carried out. Comparable energies and average powers were obtained at 610 nm using rhodamine 610, and 660 nm using sulforhodamine 640.

  2. Null polarimetry near shot noise limit at 1 Hz.

    PubMed

    He, Dechao; Xie, Boya; Feng, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    We describe the principle and report on the realization of a null polarimeter with two demonstrated features: (1) the sensitivity of the system is near shot noise limit and (2) quasi-stationary signals at 1 Hz can be measured without signal modulation. The achieved single-pass sensitivity is 7 × 10(-9) rad/Hz with a pair of Glan-Taylor polarizers, which should be of great interest for experiments such as observation of vacuum magnetic birefringence and search for new particles. The system is brought near its shot noise limit by appropriate polarization control and coherent heterodyne detection of light, resulting in a sensitivity improvement by two orders of magnitude in comparison with the case of no control on light polarization. PMID:27131649

  3. Further observations of nonperiodic optical flickering in HZ Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanden Bout, P. A.; Moffett, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    High-speed photometric observations of the HZ Her/Her X-1 system show that nonperiodic optical flickering is present during both the ON and OFF portions of the 35-day cycle. The optical flickering is broad band and not confined to emission lines. There is a weak correlation between the amplitude of the flickering and orbital phase but efforts to identify the source of the flickering were unsuccessful.

  4. A beta2-frequency (20–30 Hz) oscillation in nonsynaptic networks of somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roopun, Anita K.; Middleton, Steven J.; Cunningham, Mark O.; LeBeau, Fiona E. N.; Bibbig, Andrea; Whittington, Miles A.; Traub, Roger D.

    2006-01-01

    Beta2 frequency (20–30 Hz) oscillations appear over somatosensory and motor cortices in vivo during motor preparation and can be coherent with muscle electrical activity. We describe a beta2 frequency oscillation occurring in vitro in networks of layer V pyramidal cells, the cells of origin of the corticospinal tract. This beta2 oscillation depends on gap junctional coupling, but it survives a cut through layer 4 and, hence, does not depend on apical dendritic electrogenesis. It also survives a blockade of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors or a blockade of GABAA receptors that is sufficient to suppress gamma (30–70 Hz) oscillations in superficial cortical layers. The oscillation period is determined by the M type of K+ current. PMID:17030821

  5. Intraband absorption in the 8-12 μm band from Si-doped vertically aligned InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Q. D.; Li, J. M.; Li, H. X.; Zeng, Y. P.; Pan, L.; Chen, Y. H.; Kong, M. Y.; Lin, L. Y.

    1998-12-01

    Normal-incident infrared absorption in the 8-12-μm-atmospheric spectral window in the InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice is observed. Using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, we find that the InGaAs quantum dots are perfectly vertically aligned in the growth direction (100). Under the normal incident radiation, a distinct absorption peaked at 9.9 μm is observed. This work indicates the potential of this quantum-dot superlattice structure for use as normal-incident infrared imaging focal arrays application without fabricating grating structures.

  6. Bare-Minimum Fluorous Mixture Synthesis of a Stereoisomer Library of 4,8,12-Trimethylnonadecanols and Predictions of NMR Spectra of Saturated Oligoisoprenoid Stereoisomers

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Edmund A.-H.; Kumli, Eveline; Damodaran, Krishnan; Curran, Dennis P.

    2013-01-01

    All four diastereomers of a typical saturated oligoisoprenoid, 4,8,12-trimethylnonadecanol, are made by an iterative three step cycle with the aid of traceless thionocarbonate fluorous tags to encode configurations. The tags have a minimum number of total fluorine atoms, starting at zero and increasing in increments of one. With suitable acquisition and data processing, each diastereomer exhibited characteristic chemical shifts of methyl resonances in its 1H and 13C NMR spectra. Together, these shifts provide a basis to predict the appearance of the methyl region of the spectrum of every stereoisomer of higher saturated oligoisoprenoids. PMID:23297872

  7. 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the ipsilesional sensory cortex enhances motor learning after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Sonia M.; Meehan, Sean; Borich, Michael R.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory feedback is critical for motor learning, and thus to neurorehabilitation after stroke. Whether enhancing sensory feedback by applying excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the ipsilesional primary sensory cortex (IL-S1) might enhance motor learning in chronic stroke has yet to be investigated. The present study investigated the effects of 5 Hz rTMS over IL-S1 paired with skilled motor practice on motor learning, hemiparetic cutaneous somatosensation, and motor function. Individuals with unilateral chronic stroke were pseudo-randomly divided into either Active or Sham 5 Hz rTMS groups (n = 11/group). Following stimulation, both groups practiced a Serial Tracking Task (STT) with the hemiparetic arm; this was repeated for 5 days. Performance on the STT was quantified by response time, peak velocity, and cumulative distance tracked at baseline, during the 5 days of practice, and at a no-rTMS retention test. Cutaneous somatosensation was measured using two-point discrimination. Standardized sensorimotor tests were performed to assess whether the effects might generalize to impact hemiparetic arm function. The active 5 Hz rTMS + training group demonstrated significantly greater improvements in STT performance {response time [F(1, 286.04) = 13.016, p < 0.0005], peak velocity [F(1, 285.95) = 4.111, p = 0.044], and cumulative distance [F(1, 285.92) = 4.076, p = 0.044]} and cutaneous somatosensation [F(1, 21.15) = 8.793, p = 0.007] across all sessions compared to the sham rTMS + training group. Measures of upper extremity motor function were not significantly different for either group. Our preliminary results suggest that, when paired with motor practice, 5 Hz rTMS over IL-S1 enhances motor learning related change in individuals with chronic stroke, potentially as a consequence of improved cutaneous somatosensation, however no improvement in general upper extremity function was observed. PMID:24711790

  8. Characterization of the transcriptome of Achromobacter sp. HZ01 with the outstanding hydrocarbon-degrading ability.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yue-Hui; Deng, Mao-Cheng; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Chou-Fei; Xiao, Xi; Zhu, Qing; Sun, Xian-Xian; Zhou, Qian-Zhi; Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2016-06-15

    Microbial remediation has become one of the most important strategies for eliminating petroleum pollutants. Revealing the transcript maps of microorganisms with the hydrocarbon-degrading ability contributes to enhance the degradation of hydrocarbons and further improve the effectiveness of bioremediation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of hydrocarbon-degrading Achromobacter sp. HZ01 after petroleum treatment for 16h. A total of 38,706,280 and 38,954,413 clean reads were obtained by RNA-seq for the petroleum-treated group and control, respectively. By an effective de novo assembly, 3597 unigenes were obtained, including 3485 annotated transcripts. Petroleum treatment had significantly influenced the transcriptional profile of strain HZ01, involving 742 differentially expressed genes. A part of genes were activated to exert specific physiological functions, whereas more genes were down-regulated including specific genes related to cell motility, genes associated with glycometabolism, and genes coding for ribosomal proteins. Identification of genes related to petroleum degradation revealed that the fatty acid metabolic pathway and a part of monooxygenases and dehydrogenases were activated, whereas the TCA cycle was inactive. Additionally, terminal oxidation might be a major aerobic pathway for the degradation of n-alkanes in strain HZ01. The newly obtained data contribute to better understand the gene expression profiles of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms after petroleum treatment, to further investigate the genetic characteristics of strain HZ01 and other related species and to develop cost-effective and eco-friendly strategies for remediation of crude oil-polluted environments. PMID:26915487

  9. The multidrug resistant modulator HZ08 reverses multidrug resistance via P-glycoprotein inhibition and apoptosis sensitization in human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KBV200.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y-L; Cen, J; Zhang, Y-Y; Feng, Y-D; Yang, Y; Li, Y-M; Huang, W-L

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the multidrug resistance modulator HZ08 has a strong multidrug resistance reversal effect in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 in K562/A02 and MCF-7/ADM cells, respectively. However, there are many other mechanisms responsible for resistance. In this study, MTT assay was used to examine the cytotoxicity and multidrug resistance reversal of HZ08 in KBV200 cells. It was also used to detect Rh123 and adriamycin accumulation in the presence of HZ08 to assess the effect on P-glycoprotein. Caspase-3 activity was analyzed under the incubation of HZ08 per se and in combination with vincristine. Results showed that HZ08 could increase the activity of caspase-3 with P-glycoprotein inhibition. Further studies revealed that HZ08 increased vincristine-induced apoptosis, characterized as an intrinsic apoptosis pathway with enhanced G2/M phase arrest, since HZ08 had an effect on the intrinsic apoptotic regulator Bcl-2 and Bax. Therefore, the outstanding reversal effect of HZ08 occurs not only through suppressing the P-glycoprotein function but also through activating the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. PMID:22344570

  10. Atmospheric Electric Field Measurements at 100 Hz and High Frequency Electric Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, Ricardo; Gonçalves da Silva, Hugo; Matthews, James; Bennett, Alec; Chubb, John

    2016-04-01

    Spectral response of Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient (PG), symmetric to the Atmospheric Electric Field, gives important information about phenomena affecting these measurements with characteristic time-scales that appear in the spectra as specific periodicities. This is the case of urban pollution that has a clear weekly dependence and reveals itself on PG measurements by a ~7 day periodicity (Silva et al., 2014). While long-term time-scales (low frequencies) have been exhaustively explored in literature, short-term time-scales (high frequencies), above 1 Hz, have comparatively received much less attention (Anisimov et al., 1999). This is mainly because of the technical difficulties related with the storage of such a huge amount of data (for 100 Hz sampling two days of data uses a ~1 Gb file) and the response degradation of the field-meters at such frequencies. Nevertheless, important Electric Phenomena occurs for frequencies above 1 Hz that are worth pursuing, e.g. the Schumann Resonances have a signature of worldwide thunderstorm activity at frequencies that go from ~8 up to ~40 Hz. To that end the present work shows preliminary results on PG measurements at 100 Hz that took place on two clear-sky days (17th and 18th June 2015) on the South of Portugal, Évora (38.50° N, 7.91° W). The field-mill used is a JCI 131F installed in the University of Évora campus (at 2 m height) with a few trees and two buildings in its surroundings (~50 m away). This device was developed by John Chubb (Chubb, 2014) and manufactured by Chilworth (UK). It was calibrated in December 2013 and recent work by the author (who is honored in this study for his overwhelming contribution to atmospheric electricity) reveals basically a flat spectral response of the device up to frequencies of 100 Hz (Chubb, 2015). This makes this device suitable for the study of High Frequency Electric Phenomena. Anisimov, S.V., et al. (1999). On the generation and evolution of aeroelectric structures

  11. Algebra: Grades 8-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    A complete set of behavioral objectives for first-year algebra taught in any of grades 8 through 12 is presented. Three to six sample test items and answers are provided for each objective. Objectives were determined by surveying the most used secondary school algebra textbooks. Fourteen major categories are included: (1) whole numbers--operations…

  12. Megawatt, 1kHz PRF tunable gyrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, A.W.; Phelps, A.D.R.; Ronald, K.; Spark, S.N.; Turnbull, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    Repetitively pulsed and cw gyrotrons have hitherto used thermionic cathodes whereas cold cathode gyrotrons have normally operated as {open_quote} single shot{close_quote} or low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) devices. The novel results presented here demonstrate that a stacked Blumlein pulse generator driven cold cathode gyrotron developing > 1 MW per pulse (f=90 GHz) may be run with a repetition frequency of 1 kHz over timescales of >30 seconds. A short burst PRF of 2 kHz was also observed. The PRF of the system was limited to 2 kHz by the High Voltage (HV) DC power supply. The gyrotron was based on a two-electrode configuration comprising of a field-immersed, field emission cold cathode and a shaped anode cavity. A superconducting magnet was used to produce the homogeneous intra-cavity magnetic field and a stacked Blumlein pulse generator was used to drive the electron beam. This pulse generator was capable of producing an output voltage up to 300 kV with a 20ns rise time, a 100ns flat top, and a 20ns fall time. The output impedance was 200{Omega} and the energy stored in the generator at a charging voltage of 60 kV was 5.4J. No degradation effects on the mm-wave output was evident due to diode recovery time throughout this series of results. A subsequent conclusion is that the recovery time in the cold cathode gyrotron is less than 500{mu}s.

  13. Compact 4-kHz XeF laser with a multisectional discharge gap

    SciTech Connect

    Andramanov, A V; Kabaev, S A; Lazhintsev, B V; Nor-Arevyan, V A; Selemir, Victor D

    2005-04-30

    A XeF electric-discharge laser with a pulse repetition rate f of up to 4 kHz is developed. The laser electrode unit is based on plate electrodes with inductive-capacitive discharge stabilisation. He and Ne are used as buffer gases, and NF{sub 3} serves as a fluorine donor. A narrow ({approx}1 mm) discharge is achieved; the specific energy deposition per unit length of the active volume is as high as 2 J m{sup -1}. The maximum energy in a laser pulse is {approx}3 mJ for NF{sub 3}-Xe-He and NF{sub 3}-Xe-Ne mixtures at total pressures of 0.8 and 1.2 atm, respectively, and the maximum lasing efficiency is {approx}0.73%. The maximum gas velocity in the working gap is 19 m s{sup -1}. The laser-pulse energy at a high pulse repetition rate (4 kHz) virtually coincides with that obtained at a low repetition rate. The mean output pulse power at f = 4 kHz reaches 12 W, and the rms deviation of the laser-pulse energy is {approx}2.5%. (lasers)

  14. The 2.2 Hz oscillations in auroral electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepine, D. R.; Hall, D. S.; Bryant, D. A.; Johnstone, A. D.; Christiansen, P. J.; Gough, M. P.

    1980-06-01

    A Petrel rocket was launched from Kiruna on 25 January 1979 to compare electron intensities measured at auroral altitudes with related parameters measured at geostationary altitude by the satellite GEOS 2. A sequence of quasi-periodic oscillations in electron intensities were investigated, which appear to originate in the equatorial region, probably in the neighborhood of GEOS 2 was investigated. A similar frequency oscillation in the intensity of 500-Hz VLF emissions was observed at about the same time by the S300 wave experiment located on the satellite.

  15. Design and performance of a 250 Hz alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sam, R.C.; Yeh, J.J.; Leslie, K.R.; Rapoport, W.R.

    1988-06-01

    The design, analysis, and performance of a 250 Hz alexandrite laser are described. Built as the wavelength selective laser for a molecular laser isotope separation program, the laser has to satisfy specifications on its tuning band, linewidth, output energy, temporal behavior, and repetition rate required by the process. The key design feature is the use of a tandem rod oscillator with concave curvature on rod ends for thermal lensing compensation. A model was developed to project the stability range and beam quality relative to repetition rate. The performance results of a delivered system are presented and future developments are discussed.

  16. 1-kHz-repetition-rate femtosecond Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Losev, L. L.; Pazyuk, V. S.; Tenyakov, S. Yu

    2016-07-01

    A femtosecond Raman laser utilising compressed hydrogen is experimentally investigated under pumping by radiation from a 1-kHz-repetition-rate Ti : sapphire laser. In the regime of double-pulse pumping, the conditions are determined, which correspond to the minimal energy dispersion of Stokes pulses. The optical scheme is realised, which is capable of ensuring the long-term stability of the average power of the first Stokes component with a variation of less than 2%. The Stokes pulses are produced with a pulse duration of 60 fs and energy of 0.26 mJ at a conversion efficiency of 14%.

  17. Residential 60-Hz magnetic fields and temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Robert Stephen

    1998-06-01

    The basic question addressed by this research is: How well can data from a single measurement visit estimate longer-term ambient residential 60-Hz magnetic field levels? We undertook repeat 60-Hz magnetic field measurements every two months for one year, plus one additional visit for 14 days of measurement. The study sample consisted of 51 single-family homes, 24 in Minneapolis-St. Paul and 27 in Detroit. Homes were selected by random-digit dialing; each was home to a child eligible to serve a control subject in the National Cancer Institute-Children's Cancer Group Electromagnetic Fields and Radon Study. Trained survey interviewers obtained all measurement data, using an expanded measurement protocol from the main study: (1) spot 60-Hz magnetic field measurements at the centers of three rooms and at the front door; (2) 24- hour (or 14 day) 60-Hz magnetic field measurement in the subject child's bedroom; and (3) geomagnetic field at the centers of two rooms and on the child's bed. The data set available for analysis consists of 349 out of 357 (97.8%) possible sets of spot measurements and 1060 out of 1071 (99.0%) possible days of 24-hour and two-week measurements. A Long-Term Estimate, Child's Bedroom, or LTECB, the geometric mean of the 24-hour measurement geometric means, was used as the reference for analysis. The LTECB was analyzed for house-level main effects and for repeated-measures (temporal) main effects. House-level main effects account for only 41% of the variability in the LTECB. The statistically significant main effects are study area, wire code and population density. A clear trend of increasing LTECB with population density is evident. The seasonal effect is small, but statistically significant. There is no evidence for a day-of-week effect, but a statistically significant diurnal effect is present. Correlation coefficients relating the LTECB to any of three primary single-visit measurement and exposure metric surrogates are >.9. However, when

  18. Effects of the multidrug resistance modulator HZ08 on the apoptosis pathway in human chronic leukaemia cell line K562/A02.

    PubMed

    Cen, Juan; Zhu, Yi-Lin; Yang, Yu; Zhu, Jun-Rong; Fang, Wei-Rong; Huang, Wen-Long; Li, Yun-Man; Tao, Yi-Fu

    2011-01-01

    ōancer falls to respond to chemotherapy by acquiring multidrug resistance in over 90% of patients. A previous study revealed that multidrug resistance modulator HZ08 had great multidrug resistance reversal effect in vitro and in vivo. It could enhance adriamycin (doxorubicin) induced intrinsic apoptosis pathway and rectify cell cycle and some apoptosis related proteins in human breast resistant cancer MCF-7/ADM cells. This study detected Rh123 accumulation to assess the effect of HZ08 on P-glycoprotein function in human chronic leukaemia cell line K562/A02. Moreover, mitochondria membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activity were analyzed for HZ08 treatment with or without vincristine. Since pretreatment with HZ08 could also reverse the multidrug resistance to vincristine in K562/A02 cells, the individual influence of HZ08 was further detected on apoptotic regulator like Bcl-2, Bax, p53, cell cycle checkpoints and proliferation regulatory factors like survivin, hTERT, c-Myc, c-Fos, c-Jun. Finally, it revealed that HZ08 increased vincristine induced activation in intrinsic apoptosis pathway by inhibition of P-gp mediated efflux. In addition, the outstanding reversal effect of HZ08 should also attribute to its individual effect on apoptosis and proliferation related regulatory factors. It renders HZ08 possibility of application in pretreatment to reverse multidrug resistance while avoiding unexpected drug interactions and accumulative toxicity. PMID:22232851

  19. Endocrinological effects of strong 60-Hz electric fields on rats

    SciTech Connect

    Free, M.J.; Kaune, W.T.; Phillips, R.D.; Cheng, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    Adult male rats were exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields without spark discharges, ozone, or significant levels or other secondary variables. No effects were discharges, ozone, or significant levels of other secondary variables. No effects were observed on body weights or plasma hormone levels after 30 days of exposure at an effective field strength of 68 kV/m. After 120 days of exposure (effective field strength = 64 kV/m), effects were inconsistent, with signficant reductions in body weight and plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone occurring in one replicate experiment but not in the other. Plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced after 120 days of exposure in one experiment, with a similar but not statistically significant reduction in a replicate experiment. Weanling rats, exposed or sham-exposed in electric fields with an effective field strength of 80 kV/m from 20 to 56 days of age, exhibited identical or closely similar growth trends in body and organ weights. Hormone levels in exposed and sham-exposed groups were also similar. However, there was an apparent phase shift between the two groups in the cyclic variations of concentrations of hormones at different stages of development, particularly with respect to follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone. We concluded that 60-Hz electric fields may bring about subtle changes in the endocrine system of rats, and that these changes may be related to alterations in episodic rhythms.

  20. Slip-stacking Dynamics and the 20 Hz Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffery; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Slip-stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly doubles the proton intensity. The Proton Improvement Plan II intensity upgrades require a reduction in slip-stacking losses by approximately a factor of 2. We study the single-particle dynamics that determine the stability of slip-stacking particles. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We show the particle loss as a function of time. We calculate the injection efficiency as a function of longitudinal emittance and aspect-ratio. We demonstrate that the losses from RF single particle dynamics can be reduced by a factor of 4-10 (depending on beam parameters) by upgrading the Fermilab Booster from a 15-Hz cycle-rate to a 20-Hz cycle-rate. We recommend a change in injection scheme to eliminate the need for a greater momentum aperture in the Fermilab Recycler.

  1. 4,10-Dinitro-2,6,8,12-tetraoxa-4,10-diazatetracyclo[5.5.0.05,903,11]dodecane Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimowski, Paweł; Gołofit, Tomasz

    2013-07-01

    4,10-Dinitro-2,6,8,12-tetraoxa-4,10-diazatetracyclo[5.5.0.05,903,11]dodecane (TEX) was obtained by nitrolysis of 1,4-diformyl-2,3,5,6-tetrahydroxypiperazine reaction using a mixture of fuming nitric acid and concentrated sulfuric acid. The optimal process temperature was 54-56°C. The yield of the synthesis depends inter alia on the rate the reactants are introduced into the reaction medium and on the time of conditioning of the reaction mixture. A maximal yield of ca. 40% was achieved at the reactant addition time of 2 h and conditioning time of 2 h. None of the other nitrating mixtures examined proved superior to the conventional nitrating mixture. The product was examined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques and the results are reported.

  2. The global distribution of natural and man-made ionospheric electric fields at 200 kHz and 540 kHz as observed by Ogo 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laaspere, T.; Semprebon, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment on the polar-orbiting Ogo 6 spacecraft yielded real-time analog data in several broadband channels and essentially continuous tape-recorded data from two narrow-band (200-Hz) receivers operating at 200 and 540 kHz. The results show that the worldwide distributions of signals at 200 and 540 kHz falls into a number of different categories: (1) naturally generated broadband (auroral) hiss at polar latitudes with typical 200-kHz intensities of around 0.1 microvolt per meter per Hz to the 1/2 power, maximum intensities of up to several microvolt per meter per Hz to the 1/2 power, and generally lower intensities at 540 kHz; (2) nighttime midlatitude enhancements of a few microvolts per meter, which probably result either from a superposition of signals from a number of 200- and 540-kHz stations or from interference from intense signals of much higher frequencies; (3) well-defined signal peaks associated with individual ground stations operating at 200 kHz; (4) striking signal enhancements in the conjugate region of a low-latitude 200-kHz station (Ashkhabad), suggesting propagation in the whistler mode to the opposite hemisphere; and (5) occasional signal enhancements at the magnetic equator.

  3. 60-Hz electric-field effects on pineal melatonin rhythms: time course for onset and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.; Anderson, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Rats exposed for 3 weeks to uniform 60-Hz electric fields of 39 kV/m (effective field strength) failed to show normal pineal gland circadian rhythms in serotonin N-acetyl transferase activity and melatonin concentrations. The time required for recovery of the melatonin rhythm after cessation of field exposure was determined to be less than 3 days. The rapid recovery suggests that the overall metabolic competence of the pineal is not permanently compromised by electric-field exposure, and that the circadian rhythm effect may be neuronally mediated.

  4. EV drivetrain inverter with V/HZ optimization

    DOEpatents

    Gritter, David J.; O'Neil, Walter K.

    1986-01-01

    An inverter (34) which provides power to an A.C. machine (28) is controlled by a circuit (36) employing PWM control strategy whereby A.C. power is supplied to the machine at a preselectable frequency and preselectable voltage. This is accomplished by the technique of waveform notching in which the shapes of the notches are varied to determine the average energy content of the overall waveform. Through this arrangement, the operational efficiency of the A.C. machine is optimized. The control circuit includes a micro-computer which calculates optimized machine control data signals from various parametric inputs and during steady state load conditions, seeks a best V/HZ ratio to minimize battery current drawn (system losses) from a D.C. power source (32). In the preferred embodiment, the present invention is incorporated within an electric vehicle (10) employing a 144 VDC battery pack and a three-phase induction motor (18).

  5. Influence of 60-Hz magnetic fields on sea urchin development

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M.; Winters, W.D.; Cameron, I.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Continuous exposure of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos at 18 degrees C to a cyclic 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.1 mT rms beginning 4 min after insemination caused a significant developmental delay during the subsequent 23 hours. No delay in development was recorded for periods up to 18 hours after fertilization. At 18 h, most embryos were in the mesenchyme blastula stage. At 23 h, most control embryos were in mid-gastrula whereas most magnetic-field-exposed embryos were in the early gastrula stage. Thus an estimated 1-h delay occurred between these developmental stages. The results are discussed in terms of possible magnetic-field modification of transcription as well as interference with cell migration during gastrulation. The present study extends and supports the growing body of information about potential effects of exposures to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on developing organisms.

  6. Investigation on Two-Stage 300 HZ Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H. K.; Yang, L. W.; Hong, G. T.; Luo, E. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-04-01

    In the past few years, ultra-high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers are becoming a research hotspot for their portability and compactness in aerospace and aviation applications. For preliminary research, a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler working at 300 Hz driven by a thermoacoustic engine is established to investigate the problems due to ultra high frequency, and several results have been derived in our early reports. In order to study the effect of thermal penetration depth, this paper presents the cooler adopting copper mesh as the regenerator, and comparison with stainless steel mesh is given. In addition, the influence of inertance tube on the lowest possible cooler temperature is also tested. Finally, we discuss the improvement for getting a lower temperature.

  7. Neocortical 40 Hz oscillations during carbachol-induced rapid eye movement sleep and cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Pablo; Castro-Zaballa, Santiago; Cavelli, Matías; Chase, Michael H; Falconi, Atilio

    2016-02-01

    Higher cognitive functions require the integration and coordination of large populations of neurons in cortical and subcortical regions. Oscillations in the gamma band (30-45 Hz) of the electroencephalogram (EEG) have been involved in these cognitive functions. In previous studies, we analysed the extent of functional connectivity between cortical areas employing the 'mean squared coherence' analysis of the EEG gamma band. We demonstrated that gamma coherence is maximal during alert wakefulness and is almost absent during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) is critical for REM sleep generation. The NPO is considered to exert executive control over the initiation and maintenance of REM sleep. In the cat, depending on the previous state of the animal, a single microinjection of carbachol (a cholinergic agonist) into the NPO can produce either REM sleep [REM sleep induced by carbachol (REMc)] or a waking state with muscle atonia, i.e. cataplexy [cataplexy induced by carbachol (CA)]. In the present study, in cats that were implanted with electrodes in different cortical areas to record polysomnographic activity, we compared the degree of gamma (30-45 Hz) coherence during REMc, CA and naturally-occurring behavioural states. Gamma coherence was maximal during CA and alert wakefulness. In contrast, gamma coherence was almost absent during REMc as in naturally-occurring REM sleep. We conclude that, in spite of the presence of somatic muscle paralysis, there are remarkable differences in cortical activity between REMc and CA, which confirm that EEG gamma (≈40 Hz) coherence is a trait that differentiates wakefulness from REM sleep. PMID:26670051

  8. Investigation of geomagnetic disturbances (F=1-5 Hz) before strong EQs in Kamchatka region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytenko, Y.; Ismaguilov, V.; Schekotov, A.; Molchanov, O.; Hayakawa, M.

    2007-05-01

    Regular observations of ULF electromagnetic disturbances at st. Karymshino in seismic active zone of Kamchatka peninsula were carried out by induction three-component high-sensitive magnetometer during 2001- 2003 years. Five seismic active periods with strong earthquakes (M>5) were displayed during this period. These EQs occurred at the Pacific at 20-60 km depth at 100-140 km distances to the East from the st. Karymshino. Analysis of normalized dynamic power spectra of data of high-sensitive (0.2 pT/sqrt(Hz)) three- component induction magnetometer achieved a significant disorder of daily variation and increasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities (from 0.2 to ~ 1 pT) in the whole investigated frequency range (1 - 5 Hz). The anomaly intensity increasing was observed during the 12-18 hours before main seismic shocks. Maximum of the increasing occurred during 4-6 hours before the EQs. A sharp decreasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities was observed 2-4 hours before the EQs. We suppose that physical processes in a hearth of forthcoming EQ lead to an irreversible avalanche-like formation of cracks and stimulation of the ULF electromagnetic disturbances.

  9. 47 CFR 15.219 - Operation in the band 510-1705 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 510-1705 kHz. 15.219... kHz. (a) The total input power to the final radio frequency stage (exclusive of filament or heater... ground lead (if used) shall not exceed 3 meters. (c) All emissions below 510 kHz or above 1705 kHz...

  10. Pressure Pain Thresholds Increase after Preconditioning 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Tonya M.; Witney, Alice G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary motor cortex (M1) is an effective target of non-invasive cortical stimulation (NICS) for pain threshold modulation. It has been suggested that the initial level of cortical excitability of M1 plays a key role in the plastic effects of NICS. Objective Here we investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) primed 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds and if this is related to observed alterations in cortical excitability. Method 15 healthy, male participants received 10 min 1 mA anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS to the left M1 before 15 min 1 Hz rTMS in separate sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Motor cortical excitability was recorded at baseline, post-tDCS priming and post-rTMS through recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from right FDI muscle. Pressure pain thresholds were determined by quantitative sensory testing (QST) through a computerized algometer, on the palmar thenar of the right hand pre- and post-stimulation. Results Cathodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS was found to reverse the expected suppressive effect of 1 Hz rTMS on cortical excitability; leading to an overall increase in activity (p<0.001) with a parallel increase in pressure pain thresholds (p<0.01). In contrast, anodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS resulted in a corresponding decrease in cortical excitability (p<0.05), with no significant effect on pressure pain. Conclusion This study demonstrates that priming the M1 before stimulation of 1 Hz-rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds in a safe and controlled manner, producing a form of analgesia. PMID:24658333

  11. Search for 1-Hz Coronal-Loop Oscillations at the 2008 and 2009 Total Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Babcock, B. A.; DuPré, K.; Kern, J.; Nesterenko, A.; Nesterenko, I.

    2010-05-01

    We report observations through narrow-band filters at total solar eclipses at high cadence to search for Fourier power 1 Hz, a prediction of certain classes of coronal heating through MHD waves, such as surface Alfvén waves. We previous reported such power at the 1999 eclipse (Pasachoff, Babcock, Russell, Seaton, Solar Phys. 207, 241-257, 2002). We observed at 10 Hz for 2 min 20 sec in Siberia in 2008 with the coronal red line at 637.4 nm and the coronal green line at 530.3 nm, and at 6 Hz for 5 min 50 sec at Tianhuangping, China, in 2009 with the coronal green line and a nearby continuum, using 20-cm telescopes. The sky was clear in 2008 while the eclipse was observed through moving clouds in 2009. The weakening corona gave few features on which to make a fine alignment, and much time has been spent on details of aligning the series of images. We report on the status of the alignment and the resulting transforms, and place the results in the context of the solar-activity cycle, which we show through a series of radial-filter images made as part of our expeditions in 1999, 2001, 2006, 2008, and 2009, spanning the most recent sunspot cycle. Acknowledgments: We thank C. Alex Young, Daniel B. Seaton. Yihua Yan, Jin Zhu, Lin Lan and Chenying Lai. Williams collaborators were Jianjun Wang, Marek Demianski, Huajai Cao, Sara Dwyer, and Rachel Wagner-Kaiser in 2009 and Marcus Freeman, William G. Wagner, and Marek Demianski in 2008. Our expeditions were supported in part by grants from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society. We thank the NSF Heliospheric Program for 2006 suppport and the Planetary Astronomy division of NASA for imaging-system support.

  12. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  13. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  14. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  15. 47 CFR 90.253 - Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz. 90.253 Section 90.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES... frequency 5167.5 kHz. The frequency 5167.5 kHz may be used by any station authorized under this part...

  16. 47 CFR 90.253 - Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz. 90.253 Section 90.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES... frequency 5167.5 kHz. The frequency 5167.5 kHz may be used by any station authorized under this part...

  17. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  18. CELL CULTURE STUDIES WITH THE IMC-HZ-1 NONOCCLUDED VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were conducted on an adventitious agent (Hz-lv) isolated from the IMC-Hz-1 cell line. It appeared identical to the virus first obtained by Granados et al. from a persistent infection of this cell line. Restriction endonuclease digestion of Hz-lv DNA indicated the agent wa...

  19. 47 CFR 90.253 - Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz. 90.253 Section 90.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES... frequency 5167.5 kHz. The frequency 5167.5 kHz may be used by any station authorized under this part...

  20. 47 CFR 15.221 - Operation in the band 525-1705 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 525-1705 kHz. 15.221... kHz. (a) Carrier current systems and transmitters employing a leaky coaxial cable as the radiating antenna may operate in the band 525-1705 kHz provided the field strength levels of the radiated...

  1. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  2. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with…

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DNA OF A NONOCCLUDED BACULOVIRUS, HZ-1V

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA of the nonoccluded baculovirus (Hz-1V) obtained from the IMC-Hz-1 cell line was characterized by physicochemical and restriction endonuclease techniques. Hz-1V DNA isolated from purified virus had buoyant densities of 1.58 and 1.54 g/ml in CsC1-ethidium bromide density gr...

  4. Cardiovascular response of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that exposure to high-strength electric fields can influence electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns, heart rates, and blood pressures in various species of animals. Our studies were designed to evaluate these reported effects and to help clarify some of the disagreement present in the literature. Various cardiovascular variables were measured in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields at 80 to 100 kV/m for periods up to four months. No significant differences in heart rates, ECG patterns, blood pressures, or vascular reactivity were observed between exposed and sham-exposed rats after 8 hours, 40 hours, 1 month, or 4 months of exposure. Our studies cannot be directly compared to the work of other investigators because of differences in animal species and electric-field characteristics. However, our failure to detect any cardiovascular changes may have been the result of (1) eliminating secondary field effects such as shocks, audible noise, corona, and ozone; (2) minimizing steady-state microcurrents between the mouth of the animal and watering devices; and (3) minimizing electric-field-induced vibration of the electrodes and animal cages.

  5. Water-vapor foreign-continuum absorption in the 8-12 and 3-5 μm atmospheric windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeshina, T. E.; Rodimova, O. B.

    2015-08-01

    The frequency and temperature dependence of the water vapor-nitrogen continuum in the 8-12 and 3-5 μm spectral regions obtained experimentally by CAVIAR and NIST is described with the use of the line contour constructed on the basis of asymptotic line shape theory. The parameters of the theory found from fitting the calculated values of the absorption coefficient to the pertinent experimental data enter into the expression for the classical potential describing the center-of-mass motion of interacting molecules and into the expression for the quantum potential of two interacting molecules. The frequency behavior of the line wing contours appears to depend on the band the lines of which make a major contribution to the absorption in a given spectral interval. The absorption coefficients in the wings of the band in question calculated with the line contours obtained for other bands are outside of experimental errors. The distinction in the line wing behavior may be explained by the difference in the quantum energies of molecules interacting in different vibrational states.

  6. Assessment of selenium and mercury in biological samples of normal and night blindness children of age groups (3-7) and (8-12) years.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Talpur, Farah Naz; Kazi, Atif; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Khan, Naeemullah; Arain, Mariam Shazadi; Ali, Jamshed

    2015-03-01

    The causes of night blindness in children are multifactorial and particular consideration has been given to childhood nutritional deficiency, which is the most common problem found in underdeveloped countries. Such deficiency can result in physiological and pathological processes that in turn influence biological sample composition. This study was designed to compare the levels of selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) in scalp hair, blood, and urine of night blindness children age ranged (3-7) and (8-12) years of both genders, comparing them to sex- and age-matched controls. A microwave-assisted wet acid digestion procedure was developed as a sample pretreatment for the determination of Se and Hg in biological samples of night blindness children. The proposed method was validated by using conventional wet digestion and certified reference samples of hair, blood, and urine. The Se and Hg in biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, prior to microwave acid digestion, respectively. The concentration of Se was decreased in scalp hair and blood samples of male and female night blindness children while Hg was higher in all biological samples as compared to referent subjects. The Se concentration was inversely associated with the risk of night blindness in both genders. These results add to an increasing body of evidence that Se is a protecting element for night blindness. These data present guidance to clinicians and other professional investigating deficiency of essential micronutrients in biological samples (scalp hair and blood) of night blindness children. PMID:25655123

  7. Challenges, constraints, and results of lens design for 17 micron-bolometer focal plane arrays in 8-12 micron waveband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Norbert; Franks, John

    2011-06-01

    In the 8-12 micron waveband Focal Plane Arrays (FPA) are available with a 17 micron pixel pitch in different arrays sizes (e.g. 512 x 480 pixels and 320 x 240 pixels) and with excellent electrical properties. Many applications become possible using this new type of IR-detector which will become the future standard in uncooled technology. Lenses with an f-number faster than f/1.5 minimize the diffraction impact on the spatial resolution and guarantee a high thermal resolution for uncooled cameras. Both effects will be quantified. The distinction between Traditional f-number (TF) and Radiometric f-number (RF) is discussed. Lenses with different focal lengths are required for applications in a variety of markets. They are classified by their Horizontal field of view (HFOV). Respecting the requirements for high volume markets, several two lens solutions will be discussed. A commonly accepted parameter of spatial resolution is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF)-value at the Nyquist frequency of the detector (here 30cy/mm). This parameter of resolution will be presented versus field of view. Wide Angle and Super Wide Angle lenses are susceptible to low relative illumination in the corner of the detector. Measures to reduce this drop to an acceptable value are presented.

  8. An 8.12 μW wavelet denoising chip for PPG detection and portable heart rate monitoring in 0.18 μm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Li; Xu, Zhang; Peng, Li; Xiaohui, Hu; Hongda, Chen

    2016-05-01

    A low power wavelet denoising chip for photoplethysmography (PPG) detection and portable heart rate monitoring is presented. To eliminate noise and improve detection accuracy, Harr wavelet (HWT) is chosen as the processing tool. An optimized finite impulse response structure is proposed to lower the computational complexity of proposed algorithm, which is benefit for reducing the power consumption of proposed chip. The modulus maxima pair location module is design to accurately locate the PPG peaks. A clock control unit is designed to further reduce the power consumption of the proposed chip. Fabricated with the 0.18 μm N-well CMOS 1P6M technology, the power consumption of proposed chip is only 8.12 μW in 1 V voltage supply. Validated with PPG signals in multiparameter intelligent monitoring in intensive care databases and signals acquired by the wrist photoelectric volume detection front end, the proposed chip can accurately detect PPG signals. The average sensitivity and positive prediction are 99.91% and 100%, respectively.

  9. The Dielectric Properties of Martian Soil Simulant JSC Mars-1 in the Range from 20Hz to 10kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, F.; Trautner, R.; Grard, R.; Hamelin, M.

    2004-03-01

    A laboratory facility has been setup to measure the complex permittivity of soil mixtures as a function of porosity, humidity, and temperature in the range 20 Hz 10 kHz. The influence of porosity and temperature are discussed, and a measurable gravimetric water content threshold is evaluated.

  10. Dual frequency (20.0-19.9 kHz) VLF data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, C. H.

    1968-01-01

    Data are presented from 24 months of operation of radio station WWVL. Daily measurements of the 20.0 kHz and 20.0/19.9 kHz signal phase angles corrected in accordance with the NBS measurements are presented in tabular form. The 20.0/19.9 kHz data is a function of the phase angle of the 100 Hz information inherent in the 20.0/19.9 transmissions. This data can be used to resolve the 50 microsecond ambiguity inherent in 20.0 kHz single frequency transmissions.

  11. The effect of wind-generated bubbles on sea-surface backscattering at 940 Hz.

    PubMed

    van Vossen, Robbert; Ainslie, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    Reliable predictions of sea-surface backscattering strength are required for sonar performance modeling. These are, however, difficult to obtain as measurements of sea-surface backscattering are not available at small grazing angles relevant to low-frequency active sonar (1-3 kHz). Accurate theoretical predictions of scattering strength require a good understanding of physical mechanisms giving rise to the scattering and the relative importance of these. In this paper, scattering from individual resonant bubbles is introduced as a potential mechanism and a scattering model is derived that incorporates the contribution from these together with that of rough surface scattering. The model results are fitted to Critical Sea Test (CST) measurements at a frequency of 940 Hz, treating the number of large bubbles, parameterized through the spectral slope of the size spectrum for bubbles whose radii exceed 1 mm, as a free parameter. This procedure illustrates that the CST data can be explained by scattering from a small number of large resonant bubbles, indicating that these provide an alternative mechanism to that of scattering from bubble clouds. PMID:22088015

  12. The inhibitory and combinative mechanism of HZ08 with P-glycoprotein expressed on the membrane of Caco-2 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanyan; Hu, Yahui; Feng, Yidong; Kodithuwakku, Nandani Darshika; Fang, Weirong; Li, Yunman; Huang, Wenlong

    2014-01-15

    Recently, the research and development of agents to reverse the phenomenon of multidrug resistance has been an attractive goal as well as a key approach to elevating the clinical survival of cancer patients. Although three generations of P-glycoprotein modulators have been identified, poor clearance and metabolism render these agents too toxic to be used in clinical application. HZ08, which has been under investigation for several years, shows a dramatic reversal effect with low cytotoxicity. For the first time, we aimed to describe the interaction between HZ08 and P-glycoprotein in Caco-2 cell line in which P-glycoprotein is overexpressed naturally. Cytotoxicity and multidrug resistance reversal assays, together with flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy and siRNA interference as well as Caco-2 monolayer transport model were employed in this study to evaluate the interaction between HZ08 and P-glycoprotein. This study revealed that HZ08 was capable of reversing adriamycin resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein as a result of intracellular enhancement of adriamycin accumulation, which was found to be superior to verapamil. In addition, we confirmed that HZ08 suppressed the transport of Rhodamine123 in the Caco-2 monolayer model but had little effect on P-glycoprotein expression. The transport of HZ08 was diminished by P-glycoprotein inhibitors (verapamil and LY335979) and its accumulation was increased via siRNA targeting MDR1 in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, considering the binding site of P-glycoprotein, verapamil performed as a competitive inhibitor with HZ08. In conclusion, as a P-glycoprotein substrate, HZ08 inhibited P-glycoprotein activity and may share the same binding site of verapamil to P-glycoprotein. - Highlights: • The cytotoxicity and reversing effect of HZ08 was measured in Caco-2 cell line. • HZ08 inhibited the transport of Rhodamine123 across Caco-2 cell monolayer. • The efflux ratio of HZ08 was dropped when combined with P

  13. 40-Hz steady state response in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    van Deursen, J A; Vuurman, E F P M; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, V H J M; Verhey, F R J; Riedel, W J

    2011-01-01

    The 40-Hz steady state response (SSR) reflects early sensory processing and can be measured with electroencephalography (EEG). The current study compared the 40-Hz SSR in groups consisting of mild Alzheimer's disease patients (AD) (n=15), subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n=20) and healthy elderly control subjects (n=20). All participants were naïve for psychoactive drugs. Auditory click trains at a frequency of 40-Hz evoked the 40-Hz SSR. To evaluate test-retest reliability (TRR), subjects underwent a similar assessment 1 week after the first. The results showed a high TRR and a significant increase of 40-Hz SSR power in the AD group compared to MCI and controls. Furthermore a moderate correlation between 40-Hz SSR power and cognitive performance as measured by ADAS-cog was shown. The results suggest that 40-Hz SSR might be an interesting candidate marker of disease progression. PMID:19237225

  14. Cryogenic engineering and superconductor technology; Proceedings of the 14th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference and International Cryogenic Materials Conference, Kiev, Ukraine, June 8-12, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarek, P.; Rizzuto, C.

    Consideration is given to application concepts of small regenerative cryocoolers in superconducting magnet systems, thermoelectric materials for Peltier cryogenic coolers, closed-cycle liquid helium refrigerators, built-in cryogenic control fixtures with electric drive, large cryogenic helium systems for superconducting magnets, low temperature adsorptive hydrogen isotope separation, cryogenic thermometry for space testing systems, performance of parallel flow He-II heat exchangers, and transient heat transfer to liquid helium at a 100 Hz pulsed heat load. Also discussed are He II cooling of a large superconducting magnet system, a computer code for simulation of thermal processes during quench in superconducting magnet windings, quench energies of multistable composite superconductors, a superconducting hydrogen-cooled switch on Nb-Sn tape, a gravity radiometer with coupled superconducting suspensions, new design of RSFQ logic family, and high-temperature Josephson junctions and their applications.

  15. Are the kHz QPO Lags in Neutron Star 4U 1608–52 due to Reverberation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cackett, Edward M.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray reverberation lags have recently been discovered in both active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and black hole X-ray binaries. A recent study of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 1608‑52 has also shown significant lags, whose properties hint at a reverberation origin. Here, we adapt general relativistic ray tracing impulse response functions used to model X-ray reverberation in AGNs for neutron star LMXBs. Assuming that relativistic reflection forms the broad iron line and associated reflection continuum, we use reflection fits to the energy spectrum along with the impulse response functions to calculate the expected lags as a function of energy over the range of observed kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies in 4U 1608‑52. We find that the lag energy spectrum is expected to increase with increasing energy above 8 keV, while the observed lags in 4U 1608‑52 show the opposite behavior. This demonstrates that the lags in the lower kHz QPO of 4U 1608‑52 are not solely due to reverberation. We do note, however, that the models appear to be more consistent with the much flatter lag energy spectrum observed in the upper kHz QPO of several neutron star LMXBs, suggesting that lower and upper kHz QPOs may have different origins.

  16. Are the kHz QPO Lags in Neutron Star 4U 1608-52 due to Reverberation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cackett, Edward M.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray reverberation lags have recently been discovered in both active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and black hole X-ray binaries. A recent study of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 1608‑52 has also shown significant lags, whose properties hint at a reverberation origin. Here, we adapt general relativistic ray tracing impulse response functions used to model X-ray reverberation in AGNs for neutron star LMXBs. Assuming that relativistic reflection forms the broad iron line and associated reflection continuum, we use reflection fits to the energy spectrum along with the impulse response functions to calculate the expected lags as a function of energy over the range of observed kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies in 4U 1608‑52. We find that the lag energy spectrum is expected to increase with increasing energy above 8 keV, while the observed lags in 4U 1608‑52 show the opposite behavior. This demonstrates that the lags in the lower kHz QPO of 4U 1608‑52 are not solely due to reverberation. We do note, however, that the models appear to be more consistent with the much flatter lag energy spectrum observed in the upper kHz QPO of several neutron star LMXBs, suggesting that lower and upper kHz QPOs may have different origins.

  17. Are the kHz QPO lags in neutron star 4U 1608-52 due to reverberation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cackett, Edward

    2016-04-01

    X-ray reverberation lags have recently been discovered in both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and black hole X-ray binaries. A recent study of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 has also shown significant lags, whose properties hint at a reverberation origin. Here, we adapt general relativistic ray tracing impulse response functions used to model X-ray reverberation in AGN for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, and calculate the expected lags as a function of energy over the range of observed kHz QPO frequencies in 4U 1608-52. We find that the lag energy spectrum is expected to increase with increasing energy above 8 keV, while the observed lags in 4U 1608-52 show the opposite behavior. This demonstrates that the lags in the lower kHz QPO of 4U 1608-52 are not solely due to reverberation. We do note, however, that the models appear to be more consistent with the much flatter lag energy spectrum observed in the upper kHz QPO of several neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, suggesting that lower and upper kHz QPOs may have different origins.

  18. Seismic exploration-scale velocities and structure from ambient seismic noise (>1 Hz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganov, Deyan; Campman, Xander; Thorbecke, Jan; Verdel, Arie; Wapenaar, Kees

    2013-08-01

    The successful surface waves retrieval in solid-Earth seismology using long-time correlations and subsequent tomographic images of the crust have sparked interest in extraction of subsurface information from noise in the exploration seismology. Subsurface information in exploration seismology is usually derived from body-wave reflections > 1 Hz, which is challenging for utilization of ambient noise. We use 11 h of noise recorded in the Sirte basin, Libya. First, we study the characteristics of the noise. We show that the bulk of the noise is composed of surface waves at frequencies below 6 Hz. Some noise panels contain nearly vertically traveling events. We further characterize these events using a beamforming algorithm. From the beamforming, we conclude that these events represent body-wave arrivals with a fairly rich azimuthal distribution. Having body-wave arrivals in the noise is a prerequisite for body-wave reflections retrieval. We crosscorrelate and sum the recorded ambient-noise panels to retrieve common-source gathers, following two approaches—using all the noise and using only noise panels containing body-wave arrivals likely to contribute to the reflections retrieval. Comparing the retrieved gathers with active seismic data, we show that the two-way traveltimes at short offsets of several retrieved events coincide with those of reflections in the active data and thus correspond to apexes of reflections. We then compare retrieved stacked sections of the subsurface from both approaches with the active-data stacked section and show that the reflectors are consistent along a line. The results from the second approach exhibit the reflectors better.

  19. Cardiovascular rhythms in the 0.15-Hz band: common origin of identical phenomena in man and dog in the reticular formation of the brain stem?

    PubMed

    Perlitz, Volker; Lambertz, Manfred; Cotuk, Birol; Grebe, Reinhard; Vandenhouten, Ralf; Flatten, Guido; Petzold, Ernst Richard; Schmid-Schönbein, Holger; Langhorst, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Selected examples from experiments in humans and dogs with time series of reticular neurons, respiration, arterial blood pressure and cutaneous forehead blood content fluctuations were analysed using multiscaled time-frequency distribution, post-event-scan and pointwise transinformation. We found in both experiments a "0.15-Hz rhythm" exhibiting periods of spindle waves (increasing and decreasing amplitudes), phase synchronized with respiration at 1:2 and 1:1 integer number ratios. At times of wave-epochs and n:m phase synchronization, the 0.15-Hz rhythm appeared in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. As phase synchronization of the 0.15-Hz rhythm with respiration was established at a 1:1 integer number ratio, all cardiovascular-respiratory oscillations were synchronized at 0.15 Hz. Analysis of a canine experiment supplied evidence that the emergence of the 0.15-Hz rhythm and n:m phase synchronization appears to result from a decline in the level of the general activity of the organism associated with a decline in the level of activity of reticular neurons in the lower brainstem network. These findings corroborate the notion of the 0.15-Hz rhythm as a marker of the "trophotropic mode of operation" first introduced by W.R. Hess. PMID:15138824

  20. Cortico-muscular coupling and motor performance are modulated by 20 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Vanessa; Wach, Claudia; Südmeyer, Martin; Ferrea, Stefano; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with pathologically altered oscillatory activity. While synchronized oscillations between 13 and 30 Hz are increased within a cortico-subcortical network, cortico-muscular coupling (CMC) is decreased. The present study aims at investigating the effect of non-invasive transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) on motor symptoms and motor-cortical oscillations in PD. In 10 PD patients and 10 healthy control subjects, static isometric contraction, dynamic fast finger tapping, and diadochokinesia of the more severely affected hand were investigated prior to and shortly after tACS of the contralateral M1 at 10 Hz vs. 20 Hz vs. sham. During isometric contraction, neuromagnetic activity was recorded using magnetoencephalography. 20 Hz tACS attenuated beta band CMC during isometric contraction and amplitude variability during finger tapping in PD patients but not in healthy control subjects. 10 Hz tACS yielded no significant after-effects. The present data suggest that PD is associated with pathophysiological alterations which abet a higher responsiveness toward frequency-specific tACS – possibly due to pathologically altered motor-cortical oscillatory synchronization at frequencies between 13 and 30 Hz. PMID:24474912

  1. Potential low frequency ground vibration (<6.3 Hz) impacts from underground LRT operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.

    2003-10-01

    Vibration sensitive research activities at the laboratories of the University of Washington (UW) Physics and Astronomy Building (PAB) were a critical issue for the design of the Sound Transit Link Light Rail LRT system in Seattle, Washington. A study was conducted to measure and predict low frequency ground vibration generated by the LRT operations. The University's concern was an on-going research experiment in gravity, which had sensitivity to vibration below 6.3 Hz. The experiment was located on an independent concrete slab in an area cut-out from the building foundation with no connection to the building structure. Another concern was the planned future construction of a Life Sciences Center with vibration sensitive test equipment. This paper presents the results of a study to estimate the ground displacement at these buildings using empirical measured data of a similar deep tunnel transit system and finite difference modelling analysis.

  2. Habitability of terrestrial-mass planets in the HZ of M Dwarfs - I. H/He-dominated atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2016-07-01

    The ubiquity of M dwarfs, combined with the relative ease of detecting terrestrial-mass planets around them, has made them prime targets for finding and characterizing planets in the `habitable zone' (HZ). However, Kepler finds that terrestrial-mass exoplanets are often born with voluminous H/He envelopes, comprising mass-fractions (Menv/Mcore) ≳1 per cent. If these planets retain such envelopes over Gyr time-scales, they will not be `habitable' even within the HZ. Given the strong X-ray/UV fluxes of M dwarfs, we study whether sufficient envelope mass can be photoevaporated away for these planets to become habitable. We improve upon previous work by using hydrodynamic models that account for radiative cooling as well as the transition from hydrodynamic to ballistic escape. Adopting a template active M dwarf XUV spectrum, including stellar evolution, and considering both evaporation and thermal evolution, we show that: (1) the mass-loss is (considerably) lower than previous estimates that use an `energy-limited' formalism and ignore the transition to Jeans escape; (2) at the inner edge of the HZ, planets with core mass ≲ 0.9 M⊕ can lose enough H/He to become habitable if their initial envelope mass-fraction is ˜1 per cent; (3) at the outer edge of the HZ, evaporation cannot remove a ˜1 per cent H/He envelope even from cores down to 0.8 M⊕. Thus, if planets form with bulky H/He envelopes, only those with low-mass cores may eventually be habitable. Cores ≳1 M⊕, with ≳1 per cent natal H/He envelopes, will not be habitable in the HZ of M dwarfs.

  3. Habitability of Terrestrial-Mass Planets in the HZ of M Dwarfs. I. H/He-Dominated Atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2016-04-01

    The ubiquity of M dwarfs, combined with the relative ease of detecting terrestrial-mass planets around them, has made them prime targets for finding and characterising planets in the "Habitable Zone" (HZ). However, Kepler finds that terrestrial-mass exoplanets are often born with voluminous H/He envelopes, comprising mass-fractions (Menv/Mcore) ≳ 1%. If these planets retain such envelopes over Gyr timescales, they will not be "habitable" even within the HZ. Given the strong X-ray/UV fluxes of M dwarfs, we study whether sufficient envelope mass can be photoevaporated away for these planets to become habitable. We improve upon previous work by using hydrodynamic models that account for radiative cooling as well as the transition from hydrodynamic to ballistic escape. Adopting a template active M dwarf XUV spectrum, including stellar evolution, and considering both evaporation and thermal evolution, we show that: (1) the mass-loss is (considerably) lower than previous estimates that use an "energy-limited" formalism and ignore the transition to Jeans escape; (2) at the inner edge of the HZ, planets with core mass ≲ 0.9 M⊕ can lose enough H/He to become habitable if their initial envelope mass-fraction is ˜1%; (3) at the outer edge of the HZ, evaporation cannot remove a ˜1% H/He envelope even from cores down to 0.8 M⊕. Thus, if planets form with bulky H/He envelopes, only those with low-mass cores may eventually be habitable. Cores ≳ 1 M⊕, with ≳1% natal H/He envelopes, will not be habitable in the HZ of M dwarfs.

  4. Effects of a 50 Hz magnetic field on Dictyostelium discoideum (Protista).

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Trielli, Francesca; Bianco, Bruno; Giordano, Stefano; Moggia, Elsa; Corrado, Maria Umberta Delmonte

    2006-10-01

    Some studies have demonstrated that a few biological systems are affected by weak, extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs), lower than 10 mT. However, to date there is scanty evidence of this effect on Protists in the literature. Due to their peculiarity as single-cell eukaryotic organisms, Protists respond directly to environmental stimuli, thus appearing as very suitable experimental systems. Recently, we showed the presence of propionylcholinesterase (PrChE) activity in single-cell amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum. This enzyme activity was assumed to be involved in cell-cell and cell-environment interactions, as its inhibition affects cell aggregation and differentiation. In this work, we have exposed single-cell amoebae of D. discoideum to an ELF-EMF of about 200 microT, 50 Hz, for 3 h or 24 h at 21 degrees C. A delay in the early phase of the differentiation was observed in 3 h exposed cells, and a significant decrease in the fission rate appeared in 24 h exposed cells. The PrChE activity was significantly lower in 3 h exposed cells than in the controls, whereas 24 h exposed cells exhibited an increase in this enzyme activity. However, such effects appeared to be transient, as the fission rate and PrChE activity values returned to the respective control values after a 24 h stay under standard conditions. PMID:16715524

  5. Sexual performance and precontact 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in WAG/Rij rats: effects of opioid receptor treatment.

    PubMed

    Bialy, Michal; Strefnel, Michal; Nikolaev-Diak, Anna; Socha, Anna; Nikolaev, Evgeni; Boguszewski, Pawel M

    2014-10-01

    WAG/Rij rats are genetically selected animals that model absence epilepsy in rats. Ultrasonic vocalizations and sexual behavior - both ethologically relevant markers of reward system functioning - are poorly described in this strain. The aim of our experiment was to investigate reward-dependent precontact 50-kHz vocalizations (PVs) and copulatory behavior as well as the effects of opioid receptor treatment on such behaviors in sexually experienced WAG/Rij males and rats from two control strains: Sprague-Dawley and Crl: Han Wistar. We analyzed the effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (3 mg/kg) and the agonist morphine (1 mg/kg) administration. Additionally, we analyzed the initiation of copulation in sexually naïve males before drug treatment. A significantly lower number of sexually naïve WAG/Rij rats initiated copulation. Sexually experienced WAG/Rij males differed at the control session (after physiological saline treatment) compared with Sprague-Dawley rats: WAG/Rij rats displayed more 50-kHz precontact vocalizations and had longer mount and intromission latencies, longer ejaculation latency, longer postejaculatory latency to exploration, longer 22-kHz vocalization duration after ejaculation, and longer postejaculatory intromission latency. Compared with Crl: Han Wistar rats, WAG/Rij males displayed longer mount latency and shorter 22-kHz vocalization duration. Neither naltrexone nor morphine affected PVs in all groups. On the other hand, opioid receptor treatment differently influenced the number of intromissions required to achieve ejaculation and 22-kHz postejaculatory vocalization duration in WAG/Rij rats than in both control groups. This suggests functional differences in the opioid system in this strain. As a result of the number of males that initiated copulation as well as the number of intromissions to ejaculation and 22-kHz postejaculatory vocalizations which all depend on D1 receptor activation, we suggest that the proportion of

  6. A Test of Cosmological Models Using High-z Measurements of H(z)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio; McClintock, Thomas M.

    2015-10-01

    The recently constructed Hubble diagram using a combined sample of SNLS and SDSS-II SNe Ia, and an application of the Alcock-Paczyński (AP) test using model-independent Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) data, have suggested that the principal constraint underlying the cosmic expansion is the total equation-of-state of the cosmic fluid, rather than that of its dark energy. These studies have focused on the critical redshift range (0 ≲ z ≲ 2) within which the transition from decelerated to accelerated expansion is thought to have occurred, and they suggest that the cosmic fluid has zero active mass, consistent with a constant expansion rate. The evident impact of this conclusion on cosmological theory calls for an independent confirmation. In this paper, we carry out this crucial one-on-one comparison between the Rh = ct universe (a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology with zero active mass) and wCDM/ΛCDM, using the latest high-z measurements of H(z). Whereas the SNe Ia yield the integrated luminosity distance, while the AP diagnostic tests the geometry of the universe, the Hubble parameter directly samples the expansion rate itself. We find that the model-independent cosmic chronometer data prefer Rh = ct over wCDM/ΛCDM with a Bayes Information Criterion likelihood of ˜95% versus only ˜5%, in strong support of the earlier SNe Ia and AP results. This contrasts with a recent analysis of H(z) data based solely on BAO measurements which, however, strongly depend on the assumed cosmology. We discuss why the latter approach is inappropriate for model comparisons, and emphasize again the need for truly model-independent observations to be used in cosmological tests.

  7. In vitro effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on oxidatively damaged rabbit red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorani, M.; Biagiarelli, B.; Vetrano, F.; Guidi, G.; Dacha, M.; Stocchi, V.

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on rabbit red blood cells (RBCs) that were exposed simultaneously to the action of an oxygen radical-generating system, Fe(II)/ascorbate. Previous data obtained in the authors` laboratory showed that the exposure of rabbit erythrocytes or reticulocytes to Fe(II)/ascorbate induces hexokinase inactivation, whereas the other glycolytic enzymes do not show any decay. The authors also observed depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) content with a concomitant intracellular and extracellular increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and a decrease in energy charge. In this work, they investigated whether 50 Hz magnetic fields could influence the intracellular impairments that occur when erythrocytes or reticulocytes are exposed to this oxidant system, namely, inactivation of hexokinase activity, GSH depletion, a change in energy charge, and hemoglobin oxidation. The results obtained indicate that a 0.5 mT magnetic field had no effect on intact RBCs, whereas it increased the damage in an oxidatively stressed erythrocyte system. In fact, exposure of intact erythrocytes incubated with Fe(II)/ascorbate to a 0.5 mT magnetic field induced a significant further decay in hexokinase activity as well as a twofold increase in methemoglobin production compared with RBCs that were exposed to the oxidant system alone. Although further studies will be needed to determine the physiological implications of these data, the results reported in this study demonstrate that the effects of the magnetic fields investigated are able to potentiate the cellular damage induced in vitro by oxidizing agents.

  8. Frequency specific interactions of MEG resting state activity within and across brain networks as revealed by the multivariate interaction measure.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, L; Della Penna, S; Snyder, A Z; Pizzella, V; Nolte, G; de Pasquale, F; Romani, G L; Corbetta, M

    2013-10-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) are sets of brain regions exhibiting temporally coherent activity fluctuations in the absence of imposed task structure. RSNs have been extensively studied with fMRI in the infra-slow frequency range (nominally <10(-1)Hz). The topography of fMRI RSNs reflects stationary temporal correlation over minutes. However, neuronal communication occurs on a much faster time scale, at frequencies nominally in the range of 10(0)-10(2)Hz. We examined phase-shifted interactions in the delta (2-3.5 Hz), theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) frequency bands of resting-state source space MEG signals. These analyses were conducted between nodes of the dorsal attention network (DAN), one of the most robust RSNs, and between the DAN and other networks. Phase shifted interactions were mapped by the multivariate interaction measure (MIM), a measure of true interaction constructed from the maximization of imaginary coherency in the virtual channels comprised of voxel signals in source space. Non-zero-phase interactions occurred between homologous left and right hemisphere regions of the DAN in the delta and alpha frequency bands. Even stronger non-zero-phase interactions were detected between networks. Visual regions bilaterally showed phase-shifted interactions in the alpha band with regions of the DAN. Bilateral somatomotor regions interacted with DAN nodes in the beta band. These results demonstrate the existence of consistent, frequency specific phase-shifted interactions on a millisecond time scale between cortical regions within RSN as well as across RSNs. PMID:23631996

  9. Coils performances of superconducting cables for 50/60 Hz applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze, A.; Laumond, Y. ); Tavergnier, J.P.; Fevrier, A.; Verhaege, T. ); Dalle, B.; Ansart, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Multifilamentary superconducting wires with a greatly reduced level of losses have been produced with unit lengths of several tens of kilometers by AISA (GEC ALSTHOM - IGC). With the reduction of the filament diameter, proximity effects are avoided and the authors take a maximum advantage of the reversible motion of flux lines, so that the hysteretic and matrix losses are lower. In this paper the authors report on 50 Hz and DC quench currents, 50 Hz AC losses, 50 Hz electromagnetic stability results.

  10. 47 CFR 15.217 - Operation in the band 160-190 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 160-190 kHz. 15.217... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.217 Operation in the band 160-190 k... lead (if used) shall not exceed 15 meters. (c) All emissions below 160 kHz or above 190 kHz shall...

  11. Beta2 oscillations (23-30 Hz) in the mouse hippocampus during novel object recognition.

    PubMed

    França, Arthur S C; do Nascimento, George C; Lopes-dos-Santos, Vítor; Muratori, Larissa; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Lobão-Soares, Bruno; Tort, Adriano B L

    2014-12-01

    The oscillatory activity of hippocampal neuronal networks is believed to play a role in memory acquisition and consolidation. Particular focus has been given to characterising theta (4-12 Hz), gamma (40-100 Hz) and ripple (150-250 Hz) oscillations. Beyond these well-described network states, few studies have investigated hippocampal beta2 (23-30 Hz) activity in vivo and its link to behaviour. A previous sudy showed that the exploration of novel environments may lead to the appearance of beta2 oscillations in the mouse hippocampus. In the present study we characterised hippocampal beta2 oscillations in mice during an object recognition task. We found prominent bursts of beta2 oscillations in the beginning of novel exploration sessions (four new objects), which could be readily observed by spectral analysis and visual inspection of local field potentials. Beta2 modulated hippocampal but not neocortical neurons and its power decreased along the session. We also found increased beta2 power in the beginning of a second exploration session performed 24 h later in a slightly modified environment (two new, two familiar objects), but to a lesser extent than in the first session. However, the increase in beta2 power in the second exploration session became similar to the first session when we pharmacologically impaired object recognition in a new set of experiments performed 1 week later. Our results suggest that hippocampal beta2 activity is associated with a dynamic network state tuned for novelty detection and which may allow new learning to occur. PMID:25288307

  12. Breeding for 50-kHz positive affective vocalization in rats.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Panksepp, Jaak; Brudzynski, Stefan M; Kroes, Roger; Moskal, Joseph R

    2005-01-01

    Adolescent and adult rats exhibit at least two distinct ultrasonic vocalizations that reflect distinct emotional states. Rats exhibit 22-kHz calls during social defeat, drug withdrawal, as well as in anticipation of aversive events. In contrast, 50-kHz calls are exhibited in high rates during play behavior, mating, as well as in anticipation of rewarding events. The neurochemistry of 22-kHz and 50-kHz calls closely matches that of negative and positive emotional systems in humans, respectively. The aim of this study was to replicate and further evaluate selective breeding for 50-kHz vocalization, in preparation for the analysis of the genetic underpinnings of the 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalization (USV). Isolate housed adolescent rats (23-26 days old) received experimenter administered tactile stimulation (dubbed "tickling"), which mimicked the rat rough-and-tumble play behavior. This stimulation has previously been shown to elicit high levels of 50-kHz USVs and to be highly rewarding in isolate-housed animals. Each tickling session consisted of 4 cycles of 15 seconds stimulation followed by 15 seconds no stimulation for a total of 2 min, and was repeated once per day across 4 successive days. Rats were then selected for either High or Low levels of sonographically verified 50-kHz USVs in response to the stimulation, and a randomly selected line served as a control (Random group). Animals emitted both 22-kHz and 50-kHz types of calls. After 5 generations, animals in the High Line exhibited significantly more 50-kHz and fewer 22-kHz USVs than animals in the Low Line. Animals selected for low levels of 50-kHz calls showed marginally more 22-kHz USVs then randomly selected animals but did not differ in the rate of 50-kHz calls. These results extend our previous findings that laboratory rats could be bred for differential rates of sonographically verified 50-kHz USVs. PMID:15674533

  13. Alarm pheromone does not modulate 22-kHz calls in male rats.

    PubMed

    Muyama, Hiromi; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Inagaki, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-03-15

    Rats are known to emit a series of ultrasonic vocalizations, termed 22-kHz calls, when exposed to distressing stimuli. Pharmacological studies have indicated that anxiety mediates 22-kHz calls in distressed rats. We previously found that exposure to the rat alarm pheromone increases anxiety in rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that the alarm pheromone would increase 22-kHz calls in pheromone-exposed rats. Accordingly, we tested whether exposure to the alarm pheromone induced 22-kHz calls, as well as whether the alarm pheromone increased 22-kHz calls in response to an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS). Rats were first fear-conditioned to an auditory and contextual CS. On the following day, the rats were either exposed to the alarm pheromone or a control odor that was released from the neck region of odor-donor rats. Then, the rats were re-exposed to the aversive CS. The alarm pheromone neither induced 22-kHz calls nor increased 22-kHz calls in response to the aversive CS. In contrast, the control odor unexpectedly reduced the total number and duration of 22-kHz calls elicited by the aversive CS, as well as the duration of freezing. These results suggest that the alarm pheromone does not affect 22-kHz calls in rats. However, we may have found evidence for an appeasing olfactory signal, released from the neck region of odor-donor rats. PMID:26796788

  14. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on serotonin metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.; Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.

    1982-06-01

    Serotonin and two of its metabolites, melatonin and 5-methoxytryptophol, exhibit circadian rhythmicity in the pineal gland. We recently reported a marked reduction in the normal night-time increase in melatonin concentration in the pineal glands of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Concomitant with the apparent abolition of melatonin rhythmicity, serotonin-N-acetyl transferase (SNAT) activity was suppressed. We have now conducted studies to determine if abolition of the rhythm in melatonin production in electric-field-exposed rats arises solely from interference in SNAT activity, or if the availability of pineal serotonin is a factor that is affected by exposure. Pineal serotonin concentrations were compared in rats that were either exposed or sham exposed to 65 kV/m for 30 days. Sham-exposed animals exhibited normal diurnal rhythmicity for pineal concentrations of both melatonin and serotonin; melatonin levels increased markedly during the dark phase with a concurrent decrease in serotonin levels. In the exposed animals, however, normal serotonin rhythmicity was abolished; serotonin levels in these animals did not increase during the light period. The conclusion that electric field exposure results in a biochemical alteration in SNAT enzyme activity can be inferred from the loss of both serotonin and melatonin rhythmicity, as well as by direct measurement of SNAT activity itself. 35 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  15. Changes in the spectral composition of animal-brain electrical activity under the influence of nonthermal millimeter-wave radiation on acupuncture points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khramov, R. N.; Vorob'ev, V. V.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency spectra (0 26 Hz) of electrograms (EG) of the preoptic region of the hypothalamus were studied in chronic experiments on nine awake rabbits under the influence of nonthermal millimeter-band (55 75 GHz) electromagnetic fields on various acupuncture points: I) the auricular “heart” point (after F. G. Portnov); II) the cranial acupoint (TR-20; the “hypothalamus” point after R. Voll); and III) the “longevity” acupoint (E-36). Irradiation of point I was accompanied by significant suppression of hypothalamic electrical activity at 5 and 16 Hz and enhancement at 7 8, 12, and 26 Hz. Irradiation of point II had similar but less-prominent effects at 7 8 and 12 Hz. Minimal EG changes were observed with exposure of point III. The probabilities of significant changes in EG spectra for irradiation of points I, II, and III were, respectively, 31%, 21%, and 5% (p<0.05, U-criterion). These results suggest that acupuncture points I and II are more sensitive to millimeter-band radiation than is point III. The presence of individual characteristics of the effects and their change after stress to sign inversion were shown in rat experiments in which the acupuncture points were irradiated.

  16. Muscle fatigue increases beta-band coherence between the firing times of simultaneously active motor units in the first dorsal interosseous muscle.

    PubMed

    McManus, Lara; Hu, Xiaogang; Rymer, William Z; Suresh, Nina L; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2016-06-01

    Synchronization between the firing times of simultaneously active motor units (MUs) is generally assumed to increase during fatiguing contractions. To date, however, estimates of MU synchronization have relied on indirect measures, derived from surface electromyographic (EMG) interference signals. This study used intramuscular coherence to investigate the correlation between MU discharges in the first dorsal interosseous muscle during and immediately following a submaximal fatiguing contraction, and after rest. Coherence between composite MU spike trains, derived from decomposed surface EMG, were examined in the delta (1-4 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (15-30 Hz), and gamma (30-60 Hz) frequency band ranges. A significant increase in MU coherence was observed in the delta, alpha, and beta frequency bands postfatigue. In addition, wavelet coherence revealed a tendency for delta-, alpha-, and beta-band coherence to increase during the fatiguing contraction, with subjects exhibiting low initial coherence values displaying the greatest relative increase. This was accompanied by an increase in MU short-term synchronization and a decline in mean firing rate of the majority of MUs detected during the sustained contraction. A model of the motoneuron pool and surface EMG was used to investigate factors influencing the coherence estimate. Simulation results indicated that changes in motoneuron inhibition and firing rates alone could not directly account for increased beta-band coherence postfatigue. The observed increase is, therefore, more likely to arise from an increase in the strength of correlated inputs to MUs as the muscle fatigues. PMID:26984420

  17. Picosesond pulses in deep ultraviolet produced by a 100 kHz solid-state thin disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turčičová, H.; Novák, O.; Smrž, M.; Miura, T.; Endo, A.; Mocek, T.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the generation of 100 kHz 0.1mJ-level deep ultraviolet pulses based on frequency-quadrupled (257.5 nm) beam of a diode pumped Yb:YAG thin disk laser at the HiLASE Centre. The 100-kHz beamline used for the generation of the harmonic frequencies is operated at an average output power of 100 W level and 2 picosecond duration of pulses. The amplification of the oscillator beam is performed in a regenerative amplifier where the thin disk serves as an active mirror. The CPA technique is used for achieving high average output power of the whole system. The outcoming laser beam at 1030 nm wavelength is frequency-doubled in an LBO crystal and then frequency-quadrupled in BBO crystal, conversion efficiencies being 40% and 19%, resp. The basic characteristics of the harmonics generation in both crystals are given.

  18. 1  J, 0.5  kHz repetition rate picosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Cory; Pedicone, Michael; Bravo, Herman; Wang, Hanchen; Yin, Liang; Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J; Reagan, Brendan A

    2016-07-15

    We report the demonstration of a diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser that produces λ=1.03  μm pulses of up to 1.5 J energy compressible to sub-5 ps duration at a repetition rate of 500 Hz (750 W average power). Amplification to high energy takes place in cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG active mirrors designed for kilowatt average power laser operation. This compact laser system will enable new advances in high-average-power ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-repetition-rate tabletop soft x-ray lasers. As a first application, the laser was used to pump a 400 Hz λ=18.9  nm laser. PMID:27420530

  19. Exploratory Analyses of the Long-Term Effects of Improving Behavior, Attendance, and Educational Achievement in Grades 1-6 and 8-12. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (3)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Richard; Gibson, Neal

    2012-01-01

    We studied relationships among background characteristics, behavioral infractions, punishments, attendance, and educational achievement, using longitudinal data of students in grades 1-6 and 8-12. We estimated how much hypothesized early improvements in educational achievement or sustained improvements in behavior and attendance might ultimately…

  20. Coherent 25- to 35-Hz Oscillations in the Sensorimotor Cortex of Awake Behaving Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Venkatesh N.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    1992-06-01

    Synchronous 25- to 35-Hz oscillations were observed in local field potentials and unit activity in sensorimotor cortex of awake rhesus monkeys. The oscillatory episodes occurred often when the monkeys retrieved raisins from a Kluver board or from unseen locations using somatosensory feedback; they occurred less often during performance of repetitive wrist flexion and extension movements. The amplitude, duration, and frequency of oscillations were not directly related to movement parameters in behaviors studied so far. The occurrence of the oscillations was not consistently related to bursts of activity in forearm muscles, but cycle-triggered averages of electromyograms revealed synchronous modulation in flexor and extensor muscles. The phase of the oscillations changed continuously from the surface to the deeper layers of the cortex, reversing their polarity completely at depths exceeding 800 μm. The oscillations could become synchronized over a distance of 14 mm mediolaterally in precentral cortex. Coherent oscillations could also occur at pre- and postcentral sites separated by an estimated tangential intracortical distance of 20 mm. Activity of single units was commonly seen to burst in synchrony with field potential oscillations. These findings suggest that such oscillations may facilitate interactions between cells during exploratory and manipulative movements, requiring attention to sensorimotor integration.

  1. COOMET.AUV.W-S1 supplementary comparison of free-field hydrophone calibrations in the frequency range 250 Hz to 8 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. E.; Yi, Chen; Matveev, A. N.; Zihong, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A description is given of COOMET.AUV.W-S1 supplementary comparison of free-field hydrophone calibrations in the frequency range 250 Hz to 8 kHz between Hangzhou Applied Acoustics Research Institute—a pilot and Russian National Research Institute for Physicotechnical and Radio Engineering Measurements. Two standard hydrophones of TC 4033 and GI 55 were calibrated in this comparison. Reciprocity method, comparison methods, and their facilities were used to assess the current state of free-field hydrophone calibration in the frequency range 250 Hz to 8 kHz of China and Russia. The consistency of calibration results between two participants was confirmed, and the maximum deviation observed was 0.59 dB at frequency 400 Hz. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. In Vitro Host Range of the Hz-1 Non-Occluded Virus in Arthropod Cell Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 13 insect cell lines spanning 4 Orders and including Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and Homoptera were tested for their ability to replicate the non-occluded virus Hz-1. Only the Lepidpteran cell lines were able to support replication of the virus with TN-CL1 and BCIRL-HZ-AM1 producing ...

  3. Sub-kHz Linewidth GaSb Semiconductor Diode Lasers Operating Near 2 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagheri, Mahmood; Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Ksendzov, Alexander; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    We report on the phase noise properties of DFB lasers operating near 2.0 microns. Measured noise spectra indicate intrinsic laser linewidths below 1 kHz. An effective linewidth of less than 200 kHz for 5 ms measurement times is estimated.

  4. The 1983-84 Connecticut 45-Hz-band field-strength measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, P. R.

    1986-03-01

    Extremely low frequency (ELF) measurements are made of the transverse horizontal magnetic field strength received in Connecticut. The AN/BSR-1 receiver consists of an AN/UYK-20 minicomputer, a signal timing and interface unit (STIU), a rubidium frequency time standard, two magnetic tape recorders, and a preamplifier. The transmission source of these farfield (1.6-Mm range) measurements is the U.S. Navy's ELF Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF), located in the Chequamegon National Forest in north central Wisconsin, about 8 km south of the village of Clam Lake. The WTF consists of two 22.5-km antennas; one of which is situated approximately in the north-south (NS) direction and the other approximately in the east-west (EW) direction. Each antenna is grounded at both ends. The electrical axis of the WTF EW antenna is 11 deg east of north at 45 Hz and 14 deg east of north at 75Hz. The electrical axis of the WTF NS antenna is 11 deg east of north at 45 Hz and 14 deg east of north at 75 Hz. The WTF array can be steered electrically. Its radiated power is approximately 0.5 W at 45 Hz and 1 W at 75 Hz. This report will compare results of 45 Hz band data taken during 1983 to 1984 with previous 45 Hz band measurements.

  5. Development and testing of a 20-kHz component test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Brush, Andrew S.; Sundberg, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    A history of the General Dynamics Space Systems Division 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including its current configuration and its role in the Space Station Freedom (SSF) program. Highlights and results are presented on a series of tests conducted on the 20 kHz Breadboard. The first test presented is the 20 kHz Breadboard Acceptance test. This test verified the operation of the delivered Breadboard and also characterized the main components of the system. Next, an indepth efficiency testing effort is presented. The tests attempted to apportion all the power losses in the 20 kHz Breadboard Main Invert Units. Distortion test data is presented showing the distortion characteristics of a Mapham inverter. Lastly, current work on the 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including Main Inverter Unit paralleling tests. Conclusions are summarized and references given.

  6. Human exposure standards in the frequency range 1 Hz To 100 kHz: the case for adoption of the IEEE standard.

    PubMed

    Patrick Reilly, J

    2014-10-01

    Differences between IEEE C95 Standards (C95.6-2002 and C95.1-2005) in the low-frequency (1 Hz-100 kHz) and the ICNIRP-2010 guidelines appear across the frequency spectrum. Factors accounting for lack of convergence include: differences between the IEEE standards and the ICNIRP guidelines with respect to biological induction models, stated objectives, data trail from experimentally derived thresholds through physical and biological principles, selection and justification of safety/reduction factors, use of probability models, compliance standards for the limbs as distinct from the whole body, defined population categories, strategies for central nervous system protection below 20 Hz, and correspondence of environmental electric field limits with contact currents. This paper discusses these factors and makes the case for adoption of the limits in the IEEE standards. PMID:25162425

  7. Acute effect of carbamazepine on corticothalamic 5-9-Hz and thalamocortical spindle (10-16-Hz) oscillations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Thomas W; O'Brien, Terence J; Kulikova, Sofya P; Reid, Christopher A; Morris, Margaret J; Pinault, Didier

    2014-03-01

    A major side effect of carbamazepine (CBZ), a drug used to treat neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, is drowsiness, a state characterized by increased slow-wave oscillations with the emergence of sleep spindles in the electroencephalogram (EEG). We conducted cortical EEG and thalamic cellular recordings in freely moving or lightly anesthetized rats to explore the impact of CBZ within the intact corticothalamic (CT)-thalamocortical (TC) network, more specifically on CT 5-9-Hz and TC spindle (10-16-Hz) oscillations. Two to three successive 5-9-Hz waves were followed by a spindle in the cortical EEG. A single systemic injection of CBZ (20 mg/kg) induced a significant increase in the power of EEG 5-9-Hz oscillations and spindles. Intracellular recordings of glutamatergic TC neurons revealed 5-9-Hz depolarizing wave-hyperpolarizing wave sequences prolonged by robust, rhythmic spindle-frequency hyperpolarizing waves. This hybrid sequence occurred during a slow hyperpolarizing trough, and was at least 10 times more frequent under the CBZ condition than under the control condition. The hyperpolarizing waves reversed at approximately -70 mV, and became depolarizing when recorded with KCl-filled intracellular micropipettes, indicating that they were GABAA receptor-mediated potentials. In neurons of the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus, the principal source of TC GABAergic inputs, CBZ augmented both the number and the duration of sequences of rhythmic spindle-frequency bursts of action potentials. This indicates that these GABAergic neurons are responsible for the generation of at least the spindle-frequency hyperpolarizing waves in TC neurons. In conclusion, CBZ potentiates GABAA receptor-mediated TC spindle oscillations. Furthermore, we propose that CT 5-9-Hz waves can trigger TC spindles. PMID:24308357

  8. Expression of c-Fos in rat auditory and limbic systems following 22-kHz calls.

    PubMed

    Ouda, Ladislav; Jílek, Milan; Syka, Josef

    2016-07-15

    In the present study, adult Long-Evans rats were exposed either to natural conspecific aversive 22-kHz vocalizations or to artificial call-like stimuli with comparable frequency-temporal features, followed by c-Fos immunohistochemistry. The natural 22-kHz vocalizations was either played from a recording or produced by a foot-shocked animal located nearby (live vocalizations). In comparison with controls (non-exposed animals), c-Fos immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the inferior colliculus (IC), auditory cortex (AC), periaqueductal grey (PAG), basolateral amygdala (BA), and hippocampus (Hip) of rats exposed to either live or recorded 22-kHz natural vocalizations. Exposure to live natural vocalizations of the foot-shocked animal resulted in a similar pattern of c-Fos activity, as did exposure to the playback of the natural vocalizations. In contrast to this, foot-shocked rats (emitting the 22-kHz vocalizations) had the c-Fos positivity increased markedly in the PAG and only slightly in the AC. The expression of c-Fos also increased in the IC, AC, and in the PAG in animals exposed to the artificial call-like stimuli, when compared to controls; however, the increase was much less pronounced. In this case, c-Fos expression was not increased in the hippocampus or basolateral amygdala. Interestingly, almost no c-Fos expression was found in the medial nucleus of the geniculate body in any of the experimental groups. These findings suggest that differences exist between the processing of important natural conspecific vocalizations and artificial call-like stimuli with similar frequency-temporal features, and moreover they suggest the specific role of individual brain structures in the processing of such calls. PMID:27102341

  9. Survey of residential 50 Hz EMF exposure from transformer stations.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Judit; Jánossy, Gábor; Thuróczy, György

    2007-01-01

    In Hungary it is typical that 10/04 kV transformer stations are being installed in multistory residential and office buildings. Magnetic fields (MFs) up to several tens of microT have been measured in apartments close to transformers. The aim of the present study was to provide systematic assessment of MF exposure of residents living above transformer stations. Out of 41 addresses provided by the electricity supplier, current load of 21 transformers and MF in 21 apartments was measured. Spot MFs at 1 m height and time weighted average 24 h MF exposure at bed height was measured. All-day personal MF exposure was measured at waist and HOME exposure was calculated. BED exposure was measured at bed height. Participants kept a time-activity diary. The time-weighted average 24 h MF exposure (3.03 microT) exceeded the usual residential exposure (<0.2 microT). The mean HOME and BED personal exposure above transformers was 0.825 and 1.033 microT, respectively. Our study provides exposure assessment of a cohort with a wider exposure range, compared to power-line epidemiological studies. PMID:16988992

  10. Involvement of Glutamate NMDA Receptors in the Acute, Long-Term, and Conditioned Effects of Amphetamine on Rat 50kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Giulia; Morelli, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rats emit 50kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in response to either natural or pharmacological pleasurable stimuli, and these USVs have emerged as a new behavioral measure for investigating the motivational properties of drugs. Earlier studies have indicated that activation of the dopaminergic system is critically involved in 50kHz USV emissions. However, evidence also exists that non-dopaminergic neurotransmitters participate in this behavioral response. Methods: To ascertain whether glutamate transmission plays a role in 50kHz USV emissions stimulated by amphetamine, rats received five amphetamine (1–2mg/kg, i.p.) administrations on alternate days in a test cage, either alone or combined with the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.1–0.5mg/kg, i.p.). Seven days after treatment discontinuation, rats were re-exposed to the test cage to assess drug conditioning, and afterwards received a drug challenge. USVs and locomotor activity were evaluated, along with immunofluorescence for Zif-268 in various brain regions and spontaneous alternation in a Y maze. Results: Amphetamine-treated rats displayed higher 50kHz USV emissions and locomotor activity than vehicle-treated rats, and emitted conditioned vocalizations on test cage re-exposure. Rats co-administered amphetamine and MK-801 displayed lower and dose-dependent 50kHz USV emissions, but not lower locomotor activity, during repeated treatment and challenge, and scarce conditioned vocalization compared with amphetamine-treated rats. These effects were associated with lower levels of Zif-268 after amphetamine challenge and spontaneous alternation deficits. Conclusions: These results indicate that glutamate transmission participates in the acute, long-term, and conditioned effects of amphetamine on 50kHz USVs, possibly by influencing amphetamine-induced long-term neuronal changes and/or amphetamine-associated memories. PMID:25991653

  11. Nonuniform High-Gamma (60–500 Hz) Power Changes Dissociate Cognitive Task and Anatomy in Human Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gaona, Charles M.; Sharma, Mohit; Freudenburg, Zachary V.; Breshears, Jonathan D.; Bundy, David T.; Roland, Jarod; Barbour, Dennis L.; Schalk, Gerwin

    2011-01-01

    High-gamma-band (>60 Hz) power changes in cortical electrophysiology are a reliable indicator of focal, event-related cortical activity. Despite discoveries of oscillatory subthreshold and synchronous suprathreshold activity at the cellular level, there is an increasingly popular view that high-gamma-band amplitude changes recorded from cellular ensembles are the result of asynchronous firing activity that yields wideband and uniform power increases. Others have demonstrated independence of power changes in the low- and high-gamma bands, but to date, no studies have shown evidence of any such independence above 60 Hz. Based on nonuniformities in time-frequency analyses of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals, we hypothesized that induced high-gamma-band (60–500 Hz) power changes are more heterogeneous than currently understood. Using single-word repetition tasks in six human subjects, we showed that functional responsiveness of different ECoG high-gamma sub-bands can discriminate cognitive task (e.g., hearing, reading, speaking) and cortical locations. Power changes in these sub-bands of the high-gamma range are consistently present within single trials and have statistically different time courses within the trial structure. Moreover, when consolidated across all subjects within three task-relevant anatomic regions (sensorimotor, Broca's area, and superior temporal gyrus), these behavior- and location-dependent power changes evidenced nonuniform trends across the population. Together, the independence and nonuniformity of power changes across a broad range of frequencies suggest that a new approach to evaluating high-gamma-band cortical activity is necessary. These findings show that in addition to time and location, frequency is another fundamental dimension of high-gamma dynamics. PMID:21307246

  12. Interferometric readout of a monolithic accelerometer, towards the fm /√{ Hz } resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijningen, J. V.; Bertolini, A.; van den Brand, J. F. J.

    2016-07-01

    The European Gravitational wave Observatory Virgo is undergoing an upgrade to increase its strain sensitivity to about 3 ×10-24 1 /√{ Hz } in the detection band of 10 Hz-10 kHz. The upgrade for this detector necessitates seismically isolating sensing optics in a vacuum environment that were on an optical bench outside vacuum in previous Virgo configurations. For this purpose, Nikhef has designed and built the five compact isolators, called MultiSAS. To measure the residual motion of the optical components and the transfer function of the isolator in full assembly, no (commercial) sensor is available that has sufficient sensitivity. A novel vibration sensor has been built at Nikhef that features an interferometric readout for a horizontal monolithic accelerometer. It will be able to measure in the vicinity of the fm/Hz regime from 10 Hz onwards. Current results show unprecedented (self) noise levels around 35 fm/Hz from 25 Hz onwards. In spite of these excellent results, it is still higher than the modeled noises. Several possible unmodeled noise sources and possible solutions have been identified.

  13. Air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Sato, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Air puff-induced ultrasonic vocalizations in adult rats, termed "22-kHz calls," have been applied as a useful animal model to develop psychoneurological and psychopharmacological studies focusing on human aversive affective disorders. To date, all previous studies on air puff-induced 22-kHz calls have used outbred rats. Furthermore, newly developed gene targeting technologies, which are essential for further advancement of biomedical experiments using air puff-induced 22-kHz calls, have enabled the production of genetically modified rats using inbred rat strains. Therefore, we considered it necessary to assess air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred rats. In this study, we assessed differences in air puff-induced 22-kHz calls between inbred F344 rats and outbred Wistar rats. Male F344 rats displayed similar total (summed) duration of air puff-induced 22 kHz vocalizations to that of male Wistar rats, however, Wistar rats emitted fewer calls of longer duration, while F344 rats emitted higher number of vocalizations of shorter duration. Additionally, female F344 rats emitted fewer air puff-induced 22-kHz calls than did males, thus confirming the existence of a sex difference that was previously reported for outbred Wistar rats. The results of this study could confirm the reliability of air puff stimulus for induction of a similar amount of emissions of 22-kHz calls in different rat strains, enabling the use of air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred F344 rats and derived genetically modified animals in future studies concerning human aversive affective disorders. PMID:26723270

  14. Using ictal high-frequency oscillations (80-500Hz) to localize seizure onset zones in childhood absence epilepsy: a MEG study.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ailiang; Xiang, Jing; Tang, Lu; Ge, Huaiting; Liu, Hongxing; Wu, Ting; Chen, Qiqi; Hu, Zheng; Lu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xiaoshan

    2014-04-30

    This study aimed to use ictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) ranging from 80Hz to 500Hz to locate seizure onset zones in childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) using non-invasive magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ten drug-naïve children with CAE were studied using a 275-channel MEG system. MEG data were digitized at a sampling rate of 6000Hz. HFO spectral power in real-time spectrograms was assessed using Morlet continuous wavelet transform. Magnetic sources were volumetrically localized through dynamic magnetic source imaging with a slide window. HFOs were identified in all patients. The total time of fast ripples (250-500Hz) was greater than that of ripples (80-250Hz) during absence seizures. The rate of fast ripples was associated with seizure frequency. HFO duration was significantly longer when co-occurring with spikes than when occurring independently, and the maximum frequency of HFOs co-occurring with spikes was higher than that of HFOs occurring independently. HFOs were predominantly localized in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), whereas spikes were widespread to a variety of regions during the absence seizures. Compared with spikes, HFOs appeared to be more focal. The findings indicate that HFOs in the MPFC have a primary function in initializing epileptic activity in CAE. PMID:24582907

  15. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    An overall description of this research program is presented. The objectives are to investigate using nonhuman primates, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high-intensity, 60 Hz, electric fields. 6 tabs.

  16. 5 Hz, >250 mJ Optical Parametric Chirped-Pulse Amplifier at 1053 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Guardalben, M.J.; Puth, J.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2005-07-15

    A 250 mJ, 5 Hz repetition rate optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier with near-Fourier-transform-limited, 430 fs pulses and a beam that can be focused to near the diffraction limit is demonstrated.

  17. Mitigation of 50-60 Hz power line interference in geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. B.; Said, R. K.; Inan, U. S.

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of ELF/VLF radio data has broad applications for ionospheric and magnetospheric phenomena, lightning activity, long-range communications, and geophysical prospecting. However, recordings of ELF/VLF data on the ground are adversely affected by the presence of electromagnetic fields from 50-60 Hz power lines, whose harmonics can extend to many kilohertz and interfere with the detection of natural and man-made signals. Removal of this interference is complicated by the time-varying fundamental frequency of power lines and strongly varying characteristics across different power grids. We discuss two methods for isolation and then subtraction of this interference, by an adaptive filtering technique and with least squares matrix analysis. Methods for estimating the time-varying frequency are also discussed. A few variants of these techniques are applied both to simulated data and then to real data. It is found that least squares isolation gives superior results, although the adaptive filter is potentially more effective for poorly behaved power line interference with rapidly changing fundamental frequencies as well as being computationally more efficient.

  18. 1-Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation over the Posterior Parietal Cortex Modulates Spatial Attention

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guang-qing; Lan, Yue; Zhang, Qun; Liu, Dong-xu; He, Xiao-fei; Lin, Tuo

    2016-01-01

    Lesion and neuroimaging studies have suggested that regions in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) are involved in visual spatial attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects on spatial attention resulting from a transient parietal impairment induced by 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We examined 50 healthy subjects using the attention network test (ANT) after first applying rTMS to right or left PPC. The right parietal rTMS, but not left PPC rTMS, caused a significant slowing in the mean reaction time (RT) to target presentation following a spatial cue during the ANT test. There were no significant effects of rTMS on mean RT under the no-cue, center-cue, and double-cue conditions, or for each flanker type among the experimental groups. Moreover, after rTMS to the right PPC, test subjects displayed deficits in networks related to alerting and orienting, whereas they exhibited improvement following rTMS to the left PPC. These findings indicate that the right PPC serves an important function in spatial orienting and the alerting activities. We interpreted the enhancement in alerting and spatial orienting function following low-frequency rTMS of left PPC as reflecting a disinhibition of right PPC via an inter-hemispheric inhibition account. PMID:26869911

  19. 1-Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation over the Posterior Parietal Cortex Modulates Spatial Attention.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Qing; Lan, Yue; Zhang, Qun; Liu, Dong-Xu; He, Xiao-Fei; Lin, Tuo

    2016-01-01

    Lesion and neuroimaging studies have suggested that regions in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) are involved in visual spatial attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects on spatial attention resulting from a transient parietal impairment induced by 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We examined 50 healthy subjects using the attention network test (ANT) after first applying rTMS to right or left PPC. The right parietal rTMS, but not left PPC rTMS, caused a significant slowing in the mean reaction time (RT) to target presentation following a spatial cue during the ANT test. There were no significant effects of rTMS on mean RT under the no-cue, center-cue, and double-cue conditions, or for each flanker type among the experimental groups. Moreover, after rTMS to the right PPC, test subjects displayed deficits in networks related to alerting and orienting, whereas they exhibited improvement following rTMS to the left PPC. These findings indicate that the right PPC serves an important function in spatial orienting and the alerting activities. We interpreted the enhancement in alerting and spatial orienting function following low-frequency rTMS of left PPC as reflecting a disinhibition of right PPC via an inter-hemispheric inhibition account. PMID:26869911

  20. Cyclic Stress at mHz Frequencies Aligns Fibroblasts in Direction of Zero Strain

    PubMed Central

    Rubner, Wolfgang; Kirchgeßner, Norbert; Safran, Sam; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of external mechanical signals is vital for mammalian cells. Cyclic stretch, e.g. around blood vessels, is one such signal that induces cell reorientation from parallel to almost perpendicular to the direction of stretch. Here, we present quantitative analyses of both, cell and cytoskeletal reorientation of umbilical cord fibroblasts. Cyclic strain of preset amplitudes was applied at mHz frequencies. Elastomeric chambers were specifically designed and characterized to distinguish between zero strain and minimal stress directions and to allow accurate theoretical modeling. Reorientation was only induced when the applied stretch exceeded a specific amplitude, suggesting a non-linear response. However, on very soft substrates no mechanoresponse occurs even for high strain. For all stretch amplitudes, the angular distributions of reoriented cells are in very good agreement with a theory modeling stretched cells as active force dipoles. Cyclic stretch increases the number of stress fibers and the coupling to adhesions. We show that changes in cell shape follow cytoskeletal reorientation with a significant temporal delay. Our data identify the importance of environmental stiffness for cell reorientation, here in direction of zero strain. These in vitro experiments on cultured cells argue for the necessity of rather stiff environmental conditions to induce cellular reorientation in mammalian tissues. PMID:22194961

  1. Measurement of the acoustic reflectivity of sirenia (Florida manatees) at 171 kHz.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Jules S; Simonet, Fernando; Roberts, Paul L D; Bowles, Ann E

    2007-01-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is an endangered sirenian. At present, its adult population (approximately 2200) seems stable, but tenuous. Manatee-boat collisions are a significant proportion (approximately 25%) of mortalities. Here, the potential use of active sonar for detecting manatees by quantifying sonic reflectivity is explored. In order to estimate reflectivity two methods were used. One method measured live reflections from captive animals using a carefully calibrated acoustic and co-registered optical system. The other method consisted of the analysis of animal tissue in order to obtain estimates of the sound speed and density and to predict reflectivity. The impedance measurement predicts that for a lateral view, the tissue reflectivity is close to 0.13, with a critical grazing angle of 28 degrees. Data measured from live animals indicate that substantial reflections can be recorded, however in many instances observed "empirical target strengths" were less than an experimentally dependent -48-dB threshold. Conclusions favor the hypothesis that the animals reflect substantial amounts of sound; however, the reflections can often be specular, and therefore impractical for observation by a manatee detection sonar operating at 171 kHz. PMID:17297771

  2. Temporary threshold shifts and recovery in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) after octave-band noise at 4 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean; Olthuis, Juul

    2012-11-01

    Safety criteria for underwater sound produced during offshore pile driving are needed to protect marine mammals. A harbor porpoise was exposed to fatiguing noise at 18 sound pressure level (SPL) and duration combinations. Its temporary hearing threshold shift (TTS) and hearing recovery were quantified with a psychoacoustic technique. Octave-band white noise centered at 4 kHz was the fatiguing stimulus at three mean received SPLs (124, 136, and 148 dB re 1 μPa) and at six durations (7.5, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min). Approximate received sound exposure levels (SELs) varied between 151 and 190 dB re 1 μPa(2) s. Hearing thresholds were determined for a narrow-band frequency-swept sine wave (3.9-4.1 kHz; 1 s) before exposure to the fatiguing noise, and at 1-4, 4-8, 8-12, 48, and 96 min after exposure. The lowest SEL (151 dB re 1 μPa(2) s) which caused a significant TTS(1-4) was due to exposure to an SPL of 124 dB re 1 μPa for 7.5 min. The maximum TTS(1-4), induced after a 240 min exposure to 148 dB re 1 μPa, was around 15 dB at a SEL of 190 dB re 1 μPa(2) s. Recovery time following TTS varied between 4 min and under 96 min, depending on the exposure level, duration, and the TTS induced. PMID:23145632

  3. Aging and the 4-kHz Air-Bone Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nondahl, David M.; Tweed, Ted S.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Wiley, Terry L.; Dalton, Dayna S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors assessed age- and sex-related patterns in the prevalence and 10-year incidence of 4-kHz air-bone gaps and associated factors. Method: Data were obtained as part of the longitudinal, population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study ( Cruickshanks et al., 1998). An air-bone gap at 4 kHz was defined as an…

  4. Antiadipogenic effects of subthermal electric stimulation at 448 kHz on differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    HERNÁNDEZ-BULE, MARÍA LUISA; MARTÍNEZ-BOTAS, JAVIER; TRILLO, MARÍA ÁNGELES; PAÍNO, CARLOS L; ÚBEDA, ALEJANDRO

    2016-01-01

    The 448 kHz capacitive-resistive electric transfer (CRET) is an electrothermal therapy currently applied in anticellulite and antiobesity treatments. The aim of the present study was to determine whether exposure to the CRET electric signal at subthermal doses affected early adipogenic processes in adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) from human donors. ADSC were incubated for 2 or 9 days in the presence of adipogenic medium, and exposed or sham-exposed to 5 min pulses of 448 kHz electric signal at 50 µA/mm2 during the last 48 h of the incubation. Colorimetric, immunofluorescence, western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were performed to assess adipogenic differentiation of the ADSC. Electric stimulation significantly decreased cytoplasmic lipid content, after both 2 and 9 days of differentiation. The antiadipogenic response in the 9 day samples was accompanied by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2, decreased expression and partial inactivation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, which was translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, together with a significant decrease in the expression levels of the PPARG1 gene, perilipin, angiopoietin-like protein 4 and fatty acid synthase. These results demonstrated that subthermal stimulation with CRET interferes with the early adipogenic differentiation in ADSC, indicating that the electric stimulus itself can modulate processes controlling the synthesis and mobilization of fat, even in the absence of the concomitant thermal and mechanical components of the thermoelectric therapy CRET. PMID:27035334

  5. An extrasolar extreme-ultraviolet object. II - The nature of HZ 43. [hot white dwarf star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Liebert, J.; Lampton, M.; Spinrad, H.; Bowyer, S.; Gatewood, G.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of data are presented concerning the spectrum, distance, temperature, and evolutionary state of the hot white dwarf HZ 43, the first extrasolar object to be detected in the EUV band. The data include spectrophotometry of the star and its red dwarf companion (HZ 43B), a trigonometric parallax for the star, its tangential velocity, and results of soft X-ray and EUV observations. The main conclusions are that: (1) the spectrum of HZ 43A is that of a hot DAwk star, (2) HZ 43B is a dM3.5e star, (3) the distance of the system is about 65 pc, (4) the tangential velocity is not atypical of white dwarfs, and (5) the stellar energy distribution of HZ 43A is well fitted by a black body with an effective temperature of approximately 110,000 K. Evolutionary implications of the existence of an object as hot as HZ 43A are briefly considered, and it is suggested that the progenitors of hot DA stars must include objects hotter than spectral type sdB, with logical possibilities being nuclei of planetary nebulae and sdO stars.

  6. Ultrasonic Plastic Welding Using 90 kHz Upper and Lower Vibration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Ishii, Yasuhiro; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki

    1994-05-01

    Direct and transmission welding characteristics of an ultrasonic plastic welding system using 90 kHz upper and lower vibration systems are studied. By using high frequency, welding characteristics of plastic specimens may be improved because ultrasonic vibration absorption by plastic material increases as vibration frequency increases. The 90 kHz ultrasonic vibration source designed consists of a radial-to-longitudinal vibration direction converter with four bolt-clamped Langevin-type piezoelectric ceramic (lead-zircon-titanate; PZT) transducers of 15 mm in diameter. The 90 kHz welding equipment consists of two vibration sources positioned at upper and lower parts and a welding frame. In the case of direct welding of various sheet specimens, the required total velocity of 90 kHz upper and lower welding tips is less than 60% that of 27 kHz welding tips. Direct and transmission welding characteristics of a 90 kHz welding system with two vibration sources are significantly improved compared with those of conventional systems.

  7. Total and local impedances of the chest wall up to 10 Hz.

    PubMed

    Barnas, G M; Yoshino, K; Fredberg, J; Kikuchi, Y; Loring, S H; Mead, J

    1990-04-01

    To understand how bical mechanical chest wall (CW) properties are related to those of the CW as a whole, we measured esophageal and gastric pressures, CW volume changes (measured with a head-out body plethysmograph), and anteroposterior and transverse CW diameter changes (measured with magnetometers attached to the surface) during sinusoidal forcing at the mouth (2.5% vital capacity, 0.5-10 Hz) in four healthy subjects. Total CW resistance decreased sharply as frequency rose to 3-4 Hz and remained relatively constant at higher frequencies. Total CW reactance became less negative with increasing frequency but showed no tendency to change sign. Above 2 Hz, diameters measured at different locations changed asynchronously between and within the rib cage and abdomen. "Local pathway impedances" (ratios of esophageal or gastric pressure to a rate of diameter change) showed frequency dependence similar to that of the total CW less than 3 Hz. Local pathway impedances increased during contraction of respiratory muscles acting on the pathway. We conclude that 1) total CW behavior is mainly a reflection of its individual local properties at less than or equal to 3 Hz, 2) local impedances within the rib cage or within the abdomen can change independently in some situations, and 3) asynchronies that develop within the CW during forcing greater than 3 Hz suggest that two compartments may be insufficient to describe CW properties from impedance measurements. PMID:2140827

  8. Power line emission 50/60 Hz and Schumann resonances observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, Denys; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    The overhead power lines are the sources of intense wideband electromagnetic (EM) emission, especially in ELF-VLF range, because of significant length (up to a few thousand kilometers) and strong 50/60 Hz currents with noticeable distortion. The radiation efficiency of the power line emission (PLE) increases with the harmonic order, so they are well observed by ground-based EM sensors. However their observations by low orbiting satellites (LEO) are very rare, particularly at basic harmonic 50/60 Hz, because of the ionospheric plasma opacity in ELF band. The Schumann resonance (SR) is the narrow-band EM noise that occurs due to the global thunderstorm activity in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. The first five eigenmodes of the SR are 7.8, 14.3, 20.8, 27.3 and 33.8 Hz and, thus, SR harmonics are also strongly absorbed by the Earth ionosphere. The published numerical simulations show that the penetration depth of such an ELF emission into the Earth's ionosphere is limited to 50-70 km for electric field and 120-240 km for magnetic field. From this follows, that PLE and SR can hardly ever be detected by LEO satellites, i.e. above the F-layer of ionosphere. In spite of this fact, these emissions were recently observed with use of the electric field antennas placed on the satellites C/NOFS (USA) and Chibis-M (Russia). Microsatellite Chibis-M was launched on January 24, 2012, at 23:18:30 UTC from the cargo ship "Progress M-13M" to circular orbit with altitude ~500 km and inclination ~52° . Chibis-M mass is about 40 kg where one third is a scientific instrumentation. The dimensions of the microsatellite case are 0.26x0.26x0.54 m with the outside mounted solar panels, service and scientific instrumentation. The main scientific objective of Chibis-M is the theoretical model verification for the atmospheric gamma-ray bursts. It requires the study of the accompanying EM processes such as the plasma waves produced by the lightning discharges in the VLF band. Chibis-M decayed on 15

  9. Increased Beta Frequency (15-30 Hz) Oscillatory Responses in Euthymic Bipolar Patients Under Lithium Monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Devran; Özerdem, Ayşegül; Güntekin, Bahar; Atagün, M Ilhan; Tülay, Elif; Karadağ, Figen; Başar, Erol

    2016-04-01

    The effect of lithium on neurocognition is not still fully explored. Brain oscillatory activity is altered in bipolar disorder. We aimed to assess the oscillatory responses of euthymic bipolar patients and how they are affected by lithium monotherapy. Event-related oscillations in response to visual target stimulus during an oddball paradigm in 16 euthymic drug-free and 13 euthymic lithium-treated bipolar patients were compared with 16 healthy controls. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitudes were measured for each subject's averaged beta (15-30 Hz) responses in the 0- to 300-ms time window over frontal (F3, Fz, F4), central (C3, Cz, C4), temporal (T7, T8), temporo-parietal (TP7, TP8), parietal (P3, Pz, P4), and occipital (O1, Oz, O2) areas. Patients under lithium monotherapy had significantly higher beta responses to visual target stimuli than healthy controls (P=.017) and drug-free patients (P=.015). The increase in beta response was observed at all electrode locations, however, the difference was statistically significant for the left (T7; P=.016) and right (T8; P=.031) temporal beta responses. Increased beta responses in drug-free patients and further significant increase in lithium-treated patients may be indicative of a core pathophysiological process of bipolar disorder and how it is affected by lithium. Whether the finding corresponds to lithium's corrective effect on the underlying pathology or to its neurocognitive side effect remains to be further explored. In either case, the finding is a sign that the oscillatory activity may be useful in tracking medication effect in bipolar disorder. PMID:25465436

  10. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-08

    Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a

  11. EFFECTS OF ELF (EXTREMELY LOW FREQUENCY) (1-120 HZ) AND MODULATED (50 HZ) RF (RADIO FREQUENCY) FIELDS ON THE EFFLUX OF CALCIUM IONS FROM BRAIN TISSUE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have previously shown that 16-Hz, sinusoidal electromagnetic fields can cause enhanced efflux of calcium ions from chick brain tissue, in vitro, in two intensity regions centered on 6 and 40 Vp-p/m. Alternatively, 1-Hz and 30-Hz fields at 40Vp-p/m did not cause enhanc...

  12. Shaping prestimulus neural activity with auditory rhythmic stimulation improves the temporal allocation of attention.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Luca; Pincham, Hannah L; Cristoforetti, Giulia; Facoetti, Andrea; Szűcs, Dénes

    2016-05-01

    Human attention fluctuates across time, and even when stimuli have identical physical characteristics and the task demands are the same, relevant information is sometimes consciously perceived and at other times not. A typical example of this phenomenon is the attentional blink, where participants show a robust deficit in reporting the second of two targets (T2) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream. Previous electroencephalographical (EEG) studies showed that neural correlates of correct T2 report are not limited to the RSVP period, but extend before visual stimulation begins. In particular, reduced oscillatory neural activity in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) before the onset of the RSVP has been linked to lower T2 accuracy. We therefore examined whether auditory rhythmic stimuli presented at a rate of 10 Hz (within the alpha band) could increase oscillatory alpha-band activity and improve T2 performance in the attentional blink time window. Behaviourally, the auditory rhythmic stimulation worked to enhance T2 accuracy. This enhanced perception was associated with increases in the posterior T2-evoked N2 component of the event-related potentials and this effect was observed selectively at lag 3. Frontal and posterior oscillatory alpha-band activity was also enhanced during auditory stimulation in the pre-RSVP period and positively correlated with T2 accuracy. These findings suggest that ongoing fluctuations can be shaped by sensorial events to improve the allocation of attention in time. PMID:26986506

  13. Shaping prestimulus neural activity with auditory rhythmic stimulation improves the temporal allocation of attention

    PubMed Central

    Pincham, Hannah L.; Cristoforetti, Giulia; Facoetti, Andrea; Szűcs, Dénes

    2016-01-01

    Human attention fluctuates across time, and even when stimuli have identical physical characteristics and the task demands are the same, relevant information is sometimes consciously perceived and at other times not. A typical example of this phenomenon is the attentional blink, where participants show a robust deficit in reporting the second of two targets (T2) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream. Previous electroencephalographical (EEG) studies showed that neural correlates of correct T2 report are not limited to the RSVP period, but extend before visual stimulation begins. In particular, reduced oscillatory neural activity in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) before the onset of the RSVP has been linked to lower T2 accuracy. We therefore examined whether auditory rhythmic stimuli presented at a rate of 10 Hz (within the alpha band) could increase oscillatory alpha-band activity and improve T2 performance in the attentional blink time window. Behaviourally, the auditory rhythmic stimulation worked to enhance T2 accuracy. This enhanced perception was associated with increases in the posterior T2-evoked N2 component of the event-related potentials and this effect was observed selectively at lag 3. Frontal and posterior oscillatory alpha-band activity was also enhanced during auditory stimulation in the pre-RSVP period and positively correlated with T2 accuracy. These findings suggest that ongoing fluctuations can be shaped by sensorial events to improve the allocation of attention in time. PMID:26986506

  14. Adsorption Isotherms for Xenon and Krypton using INL HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Veronica J. Rutledge; Jack D. Law

    2014-08-01

    The generation of adsorption isotherms compliments the scale-up of off-gas processes used to control the emission of encapsulated radioactive volatile fission and activation products released during Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) reprocessing activities. A series of experiments were conducted to obtain capacity results for varying Kr and Xe gas concentrations using HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN engineered form sorbents. Gas compositions for Kr ranged from 150-40,000 ppmv and 250-5020 ppmv for Xe in a helium balance. The experiments were all performed at 220 K at a flowrate of 50 sccm. Acquired capacities were then respectively fit to the Langmuir equation using the Langmuir linear regression method to obtain the equilibrium parameters Qmax and Keq. Generated experimental adsorption isotherms were then plotted with the Langmuir predicted isotherms to illustrate agreement between the two. The Langmuir parameters were provided for input into the OSPREY model to predict breakthrough of single component adsorption of Kr and Xe on HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN sorbents at the experimental conditions tested. Kr and Xe capacities resulting from model breakthrough predictions were then compared to experimental capacities for model validation.

  15. Glacier Change and Biologic Succession: a new Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA) Science Camp Module for Grades 8-12 in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, C. L.; Drake, J.; Good, C.; Fatland, R.; Hakala, M.; Woodford, R.; Donohoe, R.; Brenner, R.; Moriarty, T.

    2008-12-01

    During the summer of 2008, university faculty and instructors from southeast Alaska joined the University Alaska Fairbanks(UAF)Alaska Summer Research Academy(ASRA)to initiate a 12-day module on glacier change and biologic succession in Glacier Bay National Park. Nine students from Alaska, Colorado, Massachusetts, and Texas, made field observations and collected data while learning about tidewater glacier dynamics, plant succession, post-glacial uplift, and habitat use of terrestrial and marine vertebrates and invertebrates in this dynamic landscape that was covered by 6,000 km2 of ice just 250 years ago. ASRA students located their study sites using GPS and created maps in GIS and GOOGLE Earth. They deployed salinometers and temperature sensors to collect vertical profiles of seawater characteristics up-bay near active tidewater glacier termini and down-bay in completely deglaciated coves. ASRA student data was then compared with data collected during the same time period by Juneau undergraduates working on the SEAMONSTER project in Mendenhall Lake. ASRA students traversed actively forming, up-bay recessional moraines devoid of vegetation, and the fully reforested Little Ice Age terminal moraine near Park Headquarters in the lower bay region. Students surveyed marine organisms living between supratidal and subtidal zones near glaciers and far from glaciers, and compared up-bay and down-bay communities. Students made observations and logged sightings of bird populations and terrestrial mammals in a linear traverse from the bay's northwestern most fjord near Mt. Fairweather for 120 km to the bay's entrance, south of Park Headquarters at Bartlett Cove. One student constructed an ROV and was able to deploy a video camera and capture changing silt concentrations in the water column as well as marine life on the fjord bottom. Students also observed exhumed Neoglacial spruce forests and visited outcrops of Silurian reef faunas, now fossilized in Alexander terrane

  16. 50-kHz calls in rats: effects of MDMA and the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT.

    PubMed

    Sadananda, Monika; Natusch, Claudia; Karrenbauer, Britta; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations of laboratory rats have become increasingly important behavioral measures in research on emotion and motivation, since these calls may help to study appetitive subjective states, for example in relation to addiction. Among others, 50-kHz calls occur when rats experience or expect rewards, including drugs of abuse, and it is assumed that these calls depend on dopamine function, especially in the meso-limbic system. One established means to induce 50-kHz calls is to challenge rats with D-amphetamine, a psychomotor stimulant, which acts largely by boosting dopamine and noradrenaline function in the brain. In a 1st experiment, we studied whether another psycho-stimulatory amphetamine, namely the derivative 3,4-methylene-dioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy), could also enhance 50-kHz calls by using an activity box and testing conditions, which had previously been found to be appropriate in case of D-amphetamine. In support of previous work, we found that MDMA (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg, ip) dose-dependently increased locomotion and center time, together with decreases in rearing activity, but the drug did not elicit 50-kHz calls. Assuming that this lack of effect is due to the drug's substantial pro-serotonergic effects in the brain, which may inhibit 50-kHz calls, we performed a 2nd experiment where we tested the serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 0.05, 0.5, 2.5 mg/kg, ip). This drug dose-dependently stimulates serotonin autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, can act in a psycho-stimulatory way and can enhance dopamine function. In the activity box, 8-OH-DPAT increased locomotor activity (0.5, 2.5 mg/kg) and decreased rearing (2.5 mg/kg); that is, the drug seemed to share some psycho-stimulatory effects with MDMA. Unlike MDMA, 8-OH-DPAT enhanced 50-kHz calls in a dose-dependent way, namely only with the 0.5 mg/kg dose. These results are discussed with respect to their possible neurochemical

  17. Effect of 100 Hz electroacupuncture on salivary immunoglobulin A and the autonomic nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Hideaki, Waki; Tatsuya, Hisajima; Shogo, Miyazaki; Naruto, Yoshida; Hideaki, Tamai; Yoichi, Minakawa; Yoshihiro, Okuma; Kazuo, Uebaba; Hidenori, Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Background A previous study has reported that low-frequency (LF) electroacupuncture (EA) influences salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The ANS is known to control the secretion volume of sIgA; however, the effect of high-frequency (HF) EA on salivary sIgA has not been determined. We investigated whether HF EA affects salivary sIgA levels and the ANS. Method Sixteen healthy subjects were randomly classified into two groups: a control group and an EA group. After a 5 min rest, subjects in the EA group received EA at 100 Hz bilaterally at LI4 and LI11 for 15 min before resting for a further 40 min post-stimulation. Subjects in the control group rested for a total of 60 min. Measurements of the ANS and sIgA levels in both groups were made before, immediately after, 20 min after, and 40 min after rest or 15 min EA treatment. HF and LF components of heart rate variability were analysed as markers of ANS function. LF/HF ratio and HF were taken as indices of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity, respectively. Salivary protein concentrations and sIgA levels were determined by Bradford protein assay and ELISA, respectively. Results LF/HF ratio was significantly increased immediately after EA. HF was significantly increased at 20 min after EA and sIgA level was significantly increased at 40 min after EA. In addition, HF and salivary sIgA level were positively correlated with each another. Conclusions HF EA exerted sequential positive effects on sympathetic nerve activity, parasympathetic nerve activity, and salivary sIgA level (immediately and after 20 and 40 min, respectively). HF EA may increase salivary sIgA levels by influencing parasympathetic nerve activity. PMID:26449884

  18. Monochromatic ultra-slow (~0.1 Hz) oscillations in the human electroencephalogram and their relation to hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nikulin, Vadim V; Fedele, Tommaso; Mehnert, Jan; Lipp, Axel; Noack, Cornelia; Steinbrink, Jens; Curio, Gabriel

    2014-08-15

    Previous studies demonstrated the presence of Monochromatic Ultra-Slow Oscillations (MUSO) in human EEG. In the present study we explored the biological origin of MUSO by simultaneous recordings of EEG, Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), arterial blood pressure, respiration and Laser Doppler flowmetry. We used a head-up tilt test in order to check whether MUSO might relate to Mayer waves in arterial blood pressure, known to be enhanced by the tilting procedure. MUSO were detected in 8 out of 10 subjects during rest and showed a striking monochromatic spectrum (0.07-0.14 Hz). The spatial topography of MUSO was complex, showing multiple foci variable across subjects. While the head-up tilt test increased the relative power of Mayer waves, it had no effect on MUSO. On the other hand, the relative spectral power of 0.1 Hz oscillations in EEG, NIRS and blood pressure signals were positively correlated across subjects in the tilted condition. Eight subjects showed a coherence between MUSO and NIRS/arterial blood pressure. Moreover, MUSO at different electrode sites demonstrated coherence not reducible to volume conduction, thus indicating that MUSO are unlikely to be generated by one source. We related our experimental findings to known biological phenomena being generated at about 0.1 Hz, i.e.: arterial blood pressure, cerebral and skin vasomotion, respiration and neuronal activity. While no definite conclusion can yet be drawn as to an exact physiological mechanism of MUSO, we suggest that these oscillations might be of a rather extraneuronal origin reflecting cerebral vasomotion. PMID:24732648

  19. Clinical progression of transplanted large granular lymphocytic leukemia in Fischer 334 rats exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James E. ); Sasser, Lyle B. ); Miller, Douglas L. ); Dagle, Gerald E.; Rafferty, C N.; Ebi, K L.; Anderson, Larry E. )

    1999-01-19

    The purpose of this study was to determine if 60 Hz magnetic fields could alter the clinical progression of leukemia in an animal model. Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia cells from spleens of leukemic rats were transplanted into young male Fischer rats, producing signs of leukemia in about 2-3 months. The animals were injected with 2.2 x 107 LGL leukemia cells at the initiation of the study and assigned to 4 treatment groups 108/group) as follows: (1) 10 G linearly polarized 60 Hz magnetic fields, (2) sham exposed null energized unit with residual 20 mG fields, (3) ambient controls < 1 mG, and (4) positive controls (a single 5 Gy whole body exposure to 60Co 4 days prior to initiation of exposure). The magnetic fields were activated 20h/day, 7 days/week. Eighteen Rats (18 from each treatment group) were bled, killed, and evaluated at a5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11 weeks of exposure. Hematological endpoints, changes in spleen growth, and LGL cell infiltration into the spleen and liver were measured to evaluate the leukemia progression. Significant differences were not detected between the magnetic field exposed groups and the ambient control group, although the clinical progress of leukemia was enhanced in the positive control animals. These data indicate that exposure to sinusoidal, linearly polarized 60 Hz, 10 G magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia. Furthermore, the data are in general agreement with previous results of a companion repeated-bleeding study.

  20. Feasibility of a bilateral 4000–6000 Hz notch as a phenotype for genetic association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Susan L.; Richter, Scott J.; Teglas, Sandra L.; Bhatt, Ishan S.; Morehouse, Robin C.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Henrich, Vincent C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a worldwide health problem and a growing concern among young people. Although some people appear to be more susceptible to NIHL, genetic association studies lack a specific phenotype. We tested the feasibility of a bilateral 4000–6000 Hz audiometric notch as a phenotype for identifying genetic contributions to hearing loss in young adults. Design A case-control-control study was conducted to examine selected SNPs in 52 genes previously associated with hearing loss and/or expressed in the cochlea. A notch was defined as a minimum of a 15-dB drop at 4000–6000 Hz from the previous best threshold with a 5-dB ‘recovery’ at 8000 Hz. Study sample Participants were 252 individuals of European descent taken from a population of 640 young adults who are students of classical music. Participants were grouped as No-notch (NN), Unilateral Notch (UN), or Bilateral Notch (BN). Results The strongest evidence of a genetic association with the 4000–6000 Hz notch was a nonsynonymous SNP variant in the ESRR? gene (rs61742642:C>T, P386S). Carriers of the minor allele accounted for 26% of all bilateral losses. Conclusion This study indicates that the 4000–6000 Hz bilateral notch is a feasible phenotype for identifying genetic susceptibility to hearing loss. PMID:25938503

  1. 40Hz-Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) selectively modulates speech perception.

    PubMed

    Rufener, Katharina S; Zaehle, Tino; Oechslin, Mathias S; Meyer, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigated the functional relevance of gamma oscillations for the processing of rapidly changing acoustic features in speech signals. For this purpose we analyzed repetition-induced perceptual learning effects in 18 healthy adult participants. The participants received either 6Hz or 40Hz tACS over the bilateral auditory cortex, while repeatedly performing a phoneme categorization task. In result, we found that 40Hz tACS led to a specific alteration in repetition-induced perceptual learning. While participants in the non-stimulated control group as well as those in the experimental group receiving 6Hz tACS considerably improved their perceptual performance, the application of 40Hz tACS selectively attenuated the repetition-induced improvement in phoneme categorization abilities. Our data provide causal evidence for a functional relevance of gamma oscillations during the perceptual learning of acoustic speech features. Moreover, we demonstrate that even less than twenty minutes of alternating current stimulation below the individual perceptual threshold is sufficient to affect speech perception. This finding is relevant in that this novel approach might have implications with respect to impaired speech processing in dyslexics and older adults. PMID:26779822

  2. Arc extinction characteristics in power supply frequencies from 50 Hz to 1 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, N.; Sawa, K.

    2010-04-01

    It is well-known that arcing phenomena at the break of contacts affect seriously the reliability and lifetime of contacts. Therefore, many papers have reported arc duration, arc extinction current and other characteristics. Recently, in mobile communication application an electro-mechanical switch is said to be superior to a semiconductor switch in insertion loss and isolation, and a RF (radio frequency) MEMS relay has been intensively developed. Based on the above background it is one of important research topics how the frequency of interrupted current affects the characteristics of breaking arc. However, there are few papers on that topic. In this paper the effect of frequency on arc characteristics is investigated in range of the frequency of interrupted current from 50 Hz to 1 MHz. Consequently the followings can be made clear. At the interruption of peak current 2 A arc extinguishes in terms of arc characteristics and circuit conditions up to the frequency of 200 Hz. Above 200 Hz the arc extinguishes at current zero. The current zero extinction takes place up to 500 kHz. Therefore, arc duration decreases with high frequencies and the contact damage caused by arc is reduced with frequency. However, at frequencies higher than 600 kHz an arc is re-ignited after the current zero and failed to extinguish.

  3. Free-field calibration of measurement microphones at frequencies up to 80 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Herring, Gregory C.

    2002-11-01

    Civil-aviation noise-reduction programs, that make use of scaled-down aircraft models in wind tunnel tests, require knowledge of microphone pressure (i.e., not free-field) sensitivities beyond 20 kHz--since noise wavelengths also scale down with decreasing model size. Furthermore, not all microphone types (e.g., electrets) are easily calibrated with the electrostatic technique, while enclosed cavity calibrations typically have an upper limit for the useful frequency range. Thus, work was initiated to perform a high-frequency pressure calibration of Panasonic electret microphones using a substitution free-field method in a small anechoic chamber. First, a standard variable-frequency pistonphone was used to obtain the pressure calibration up to 16 kHz. Above 16 kHz, to avoid spatially irregular sound fields due to dephasing of loudspeaker diaphragms, a series of resonant ceramic piezoelectric crystals was used at five specific ultrasonic frequencies as the free-field calibration sound source. Then, the free-field sensitivity was converted to a pressure sensitivity with an electrostatic calibration of the reference microphone (an air condenser type), for which the free-field correction is known. Combining the low- and high-frequency data sets, a full frequency calibration of pressure sensitivity for an electret microphone was generated from 63 Hz to 80 kHz.

  4. Operation and thermal modeling of the ISIS H- source from 50 to 2 Hz repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, H.; Faircloth, D.; Lettry, J.

    2013-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 accelerator H- ion source, currently under construction, will operate at a 2 Hz repetition rate, with pulse length of 0.5 ms and a beam current of 80 mA. Its reliability must exceed 99 % with a mandatory 3 month uninterrupted operation period. A Penning ion source is successfully operated at ISIS; at 50 Hz repetition rate it reliably provides 55 mA H- pulses of 0.25 ms duration over 1 month. The discharge plasma ignition is very sensitive to the temperatures of the discharge region, especially of its cathode. The investigation by modeling and measurement of operation parameters suitable for arc ignition and H- production at 2 Hz is of paramount importance and must be understood prior to the implementation of discharge ion sources in the Linac4 accelerator. In its original configuration, the ISIS H- source delivers beam only if the repetition rate is above 12.5 Hz, this paper describes the implementation of a temperature control of the discharge region aiming at lower repetition rate operation. The experimental results of the modified source successfully operated down to 1.6 Hz and providing 30 mA H- pulses of 0.75 ms duration are presented. A thermal modeling of the ISIS ion source gives insight to the relevant parameters. The analysis demonstrates the adaptability of discharge sources for the operating conditions of the Linac4.

  5. 47 CFR 73.30 - Petition for authorization of an allotment in the 1605-1705 kHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the 1605-1705 kHz band. 73.30 Section 73.30 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... authorization of an allotment in the 1605-1705 kHz band. (a) Any party interested in operating an AM broadcast station on one of the ten channels in the 1605-1705 kHz band must file a petition for the establishment...

  6. DNA Strand Breaks in Fibroblasts Exposed to a 50-Hz Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Maresuke; Hondou, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Hidetake

    A large number of studies have reported DNA damages caused by low frequency magnetic field (LFMF). However, the mechanism of the DNA damage is not well understood, partly because of a lack of reproducibility. Because DNA integrity is essential for the activities of life, the present study focused on DNA damages induced by LFMF. Fibroblast cells (3T3 Swiss albino) were exposed for various periods (15, 18 and 24 h) to 50-Hz magnetic fields (MF) of various intensities (100, 500 and 1000 µT). Two modes of exposure, intermittent (on for 5 min, off for 10 min) and continuous, were employed. DNA damages were evaluated by the alkaline comet assay. This assay semi-quantify the degree of DNA strand breaks. With the intermittent 500 µT MF, the degree of DNA strand breaks was higher in the exposed cells than non-exposed cells, and the difference was maximal at 18 h (statistically significant difference was observed at 18 and 24 h). Also with the intermittexnt, 100 and 1000 µT MFs, the degree of DNA strand breaks of exposed cells was higher than non-exposed cells, but the statistically significant difference was observed only at 1000 µT, 18 h exposure. The continuous exposure for 15, 18 and 24 h at 500 µT exhibited a significant difference between the exposed and non-exposed cells only at 18 h, but the difference was not as prominent as that observed under the intermittent exposure.

  7. 20 kHz ultrasound assisted treatment of chronic wounds with concurrent optic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawiec, Christopher R.; Sunny, Youhan; Diaz, David; Nadkarni, Sumati; Weingarten, Michael S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Margolis, David J.; Zubkov, Leonid; Lewin, Peter A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a novel, wearable, battery powered ultrasound applicator that was evaluated as a therapeutic tool for healing of chronic wounds, such as venous ulcers. The low frequency and low intensity (~100mW/cm2) applicator works by generating ultrasound waves with peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes of 55 kPa at 20 kHz. The device was used in a pilot human study (n=25) concurrently with remote optical (diffuse correlation spectroscopy - DCS) monitoring to assess the healing outcome. More specifically, the ulcers' healing status was determined by measuring tissue oxygenation and blood flow in the capillary network. This procedure facilitated an early prognosis of the treatment outcome and - once verified - may eventually enable customization of wound management. The outcome of the study shows that the healing patients of the ultrasound treated group had a statistically improved (p<0.05) average rate of wound healing (20.6%/week) compared to the control group (5.3%/week). In addition, the calculated blood flow index (BFI) decreased more rapidly in wounds that decreased in size, indicating a correlation between BFI and wound healing prediction. Overall, the results presented support the notion that active low frequency ultrasound treatment of chronic venous ulcers accelerates healing when combined with the current standard clinical care. The ultrasound applicator described here provides a user-friendly, fully wearable system that has the potential for becoming the first device suitable for treatment of chronic wounds in patient's homes, which - in turn - would increase patients' compliance and improve quality of life.

  8. Low-frequency sounds and psychological tests at 7, 18, and 40 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damijan, Zbigniew; Kasprzak, Cezary; Panuszka, Ryszard

    2001-05-01

    Research included the results of tests aimed to determine how LFN (low-frequency noise) with the dominating frequency (7 Hz at 120 dB, 18 Hz at 120 dB, and 40 Hz at 110 dB) influences human brain potentials and understanding the dependency of results achieved in psychological questionnaires. The psychological questionnaires (EPQ-R Eysencks and SSS-5 Zuckermans) were analyzed. Presented issue existences difference, relative influence LFN on human biopotentials, dependence from acquired results in ranges EPQ-R Eysencks and SSS-5 Zuckermans. The test included 96 experiments. Standard EEG potentials, ECG potentials, and EDP (dermal) were recorded before, during and after subject's 35-min exposures to LFN. Evident differences in changed bio-signals especially in EEG subject's dispersion, were easily determined and correlated to questionnaire reports.

  9. Plasma antennas driven by 5–20 kHz AC power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiansen Chen, Yuli; Sun, Yang; Wu, Huafeng; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Qiumeng

    2015-12-15

    The experiments described in this work were performed with the aim of introducing a new plasma antenna that was excited by a 5–20 kHz alternating current (AC) power supply, where the antenna was transformed into a U-shape. The results show that the impedance, voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR), radiation pattern and gain characteristics of the antenna can be controlled rapidly by varying not only the discharge power, but also by varying the discharge frequency in the range from 5 to 20 kHz. When the discharge frequency is adjusted from 10 to 12 kHz, the gain is higher within a relatively broad frequency band and the switch-on time is less than 1 ms when the discharge power is less than 5 W, meaning that the plasma antenna can be turned on and off rapidly.

  10. Large Granular Lymphocytic (LGL) Leukemia in Rats Exposed to Intermittent 60 Hz Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Larry E.); Morris, James E.); Miller, Douglas L.); Ebi, K L.; Sasser, Lyle B.)

    2001-04-01

    An animal model for large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in male Fischer 344 rats utilized to determine whether magnetic field exposure can be shown to influence the progression of leukemia. We previously reported that exposure to continuous 60 Hz 1 mT magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia in young male rats following inspection of spleen cells from donor leukemic rats. Results presented here extend those studies with the objectives to (1) replicate the previous study of continuous 60-Hz magnetic field exposures but using fewer LGL cells in the inoculum, and (2) determine if intermittent 60-Hz magnetic fields can alter the clinical progression of leukemia.

  11. 2- to 3-kHz continuum emissions as possible indications of global heliospheric 'breathing'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzedzielski, S.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper analyzes the main features of 2- to 3-kHz heliospheric emissions in the context of a general heliospheric 'breathing' as inferred from the Voyager 2 solar wind average ram pressure data. Triggers for the three 3-kHz emission events seen to date are suggested, and good agreement is obtained in timing and expected postshock frequency for termination shock distances of about 90 AU. It is suggested that the visibility of the individual 3-kHz events and their observed upward frequency drift are enhanced when the postulated global heliospheric expansion results in the formation of a transient, compressed external plasma barrier around the heliopause that prevents radiation escape for several months. The average termination shock distance is estimated to be in the range 80-90 AU.

  12. Ultra-low-noise EEG/MEG systems enable bimodal non-invasive detection of spike-like human somatosensory evoked responses at 1 kHz.

    PubMed

    Fedele, T; Scheer, H J; Burghoff, M; Curio, G; Körber, R

    2015-02-01

    Non-invasive EEG detection of very high frequency somatosensory evoked potentials featuring frequencies up to and above 1 kHz has been recently reported. Here, we establish the detectability of such components by combined low-noise EEG/MEG. We recorded SEP/SEF simultaneously using median nerve stimulation in five healthy human subjects inside an electromagnetically shielded room, combining a low-noise EEG custom-made amplifier (4.7 nV/√Hz) and a custom-made single-channel low-noise MEG (0.5 fT/√Hz @ 1 kHz). Both, low-noise EEG and MEG revealed three spectrally distinct and temporally overlapping evoked components: N20 (<100 Hz), sigma-burst (450-750 Hz), and kappa-burst (850-1200 Hz). The two recording modalities showed similar relative scaling of signal amplitude in all three frequencies domains (EEG [10 nV] ≅ MEG [1 fT]). Pronounced waveform (peak-by-peak) overlap of EEG and MEG signals is observed in the sigma band, whereas in the kappa band overlap was only partial. A decreasing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR; calculated for n = 12.000 averages) from sigma to kappa components characterizes both, electric and magnetic field recordings: Sigma-band SNR was 12.9  ±  5.5/19.8  ±  12.6 for EEG/MEG, and kappa-band SNR at 3.77  ±  0.8/4.5  ±  2.9. High-frequency performance of a tailor-made MEG matches closely with simultaneously recorded low-noise EEG for the non-invasive detection of somatosensory evoked activity at and above 1 kHz. Thus, future multi-channel dual-mode low-noise technology could offer complementary views for source reconstruction of the neural generators underlying such high-frequency responses, and render neural high-frequency processes related to multi-unit spike discharges accessible in non-invasive recordings. PMID:25612926

  13. Investigation of atmospheric insect wing-beat frequencies and iridescence features using a multispectral kHz remote detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebru, Alem; Rohwer, Erich; Neethling, Pieter; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative investigation of insect activity in their natural habitat is a challenging task for entomologists. It is difficult to address questions such as flight direction, predation strength, and overall activities using the current techniques such as traps and sweep nets. A multispectral kHz remote detection system using sunlight as an illumination source is presented. We explore the possibilities of remote optical classification of insects based on their wing-beat frequencies and iridescence features. It is shown that the wing-beat frequency of the fast insect events can be resolved by implementing high-sampling frequency. The iridescence features generated from the change of color in two channels (visible and near-infrared) during wing-beat cycle are presented. We show that the shape of the wing-beat trajectory is different for different insects. The flight direction of an atmospheric insect is also determined using a silicon quadrant detector.

  14. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy of esophageal tissues at 100 kHz line rate

    PubMed Central

    Schlachter, Simon C.; Kang, DongKyun; Gora, Michalina J.; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Wu, Tao; Carruth, Robert W.; Wilsterman, Eric J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Woods, Kevin; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a reflectance confocal microscopy technology that uses a diffraction grating to illuminate different locations on the sample with distinct wavelengths. SECM can obtain line images without any beam scanning devices, which opens up the possibility of high-speed imaging with relatively simple probe optics. This feature makes SECM a promising technology for rapid endoscopic imaging of internal organs, such as the esophagus, at microscopic resolution. SECM imaging of the esophagus has been previously demonstrated at relatively low line rates (5 kHz). In this paper, we demonstrate SECM imaging of large regions of esophageal tissues at a high line imaging rate of 100 kHz. The SECM system comprises a wavelength-swept source with a fast sweep rate (100 kHz), high output power (80 mW), and a detector unit with a large bandwidth (100 MHz). The sensitivity of the 100-kHz SECM system was measured to be 60 dB and the transverse resolution was 1.6 µm. Excised swine and human esophageal tissues were imaged with the 100-kHz SECM system at a rate of 6.6 mm2/sec. Architectural and cellular features of esophageal tissues could be clearly visualized in the SECM images, including papillae, glands, and nuclei. These results demonstrate that large-area SECM imaging of esophageal tissues can be successfully conducted at a high line imaging rate of 100 kHz, which will enable whole-organ SECM imaging in vivo. PMID:24049684

  15. Comparison of cardiac and 60 Hz magnetically induced electric fields measured in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Creim, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields interact with an animal by inducing internal electric fields, which are in addition to the normal endogenous fields present in living animals. Male rats weighing about 560 g each were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine. Small incisions were made in the ventral body wall at the chest and upper abdomen to position a miniature probe for measuring internal electric fields. The calibration constant for the probe size was 5.7 mm, with a flat response from at least 12 Hz to 20 kHz. A cardiac signal, similar to the normal electrocardiogram with a heart rate of about 250 bpm, was readily obtained at the chest. Upon analysis of its spectrum, the cardiac field detected by the probe had a broad maximum at 32--95 Hz. When the rates were exposed to a 1 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field, a spike appeared in the spectrum at 60 Hz. The peak-to-peak magnitudes of electric fields associated with normal heart function were comparable to fields induced by a 1 mT magnetic field at 60 Hz for those positions measured on the body surface. Within the body, or in different directions relative to the applied field, the induced fields were reduced. The cardiac field increased near the heart, becoming much larger than the induced field. Thus, the cardiac electric field, together with the other endogenous fields, combine with induced electric fields and help to provide reference levels for the induced-field dosimetry of ELF magnetic field exposures of living animals.

  16. SOFT LAGS IN NEUTRON STAR kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERBERATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Barret, Didier

    2013-06-10

    High frequency soft reverberation lags have now been detected from stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Their interpretation involves reflection of a hard source of photons onto an accretion disk, producing a delayed reflected emission, with a time lag consistent with the light travel time between the irradiating source and the disk. Independently of the location of the clock, the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) emission is thought to arise from the neutron star boundary layer. Here, we search for the signature of reverberation of the kHz QPO emission, by measuring the soft lags and the lag energy spectrum of the lower kHz QPOs from 4U1608-522. Soft lags, ranging from {approx}15 to {approx}40 {mu}s, between the 3-8 keV and 8-30 keV modulated emissions are detected between 565 and 890 Hz. The soft lags are not constant with frequency and show a smooth decrease between 680 Hz and 890 Hz. The broad band X-ray spectrum is modeled as the sum of a disk and a thermal Comptonized component, plus a broad iron line, expected from reflection. The spectral parameters follow a smooth relationship with the QPO frequency, in particular the fitted inner disk radius decreases steadily with frequency. Both the bump around the iron line in the lag energy spectrum and the consistency between the lag changes and the inferred changes of the inner disk radius, from either spectral fitting or the QPO frequency, suggest that the soft lags may indeed involve reverberation of the hard pulsating QPO source on the disk.

  17. Changes in the spectral composition of animal-brain electrical activity under the influence of nonthermal millimeter-wave radiation on acupuncture points

    SciTech Connect

    Khramov, R.N.; Vorob`ev, V.V.

    1994-07-01

    The frequency spectra (0-26 Hz) of electrograms (EG) of the preoptic region of the hypothalamus were studied in chronic experiments on nine awake rabbits under the influence of nonthermal millimeter-bank (55-75 GHz) electromagnetic fields on various acupuncture points: (I) the auricular {open_quotes}heart{close_quotes} point (after F. G. Portnov); (II) the cranial acupoint (TR-20; the {open_quotes}hypothalamus{close_quotes} point after R. Voll); and (III) the {open_quotes}longevity{close_quotes} acupoint (E-36). Irradiation of point I was accompanied by significant suppression of hypothalamic electrical activity at 5 and 16 Hz and enhancement at 7-8, 12, and 26 Hz. Irradiation of point II, and III were, respectively, 31%, 21%, and 5% (p < 0.05, U-criterion). These results suggest that acupuncture points I and II are more sensitive to millimeter-band radiation than is point III. The presence of individual characteristics of the effects and their change after stress to sign inversion were shown in rat experiments in which the acupuncture points were irradiated.

  18. 20 kHz main inverter unit. [for space station power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, S.

    1989-01-01

    A proof-of-concept main inverter unit has demonstrated the operation of a pulse-width-modulated parallel resonant power stage topology as a 20-kHz ac power source driver, showing simple output regulation, parallel operation, power sharing and short-circuit operation. The use of a two-stage dc input filter controls the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) characteristics of the dc power bus, and the use of an ac harmonic trap controls the EMC characteristics of the 20-kHz ac power bus.

  19. Near real-time response matrix calibration for 10 Hz GOFB

    SciTech Connect

    Liu C.; Hulsart, R.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.

    2012-05-20

    The 10 Hz global orbit feedback (GOFB), for damping the trajectory perturbation ({approx}10 Hz) due to the vibrations of the triplet quadrupoles, is operational. The correction algorithm uses transfer functions between the beam position monitors and correctors obtained from the online optics model and a correction algorithm based on singular value decomposition (SVD). Recently the calibration of the transfer functions was measured using beam position measurements acquired while modulating dedicated correctors. In this report, the feedback results with model matrix and measured matrix are compared.

  20. High-average-power 100-Hz repetition rate table-top soft x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Jorge J.; Reagan, Brendan A.; Wernsing, Keith; Wang, Yong; Yin, Liang; Wang, Shoujun; Berrill, Mark; Woolston, Mark R.; Curtis, Alden H.; Furch, Federico J. A.; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Luther, Brad M.; Patel, Dinesh; Marconi, Mario C.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2013-09-01

    The table-top generation of high average power coherent soft x-ray radiation in a compact set up is of high interest for numerous applications. We have demonstrated the generation of bright soft x-ray laser pulses at 100 Hz repetition rate with record-high average power from compact plasma amplifiers excited by an ultrafast diode-pumped solid state laser. Results of compact λ=18.9nm Ni-like Mo and λ=13.9nm Ni-like Ag lasers operating at 100 Hz repetition rate are discussed.

  1. Sperm whales reduce foraging effort during exposure to 1-2 kHz sonar and killer whale sounds.

    PubMed

    Isojunno, Saana; Cure, Charlotte; Kvadsheim, Petter Helgevold; Lam, Frans-Peter Alexander; Tyack, Peter Lloyd; Wensveen, Paul Jacobus; Miller, Patrick James O'Malley

    2016-01-01

    The time and energetic costs of behavioral responses to incidental and experimental sonar exposures, as well as control stimuli, were quantified using hidden state analysis of time series of acoustic and movement data recorded by tags (DTAG) attached to 12 sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) using suction cups. Behavioral state transition modeling showed that tagged whales switched to a non-foraging, non-resting state during both experimental transmissions of low-frequency active sonar from an approaching vessel (LFAS; 1-2 kHz, source level 214 dB re 1 µPa m, four tag records) and playbacks of potential predator (killer whale, Orcinus orca) sounds broadcast at naturally occurring sound levels as a positive control from a drifting boat (five tag records). Time spent in foraging states and the probability of prey capture attempts were reduced during these two types of exposures with little change in overall locomotion activity, suggesting an effect on energy intake with no immediate compensation. Whales switched to the active non-foraging state over received sound pressure levels of 131-165 dB re 1 µPa during LFAS exposure. In contrast, no changes in foraging behavior were detected in response to experimental negative controls (no-sonar ship approach or noise control playback) or to experimental medium-frequency active sonar exposures (MFAS; 6-7 kHz, source level 199 re 1 µPa m, received sound pressure level [SPL] = 73-158 dB re 1 µPa). Similarly, there was no reduction in foraging effort for three whales exposed to incidental, unidentified 4.7-5.1 kHz sonar signals received at lower levels (SPL = 89-133 dB re 1 µPa). These results demonstrate that similar to predation risk, exposure to sonar can affect functional behaviors, and indicate that increased perception of risk with higher source level or lower frequency may modulate how sperm whales respond to anthropogenic sound. PMID:27039511

  2. Mapping and mining interictal pathological gamma (30–100 Hz) oscillations with clinical intracranial EEG in patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Otis; Maus, Douglas; Marsh, Eric; Dlugos, Dennis; Litt, Brian; Meador, Kimford

    2012-01-01

    Localizing an epileptic network is essential for guiding neurosurgery and antiepileptic medical devices as well as elucidating mechanisms that may explain seizure-generation and epilepsy. There is increasing evidence that pathological oscillations may be specific to diseased networks in patients with epilepsy and that these oscillations may be a key biomarker for generating and indentifying epileptic networks. We present a semi-automated method that detects, maps, and mines pathological gamma (30–100 Hz) oscillations (PGOs) in human epileptic brain to possibly localize epileptic networks. We apply the method to standard clinical iEEG (<100 Hz) with interictal PGOs and seizures from six patients with medically refractory epilepsy. We demonstrate that electrodes with consistent PGO discharges do not always coincide with clinically determined seizure onset zone (SOZ) electrodes but at times PGO-dense electrodes include secondary seizure-areas (SS) or even areas without seizures (NS). In 4/5 patients with epilepsy surgery, we observe poor (Engel Class 4) post-surgical outcomes and identify more PGO-activity in SS or NS than in SOZ. Additional studies are needed to further clarify the role of PGOs in epileptic brain. PMID:23105174

  3. Development of a compact efficient 10 Hz 20 TW Ti:sapphire laser system with a 1 kHz regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Suzuki, Masayuki; Baba, Motoyoshi; Wei Zhiyi; Wang Zhaohua; Wang Peng; Zhang Jie; Zheng Jiaan; Kuroda, Hiroto

    2007-05-01

    We have constructed a compact efficient Ti:sapphire laser system that generates30 fs,630 mJ pulses at a repetition rate of10 Hz. A new geometry for a single-stage multipass power amplifier is proposed that greatly weakens and even makes use of thermal lensing. Such geometry can realize high output in a single-stage power amplifier; otherwise at least two-stage power amplifiers are required.The new configuration simplifies the laser system and reduces the cost. The key point in this design is that the beam spot size evolution is considered in combination with the pulse amplification.

  4. Discovery of kHz Quasi-periodic Oscillations in the Z Source Cygnus X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnands, Rudy; Homan, Jeroen; van der Klis, Michiel; Kuulkers, Erik; van Paradijs, Jan; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Vaughan, Brian

    1998-02-01

    During observations with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer from 1997 June 31 to July 3 we discovered two simultaneous kHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) near 500 and 860 Hz in the low-mass X-ray binary and Z source Cygnus X-2. In the X-ray color-color diagram and hardness-intensity diagram (HID), a clear Z track was traced out, which shifted in the HID within 1 day to higher count rates at the end of the observation. Z track shifts are well known to occur in Cyg X-2 our observation for the first time catches the source in the act. A single kHz QPO peak was detected at the left end of the horizontal branch (HB) of the Z track, with a frequency of 731+/-20 Hz and an amplitude of 4.7+0.8-0.6% rms in the energy band 5.0-60 keV. Further to the right on the HB, at somewhat higher count rates, an additional peak at 532+/-43 Hz was detected with an rms amplitude of 3.0+1.0-0.7%. When the source moved down the HB, thus when the inferred mass accretion rate increased, the frequency of the higher frequency QPO increased to 839+/-13 Hz, and its amplitude decreased to 3.5+0.4-0.3% rms. The higher frequency QPO was also detected on the upper normal branch (NB) with an rms amplitude of 1.8+0.6-0.4% and a frequency of 1007+/-15 Hz; its peak width did not show a clear correlation with inferred mass accretion rate. The lower frequency QPO was most of the time undetectable, with typical upper limits of 2% rms; no conclusion on how this QPO behaved with mass accretion rate can be drawn. If the peak separation between the QPOs is the neutron star spin frequency (as required in some beat-frequency models), then the neutron star spin period is 2.9+/-0.2 ms (346+/-29 Hz). This discovery makes Cyg X-2 the fourth Z source that displays kHz QPOs. The properties of the kHz QPOs in Cyg X-2 are similar to those of other Z sources. Simultaneous with the kHz QPOs, the well-known horizontal-branch QPOs (HBOs) were visible in the power spectra. At the left end of the HB, the second harmonic of

  5. A novel self-guided approach to alpha activity training.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Geert J M; Denissen, Ad J M; Jäger, Mark; Vernon, David; Dekker, Marian K J; Mihajlović, Vojkan; Sitskoorn, Margriet M

    2012-03-01

    Fifty healthy participants took part in a double-blind placebo-controlled study in which they were either given auditory alpha activity (8-12Hz) training (N=18), random beta training (N=12), or no training at all (N=20). A novel wireless electrode system was used for training without instructions, involving water-based electrodes mounted in an audio headset. Training was applied approximately at central electrodes. Post-training measurement using a conventional full-cap EEG system revealed a 10% increase in alpha activity at posterior sites compared to pre-training levels, when using the conventional index of alpha activity and a non-linear regression fit intended to model individual alpha frequency. This statistically significant increase was present only in the group that received the alpha training, and remained evident at a 3 month follow-up session, especially under eyes open conditions where an additional 10% increase was found. In an exit interview, approximately twice as many participants in the alpha training group (53%) mentioned that the training was relaxing, compared to those in either the beta (20%) or no training (21%) control groups. Behavioural measures of stress and relaxation were indicative of effects of alpha activity training but failed to reach statistical significance. These results are discussed in terms of a lack of statistical power. Overall, results suggest that self-guided alpha activity training using this novel system is feasible and represents a step forward in the ease of instrumental conditioning of brain rhythms. PMID:22119661

  6. Accommodative response and cortical activity during sustained attention.

    PubMed

    Poltavski, Dmitri V; Biberdorf, David; Petros, Thomas V

    2012-06-15

    Greater accommodative lag and vergence deficits have been linked to attentional deficits similar to those observed in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of accommodative-vergence stress on a measure of sustained attention (Conners CPT) used in the diagnosis of ADHD. Twenty-seven normal non-ADHD adults completed the Conners CPT twice: wearing -2.00 D lenses and normally (without the -2.00 D lenses) in a counterbalanced order with at least 24 h between the sessions. Simultaneous recording of participants' dynamic accommodative responses was performed from the right eye using the Grand Seiko WAM-5500 auto-refractor and electroencephalographic activity (EEG) in the left prefrontal region using the Neurosky Mindset headset. The results demonstrated a significantly greater accommodative lag in the -2.00 D stress condition and a significantly poorer performance on the Conners CPT as indexed by slower reaction time, greater standard error of hit reaction time, grater response variability, poorer stimulus detectability and a greater number of perseverations. No differences were observed on measures of EEG in the theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), and beta (12-20 Hz) bands. Moreover, when directly juxtaposed with each EEG band in multiple linear regression analyses, greater accommodative lag in the stress condition was significantly associated with a greater probability of clinical classification on the Conners CPT, and was also marginally predictive of the number of omissions recorded in the stress condition. The results demonstrated that sustained attention can be influenced by such factors as accommodative-vergence stress and suggest that bottom-up processes can contribute to and potentially exacerbate attentional problems in individuals with ADHD. The study also showed that cortical dysfunction (while sufficient) may not be a necessary condition for attentional deficits. PMID:22580016

  7. 24 CFR 8.12 - Employment criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... handicap that impairs sensory, manual, or speaking skills, the test results accurately reflect the..., rather than the applicant's or employee's impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills (except...

  8. Oscillatory phase modulates the timing of neuronal activations and resulting behavior.

    PubMed

    Coon, W G; Gunduz, A; Brunner, P; Ritaccio, A L; Pesaran, B; Schalk, G

    2016-06-01

    Human behavioral response timing is highly variable from trial to trial. While it is generally understood that behavioral variability must be due to trial-by-trial variations in brain function, it is still largely unknown which physiological mechanisms govern the timing of neural activity as it travels through networks of neuronal populations, and how variations in the timing of neural activity relate to variations in the timing of behavior. In our study, we submitted recordings from the cortical surface to novel analytic techniques to chart the trajectory of neuronal population activity across the human cortex in single trials, and found joint modulation of the timing of this activity and of consequent behavior by neuronal oscillations in the alpha band (8-12Hz). Specifically, we established that the onset of population activity tends to occur during the trough of oscillatory activity, and that deviations from this preferred relationship are related to changes in the timing of population activity and the speed of the resulting behavioral response. These results indicate that neuronal activity incurs variable delays as it propagates across neuronal populations, and that the duration of each delay is a function of the instantaneous phase of oscillatory activity. We conclude that the results presented in this paper are supportive of a general model for variability in the effective speed of information transmission in the human brain and for variability in the timing of human behavior. PMID:26975551

  9. Final report on key comparison CCAUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avison, Janine; Barham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This document and the accompanying spreadsheets constitute the final report for key comparison CCAUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Twelve national measurement institutes took part in the key comparison and the National Physical Laboratory piloted the project. Two laboratory standard microphones IEC type LS1P were circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected throughout the project. One of the microphones was subsequently deemed to have compromised stability for the purpose of deriving a reference value. Consequently the key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been made based on the weighted mean results for sensitivity level and for sensitivity phase from just one of the microphones. Corresponding degrees of equivalence (DoEs) have also been calculated and are presented. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Report on key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolska, D.; Kosterov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the final report for regional key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Two laboratories—Central Office of Measures (GUM)—the national metrology institute for Poland and the State Enterprise Scientific-Research Institute for Metrology of Measurement and Control Systems (DP NDI Systema)— the designated institute for acoustics in Ukraine took part in this comparison with the GUM as a pilot. One travelling type LS1P microphone was circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected. The results of the DP NDI Systema obtained in this comparison were linked to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison through the joint participation of the GUM. The degrees of equivalence were computed for DP NDI Systema with respect to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison reference value. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. COOMET pilot comparison 473/RU-a/09: Comparison of hydrophone calibrations in the frequency range 250 Hz to 200 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chen; Isaev, A. E.; Yuebing, Wang; Enyakov, A. M.; Teng, Fei; Matveev, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    A description is given of the COOMET project 473/RU-a/09: a pilot comparison of hydrophone calibrations at frequencies from 250 Hz to 200 kHz between Hangzhou Applied Acoustics Research Institute (HAARI, China)—pilot laboratory—and Russian National Research Institute for Physicotechnical and Radio Engineering Measurements (VNIIFTRI, Designated Institute of Russia of the CIPM MRA). Two standard hydrophones, B&K 8104 and TC 4033, were calibrated and compared to assess the current state of hydrophone calibration of HAARI (China) and Russia. Three different calibration methods were applied: a vibrating column method, a free-field reciprocity method and a comparison method. The standard facilities of each laboratory were used, and three different sound fields were applied: pressure field, free-field and reverberant field. The maximum deviation of the sensitivities of two hydrophones between the participants' results was 0.36 dB. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV-KCWG.

  12. Repeated 6-Hz Corneal Stimulation Progressively Increases FosB/ΔFosB Levels in the Lateral Amygdala and Induces Seizure Generalization to the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carmela; Vinet, Jonathan; Curia, Giulia; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to repetitive seizures is known to promote convulsions which depend on specific patterns of network activity. We aimed at evaluating the changes in seizure phenotype and neuronal network activation caused by a modified 6-Hz corneal stimulation model of psychomotor seizures. Mice received up to 4 sessions of 6-Hz corneal stimulation with fixed current amplitude of 32 mA and inter-stimulation interval of 72 h. Video-electroencephalography showed that evoked seizures were characterized by a motor component and a non-motor component. Seizures always appeared in frontal cortex, but only at the fourth stimulation they involved the hippocampus, suggesting the establishment of an epileptogenic process. Duration of seizure non-motor component progressively decreased after the second session, whereas convulsive seizures remained unchanged. In addition, a more severe seizure phenotype, consisting of tonic-clonic generalized convulsions, was predominant after the second session. Immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence experiments revealed a significant increase in neuronal activity occurring in the lateral amygdala after the fourth session, most likely due to activity of principal cells. These findings indicate a predominant role of amygdala in promoting progressively more severe convulsions as well as the late recruitment of the hippocampus in the seizure spread. We propose that the repeated 6-Hz corneal stimulation model may be used to investigate some mechanisms of epileptogenesis and to test putative antiepileptogenic drugs. PMID:26555229

  13. Antiadipogenic effects of subthermal electric stimulation at 448 kHz on differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Bule, María Luisa; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Trillo, María Ángeles; Paíno, Carlos L; Úbeda, Alejandro

    2016-05-01

    The 448 kHz capacitive‑resistive electric transfer (CRET) is an electrothermal therapy currently applied in anticellulite and antiobesity treatments. The aim of the present study was to determine whether exposure to the CRET electric signal at subthermal doses affected early adipogenic processes in adipose‑derived stem cells (ADSC) from human donors. ADSC were incubated for 2 or 9 days in the presence of adipogenic medium, and exposed or sham‑exposed to 5 min pulses of 448 kHz electric signal at 50 µA/mm2 during the last 48 h of the incubation. Colorimetric, immunofluorescence, western blotting and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were performed to assess adipogenic differentiation of the ADSC. Electric stimulation significantly decreased cytoplasmic lipid content, after both 2 and 9 days of differentiation. The antiadipogenic response in the 9 day samples was accompanied by activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinase kinase 1/2, decreased expression and partial inactivation of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR) γ, which was translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, together with a significant decrease in the expression levels of the PPARG1 gene, perilipin, angiopoietin‑like protein 4 and fatty acid synthase. These results demonstrated that subthermal stimulation with CRET interferes with the early adipogenic differentiation in ADSC, indicating that the electric stimulus itself can modulate processes controlling the synthesis and mobilization of fat, even in the absence of the concomitant thermal and mechanical components of the thermoelectric therapy CRET. PMID:27035334

  14. 47 CFR 90.253 - Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz. 90.253 Section 90.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Standards for Special Frequencies or Frequency Bands § 90.253 Use...

  15. 47 CFR 90.253 - Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz. 90.253 Section 90.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Standards for Special Frequencies or Frequency Bands § 90.253 Use...

  16. Analysis of the genome of the sexually transmitted insect virus Hz-2V

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hz-2V is an insect DNA virus closely related to the baculoviruses that grow to high titers in insect cells and produces high yields of virus progeny. The capacity of this virus to replicate to high titers in insect cells may allow the use of this virus for production of large amount of proteins. Th...

  17. A megavolt Marx generator with pulse recurrence frequency of 200 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Bushlyakov, A.I.; Rukin, S.N.; Slovikovskii, B.G.

    1995-10-01

    The design problems related to repetitive Marx generators are discussed. The circuitry and structure of a megavolt nanosecond Marx generator with a pulse recurrence frequency of 200 Hz operating at an average power of 80 kW are described. The results of generator tests are given.

  18. ACTION OF 50 HZ MAGNETIC FIELDS ON NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study tests the capacity of 50-Hz magnetic and electric fields to stimulate neurite outgrowth in PC-12D cells, a cell line which originated from a pheochromocytoma in rat adrenal medulla. he cells were plated on collagen-coated plastic petri dishes and exposed to sinusoidal ...

  19. An 18 bit 50 kHz ADC for low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thelen, Donald C.

    1992-01-01

    A fourth order incremental analog to digital converter (ADC) is proposed which performs 18 bit conversions at a 50 kHz rate on sampled and held data. A new self calibration scheme is presented which eases the matching requirements of capacitors, and the performance of the operational amplifiers in the ADC by changing coefficients in the digital postprocessing.

  20. 47 CFR 15.221 - Operation in the band 525-1705 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... do not exceed 15 uV/m, as measured at a distance of 47,715/(frequency in kHz) meters (equivalent to... of an AM broadcast station on a college or university campus or on the campus of any other...

  1. Twelve years of tracking 52-Hz whale calls from a unique source in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, William A.; Daher, Mary Ann; George, Joseph E.; Rodriguez, David

    2004-12-01

    A unique whale call with 50-52 Hz emphasis from a single source has been tracked over 12 years in the central and eastern North Pacific. These calls, referred to as 52-Hz calls, were monitored and analyzed from acoustic data recorded by hydrophones of the US Navy Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) and other arrays. The calls were noticed first in 1989, and have been detected and tracked since 1992. No other calls with similar characteristics have been identified in the acoustic data from any hydrophone system in the North Pacific basin. Only one series of these 52-Hz calls has been recorded at a time, with no call overlap, suggesting that a single whale produced the calls. The calls were recorded from August to February with most in December and January. The species producing these calls is unknown. The tracks of the 52-Hz whale were different each year, and varied in length from 708 to 11,062 km with travel speeds ranging from 0.7 to 3.8 km/h. Tracks included (A) meandering over short ranges, (B) predominantly west-to-east movement, and (C) mostly north-to-south travel. These tracks consistently appeared to be unrelated to the presence or movement of other whale species (blue, fin and humpback) monitored year-round with the same hydrophones.

  2. High-sensitivity cooled coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance in kHz range

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tingting; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho; Lin, Jun

    2014-11-15

    In several low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) and surface nuclear magnetic resonance applications, i.e., in the frequency range of kHz, high sensitivity magnetic field detectors are needed. Usually, low-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with a high field sensitivity of about 1 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} are employed as detectors. Considering the flux trapping and operational difficulties associated with low-T{sub c} SQUIDs, we designed and fabricated liquid-nitrogen-cooled Cu coils for NMR detection in the kHz range. A cooled coil system consisting of a 9-cm diameter Cu coil and a low noise preamplifier was systematically investigated and reached a sensitivity of 2 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 77 K, which is 3 times better compared to the sensitivity at 300 K. A Q-switch circuit as an essential element for damping the ringing effects of the pickup coil was developed to acquire free induction decay signals of a water sample with minimum loss of signal. Our studies demonstrate that cooled Cu coils, if designed properly, can provide a comparable sensitivity to low-T{sub c} SQUIDs.

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 40 kHz magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sachin R; Berruyer, Pierrick; Gajan, David; Reiter, Christian; Engelke, Frank; Silverio, Daniel L; Copéret, Christophe; Lelli, Moreno; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2016-04-21

    DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy under magic angle spinning (MAS) is rapidly developing into a powerful analytical tool to investigate the structure of a wide range of solid materials, because it provides unsurpassed sensitivity gains. Most developments and applications of DNP MAS NMR were so far reported at moderate spinning frequencies (up to 14 kHz using 3.2 mm rotors). Here, using a 1.3 mm MAS DNP probe operating at 18.8 T and ∼100 K, we show that signal amplification factors can be increased by up to a factor two when using smaller volume rotors as compared to 3.2 mm rotors, and report enhancements of around 60 over a range of sample spinning rates from 10 to 40 kHz. Spinning at 40 kHz is also shown to increase (29)Si coherence lifetimes by a factor three as compared to 10 kHz, substantially increasing sensitivity in CPMG type experiments. The contribution of quenching effects to the overall sensitivity gain at very fast MAS is evaluated, and applications are reported on a functionalised mesostructured organic-inorganic material. PMID:27035630

  4. Observation of 20-400 kHz fluctuations in the U-3M torsatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreval, M. B.; Yakovenko, Yu. V.; Sorokovoy, E. L.; Slavnyj, A. S.; Pavlichenko, R. O.; Kulaga, A. E.; Zamanov, N. V.; Hirose, A.

    2016-02-01

    First observations of quasi-coherent fluctuations in the frequency range of 20-400 kHz in Alfvén-wave-heated plasmas of the U-3M torsatron are presented. The excitation conditions of these modes depend on the radio frequency antenna type and the plasma density, the appearance of the modes correlating with the presence of both suprathermal electrons and high-energy ions in the plasma, which supports our opinion that the modes are excited by energetic particles. Complicated evolution of the mode frequencies with abrupt changes at the instants of plasma confinement transitions is observed at the initial stage of each discharge. The frequencies become stable at the stage of the plasma current flattop. Raw estimates show that toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes could be responsible for the 150-400 kHz fluctuations. Low-frequency 20-70 kHz bursts are observed during plasma confinement transitions. The poloidal mode number of one of these bursts with the frequency of 20 kHz burst was determined to be m = 2. This mode rotated in the electron diamagnetic rotation direction with a frequency lower than the geodesic acoustic mode frequency and can be identified as a drift-sound-type mode.

  5. Coherent WDM, toward > 1 bit/s/Hz information spectral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Andrew D.; Gunning, Fatima C.

    2005-06-01

    Many approaches to achieving high information spectral density (ISD), have been reported recently. The standard non-return-to-zero (NRZ) format, which offers a base line performance around 0.4 bit/s/Hz, may be enhanced using a variety of techniques, including: pre-filtering within the transmitter, multi-level modulation formats and polarisation interleaving or multiplexing. These techniques either increase the information per channel (multi-level formats and polarization multiplexing) or minimise interferometric cross talk (pre-filtering and polarisation interleaving) and result in ISDs around 0.8 bit/s/Hz. Combinations of these techniques have been used to provide ISDs of up to 1.6 bit/s/Hz. In this paper we propose a new technique, which we call Coherent WDM (CoWDM), to increase the ISD of NRZ binary coded signals in a single polarisation from 0.4 to 1 bit/s/Hz whilst simultaneously eliminating the need for pre-filters within the transmitter. Phase control within the transmitter is used to achieve precise control of interferometric cross talk. This allows the use of stronger demultiplexing filters at the receiver, and provides optimum performance when the bit rate equals the channel spacing, giving an ISD of 1 bit/s/Hz. This interference control may be achieved by controlling the phase of each laser individually with optical phase locked loops, or by replacing the typical bank of lasers with one or more coherent comb sources, and encoding data using an array of modulators that preserves this relative optical phase. Since optical filtering is not required in the transmitter, stronger optical filters may be used to demultiplex the individual WDM channels at the receiver, further reducing cross talk.

  6. Direction-Finding Measurements of Heliospheric 2-3 kHz Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1998-01-01

    Using data from the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument, a series of direction-finding measurements is presented for the intense 1992-93 heliospheric 2- to 3-kHz radio emission event, and several weaker events extending into 1994. Direction-finding measurements can only be obtained during roll maneuvers, which are performed about once every three months. Two parameters can be determined from the roll-induced intensity modulation, the azimuthal direction of arrival (measured around the roll axis), and the modulation index (the peak-to-peak amplitude divided by the peak amplitude). Measurements were made at two frequencies, 1.78 and 3.11 kHz. No roll modulation was observed at 1.78 kHz, which is consistent with an isotropic source at this frequency. In most cases an easily measurable roll modulation was detectable at 3.11 kHz. Although the azimuth angles have considerable scatter, the directions of arrival at 3.11 kHz can be organized into three groups, each of which appears to be associated with a separate upward drifting feature in the radio emission spectrum. The first group, which is associated with the main 1992-93 event, is consistent with a source located near the nose of the heliosphere. The remaining two groups, which occur after the main 1992-93 event, have azimuth angles well away from the nose of the heliosphere. The modulation indexes vary over a large range, from 0.06 to 0.61, with no obvious trend. Although the variations in the directions of arrival and modulation indicies appear to reflect changes in the position and angular size of the source, it is also possible that they could be caused by refraction or scattering due to density structures in the solar wind.

  7. Occupational exposures to high frequency electromagnetic fields in the intermediate range ( >300 Hz-10 MHz).

    PubMed

    Floderus, Birgitta; Stenlund, Carin; Carlgren, Frank

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify work situations with electromagnetic fields of 300 Hz-10 MHz and to characterize the occupational exposure. Work place investigations included descriptions of the work environment and physical measurements. We estimated electric (E) and magnetic (H) fields by spot measurements in air, by logged exposure data, and when possible, we recorded induced currents in limbs. The instruments used were Wandel and Golterman EFA-3, NARDA 8718, Holaday HI-3702. The exposure sources comprised five induction furnaces, seven induction heaters, one surface treatment equipment, four units of electronic article surveillance (EAS), and medical devices for surgery and muscle stimulation. The induction furnaces operated at 480 Hz-7 kHz, and the maximum values of logged data varied between 512-2,093 V/m (E field) and 10.5-87.3 A/m (H field). The induction heaters (3.8 kHz-1.25 MHz) also showed high maximum exposure values of both E and H fields. Three EAS units, an electromagnetic plate at a library, a luggage control unit, and an antitheft gate, showed E fields reaching 658-1,069 V/m. The H fields were comparatively lower, except for the antitheft gate (5 and 7.5 kHz) showing a maximum value of 27.2 A/m (recorded during repair). Induced currents of 5-13 mA were measured for the medical devices. The study improves the basis for an exposure assessment for epidemiological studies of long term effects of exposures to high frequency electromagnetic fields. PMID:12395411

  8. HZ Her: Stellar radius from X-ray eclipse observations, evolutionary state, and a new distance

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D. A.; Abdallah, M. H.

    2014-10-01

    Observations of HZ Her/Her X-1 by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) covering high state eclipses of the neutron star are analyzed here. Models of the eclipse are used to measure the radius and atmospheric scale height of HZ Her, the stellar companion to the neutron star. The radius is 2.58-3.01 × 10{sup 11} cm, depending on system inclination and mass ratio (q), with an accuracy of ∼1 part in 1000 for given inclination and q. We fit Kurucz model stellar atmosphere models to archival optical observations. The resulting effective temperature (T {sub eff}) of the unheated face of HZ Her is determined to be in the 2σ range of 7720 K-7865 K, and metallicity (log (Z/Z {sub ☉})) in the range of –0.27 to +.03. The model atmosphere surface flux and new radius yield a new distance to HZ Her/Her X-1, depending on system inclination and q: a best-fit value of 6.1 kpc with upper and lower limits of 5.7 kpc and 7.0 kpc. We calculate stellar evolution models for the range of allowed masses (from orbital parameters) and allowed metallicities (from optical spectrum fits). The stellar models agree with T {sub eff} and the radius of HZ Her for two narrow ranges of mass: 2.15-2.20 M {sub ☉} and 2.35-2.45 M {sub ☉}. This lower mass range implies a low neutron star mass (1.3 M {sub ☉}), whereas the higher mass range implies a high neutron star mass (1.5-1.7 M {sub ☉}).

  9. Coupling between the 45 Hz Horizontal-Branch Oscillation and the Normal-Branch Oscillation in Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenfei

    2007-04-01

    The observations of the bright persistent neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Sco X-1 performed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) show a ~6 Hz normal-branch oscillation (NBO), a ~45 Hz horizontal-branch oscillation (HBO), and twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) on its normal branch simultaneously. We have found that the fractional amplitude of the HBO corresponding to the NBO phase of high flux is 1.1%, while that of the NBO phase of low flux is undetectable, with a 3 σ upper limit of 0.4%, implying that the HBO strength varies with the NBO phase in a manner opposite that of the lower kHz QPO previously found, and suggests that the condition for the generation of the HBO is met when the NBO flux is high. The 6 Hz NBO in Sco X-1 connects the 45 Hz HBO and the twin kHz QPO together, showing a unique picture indicating a coupling between the QPOs, which has never been observed in other neutron star LMXBs. We discuss the implications for current models of the 45 Hz HBO, the 6 Hz NBO, and the twin kHz QPOs.

  10. Generation of 6.05J nanosecond pulses at a 1Hz repetition rate from a cryogenic cooled diode-pumped Yb:YAG MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaojin; Wang, Jianlei; Yang, Zhongguo; Liu, Jin; Li, Lei; Shi, Xiangchun; Huang, Wenfa; Wang, Jiangfeng; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    Diode-pumped solid state laser system based on cryogenic Yb:YAG active-mirror scheme are presented with recent energy output. With improved optical design, 6.05J/1Hz pulse energy is achieved and a conceptual design with 30J output energy is theoretical simulated. The doubling efficiency of YCa4O (BO3)(YCOB) crystal is also discussed in this paper.

  11. Fs-lentotomy: first in vivo studies on rabbit eyes with a 100 kHz laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, S.; Oberheide, U.; Fromm, M.; Ertmer, W.; Gerten, G.; Wegener, A.; Lubatschowski, H.

    2008-02-01

    Up to now reading glasses are the conventional treatment of presbyopia, an age related effect for every human. According to the Helmholtz theory the reason for the development of accommodative loss is a decreasing elasticity of the lens due to the increasing sclerosis. Since the ciliary muscle and the lens capsule remain active and elastic the whole life, a possible treatment could be the increase of the flexibility by creating gliding planes with fs-laser pulses. flexibility of ex vivo porcine as well as human donor lenses with a laboratory laser system. We will present new results with a compact 100 kHz repetition rate turn key laser system which speeds up the treatment time by a factor of 10. This will offer the opportunity for future clinical trials. Furthermore first in-vivo results on rabbits are presented.

  12. Aminergic control of high-frequency (approximately 200 Hz) network oscillations in the hippocampus of the behaving rat.

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, Alexei A; Knoche, Anja; Korotkova, Tatiana M; Haas, Helmut L

    2003-09-11

    Hippocampal high-frequency (200 Hz, 'ripple') oscillations were recorded in the CA1 area of behaving rats. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist pyrilamine facilitated while the H2-antagonist zolantidine (5 mg/kg i.p) transiently decreased ripple occurrence. Thioperamide, an H3 antagonist, had no effect. The 5-HT1A-receptor antagonist WAY100635 (50 microg i.c.v.) reduced the occurrence and the intrinsic frequency of ripples. The 5-HT3-receptor antagonist Y-25130 (i.c.v.) increased the number but reduced the amplitude of ripples. All the treatments affected sharp-waves and ripple oscillations to the same extent. Changes of ripple occurrence were not secondary to alterations of behavior. In the light of these divergent actions via different receptor subtypes the net effect of aminergic innervations will be determined by their state-dependent activities and mutual interactions as well as receptor localizations. PMID:12902028

  13. Reconstituted high density lipoprotein mediated targeted co-delivery of HZ08 and paclitaxel enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel in multidrug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangrong; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xu, Xiangting; Li, Min; Zhou, Jianping; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-20

    In the past decades, reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) has been successfully developed as a drug carrier since the enhanced HDL-lipids uptake is demonstrated in several human cancers. In this paper, rHDL, for the first time, was utilized to co-encapsulate two hydrophobic drugs: an anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), and a new reversal agent for P-gp (P-glycoprotein)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer, N-cyano-1-[(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-N'-octyl-2(1H)-isoquinoline-carboximidamide (HZ08). We proposed this drug co-delivery strategy to reverse PTX resistance. The study aimed to develop a biomimetic nanovector, reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL), mediating targeted PTX-HZ08 delivery for cancer therapy. Using sodium cholate dialysis method, we successfully formulated dual-agent co-delivering rHDL nanoparticles (PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs) with a typical spherical morphology, well-distributed size (~100nm), high drug encapsulation efficiency (approximately 90%), sustained drug release properties and exceptional stability even after storage for 1month or incubation in 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) DMEM for up to 2days. Results demonstrated that PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs significantly enhanced anticancer efficacy in vitro, including higher cytotoxicity and better ability to induce cell apoptosis against both PTX-sensitive and -resistant MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MCF-7/PTX cells). Mechanism studies demonstrated that these improvements could be correlated with increased cellular uptake of PTX mediated by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) as well as prolonged intracellular retention of PTX due to the HZ08 mediated drug-efflux inhibition. In addition, in vivo investigation showed that the PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs were substantially safer, have higher tumor-targeted capacity and have stronger antitumor activity than the corresponding dosage of paclitaxel injection. These findings suggested that rHDL NPs could

  14. Gas-Phase Condensation Reactions of SixOyHz- Oxyanions with H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Hodges, Brittany DM; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Benson, Michael Timothy; Wright, J. B.

    2001-09-01

    Water was reacted with gas-phase oxyanions having the general composition SixOyHz- that were formed and isolated in an ion trap-secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS). The radical SiO2- reacted slowly with H2O to abstract HO, forming SiO3H-, at a rate of 8 × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, corresponding to an efficiency of about 0.03% compared with the theoretical collision rate constant (average dipole orientation). The product ion SiO3H- underwent a consecutive condensation reaction with H2O to form SiO4H3- at a rate that was approximately 0.4-0.7% efficient. SiO4H3- did not undergo further reaction with water. The multiple reaction pathways by which radical SiO3- reacted with H2O were kinetically modeled using a stochastic approach. SiO3- reacted with water by three parallel reaction pathways: (1) abstraction of a radical H to form SiO3H-, which then reacted with a second H2O to form SiO4H3-; (2) abstraction of a radical OH to form SiO4H-, which further reacted by consecutive H abstractions to form SiO4H2- and then SiO4H3-; and (3) condensation with H2O to form SiO4H2-, which subsequently abstracted a radical H from a second H2O to form SiO4H3-. In all of these reactions, the rate constants were determined to be very slow, as determined by both direct measurement and stochastic modeling. For comparison, the even electron ion Si2O5H- was also investigated: it underwent condensation with H2O to form Si2O6H3-, with a rate constant corresponding to 50% efficiency. The reactions were also modeled using ab initio calculations at the UB3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) level. Addition of H2O to SiO3-, SiO3H-, and Si2O5H- was calculated to be approximately 42, 45, and 55 kcal mol-1 exothermic, respectively, and encountered low activation barriers. Modeling of SiO2- and SiO3- reactions with H2O failed to produce radical abstraction reaction pathways observed in the IT-SIMS, possibly indicating that alternative reaction mechanisms are operative.

  15. Acute and subchronic toxicity of 20  kHz and 60  kHz magnetic fields in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Izumi; Oshima, Atsushi; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Mitani, Takashi; Negishi, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    Despite increasing use of intermediate frequency (IF) magnetic fields (MFs) in occupational and domestic settings, scientific evidence necessary for health risk assessments of IF MF is insufficient. Male and female Crl:CD(SD) rats (12 per sex per group) were exposed to 20 kHz, 0.20 mT(root mean square, rms) or 60 kHz, 0.10 mT(rms) sinusoidal MFs for 22 h day(-1) for 14 days (acute) or 13 weeks (subchronic). Experiments were duplicated for each frequency to ensure outcome reproducibility, and examinations were blinded for quality assurance. All rats survived without significant clinical signs until the end of experiments. Some changes in body weight between the MF-exposed and control groups were observed over the course of exposure, although the directions of the changes were inconsistent and not statistically significant after subchronic exposure. There were significant differences between MF-exposed and control groups in some organ weights and parameters in hematology and clinical chemistry, but these were minor in magnitude and not repeated in duplicate experiments. Histopathological findings reflecting toxicity were sporadic. Frequencies of other findings were similar to historic data in this rat strain, and findings had no specific relationship to changes in organ weight or parameters of hematology and clinical chemistry in each animal. The changes observed throughout this study were considered biologically isolated and were attributable to chance associations rather than to MF exposure. The results, in particular the histopathological evidence, indicate an absence of toxicity in IF MF-exposed rats and do not support the hypothesis that IF MF exposure produces significant toxicity. PMID:25982482

  16. Carrier-envelope phase stabilization of a 16 TW, 10  Hz Ti:sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji J; Fu, Yuxi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-11-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple and promising method for stabilizing the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of a high-energy ultrashort pulse laser operating at a low repetition rate. The method was successfully applied to a Ti:sapphire laser operating at 10 Hz with 400 mJ pulse energy and 25 fs pulse duration (16 TW). The laser system consists of a 1 kHz front-end preamplifier and a 10 Hz back-end power amplifier. By sampling a 500 Hz reference pulse from a 1 kHz seed pulse, the measured single-shot CEP noise of a 10 Hz amplified pulse is stabilized to 670 mrad rms. Our proposed CEP stabilization concept can be applied to single-shot ultrahigh-power lasers, such as a petawatt laser system. PMID:26512462

  17. Performance of a 30-kV, 1-kHz, nanosecond source

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, K.; Goerz, D.

    1992-06-01

    An existing pulser at LLNL was modified to increase its repetition rate to 1000 Hz. Spark gap recovery measurements were made for both the Marx and the Blumlein output switches. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were necessary to over-voltage the switch. The output of the pulser was used to drive a log-periodic-dipole-array. Measurements were made on the transmitted pulses in an anechoic chamber and yielded a center frequency of 80 MHz. This paper describes the modifications made on the pulse generator, discusses the spark gap recovery data, and summarizes the performance of the pulser at 1 kHz. In addition, a brief description of the antenna is given along with the field measurements that were made in the EMPEROR facility.

  18. Orbit compensation for the time-varying elliptically polarized wiggler with switching frequency at 100 hz

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.; Krinsky, S.

    1997-07-01

    In October 1996, the elliptically polarized wiggler, installed in the X13 straight section of the NSLS X-ray ring, was commissioned at an operating frequency of 100 hz. This wiggler generates circularly polarized photons in the energy range of 0.1 to 10 keV with AC modulation of polarization helicity. The vertical magnetic field is produced by a hybrid permanent magnet structure, and the horizontal magnetic field is generated by an electromagnet capable of switching at frequencies up to 100 hz. Here, the authors discuss the compensation of the residual vertical and horizontal orbit motion utilizing a time-domain algorithm employing a function generator to drive trim coils at the wiggler ends, and the wideband high precision orbit measurement system of the X-ray ring. The residual orbit motion has been reduced to a level below 1 micron, and the device has been run in regular operations with no negative effect on other users.

  19. Extended high-frequency audiometry (9,000-20,000 Hz). Usefulness in audiological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Valiente, Antonio; Roldán Fidalgo, Amaya; Villarreal, Ithzel M; García Berrocal, José R

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and appropriate treatment of hearing loss are essential to minimise the consequences of hearing loss. In addition to conventional audiometry (125-8,000 Hz), extended high-frequency audiometry (9,000-20,000 Hz) is available. This type of audiometry may be useful in early diagnosis of hearing loss in certain conditions, such as the ototoxic effect of cisplatin-based treatment, noise exposure or oral misunderstanding, especially in noisy environments. Eleven examples are shown in which extended high-frequency audiometry has been useful in early detection of hearing loss, despite the subject having a normal conventional audiometry. The goal of the present paper was to highlight the importance of the extended high-frequency audiometry examination for it to become a standard tool in routine audiological examinations. PMID:26025356

  20. Implications of a 20-Hz Booster cycle-rate for Slip-stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-06-10

    We examine the potential impacts to slip-stacking from a change of the Booster cycle-rate from 15- to 20-Hz. We find that changing the Booster cycle-rate to 20-Hz would greatly increase the slip-stacking bucket area, while potentially requiring greater usage of the Recycler momentum aperture and additional power dissipation in the RF cavities. In particular, the losses from RF interference can be reduced by a factor of 4-10 (depending on Booster beam longitudinal parameters). We discuss the aspect ratio and beam emittance requirements for efficient slip-stacking in both cycle-rate cases. Using a different injection scheme can eliminate the need for greater momentum aperture in the Recycler.

  1. Study of the decomposition of wet SF6, subjected to 50-Hz ac corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derdouri, A.; Casanovas, J.; Hergli, R.; Grob, R.; Mathieu, J.

    1989-03-01

    Mixtures of SF6 (100 kPa≤PSF6≤400 kPa) and water (concentrations ranging from 240 to 2000 vpm) have been submitted to point-plane 50-Hz ac corona discharges. The only stable gaseous by-products detected, either by gas-phase chromatography or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, were SOF2 and SO2F2. The variation of their concentrations as a function of the discharge current value (3-25 μA rms), the charge transported (0.15-1.5 C), the water content, the SF6 pressure, and the gap spacing (1.5-5 mm) have been studied. The results indicate that, at least in our experimental conditions, the 50-Hz ac corona discharges behave more like negative than like positive dc corona.

  2. Zero-phonon-line pumped 100-kHz Yb:YAG thin disk regenerative amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taisuke; Smrž, Martin; Nagisetty, Siva Sankar; Novák, Ondřej; Chyla, Michal; Severová, Patricie; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáś

    2014-02-01

    We are developing 100-kHz picosecond Yb:YAG thin disk regenerative amplifier with 500-W average power for medical and industrial applications. Especially in case of the next generation of semiconductor lithography, high average power solid-state laser with picosecond pulse duration as pre pulse source is a key element to realize 1-kW EUV lithography source. We compared the output characteristics of CW laser operation pumped at 940-nm and 969-nm, and measured the surface temperature of thin disk. We found that the surface temperature of thin disk pumped at 960-nm was much lower than that pumped at 940-nm. We obtained 83-W output from thin disk regenerative amplifier at the repetition rate of 100-kHz pumped at 969-nm. The measured pulse duration was 1.9-ps.

  3. Comparative study of cable construction for 20 kHz power distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putney, William W.; McKay, Scott J.; Freeman, Kenneth A.

    Problems associated with transmission of 20 kHz power because of skin effect are well known. At 20 kHz, classical cable constructions (i.e., solid circular and those based on circular layup of multiple noninsulated strands) larger than 18 gauge utilize only a portion of the conductor cross section to carry current. The unused metal internal to the conduction layer ('skin') can represent considerable excess weight, volume, and material cost for relatively large diameters. In this paper several special constructions have been studied to facilitate making the best choice for given current levels and cable lengths to minimize or eliminate the wasted copper. Among the candidate constructions were Litz, flat conductor, coaxial, and multiple twisted pair. Selection criteria were efficiency of copper utilization, flexibility, EMI, impedances, volume, weight, manufacturing and assembly costs, and whether existing, new, or modified existing termination techniques and hardware would be used.

  4. Dual-rod, 100 Hz, 388 mJ nanosecond Nd:YAG oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Liu, Jianhui; Gong, Mali

    2011-03-10

    We report a large mode volume unstable resonator working at 100 Hz. The resonator is combined with a variable reflectivity convex mirror and a high-reflective convex mirror. The cavity mirrors are used to compensate for the thermal lensing effect of the two Nd:YAG laser rods, which are pumped by high-energy high-repetition-rate diode lasers. A 90° quartz rotator is placed between the two laser rods to compensate for the thermal depolarization. In the experiment, output of as high as 388 mJ is obtained at 100 Hz with slope efficiency of 36%. The pulse width is 15 ns, and the beam quality factor is M(x)(2)=3.2, M(y)(2)=2.8. PMID:21394190

  5. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on living plants exposed for extended periods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The effects of intense 60-Hz electric fields were studied by exposing plants of five kinds (crops) for extended periods in a special greenhouse where cultural and environmental factors could be controlled. Plant populations and densities simulated field conditions. While exposed, plants of all crops germinated satisfactorily, and plants of sweet corn and wheat completed their life cycles and produced viable seed. Plants of alfalfa and tall fescue were at the early bloom stage when harvested. Exposure of plants of five kinds to electric fields had no statistically significant effects on seed germination, seedling growth, plant growth, phenology, flowering, seed set, biomass production, plant height, leaf area, plant survival, and nodulation. Exposure to 60-Hz electric fields resulted in very limited damage to terminal leaf tips, awns, and corn tassels, particularly at fields of 30 kV/m or greater. 47 refs., 36 figs., 44 tabs.

  6. Orbit response matrix measurements for 10Hz global orbit feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Minty, M.

    2010-10-01

    The 10 Hz global orbit feedback system (gofb) was designed to correct the 10 Hz horizontal beam perturbations in both rings that are suspected to be caused by vibrations of the final focusing quadrupoles (triplets). The full system envisioned for Run-11 consists of 36 BPMs, corresponding to 2 per triplet in each of the 12 triplet locations and two in each of the 6 arcs, and 1 dipole corrector at each triplet location for a total of 12 correctors. Prototype testing was successfully carried out during RHIC Run-10 in store condition with 4 new dipole correctors (with independent power supplies) and 8 stripline beam position monitors (BPMs) per accelerator. An SVD-based algorithm was used to compute the applied corrections. For Run-10, the response matrix was provided by W. W. MacKay. The response matrix R relates corrector angles to beam displacements at BPMs.

  7. Hearing threshold shifts and recovery in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) after octave-band noise exposure at 4 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean; Macleod, Amy; Terhune, John M

    2012-10-01

    Safety criteria for underwater sounds from offshore pile driving are needed to protect marine mammals. As a first step toward understanding effects of impulsive sounds, two harbor seals were exposed to octave-band white noise centered at 4 kHz at three mean received sound pressure levels (SPLs; 124, 136, and 148 dB re 1 μPa) at up to six durations (7.5, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min); mean received sound exposure level (SEL) range was 166-190 dB re 1 μPa(2) s. Hearing thresholds were determined before and after exposure. Temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTS) and subsequent recovery were quantified as changes in hearing thresholds at 1-4, 4-8, 8-12, 48, and 96 min after noise exposure in seal 01, and at 12-16, 16-20, 20-24, 60, and 108 min after exposure in seal 02. Maximum TTS (1-4 min after 120 min exposure to 148 dB re 1 μPa; 187 dB SEL) was 10 dB. Recovery occurred within ~60 min. Statistically significant TTSs (>2.5 dB) began to occur at SELs of ~170 (136 SPL, 60 min) and 178 dB re 1 μPa(2) s (148 SPL, 15 min). However, SEL is not an optimal predictor of TTS for long duration, low SPL continuous noise, as duration and SPL play unequal roles in determining induced TTS. PMID:23039466

  8. The topography of alpha-band activity tracks the content of spatial working memory.

    PubMed

    Foster, Joshua J; Sutterer, David W; Serences, John T; Vogel, Edward K; Awh, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is a system for the online storage of information. An emerging view is that neuronal oscillations coordinate the cellular assemblies that code the content of WM. In line with this view, previous work has demonstrated that oscillatory activity in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) plays a role in WM maintenance, but the exact contributions of this activity have remained unclear. Here, we used an inverted spatial encoding model in combination with electroencephalography (EEG) to test whether the topographic distribution of alpha-band activity tracks spatial representations held in WM. Participants in three experiments performed spatial WM tasks that required them to remember the precise angular location of a sample stimulus for 1,000-1,750 ms. Across all three experiments, we found that the topographic distribution of alpha-band activity tracked the specific location that was held in WM. Evoked (i.e., activity phase-locked to stimulus onset) and total (i.e., activity regardless of phase) power across a range of low-frequency bands transiently tracked the location of the sample stimulus following stimulus onset. However, only total power in the alpha band tracked the content of spatial WM throughout the memory delay period, which enabled reconstruction of location-selective channel tuning functions (CTFs). These findings demonstrate that alpha-band activity is directly related to the coding of spatial representations held in WM and provide a promising method for tracking the content of this online memory system. PMID:26467522

  9. Cosmic chronometers: constraining the equation of state of dark energy. I: H(z) measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Daniel; Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia; Kamionkowski, Marc; Stanford, S. Adam E-mail: raul@icc.ub.edu E-mail: kamion@tapir.caltech.edu

    2010-02-01

    We present new determinations of the cosmic expansion history from red-envelope galaxies. We have obtained for this purpose high-quality spectra with the Keck-LRIS spectrograph of red-envelope galaxies in 24 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 1.0. We complement these Keck spectra with high-quality, publicly available archival spectra from the SPICES and VVDS surveys. We improve over our previous expansion history measurements in Simon et al. (2005) by providing two new determinations of the expansion history: H(z) = 97±62 km sec{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1} at z ≅ 0.5 and H(z) = 90±40 km sec{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1} at z ≅ 0.9. We discuss the uncertainty in the expansion history determination that arises from uncertainties in the synthetic stellar-population models. We then use these new measurements in concert with cosmic-microwave-background (CMB) measurements to constrain cosmological parameters, with a special emphasis on dark-energy parameters and constraints to the curvature. In particular, we demonstrate the usefulness of direct H(z) measurements by constraining the dark-energy equation of state parameterized by w{sub 0} and w{sub a} and allowing for arbitrary curvature. Further, we also constrain, using only CMB and H(z) data, the number of relativistic degrees of freedom to be 4±0.5 and their total mass to be < 0.2 eV, both at 1σ.

  10. Superradiance on the mHz linewidth clock transition in 87Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcia, Matthew; Winchester, Matthew; Cline, Julia; Thompson, James

    2016-05-01

    In this talk, I will discuss our recent experimental explorations of superradiant emission from the mHz linewidth clock transition in an ensemble of cold 87 Sr atoms confined within a high-finesse optical cavity. Recent proposals suggest that superradiant lasers based on such dipole-forbidden transitions in alkaline earth atoms could achieve linewidths below the current state of the art, with reduced sensitivity to environmental perturbations.

  11. 115 kHz tuning repetition rate ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser

    PubMed Central

    Oh, W. Y.; Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser using a polygon-based wavelength scanning filter. With a polygon rotational speed of 900 revolutions per second, a continuous wavelength tuning rate of 9200 nm/ms and a tuning repetition rate of 115 kHz were achieved. The wavelength tuning range of the laser was 80 nm centered at 1325 nm, and the average polarized output power was 23 mW. PMID:16350273

  12. Weighted SVD algorithm for close-orbit correction and 10 Hz feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu C.; Hulsart, R.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2012-05-20

    Measurements of the beam position along an accelerator are typically treated equally using standard SVD-based orbit correction algorithms so distributing the residual errors, modulo the local beta function, equally at the measurement locations. However, sometimes a more stable orbit at select locations is desirable. In this paper, we introduce an algorithm for weighting the beam position measurements to achieve a more stable local orbit. The results of its application to close-orbit correction and 10 Hz orbit feedback are presented.

  13. A modified commercial Ti:sapphire laser with 4 kHz rms linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubrich, D.; Wynands, R.

    1996-02-01

    We have modified a commercial Ti:sapphire laser to allow optical phase stabilization to an extremely stable semiconductor laser, which in turn is locked to a Doppler-free resonance in a cesium vapor cell. For time scales from 10 μs up to several hours the combined system has a rms linewidth of 4 kHz with respect to the cesium resonance. The system allows the resolution of extremely narrow resonances in a cloud of trapped atoms.

  14. Ion Molecule Reactions of Gas-Phase Chromium Oxyanions:CrxOyHz- + O2

    SciTech Connect

    Anita K. Gianotto; Brittany D. M. Hodges; Peter de B. Harrington; Anthony Appelhans; John E. Olson; Gary S. Groenewold

    2003-10-01

    Chromium oxyanions, CrxOyHz-, were generated in the gas-phase using a quadrupole ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS), where they were reacted with O2. Only CrO2- of the Cr1OyHz- envelope was observed to react with oxygen, producing primarily CrO3-. The rate constant for the reaction of CrO2- with O2 was 38% of the Langevin collision constant at 310 K. CrO3-, CrO4-, and CrO4H- were unreactive with O2 in the ion trap. In contrast, Cr2O4- was observed to react with O2 producing CrO3- + CrO3 via oxidative degradation at a rate that was 15% efficient. The presence of background water facilitated the reaction of Cr2O4- + H2O to form Cr2O5H2-; the hydrated product ion Cr2O5H2- reacted with O2 to form Cr2O6- (with concurrent elimination of H2O) at a rate that was 6% efficient. Cr2O5- also reacted with O2 to form Cr2O7- (4% efficient) and Cr2O6- + O (2% efficient); these reactions proceeded in parallel. By comparison, Cr2O6- was unreactive with O2, and in fact, no further O2 addition could be observed for any of the Cr2O6Hz- anions. Generalizing, CrxOyHz- species that have low coordinate, low oxidation state metal centers are susceptible to O2 oxidation. However, when the metal coordination is >3, or when the formal oxidation state is =5, reactivity stops.

  15. Discovery of a Neutron Star with Spin Frequency 530 Hz in A1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Swank, Jean H.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2005-01-01

    We report the detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) of 530 Hz burst oscillations in a thermonuclear (Type I) burst from the transient X-ray source A1744-361. This is only the second burst ever observed from this source, and the first to be seen in any detail. Our results confirm that A1744-361 is a low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system harboring a rapidly rotating neutron star. The oscillations are first detected along the rising edge of the burst, and show evidence for frequency evolution of a magnitude similar to that seen in other burst sources. The modulation amplitude and its increase with photon energy are also typical of burst oscillations. The lack of any strong indication of photospheric radius expansion during the burst suggests a 9 kpc upper limit of the source distance. We also find energy dependent dips, establishing A1744-361 as a high inclination, dipping LMXB. The timescale between the two episodes of observed dips suggests an orbital period of approx. 97 min. We have also detected a 2 - 4 Hz quasi-periodic-oscillation (QPO) for the first time from this source. This QPO appears consistent with approx. 1 Hz QPOs seen from other high inclination systems. We searched for kilohertz QPOs, and found a suggestive 2.3 sigma feature at 800 Hz in one observation. The frequency, strength and quality factor are consistent with that of a lower frequency kilohertz QPO, but the relatively low significance argues for caution, so we consider this a tentative detection requiring confirmation.

  16. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on embryo and chick development, growth, and behavior. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize an avian model to determine the effects of 60-Hz electric fields on embryo and chick development. A specially designed incubator allowed simultaneous incubation of control eggs and eggs exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Two series of experimental voltages were utilized for this study. In Series 1, the subject eggs were exposed to 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 kV/m fields and, in Series 2, eggs were exposed to 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 kV/m. Data were collected on mortality, malformation, and growth (weight) of 7- and 14-day-old embryos after continuous exposure to electric fields. Eggs were also incubated, exposed to electric fields, and hatched in order to collect data on chick weights at one day and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after hatching. Behavior tests on newly hatched chicks that had been exposed to electric fields during development were also performed. The results indicated no consistent effect of 60-Hz electric fields, varying from 0.1 to 100 kV/m, on mortality, malformations, weights, bone growth (metatarsal length), or behavior of embryos or chicks. This study strongly suggests that within the scope of this project, there is no consistent direct effect of 60 Hz electric fields on the health and well-being of avian embryos. A dose-response analysis was also utilized in which all the data in each series, for each age of the embryos, were simultaneously evaluated in a statistical model. This analysis demonstrated that there is no significant dose-response of electric fields on 7- and 14-day-old embryo and 1-day-old chick weights. 24 refs., 21 figs., 56 tabs.

  17. Stereoscopic Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging at 500 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medford, Taylor L.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Jiang, N.; Webster, M.; Lempert, Walter; Miller, J.; Meyer, T.

    2011-01-01

    A new measurement technique for obtaining time- and spatially-resolved image sequences in hypersonic flows is developed. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) has previously been used to investigate transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hypersonic boundary layers using both planar and volumetric imaging capabilities. Low flow rates of NO were typically seeded into the flow, minimally perturbing the flow. The volumetric imaging was performed at a measurement rate of 10 Hz using a thick planar laser sheet that excited NO fluorescence. The fluorescence was captured by a pair of cameras having slightly different views of the flow. Subsequent stereoscopic reconstruction of these images allowed the three-dimensional flow structures to be viewed. In the current paper, this approach has been extended to 50,000 times higher repetition rates. A laser operating at 500 kHz excites the seeded NO molecules, and a camera, synchronized with the laser and fitted with a beam-splitting assembly, acquires two separate images of the flow. The resulting stereoscopic images provide three-dimensional flow visualizations at 500 kHz for the first time. The 200 ns exposure time in each frame is fast enough to freeze the flow while the 500 kHz repetition rate is fast enough to time-resolve changes in the flow being studied. This method is applied to visualize the evolving hypersonic flow structures that propagate downstream of a discrete protuberance attached to a flat plate. The technique was demonstrated in the NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Different tunnel Reynolds number conditions, NO flow rates and two different cylindrical protuberance heights were investigated. The location of the onset of flow unsteadiness, an indicator of transition, was observed to move downstream during the tunnel runs, coinciding with an increase in the model temperature.

  18. Ozone generation in a kHz-pulsed He-O2 capillary dielectric barrier discharge operated in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Brian L.; Ganguly, Biswa N.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species using nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet devices has been a subject of recent interest due to their ability to generate localized concentrations from a compact source. To date, such studies with plasma jet devices have primarily utilized radio-frequency excitation. In this work, we characterize ozone generation in a kHz-pulsed capillary dielectric barrier discharge configuration comprised of an active discharge plasma jet operating in ambient air that is externally grounded. The plasma jet flow gas was composed of helium with an admixture of up to 5% oxygen. A unipolar voltage pulse train with a 20 ns pulse risetime was used to drive the discharge at repetition rates between 2-25 kHz. Using UVLED absorption spectroscopy centered at 255 nm near the Hartley-band absorption peak, ozone was detected over 1 cm from the capillary axis. We observed roughly linear scaling of ozone production with increasing pulse repetition rate up to a "turnover frequency," beyond which ozone production steadily dropped and discharge current and 777 nm O(5P→5S°) emission sharply increased. The turnover in ozone production occurred at higher pulse frequencies with increasing flow rate and decreasing applied voltage with a common energy density of 55 mJ/cm3 supplied to the discharge. The limiting energy density and peak ozone production both increased with increasing O2 admixture. The power dissipated in the discharge was obtained from circuit current and voltage measurements using a modified parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge circuit model and the volume-averaged ozone concentration was derived from a 2D ozone absorption measurement. From these measurements, the volume-averaged efficiency of ozone production was calculated to be 23 g/kWh at conditions for peak ozone production of 41 mg/h at 11 kV applied voltage, 3% O2, 2 l/min flow rate, and 13 kHz pulse repetition rate, with 1.79 W dissipated in the discharge.

  19. Retinoic acid inhibits the cytoproliferative response to weak 50-Hz magnetic fields in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    TRILLO, MARÍA ÁNGELES; MARTÍNEZ, MARÍA ANTONIA; CID, MARÍA ANTONIA; ÚBEDA, ALEJANDRO

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that intermittent exposure to a 50-Hz magnetic field (MF) at 100 μT stimulates cell proliferation in the human neuroblastoma cell line NB69. The present study aimed to investigate whether the magnetic field-induced growth promotion also occurs at a lower magnetic flux density of 10 μT. To this purpose, NB69 cells were subjected for 42 h to intermittent exposure, 3 h on/3 h off, to a 50-Hz MF at a 10 or 100 μT magnetic flux density. The field exposure took place either in the presence or in the absence of the antiproliferative agent retinoic acid. At the end of the treatment and/or incubation period, the cell growth was estimated by hemocytometric counting and spectrophotometric analysis of total protein and DNA contents. Potential changes in DNA synthesis were also assessed through proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunolabeling. The results confirmed previously reported data that a 42-h exposure to a 50-Hz sine wave MF at 100 μT promotes cell growth in the NB69 cell line, and showed that 10 μT induces a similar proliferative response. This effect, which was significantly associated and linearly correlated with PCNA expression, was abolished by the presence of retinoic acid in the culture medium. PMID:23292364

  20. Dependence of kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies on accretion-related parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakan Erkut, M.; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan; Çatmabacak, Önder

    2016-07-01

    To study the possible dependence of kHz QPO frequencies on the parameters such as the mass accretion rate, the surface magnetic field strength, mass, and radius of the neutron star, we consider the up-to-date distribution of neutron star LMXBs in the kHz QPO frequency versus X-ray luminosity plane. We confirm the absence of any correlation between QPO frequencies and luminosity in the ensemble of LMXBs. Searching for the dependence of QPO data on accretion-related parameters, we find a correlation between the lower kHz QPO frequency and the parameter combining mass accretion rate with magnetic field strength. The correlation cannot be adequately described by a simple power law due to observed scattering of individual source data in the ensemble of Z and atoll sources. Based on disk-magnetosphere boundary region, the model function for QPO frequency can delineate the correlation taking into account the scattering of individual sources. In addition to mass accretion rate and magnetic field strength, the model function also depends on the radial width of the boundary region near the magnetopause. Modelling the variation of the width with mass accretion rate, we also provide an explanation for the parallel tracks phenomenon observed in the case of individual sources.

  1. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-10-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The first project evaluated the potentially aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity that produces escape or avoidance responses. The second project estimated the threshold intensity for detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means was 6 to 16 kV/m. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. 131 refs., 87 figs., 123 tabs.

  2. Continuous hydroxyl radical planar laser imaging at 50 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Hammack, Stephen; Carter, Campbell; Wuensche, Clemens; Lee, Tonghun

    2014-08-10

    This study demonstrates high-repetition-rate planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of hydroxyl radicals (OH) in flames at a continuous framing rate of 50 kHz. A frequency-doubled dye laser is pumped by the second harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser to generate laser radiation near 283 nm with a pulse width of 8 ns and rate of 50 kHz. Fluorescence is recorded by a two-stage image intensifier and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera. The average power of the 283 nm beam reaches 7 W, yielding a pulse energy of 140 μJ. Both a Hencken burner and a DC transient-arc plasmatron are used to produce premixed CH4/air flames to evaluate the OH PLIF system. The average signal-to-noise ratio for the Hencken burner flame is greater than 20 near the flame front and greater than 10 further downstream in a region of the flame near equilibrium. Image sequences of the DC plasmatron discharge clearly illustrate development and evolution of flow features with signal levels comparable to those in the Hencken burner. The results are a demonstration of the ability to make high-fidelity OH PLIF measurements at 50 kHz using a Nd:YAG-pumped, frequency-doubled dye laser. PMID:25320935

  3. A novel particle separation technique using 20-kHz-order ultrasound irradiation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Hiroya; Yanai, Sayuri; Mizushima, Yuki; Saito, Takayuki

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound techniques such as washing, fine-particle manipulation and mixing have been investigated. MHz-band ultrasound was usually used in the previous work, and studies of kHz-order ultrasound are very rare. In the usual manipulation technique, μm- order particles are targeted due to wavelength limitations. We discovered an interesting phenomenon that holds promise for a novel particle separation technique using kHz-order ultrasound. Here, particles with sub-mm- or mm-order diameters were flocculated into a swarm in water irradiated by 20-kHz ultrasound. To develop a practical separation process, we investigated the stationary position and dia. of the particle swarms and the sound- pressure profiles in a vessel, as well as the flocculation mechanism, by varying the irradiation frequency, water level, particle diameter and particle amount. The primary stationary position corresponded to the wavelength calculated from the resonant frequency regardless of the particle diameter. Subtle changes in the frequency and water level resulted in a significant change in the stationary position. Based on these results, we propose a new separation process based on the particle diameter for sub-mm- or mm-order particles.

  4. Developmental effects of magnetic field (50 Hz) in combination with ionizing radiation and chemical teratogens.

    PubMed

    Pafková, H; Jerábek, J; Tejnorová, I; Bednár, V

    1996-11-01

    The influence of a 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) on avian and mammalian embryogenesis, the MF level and vector, as well as the effect of exposure to MF (50 Hz, 10 mT) in combination with X-rays has been recently reported [2,3]. No significant alterations of chick or rat embryogenesis were found after repeated exposures to 50 Hz MF at 10 mT or 6 microT or with different vectors. However, X-ray chick embryotoxicity was significantly affected by repeated exposures of developing organisms to MF. A strong dependence of effect on the type of interaction was revealed. A decrease of X-ray induced teratogenicity was observed when MF preceded X-ray exposure (indirect interaction), while MF exposure applied immediately after X-ray radiation (direct interaction) non-significantly potentiated adverse developmental effects of ionizing radiation. This study deals with the effects of MF in combination with insulin or tetracycline. Exposure of chick embryos to MF influenced the sensitivity of embryonic morphogenetic systems to the subsequently administered chemical teratogens, insulin and/or tetracycline. A protective effect of MF was detected similarly as in the case of indirect interaction with ionizing radiation. PMID:8920754

  5. Microstructural modifications induced by rapid thermal annealing in plasma deposited SiOxNyHz films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Prado, A.; San Andrés, E.; Mártil, I.; González-Díaz, G.; Bravo, D.; López, F. J.; Fernández, M.; Martínez, F. L.

    2003-07-01

    The effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) processes on the structural properties of SiOxNyHz films was investigated. The samples were deposited by the electron cyclotron resonance plasma method, using SiH4, O2 and N2 as precursor gases. For SiOxNyHz films with composition close to that of SiO2, which have a very low H content, RTA induces thermal relaxation of the lattice and improvement of the structural order. For films of intermediate composition and of compositions close to SiNyHz, the main effect of RTA is the release of H at high temperatures (T>700 °C). This H release is more significant in films containing both Si-H and N-H bonds, due to cooperative reactions between both kinds of bonds. In these films the degradation of structural order associated to H release prevails over thermal relaxation, while in those films with only N-H bonds, thermal relaxation predominates. For annealing temperatures in the 500-700 °C range, the passivation of dangling bonds by the nonbonded H in the films and the transition from the paramagnetic state to the diamagnetic state of the K center result in a decrease of the density of paramagnetic defects. The H release observed at high annealing temperatures is accompanied by an increase of density of paramagnetic defects.

  6. Discovery of 800 HZ Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, M.; van der Klis, M.; van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Lamb, F.; Vaughan, B.; Kuulkers, E.; Augusteijn, T.; Zhang, W.; Marshall, F. E.; Swank, J. H.; Lapidus, I.; Lochner, J. C.; Strohmayer, T. E.

    1996-09-01

    We present results of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer observations of the low-mass X-ray binary and atoll source 4U 1608-52 made over 9 days during the decline of an X-ray intensity outburst in 1996 March. A fast-timing analysis shows a strong and narrow quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) peak at frequencies between 850 and 890 Hz on March 3 and 6, as well as a broad peak around 690 Hz on March 9. Observations on March 12 show no significant signal. On March 3, the X-ray spectrum of the QPO is quite hard; its strength increases steadily from 5% at ~2 keV to ~20% at ~12 keV. The QPO frequency varies between 850 and 890 Hz on that day, and the peak widens and its rms decreases with centroid frequency in a way very similar to the well-known horizontal branch oscillations (HBO) in Z sources. We apply the HBO beat frequency model to atoll sources and suggest that, whereas the model could produce QPOs at the observed frequencies, the lack of correlation we observe between QPO properties and X-ray count rate is hard to reconcile with this model.

  7. Exposure to 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field induces DNA damage-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunyun; Xia, Ruohong; Jiang, Hengjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Hong, Ling; Yu, Yunxian; Xu, Zhengping; Zeng, Qunli

    2016-08-01

    As electromagnetic field (EMF) is commonly encountered within our daily lives, the biological effects of EMF are of great concern. Autophagy is a key process for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and it can also reveal cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological effects of a 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field on autophagy and we identified its mechanism of action in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells. CHL cells were exposed to a 50Hz sinusoidal EMF at 0.4mT for 30min or 24h. In this study, we found that a 0.4mT EMF resulted in: (i) an increase in LC3-II expression and increased autophagosome formation; (ii) no significant difference in the incidence of γH2AX foci between the sham and exposure groups; (iii) reorganized actin filaments and increased pseudopodial extensions without promoting cell migration; and (iv) enhanced cell apoptosis when autophagy was blocked by Bafilomycin A1. These results implied that DNA damage was not directly involved in the autophagy induced by a 0.4mT 50Hz EMF. In addition, an EMF induced autophagy balanced the cellular homeostasis to protect the cells from severe adverse biological consequences. PMID:27177844

  8. Laser-induced incandescence measurements in a fired diesel engine at 3 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxx, I. G.; Heinold, O.; Geigle, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced incandescence (LII) was performed at 3 kHz in an optically accessible cylinder of a fired diesel engine using a commercially available diode-pumped solid-state laser and an intensified CMOS camera. The resulting images, acquired every 3° of crank angle, enabled the spatiotemporal tracking of soot structures during the expansion/exhaust stroke of the engine cycle. The image sequences demonstrate that soot tends to form in thin sheets that propagate and interact with the in-cylinder flow. These sheets tend to align parallel to the central axis of the cylinder and are frequently wrapped into conical spirals by aerodynamic swirl. Most of the soot is observed well away from the cylinder walls. Quantitative soot measurements were beyond the scope of this study but the results demonstrate the practical utility of using kHz-rate LII to acquire ensemble-averaged statistical data with high crank angle resolution over a complete engine cycle. Based on semi-quantitative measures of soot distribution, it was possible to identify soot dynamics related to incomplete charge exchange. This study shows that long-duration, multi-kHz acquisition rate LII measurements are viable in a fired diesel engine with currently available laser and camera technology, albeit only in the expansion and exhaust phase of the cycle at present. Furthermore, such measurements yield useful insight into soot dynamics and therefore constitute an important new tool for the development and optimization of diesel engine technology.

  9. Observations of backscatter from sand and gravel seafloors between 170 and 250 kHz.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C; Ward, Larry G

    2015-10-01

    Interpreting observations of frequency-dependence in backscatter from the seafloor offers many challenges, either because multiple frequencies are used for different observations that will later be merged or simply because seafloor scattering models are not well-understood above 100 kHz. Hindering the understanding of these observations is the paucity of reported, calibrated acoustic measurements above 100 kHz. This manuscript seeks to help elucidate the linkages between seafloor properties and frequency-dependent seafloor backscatter by describing observations of backscatter collected from sand, gravel, and bedrock seafloors at frequencies between 170 and 250 kHz and at a grazing angle of 45°. Overall, the frequency dependence appeared weak for all seafloor types, with a slight increase in seafloor scattering strength with increasing frequency for an area with unimodal, very poorly to moderately well sorted, slightly granular to granular medium sand with significant amounts of shell debris and a slight decrease in all other locations. PMID:26520300

  10. Testing the Interaction Dark Energy Model with H(z) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Li, L.; Cao, S.; Pan, N. N.; Zhang, Y.; Hu, Z. X.

    2015-07-01

    We constrain an interaction dark energy model with the newly revised H(z) data combining with the 7-year baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations from the Planck first data release using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The marginalized 1σ constraints of the combinations: Ω_{m}=0. 266_{-0. 028}^{+0. 028}(1σ), γ=0.090_{-0.098}^{+0.100}(1σ), w_X=-1. 307_{-0. 269}^{+0.263}(1σ), and H_0=74. 20_{-4.56}^{+4.66}(1σ). The coupling parameter is γ>0 which means the energy is transferred from dark matter to dark energy, and the coincidence problem is slightly alleviated in 1σ range. For comparison, we constrain this model with BAO+CMB observations and H(z) data alone. The results are as follows: (1) The H(z) data could put stricter constraint on the parameter γ. (2) The ΛCDM model remains the best, and the coupling parameter γ is correlated with other model parameters Ω_{m} and H_0. (3) The tension of the constraining results of H_0 between the local distance ladder measurements and the Planck result could be alleviated by considering the interaction term.

  11. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Activities this quarter extended those of the first project year: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. 18 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine systems of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Activities this quarter extended those of the first project year which focused on two technical areas: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. 25 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. A comparison between automated detection methods of high-frequency oscillations (80–500 Hz) during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Salami, Pariya; Lévesque, Maxime; Gotman, Jean; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs, ripples: 80–200 Hz, fast ripples: 250–500 Hz) recorded from the epileptic brain are thought to reflect abnormal network-driven activity. They are also better markers of seizure onset zones compared to interictal spikes. There is thus an increasing number of studies analysing HFOs in vitro, in vivo and in the EEG of human patients with refractory epilepsy. However, most of these studies have focused on HFOs during interictal events or at seizure onset, and few have analysed HFOs during seizures. In this study, we are comparing three different automated methods of HFO detection to two methods of visual analysis, during the pre-ictal, ictal and post-ictal periods on multiple channels using the rat pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy. The first method (method 1) detected HFOs using the average of the normalised period, the second (method 2) detected HFOs using the average of the normalised period in 1 s windows and the third (method 3) detected HFOs using the average of a reference period before seizure onset. Overall, methods 2 and 3 showed higher sensitivity compared to method 1. When dividing the analysed traces in pre-, ictal and post-ictal periods, method 3 showed the highest sensitivity during the ictal period compared to method 1, while method 2 was not significantly different from method 1. These findings suggest that method 3 could be used for automated and reliable detection of HFOs on large data sets containing multiple channels during the ictal period. PMID:22983173

  14. Effect of long-term 50 Hz magnetic field exposure on the micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes of mice.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Miguel; Olmos, Encarnación; Alcaraz-Saura, Miguel; Achel, Daniel G; Castillo, Julián

    2014-01-01

    In recent years extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-EMF) have become widely used in human activities, leading to an increased chance of exposure to ELF-EMF. There are few reports on in vivo mammalian genotoxic effects using micronucleus (MN) assays, which generally have been used as a short-term screening system. We analyzed the possible genotoxic effect induced by long-term exposure (7, 14, 21, 28 d) of a 50 Hz ELM-MF to mice by measuring the increase in frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte in their bone marrow (MNPCEs) and we compared it with that induced by 50 cGy of X-rays. Subsequently, we tried to reduce this chromosomal damage by administering four antioxidants substances with radioprotective capacities: dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU), grape-procyanidins (P) and citrus flavonoids extract (CE). The increase in micronucleated cells was higher in both physical treatments (Control < ELF-EMF (p < 0.01)  0.001)); however, the antioxidant substances only showed a genoprotective capacity against the damage induced by ionizing radiation (Ci > PTU = DMSO (p < 0.001) >P = CE (p < 0.001). The 50 Hz ELM-MF increased MNPCEs in mouse bone marrow, expressing a genotoxic capacity. Administration of antioxidant substances with radioprotective capacities known to act through the elimination of free radicals did not diminish the genotoxic effect induced by ELM-MF. PMID:23781994

  15. Evaluation of the developmental toxicity of 60 Hz magnetic fields and harmonic frequencies in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ryan, B M; Polen, M; Gauger, J R; Mallett, E; Kearns, M B; Bryan, T L; McCormick, D L

    2000-05-01

    Experimental data suggest that exposure to the 50 and 60 Hz sinusoidal components of power-frequency magnetic fields (MFs) does not have an adverse impact on fetal development. However, the possible developmental toxicity of MF harmonics has not been investigated. This study was designed to determine whether exposure to 180 Hz MFs (third harmonic), alone or in combination with 60 Hz MFs, induces birth defects in Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of sperm-positive dams (> or =20/group) were exposed for 18.5 h per day from gestation days 6 through 19 to (1) ambient MFs only (<0.0001 mT; sham controls); (2) 60 Hz MFs at 0.2 mT; (3) 180 Hz MFs at 0.2 mT; or (4) 60 Hz + 180 Hz MFs (10% third harmonic; total field strength = 0.2 mT). Litter size, litter weight, percentage live births, sex ratio, and number of resorption sites were determined for each dam, and gross external, visceral, cephalic and skeletal examinations were performed on all fetuses. MF exposure had no significant effects on litter size, litter weight, or fetal development. With the exception of common rib variants, the incidence of fetal anomalies was comparable in all groups. A small increase in the incidence of rib variants was seen in the group exposed to 60 Hz + 180 Hz MFs; however, the incidence of rib variants in this group was similar to that in historical controls from our laboratory. These data extend the existing database on developmental toxicity of MFs by demonstrating that exposure to 180 Hz MFs, either alone or superimposed on an underlying 60 Hz signal, does not induce biologically significant developmental toxicity. These data do not support the hypothesis that exposure to power-frequency MFs is an important risk factor for fetal development. PMID:10790286

  16. PULSE AMPLITUDE DEPENDS ON kHz QPO FREQUENCY IN THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND PULSAR SAX J1808.4-3658

    SciTech Connect

    Bult, Peter; Van der Klis, Michiel

    2015-01-10

    We study the relation between the 300-700 Hz upper kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and the 401 Hz coherent pulsations across all outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find that the pulse amplitude systematically changes by a factor of ∼2 when the upper kHz QPO frequency passes through 401 Hz: it halves when the QPO moves to above the spin frequency and doubles again on the way back. This establishes for the first time the existence of a direct effect of kHz QPOs on the millisecond pulsations and provides a new clue to the origin of the upper kHz QPO. We discuss several scenarios and conclude that while more complex explanations can not formally be excluded, our result strongly suggests that the QPO is produced by azimuthal motion at the inner edge of the accretion disk, most likely orbital motion. Depending on whether this azimuthal motion is faster or slower than the spin, the plasma then interacts differently with the neutron-star magnetic field. The most straightforward interpretation involves magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow that sets in when the upper kHz QPO becomes slower than the spin.

  17. Active rejector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, A.G.; Pirogov, S.G.; Savchenko, V.M.; Yakushev, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes an active rejector filter for suppressing noise signals in the frequency range 50-100 Hz and for extracting a vlf information signal. The filter has the following characteristics: a high input impedance, a resonant frequency of 75 Hz, a Q of 1.25, and an attenuation factor of 53 dB at resonant frequency.

  18. 52 W kHz-linewidth low-noise linearly-polarized all-fiber single-frequency MOPA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changsheng; Xu, Shanhui; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Yuanfei; Zhao, Qilai; Li, Can; Zhou, Kaijun; Feng, Zhouming; Gan, Jiulin; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-05-01

    An all-fiber Yb-doped kHz-linewidth low-noise linearly polarized single-frequency master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) laser with a stable CW output power of >52 W is demonstrated. By suppressing the intensity noise of the DBR phosphate fiber oscillator, the linewidth of MOPA laser is not noticeably broadened, and an ultra-narrow linewidth of <3 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the low-noise behavior of MOPA lasers is investigated. A measured relative intensity noise of < -130 dB Hz-1 at frequencies of over 2 MHz, a phase noise above 1 kHz of <5 μrad/Hz1/2, and a signal-to-noise ratio of >63 dB are achieved.

  19. Large-aperture, tapered fiber-coupled, 10-kHz particle-image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Roy, Sukesh; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate the design and implementation of a fiber-optic beam-delivery system using a large-aperture, tapered step-index fiber for high-speed particle-image velocimetry (PIV) in turbulent combustion flows. The tapered fiber in conjunction with a diffractive-optical-element (DOE) fiber-optic coupler significantly increases the damage threshold of the fiber, enabling fiber-optic beam delivery of sufficient nanosecond, 532-nm, laser pulse energy for high-speed PIV measurements. The fiber successfully transmits 1-kHz and 10-kHz laser pulses with energies of 5.3 mJ and 2 mJ, respectively, for more than 25 min without any indication of damage. It is experimentally demonstrated that the tapered fiber possesses the high coupling efficiency (~80%) and moderate beam quality for PIV. Additionally, the nearly uniform output-beam profile exiting the fiber is ideal for PIV applications. Comparative PIV measurements are made using a conventionally (bulk-optic) delivered light sheet, and a similar order of measurement accuracy is obtained with and without fiber coupling. Effective use of fiber-coupled, 10-kHz PIV is demonstrated for instantaneous 2D velocity-field measurements in turbulent reacting flows. Proof-of-concept measurements show significant promise for the performance of fiber-coupled, high-speed PIV using a tapered optical fiber in harsh laser-diagnostic environments such as those encountered in gas-turbine test beds and the cylinder of a combustion engine. PMID:23481818

  20. The distribution of kHz QPO frequencies in bright low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, T.; Méndez, M.; Homan, J.

    2005-07-01

    We analyzed all published frequencies, ν1 and ν2, of the twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in bright neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. The two frequencies are well correlated but, contrary to recent suggestions, the frequency-frequency correlation is significantly different from a ν2 = (3/2) ν1 relation. To check whether, although not following the the 3/2 relation, the QPO frequencies cluster around a region where ν2/ν1 ≈ 3/2, we re-analyzed the Sco X-1 data that were used to report that ratio and show that, because the distribution of ratios of linearly correlated measurements is intrinsically biased, although the significance of the clustering around ν2/ν1 ≈ 3/2 previously reported in the case of Sco X-1 is formally correct, it does not provide any useful information about a possible underlying resonance mechanism in this source. Using the same data, we then show that the (unbiased) distribution of QPO frequencies is consistent with a uniform distribution at a 2.4σ level. To investigate this further, we analyzed a larger data set of Sco X-1 and four other sources, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1728-34 and 4U 1820-30. We find that for all five sources the distribution of the kHz QPO frequencies is not uniform and has multiple peaks, which have no analogy in the distribution of points in the spectral color-color diagrams of these sources. Finally, we demonstrate that a simple random walk of the QPO frequencies can reproduce qualitatively the observed distributions in frequency and frequency ratio. This result weakens the support for resonance models of kHz QPOs in neutron stars.

  1. 2.5-kHz magnetostrictive Tonpilz sonar transducer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Stephen C.

    2002-07-01

    Naval Undersea Warfare Center has fabricated and tested a 2.5 kHz magnetostrictive sonar transducer to validate various modeling techniques. The transducer selected is a longitudinal vibrator Tonpilz type consisting of Terfenol-D driver, tail mass, radiating head mass, and stress rod bolt with 21 MPa (3000 psi) prestress. The Terfenol-D drive rod is interlaced with three samarium cobalt magnets, one in the center and one on either end magnetically biasing the Terfenol to 60 kA/m (750 Oe). Both the Terfenol-D rods and magnets were laminated to reduce eddy currents. The magnetic circuit is comprised of pole piece discs on each end of the Terfenol-D magnet assembly and an external magnetic cylinder (return path) made of a high-permeability, high-resistivity, high-saturation powdered metal 'T2'. The transducer has a 25 cm (9.8in) diameter radiating face (piston), is 28 cm (11 in.) long, and weighs 15 kg (32 lb.) without the housing. It is 41 cm (16 in.) long and 25 kg (56 lb.) with the underwater housing. The measured results are compared to a finite element model using 'ATILA' and distributed plane wave element equivalent circuit model. The coupling coefficient, permeability and mechanical loss effects for different prestress loads were measured on a resonant Terfenol 'dumbbell' device. The in-water measured results indicate a mechanical Q of 2.5, an effective coupling coefficient of 0.36, an electro-acoustic efficiency of 60 percent, beam pattern directivity index of 6 dB, a maximum Source Level of 214.6 dB re 1uPa/m at 15 Amps AC drive and bandwidth of 2 kHz to 5.4 kHz +/- 1.5 dB.

  2. Ground-truthing 6. 5-kHz side scan sonographs: What are we really imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.V.; Field, M.E.; Lee, H.; Edwards, B.E. ); Masson, D.G.; Kenyon, N. ); Kidd, R.B. )

    1991-04-10

    A 1,000-km{sup 2} area on the distal lobe of Monterey Fan shows a digitate pattern of juxtaposed high and low backscatter on GLORIA side scan sonographs. This area was investigated using stereo photography, high-resolution seismic profiles, and measurements of physical properties of cores to quantitatively evaluate the causes of backscatter from the 6.5-kHz side scan sonar. Stereo photography and bottom video were used to determine that the sediment-water interface typically has a bed roughness less than 10 cm over the entire ground truth area; consequently, bed roughness is not a significant contributor to the sonar backscatter. Vertical-incidence 3.5-kHz profiles reveal that high-backscatter areas allow less penetration and have slightly more relief than low-backscatter areas. Closely spaced measurements of {rho} wave velocity, density, and grain size made on transponder-navigated cores are used to investigate the geoacoustic properties of the sediment with the aid of a numerical model. The model results demonstrate that the sediment-water interface is, in most cases, acoustically transparent to the sonar energy and that most or all of the energy is refracted into the sediment to depths of at least a few meters rather than scattered from the surface. In this area, thick (up to 50 cm) sand deposits with thin interbeds of silty clay correlate with lower backscatter than do silty clay deposits with thin interbeds of sand. This suggests that volume inhomogeneities and complex constructive and destructive interferences caused by the subsurface volume inhomogeneities within the top few meters of the sediment ultimately modulate the intensity of backscatter. Although 6.5-kHz sonographs appear easy to interpret in a conventional and simplistic manner, caution should be used when interpreting lithofacies from backscatter intensities.

  3. Testing the interaction between dark energy and dark matter with H(z) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pan; Li, Li; Shuo, Cao; Na-na, Pan; Yi, Zhang; Zi-xuan, Hu

    2016-04-01

    With the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, we constrain an interactive dark energy model by combing the up-to-date observational data of Hubble parameter H(z) with the 7-year baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data observed by the Planck satellite. Under the joint constraint of the three kinds of data, the best-fit values of the model parameters and their 1-σ errors are obtained as follows: the energy density Ωm =0.266-0.028+0.028 (1 σ) , the interaction factor γ =0.090-0.098+0.100 (1 σ) , the parameter of state equation of dark matter wX = -1.307-0.269+0.263 (1 σ) , and the Hubble Constant H0 =7420-4.56+4.66 (1 σ) , where the coupling parameter γ > 0 means that the energy is transferred from dark matter to dark energy, and the coincidence problem in the Lambda-Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) model is slightly alleviated in the 1σ range. For comparisons, we constrain the same model with the BAO+CMB observations and H(z) data separately. The results are as follows: (1) The H(z) data could put stricter constraint on the parameter γ than the BAO+CMB observations. (2) The ΛCDM model is best fitted, and the coupling parameter γ is correlated with parameters Ωm and H0. (3) The inconsistency of the constraint results of H0 between the local distance ladder measurements and the Planck observations can be alleviated after taking account of the interaction between dark energy and dark matter.

  4. Assessment of "non-recordable" electroretinograms by 9 Hz flicker stimulation under scotopic conditions.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Andreas; Wilke, Robert; Strasser, Torsten; Gekeler, Florian; Messias, Andre; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2012-02-01

    To refine methods of electroretinographical (ERG) recording for the analysis of low retinal potentials under scotopic conditions in advanced retinal degenerative diseases. Standard Ganzfeld ERG equipment (Diagnosys LLC, Cambridge, UK) was used in 27 healthy volunteers (mean age 28 ± SD 8.5 years) to define the stimulation protocol. The protocol was then applied in clinical routine and 992 recordings were obtained from patients (mean age 40.6 ± 18.3 years) over a period of 5 years. A blue stimulus with a flicker frequency of 9 Hz was specified under scotopic conditions to preferentially record rod-driven responses. A range of stimulus strengths (0.0000012-6.32 scot. cd s/m² and 6-14 ms flash duration) was tested for maximal amplitudes and interference between rods and cones. Analysis of results was done by standard Fourier Transformation and assessment of signal-to-noise ratio. Optimized stimulus parameters were found to be a time-integrated luminance of 0.012 scot. cd s/m² using a blue (470 nm) flash of 10 ms duration at a repetition frequency of 9 Hz. Characteristic stimulus strength versus amplitude curves and tests with stimuli of red or green wavelength suggest a predominant rod-system response. The 9 Hz response was found statistically distinguishable from noise in 38% of patients with otherwise non-recordable rod responses according to International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision standards. Thus, we believe this protocol can be used to record ERG potentials in patients with advanced retinal diseases and in the evaluation of potential treatments for these patients. The ease of implementation in clinical routine and of statistical evaluation providing an observer-independent evaluation may further facilitate its employment. PMID:22179598

  5. Lack of Teratological Effects in Rats Exposed to 20 or 60 kHz Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Izumi; Oshima, Atsushi; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Negishi, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A risk assessment of magnetic field (MF) exposure conducted by the World Health Organization indicated the need for biological studies on primary hazard identification and quantitative risk evaluation of intermediate frequency (300 Hz–100 kHz) MFs. Because induction heating cookers generate such MFs for cooking, reproductive and developmental effects are a concern due to the close proximity of the fields' source to a cook's abdomen. METHODS: Pregnant Crl:CD(SD) rats (25/group) were exposed to a 20 kHz, 0.2 mT(rms) or 60 kHz, 0.1 mT(rms) sinusoidal MF or sham-exposed for 22 hr/day during organogenesis, and their fetuses were examined for malformations on gestation day 20. All teratological evaluations were conducted in a blind fashion, and experiments were duplicated for each frequency to confirm consistency of experimental outcomes. RESULTS: No exposure-related changes were found in clinical signs, gross pathology, or number of implantation losses. The number of live fetuses and low-body-weight fetuses as well as the incidence of external, visceral, and skeletal malformations in the fetuses did not indicate significant differences between MF-exposed and sham-exposed groups. Although some fetuses showed isolated changes in sex ratio and skeletal variation and ossification, such changes were neither reproduced in duplicate experiments nor were they common to specific field frequencies. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure of rats to MFs during organogenesis did not show significant reproducible teratogenicity under experimental conditions. Present findings do not support the hypothesis that intermediate frequency MF exposure after implantation carries a significant risk for developing mammalian fetuses. Birth Defects Res (Part B) 92:469–477, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21770026

  6. On the Solar Origin of the 220.7 μHz Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, A.; García, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Gravity modes in the Sun have been long searched for during the past decades. Using their asymptotic properties García et al. (2007) found the signature of the dipole g modes analyzing an spectral window between 25 and 140 μHz of velocity power spectrum obtained from the Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies (GOLF)/SoHO instrument. Using this result it has been possible to check some properties of the structure of the solar interior (García, Mathur & Ballot 2008) as well as some indications of the dynamics of the core. However, the individual detection of such modes remains evasive and they are needed to really improve our knowledge of the deepest layers in the Sun (Mathur et al. 2008). In this work we study the signal at 220.7 μHz which is present in most of the helioseismic instruments during the last 10 years. This signal has been previously identified as part of a g-mode candidate in the GOLF data (Turck-Chièze et al. 2004; Mathur et al. 2007) and in SPM/Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations (VIRGO) (García et al. 2008) with more than 90% confidence level. It could be labeled as the l=2 n=-3 g mode as it is in the region were this mode is expected. We have checked the possibility that the 220.7 μHz signal could have an instrumental origin without success by analyzing all available housekeeping data as well as information on the roll, pitch and yaw of the SoHO spacecraft. In consequence, we are confident that this signal has a solar origin.

  7. A four kHz repetition rate compact TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yijun; Tan, Rongqing

    2013-09-01

    A compact transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser with high repetition-rate was reported. The size of the laser is 380 mm×300 mm×200 mm, and the discharge volume is 12×103 mm3. The laser cavity has a length of 320mm and consists of a totally reflective concave mirror with a radius of curvature of 4 m (Cu metal substrate coated with Au) and a partially reflecting mirror. The ultraviolet preionization makes the discharge even and stable,the output energy can be as high as 28 mJ under the circumstance of free oscillation, and the width of the light pulse is 60ns.To acquire the high wind velocity, a turbocharger is used in the system of the fast-gas flow cycle. When the wind speed is 100m/s, the repetition rate of the transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser is up to 2 kHz. On this basis, a dual modular structure with two sets of the gas discharge unit is adopted to obtain a higher pulse repetition frequency output. The dual discharge unit composed two sets of electrodes and two sets of turbo fan. Alternate trigger technology is used to make the two sets of discharge module work in turn with repetition frequency of 2 kHz, the discharge interval of two sets of the gas discharge unit can be adjusted continuously from 20 microseconds to 250 microseconds. Under the conditions of maintaining the other parameters constant, the repetition frequency of the laser pulse is up to 4 kHz. The total size of laser with dual modular structure is 380mm×520mm×200mm, and the discharge volume is 24×103 mm3 with the cavity length of 520mm.

  8. Beyond Quasi-Geostrophic Turbulence: Generalized Scale Invariance and (2+Hz)-Dimensional Vorticity Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D. J.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Lovejoy, S.; Tuck, A.

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the claim of Lindborg et al (2009) that the spectrum power law E(k)≈k-3 on scales ≥600 km obtained with the help of commercial jetliner trajectory deviations (GASP and Mozaic databases) could not be brought into question by Lovejoy et al (2009), because this spectrum corresponds to a “well known theory of quasi-geostrophic turbulence developed by Charney (1971)”. Lindborg, et al (2009) also argued that “earlier limitations [of this theory] would have been relaxed in many of the modern models of atmospheric turbulence”. We show that both these statements are irrelevant and that generalized scale invariance (GSI, Schertzer and Lovejoy 1985) is rather indispensable to go beyond the quasi-geostrophic limitations, to go in fact from scale analysis to scaling analysis. This enables us to derive dynamical equations for the vorticity in an embedding space of (fractional) dimension D=2+Hz (0≤ Hz ≤1, 1- Hz measures the scaling stratification of atmospheric turbulence). These equations correspond to an interesting dynamical alternative to quasi-geostrophic approximation and turbulence. References: Charney, J. G. (1971). "Geostrophic Turbulence." J. Atmos. Sci 28: 1087. Lindborg, E., K. K. Tung, G. D. Nastrom, J. Y. N. Cho and K. S. Gage (2009). "Comment on "Reinterpreting aircraft measurements in anisotropic scaling turbulence" by lovejoy et al. (2009)." Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. 9: 22331-22336. Lovejoy, S., A. F. Tuck, D. Schertzer and S. J. Hovde (2009). "Rinterpreting aircraft measurements in anisotropic scaling turbulence." Atmos. Chem. Phys. 9: 5007-5025. Schertzer, D. and S. Lovejoy (1985). "Generalised scale invariance in turbulent phenomena." Physico-Chemical Hydrodynamics Journal 6: 623-635.

  9. 40-Hz oscillations underlying perceptual binding in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Ross, Bernhard; Fujioka, Takako

    2016-07-01

    Auditory object perception requires binding of elementary features of complex stimuli. Synchronization of high-frequency oscillation in neural networks has been proposed as an effective alternative to binding via hard-wired connections because binding in an oscillatory network can be dynamically adjusted to the ever-changing sensory environment. Previously, we demonstrated in young adults that gamma oscillations are critical for sensory integration and found that they were affected by concurrent noise. Here, we aimed to support the hypothesis that stimulus evoked auditory 40-Hz responses are a component of thalamocortical gamma oscillations and examined whether this oscillatory system may become less effective in aging. In young and older adults, we recorded neuromagnetic 40-Hz oscillations, elicited by monaural amplitude-modulated sound. Comparing responses in quiet and under contralateral masking with multitalker babble noise revealed two functionally distinct components of auditory 40-Hz responses. The first component followed changes in the auditory input with high fidelity and was of similar amplitude in young and older adults. The second, significantly smaller in older adults, showed a 200-ms interval of amplitude and phase rebound and was strongly attenuated by contralateral noise. The amplitude of the second component was correlated with behavioral speech-in-noise performance. Concurrent noise also reduced the P2 wave of auditory evoked responses at 200-ms latency, but not the earlier N1 wave. P2 modulation was reduced in older adults. The results support the model of sensory binding through thalamocortical gamma oscillations. Limitation of neural resources for this process in older adults may contribute to their speech-in-noise understanding deficits. PMID:27080577

  10. Camera-based three-dimensional real-time particle tracking at kHz rates and Ångström accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Joo, Sihwa; Otto, Oliver; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Seidel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Optical and magnetic tweezers are widely employed to probe the mechanics and activity of individual biomolecular complexes. They rely on micrometer-sized particles to detect molecular conformational changes from the particle position. Real-time particle tracking with Ångström accuracy has so far been only achieved using laser detection through photodiodes. Here we demonstrate that camera-based imaging can provide a similar performance for all three dimensions. Particle imaging at kHz rates is combined with real-time data processing being accelerated by a graphics processing unit. For particles that are fixed in the sample cell we can detect 3 Å sized steps that are introduced by cell translations at rates of 10 Hz, while for DNA-tethered particles 5 Å steps at 1 Hz can be resolved. Moreover, 20 particles can be tracked in parallel with comparable accuracy. Our approach provides a simple and robust way for high-resolution tweezers experiments using multiple particles at a time. PMID:25565216

  11. Variation of 40 kHz Signal Level in Relation to Sunrise, Sunset and Climatic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, A.; De, B. K.; Saha, A.; Das, T. K.

    2007-07-01

    The sunrise effect, sunset effect, the diurnal and seasonal variations are the characteristic feature of low frequency (LF) radio wave propagated over a large distance. The normal character has been found to be perturbed during rainy days. The amplitude of 40 kHz signal transmitted from Miyakoji station, Japan and received in North-East India is remarkably attenuated after the commencement of rain. On the basis of nature of attenuation the observed records have been classified into two different forms viz., F1 and F2. An analysis in this regard is represented in this paper.

  12. New physics and signal-background interference in associated pp → HZ production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Rosenfeld, Rogerio; Spannowsky, Michael; Tonero, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    We re-investigate electroweak signal-background interference in associated Higgs production via gluon fusion in the presence of new physics in the top Higgs sector. Considering the full final state pp \\to b \\bar b \\ell^+\\ell^-~(\\ell=e,μ) , we discuss how new physics in the top Higgs sector that enhances the ZZ component can leave footprints in the HZ limit setting. In passing we investigate the phenomenology of a class of new physics interactions that can be genuinely studied in this process.

  13. Buffer-gas-induced linewidth reduction of coherent dark resonances to below 50 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Nagel, A.; Wynands, R.; Meschede, D.

    1997-08-01

    When neon is introduced as a buffer gas the interaction time of cesium atoms in a vapor cell with resonant laser beams is drastically increased. Using a pair of phase-locked lasers we have observed linewidths as narrow as 42 Hz for coherent dark resonances in a cesium vapor cell. We study the influence of power and pressure broadening and systematic shifts of the resonance frequency. Our experiments demonstrate that coherent dark resonances could rival direct radio-frequency precision measurements, which have a wide range of applications in physics.

  14. In situ 24 kHz coherent imaging of morphology change in laser percussion drilling.

    PubMed

    Webster, Paul J L; Yu, Joe X Z; Leung, Ben Y C; Anderson, Mitchell D; Yang, Victor X D; Fraser, James M

    2010-03-01

    We observe sample morphology changes in real time (24 kHz) during and between percussion drilling pulses by integrating a low-coherence microscope into a laser micromachining platform. Nonuniform cut speed and sidewall evolution in stainless steel are observed to strongly depend on assist gas. Interpulse morphology relaxation such as hole refill is directly imaged, showing dramatic differences in the material removal process dependent on pulse duration/peak power (micros/0.1 kW, ps/20 MW) and material (steel, lead zirconate titanate PZT). Blind hole depth precision is improved by over 1 order of magnitude using in situ feedback from the imaging system. PMID:20195306

  15. The phonological function of vowels is maintained at fundamental frequencies up to 880 Hz.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Daniel; Maurer, Dieter; Dellwo, Volker

    2015-07-01

    In a between-subject perception task, listeners either identified full words or vowels isolated from these words at F0s between 220 and 880 Hz. They received two written words as response options (minimal pair with the stimulus vowel in contrastive position). Listeners' sensitivity (A') was extremely high in both conditions at all F0s, showing that the phonological function of vowels can also be maintained at high F0s. This indicates that vowel sounds may carry strong acoustic cues departing from common formant frequencies at high F0s and that listeners do not rely on consonantal context phenomena for their identification performance. PMID:26233058

  16. 340-GHz 3D radar imaging test bed with 10-Hz frame rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Marsh, Paul N.; Bolton, David R.; Middleton, Robert J. C.; Hunter, Robert I.; Speirs, Peter J.; Macfarlane, David G.; Cassidy, Scott L.; Smith, Graham M.

    2012-06-01

    We present a 340 GHz 3D radar imaging test bed with 10 Hz frame rate which enables the investigation of strategies for the detection of concealed threats in high risk public areas. The radar uses a wideband heterodyne scheme and fast-scanning optics to achieve moderate resolution volumetric data sets, over a limited field of view, of targets at moderate stand-off ranges. The high frame rate is achieved through the use of DDS chirp generation, fast galvanometer scanners and efficient processing which combines CPU multi-threading and GPU-based techniques, and is sufficiently fast to follow smoothly the natural motion of people.

  17. 8-kHz bottom backscattering measurements at low grazing angles in shallow water.

    PubMed

    La, Hyoungsul; Choi, Jee Woong

    2010-04-01

    8-kHz bottom backscattering measurements at low grazing angles (6 degrees -31 degrees ) are presented. The experiment was performed at a very shallow water site with a silty bottom on the south coast of Korea. Backscattering strengths between -42 and -30 dB were obtained and were compared to a theoretical backscattering model and Lambert's law. The fit of the theoretical model to the measurements suggests that sediment volume scattering is dominant over scattering from bottom interface roughness. Combining these results with previous measurements found in the published literature implies that backscattering strengths from silty sediment increase slightly as the frequency increases. PMID:20369984

  18. 200 Deg C Demonstration Transformer Operates Efficiently at 50 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A compact, high temperature demonstration transformer was constructed, using a moly permalloy powder core and Teflon -insulated copper wire. At 50 kHz and 200 C, this 1:2 ratio transformer is capable of 98 percent efficiency when operating at a specific power of 6.1 kW/kg at 4 kW. This roughly 7 cm diameter transformer has a mass of 0.65 kg. Although Teflon is unstable above 200 C, about the same electrical performance was seen at 250 C. A plot of winding loss versus frequency illustrates the need to control these losses at high frequency.

  19. Complete synthetic seismograms up to 2 Hz for transversely isotropic spherically symmetric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Kenji; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Geller, Robert J.

    2006-02-01

    We use the direct solution method (DSM) with optimally accurate numerical operators to calculate complete (including both body and surface waves) three-component synthetic seismograms for transversely isotropic (TI), spherically symmetric media, up to 2 Hz. We present examples of calculations for both deep (600 km) and shallow (5 km) sources. Such synthetics should be useful in forward and inverse studies of earth structure. In order to make these calculations accurately and efficiently the vertical grid spacing, maximum angular order, and cut-off depth must be carefully and systematically chosen.

  20. High-order harmonic generation at a repetition rate of 100 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, F.; Stremme, W.; Schaetzel, M. G.; Grasbon, F.; Paulus, G. G.; Walther, H.; Hartmann, R.; Strueder, L.

    2003-07-01

    We report high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in rare gases using a femtosecond laser system with a very high repetition rate (100 kHz) and low pulse energy (7 {mu}J). To our knowledge, this is the highest repetition rate reported to date for HHG. The tight focusing geometry required to reach sufficiently high intensities implies low efficiency of the process. Harmonics up to the 45th order are nevertheless generated and detected. We show evidence of clear separation and selection of quantum trajectories by moving the gas jet with respect to the focus, in agreement with the theoretical predictions of the semiclassical model of HHG.

  1. Wavelength tunable, 264 J laser diode array for 10 Hz/1ms Yb:YAG pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteloup, J.-C.; Albach, D.; Assémat, F.; Bahbah, S.; Bourdet, G.; Piatti, P.; Pluvinage, M.; Vincent, B.; LeTouzé, G.; Mattern, T.; Biesenbach, J.; Müntz, H.; Noeske, A.; Venohr, R.

    2008-05-01

    The Lucia [1,2] Laser program, under development at the LULI laboratory, aims at delivering a 1030 nm, 100J, 10 Hz, 10 ns pulse train. The two laser heads used in the amplification stage relies on water-cooled mm-thick Yb:YAG disks, each of them pumped by a 34×13 cm2 Laser Diode Array (LDA). For each LDA, the 88 QCW diodes stacks manufactured by DILAS GmbH will be tiled in an 8×11 arrangement. Fine wavelength tuning is performed through bias current adjustment, water temperature control and conductivity adjustment. Wavelength homogeneity experimental verification has been validated.

  2. A 5 Hz flashlamp pumped Cr:LiSAF multipass amplifier for ultrashort pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, R. E.; Nogueira, G. E. C.; Baldochi, S. L.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2008-10-01

    We report here the operation, at 5 Hz, of a multipass flashlamp pumped Cr:LiSAF ultrashort pulse amplifier, presenting peak powers over 0.3 TW. This unusual high repetition rate was obtained by using a two-flashlamp pumping scheme, aiming at the minimization of the thermal load on the gain medium by the use of intracavity absorption filters. This cavity was used as a four-pass multipass amplifier in a hybrid Ti:sapphire/Cr:LiSAF system. The maximum amplification factor was 150, and the compressed pulse duration was 60 fs.

  3. Bulk Current Injection Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques, 50 kHz to 400 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.; Singh, Manisha

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated using bulk current injection (BCI) techniques with radiated fields from 50 kHz - 400 MHz. It is a follow up to the two-part paper series presented at the Asia Pacific EMC Conference that focused on TEM cell signal injection. This paper discusses the effects of cable types, shield connections, and chassis connections on cable noise. For each topic, well established theories are compared with data from a real-world physical system.

  4. Infrared peak in HZ Herculis prior to X-ray eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, IU.N.; Kirian, V.V.; Krat, A.V.; Pogodin, M.A.; Tarasov, A.E.

    1986-04-01

    In the summer and autumn of 1984, HZ Her (one of the stars in the Hercules X-1 binary system) was observed in the IR (J, H, and K bands) with the 125-cm AZT-11 telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. The observations of the star disclosed a sharp IR peak at orbital phase phi = 0.91, shortly before an X-ray eclipse, reaching a power greater than about 10 to the 36th erg/s. Although several hypotheses are suggested to provide an interpretation of this phenomenon, none of the proposed mechanisms can fully explain the peculiarities in the object's light curves close to eclipse. 16 references.

  5. 1047nm 270mJ all solid state diode pumped MOPA at 50 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Yang, Qi; Lu, Tingting; Ma, Xiuhua; Zhu, Xiaolei; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    A diode-pumped nanosecond Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) system based on Nd:YLF crystal slabs has been demonstrated. The seed pulses with pulse duration of 11 ns were generated in an EO Q-switched Nd:YLF laser, with single pulse energy of 10 mJ. The 1047 nm signal pulses were amplified in a double-pass amplification system. Maximum output pulse energy of 270 mJ at a repetition rate of 50 Hz has been achieved with effective optical-to-optical efficiency of 14.5%.

  6. Calibration of miniature medical ultrasonic hydrophones for frequencies in the range 100 to 500 kHz using an ultrasonically absorbing waveguide.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Srinath; Zeqiri, Bajram; Gélat, Pierre N

    2014-05-01

    Enhancements to the existing primary standard optical interferometer and narrowband tone-burst comparison calibration methods for miniature medical ultrasonic hydrophones of the membrane type over the frequency range 100 to 500 kHz are described. Improvements were realized through application of an ultrasonically absorbing waveguide made of a low-frequency-absorbing tile used in sonar applications which narrows the spatial extent of the broad acoustic field. The waveguide was employed in conjunction with a sonar multilayered polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) hydrophone used as a transmitting transducer covering a frequency range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The acoustic field emanating from the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide reduced the significance of diffracted acoustic waves from the membrane hydrophone ring and the consequent interference of this wave with the direct acoustic wave received by the active element of the hydrophone during calibration. Four membrane hydrophone make/ models with ring sizes (defined as the inner diameter of the annular mounting ring of the hydrophone) in the range 50 to 100 mm were employed along with a needle hydrophone. A reference membrane hydrophone, calibrated using the NPL primary standard optical interferometer in combination with the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide, was subsequently used to calibrate the other four hydrophones by comparison, again using the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide. In comparison to existing methods, the use of the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide enabled the low-frequency calibration limit of a membrane hydrophone with a ring diameter of 50 mm to be reduced from 400 kHz to 200 kHz. PMID:24803021

  7. XMM-Newton discovery of mHz quasi-periodic oscillations in the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J19140+0951

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidoli, L.; Esposito, P.; Motta, S. E.; Israel, G. L.; Rodríguez Castillo, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the discovery of mHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from the high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) IGR J19140+0951, during a 40 ks XMM-Newton observation performed in 2015, which caught the source in its faintest state ever observed. At the start of the observation, IGR J19140+0951 was at a low flux of 2 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 (2-10 keV; LX = 3 × 1033 erg s-1 at 3.6 kpc), then its emission rose reaching a flux ˜10 times higher, in a flare-like activity. The investigation of the power spectrum reveals the presence of QPOs, detected only in the second part of the observation, with a strong peak at a frequency of 1.46 ± 0.07 mHz, together with higher harmonics. The X-ray spectrum is highly absorbed (NH = 1023 cm-2), well fitted by a power law with a photon index in the range 1.2-1.8. The re-analysis of a Chandra archival observation shows a modulation at ˜0.17 ± 0.05 mHz, very likely the neutron-star spin period (although a QPO cannot be excluded). We discuss the origin of the 1.46 mHz QPO in the framework of both disc-fed and wind-fed HMXBs, favouring the quasi-spherical accretion scenario. The low flux observed by XMM-Newton leads to about three orders of magnitude the source dynamic range, overlapping with the one observed from Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs). However, since its duty cycle is not as low as in SFXTs, IGR J19140+0951 is an intermediate system between persistent supergiant HMXBs and SFXTs, suggesting a smooth transition between these two sub-classes.

  8. Lack of effect of a 60 Hz magnetic field on biomarkers of tumor promotion in the skin of SENCAR mice

    SciTech Connect

    Digiovanni, John; Johnston, D A.; Rupp, Tim; Sasser, Lyle B. ); Anderson, Larry E. ); Morris, James E. ); Miller, Douglas L. ); Kavet, R; Walborg, Earl R.

    1999-04-20

    It has been proposed that extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields may enhance tumorigenesis through a co-promotional mechanism. This hypothesis has been further tested using the two-stage model of mouse skin carcinogenesis, i.e. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced promotion of skin carcinogenesis in mice initiated by a single subcarcinogenic dose of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. Experimentation utilized three different doses of TPA within its dose-response range (0.85, 1.70 or 3.40 nmol) and examined the following early biomarkers of tumor promotion after 1, 2 and 5 weeks of promotion: increases in epidermal thickness and the labeling index of epidermal cells, induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity and down regulation of epidermal protein kinase C activity. Mice exposed to a 60 Hz magnetic field having a flux density of 2 mT for 6 hr per day for 5 days per week were compared to mice exposed to an ambient magnetic field. Within the sensitivity limits of the biomarker methodology and the exposure parameters employed, no consistent, statistically significant effects, indicative of co-promotion by the magnetic field, were demonstrated.

  9. Clinical significance of neuropsychological improvement after supplementation with omega-3 in 8-12 years old malnourished Mexican children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo and treatment clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Portillo-Reyes, Verónica; Pérez-García, Miguel; Loya-Méndez, Yolanda; Puente, Antonio E

    2014-04-01

    It has been shown that supplementation with omega-3 improves cognitive performance, especially in infants and toddlers, but it is unknown whether these results are effective in older malnourished children. The aims of this study, therefore, were to investigate the omega-3 supplementation effects in 8- to 12-year-old children and to know which neuropsychological functions improve after three months of intervention in a sample of Mexican children with mild to moderate malnutrition. This study was a randomized, double-blind, treatment and placebo study of 59 children aged 8-12 years who were individually allocated to 2 groups. The duration of the intervention lasted 3 months. Neuropsychological performance was measured at baseline and at 3 months. Results show that more than 50% of children in the treatment group had greater improvement in 11 of the 18 neuropsychological variables studied. Processing speed, visual-motor coordination, perceptual integration, attention and executive function showed improvement in more than 70% of the omega-3 supplemented children. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01199120. PMID:24508294

  10. Dynamic peripheral visual performance relates to alpha activity in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenya; Migotina, Daria; Wan, Feng; Lou, Chin Ian; Rodrigues, João; Semedo, João; Vai, Mang I; Pereira, Jose Gomes; Melicio, Fernando; Da Rosa, Agostinho C

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the relationship between the alpha activity and the central visual ability, in which the visual ability is usually assessed through static stimuli. Besides static circumstance, however in the real environment there are often dynamic changes and the peripheral visual ability in a dynamic environment (i.e., dynamic peripheral visual ability) is important for all people. So far, no work has reported whether there is a relationship between the dynamic peripheral visual ability and the alpha activity. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate their relationship. Sixty-two soccer players performed a newly designed peripheral vision task in which the visual stimuli were dynamic, while their EEG signals were recorded from Cz, O1, and O2 locations. The relationship between the dynamic peripheral visual performance and the alpha activity was examined by the percentage-bend correlation test. The results indicated no significant correlation between the dynamic peripheral visual performance and the alpha amplitudes in the eyes-open and eyes-closed resting condition. However, it was not the case for the alpha activity during the peripheral vision task: the dynamic peripheral visual performance showed significant positive inter-individual correlations with the amplitudes in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) and the individual alpha band (IAB) during the peripheral vision task. A potential application of this finding is to improve the dynamic peripheral visual performance by up-regulating alpha activity using neuromodulation techniques. PMID:25426058

  11. Effect of infrasound on cochlear damage from exposure to a 4-kHz octave band of noise

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Gary W.; Bohne, Barbara A.; Lee, Steve C.; Salt, Alec N.

    2008-01-01

    Infrasound (i.e., < 20 Hz for humans; < 100 Hz for chinchillas) is not audible, but exposure to high levels of infrasound will produce large movements of cochlear fluids. We speculated that high-level infrasound might bias the basilar membrane and perhaps be able to minimize noise-induced hearing loss. Chinchillas were simultaneously exposed to a 30 Hz tone at 100 dB SPL and a 4-kHz OBN at either 108 dB SPL for 1.75 h or 86 dB SPL for 24 h. For each animal, the tympanic membrane (TM) in one ear was perforated (~1 mm2) prior to exposure to attenuate infrasound transmission to that cochlea by about 50 dB SPL. Controls included animals that were exposed to the infrasound only or the 4-kHz OBN only. ABR threshold shifts (TSs) and DPOAE level shifts (LSs) were determined pre- and post-TM-perforation and immediately post-exposure, just before cochlear fixation. The cochleae were dehydrated, embedded in plastic, and dissected into flat preparations of the organ of Corti (OC). Each dissected segment was evaluated for losses of inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs). For each chinchilla, the magnitude and pattern of functional and hair cell losses were compared between their right and left cochleae. The TM perforation produced no ABR TS across frequency but did produce a 10–21 dB DPOAE LS from 0.6–2 kHz. The infrasound exposure alone resulted in a 10–20 dB ABR TS at and below 2 kHz, no DPOAE LS and no IHC or OHC losses. Exposure to the 4-kHz OBN alone at 108 dB produced a 10–50 dB ABR TS for 0.5–12 kHz, a 10–60 dB DPOAE LS for 0.6–16 kHz and severe OHC loss in the middle of the first turn. When infrasound was present during exposure to the 4-kHz OBN at 108 dB, the functional losses and OHC losses extended much further toward the apical and basal tips of the OC than in cochleae exposed to the 4-kHz OBN alone. Exposure to only the 4-kHz OBN at 86 dB produces a 10–40 dB ABR TS for 3–12 kHz and 10–30 dB DPOAE LS for 3–8 kHz but little or no

  12. 35 Hz shape memory alloy actuator with bending-twisting mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Rodrigue, Hugo; Choi, Ik-Seong; Kang, Yeon June; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) materials are widely used as an actuating source for bending actuators due to their high power density. However, due to the slow actuation speed of SMAs, there are limitations in their range of possible applications. This paper proposes a smart soft composite (SSC) actuator capable of fast bending actuation with large deformations. To increase the actuation speed of SMA actuator, multiple thin SMA wires are used to increase the heat dissipation for faster cooling. The actuation characteristics of the actuator at different frequencies are measured with different actuator lengths and results show that resonance can be used to realize large deformations up to 35 Hz. The actuation characteristics of the actuator can be modified by changing the design of the layered reinforcement structure embedded in the actuator, thus the natural frequency and length of an actuator can be optimized for a specific actuation speed. A model is used to compare with the experimental results of actuators with different layered reinforcement structure designs. Also, a bend-twist coupled motion using an anisotropic layered reinforcement structure at a speed of 10 Hz is also realized. By increasing their range of actuation characteristics, the proposed actuator extends the range of application of SMA bending actuators.

  13. 1 Hz linewidth Ti:sapphire laser as local oscillator for (40)Ca(+) optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wu; Huang, Yao; Guan, Hua; Liu, Peiliang; Ma, Longsheng; Gao, Kelin

    2016-06-01

    A Ti:sapphire laser at 729 nm is frequency stabilized to an ultra-stable ultra-low thermal expansion coefficient (ULE) cavity by means of Pound-Drever-Hall method. An acousto-optic modulator is used as the fast frequency feedback component. 1 Hz linewidth and 2 × 10(-15) frequency stability at 1-100 s are characterized by optical beating with a separated Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized diode laser. Compared to the universal method that the error signal feedback to inject current of a diode laser, this scheme is demonstrated to be simple and also effective for linewidth narrowing. The temperature of zero coefficient of the thermal expansion of the ULE cavity is measured with the help of a femto-second frequency comb. And the performance of the laser is well defined by locking it to the unperturbed clock transition line-center of 4 S1/2-3 D5/2 clock transition of a single laser cooled (40)Ca(+) ion. A Fourier-transform limited resonance of 6 Hz (Δv/v = 1.5 × 10(-14)) is observed. This laser is also used as the local oscillator for the comparison experiment of two (40)Ca(+) ion optical clocks and improves the stability of comparison for an order of magnitude better than the previous results. PMID:27370440

  14. 35 Hz shape memory alloy actuator with bending-twisting mode

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Rodrigue, Hugo; Choi, Ik-Seong; Kang, Yeon June; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) materials are widely used as an actuating source for bending actuators due to their high power density. However, due to the slow actuation speed of SMAs, there are limitations in their range of possible applications. This paper proposes a smart soft composite (SSC) actuator capable of fast bending actuation with large deformations. To increase the actuation speed of SMA actuator, multiple thin SMA wires are used to increase the heat dissipation for faster cooling. The actuation characteristics of the actuator at different frequencies are measured with different actuator lengths and results show that resonance can be used to realize large deformations up to 35 Hz. The actuation characteristics of the actuator can be modified by changing the design of the layered reinforcement structure embedded in the actuator, thus the natural frequency and length of an actuator can be optimized for a specific actuation speed. A model is used to compare with the experimental results of actuators with different layered reinforcement structure designs. Also, a bend-twist coupled motion using an anisotropic layered reinforcement structure at a speed of 10 Hz is also realized. By increasing their range of actuation characteristics, the proposed actuator extends the range of application of SMA bending actuators. PMID:26892438

  15. 3D measurements of ignition processes at 20 kHz in a supersonic combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Lei, Qingchun; Wu, Yue; Ombrello, Timothy M.; Carter, Campbell D.

    2015-05-01

    The ignition dynamics in a Mach 2 combustor were investigated using a three-dimensional (3D) diagnostic with 20 kHz temporal resolution. The diagnostic was based on a combination of tomographic chemiluminescence and fiber-based endoscopes (FBEs). Customized FBEs were employed to capture line-of-sight integrated chemiluminescence images (termed projections) of the combustor from eight different orientations simultaneously at 20 kHz. The measured projections were then used in a tomographic algorithm to obtain 3D reconstruction of the sparks, ignition kernel, and stable flame. Processing the reconstructions frame by frame resulted in 4D measurements. Key properties were then extracted to quantify the ignition processes, including 3D volume, surface area, sphericity, and velocity of the ignition kernel. The data collected in this work revealed detailed spatiotemporal dynamics of the ignition kernel, which are not obtainable with planar diagnostics, such as its growth, movement, and development into "stable" combustion. This work also illustrates the potential for obtaining quantitative 3D measurements using tomographic techniques and the practical utility of FBEs.

  16. Quasi-periodic (~mHz) dayside auroral brightennings associated with high-speed solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, K.

    2013-12-01

    It has been reported that dayside auroral pulsations of a few mHz frequency can occur when variations of solar wind dynamic pressure at the same frequency appear. Magnetospheric compression/decompression is attributed to the auroral pulsations. Here we report another type of dayside auroral pulsations not associated with solar wind dynamic pressure changes by using global auroral images acquired from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on board the Polar satellite. From one periodic (~2 - 8 mHz) auroral event that occurred on February 8, 2000, it is found that the auroral enhancements covered most of the day (~05 - 16 MLT) sector and did not show a latitudinal dependence. Based on in situ particle data from DMSP SSJ/4, the brightennings were associated mainly with enhanced particle precipitations from the central plasma sheet (i.e., diffuse aurora). There was no geomagnetic pulsation on the ground and in the dawn sector of the magnetosheath as indicated by the Geotail measurements. While the auroral pulsations occurred during high solar wind speed (> 600 km/s), they commenced when the interplanetary magnetic field turned northward, suggesting the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability being a source of the pulsations. We will present detail analysis results and discuss other possible mechanisms in the context of current theories.

  17. High-energy, kHz, picosecond hybrid Yb-doped chirped-pulse amplifier.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Lin; Krogen, Peter; Hong, Kyung-Han; Zapata, Luis E; Moses, Jeffrey; Calendron, Anne-Laure; Liang, Houkun; Lai, Chien-Jen; Stein, Gregory J; Keathley, Phillip D; Laurent, Guillaume; Kärtner, Franz X

    2015-04-20

    We report on a diode-pumped, hybrid Yb-doped chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser system with a compact pulse stretcher and compressor, consisting of Yb-doped fiber preamplifiers, a room-temperature Yb:KYW regenerative amplifier (RGA), and cryogenic Yb:YAG multi-pass amplifiers. The RGA provides a relatively broad amplification bandwidth and thereby a long pulse duration to mitigate B-integral in the CPA chain. The ~1030-nm laser pulses are amplified up to 70 mJ at 1-kHz repetition rate, currently limited by available optics apertures, and then compressed to ~6 ps with high efficiency. The near-diffraction-limited beam focusing quality is demonstrated with M(x)(2) = 1.1 and M(y)(2) = 1.2. The shot-to-shot energy fluctuation is as low as ~1% (rms), and the long-term energy drift and beam pointing stability for over 8 hours measurement are ~3.5% and <6 μrad (rms), respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this hybrid laser system produces the most energetic picosecond pulses at kHz repetition rates among rod-type laser amplifiers. With an optically synchronized Ti:sapphire seed laser, it provides a versatile platform optimized for pumping optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification systems as well as driving inverse Compton scattered X-rays. PMID:25969056

  18. Harvesting Low-Frequency (<5 Hz) Irregular Mechanical Energy: A Possible Killer Application of Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Zi, Yunlong; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-26

    Electromagnetic generators (EMGs) and triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are the two most powerful approaches for harvesting ambient mechanical energy, but the effectiveness of each depends on the triggering frequency. Here, after systematically comparing the performances of EMGs and TENGs under low-frequency motion (<5 Hz), we demonstrated that the output performance of EMGs is proportional to the square of the frequency, while that of TENGs is approximately in proportion to the frequency. Therefore, the TENG has a much better performance than that of the EMG at low frequency (typically 0.1-3 Hz). Importantly, the extremely small output voltage of the EMG at low frequency makes it almost inapplicable to drive any electronic unit that requires a certain threshold voltage (∼0.2-4 V), so that most of the harvested energy is wasted. In contrast, a TENG has an output voltage that is usually high enough (>10-100 V) and independent of frequency so that most of the generated power can be effectively used to power the devices. Furthermore, a TENG also has advantages of light weight, low cost, and easy scale up through advanced structure designs. All these merits verify the possible killer application of a TENG for harvesting energy at low frequency from motions such as human motions for powering small electronics and possibly ocean waves for large-scale blue energy. PMID:27077467

  19. 23 kHz MEMS based swept source for optical coherence tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Barry; Sun, Cuiru; Harduar, Mark K; Mariampillai, Adrian; Isamoto, Keiji; Chong, Changho; Standish, Beau A; Yang, Victor X D

    2011-01-01

    The transition from benchtop to clinical system often requires the medical technology to be robust, portable and accurate. This poses a challenge to current swept source optical coherence tomography imaging systems, as the bulk of the systems footprint is due to laser components. With the recent advancement of micromachining technology, we demonstrate the characterization of a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) swept source laser for optical coherence tomography imaging (OCT). This laser utilizes a 2 degree of freedom MEMS scanning mirror and a diffraction grating, which are arranged in a Littrow configuration. This resulted in a swept source laser that was capable of scanning at 23.165 kHz (bidirectional) or 11.582 kHz (unidirectional). The free spectral range of the laser was ≈ 100 nm with a central wavelength of ≈ 1330 nm. The 6 dB roll off depth was measured to be at 2.5 mm. Furthermore, the structural morphology of a human finger and tadpole (Xenopus laevis) were evaluated. The overall volumetric footprint of the laser source was measured to be 70 times less than non-MEMS swept sources. Continued work on the miniaturization of OCT system is on going. It is hypothesized that the overall laser size can be reduced for suitable OCT imaging for a point of care application. PMID:22255739

  20. Spectroscopic study of 50 Hz pulsed Ar-O2 mixture plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, M.; Rehman, N. U.; Khan, A. W.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2016-06-01

    Plasma sterilization is widely used to disinfect the heat sensitive materials. In this study, we have investigated 50 Hz pulsed capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) system operated in Ar-O2 mixture. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to identify the optimum conditions suitable for plasma based sterilization. Explicitly, excitation temperature of Ar-I lines, atomic oxygen density, dissociation fraction and UV radiation intensity are measured as a function of discharge parameters. The excitation temperature is calculated using Boltzmann plot method whereas OES has also been employed to evaluate the ground state atomic oxygen density and dissociation fraction. Similarly the normalized UV radiation intensity is determined from UV spectrum in 200-400 nm range. The results show that the total UV emission has optimum value at 20% oxygen, 2 mbar pressure and 2.68 mA/cm2 current density in the mixture. While excitation temperature, atomic oxygen density and dissociation fraction increase with the current density. A comparison with the literature suggests 50 Hz CCP system operated in Ar-O2 mixture has the potential of a cheap and reliable system for plasma sterilization.

  1. Multi-mJ, kHz, ps deep-ultraviolet source.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Lin; Krogen, Peter; Liang, Houkun; Stein, Gregory J; Moses, Jeffrey; Lai, Chien-Jen; Siqueira, Jonathas P; Zapata, Luis E; Kärtner, Franz X; Hong, Kyung-Han

    2015-02-15

    We demonstrate a 0.56-GW, 1-kHz, 4.2-ps, 2.74-mJ deep-ultraviolet (DUV) laser at ∼257.7  nm with a beam propagation factor (M2) of ∼2.54 from a frequency-quadrupled cryogenic multi-stage Yb-doped chirped-pulse amplifier. The frequency quadrupling is achieved using LiB3O5 and β-BaB2O4 crystals for near-infrared (NIR)-to-green and green-to-DUV conversion, respectively. An overall NIR-to-DUV efficiency of ∼10% has been achieved, which is currently limited by the thermal-induced phase mismatching and the DUV-induced degradation of transmittance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest peak-power picosecond DUV source from a diode-pumped solid-state laser operating at kHz repetition rates. PMID:25680176

  2. Diurnal patterns in brain biogenic amines of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, B.J.; Anderson, L.E.; Lowery, C.I.; Adey, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Levels of brain neurotransmitters and their metabolites, as well as concentrations of enzymes associated with their synthesis and metabolism, fluctuate during the day in patterns defined as circadian. The present study examined these rhythms in albino rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Thirty-six animals were exposed to a 39 kV/m field for 4 weeks, 20 h/day, in a parallel-plate electrode system. A group of 36 sham animals was similarly handled and housed in a nonenergized exposure system. On the sampling day, animals were sacrificed at 4-h intervals throughout the 24-h day. Brains were removed, dissected, and kept frozen until chemically analyzed. The levels of biogenic amines and their acidic metabolites in the striatum, hypothalamus, and hippocampus were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) methods. Repeated exposure to 60-Hz electric fields produced significant alterations in the diurnal rhythms of several biogenic amines: dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, the primary metabolite of dopamine in the rat) in the striatum, and norepinephrine, dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA; serotonin metabolite) in the hypothalamus. Levels of serotonin in the striatum and hypothalamus showed clear circadian patterns that was not affected by the field. No diurnal or field-related changes were observed in the hippocampal amines.

  3. Study on a Single-Stage 120 HZ Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. Z.; Gan, Z. H.; Qiu, L. M.; Chen, J.; Li, Z. P.

    2010-04-01

    Miniaturization of pulse tube cryocoolers is required for some particular applications where size and mass for devices are limited. In order to pack more cooling power in a small volume, higher operating frequencies are commonly used for Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers. To maintain high efficiency of the regenerator with a higher frequency, a higher charging pressure, smaller hydraulic diameters of regenerator material and a shorter regenerator length should be applied. A rapid growth of research and development on pulse tube cryocoolers operating at a high frequency over 100 Hz in the last 3 years has occurred. In this study, a single stage pulse tube cryocooler with 120 Hz to provide 10 W of lift at 80 K has been developed by using the numerical model, known as REGEN 3.2. Experiments performed on this cryocooler driven by a CFIC linear compressor show that a no-load temperature of 49.6 K was achieved and the net refrigeration power at 78.5 K was 8.0 W. The effect of pulse tube orientation was tested, and the copper velvet as a regenerator matrix was proposed for high frequency operation.

  4. Reducing the Heat Load on the LCLS 120 Hz RF Gun with RF Pulse Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.

    2005-01-31

    The LCLS injector must operate at 120 Hz repetition frequency but to date the maximum operating frequency of an S-band rf gun has been 50 Hz. The high fields desired for the LCLS gun operation limit the repetition frequency due to thermal expansion causing rf detuning and field redistribution. One method of addressing the thermal loading problem is too reduce the power lost on the cavity walls by properly shaping the rf pulse incident on the gun. The idea is to reach the steady state field value in the gun faster than the time constant of the gun would allow when using a flat incident rf pulse. By increasing the incident power by about a factor of three and then decreasing the incident power when the field reaches the desired value in the gun, the field build up time can be decreased by more than a factor of three. Using this technique the heat load is also decreased by more than a factor of three. In addition the rf coupling coefficient can be increased from the typical critically coupled designs to an overcoupled design which also helps reduce the field build up time. Increasing the coupling coefficient from 1 to 2 reduces the heat load by another 25% and still limits the reflected power and coupling hole size to manageable levels.

  5. A microrod-resonator Brillouin laser with 240 Hz absolute linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, William; Becker, Joe; Cole, Daniel C.; Coillet, Aurelien; Baynes, Fred N.; Papp, Scott B.; Diddams, Scott A.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an ultralow-noise microrod-resonator based laser that oscillates on the gain supplied by the stimulated Brillouin scattering optical nonlinearity. Microresonator Brillouin lasers are known to offer an outstanding frequency noise floor, which is limited by fundamental thermal fluctuations. Here, we show experimental evidence that thermal effects also dominate the close-to-carrier frequency fluctuations. The 6 mm diameter microrod resonator used in our experiments has a large optical mode area of ∼100 μm2, and hence its 10 ms thermal time constant filters the close-to-carrier optical frequency noise. The result is an absolute laser linewidth of 240 Hz with a corresponding white-frequency noise floor of 0.1 Hz2 Hz‑1. We explain the steady-state performance of this laser by measurements of its operation state and of its mode detuning and lineshape. Our results highlight a mechanism for noise that is common to many microresonator devices due to the inherent coupling between intracavity power and mode frequency. We demonstrate the ability to reduce this noise through a feedback loop that stabilizes the intracavity power.

  6. a Thermoacoustically-Driven Pulse Tube Cryocryocooler Operating around 300HZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, G. Y.; Zhu, S. L.; Dai, W.; Luo, E. C.

    2008-03-01

    High frequency operation of the thermoacoustic cryocooler system, i.e. pulse tube cryocooler driven by thermoacoustic engine, leads to reduced size, which is quite attractive to small-scale cryogenic applications. In this work, a no-load coldhead temperature of 77.8 K is achieved on a 292 Hz pulse tube cryocooler driven by a standing-wave thermoacoustic engine with 3.92 MPa helium gas and 1750 W heat input. To improve thermal efficiency, a high frequency thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine is also built to drive the same pulse tube cryocooler, and a no-load temperature of 109 K was obtained with 4.38 MPa helium gas, 292 Hz working frequency and 400W heating power. Ideas such as tapered resonators, acoustic amplifier tubes and simple thin tubes without reservoir are used to effectively suppress harmonic modes, amplify the acoustic pressure wave available to the pulse tube cryocooler and provide desired acoustic impedance for the pulse tube cryocooler, respectively. Comparison of systems with different thermoacoustic engines is made. Numerical simulations based on the linear thermoacoustic theory have also been done for comparison with experimental results, which shows reasonable agreement.

  7. 1 Hz linewidth Ti:sapphire laser as local oscillator for 40Ca+ optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Wu; Huang, Yao; Guan, Hua; Liu, Peiliang; Ma, Longsheng; Gao, Kelin

    2016-06-01

    A Ti:sapphire laser at 729 nm is frequency stabilized to an ultra-stable ultra-low thermal expansion coefficient (ULE) cavity by means of Pound-Drever-Hall method. An acousto-optic modulator is used as the fast frequency feedback component. 1 Hz linewidth and 2 × 10-15 frequency stability at 1-100 s are characterized by optical beating with a separated Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized diode laser. Compared to the universal method that the error signal feedback to inject current of a diode laser, this scheme is demonstrated to be simple and also effective for linewidth narrowing. The temperature of zero coefficient of the thermal expansion of the ULE cavity is measured with the help of a femto-second frequency comb. And the performance of the laser is well defined by locking it to the unperturbed clock transition line-center of 4 S1/2-3 D5/2 clock transition of a single laser cooled 40Ca+ ion. A Fourier-transform limited resonance of 6 Hz (Δv/v = 1.5 × 10-14) is observed. This laser is also used as the local oscillator for the comparison experiment of two 40Ca+ ion optical clocks and improves the stability of comparison for an order of magnitude better than the previous results.

  8. Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces the concept of constant Volt/Hz operation of offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore WPPs requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cables, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current transmission, which is economical for transmission distances longer than 50 kilometers. In the concept presented here, the onshore substation is operated at 60 Hz synced with the grid, and the offshore substation is operated at variable frequency and voltage, thus allowing the WPP to be operated at constant Volt/Hz.

  9. High power Yb:YAG diode pumped LUCIA front-end oscillator (250 mJ, 50 ns, 2 Hz).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahbah, S.; Albach, D.; Assémat, F.; Bourdet, G.; Chanteloup, J.-C.; Piatti, P.; Pluvinage, M.; Vincent, B.; Touzé, G. L.

    2008-05-01

    The LULI laboratory is building a new intense laser chain with an energy goal of 100, J and at high repetition rate (10 Hz). This chain, called LUCIA, is composed of an oscillator and two diode pumped Yb:YAG amplifiers. We will show the progress of our work on the oscillator. In terms of performance in free running regime, we reach energies of about 4 J at 2 Hz with diode pumping energies of 11, J. In Q-switch regime 49ns long pulses at a repetition rate of 2 Hz were observed.

  10. Measurements and mechanisms investigation of seismic wave attenuation for frequencies between 1 and 100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, N.; Madonna, C.; Saenger, E. H.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic wave attenuation at low frequencies in the earth crust has been explained by partial saturation as well as permeability models. We present results obtained by the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel (BBAV) which measures seismic wave attenuation using the sub-resonance method in the frequency range 0.01 - 100 Hz. The apparatus also allows the investigation of attenuation mechanisms related to fluid flow by means of five pore pressure sensors placed in the specimen. This allows continuous local measurements of pore pressure changes generated by stress field changes. Measurements were performed on 76 mm diameter, 250 mm long, 20% porosity, and ~500 mD permeability Berea sandstone samples. The confining pressure was varied between 0 and 20 MPa, and the specimens were saturated with water between 0% and 90%. Attenuation measurements show dependence with saturation. For instance, when samples are at dry conditions they exhibit attenuation values around 0.01, the same sample saturated with 90% water shows attenuation values between 0.018 and 0.028 across the entire frequency range. Attenuation is also confining pressure dependent. For instance, variations of confining pressure ranging between 0 and 8 MPa lead to quality factors between 40 and 10 at 60 Hz and 60% water saturation. Best fits on these measurements reveal that the corner frequency of the attenuation mechanism decreases from ~800 to ~200 Hz with increasing confining pressure. Using calibration measurements with Aluminum the possibility of apparatus resonances can be ruled out. Local pore pressure measurements corroborate this observation showing pore pressure evolution as a function of saturation. The results are discussed and interpreted in light of known attenuation mechanisms for partially saturated rocks (patchy saturation and squirt flow). We rule out the possibility of patchy saturation occurrence, but squirt flow would offer an explanation. The confining pressure dependence could be the result of

  11. Rare Super Cyclone Phailin in the Indian Ocean: Analysis of VIIRS High-Resolution IR Images and 40 kHz Sferics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, A. B.; Pandit, J.; Bhattacharya, R.

    2014-10-01

    VIIRS high-resolution infrared (IR) images of the rare super cyclone Phailin of the Northern Indian Ocean as well as 40 kHz sferics data as recorded over Kalyani have been analyzed in this paper with a view to investigate the characteristics of the super cyclone. The maximum IR brightness temperature in the eye of the cyclone was pretty warm and it was illuminated by airglow. The Phailin was one of the strongest cyclones with a peak estimated intensity of 140 kts. Our round-the-clock sferics data also reveals remarkable changes in the sferics record on October 10, 2013, when the super cyclone was active.

  12. Neurochemical effects of a 20 kHz magnetic field on the central nervous system in prenatally exposed mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dimberg, Y.

    1995-09-01

    C57/B1 mice were exposed during pregnancy (gestation days 0--19) to a 20 kHz magnetic field (MF). The asymmetric sawtooth-waveform magnetic field in the exposed racks had a flux density of 15 {micro}T (peak to peak). After 19 days, the exposure was terminated, and the mice were housed individually under normal laboratory conditions. On postnatal day (PD) 1, PD21, and PD308, various neurochemical markers in the brains of the offspring were investigated and the brains weighed. No significant difference was found in the whole brain weight at PD1 or PD21 between exposed offspring and control animals. However, on PD308, a significant decrease in weight of the whole brain was detected in exposed animals. No significant differences were found in the weight of cortex, hippocampus, septum, or cerebellum on nay of the sampling occasions, nor were any significant differences detected in protein-, DNA-level, nerve growth factor (NGF), acetylcholine esterase- (AChE), or 2{prime},3{prime}-cyclic nucleotide 3{prime}-phosphodiesterase- (CNP; marker for oligodendrocytes) activities on PD21 in cerebellum. Cortex showed a more complex pattern of response to MF: MF treatment resulted in a decrease in DNA level and increases in the activities of CNP, AChE, and NGF protein. On PD308, the amount of DNA was significantly reduced in MF-treated cerebellum and CNP activity was still enhanced in MF-treated cortex compared to controls. Most of the effect of MF treatment during the embryonic period were similar to those induced by ionizing radiation but much weaker. However, the duration of the exposure required to elucidate the response of different markers to MF seems to be greater and effects appear later during development compared to responses to ionizing radiation.

  13. Improving the sensitivity of future GW observatories in the 1-10 Hz band: Newtonian and seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beker, M. G.; Cella, G.; Desalvo, R.; Doets, M.; Grote, H.; Harms, J.; Hennes, E.; Mandic, V.; Rabeling, D. S.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van Leeuwen, C. M.

    2011-02-01

    The next generation gravitational wave interferometric detectors will likely be underground detectors to extend the GW detection frequency band to frequencies below the Newtonian noise limit. Newtonian noise originates from the continuous motion of the Earth's crust driven by human activity, tidal stresses and seismic motion, and from mass density fluctuations in the atmosphere. It is calculated that on Earth's surface, on a typical day, it will exceed the expected GW signals at frequencies below 10 Hz. The noise will decrease underground by an unknown amount. It is important to investigate and to quantify this expected reduction and its effect on the sensitivity of future detectors, to plan for further improvement strategies. We report about some of these aspects. Analytical models can be used in the simplest scenarios to get a better qualitative and semi-quantitative understanding. As more complete modeling can be done numerically, we will discuss also some results obtained with a finite-element-based modeling tool. The method is verified by comparing its results with the results of analytic calculations for surface detectors. A key point about noise models is their initial parameters and conditions, which require detailed information about seismic motion in a real scenario. We will describe an effort to characterize the seismic activity at the Homestake mine which is currently in progress. This activity is specifically aimed to provide informations and to explore the site as a possible candidate for an underground observatory. Although the only compelling reason to put the interferometer underground is to reduce the Newtonian noise, we expect that the more stable underground environment will have a more general positive impact on the sensitivity. We will end this report with some considerations about seismic and suspension noise.

  14. Effects of exposure to 30 kV/m, 60-Hz electric fields on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field produces significant change (stress) in the social behavior of adult male baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis). One group of eight baboons was exposed to an electric field (12 hours per day, 7 days per week for 6 weeks) while a second group of eight baboons was maintained in a sham-exposure (control) condition. Exposed subjects and control subjects were compared over three, six-week experimental periods (pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure). Performance rates of six categories of social behaviors (passive affinity, active affinity, approach, tension, threat, and attack) and four categories of nonsocial behaviors (forage, manipulate, posture, and stereotypy) were used to compare the two groups. The results of our study indicate that (1) there were no significant differences between the two groups during the pre-exposure or post-exposure periods; (2) during the exposure period, experimental and control groups exhibited statistically significant differences in the mean performance rates of three behavior categories; (3) within-group comparisons across periods indicate that the experimentally exposed group exhibited statistically significant changes in passive affinity, tension, and stereotypy; and (4) changes in behavior performance among the exposed subjects reflect a stress response to the electric field.

  15. Finite element static displacement optimization of 20-100 kHz flexural transducers for fully portable ultrasound applicator.

    PubMed

    Bawiec, Christopher R; Sunny, Youhan; Nguyen, An T; Samuels, Joshua A; Weingarten, Michael S; Zubkov, Leonid A; Lewin, Peter A

    2013-02-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a finite-element model and subsequent stationary analysis performed to optimize individual flexural piezoelectric elements for operation in the frequency range of 20-100kHz. These elements form the basic building blocks of a viable, un-tethered, and portable ultrasound applicator that can produce intensities on the order of 100mW/cm(2) spatial-peak temporal-peak (I(SPTP)) with minimum (on the order of 15V) excitation voltage. The ultrasound applicator can be constructed with different numbers of individual transducer elements and different geometries such that its footprint or active area is adjustable. The primary motivation behind this research was to develop a tether-free, battery operated, fully portable ultrasound applicator for therapeutic applications such as wound healing and non-invasive transdermal delivery of both naked and encapsulated drugs. It is shown that careful selection of the components determining applicator architecture allows the displacement amplitude to be maximized for a specific frequency of operation. The work described here used the finite-element analysis software COMSOL to identify the geometry and material properties that permit the applicator's design to be optimized. By minimizing the excitation voltage required to achieve the desired output (100mW/cm(2)I(SPTP)) the power source (rechargeable Li-Polymer batteries) size may be reduced permitting both the electronics and ultrasound applicator to fit in a wearable housing. PMID:23040829

  16. 300 Hz thermoacoustically driven pulse tube cooler for temperature below 100 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Yu, Guoyao; Zhu, Shanglong; Luo, Ercang

    2007-01-01

    This letter introduces a thermoacoustically driven pulse tube cooler system working at around 300Hz. In the system, a thermoacoustic standing-wave engine is used to drive a Stirling-type pulse tube cooler. Besides the design considerations for key components in each subsystem, the benefits of using the acoustic amplifier tube to couple the engine and the cooler have been analyzed through both calculations and experiments. So far, a lowest no-load temperature of 95K has been obtained on the system with the acoustic amplifier tube being used. Since high frequency operation of the system could lead to a much reduced system size, the result shows the potential of using the system in small-scale cryogenic applications.

  17. Mechanism for generation of 2-3 kHz radiation beyond the termination shock

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, Wieslaw M.

    1996-07-20

    Intensity of radio emissions at 2 to 3 kHz detected by the Voyager plasma wave instrument in the outer heliosphere can possibly be explained provided that the electron beams generating Langmuir waves exist also in the postshock plasma due to secondary shocks in the compressed solar wind beyond the termination shock. The mechanism consists of two steps. First, the beam of energetic electrons generate a high level of electrostatic Langmuir plasma waves. Second, electromagnetic radiation results from the non-linear interaction between Langmuir waves. The field strength of Langmuir waves required to generate the second harmonic emissions are of 50-100 {mu}V m{sup 1}. These waves may be observed in situ by Voyager in the near future.

  18. Characterization of focused beam of desktop 10-Hz capillary-discharge 46.9-nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyšin, Ludek; Burian, Tomás; Chalupský, Jaromír; Grisham, Michael; Hájková, Vera; Heinbuch, Scott; Jakubczak, Krzysztof; Martz, Dale; Mocek, Tomás; Pira, Peter; Polan, Jirí; Rocca, Jorge J.; Rus, Bedrich; Sobota, Jaroslav; Juha, Libor

    2009-05-01

    The desktop capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL) providing 10-μJ nanosecond pulses of coherent 46.9-nm radiation with a repetition rate up to 12 Hz was developed and built at the Colorado State University in Fort Collins and then installed in Prague. The beam of the laser was focused by a spherical mirror covered with Si/Sc multilayer coating onto the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) - PMMA. Interaction parameters vary by changing the distance between sample surface and beam focus. The samples were exposed to various numbers of shots. Analysis of damaged PMMA by atomic force (AFM) and Nomarski (DIC - differential interference contrast) microscopes allows not only to determine the key characteristics of the focused beam (e.g. Rayleigh's parameter, focal spot diameter, tight focus position, etc.) but also to investigate mechanisms of the radiation-induced erosion processes.

  19. Transmission line design for a power distribution system at 20 kHz for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelby, L. W.; Mathes, J. B.; Shawver, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A low inductance, low characteristic impedance transmission line was designed for a 20 kHz power distribution system. Several different conductor configurations were considered: strip lines, interdigitated metal ribbons, and standard insulated wires in multiwire configurations (circular and rectangular cylindrical arrangements). The final design was a rectangular arrangement of multiple wires of the same gauge with alternating polarities from wire to wire. This offered the lowest inductance per unit length (on the order of several nanohenries/meter) and the lowest characteristic impedance (on the order of one Ohm). Standard multipin connectors with gold-plated elements were recommended with this transmission line, the junction boxes to be internally connected with flat metal ribbons for low inductance, and the line to be constructed in sections of suitable length. Computer programs for the calculation of inductance of multiwire lines and of capacitances of strip lines were developed.

  20. 50 kHz bottom backscattering measurements from two types of artificially roughened sandy bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Su-Uk; Cho, Sungho; Choi, Jee Woong

    2016-07-01

    Laboratory measurements of 50 kHz bottom backscattering strengths as a function of grazing angle were performed on the sandy bottom of a water tank; two types of bottom roughnesses, a relatively smooth interface and a rough interface, were created on the bottom surface. The roughness profiles of the two interface types were measured directly using an ultrasound arrival time difference of 5 MHz and then were Fourier transformed to obtain the roughness power spectra. The measured backscattering strengths increased from ‑29 to 0 dB with increasing grazing angle from 35 to 86°, which were compared to theoretical backscattering model predictions. The comparison results implied that bottom roughness is a key factor in accurately predicting bottom scattering for a sandy bottom.

  1. Band limited emission with central frequency around 2 Hz accompanying powerful cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troitskaia, V. A.; Shepetnov, K. S.; Dvobnia, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    It has been found that powerful cyclones are proceeded, accompanied and followed by narrow band electromagnetic emission with central frequency around 2 Hz. It is shown that the signal from this emission is unique and clearly distinguishable from known types of magnetic pulsations, spectra of local thunderstorms, and signals from industrial sources. This emission was first observed during an unusually powerful cyclone with tornadoes in the western European part of the Soviet Union, which passed by the observatory of Borok from south to north-east. The emission has been confirmed by analysis of similar events in Antarctica. The phenomenon described presents a new aspect of interactions of processes in the lower atmosphere and the ionosphere.

  2. Effects of 60 Hz electrical fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.

    1988-04-06

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This program is being conducted at Southwest Research Institute as part of an international collaborative information exchange and scientific research effort involving the United State Department of Energy, Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and Japan's Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry. Since August of 1984, four major research projects were successfully completed. 48 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. All-weather ultraviolet solar spectra retrieved at a 0.5-Hz sampling rate.

    PubMed

    Thorseth, T M; Kjeldstad, B

    1999-10-20

    A measurement scheme and an algorithm have been developed to retrieve global irradiance ultraviolet solar spectra (290-400 nm) at a sampling rate of 0.5 Hz. The algorithm combines spectral irradiance measurements performed with a slow (a few minutes) scanning spectroradiometer (Optronic Model OL752) and a moderate bandwidth multichannel radiometer (Biospherical ground-based ultraviolet radiometer Model 541). The filter radiometer instrument allows for continuous observations of global UV radiation at five channels (approximately 10-nm bandwidth), performed simultaneously with spectral measurements. Information about changing cloud conditions during a spectral scan was retrieved from filter measurements and applied to spectral data, hence estimated spectra without cloud variations could be constructed. The quality of the estimated spectra depends on data quality from both instruments. The method works well in all kinds of weather conditions, as long as the Sun is above the horizon and none of the instruments are hampered by measurement errors. PMID:18324148

  4. Femtosecond pump/supercontinuum-probe setup with 20 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Auböck, Gerald; Consani, Cristina; Monni, Roberto; Cannizzo, Andrea; van Mourik, Frank; Chergui, Majed

    2012-09-01

    We developed a fast multichannel detection system for pump-probe spectroscopy, capable of detecting single shot super-continuum spectra at the repetition rate (10-50 kHz) of an amplified femtosecond laser system. By tandem pumping the amplifier with three pump lasers we obtain very low noise operation, with less than 0.1% rms intensity fluctuations at the output of the amplifier. We also propose an alternative way of chopping the pump beam. With a synchronized scanning mirror two spots in the sample are illuminated by the train of pump pulses in an alternating fashion, such that when both spots are interrogated by the probe pulse, the duty cycle of the experiment is doubled. PMID:23020360

  5. The gravitational resolving power of global seismic networks in the 0.1-10 Hz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Kamenshchik, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Among the first attempts to detect gravitational waves, the seismic approach pre-dates the digital era. Major advances in computational power, seismic instrumentation and in the knowledge of seismic noise suggest to reappraise its potential. Using the whole earth as a detector, with the thousands of digital seismometers of seismic global networks as a single phased array, more than two decades of continuous seismic noise data are available and can be readily sifted at the only cost of (a pretty gigantic) computation. Using a subset of data, we show that absolute strains h ≲10-17 on burst gravitational pulses and h ≲10-21 on periodic signals may be feasibly resolved in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, only marginally covered by current advanced LIGO and future eLISA. However, theoretical predictions for the largest cosmic gravitational emissions at these frequencies are a few orders of magnitude lower.

  6. Influence of Liquid Height on Mechanical and Chemical Effects in 20 kHz Sonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Khuyen Viet Bao; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Koda, Shinobu

    2013-07-01

    We examined the influence of liquid height on mechanical and chemical effects in 20 kHz sonication with a new Langevin-type transducer. Mechanical effects were evaluated from the degradation of polyethylene oxide in aqueous solution and chemical effects were measured with potassium iodide solution. Standing waves or reactive zones were observed using sonochemical luminescence and aluminum foil erosion. The observed wavelength was reduced by coupled vibration, compared with the wavelength calculated by dividing velocity by irradiation frequency. As liquid height increased, mechanical effects were suppressed. In the case of chemical effects, the stable sonochemical efficiency gained at a height of over 120 mm, and the sonochemical efficiency were also markedly higher than those of a conventional horn-type one.

  7. 20 kHz, 25 kVA node power transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, S.

    1989-01-01

    The electrical and mechanical design information and the electrical and thermal testing performed on the 440-208-V rms, 20-kHz, 25-kVa prototype node transformer are summarized. The calculated efficiency of the node transformer is 99.3 percent based on core loss and copper loss test data, and its maximum calculated load regulation is 0.7 percent. The node transformer has a weight of 19.7 lb and has a power density of 0.8 lb/kW. The hot-spot temperature rise is estimated to be 33 C above the cold plate mounting base. This proof-of-concept transformer design is a viable candidate for the space station Freedom application.

  8. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-01-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways. PMID:26596641

  9. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-11-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways.

  10. Differently patterned airflows induced by 1-kHz femtosecond laser filaments in a cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liang, Hong; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Wei, Yingxia; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-11-01

    Airflow induced by femtosecond laser (800 nm/1 kHz/25 fs) filamentation with different lengths was investigated in a laboratory cloud chamber. Various filament lengths were generated by adjusting laser energy and lens focal length. It was found that airflow patterns are closely related to filament intensity and length. Intense and long filaments are beneficial in updraft generation with large vortices above the filament, while intense and short filaments tend to promote the formation of well-contacted vortices below the filament. Differently patterned airflows induced elliptical snow piles with different masses. We simulated airflow in a cloud chamber numerically taking laser filaments as heat sources. The mechanisms of differently patterned airflow and snow formation induced by filaments were discussed.

  11. 100 kHz Mueller polarimeter for laser scanning polarimetric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gratiet, A.; Dubreuil, M.; Rivet, S.; Le Grand, Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new setup was recently proposed to perform Mueller matrix polarimetry at 100 kHz using a swept laser source, high order retarders and a single channel photodetector. In this communication, we present the implementation of this setup on a laser scanning microscope to perform high speed scanning Mueller microscopy in transmission. Calibration of the instrument is briefly described and precision and stability over time are evaluated. Finally, Mueller images of a manufactured scene are reported. To our best knowledge, this is the first time that Mueller polarimetry is performed using a laser scanning microscope. We further plan to develop confocal/nonlinear/Mueller microscopy from the same setup in order to produce multimodal contrast images of biological samples.

  12. Sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 50 hz helps in retaining calcium in tibias of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Khanduja, K L; Syal, N

    2003-03-01

    Effect of 50Hz sinusoidal electromagnetic field (SEMF) on normal bone physiology was evaluated in young and old female and male Wistar rats. Exposure to SEMF resulted in increased 45Ca retention in tibias of aged animals only. Levels of serum calcium in young female and male rats were significantly less than in respective aged rats. These were further decreased after 4 weeks of SEMF exposure. SEMF exposure did not change the serum calcium levels in aged rats, and inorganic phosphates in young and aged animals. Similarly, the levels of tartrate resistant acid and alkaline phosphatase were significantly decreased in young rats, whereas the levels remained unchanged in aged rats of either sex. The results revealed that SEMF of 1mT can prevent bone calcium loss due to aging in animals. PMID:15267147

  13. Single-beam Denisyuk holograms recording with pulsed 30Hz RGB laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharovas, Stanislovas; Bakanas, Ramūnas; Stankauskas, Algimantas

    2016-03-01

    It is well known fact that holograms can be recorded either by continuous wave (CW) laser, or by single pulse coming from pulsed laser. However, multi-pulse or multiple-exposure holograms were used only in interferometry as well as for information storage. We have used Geola's single longitudinal mode pulsed RGB laser to record Denisyuk type holograms. We successfully recorded objects situated at the distance of more than 30cm, employing the multi-pulse working regime of the laser. To record Denisyuk hologram we have used 50 ns duration 440, 660nm wavelength and 35ns duration 532nm wavelength laser pulses at the repetition rate of 30Hz. As photosensitive medium we have used Slavich-Geola PFG-03C glass photoplate. Radiations with different wavelengths were mixed into "white" beam, collimated and directed onto the photoplate. For further objects illumination an additional flat silver coated mirror was used.

  14. 100-kHz 22-fs Ti:sapphire regenerative amplification laser with programmable spectral control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nam, Chang Hee; Lee, Seong Ku

    2016-05-01

    An ultrashort, high-power Ti:sapphire laser operating at 100 kHz was developed. A regenerative amplifier with a cryogenically cooled Ti:sapphire crystal and a grism compressor were incorporated in the laser. For achieving a wide bandwidth of 78 nm, a programmable spectral control filter was applied to the regenerative amplifier to compensate for the gain narrowing effect. An output power of 1.4 GW with near Fourier-transform-limited pulse duration of 22 fs was achieved after minimizing a spectral phase error with the grism compressor, and the measured beam quality factor ( M 2) was less than 1.2. This high-quality laser will facilitate applications requiring high-repetition rate, ultrashort, high-power laser pulses.

  15. 200 Hz repetition frequency joule-level high beam quality Nd:YAG nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jisi; Tang, Xiongxin; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Haocheng

    2016-06-01

    A joule-level Nd:YAG nanosecond laser of high repetition frequency and high beam quality is developed out. The laser is designed as a MOPA system mainly including single longitudinal mode seed, pre-amplifier unit an d power amplifier unit. In order to obtain the high-quality laser beam output, phase conjugation is adopted to compensate the laser beam distortion. Under the condition of 200 Hz high repetition frequency and 8.19 μJ single pulse energy injected by the single longitudinal mode seed, 1.53 J output energy is gained. The output laser beam is of 9 mm diameter, 7.41 ns pulse width, the far field beam spot 1.32 times the value of the diffraction limit, 1.2% energy stability (RMS) and less than 13 μrad far field beam spot angle shift.

  16. Comparison of lower-frequency (<1000 Hz) downhole seismic sources for use at environmental sites

    SciTech Connect

    Elbring, G.J.

    1995-03-01

    In conjunction with crosswell seismic surveying being done at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington, four different downhole seismic sources have been tested between the same set of boreholes. The four sources evaluated were the Bolt airgun, the OYO-Conoco orbital vibrator, and two Sandia-developed vertical vibrators, one pneumatically-driven, and the other based on a magnetostrictive actuator. The sources generate seismic energy in the lower frequency range of less than 1000 Hz and have different frequency characteristics, radiation patterns, energy levels, and operational considerations. Collection of identical data sets with all four sources allows the direct comparison of these characteristics and an evaluation of the suitability of each source for a given site and target.

  17. Direct welding of glass and metal by 1  kHz femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua

    2015-10-20

    In the welding process between similar or dissimilar materials, inserting an intermediate layer and pressure assistance are usually thought to be necessary. In this paper, the direct welding between alumina-silicate glass and metal (aluminum, copper, and steel), under exposure from 1 kHz femtosecond laser pulses without any auxiliary processes, is demonstrated. The micron/nanometer-sized metal particles induced by laser ablation were considered to act as the adhesive in the welding process. The welding parameters were optimized by varying the pulse energy and the translation velocity of the sample. The shear joining strength characterized by a shear force testing equipment was as high as 2.34 MPa. This direct bonding technology has potential for applications in medical devices, sensors, and photovoltaic devices. PMID:26560385

  18. 0.26-Hz-linewidth ultrastable lasers at 1557 nm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lifei; Jiang, Yanyi; Ma, Chaoqun; Qi, Wen; Yu, Hongfu; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2016-01-01

    Narrow-linewidth ultrastable lasers at 1.5 μm are essential in many applications such as coherent transfer of light through fiber and precision spectroscopy. Those applications all rely on the ultimate performance of the lasers. Here we demonstrate two ultrastable lasers at 1557 nm with a most probable linewidth of 0.26 Hz by independently frequency-stabilizing to the resonance of 10-cm-long ultrastable Fabry-Pérot cavities at room temperature. The fractional frequency instability of each laser system is nearly 8 × 10−16 at 1–30 s averaging time, approaching the thermal noise limit of the reference cavities. A remarkable frequency instability of 1 × 10−15 is achieved on the long time scale of 100–4000 s. PMID:27117356

  19. A 10-Hz Terawatt Class Ti:Sapphire Laser System: Development and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.K.; Smedley, J.; Tsang, T.; Rao, T.

    2010-01-12

    We developed a two stage Ti:Sapphire laser system to generate 16 mJ/80fs laser pulses at the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. The key deriver for the present design is implementing a highly efficient symmetric confocal pre-amplifier and employing a simple, inexpensive synchronization scheme relying only on a commercial digital delay-generator. We characterized the amplified pulses in spatial-, spectral-, and temporal-domains. The laser system was used to investigate various nonlinear optical processes, and to modify the optical properties of metal- and semiconductor-surfaces. We are currently building a third amplifier to boost the laser power to the multi-terawatt range.

  20. Sunlight-powered kHz rotation of a hemithioindigo-based molecular motor

    PubMed Central

    Guentner, Manuel; Schildhauer, Monika; Thumser, Stefan; Mayer, Peter; Stephenson, David; Mayer, Peter J.; Dube, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Photodriven molecular motors are able to convert light energy into directional motion and hold great promise as miniaturized powering units for future nanomachines. In the current state of the art, considerable efforts have still to be made to increase the efficiency of energy transduction and devise systems that allow operation in ambient and non-damaging conditions with high rates of directional motions. The need for ultraviolet light to induce the motion of virtually all available light-driven motors especially hampers the broad applicability of these systems. We describe here a hemithioindigo-based molecular motor, which is powered exclusively by nondestructive visible light (up to 500 nm) and rotates completely directionally with kHz frequency at 20 °C. This is the fastest directional motion of a synthetic system driven by visible light to date permitting materials and biocompatible irradiation conditions to establish similarly high speeds as natural molecular motors. PMID:26411883

  1. A 2 kHz-100 MHz dynamic amplifier for tracking targets of variable amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Mahaveer K.; Bitler, J. Samuel; Grimes, Craig A.

    2001-06-01

    A 2 kHz-100 MHz constant-output dynamic amplifier design is presented. Application of the amplifier is shown for tracking wireless magnetoelastic and magnetoacoustic environmental sensors [C. A. Grimes et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 4711 (1999); K. Loiselle and C. A. Grimes, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 1141 (2000)], the detected amplitude which varies significantly with spatial location from the detector. The amplification of the dynamic amplifier, 80 dB, is controlled by inverted feedback voltage; the design is suitable for an input voltage range of -150 to -10 dB. The dynamic amplifier enhances the detection range of magnetoacoustic sensors by an approximate factor of three, and that of magnetoelastic sensors by a factor of 1.25, with the magnetoelastic sensors having comparatively less detection range increase due to higher background noise levels.

  2. Effect of chronic 60-Hz electric field exposure on mammary tumorigenesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Leung, F.C.; Rommereim, D.N.; Buschbom, R.L.; Wilson, B.W.; Stevens, R.G.

    1989-07-01

    Female rats were administered a single dosage of 7 or 10 mg of DMBA intragastrically between 50 and 55 days of age and palpated weekly for mammary tumors in two experiments. Rats were either exposed to a 40 kV/m 60-Hz electric field or sham-exposed in utero through 18 or 23 weeks of age. There was no difference between electric field exposed and sham-exposed in incidence of first tumor. When the results of the two experiments were combined, the electric field exposed groups had significantly more tumors per tumor-bearing animal than the sham-groups. These results may have implications for the role of electric power use in the etiology and promotion of breast cancer. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Strain development during the phase transition of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves Bez, Henrique; Nielsen, Kaspar K.; Smith, Anders; Norby, Poul; Stâhl, Kenny; Bahl, Christian R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We use powder X-ray diffraction to evaluate the temperature dependence of the crystalline properties during the magnetic phase transition of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hz as a function of the Fe/Mn/Si ratio. Both the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic phases were observed as peak overlaps in the patterns around the Curie temperature (TC) occurring continuously in a temperature range of about 5 K around TC. Using the Williamson-Hall method, we evaluate the strain developing in the crystallites during the transition and find that it is associated with the growth of the paramagnetic phase as the transition occurs. Based on our measurements and microstructure analyses, we propose that cracking during the phase transition is due to or aggravated by the small content of a La-rich phase.

  4. Development of a flashlamp-pumped Cr:LiSAF laser operating at 30 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgul Samad, Ricardo; Calvo Nogueira, Gesse Eduardo; Licia Baldochi, Sonia; Dias Vieira, Nilson, Jr.

    2006-05-01

    Cr3+:LiSrAlF6 crystals are an interesting laser medium because of their spectroscopic characteristics: They present a broad emission band in the near infrared and can be pumped either by a flashlamp or by diodes. Up to now, their limitation has been mostly due to their poor thermal properties that limit the laser performance either in the repetition rate in a pulsed system or output power in cw systems. We have designed and constructed a flashlamp-pumped laser using a standard rod pumping cavity that avoids most of the heat generated in the pumping process and allows operation at a fairly high repetition rate of 30 Hz with a high average power of 20 W in a conservative operation mode.

  5. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on central cholinergic systems of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1993-03-15

    The authors studied the effects of an acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field on sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in the brain of the rat. Decreases in uptake were observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after the animals were exposed to a magnetic field at flux densities [>=] 0.75 mT. These effects of the magnetic field were blocked by pretreating the animals with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide. These data indicate that the magnetic-field-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain were mediated by endogenous opioids in the central nervous systems.

  6. Exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (100 kHz-2 GHz) in Extremadura (Spain).

    PubMed

    Rufo, M Montaña; Paniagua, Jesús M; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid increase in people's exposure to electromagnetic fields. This paper reports the measurements of radiofrequency (RF) total power densities and power density spectra in 35 towns of the region of Extremadura, Spain. The spectra were taken with three antennas covering frequencies from 100 kHz to 2.2 GHz. This frequency range includes AM/FM radio broadcasting, television, and cellular telephone signals. The power density data and transmitting antenna locations were stored in a geographic information system (GIS) as an aid in analyzing and interpreting the results. The results showed the power density levels to be below the reference level guidelines for human exposure and that the power densities are different for different frequency ranges and different size categories of towns. PMID:22048492

  7. Femtosecond-pulse-driven 10-Hz 41.8-nm laser in Xe IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoff, B. E.; Yin, G. Y.; Gordon, C. L., III; Barty, C. P. J.; Harris, S. E.

    1996-01-01

    We report the observation of extreme UV lasing at 41.81 nm on the 4d95d1S0 - 4d95p1P1 transition in Xe IX, as proposed by Lemoff et al. [Opt. Lett. 19, 569 (1994)]. A 10-Hz circularly polarized 800-nm laser pulse with an energy of \\similar 70 mJ and a duration of \\similar 40 fs is longitudinally focused to a peak intensity of >3 \\times 1016 W / cm2 over a length of 8.4 nm in a differentially pumped cell containing 12 Torr of Xe gas. Laser amplification was observed with an estimated gain coefficient of 13 cm-1 and a total gain of exp(11).

  8. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-01-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways. PMID:26596641

  9. Source region of 0.2 to 1.0 Hz geomagnetic pulsation bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.J.; Erlandson, R.E.; Engebretson, M.J.

    1996-04-01

    Geomagnetic pulsations from 0.2 to 5.0 Hz (Pc 1) observed on the ground could be used to monitor the magnetospheric processes generating them if their source regions were known. The authors report simultaneous observations of Pc 1 bursts at South Pole Station and in space at 9 R{sub E} geocentric distance near the magnetic equator showing that the subsolar outer magnetosphere, earthward of the low latitude boundary layer, is the source region of Pc 1 bursts. The source extends 1 to 2 hours azimuthally and 1 to 2 R{sub E} radially. Correlation of magnetopause displacements and bursts at South Pole indicates that the bursts are simulated by compression of dayside magnetosphere. In space bursts occur above the He{sup +} gyrofrequency implying that the H{sup +}-He{sup +} bi-ion resonance does not prevent the signals from reaching the ionosphere. 17 refs., 4 fig.

  10. In situ ozone instrumentation for 10-Hz measurements - Development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Hudgins, C. H.; Ritter, J. A.; Lawrence, M.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the fast-response ozone detector for the Electra aircraft is described. The selection of a technique to meet the design goal of 10-Hz detection is examined in terms of detection principles, instrument sampling parameters, signal conditioning, and aircraft and sampling environment. An instrument which employs a NO technique for detection of ozone with a reaction chamber volume of 16 cu cm, a pressure of 60 torr, and a sample flow of 1000 standard cu cm/min was developed. Laboratory and flight testings of the detector were conducted in order to evaluate its performance. The data reveal that the fast-response ozone detector is highly reliable with a response of 0.1 sec to 90 percent of reading, has a lower detection limit of 1 ppbv, and an S/N of 20 at 20 ppbv ozone.

  11. A stroll with eLISA through the mHz gravitational-wave zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littenberg, Tyson

    2013-04-01

    No great scientific endeavor has been without setbacks, and space-based gravitational wave (GW) astronomy has seen its fair share. Despite programmatic challenges, the science-case for a gravitational wave observatory operating in the mHz regime has never been stronger. Improvements in both theoretical understanding of the sources, and advancements in techniques for extracting signals from the data, have allowed the anticipated science impact of a space borne detector to survive imposed reductions in mission scope. I will lay out the case for the GW sources which we predict will play a starring role in the eLISA/NGO source catalog, and highlight how inferences made from these systems will help answer pressing questions in both physics and astronomy.

  12. High-energy, efficient, 30-Hz ultraviolet laser sources for airborne ozone-lidar systems.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Khaled A; Chen, Songsheng; Petway, Larry B; Meadows, Byron L; Marsh, Waverly D; Edwards, William C; Barnes, James C; DeYoung, Russell J

    2002-05-20

    Two compact, high-pulse-energy, injection-seeded, 30-Hz frequency-doubled Nd:YAG-laser-pumped Ti: sapphire lasers were developed and operated at infrared wavelengths of 867 and 900 nm. Beams with laser pulse energy >30 mJ at ultraviolet wavelengths of 289 and 300 nm were generated through a tripling of the frequencies of these Ti:sapphire lasers. This work is directed at the replacement of dye lasers for use in an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar system. The ultraviolet pulse energy at 289 and 300 nm had 27% and 31% absolute optical energy conversion efficiencies from input pulse energies at 867 and 900 nm, respectively. PMID:12027160

  13. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on neuromuscular function in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.A.; Laszewski, B.L.; Carr, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    Neuromuscular function in adult male rats was studied following 30 days of exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 100 kV/m (unperturbed field strength). Isometric force transducters were attached to the tendons of the plantaris (predominantly fast twitch), and soleus (predominantly slow twitch) muscles in the urethan-anesthetized rat. Square-wave stimuli were delivered to the distal stump of the transected sciatic nerve. Several measurements were used to characterize neuromuscular function, including twitch characteristics, chronaxie, tetanic and posttetanic potentiation, and fatigue and recovery. The results from three independent series of experiments are reported. Only recovery from fatigue in slow-twitch muscles was consistently and significantly affected (enhanced) by electric-field exposure. This effect does not appear to be mediated by field-induced changes in either neuromuscular transmission, or in the contractile mechanism itself. It is suggested that the effect may be mediated secondary to an effect on mechanisms regulating muscle blood flow or metabolism.

  14. Mechanism for generation of 2-3 kHz radiation in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macek, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    The question of how low-frequency non-thermal radio emissions at the boundary of the heliosphere might be generated is considered. The mechanism consists of two steps. First, the beam of energetic electrons generates a high level of electrostatic Langmuir plasma waves. Second, electromagnetic radiation results from the non-linear interaction between Langmuir waves. Intensity of radio emissions at 2 to 3 kHz detected by the Voyager plasma wave instrument in the outer heliosphere can be explained provided that the electron beams generating Langmuir waves exist also in the postshock plasma due to secondary shocks in the compressed solar wind beyond the termination shock. Modification of the heliospheric shocks by the cosmic ray pressure is also taken into account. The field strengths of Langmuir waves required to generate the second harmonic emissions are of 50 to 100 microvolts per meter. These waves may be observed in situ by Voyager 1 and 2 in the near future.

  15. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Perera, L.P.; Reep, M.; Witte, H.; Hansen, S.; Lopes, M.L.; Reidy Jr., J.; /Oxford High School

    2012-05-01

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  16. High frequency (1-100 HZ) noise and signal recorded at different depths in a mine, northwest Adirondacks, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, Noël; Carter, Jerry A.; Pomeroy, Paul W.; Sutton, George H.; Chael, Eric P.; Leahy, Patrick J.

    Seismograms of noise recorded simultaneously at the surface and at two subsurface stations (335m and 945m below surface level) show that high frequency (1-100 Hz) background noise is reduced at the subsurface stations. Seismometers at all three stations are well coupled to hard crystalline bedrock. Most of the noise reduction occurs between the surface and 335m depth. Between 1 and 3 Hz, seismic noise correlates well with wind speed at all levels. Above 3 Hz, wind speed up to 8 m/sec does not influence high frequency noise levels at 335m or 945m depths. At the surface, however, high frequency noise is associated with wind speeds in excess of 2 m/s. A site resonance is characteristic of the surface spectra, but is not characteristic of the subsurface sites. Spectral signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios, measured for S-waves from a regional earthquake (Δ = 530 km, mb = 4.1), are roughly equal from 1-10 Hz at all depths. Above 10 Hz, however, S/N is greater at the subsurface stations with S/N greater than 1 up to 30 Hz for the surface station, ≈ 50 Hz for the 335m station, and ≈ 70 Hz for the 945m station. Results indicate the advantage of employing high frequency sensors sufficiently below the surface to reduce the level of noise and to improve the S/N ratio in the high frequency range. Such an advantage could be critically important for nuclear test detection and discrimination.

  17. High frequency (1-100 Hz) noise and signal recorded at different depths in a mine, northwest Adirondacks, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Barstow, N.; Carter, J.A.; Pomeroy, P.W.; Sutton, G.H. ); Chael, E.P.; Leahy, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Seismograms of noise recorded simultaneously at the surface and at two subsurface stations (335m and 945m below surface level) show that high frequency (1-100 Hz) background noise is reduced at the subsurface stations. Seismometers at all three stations are well coupled to hard crystalline bedrock. Most of the noise reduction occurs between the surface and 335m depth. Between 1 and 3 Hz, seismic noise correlates well with wind speed at all levels. Above 3 Hz, wind speed up to 8 m/sec does not influence high frequency noise levels at 335m or 945m depths. At the surface, however, high frequency noise is associated with wind speeds in excess of 2 m/s. A site resonance is characteristic of the surface spectra, but is not characteristic of the subsurface sites. Spectral signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios, measured for S-waves from a regional earthquake ({Delta} = 530 km, m{sub b} = 4.1), are roughly equal from 1-10 Hz at all depths. Above 10 Hz, however, S/N is greater at the subsurface stations with S/N greater than 1 up to 30 Hz for the surface station, {approx} 50 Hz for the 335m station, and {approx} 70 Hz for the 945m station. Results indicate the advantage of employing high frequency sensors sufficiently below the surface to reduce the level of noise and to improve the S/N ratio in the high frequency range. Such an advantage could be critically important for nuclear test detection and discrimination.

  18. Diagnostic system for cryogenically cooled 10 Hz Yb:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koubíková, Lucia; Thoma, Jiří; Naylon, Jack A.; Indra, Lukáš; Fibrich, Martin; Kramer, Daniel; Rus, Bedrich

    2015-01-01

    The ELI Beamlines facility will house repetition rate high-power lasers with pulse durations down to 15 fs and over petawatt peak powers. Our research group participates in the construction of a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG multi-slab amplifier; part of the L2 beamline. The system shall provide square, super-Gaussian beam with nearly 2 ns pulses with rectangular temporal profile and energy of up to 10 J at 10 Hz. The laser will provide pump beams for broadband OPCPA stages. The diagnostic system of the pump laser is critical for the correct performance analysis, stabilization feedback and mostly for the machine interlock system as damages of the expensive optical components can develop very fast with the 10 Hz repetition rate. The diagnostic system provides key laser parameters and characteristics in temporal, spectral and spatial domain. The paper describes testing of the setup for measurements of the final 10 J output. Its design is based on a combination of optical wedges and diffractive sampler to facilitate multiple diagnostics on a relatively small footprint. The laser diagnostics package covers measurements in spatial domain such as near-field, far-field, or wavefront analysis, further optical spectrum, pulse energy and temporal shape. In order to detect possible damage dark-field analysis was implemented as well. The final setup was modeled in optical design software (Radiant Zemax) to understand its behavior and later tested together with real-time LabVIEW code developed by our group as being part of the machine interlock system. The first results of the tests as well as detailed description of the diagnostics package design are presented.

  19. Electrorotation of single yeast cells at frequencies between 100 Hz and 1.6 GHz.

    PubMed Central

    Hölzel, R

    1997-01-01

    The determination of complete electrorotation spectra of living cells has been made possible by the development of a quadrature generator and an electrode assembly that span the frequency range between 100 Hz and 1.6 GHz. Multiple spectra of single cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been measured at different medium conductivities ranging from 0.7 to 550 microS cm-1. A spherical four-shell model was applied that simulated the experimental data well and disclosed the four-layer structure of the cell envelope attributed to the plasma membrane, the periplasmic space, and a thick inner and a thin outer wall region. Below 10 kHz an additional rotation effect was found, which changed its direction depending on the ionic strength of the medium. This is supposed to be connected with properties of the cell surface and its close vicinity. From the four-shell simulation the following physical properties of cell compartments could be derived: specific capacitance of plasma membrane (0.76 microF cm-2), periplasmic space (0.5 microF cm-2), and outer wall region (0.1 microF cm-2). The conductivity of cytoplasm, plasma membrane, and inner wall region were found to vary with medium ionic strength from 9 to 12 mS cm-1, 5.8 nS cm-1 to approximately 50 nS cm-1, and 6 microS cm-1 to 240 microS cm-1, respectively. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9251826

  20. Sub-kHz traceable characterization of stroboscopic scanning white light interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, V.; Kassamakov, I.; Paulin, T.; Nolvi, A.; Seppä, J.; Lassila, A.; Hæggström, E.

    2014-05-01

    Scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) is an established methodology for non-destructive testing of MEMS/NEMS. In contrast to monochromatic interference microcopy SWLI can unambiguously resolve surfaces featuring tall vertical steps. Oscillating samples can be imaged using a stroboscopic SWLI (SSWLI) equipped with a pulsed light source. To measure static samples the lateral and vertical scales of the SSWLI can be calibrated using transfer standards with calibrated dimensions such as line scales, 2D gratings, gauge blocks, and step height standards. However, traceable dynamic characterization of SSWLI requires a transfer standard (TS) providing repeatable traceable periodic movement. A TS based on a piezo-scanned flexure guided stage with capacitive feedback was designed and manufactured. The trajectories of the stage motion for different amplitude and frequency settings were characterized to have ~2 nm standard uncertainty. Characterization was made using a symmetric differential heterodyne laser interferometer (SDHLI). The TS was first used to characterize quasidynamic measurements across the vertical range of the SSWLI, 100 μm. Dynamic measurement properties of the SSWLI were then characterized using a sinusoidal vertical trajectory with 2 μm nominal amplitude and 50 Hz frequency. The motion amplitude of the TS, 2038 nm, measured with the SSWLI was 6 nm smaller than the amplitude measured with SDHLI. The repeatability of SSWLI expressed as experimental standard deviation of the mean was 8.8 nm. The maximum deviation in instantaneous displacement and oscillation velocity were 49 nm and 27 μm/s, respectively. A traceable method to characterize the capacity of the SSWLI to perform dynamic measurements at sub-kHz frequencies was demonstrated.

  1. 100 Hz repetition rate, high average power, plasma-based soft x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Brendan; Wernsing, Keith; Baumgarten, Cory; Berrill, Mark; Durivage, Leon; Furch, Federico; Curtis, Alden; Luther, Bradley; Patel, Dinesh; Menoni, Carmen; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav; Rocca, Jorge

    2013-10-01

    Numerous applications demand high average power / high repetition rate compact sources of coherent soft x-ray radiation. We report the demonstration table-top soft x-ray lasers at wavelengths ranging from 10.9 nm to 18.9 nm from plasmas created at 100 Hz repetition rate. Results includes a record average power of 0.15 mW at λ = 18.9 nm from a laser-produced Mo plasma and 0.1 mW average power at λ = 13.9 nm from a Ag plasma. These soft x-ray lasers are driven by collisional electron impact excitation in elongated line focus plasmas a few mm in length heated by a compact, directly diode-pumped, chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser that produces 1 J pulses of ps duration at 100 Hz repetition rate. Pulses from this laser irradiate the surface of polished metal targets producing transient population inversions on the 4d1S0 --> 4p1P1 transition of Ni-like ions. Tailoring of the temporal profile of the driver laser pulse is observed to significantly increase soft x-ray laser output power as well as allow the generation of shorter wavelength lasers with reduced pump energy. Work was supported by the NSF ERC for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology using equipment developed under NSF Award MRI-ARRA 09-561, and by the AMOS program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy.

  2. 486nm blue laser operating at 500 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creeden, Daniel; Blanchard, Jon; Pretorius, Herman; Limongelli, Julia; Setzler, Scott D.

    2016-03-01

    Compact, high power blue light in the 470-490nm region is difficult to generate due to the lack of laser sources which are easily convertible (through parametric processes) to those wavelengths. By using a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser as a pump source for a 2-stage second harmonic generation (SHG) scheme, we have generated ~2W of 486.5nm light at 500kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF). To our knowledge, this is the highest PRF and output power achieved in the blue region based on a frequency converted, monolithic fiber laser. This pump laser is a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser/amplifier which generates 12.8W of 1946nm power at 500kHz PRF with diffraction-limited output from a purely single-mode fiber. The output from this laser is converted to 973nm through second harmonic generation (SHG). The 973nm is then converted to 486.5nm via another SHG stage. This architecture operates with very low peak power, which can be challenging from a nonlinear conversion standpoint. However, the low peak power enables the use of a single-mode monolithic fiber amplifier without undergoing nonlinear effects in the fiber. This also eliminates the need for novel fiber designs, large-mode area fiber, or free-space coupling to rod-type amplifiers, improving reliability and robustness of the laser source. Higher power and conversion efficiency are possible through the addition of Tm-doped fiber amplification stages as well as optimization of the nonlinear conversion process and nonlinear materials. In this paper, we discuss the laser layout, results, and challenges with generating blue light using a low peak power approach.

  3. Theory for 2-3 kHz radiation from the outer heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. J.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2004-06-01

    High-intensity radio emission events at 2-3 kHz were observed by the Voyager spacecraft during 1983-1984 and 1992-1993. Such events are thought to occur when shock waves associated with global merged interaction regions (GMIRs) enter a region of the outer heliosheath where the electron speed distribution is primed with a superthermal tail, generated by lower hybrid drive. Previously, this priming mechanism was combined with a theory for type II solar radio bursts to predict the flux of radio emission in the outer heliosphere. Here this theory is extended in a number of ways. First, theoretical arguments regarding the availability of Langmuir and ion sound waves are used to determine whether emission occurs via three-wave processes or processes involving wave scattering off thermal ions (STI). New expressions for conversion efficiencies into radio emission associated with STI are then implemented where appropriate. Next, the dependence of the predicted fluxes on plasma and shock parameters are determined. Lastly, dynamic spectra are calculated for the radio emission generated by shocks traveling from the inner solar wind to beyond the heliopause and into the very local interstellar medium (VLISM). It is found that the predicted fluxes of fundamental radiation are comparable with those observed for plausible shock and plasma parameters. The theory can also predict radio-quiet GMIRs to be smaller and slower and to propagate through heliosheath regions with weaker superthermal tails. The calculated dynamic spectra have predicted fluxes below the Voyager detection thresholds in the solar wind, inner heliosheath, and VLISM. However, the predicted fluxes and frequency-time behavior are very similar to the 2 kHz component observed by the Voyager spacecraft when the GMIR is in the primed region.

  4. Interictal high-frequency oscillations (80-500 Hz) in the human epileptic brain: entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Bragin, Anatol; Wilson, Charles L; Staba, Richard J; Reddick, Mark; Fried, Itzhak; Engel, Jerome

    2002-10-01

    Unique high-frequency oscillations of 250 to 500 Hz, termed fast ripples, have been identified in seizure-generating limbic areas in rats made epileptic by intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid, and in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In the rat, fast ripples clearly are generated by a different neuronal population than normally occurring endogenous ripple oscillations (100-200 Hz), but this distinction has not been previously evaluated in humans. The characteristics of oscillations in the ripple and fast ripple frequency bands were compared in the entorhinal cortex of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using local field potential and unit recordings from chronically implanted bundles of eight microelectrodes with tips spaced 500 microm apart. The results showed that ripple oscillations possessed different voltage versus depth profiles compared with fast ripple oscillations. Fast ripple oscillations usually demonstrated a reversal of polarity in the middle layers of entorhinal cortex, whereas ripple oscillations rarely showed reversals across entorhinal cortex layers. There was no significant difference in the amplitude distributions of ripple and fast ripple oscillations. Furthermore, multiunit synchronization was significantly increased during fast ripple oscillations compared with ripple oscillations (p < 0.001). These data recorded from the mesial temporal lobe of epileptic patients suggest that the cellular networks underlying fast ripple generation are more localized than those involved in the generation of normally occurring ripple oscillations. Results from this study are consistent with previous studies in the intrahippocampal kainic acid rat model of chronic epilepsy that provide evidence supporting the view that fast ripples in the human brain reflect localized pathological events related to epileptogenesis. PMID:12325068

  5. Exercise reward induces appetitive 50-kHz calls in rats.

    PubMed

    Heyse, Natalie C; Brenes, Juan C; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2015-08-01

    Rats express affective states by visible behaviors (like approach or flight) and through different kinds of ultrasonic vocalizations (USV). 50-kHz calls are thought to reflect positive affective states since they occur during rewarding situations like social play or palatable food. However, the effects of voluntary exercise on USV have not been investigated yet, although such exercise can serve as reward. To this aim, we gave young adult rats restricted daily access to a runway maze, where they could interact with either a movable (experimental group) or locked wheel (sedentary group) for 14days and we tested USV in anticipation of and during subsequent running. We also studied inter-individual differences in running, and relationships with USV, and rat-typical trait measures. The results showed that the experimental rats had to be separated into "runners" and "pseudorunners" since only runners performed true running, whereas pseudorunners hardly entered the wheel and turned it only with their forelimbs. This outcome seems to be related to subject-dependent differences in responding to novelty and in reward sensitivity, as indicated by pertinent screening tests, which we had performed prior to the 14days of wheel access. In the runway, our experimental and control groups did not differ in visible anticipatory behavior, like approach. Yet, only runners and sedentary rats displayed an increasing but similar amount of anticipatory USV, which is suggestive of a state of incentive anticipation of the coming wheel access. During exercise, only runners increased USV, probably indicating a highly positive emotional state. To conclude, voluntary exercise provides a promising tool to induce 50-kHz USV during and in anticipation of exercise. When performing such studies, possible individual differences between subjects have to be taken into account, and the actual wheel performance should carefully be controlled. PMID:25872156

  6. Energy dependent time delays of kHz oscillations due to thermal Comptonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Misra, Ranjeev

    2014-12-01

    We study the energy dependent photon variability from a thermal Comptonizing plasma that is oscillating at kHz frequencies. In particular, we solve the linearized time-dependent Kompaneets equation and consider the oscillatory perturbation to be either in the soft photon source or in the heating rate of the plasma. For each case, we self consistently consider the energy balance of the plasma and the soft photon source. The model incorporates the possibility of a fraction of the Comptonized photons impinging back into the soft photon source. We find that when the oscillation is due to the soft photon source, the variation of the fractional root mean sqaure (rms) is nearly constant with energy and the time-lags are hard. However, for the case when the oscillation is due to variation in the heating rate of the corona, and when a significant fraction of the photons impinge back into the soft photon source, the rms increases with energy and the time-lags are soft. As an example, we compare the results with the ˜850 Hz oscillation observed on 1996 March 3 for 4U 1608-52 and show that both the observed soft time-lags as well as the rms versus energy can be well described by such a model where the size of the Comptonizing plasma is ˜1 km. Thus, modelling of the time-lags as due to Comptonization delays, can provide tight constraints on the size and geometry of the system. Detailed analysis would require well-constrained spectral parameters.

  7. Photoreactivation and dark repair of environmental E. coli strains following 24 kHz continuous ultrasound and UV-C irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasjeet; Karthikeyan, Raghupathy; Pillai, Suresh D

    2016-07-01

    In this study, effects of 24 kHz continuous ultrasound and UV-C on inactivation and potential repair of environmental E. coli strains were studied through a culture based method and a metabolic activity assay. Three environmental E. coli strains isolated from fecal samples of feral hog and deer and treated wastewater effluent were studied and compared with a laboratory E. coli strain (ATCC® 10798). Metabolic activity of E. coli cells during the inactivation and repair period was assessed using the AlamarBlue® assay. Transmission electron microscopy assays were also performed to evaluate morphological damage of bacterial cell wall. After 24 h of photoreactivation period, laboratory E. coli strain (ATCC® 10798) reactivated by 30% and 42% in contrast to E. coli isolate from treated wastewater effluent, which reactivated by 53% and 82% after ultrasound and UV-C treatment, respectively. Possible shearing and reduction in cell size of E. coli strains exposed to ultrasound was revealed by transmission electron micrographs. Metabolic activity of E. coli strains was greatly reduced due to morphological damage to cell membrane caused by 24 kHz continuous ultrasound. Based upon experimental data and TEM micrographs, it could be concluded that ultrasound irradiation has potential in advanced water treatment and water reuse applications. PMID:27050143

  8. Pre-Synaptic Inhibition of Afferent Feedback in the Macaque Spinal Cord Does Not Modulate with Cycles of Peripheral Oscillations Around 10 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Ferran; Baker, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal interneurons are partially phase-locked to physiological tremor around 10 Hz. The phase of spinal interneuron activity is approximately opposite to descending drive to motoneurons, leading to partial phase cancellation and tremor reduction. Pre-synaptic inhibition of afferent feedback modulates during voluntary movements, but it is not known whether it tracks more rapid fluctuations in motor output such as during tremor. In this study, dorsal root potentials (DRPs) were recorded from the C8 and T1 roots in two macaque monkeys following intra-spinal micro-stimulation (random inter-stimulus interval 1.5–2.5 s, 30–100 μA), whilst the animals performed an index finger flexion task which elicited peripheral oscillations around 10 Hz. Forty one responses were identified with latency < 5 ms; these were narrow (mean width 0.59 ms), and likely resulted from antidromic activation of afferents following stimulation near terminals. Significant modulation during task performance occurred in 16/41 responses, reflecting terminal excitability changes generated by pre-synaptic inhibition (Wall's excitability test). Stimuli falling during large-amplitude 8–12 Hz oscillations in finger acceleration were extracted, and sub-averages of DRPs constructed for stimuli delivered at different oscillation phases. Although some apparent phase-dependent modulation was seen, this was not above the level expected by chance. We conclude that, although terminal excitability reflecting pre-synaptic inhibition of afferents modulates over the timescale of a voluntary movement, it does not follow more rapid changes in motor output. This suggests that pre-synaptic inhibition is not part of the spinal systems for tremor reduction described previously, and that it plays a role in overall—but not moment-by-moment—regulation of feedback gain. PMID:26635536

  9. Dentin is dissolved by high concentrations of L-ascorbic acid 2-[3,4-dihydro-2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-6-yl-hydrogen phosphate] potassium salt with or without hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kozuka, Masahiro; Tsujimoto, Yasuhisa

    2004-06-01

    L-Ascorbic acid 2-[3,4-dihydro-2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-6-yl-hydrogen phosphate] potassium salt (EPC-K(1)) is a conjugate of vitamin C and vitamin E that is water-soluble and stable at room temperature. EPC-K(1) has been developed as a hydroxyl radical (.OH) scavenger and antioxidant. In a previous tooth whitening experiment, it was accidentally found that tooth (dentin) blocks were dissolved by EPC-K(1) with H(2)O(2). In the current study, high concentrations of EPC-K(1) (2.5, 25 mM) with 3% H(2)O(2) dissolved and caused the collapse of dentin blocks. Similar concentrations of EPC-K(1) without 3% H(2)O(2), however, dissolved the dentin blocks without collapse over a 3-week period. In these cases, a.OH-like signal was detected using an ESR spin-trapping method. The volume of calcium in solution (including the dentin block) increased on the addition of EPC-K(1) in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the calcium : phosphorus ratio changed from 2 : 1 in sound dentin to 1 : 2 in the collapsed dentin block. High concentrations of EPC-K(1) are therefore considered to have calcium chelating and dentin dissolving activity. The dentin dissolving activity was enhanced when EPC-K(1) was used with H(2)O(2). EPC-K(1) had no protective effect when used in tooth whitening with H(2)O(2). PMID:15187428

  10. Sleep misperception, EEG characteristics and autonomic nervous system activity in primary insomnia: a retrospective study on polysomnographic data.

    PubMed

    Maes, J; Verbraecken, J; Willemen, M; De Volder, I; van Gastel, A; Michiels, N; Verbeek, I; Vandekerckhove, M; Wuyts, J; Haex, B; Willemen, T; Exadaktylos, V; Bulckaert, A; Cluydts, R

    2014-03-01

    Misperception of Sleep Onset Latency, often found in Primary Insomnia, has been cited to be influenced by hyperarousal, reflected in EEG- and ECG-related indices. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the association between Central Nervous System (i.e. EEG) and Autonomic Nervous System activity in the Sleep Onset Period and the first NREM sleep cycle in Primary Insomnia (n=17) and healthy controls (n=11). Furthermore, the study examined the influence of elevated EEG and Autonomic Nervous System activity on Stage2 sleep-protective mechanisms (K-complexes and sleep spindles). Confirming previous findings, the Primary Insomnia-group overestimated Sleep Onset Latency and this overestimation was correlated with elevated EEG activity. A higher amount of beta EEG activity during the Sleep Onset Period was correlated with the appearance of K-complexes immediately followed by a sleep spindle in the Primary Insomnia-group. This can be interpreted as an extra attempt to protect sleep continuity or as a failure of the sleep-protective role of the K-complex by fast EEG frequencies following within one second. The strong association found between K-alpha (K-complex within one second followed by 8-12 Hz EEG activity) in Stage2 sleep and a lower parasympathetic Autonomic Nervous System dominance (less high frequency HR) in Slow-wave sleep, further assumes a state of hyperarousal continuing through sleep in Primary Insomnia. PMID:24177246

  11. The anterior and posterior pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus are involved in behavior and neuronal activity of the cuneiform and entopeduncular nuclei.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Schwabe, K; Krauss, J K; Alam, M

    2016-05-13

    Loss of cholinergic neurons in the mesencephalic locomotor region, comprising the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) and the cuneiform nucleus (CnF), is related to gait disturbances in late stage Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigate the effect of anterior or posterior cholinergic lesions of the PPN on gait-related motor behavior, and on neuronal network activity of the PPN area and basal ganglia (BG) motor loop in rats. Anterior PPN lesions, posterior PPN lesions or sham lesions were induced by stereotaxic microinjection of the cholinergic toxin AF64-A or vehicle in male Sprague-Dawley rats. First, locomotor activity (open field), postural disturbances (Rotarod) and gait asymmetry (treadmill test) were assessed. Thereafter, single-unit and oscillatory activities were measured in the non-lesioned area of the PPN, the CnF and the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), the BG output region, with microelectrodes under urethane anesthesia. Additionally, ECoG was recorded in the motor cortex. Injection of AF64-A into the anterior and posterior PPN decreased cholinergic cell counts as compared to naive controls (P<0.001) but also destroyed non-cholinergic cells. Only anterior PPN lesions decreased the front limb swing time of gait in the treadmill test, while not affecting other gait-related parameters tested. Main electrophysiological findings were that anterior PPN lesions increased the firing activity in the CnF (P<0.001). Further, lesions of either PPN region decreased the coherence of alpha (8-12Hz) band between CnF and motor cortex (MCx), and increased the beta (12-30Hz) oscillatory synchronization between EPN and the MCx. Lesions of the PPN in rats had complex effects on oscillatory neuronal activity of the CnF and the BG network, which may contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiology of gait disturbance in PD. PMID:26880033

  12. The Effects of Electrical and Optical Stimulation of Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons on Rat 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    Scardochio, Tina; Trujillo-Pisanty, Ivan; Conover, Kent; Shizgal, Peter; Clarke, Paul B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Adult rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) at around 50-kHz; these commonly occur in contexts that putatively engender positive affect. While several reports indicate that dopaminergic (DAergic) transmission plays a role in the emission of 50-kHz calls, the pharmacological evidence is mixed. Different modes of dopamine (DA) release (i.e., tonic and phasic) could potentially explain this discrepancy. Objective: To investigate the potential role of phasic DA release in 50-kHz call emission. Methods: In Experiment 1, USVs were recorded in adult male rats following unexpected electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In parallel, phasic DA release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) was recorded using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. In Experiment 2, USVs were recorded following response-contingent or non-contingent optogenetic stimulation of midbrain DAergic neurons. Four 20-s schedules of optogenetic stimulation were used: fixed-interval, fixed-time, variable-interval, and variable-time. Results: Brief electrical stimulation of the MFB increased both 50-kHz call rate and phasic DA release in the NAcc. During optogenetic stimulation sessions, rats initially called at a high rate comparable to that observed following reinforcers such as psychostimulants. Although optogenetic stimulation maintained reinforced responding throughout the 2-h session, the call rate declined to near zero within the first 30 min. The trill call subtype predominated following both electrical and optical stimulation. Conclusion: The occurrence of electrically-evoked 50-kHz calls, time-locked to phasic DA (Experiment 1), provides correlational evidence supporting a role for phasic DA in USV production. However, in Experiment 2, the temporal dissociation between calling and optogenetic stimulation of midbrain DAergic neurons suggests that phasic mesolimbic DA release is not sufficient to produce 50-kHz calls. The emission of the trill subtype of 50-kHz calls

  13. Exotic decays of a heavy neutral Higgs through HZ/AZ channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Kling, Felix; Su, Shufang

    2014-09-01

    Models of electroweak symmetry breaking with extended Higgs sectors are theoretically well motivated. In this study, we focus on the Two Higgs Doublet Model with a low energy spectrum containing scalars H and a pseudoscalar A. We study the decays A → HZ or H → AZ, which could reach sizable branching fractions in certain parameter regions. With detailed collider analysis, we obtain model independent exclusion bounds as well as discovery reach at the 14 TeV LHC for the process: gg → A/ H → HZ/ AZ, looking at final states bbℓℓ, ττℓℓ and ZZZ(4 ℓ + 2 j) for ℓ = e, μ. We further interpret these bounds in the context of the Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model, considering three different classes of processes: A → h 0 Z, A → H 0 Z, and H 0 → AZ, in which h 0 and H 0 are the light and heavy CP-even Higgses respectively. For 100 fb-1 integrated luminosity at the 14 TeV LHC, we find that for parent particle mass around 300-400 GeV, A → h 0 Z has the greatest reach when H 0 is interpreted as the 126 GeV Higgs: most regions in the tan β versus sin( β - α) plane can be excluded and a significant fraction at small and large tan β can be covered by discovery. For 126 GeV h 0, only relatively small tan β ≲ 10 (5) can be reached by exclusion (discovery) while a wide range of sin( β - α) is accessible. For A → H 0 Z, the reach is typically restricted to sin( β - α) ~ ±1 with tan β ≲ 10 in bbℓℓ and ττℓℓ channels. The ZZZ(4 ℓ2 j) channel, on the other hand, covers a wide range of 0 .3 < | sin( β - α)| < 1 for tan β ≲ 4. H 0 → AZ typically favors negative values of sin( β - α), with exclusion/discovery reach possibly extending to all values of tan β. A study of exotic decays of extra Higgses appearing in extensions of the Standard Model would extend the reach at the LHC and provides nice complementarity to conventional Higgs search channels.

  14. Synergistic effects of noradrenergic modulation with atomoxetine and 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor learning in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is able to induce changes in neuronal activity that outlast stimulation. The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. They might be analogous to long-term potentiation or depression, as the duration of the effects seems to implicate changes in synaptic plasticity. Norepinephrine (NE) has been shown to play a crucial role in neuronal plasticity in the healthy and injured human brain. Atomoxetine (ATX) and other NE reuptake inhibitors have been shown to increase excitability in different systems and to influence learning processes. Thus, the combination of two facilitative interventions may lead to further increase in excitability and motor learning. But in some cases homeostatic metaplasticity might protect the brain from harmful hyperexcitability. In this study, the combination of 60 mg ATX and 10 Hz rTMS over the primary motor cortex was used to examine changes in cortical excitability and motor learning and to investigate their influence on synaptic plasticity mechanisms. Results The results of this double-blind placebo-controlled study showed that ATX facilitated corticospinal and intracortical excitability in motor cortex. 10 Hertz rTMS applied during a motor task was able to further increase intracortical excitability only in combination with ATX. In addition, only the combination of 10 Hz rTMS and ATX was capable of enhancing the total number of correct responses and reaction time significantly, indicating an interaction effect between rTMS and ATX without signs of homeostatic metaplasticity. Conclusion These results suggest that pharmacologically enhanced NE transmission and 10 Hz rTMS exert a synergistic effect on motor cortex excitability and motor learning in healthy humans. PMID:24690416

  15. Development of a 5-kHz ultra-line-narrowed F2 laser for dioptric projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Hidenori; Kumazaki, Takahito; Kitatochi, Naoki; Sasano, Kotaro; Ueno, Yoshifumi; Konishi, Masayuki; Suganuma, Takashi; Nakano, Masaki; Yamashita, Toshio; Nishisaka, Toshihiro; Nohdomi, Ryoichi; Hotta, Kazuaki; Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Nakao, Kiyoharu

    2002-07-01

    The roadmap of semiconductor fabrication predicts that the semiconductor market will demand 65 nm node devices from 2004/2005. Therefore, an Ultra-Line-Narrowed F2 laser for dioptric projection systems is currently being developed under the ASET project of The F2 Laser Lithography Development Project. The target of this project is to achieve a F2 laser spectral bandwidth below 0.2 pm (FWHM) and an average power of 25 W at a repetition rate of 5 kHz. The energy stability (3-sigma) target is less than 10%. An Oscillator-Amplifier arrangement at 2 kHz was developed as a first step of an Ultra-Line-Narrowed F2 laser system. With this laser system, we did the basic study of the synchronization technology for line narrowing operation using two system arrangements: MOPA (Master Oscillator/Power Amplifier) and Injection Locking. Based on this experience we have developed the 5 kHz system. With the 5 kHz Line-Narrowed Injection Locking system, we have achieved a spectral bandwidth of < 0.2 pm with an output energy of > 5 mJ and an energy pulse to pulse stability of 10%. The feasibility of a 5 kHz Ultra-Line-Narrowed F2 Laser for Dioptric Projection Systems has been demonstrated.

  16. Development of 5-kHz ultra-line-narrowed F2 laser for dioptric projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Nohdomi, Ryoichi; Ariga, Tatsuya; Hotta, Kazuaki; Nakao, Kiyoharu; Kasuya, Koichi

    2003-11-01

    The roadmap of semiconductor fabrication predicts that the semiconductor market will demand 65 nm node devices from 2004/2005. Therefore, an Ultra-Line-Narrowed F2 laser for dioptric projection systems has been developed under the ASET project of "The F2 Laser Lithography Development Project". The target of this project is to achieve a F2 laser spectral bandwidth below 0.2 pm (FWHM) and an average power of 25 W at a repetition rate of 5 kHz. The energy stability (3-sigma) target is less than 10%. Simultaneously, it is also required to establish the technology of evaluating the optical performance. An Oscillator-Amplifier arrangement at 2 kHz was developed as a first step of an Ultra-Line-Narrowed F2 laser system. With this laser system, we achieved the basic study of the synchronization technology for line narrowing operation using two system arrangements: MOPA (Master Oscillator/Power Amplifier) and Injection Locking. Based on this experience we have developed the 5 kHz system. With the 5 kHz Line-Narrowed Injection Locking system, we have achieved a spectral bandwidth of <0.2 pm with an output energy of >5 mJ and a pulse to pulse energy stability of <10%. The feasibility of a 5 kHz Ultra-Line-Narrowed F2 Laser for Dioptric Projection Systems has been demonstrated.

  17. Configuration of a 30-mm-diameter 94 kHz Ultrasonic Longitudinal Vibration System for Plastic Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongoh, Misugi; Yoshikuni, Masafumi; Miura, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Rei; Ueoka, Tetsugi; Tsujino, Jiromaru

    2004-05-01

    Vibration and welding characteristics of a 94 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding system are studied. The 94 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding systems consist of a 30-mm-diameter bolt-clamped Langevin-type PZT longitudinal transducers with four PZT rings, a stepped horn (vibration transform ratio N = 3.0) with a supporting flange at a nodal position and a catenoidal horn (N = 3.13) with an 8-mm-diameter welding tip. Maximum vibration velocity of the 94 kHz welding tip was 3.2 m/s (peak-to-zero value) at loaded condition. The welding characteristics of the 1.0-mm-thick polypropylene sheet specimens using the 94 kHz welding system were studied. Using the 94 kHz system, a weld strength of more than 370 N per one welded area was obtained at a vibration velocity of 2.7 m/sp-0 (peak-to-zero value), welding time of 0.8 s and static pressure of 600 kPa.

  18. A broadband, capacitive, surface-micromachined, omnidirectional microphone with more than 200 kHz bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Kuntzman, Michael L; Hall, Neal A

    2014-06-01

    A surface micromachined microphone is presented with 230 kHz bandwidth. The structure uses a 2.25 μm thick, 315 μm radius polysilicon diaphragm suspended above an 11 μm gap to form a variable parallel-plate capacitance. The back cavity of the microphone consists of the 11 μm thick air volume immediately behind the moving diaphragm and also an extended lateral cavity with a radius of 504 μm. The dynamic frequency response of the sensor in response to electrostatic signals is presented using laser Doppler vibrometry and indicates a system compliance of 0.4 nm/Pa in the flat-band of the response. The sensor is configured for acoustic signal detection using a charge amplifier, and signal-to-noise ratio measurements and simulations are presented. A resolution of 0.80 mPa/√Hz (32 dB sound pressure level in a 1 Hz bin) is achieved in the flat-band portion of the response extending from 10 kHz to 230 kHz. The proposed sensor design is motivated by defense and intelligence gathering applications that require broadband, airborne signal detection. PMID:24907805

  19. Topological defects and nano-Hz gravitational waves in aligned axion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Jeong, Kwang Sik; Kitajima, Naoya; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2016-08-01

    We study the formation and evolution of topological defects in an aligned axion model with multiple Peccei-Quinn scalars, where the QCD axion is realized by a certain combination of the axions with decay constants much smaller than the conventional Peccei-Quinn breaking scale. When the underlying U(1) symmetries are spontaneously broken, the aligned structure in the axion field space exhibits itself as a complicated string-wall network in the real space. We find that the string-wall network likely survives until the QCD phase transition if the number of the Peccei-Quinn scalars is greater than two. The string-wall system collapses during the QCD phase transition, producing a significant amount of gravitational waves in the nano-Hz range at present. The typical decay constant is constrained to be below O(100) TeV by the pulsar timing observations, and the constraint will be improved by a factor of 2 in the future SKA observations.

  20. Comparison of the coupling of grounded and ungrounded humans to vertical 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kaune, W.T.; Kistler, L.M.; Miller, M.C.

    1985-12-01

    Total induced currents and average induced axial current densities have been published in the literature for human models exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. The results of these studies have been quite useful, but they deal with a somewhat idealized exposure situation that ignores the insulating effects of most types of footwear. This paper describes a new laboratory technique for studying the relationship between grounded and ungrounded exposure of humans. A conducting model of the body 40-cm-tall man was electrically divided into seven segments. Wires connected to the conducting surfaces of these segments were routed horizontally through shielded cable to remote, battery-powered electronics. The ''common'' potential of the electronics was biased to the electric-field-induced potential of the model, allowing us to accurately measure the current induced in each body segment of the model. The method was tested by measuring the current induced in the upper hemisphere of a ungrounded sphere: agreement between theory and measurement was excellent. Measurements were made with the human model located at 15 positions, ranging from touching ground to remote from ground (i.e., in free space). The ratios of free-space to grounded currents crossing horizontal sections through the body were: neck, 0.58; chest, 0.40; abdomen, 0.39; thigh, 0.36; ankle, 0.17.

  1. Nonhuman primates will not respond to turn off strong 60 Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Using a set of six baboons (Papio cynocephalus), the authors conducted a series of seven experiments designed to evaluate the potentially aversive character of a 60 Hz electric field (EF). Initially, the subjects were trained, using food rewards as the reinforcer, to respond only when a cue light was illuminated. Next, an EF was presented along with the cue light; responses produced delivery of a food pellet and turned off both the cue light and the EF. Then, stimulus and reward conditions were varied. The authors determined that (1) presence of a strong EF does not affect operant responding for food rewards, (2) subjects will not respond at normal rates when the only reinforcer is termination of a strong EF, (3) presence of a strong EF can serve as a discriminative stimulus, (4) presence of a strong EF does not affect extinction of an appetite-motivated task, and (5) presentation of an EF can become a secondary reinforcer. The pattern of results was consistent across all experiments, suggesting that an EF of as much as 65 kV/m is not aversive to nonhuman primates. Separately, the authors demonstrated that the average EF detection threshold for baboons is 12 kV/m. Thus, EF exposure at intensities well above the detection threshold and at species-scaled EF strengths greater than those found environmentally does not appear to be aversive.

  2. A 2.2-Hz modulation of auroral electrons imposed at the geomagnetic equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepine, D. R.; Bryant, D. A.; Hall, D. S.

    1980-07-01

    The direct observation of 2.2-Hz oscillations in the intensities of 4-25 keV electrons producing a pulsating aurora is reported. Electrons were measured by a Petrel sounding rocket launched from Kiruna, Sweden in conjunction with measurements made by the geomagnetically conjugate GEOS 2 satellite. Measured precipitated energy flux variations only amounted to 3% of the energy flux at pulsation maximum, and thus do not permit the confirmation of particle modulations as the source of optical brightness modulations. The oscillations, like the previously observed 1-20 sec pulsations, are found to exhibit a marked velocity dispersion, implying an equatorial origin for both forms of modulation. A comparison of the rocket results with GEOS 2 measurements indicates VLF hiss emissions to be modulated at a frequency close to that of electron intensity oscillations, however isotropic angular distributions observed suggest that low-frequency micropulsations cannot cause auroral pulsations by modulating whistler-mode wave amplitudes which induce variations in the rate of pitch-angle scattering of electrons from the magnetosphere.

  3. First demonstration of laser engagement of 1-Hz-injected flying pellets and neutron generation

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Osamu; Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Mori, Yoshitaka; Hanayama, Ryohei; Ishii, Katsuhiro; Nakayama, Suisei; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Sekine, Takashi; Sato, Nakahiro; Kurita, Takashi; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Kan, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Naoki; Kondo, Takuya; Fujine, Manabu; Azuma, Hirozumi; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Hioki, Tatsumi; Kakeno, Mitsutaka; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Miura, Eisuke

    2013-01-01

    Pellet injection and repetitive laser illumination are key technologies for realizing inertial fusion energy. Numerous studies have been conducted on target suppliers, injectors, and tracking systems for flying pellet engagement. Here we for the first time demonstrate the pellet injection, counter laser beams' engagement and neutron generation. Deuterated polystyrene (CD) bead pellets, after free-falling for a distance of 18 cm at 1 Hz, are successfully engaged by two counter laser beams from a diode-pumped, ultra-intense laser HAMA. The laser energy, pulse duration, wavelength, and the intensity are 0.63 J per beam, 104 fs, and 811 nm, 4.7 × 1018 W/cm2, respectively. The irradiated pellets produce D(d,n)3He-reacted neutrons with a maximum yield of 9.5 × 104/4π sr/shot. Moreover, the laser is found out to bore a straight channel with 10 μm-diameter through the 1-mm-diameter beads. The results indicate potentially useful technologies and findings for the next step in realizing inertial fusion energy. PMID:24008696

  4. Hydrogen in a-Si:H deposited by 55 kHz PECVD

    SciTech Connect

    Budaguan, B.G.; Aivazov, A.A.

    1998-12-31

    In this work the mechanism of hydrogen incorporation and structural stability of a-Si:H films deposited by LF 55 kHz glow discharge in a wide range of technological parameters have been investigated. The analysis of plasma emission spectra and microstructure of films measured by IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were carried out. It was shown that hydrogen desorption controls the growth rate in a wide range of substrate temperature (40--325 C) and at low values of LF power (50--200W). At the same time the abnormal increase of hydrogen content due to ion-molecule surface reactions with the increase of substrate temperature was observed. The kinetics of hydrogen diffusion and thermodynamics of defect formation in a-Si:H films were determined from modeling of differential scanning calorimetry data. It is concluded that the mechanism of hydrogen incorporation leads to formation of strong SiH bonds in the material bulk and to increase of structural stability with the increase of substrate temperature despite the increase of hydrogen content.

  5. Biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small and large laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Rats and mice were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields up to 330 kV/m for durations as long as four months. No significant effects were found in the following major areas: metabolic status and growth; organ and tissue morphology; brain morphology; cardiovascular function; serum chemistry; reproduction; prenatal growth and development; teratology; bone growth; peripheral nerve function; humoral and cell-mediated immunity; susceptibility to viral infection; cell and membrane function; illness/malaise; and cytogenetics. Statistically significant effects of electric field exposures were observed in the following areas: bone fracture repair; neonatal development; neuromuscular function; endocrinology; hematology; neurochemistry; urine volume and chemistry; sympathetic nervous system; behavior. It is likely that many of the effects observed are secondary to chronic stimulation of the animal by the field. Our research efforts have shifted to an in-depth investigation of nervous system functions, with emphasis in behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and dosimetry. Current and future research in these areas will focus on: relationship of effects to field strength and duration of exposure; recovery from observed effects; fundamental understanding of observed effects; fundamental understanding of interaction of field with animal (dosimetry); and biological significance of observed effects. (ERB)

  6. Rapid Production of Bose-Einstein Condensates at a 1 Hz Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Daniel; Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Salim, Evan

    2013-05-01

    The speed at which Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) can be produced is a key metric for the performance of ultracold-atom inertial sensors, gravimeters, and magnetometers, where production cycle time of ultracold atoms determines sensor bandwidth. Here, we demonstrate production of 87Rb BECs at rates exceeding 1 Hz. Not only can we create a BEC from a hot vapor in less than one second, but we can continuously repeat the process for several cycles. Such speeds are possible because of the short evaporation times that result when atoms are confined in tight traps. In our case, we magnetically trap atoms with an atom chip that seals the top of one of ColdQuanta's RuBECi®vacuum cells. With RF evaporative cooling sequences as short as 450 ms, we attain nearly pure condensates of 2 × 104 atoms. In the future, the apparatus described here will be integrated into a portable system that houses all of the components needed to produce BECs (e.g. lasers, vacuum, electronics, imaging, etc.) in a volume less than 0.3 m3. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research (SBIR contract N00014-10-C-0282).

  7. Task-sensitive reconfiguration of corticocortical 6-20 Hz oscillatory coherence in naturalistic human performance.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Timo; Jalava, Antti; Kujala, Jan; Stevenson, Claire; Salmelin, Riitta

    2015-07-01

    Electrophysiological oscillatory coherence between brain regions has been proposed to facilitate functional long-range connectivity within neurocognitive networks. This notion is supported by intracortical recordings of coherence in singled-out corticocortical connections in the primate cortex. However, the manner in which this operational principle manifests in the task-sensitive connectivity that supports human naturalistic performance remains undercharacterized. Here, we demonstrate task-sensitive reconfiguration of global patterns of coherent connectivity in association with a set of easier and more demanding naturalistic tasks, ranging from picture comparison to speech comprehension and object manipulation. Based on whole-cortex neuromagnetic recording in healthy behaving individuals, the task-sensitive component of long-range corticocortical coherence was mapped at spectrally narrow-band oscillatory frequencies between 6 and 20 Hz (theta to alpha and low-beta bands). This data-driven cortical mapping unveiled markedly distinct and topologically task-relevant spatiospectral connectivity patterns for the different tasks. The results demonstrate semistable oscillatory states relevant for neurocognitive processing. The present findings decisively link human behavior to corticocortical coherence at oscillatory frequencies that are widely thought to convey long-range, feedback-type neural interaction in cortical functional networks. PMID:25760689

  8. Time-dependent seafloor acoustic backscatter (10-100 kHz).

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, Daniel D; de Moustier, Christian P

    2003-11-01

    A time-dependent model of the acoustic intensity backscattered by the seafloor is described and compared with data from a calibrated, vertically oriented, echo-sounder operating at 33 and 93 kHz. The model incorporates the characteristics of the echo-sounder and transmitted pulse, and the water column spreading and absorption losses. Scattering from the water-sediment interface is predicted using Helmholtz-Kirchhoff theory, parametrized by the mean grain size, the coherent reflection coefficient, and the strength and exponent of a power-law roughness spectrum. The composite roughness approach of Jackson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79, 1410-1422 (1986)], modified for the finite duration of the transmitted signal, is used to predict backscatter from subbottom inhomogeneities. It depends on the sediment's volume scattering and attenuation coefficients, as well as the interface characteristics governing sound transmission into the sediment. Estimation of model parameters (mean grain size, roughness spectrum strength and exponent, volume scattering coefficient) reveals ambiguous ranges for the two spectral components. Analyses of model outputs and of physical measurements reported in the literature yield practical constraints on roughness spectrum parameter settings appropriate for echo-envelope-based sediment classification procedures. PMID:14650007

  9. What the [bleep]? Enhanced absolute pitch memory for a 1000Hz sine tone.

    PubMed

    Van Hedger, Stephen C; Heald, Shannon L M; Nusbaum, Howard C

    2016-09-01

    Many individuals are able to perceive when the tuning of familiar stimuli, such as popular music recordings, has been altered. This suggests a kind of ubiquitous pitch memory, though it is unclear how this ability differs across individuals with and without absolute pitch (AP) and whether it plays any role in AP. In the present study, we take advantage of a salient single frequency - the 1000Hz sine tone used to censor taboo words in broadcast media - to assess the nature of this kind of pitch memory across individuals with and without AP. We show that non-AP participants are accurate at selecting the correct version of the censor tone among incorrect versions shifted by either one or two semitones, though their accuracy was still below that of an AP population (Experiment 1). This suggests a benefit for AP listeners that could be due to the use of explicit note categories or greater amounts of musical training. However, AP possessors still outperformed all non-AP participants when incorrect versions of the censor tone were shifted within a note category, even when controlling for musical experience (Experiment 2). Experiment 3 demonstrated that AP listeners did not appear to possess a category label for the censor tone that could have helped them differentiate the censor tones used in Experiment 2. Overall, these results suggest that AP possessors may have better pitch memory, even when divorced from pitch labeling (note categories). As such, these results have implications for how AP may develop and be maintained. PMID:27289485

  10. Closed-cycle 1-kHz-pulse-repetition-frequency HF(DF) laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael R.; Morris, A. V.; Gorton, Eric K.

    1998-05-01

    We describe the design and performance of a closed cycle, high pulse repetition frequency HF(DF) laser. A short duration, glow discharge is formed in a 10 SF6:1 H2(D2) gas mixture at a total pressure of approximately 110 torr. A pair of profiled electrodes define a 15 X 0.5 X 0.5 cm3 discharge volume through which gas flow is forced in the direction transverse to the optical axis. A centrifugal fan provides adequate gas flow to enable operation up to 3 kHz repetition frequency. The fan also passes the gas through a scrubber cell in which ground state HF(DF) is eliminated from the gas stream. An automated gas make-up system replenishes the spent fuel gases removed by the scrubber. Total gas admission is regulated by monitoring the system pressure, whilst the correct fuel balance is maintained through measurement of the discharge voltage. The HF(DF) generation rate is determined to be close to 5 X 1019 molecules per second per watt of laser output. Typical mean laser output powers of up to 3 watts can be delivered for extended periods of time. The primary limitation to life is found to be the discharge pre- ionization system. A distributed resistance corona pre- ionizer is shown to be advantageous when compared with an alternative arc array scheme.

  11. Streamer properties in a repetitively pulsed plasma jet from 1 to 100 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Brian; Ganguly, Biswa; Scofield, James

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the properties of guided streamers in a nanosecond repetitively pulsed dielectric barrier plasma jet at repetition rates up to 100 kHz. In this regime, remnant ionization and neutral metastable concentrations are significant in the channel through which the streamer propagates. Both helium and a Penning mixture of helium and argon are investigated as feed gases for a plasma jet in a controlled pressure chamber with a flowing nitrogen background. The applied voltage pulse was set at 8 kV, with a risetime of 15 ns and falltime of 8.5 μs. Streamer dynamics were monitored using spatiotemporally-resolved emission spectroscopy with a PMT filtered at 706.5 nm He (33S - 23P) and 587.6 nm He (33D - 23P) to track the streamer head. Temporally-resolved ICCD imaging was also used to characterize discharge development. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was used to measure He (23S1) and Ar (3P2) metastable densities in the streamer channel, and streamer current was measured using an inductive current monitor. As the pulse rate is increased, the streamer dynamics are significantly altered, while production of He (23S1) and Ar (3P2) is enhanced with alternate production channels becoming important in the case of He (23S1). Work funded by Air Force Office of Scientific Research under program manager Jason Marshall.

  12. A Stable 200TW / 1Hz Ti:sapphire laser for driving full coherent XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi; Lu, Jun; Li, Wenkai; Wu, Fenxiang; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Cheng; Li, Zhaoyang; Lu, Xiaoming; Liu, Yanqi; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-05-01

    Basic features of the ultra-short Ti:sapphire laser for driving compact X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) seeded by laser-driven high harmonic generation (HHG) at SIOM (Shanghai, China) is presented. The laser system consists of four-stage Ti:sapphire amplifiers and can produce 8 J energy at 1 Hz repetition rate after the final power amplifier. The best shot-to-shot energy fluctuation is as low as 0.54% in rms value, which is a desirable characteristic for driving stable electron acceleration and HHG seed. After compression, maximal pulse energy of 5.6 J and pulse duration of 27 fs can be obtained, the corresponding pulse peak power is above 200 TW. To achieve full coherent XFEL, the amplified chirped laser beam is split into two beams after the final power amplifier. After compression in two independent compressors, the two laser beams can be used to drive laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) and HHG respectively. The benefit of such a scheme is to improve the timing jitter and achieve all-optical synchronization between the electron beam and HHG seed in the near future.

  13. CFD simulation of a miniature coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler operating at 128 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yibo; Dang, Haizheng

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional axis-symmetric CFD model of a miniature coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler with an overall weight of 920 g operating at 128 Hz is established, and systematic simulations of the performance characteristics at different temperatures are conducted. Both thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium mechanisms for the porous matrix are considered, and the regenerator losses including the gas and solid conduction, the pressure drop and the imperfect interfacial heat transfer are calculated, respectively. The results indicate that the pressure drop loss is dominant during the first 85% and 78% of regenerator length for the thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium models, respectively, and it decreases monotonously from warm to cold end due to the steadily decreasing Darcy and Forchheimer terms, whereas other entropy generations share similar changing tendencies, going up gradually near the warm end, increasing dramatically from about 60% of length and then decreasing sharply near the cold end. The reasons for these entropy variations are discussed.

  14. Numerical calculation and measurement of 60-Hz current densities induced in an upright grounded cylinder.

    PubMed

    Kaune, W T; McCreary, F A

    1985-01-01

    Power-frequency electric fields are strongly perturbed in the vicinity of human beings and experimental animals. As a consequence, the extrapolation of biological data from laboratory animals to human-exposure situations cannot use the unperturbed exposure field strength as a common exposure parameter. Rather, comparisons between species must be based on the actual electric fields at the outer surfaces of and inside the bodies of the subjects. Experimental data have been published on surface and internal fields for a few exposure situations, but it is not feasible to characterize experimentally more than a small fraction of the diverse types of exposures which occur in the laboratory and in the field. A predictive numerical model is needed, one whose predictions have been verified in situations where experimental data are available, and one whose results can be used with confidence in new exposure situations. This paper describes a numerical technique which can be used to develop such a model, and it carries out this development for a test case, that of a homogeneous right-circular cylinder resting upright on-end on a ground plane and exposed to a vertical, uniform, 60-Hz electric field. The accuracy of the model is tested by comparing short-circuit currents and induced current densities predicted by it to measured values: Agreement is good. PMID:3836665

  15. Rodent cell transformation and immediate early gene expression following 60-Hz magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E K; Zhang, X F; Harrison, G H; McCready, W A; Shi, Z M; Han, L H; Abraham, J M; Ampey, L L; Meltzer, S J; Jacobs, M C; Davis, C C

    1996-01-01

    Some epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to power frequency magnetic fields (MFs) may be associated with an elevated risk of human cancer, but the experimental database remains limited and controversial. We investigated the hypothesis that 60-Hz MF action at the cellular level produces changes in gene expression that can result in neoplastic transformation. Twenty-four hour 200 microT continuous MF exposure produced negative results in two standard transformation systems (Syrian hamster embryo cells and C3H/10T1/2 murine fibroblasts) with or without postexposure to a chemical promoter. This prompted a reexamination of previously reported MF-induced changes in gene expression in human HL60 cells. Extensive testing using both coded and uncoded analyses was negative for an MF effect. Using the same exposure conditions as in the transformation studies, no MF-induced changes in ornithine decarboxylase expression were observed in C3H/10T1/2 cells, casting doubt on a promotional role of MF for the tested cells and experimental conditions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 2. D Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C Figure 5. D Figure 5. E Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D Figure 6. E Figure 7. Figure 8. A Figure 8. B Figure 8. C Figure 9. Figure 10. A Figure 10. B PMID:8959408

  16. Correlations between X-ray Spectra and kHz QPOS in Sco X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Charles F.; Titarchuk, Lev; Kuznetsov, Sergey

    2008-05-01

    Recent analysis of the RXTE X-ray spectra of Sco X-1 discovered that Sco X-1 can be adequately modeled by a simple two-component model of Compton up-scattering with a soft photon electron temperature of about 0.4 keV, plus an Iron K-line. The results show a strong correlation between spectral power law index and kHz QPOs. Sco X-1 is the prototypical Z-source low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system radiating near the Eddington limit. This radiation produces a high radiation pressure in its Compton cloud. We infer that the radiation pressure produces a geometrical configuration of the cloud that is quasi-spherical. We conclude that the high Thomson optical depth of the Compton cloud, in the range of 5-6 from the best-fit model parameters, is consistent with the neutron star's surface being obscured by material, which would likely suppress a spin frequency of Sco X-1 due to photon scattering off cloud electrons. We also demonstrate the evolution of its power spectrum when Sco X-1 transitions from the horizontal branch to the normal branch.

  17. Application of longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurements in peritoneal dialysis at 50 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nescolarde, L.; Doñate, T.; Casañas, R.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2010-04-01

    More relevant information of the fluid changes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) might be obtained with segmental bioimpedance measurements rather than whole-body measurement, who hidden information of body composition. Whole-body and segmental bioimpedance measurements were obtained using 5 configurations (whole-body or right-side (RS), longitudinal-leg (L-LEG), longitudinal-abdomen (L-AB), transversal-abdomen (T-AB), and transversal-leg (T-LEG)) in 20 patients: 15 males (56.5 ± 9.4 yr, 24.2 ± 4.2 kg/m2) and 5 females (58.4 ± 7.1 yr, 28.2 ± 5.9 kg/m2) in peritoneal dialysis (PD). The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between whole-body, longitudinal-segmental (L-LEG and L-AB) and transversal-segmental (TAB and TLEG) bioimpedance measurement at 50 kHz, with clinical parameters of cardiovascular risk, dyslipidemia, nutrition and hydration. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for the normality test of all variables. Longitudinal bioimpedance parameters were normalized by the height of the patients. The Spearman correlation was used to analyze the correlation between bioimpedance and clinical parameters. The statistical significance was considered with P < 0.05. Transversal bioimpedance measurements have higher correlation with clinical parameters than longitudinal measurements.

  18. Use of 24 kHz ultrasound to improve sulfate precipitation from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Davies, Lisa A; Dargue, Andrew; Dean, John R; Deary, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Elevated sulfate concentrations in industrial effluent can lead to a number of significant problems, the most serious of which is the corrosion of concrete sewers as a result of hydrogen sulfide induced biogenic sulfuric acid attack; hydrogen sulfide can also create odor nuisance problems. The most common treatment process for sulfate removal from wastewaters is to precipitate it as gypsum using lime addition. Nevertheless, meeting discharge consent limits for sulfate can often present practical challenges due to the solubility of gypsum and so there is a need to investigate technological solutions that might provide for more consistent sulfate removal. This paper reports on the application of ultrasound during the sulfate precipitation process. We show that with as little as 10 s sonication at 24 kHz, significant increases in the rate of sulfate precipitation are observed. Particle size analysis, pH profiles and SEM micrographs, suggest that the likely mode of action is disaggregation of the calcium hydroxide particles, giving a greater solid-liquid interface, thus resulting in a faster dissolution rate and more readily available calcium ions. A range of experimental variables are studied, including the duration and power of sonication, as well as initial sulfate concentration and the effect of changing the time at which sonication is applied. For both sonicated and non-sonicated samples, precipitation commences almost immediately that the lime is added and so induction time is not an issue in this system. PMID:25218769

  19. Slope Instability on the French Guiana Transform Margin from Swath-Bathymetry and 3.5 kHz Echograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaullier, Virginie; Loncke, Lies; Droz, Laurence; Basile, Christophe; Maillard, Agnès.; Patriat, Martin; Roest, Walter R.; Loubrieu, Benoît.

    2010-05-01

    sedimentary structures are observed on the Demerara Abyssal Plain: small meandering channels of the Amazon Fan at its eastern edge and sediment waves at its western edge, along the foot of Demerara continental slope. Another remarkable characteristic of the study area is the abundance of circular and elongated bathymetric depressions corresponding to pockmarks, on the margin and in the abyssal plain. Fluid escape features are also documented on 3.5 kHz echograms. Our dataset does not allow any speculation concerning the origin of the fluids, but good candidates could be the Black Shales or Cretaceous organic-rich layers on the Demerara Plateau, as suggested by Erbacher et al. (2004). In any case, these fluid escape structures seem to be closely related with slope instabilities, either along bounding faults acting as drains, or by surficial dewatering of debris flows. Whether the deformation observed at the surface is the imprint of ancient events or active features is still unclear. Given the freshness of deformations and the abundance of pockmarks, we believe that the seaward creeping processes experienced by the whole Demerara plateau are active today. Future work will be dedicated to a better understanding of the relations between structural inheritance (i.e. transform context), slope instability and fluid escape.

  20. Reductions in finger blood flow induced by 125-Hz vibration: effect of area of contact with vibration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ying; Griffin, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    To investigate whether the Pacinian channel is involved in vibration-induced reductions of finger blood flow (FBF), vibrotactile thresholds and vasoconstriction have been studied with 125-Hz vibration and two contact areas: 3- or 6-mm-diameter vibrating probes with 2-mm gaps to fixed surrounds. Fifteen subjects provided thresholds for perceiving vibration at the thenar eminence of the right hand with both contact areas. With both contact areas, FBF was then measured in the middle fingers of both hands during five successive 5-min periods: (i) no force and no vibration, (ii) force and no vibration, (iii) force with vibration 15 dB above threshold, (iv) force and no vibration, and (v) no force and no vibration. Thresholds were in the ranges of 0.16-0.66 ms(-2) r.m.s. (6-mm probe) and 0.32-1.62 ms(-2) r.m.s. (3-mm probe). With the magnitude of vibration 15 dB above each individual's threshold with the 3-mm probe, the median reduction in FBF with the 6-mm probe (to 70 and 77 % of pre-exposure FBF on the exposed right hand and the unexposed left hand, respectively) was greater than with the 3-mm probe (79 and 85 %). There were similar reductions in FBF when vibration was presented by the two contactors at the same sensation level (i.e. 15 dB above threshold with each probe). The findings are consistent with reductions in FBF arising from excitation of the Pacinian channel: increasing the area excited by vibration increases Pacinian activation and provokes stronger perception of vibration and greater vasoconstriction. PMID:23064872