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Sample records for 8-arm radial maze

  1. Robust training attenuates TBI-induced deficits in reference and working memory on the radial 8-arm maze.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Veronica; Diallo, Aissatou; Ling, Douglas S F; Serrano, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Globally, it is estimated that nearly 10 million people sustain severe brain injuries leading to hospitalization and/or death every year. Amongst survivors, traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in a wide variety of physical, emotional and cognitive deficits. The most common cognitive deficit associated with TBI is memory loss, involving impairments in spatial reference and working memory. However, the majority of research thus far has characterized the deficits associated with TBI on either reference or working memory systems separately, without investigating how they interact within a single task. Thus, we examined the effects of TBI on short-term working and long-term reference memory using the radial 8-arm maze (RAM) with a sequence of four baited and four unbaited arms. Subjects were given 10 daily trials for 6 days followed by a memory retrieval test 2 weeks after training. Multiple training trials not only provide robust training, but also test the subjects' ability to frequently update short-term memory while learning the reference rules of the task. Our results show that TBI significantly impaired short-term working memory function on previously acquired spatial information but has little effect on long-term reference memory. Additionally, TBI significantly increased working memory errors during acquisition and reference memory errors during retention testing 2 weeks later. With a longer recovery period after TBI, the robust RAM training mitigated the reference memory deficit in retention but not the short-term working memory deficit during acquisition. These results identify the resiliency and vulnerabilities of short-term working and long-term reference memory to TBI in the context of robust training. The data highlight the role of cognitive training and other behavioral remediation strategies implicated in attenuating deficits associated with TBI. PMID:23653600

  2. Modest environmental enrichment: effect on a radial maze validation and well being of rats.

    PubMed

    Brillaud, Elsa; Morillion, Delphine; de Seze, René

    2005-08-30

    Our 8-arm radial maze test was validated to demonstrate memory deficits in rats treated with the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine hydro bromide (SHB, 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). To improve quality of life, we enriched the environment of single housing rats. Enrichment procedures were chosen to increase the animals' well being without disturbing a lot the results of behavioural tests. It is modest, consisting of a plastic tube and corn chips. Enriched environment (EE) and Non-enriched Environment (NE) animals' performances were compared during the 8-arms radial maze validation. Enrichment procedures were chosen to increase the animals' well being without disturbing the results of behavioural tests. The impact of our enrichment conditions was then evaluated on the general behaviour of rats, weight evolution and results of a plus maze anxiety test. Results showed a deficit and a delay in learning for SHB-treated animals, and a general time-dependent learning effect, validating our test. No effect of enrichment on negative control animals was observed. For SHB-treated animals, enrichment increased performances during learning task and accentuated the deficits in test task. Exploratory behaviour of enriched animals seemed to be increased. A general amelioration of well being for EE animals was found (stable weight). We conclude that our enrichment allows increasing exploratory behaviour not modifying radial maze sensitivity using a simple modification of our protocol (limitation to 16 visits/trial). We decided to generalise this enrichment to all our studies, given its simplicity and obtained benefits.

  3. Sex Differences in a Human Analogue of the Radial Arm Maze: The ''17-Box Maze Test''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Q.; Abrahams, S.; Jussab, F.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated sex differences in spatial memory using a human analogue of the Radial Arm Maze: a revision on the Nine Box Maze originally developed by Abrahams, Pickering, Polkey, and Morris (1997) called the 17-Box Maze Test herein. The task encourages allocentric spatial processing, dissociates object from spatial memory, and…

  4. Social effects on spatial choice in the radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael F; Prince, Toni-Moi N; Doyle, Karen E

    2009-08-01

    Social memory was investigated in the context of a spatial working memory task. Pairs of rats were tested in an eight-arm radial maze. Under most conditions, there was a tendency to choose maze locations that had been visited earlier by the other rat. The possibility that this tendency is produced by common preferences for particular maze locations was ruled out. An opposite tendency to avoid visits to locations that had been visited earlier during the trial by another rat was found only when the maze location contained two pellets (rather than an undepletable supply), the rats' ability to see each other in the maze was restricted to the central arena, and the maze location had been previously visited by the focal rat. The amount of food available in maze locations did not otherwise modulate social influences on spatial choice. The results indicate that memory for a rat's own previous choices is combined with memory for the choices made by another rat.

  5. Effects of ovarian hormones and environment on radial maze and water maze performance of female rats.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J M; Roberts, S L; Dohanich, G P

    1999-03-01

    The effects of gonadal hormones and environment on performance in an eight-arm radial maze and in the Morris water maze were determined in female rats. Long-Evans female rats were ovariectomized or sham ovariectomized at 35 days of age, and housed in complex environments or in isolation for the duration of the study. One month following surgeries, spatial working memory performance in the radial maze was assessed. Exposure to complex environmental conditions independently enhanced performance, as indicated by increased arm choice accuracy during 20 days of maze training. Additionally, gonadally intact females significantly outperformed ovariectomized females before cyclicity was disrupted by food deprivation. Following radial maze training, spatial reference memory performance was assessed in the same females utilizing the Morris water maze. Gonadally intact females housed in isolation performed significantly more poorly during 16 days of place training trials and displayed significantly shorter times in the platform quadrants and fewer target crossings during probe trials than gonadally intact and ovariectomized females housed in complex environments and ovariectomized rats housed in isolation. Consequently, acquisition and retention of the water maze was impaired by the presence of ovaries, and this impairment was counteracted by exposure to complex environments. Performance did not differ between groups on cued trials, indicating that sensorimotor and motivational functions did not differ between groups. Results of these experiments indicate that endogenous gonadal hormones can differentially affect performance on tasks of spatial working and spatial reference memory, and that environmental conditions can interact with gonadal hormones to affect behavior.

  6. Persistence of working memory of rats in an aversively motivated radial maze task.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, J J; Buresová, O; Bures, J

    1985-01-01

    The effects of various within-trial delays on the performance of rats in an 8-arm radial water maze (RWM) were investigated. Rats (n = 13) were trained to escape from 25 degrees C opaque water onto a submerged bench situated at the far end of each channel of the maze. After 20 s the chosen bench was collapsed and the rat had to return to a central platform, 1 cm above water level. After 15 s the platform was lowered and the animal was forced to choose again. This was repeated until all 8 channels had been visited. After 30 daily trials the mean number of correct choices per trial (first 8 choices) was 7.8. In Experiment 1, delays from 40 min up to 21 h were inserted between choices 4 and 5. The number of revisited channels (errors) in the second half of a trial increased rapidly with the duration of the delay, and was not significantly different from chance at 640 min. In Experiment 2, delays of 2.5, 5, 10 or 20 min were inserted between individual choices. Again, performance deteriorated with the duration of the delay. When the incidence of errorless trials was analyzed, performance was not significantly different from random at 5 min inter-choice delays. Comparison with conventional radial maze studies indicates that spatial working memory in the RWM has a slower, but also exponential decay.

  7. Wistar rats with high versus low rearing activity differ in radial maze performance.

    PubMed

    Görisch, Jutta; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2006-09-01

    Substantial work has shown that rats although identical in stock, sex, age, and housing conditions can differ considerably in terms of behavior and physiology. Such individual differences, which can be detected by specific behavioral screening tests, are rather stable, that is, they probably reflect a behavioral disposition or trait. Here, we asked whether and how such differences might affect performance in a task of spatial learning and memory, the radial maze. As in our previous work, we used the degree of rearing activity in a novel open field to assign male adult outbred Wistar rats into those with high versus low rearing activity (HRA/LRA rats). They were then tested in a plus-maze for possible differences in anxiety-related behavior. Finally, and most importantly, they were food deprived and underwent maze training using an 8-arm radial maze with four non-baited and four baited arms. One of these arms consistently contained a larger bait size than the other three. In the open field, HRA rats not only showed more rearing behavior, but also more locomotor activity than LRA rats. In the plus-maze, HRA rats again showed more locomotion, but did not differ in open arm time or percentage of open arm entries, that is, conventional measures of anxiety-related behavior. In the radial maze, HRA rats consistently needed less time to consume all pellets than LRA rats, which was due to faster locomotion on the arms and less time spent at the food pits (especially in baited arms) of HRA rats. During the initial days of training, they were also more efficient in obtaining all food pellets available. Furthermore, HRA rats visited more arms and made relatively less reference memory errors than LRA rats. This allowed them to forage food quickly, but was paralleled by more working memory errors than in LRA rats. In general, working memory errors were more frequent in the arm with the large bait size, but there were no indications that HRA and LRA rats responded differently

  8. Prenatal opiate exposure impairs radial arm maze performance and reduces levels of BDNF precursor following training.

    PubMed

    Schrott, Lisa M; Franklin, La 'Tonya M; Serrano, Peter A

    2008-03-10

    Prenatal exposure to opiates, which is invariably followed by postnatal withdrawal, can affect cognitive performance. To further characterize these effects, we examined radial 8-arm maze performance and expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in male rats prenatally exposed to the opiate l-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM). Female rats received 1.0 mg/kg/day LAAM or water via daily oral gavage for 28 days prior to breeding, during breeding, and throughout pregnancy. Pups were fostered to non-treated lactating dams at birth and underwent neonatal opiate withdrawal. At 5-6 months, prenatal water- and LAAM-exposed males (n=6 each; non-littermates) received radial arm maze training consisting of ten trials a day for five days and three retention trials on day six. Rats prenatally exposed to LAAM had poorer maze performance, decreased percent correct responding and more reference and working memory errors than prenatal water-treated controls. However, they were able to acquire the task by the end of training. There were no differences between the groups on retention 24 h after testing. Following retention testing, hippocampi were removed and protein extracted from cytosol and synaptic fractions. Western blots were used to measure levels of mature and precursor BDNF protein, as well as the BDNF receptor TrkB. BDNF precursor protein was significantly decreased in the synaptic fraction of trained prenatal LAAM-treated rats compared to prenatal water-treated trained controls. No effects were found for the full-length or truncated TrkB receptor. In untrained rats, prenatal treatment did not affect any of the measures. These data suggest that prenatal opiate exposure and/or postnatal withdrawal compromise expression of proteins involved in the neural plasticity underlying learning. PMID:18262500

  9. Production of a serial position effect in rats using a 12-arm radial maze.

    PubMed

    Harper, D N; Dalrymple-Alford, J C; McLean, A P

    1992-09-01

    The effects of item position (the serial position effect: SPE) on the recognition of a list of arms presented in an 8-arm radial maze have not been shown to be robust across studies which differ in numbers of subjects, amount of training and task difficulty. The present study examined whether more robust SPEs could be obtained in rats with a 12-arm radial maze using a matching-to-sample serial probe recognition (SPR) procedure. In Part 1, 23 rats received extensive training on recognition of list of arms from a 5-arm list and, in Part 2, 20 rats received training with a 7-arm list. Both Parts 1 and 2 showed that a reliable and persistent SPE emerged due to superior recognition of items at the first and last serial positions compared with the middle positions. However, the SPE was more pronounced with the 7-arm than 5-arm list. It is argued that adequate task difficulty along with sufficient subject and trial numbers is necessary to produce a clear SPE. In Part 3, an alternative means of assessing accuracy derived from signal-detection theory is examined, and the procedural requirements for its use are identified. Although this measure did not alter the conclusions reached using percent correct, it is proposed that the bias-free measure, log d, is superior to traditional indices of memory performance which may obscure the presence of, or changes in, the SPE. The procedures used here provide a valuable means to produce clear, reliable and persistent SPEs. Such procedures are essential if researchers are to be confident about the effects of lesions or drugs upon list memory in their attempts to explore the neurological bases of memory and model human neurological disorders.

  10. Spatial competences in Williams syndrome: a radial arm maze study.

    PubMed

    Mandolesi, L; Addona, F; Foti, F; Menghini, D; Petrosini, L; Vicari, S

    2009-05-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating spatial function in subjects with Williams syndrome by using the radial arm maze task and comparing their spatial abilities with those of mental age-matched control subjects. Two different paradigms were administered: the free-choice version for analyzing the aspects linked mainly to procedural and mnesic components, the forced-choice version for disentangling components linked to spatial working memory from the procedural ones. The findings evidenced a deficit in the acquisition of procedural competences as well as in the spatial memory processes in Williams subjects. In the free-choice paradigm, they performed worse than control subjects on all parameters analyzed. Namely, they needed more time to complete the task, did not collect all rewards, exhibited low values of the spatial span as well as low percentages of correct visits, and displayed a reduced use of the most efficient exploration strategies. Even in the forced-choice paradigm, Williams subjects made a number of errors significantly higher than control subjects. The marked impairment in spatial information processing is discussed on the light of neuro-anatomical alterations reported in Williams subjects.

  11. Exposure to 56Fe Particles Produces Deficits in Spatial Learning and Memory in the Radial Arm Water Maze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Miller, Marshall; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Rabin, Bernard; Joseph, James

    Previous research has shown that radiation exposure, particularly to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles) which will be encountered on long-term space missions, can adversely affect the ability of rats to perform a variety of behavioral tasks. This outcome has implications for an astronaut's ability to successfully complete requirements associated with these missions. Both aged and irradiated rats display cognitive impairment in tests of spatial learning and memory such as the Morris water maze and the radial arm maze. Therefore, in the present study, we used a combination of these two tests, the 8 arm radial water maze (RAWM), to measure spatial learning in rats which were irradiated at the NSRL with 0, 150cGy, or 200cGy of 56Fe radiation. Following irradiation the rats were shipped to the HNRCA and tested in the RAWM (2-3 months later) for 5 days, 3 trials/day. In this version of the RAWM, there were 4 hidden platforms that the rat needed to locate to successfully solve a trial. Once the rat located a platform, it was allowed to remain there for 15 sec before the platform sank, at which point the rat tried to locate the remaining ones. Reference (entering an arm that never contained the platform) and working (re-entering an arm in which the platform had already been found) memory errors were tabulated. Results showed that the irradiated rats had more reference and working memory errors while learning the maze, particularly on Day 3 of testing. Additionally, they utilized non-spatial strategies to solve the RAWM task whereas the control animals used spatial strategies. These results show that irradiation with 56Fe high-energy particles produces age-like decrements in cognitive behavior that may impair the ability of astronauts to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere. Supported by USDA Intramural and N.A.S.A. Grant NNX08AM66G

  12. Learning impairment in the radial-arm maze following prolonged cannabis treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Stiglick, A; Kalant, H

    1982-01-01

    Chronic oral administration of cannabis extract to rats (daily delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol dose 20 mg/kg) was examined in three experiments for its residual effect on radial-arm maze learning following a 1-month drug-free period. Learning a simple eight-arm maze was significantly impaired in rats treated for either 6 months (Experiment I) or 3 months (Experiment II) with the drug. In Experiment III, animals that received the extract for 3 months exhibited significant learning deficits on a much more difficult 12-arm radial maze. The results demonstrate that the deleterious effects of cannabis on radial-arm maze learning are probably due to a tendency toward increased vigilance and perseveration, possibly combined with an impaired utilization of spatial cues.

  13. Does a cognitive map guide choices in the radial-arm maze?

    PubMed

    Brown, M F

    1992-01-01

    Fifteen rats performed in a standard radial-arm maze task (Experiment 1) and in a modified task with a set of forced choices and a 15-min retention interval prior to completion of the maze (Experiment 2). In addition to the standard measure of choice in the radial-arm maze, orientation toward arms was measured and considered to constitute go-no-go "microchoice" decisions. Rats investigated but rejected many arms. A model of choice was developed in which it was assumed that choice decisions about arms were made independently and that microchoices were not selectively guided toward baited arms. The model performed nearly as well as the rats. These results place important limitations on the theory that choice behavior in the radial-arm maze is guided by a cognitive map.

  14. A cold radial maze for long-lasting spatial memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Vizi, Sándor; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2013-03-15

    Here we report the establishment of a novel spatial learning and memory test called the cold radial maze. It is specifically designed for mice, with all conditions tailored to their natural behaviors. The cold radial maze is a dry-land test with easy-to-measure variables that relies on a consistent motivation system and limits the moderately adverse experience to the duration of testing. Training on this maze produces a long-lasting, resistant, and reversible spatial memory in mice in a reproducible way, without introducing undesirable side effects typically produced in other spatial learning tests. This novel behavioral technique may prove useful in studying mouse models of memory impairment-associated human conditions.

  15. Ventral hippocampal alpha 7 nicotinic receptor blockade and chronic nicotine effects on memory performance in the radial-arm maze.

    PubMed

    Bettany, J H; Levin, E D

    2001-12-01

    Chronic nicotine administration has been shown to significantly improve working memory. Nicotinic involvement in memory function critically involves the ventral hippocampus. Local ventral hippocampal infusions of the nicotinic antagonists mecamylamine, dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DH beta E) and methyllycaconitine (MLA) significantly impair working memory. The impairment caused by hippocampal infusion of the alpha 4 beta 2 antagonist DH beta E is reversed by chronic systemic nicotine. This study determined the interaction of chronic systemic nicotine with acute ventral hippocampal infusions of the alpha 7 antagonist MLA. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on an 8-arm radial maze working memory task. Then they underwent ventral hippocampal cannulation and received sc implants of minipumps delivering nicotine (0 or 5 mg/kg/day for 28 days). Acute ventral hippocampal infusions of MLA (0, 4.88, 14.64 and 43.92 microg/side) were given during 3-4 weeks of chronic nicotine. MLA caused a significant dose-related memory impairment. In the rats not receiving nicotine, the 14.64 and 43.92 microg/side MLA doses caused significant memory impairment. Chronic systemic nicotine exposure did not block the MLA-induced memory impairment. Comparing the current results with MLA with previous results with DH beta E, equimolar ventral hippocampal DH beta E more effectively impaired memory than MLA, but the DH beta E-induced impairment was more effectively reversed by chronic systemic nicotine administration.

  16. Radial Maze Analog for Pigeons: Evidence for Flexible Coding Strategies May Result from Faulty Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipson, Cassandra D.; DiGian, Kelly A.; Miller, Holly C.; Zentall, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research with the radial maze has found evidence that rats can remember both places that they have already been (retrospective coding) and places they have yet to visit (prospective coding; Cook, R. G., Brown, M. F., & Riley, D. A. (1985). Flexible memory processing by rats: Use of prospective and retrospective information in the radial…

  17. 7-NI and ODQ Disturbs Memory in the Elevated Plus Maze, Morris Water Maze, and Radial Arm Maze Tests in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Oguz; Akar, Furuzan; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Tanyeri, Pelin; Ulak, Guner; Erden, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an atypical neurotransmitter that causes changes in cognition. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitors have been shown to exert some effects on cognition in previous studies; however, the findings have been controversial. This study was aimed at understanding the effects of an NOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), and a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), on spatial memory in modified elevated plus maze (mEPM), Morris water maze (MWM), and radial arm maze (RAM) tests. Male Balb-c mice were treated via intraperitoneal injections with 7-NI (15 mg/kg), ODQ (3, 10 mg/kg), L-arginine (100 mg/kg) + 7-NI (15 mg/kg), or physiological saline. ODQ (3 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) significantly increased the second-day latency in the mEPM test. 7-NI (15 mg/kg) and ODQ (10 mg/kg) significantly increased the escape latency in second, third, and fourth sessions, decreased the time spent in the escape platform's quadrant, and increased the mean distance to the platform in the probe trial of the MWM test. ODQ (3, 10 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) significantly increased the number of errors, whereas only 7-NI increased the latency in the RAM test. The administration of L-arginine (100 mg/kg) prior to 7-NI inverted the effects of 7-NI, which supports the role of NO on cognition. Our study shows that the NO/cGMP/GS pathway can regulate spatial memory in mice. PMID:25788830

  18. 7-NI and ODQ Disturbs Memory in the Elevated Plus Maze, Morris Water Maze, and Radial Arm Maze Tests in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Oguz; Akar, Furuzan; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Tanyeri, Pelin; Ulak, Guner; Erden, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an atypical neurotransmitter that causes changes in cognition. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitors have been shown to exert some effects on cognition in previous studies; however, the findings have been controversial. This study was aimed at understanding the effects of an NOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), and a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), on spatial memory in modified elevated plus maze (mEPM), Morris water maze (MWM), and radial arm maze (RAM) tests. Male Balb-c mice were treated via intraperitoneal injections with 7-NI (15 mg/kg), ODQ (3, 10 mg/kg), L-arginine (100 mg/kg) + 7-NI (15 mg/kg), or physiological saline. ODQ (3 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) significantly increased the second-day latency in the mEPM test. 7-NI (15 mg/kg) and ODQ (10 mg/kg) significantly increased the escape latency in second, third, and fourth sessions, decreased the time spent in the escape platform’s quadrant, and increased the mean distance to the platform in the probe trial of the MWM test. ODQ (3, 10 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) significantly increased the number of errors, whereas only 7-NI increased the latency in the RAM test. The administration of L-arginine (100 mg/kg) prior to 7-NI inverted the effects of 7-NI, which supports the role of NO on cognition. Our study shows that the NO/cGMP/GS pathway can regulate spatial memory in mice. PMID:25788830

  19. 7-NI and ODQ Disturbs Memory in the Elevated Plus Maze, Morris Water Maze, and Radial Arm Maze Tests in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Oguz; Akar, Furuzan; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Tanyeri, Pelin; Ulak, Guner; Erden, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an atypical neurotransmitter that causes changes in cognition. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitors have been shown to exert some effects on cognition in previous studies; however, the findings have been controversial. This study was aimed at understanding the effects of an NOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), and a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), on spatial memory in modified elevated plus maze (mEPM), Morris water maze (MWM), and radial arm maze (RAM) tests. Male Balb-c mice were treated via intraperitoneal injections with 7-NI (15 mg/kg), ODQ (3, 10 mg/kg), L-arginine (100 mg/kg) + 7-NI (15 mg/kg), or physiological saline. ODQ (3 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) significantly increased the second-day latency in the mEPM test. 7-NI (15 mg/kg) and ODQ (10 mg/kg) significantly increased the escape latency in second, third, and fourth sessions, decreased the time spent in the escape platform's quadrant, and increased the mean distance to the platform in the probe trial of the MWM test. ODQ (3, 10 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) significantly increased the number of errors, whereas only 7-NI increased the latency in the RAM test. The administration of L-arginine (100 mg/kg) prior to 7-NI inverted the effects of 7-NI, which supports the role of NO on cognition. Our study shows that the NO/cGMP/GS pathway can regulate spatial memory in mice.

  20. Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and the radial arm maze: spatial memory and serial position effects.

    PubMed

    Craig, Marlyse; Rand, Jacquie; Mesch, Rita; Shyan-Norwalt, Melissa; Morton, John; Flickinger, Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    The present study investigated spatial memory in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) through the use of a radial arm maze. The study consisted of a total of three separate experiments. In the first two experiments, the ability of the dogs to successfully remember previously unentered arms was evaluated. The third experiment was similar to the first two, but also examined the nature of the serial position effect. Performance in all three experiments was better than expected solely by random choices. Dogs showed a much better memory for spatial locations presented earlier in a spatial list compared with those presented in the middle. Based on the present results, we suggest that the radial arm maze assesses canine spatial memory and that dogs show a primacy effect.

  1. Exposing rats to a predator impairs spatial working memory in the radial arm water maze.

    PubMed

    Diamond, D M; Park, C R; Heman, K L; Rose, G M

    1999-01-01

    This series of studies investigated the effects of predator exposure on working memory in rats trained on the radial arm water maze (RAWM). The RAWM is a modified Morris water maze that contains four or six swim paths (arms) radiating out of an open central area, with a hidden platform located at the end of one of the arms. The hidden platform was located in the same arm on each trial within a day and was in a different arm across days. Each day rats learned the location of the hidden platform during acquisition trials, and then the rats were removed from the maze for a 30-min delay period. During the delay period, the rats were placed either in their home cage (nonstress condition) or in close proximity to a cat (stress condition). At the end of the delay period, the rats were run on a retention trial, which tested their ability to remember which arm contained the platform that day. The first experiment confirmed that the RAWM is a hippocampal-dependent task. Rats with hippocampal damage were impaired at learning the location of the hidden platform in the easiest RAWM under control (non-stress) conditions. The next three experiments showed that stress had no effect on memory in the easiest RAWM, but stress did impair memory in more difficult versions of the RAWM. These findings indicate that the capacity for stress to impair memory is influenced not only by the brain memory system involved in solving the task (hippocampal versus nonhippocampal), but also by the difficulty of the task. This work should help to resolve some of the confusion in the literature regarding the heterogeneous effects of stress on hippocampal-dependent learning and memory.

  2. The interaction between working and reference spatial memories in rats on a radial maze.

    PubMed

    Guitar, Nicole A; Roberts, William A

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of reference and working memory was studied in rats on an eight-arm radial maze. Each trial involved a two-phase procedure in which a rat was forced to enter four arms on the maze in a study phase and then was allowed to choose among all eight arms in a test phase given 5-s later, with choice of only the previously unvisited arms rewarded. For each rat, two arms on the maze were designated as reference memory arms because they were never entered in the study phase and were always rewarded in the test phase. The other two arms never entered in the study phase and rewarded in the test phase were working memory arms and varied randomly from trial to trial. In Experiment 1, rats showed acquisition of equivalent preference for entering the reference and working memory arms in their first four choices of the test phase. Subsequent tests carried out in Experiment 2 compared performance at 5-s, 1-h, and 24-h retention intervals when reference memory and working memory were congruent and incongruent. Higher accuracy for choice of reference memory arms than working memory arms appeared at the 1-h and 24-h retention intervals on congruent tests but not on incongruent tests. A process dissociation procedure analysis indicated that working memory but not reference memory declined over the 24-h retention interval. The interaction of working and reference memory was shown by superior choice of reference memory arms on congruent tests than on incongruent tests at 1-h and 24-h retention intervals but not at the 5-s retention interval. These findings suggest that working and reference memory are independent systems that can facilitate and compete with one another. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tribute to Tom Zentall.

  3. The interaction between working and reference spatial memories in rats on a radial maze.

    PubMed

    Guitar, Nicole A; Roberts, William A

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of reference and working memory was studied in rats on an eight-arm radial maze. Each trial involved a two-phase procedure in which a rat was forced to enter four arms on the maze in a study phase and then was allowed to choose among all eight arms in a test phase given 5-s later, with choice of only the previously unvisited arms rewarded. For each rat, two arms on the maze were designated as reference memory arms because they were never entered in the study phase and were always rewarded in the test phase. The other two arms never entered in the study phase and rewarded in the test phase were working memory arms and varied randomly from trial to trial. In Experiment 1, rats showed acquisition of equivalent preference for entering the reference and working memory arms in their first four choices of the test phase. Subsequent tests carried out in Experiment 2 compared performance at 5-s, 1-h, and 24-h retention intervals when reference memory and working memory were congruent and incongruent. Higher accuracy for choice of reference memory arms than working memory arms appeared at the 1-h and 24-h retention intervals on congruent tests but not on incongruent tests. A process dissociation procedure analysis indicated that working memory but not reference memory declined over the 24-h retention interval. The interaction of working and reference memory was shown by superior choice of reference memory arms on congruent tests than on incongruent tests at 1-h and 24-h retention intervals but not at the 5-s retention interval. These findings suggest that working and reference memory are independent systems that can facilitate and compete with one another. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tribute to Tom Zentall. PMID:25452076

  4. A novel radial water tread maze tracks age-related cognitive decline in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Touch, Dylan V.; Wiley, Jesse C.; Hopkins, Heather C.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Ladiges, Warren C.

    2013-01-01

    There is currently no treatment and cure for age-related dementia and cognitive impairment in humans. Mice suffer from age-related cognitive decline just as people do, but assessment is challenging because of cumbersome and at times stressful performance tasks. We developed a novel radial water tread (RWT) maze and tested male C57BL/6 (B6) and C57BL/6 x Balb/c F1 (CB6F1) mice at ages 4, 12, 20, and 28 months. B6 mice showed a consistent learning experience and memory retention that gradually decreased with age. CB6F1 mice showed a moderate learning experience in the 4 and 12 month groups, which was not evident in the 20 and 28 month groups. In conclusion, CB6F1 mice showed more severe age-related cognitive impairment compared to B6 mice and might be a suitable model for intervention studies. In addition, the RWT maze has a number of operational advantages compared to currently accepted tasks and can be used to assess age-related cognition impairment in B6 and CB6F1 mice as early as 12 months of age. PMID:24106580

  5. Predictors of virtual radial arm maze performance in adolescent Italian children

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Joe M.; Lucchini, Roberto; Bellinger, David; Hoffman, Elaine; Nazzaro, Marco; Smith, Donald R.; Wright, Robert O.

    2012-01-01

    Background Comparisons between animal and human neurotoxicology studies are a foundation of risk assessment, but are hindered by differences in measured behaviors. The Radial Arm Maze (RAM), a rodent visuospatial learning and memory task, has a computerized version for use in children, which may help improve comparisons between animal and human studies. Objective To describe the characteristics and correlates of the Virtual Radial Arm Maze (VRAM) in 255 children age 10–15 years from Italy. Methods We administered the VRAM using a laptop computer and measured children’s performance using the latency, distance, and working/reference memory errors during eight trials. Using generalized linear mixed models, we described VRAM performance in relation to demographic factors, child activities, and several standard neuropsychologic tests (Italian translations), including the Conners Parent Rating Scales-Short Version (CPRS), California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children, finger tapping speed, reaction time, and motor skills. Results Children’s VRAM performance tended to improve between trials 1–6 and then plateaued between trials 6–8. Males finished the task 14 seconds faster (95% Confidence Interval [CI]:-20, -9) than females. Children who played 2+ hours of video games per day finished 16 seconds faster (CI:-26, -6) and with 34% (CI:5, 54%) fewer working memory errors than children who reported not playing video games. Higher IQ and better CVLT scores were associated with better VRAM performance. Higher Cognitive/Inattention CPRS scores were associated with more working (11%; CI:1, 22) and reference memory errors (7%; CI:1, 12). Conclusions Consistent with animal studies, VRAM performance improved over the course of test trials and males performed better than females. Better VRAM performance was related to higher IQ, fewer inattentive behaviors, and better verbal memory. The VRAM may help improve the integration and comparison

  6. Effects of rolipram and zaprinast on learning and memory in the Morris water maze and radial arm maze tests in naive mice.

    PubMed

    Akar, F; Mutlu, O; Celikyurt, I K; Ulak, G; Erden, F; Bektas, E; Tanyeri, P

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE) improved recognition memory and counteracted spatial learning impairment induced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in recent studies. Aim of this study was to investigate effects of rolipram, a PDE4 inhibitor and zaprinast, a PDE5 inhibitor, on learning and memory in Morris water maze (MWM) and radial arm maze (RAM) tests in naive mice. Male Balb-c mice were treated subchronically with zaprinast (3 and 10 mg/kg) and rolipram (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) for 6 days in the MWM test and acutely before the retention trial of radial arm maze test. Rolipram (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) significantly decreased escape latency between 2(nd) and 5(th) sessions, while zaprinast (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased escape latency only in 2(nd) session. Rolipram (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) and zaprinast (10 mg/kg) significantly increased time spent in escape platform's quadrant in probe trial of MWM test; only rolipram decreased mean distance to platform, while zaprinast had no effect on mean distance to platform. Zaprinast (3 and 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased number of errors compared to control group, while rolipram (0.05 and 0.1mg/kg) had no effect on number of errors in retention trial of RAM test. Rolipram (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) and zaprinast (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased time spent to complete retention trial (latency) compared to control group. Our study revealed that both zaprinast and rolipram enhanced spatial memory in MWM, while zaprinast seems to have more memory enhancing effects compared to rolipram in radial arm maze test. PMID:24764251

  7. Effects of rolipram and zaprinast on learning and memory in the Morris water maze and radial arm maze tests in naive mice.

    PubMed

    Akar, F; Mutlu, O; Celikyurt, I K; Ulak, G; Erden, F; Bektas, E; Tanyeri, P

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE) improved recognition memory and counteracted spatial learning impairment induced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in recent studies. Aim of this study was to investigate effects of rolipram, a PDE4 inhibitor and zaprinast, a PDE5 inhibitor, on learning and memory in Morris water maze (MWM) and radial arm maze (RAM) tests in naive mice. Male Balb-c mice were treated subchronically with zaprinast (3 and 10 mg/kg) and rolipram (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) for 6 days in the MWM test and acutely before the retention trial of radial arm maze test. Rolipram (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) significantly decreased escape latency between 2(nd) and 5(th) sessions, while zaprinast (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased escape latency only in 2(nd) session. Rolipram (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) and zaprinast (10 mg/kg) significantly increased time spent in escape platform's quadrant in probe trial of MWM test; only rolipram decreased mean distance to platform, while zaprinast had no effect on mean distance to platform. Zaprinast (3 and 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased number of errors compared to control group, while rolipram (0.05 and 0.1mg/kg) had no effect on number of errors in retention trial of RAM test. Rolipram (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) and zaprinast (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased time spent to complete retention trial (latency) compared to control group. Our study revealed that both zaprinast and rolipram enhanced spatial memory in MWM, while zaprinast seems to have more memory enhancing effects compared to rolipram in radial arm maze test.

  8. Use of an Eight-arm Radial Water Maze to Assess Working and Reference Memory Following Neonatal Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Penley, Stephanie C.; Gaudet, Cynthia M.; Threlkeld, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Working and reference memory are commonly assessed using the land based radial arm maze. However, this paradigm requires pretraining, food deprivation, and may introduce scent cue confounds. The eight-arm radial water maze is designed to evaluate reference and working memory performance simultaneously by requiring subjects to use extra-maze cues to locate escape platforms and remedies the limitations observed in land based radial arm maze designs. Specifically, subjects are required to avoid the arms previously used for escape during each testing day (working memory) as well as avoid the fixed arms, which never contain escape platforms (reference memory). Re-entries into arms that have already been used for escape during a testing session (and thus the escape platform has been removed) and re-entries into reference memory arms are indicative of working memory deficits. Alternatively, first entries into reference memory arms are indicative of reference memory deficits. We used this maze to compare performance of rats with neonatal brain injury and sham controls following induction of hypoxia-ischemia and show significant deficits in both working and reference memory after eleven days of testing. This protocol could be easily modified to examine many other models of learning impairment. PMID:24335781

  9. Use of an eight-arm radial water maze to assess working and reference memory following neonatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Penley, Stephanie C; Gaudet, Cynthia M; Threlkeld, Steven W

    2013-12-04

    Working and reference memory are commonly assessed using the land based radial arm maze. However, this paradigm requires pretraining, food deprivation, and may introduce scent cue confounds. The eight-arm radial water maze is designed to evaluate reference and working memory performance simultaneously by requiring subjects to use extra-maze cues to locate escape platforms and remedies the limitations observed in land based radial arm maze designs. Specifically, subjects are required to avoid the arms previously used for escape during each testing day (working memory) as well as avoid the fixed arms, which never contain escape platforms (reference memory). Re-entries into arms that have already been used for escape during a testing session (and thus the escape platform has been removed) and re-entries into reference memory arms are indicative of working memory deficits. Alternatively, first entries into reference memory arms are indicative of reference memory deficits. We used this maze to compare performance of rats with neonatal brain injury and sham controls following induction of hypoxia-ischemia and show significant deficits in both working and reference memory after eleven days of testing. This protocol could be easily modified to examine many other models of learning impairment.

  10. Effects of Number of Items and Interval Length on the Acquisition of Temporal Order Discrimination in Radial Maze in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugita, Manami; Yamada, Kazuo; Ichitani, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Temporal order discrimination in rats was analyzed using a radial maze. The task consisted of a study phase in which two to five items (arms) were presented sequentially and, after a delay, a test phase in which two of these were simultaneously presented and the rat had to choose the arm presented earlier in the study phase. Acquisition of the…

  11. Learning about cognition risk with the radial-arm maze in the developmental neurotoxicology battery.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction has been found in epidemiological studies to be among the most sensitive impairments associated with developmental exposure to a variety of environmental contaminants from heavy metals to polyhalogenated hydrocarbons and pesticides. These chemicals have been also shown to impair cognitive function after developmental exposure in experimental animal models. The radial-arm maze (RAM) has proven to be a sensitive and reliable way to assess both learning and memory in a variety of species, most often in rats and mice. The RAM is a very adaptable test method that takes advantage of rodents' instinct to explore new places in the environment to forage. That is, rodents do not need to be trained to run through the maze; they will normally do this from the initial session of testing. Training with differential reinforcement for arm choices provides a more rigorous test of learning and memory. The RAM is quite adaptable for assessing various aspects of cognition. Although the RAM has been mostly used to assess spatial learning and memory, it can be configured to assess non-spatial memory as well. Both working and reference memory can be easily distinguished. The RAM can be run with both appetitive (food reinforced) and aversive (water escape) motivators. The RAM has been found to be sensitive to a wide variety of developmental toxicants including heavy metals such as mercury and pesticides such as chlorpyrifos. There is an extremely rich literature especially with rats showing the effects of many types of brain lesions and drug effects so that the participation of a wide variety of neural systems in RAM performance is known. These systems, notably the hippocampus and frontal cortex, and acetylcholine and glutamate neurotransmitter systems, are the same neural systems that have been shown in humans to be critical for learning and memory. This considerably aids the interpretation of neurobehavioral toxicity studies. PMID:26013674

  12. Learning about cognition risk with the radial-arm maze in the developmental neurotoxicology battery.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction has been found in epidemiological studies to be among the most sensitive impairments associated with developmental exposure to a variety of environmental contaminants from heavy metals to polyhalogenated hydrocarbons and pesticides. These chemicals have been also shown to impair cognitive function after developmental exposure in experimental animal models. The radial-arm maze (RAM) has proven to be a sensitive and reliable way to assess both learning and memory in a variety of species, most often in rats and mice. The RAM is a very adaptable test method that takes advantage of rodents' instinct to explore new places in the environment to forage. That is, rodents do not need to be trained to run through the maze; they will normally do this from the initial session of testing. Training with differential reinforcement for arm choices provides a more rigorous test of learning and memory. The RAM is quite adaptable for assessing various aspects of cognition. Although the RAM has been mostly used to assess spatial learning and memory, it can be configured to assess non-spatial memory as well. Both working and reference memory can be easily distinguished. The RAM can be run with both appetitive (food reinforced) and aversive (water escape) motivators. The RAM has been found to be sensitive to a wide variety of developmental toxicants including heavy metals such as mercury and pesticides such as chlorpyrifos. There is an extremely rich literature especially with rats showing the effects of many types of brain lesions and drug effects so that the participation of a wide variety of neural systems in RAM performance is known. These systems, notably the hippocampus and frontal cortex, and acetylcholine and glutamate neurotransmitter systems, are the same neural systems that have been shown in humans to be critical for learning and memory. This considerably aids the interpretation of neurobehavioral toxicity studies.

  13. Methylphenidate improves performance on the radial arm maze in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Dow-Edwards, Diana L; Weedon, Jeremy C; Hellmann, Esther

    2008-01-01

    Methylphenidate (Ritalin; MPD) is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in childhood and adolescence and many clinical studies have documented its efficacy. Due to the limitations of conducting invasive research in humans, animal models can be beneficial for studying drug effects. However, few animal studies have demonstrated the effects of methylphenidate on cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to find a dose of methylphenidate that was effective in improving performance on a spatial working memory cognitive task when administered orally to periadolescent rats. Therefore, we dosed subjects with methylphenidate at 1 or 3 mg/kg/day via gastric intubation from postnatal day 22 to 59 and assessed the effects of the drug on performance on the radial arm maze each day. To enhance performance overall, a second experiment was conducted where the subjects were moderately food restricted (to 90% of the free-feeding weight). Results of Experiment 1 show that during the first week of testing only the 3 mg/kg MPD-treated males showed improved performance (entries prior to repeated entry) when ad lib fed and housed in pairs while the same dose significantly improved performance in both males and females under conditions of food-restriction and individual housing in Experiment 2. MPD also produced a pattern of increased errors and arms entered during the first week, especially in Experiment 2. MPD increased locomotor activity when tested at postnatal day 60 in both experiments. The data suggest that 3 mg/kg oral methylphenidate improves performance on a spatial cognitive task only early in treatment in the rat. While males show improvement under conditions of both high and low motivation, females only show MPD effects when highly motivated. Hypothetically, methylphenidate may improve radial arm maze performance through increased attention and improved spatial working memory and/or alterations in locomotion, reactivity to novelty or anxiety. Regardless, the

  14. Nigella sativa Oil Enhances the Spatial Working Memory Performance of Rats on a Radial Arm Maze.

    PubMed

    Sahak, Mohamad Khairul Azali; Mohamed, Abdul Majid; Hashim, Noor Hashida; Hasan Adli, Durriyyah Sharifah

    2013-01-01

    Nigella sativa, an established historical and religion-based remedy for a wide range of health problems, is a herbal medicine known to have antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. This present study investigated the effect of Nigella sativa oil (NSO) administration on the spatial memory performance (SMP) of male adult rats using eight-arm radial arm maze (RAM). Twelve Sprague Dawley rats (7-9 weeks old) were force-fed daily with 6.0  μ L/100 g body weight of Nigella sativa oil (NSO group; n = 6) or 0.1 mL/100 g body weight of corn oil (control) (CO group; n = 6) for a period of 20 consecutive weeks. For each weekly evaluation of SMP, one day food-deprived rats were tested by allowing each of them 3 minutes to explore the RAM for food as their rewards. Similar to the control group, the SMP of the treated group was not hindered, as indicated by the establishment of the reference and working memory components of the spatial memory. The results demonstrated that lesser mean numbers of error were observed for the NSO-treated group in both parameters as compared to the CO-treated group. NSO could therefore enhance the learning and memory abilities of the rats; there was a significant decrease in the overall mean number of working memory error (WME) in the NSO-treated group. PMID:24454487

  15. Effects of perinatal bisphenol A exposure during early development on radial arm maze behavior in adult male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Renee N.; Park, Pul; Neese, Steven L.; Ferguson, Duncan C.; Schantz, Susan L.; Juraska, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) can affect anxiety behavior. However, no studies have examined whether administration of this endocrine disruptor during the perinatal period has the potential to induce alterations in cognitive behavior in both adult males and females as assessed in an appetitive task. The goal of the current study was to determine whether exposure to different doses of BPA during early development alters performance on the 17-arm radial maze in adulthood in Long-Evans rats. Oral administration of corn oil (vehicle), 4 μg/kg, 40 μg/kg, or 400 μg/kg BPA to the dams occurred daily throughout pregnancy, and the pups received direct oral administration of BPA between postnatal days 1-9. Blood was collected from offspring at weaning age to determine levels of several hormones (thyroxine, thyroid stimulating hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone). One male and one female from each litter were evaluated on the 17-arm radial maze, a working/reference memory task, in adulthood. Results indicated that after exposure to BPA at both 4 and 400 μg/kg/day, rats of both sexes had decreased levels of FSH at weaning. There were no significant effects of BPA on performance on the radial arm maze in males or females. In conclusion, exposure to BPA during early development had modest effects on circulating hormones but did not affect a spatial learning and memory task. PMID:24440629

  16. Sex differences and correlations in a virtual Morris water task, a virtual radial arm maze, and mental rotation.

    PubMed

    Astur, Robert S; Tropp, Jennifer; Sava, Simona; Constable, R Todd; Markus, Etan J

    2004-05-01

    Different tasks are often used to assess spatial memory in humans compared to nonhumans. In order to bridge this paradigmatic gap, we used a within-subject design to test 61 undergraduates on three spatial memory tasks. One of these tasks, the Vanderberg 3D mental rotation task, is classically used to assess spatial memory in humans. The other two tests are virtual analogues of two tasks used classically to assess spatial memory in rodents: the Morris water task and an eight-arm radial maze. We find that males perform significantly better than females on the mental rotation task and in finding a hidden platform in the virtual Morris water task. Moreover, during a probe trial, males spend significantly more distance of their swim in the training quadrant, but males and females do not differ in navigating to a visible platform. However, for the virtual eight-arm radial maze, there is no sex difference in working memory errors, reference memory errors, or distance to find the rewards. Surprisingly, an examination of the correlations among the three tasks indicates that only mental rotation ability and Morris water task probe trial performance correlate significantly among the three tasks (i.e. there are no significant correlations with traditional measures the tasks, e.g. time or distance to completion). Hence, the Morris water task and the eight-arm radial maze do not assess spatial memory in the same manner, and even after equating factors such as motivation, stress, and motor demands, there still are procedural demands of the tasks that reinforce differential strategy selection during spatial memory. This suggests that caution should be taken when utilizing these two tasks interchangeable as tests of spatial memory.

  17. How does the ecological foraging behavior of desert kangaroo rats (Dipodomys deserti) relate to their behavior on radial mazes?

    PubMed

    Timberlake, William; Hoffman, Cynthia M

    2002-11-01

    Experiment 1 showed that laboratory-reared desert kangaroo rats, like domestic Norway rats, efficiently search for food on a radial arm maze (RAM) by avoiding revisiting arms within a trial. By placing an RAM on the floor so the animals could approach food from any direction, Experiment 2 tested whether efficient search by kangaroo rats was based on tactics of distance minimizing, central-place foraging, trail following, or meandering. In contrast to the dominant trail-following tactic of domestic Norway rats (Hoffman, Timberlake, Leffel, & Gont, 1999), kangaroo rats tended to distance minimize, whether maze arms were present or not. Experiment 3 indicated that kangaroo rats treated a floor configuration of eight food cups as two patches of four, based on beeline travel between patches and meandering within them. We conclude that similar performance in an elevated RAM by different species can be based on different tactics, and we suggest that a laboratory apparatus can be used to cast light on niche-related mechanisms.

  18. Effects of response strategy and retention interval on performance of Clark's nutcrackers in a radial maze analogue.

    PubMed

    Olson, D J; Kamil, A C; Balda, R P

    1993-04-01

    Two groups of Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) were trained to use either a stay or shift response strategy in a radial maze analogue. Each trial had a preretention stage, a retention interval, and a postretention test. In Experiment 1, acquisition with a 5-min retention interval was studied. Response strategy did not affect the rate at which the task was learned. Performance following longer retention intervals was tested in Experiments 2-4. Changes in retention intervals were presented in trial blocks of increasing duration in Experiment 2 and were randomly presented between trials in Experiment 3. Experiment 4 extended the retention interval to 24 hr. No difference in performance was found between the 2 groups in any of these experiments. These results suggest a flexible relationship between spatial memory and response requirement in food-hoarding birds for at least 1 spatial memory task.

  19. Spatial Navigation in Complex and Radial Mazes in APP23 Animals and Neurotrophin Signaling as a Biological Marker of Early Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellweg, Rainer; Huber, Roman; Kuhl, Alexander; Riepe, Matthias W.; Lohmann, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Impairment of hippocampal function precedes frontal and parietal cortex impairment in human Alzheimer's disease(AD). Neurotrophins are critical for behavioral performance and neuronal survival in AD. We used complex and radial mazes to assess spatial orientation and learning in wild-type and B6-Tg(ThylAPP)23Sdz (APP23) animals, a transgenic mouse…

  20. Hippocampal AP5 treatment impairs both spatial working and reference memory in radial maze performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuo; Shimizu, Makoto; Kawabe, Kouichi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2015-07-01

    The possible involvement of hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in spatial reference and working memory was investigated. Rats were first trained in a four-baited/four-unbaited version of the eight-arm radial maze task in which only predetermined four arms for each rat were baited with a food pellet. After rats reached the learning criterion, their performance was tested under the treatment of a NMDA antagonist, AP5 (d,l-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, 20-40nmol), or vehicle into the dorsal hippocampus through the bilaterally implanted guide cannulae. AP5 produced dose-dependent increments on both reference and working memory errors, but did not have any effect on the running speed. Additionally, there were significant correlations between the number of trials to criterion in acquisition and the number of reference and working memory errors induced by AP5 treatment. The results suggest that hippocampal NMDA receptors are involved in both spatial reference and working memory.

  1. Inter-session delay and its effects on performance and retention of spatial learning on a radial maze with mice.

    PubMed

    Roullet, P

    1995-07-01

    Spatial learning on the radial maze was studied in two inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6 and DBA/2). Five different periods of delay (no delay, 40 min, 2, 8, and 24 h) were inserted between sessions in order to analyze the role of this inter-session delay on training and on retest 1 month later. Results showed that learning profiles and performance levels varied widely with inter-session delay. When the delay was very short (no delay and 40 min), mice of both strains were incapable of learning the task but when the delay was more than or equal to 2 h, the mice succeeded very quickly. The inter-session delay also influenced the performance of mice in the 1-month retention test. C57BL/6 mice obtained good performances in the procedure including a 2-h inter-session delay, while DBA/2 mice obtained good performances with 2- and 8-h delays. These results demonstrate the importance of the procedure in complex spatial learning.

  2. Frontal cortex and hippocampus neurotransmitter receptor complex level parallels spatial memory performance in the radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Bharanidharan; Sase, Ajinkya; Miklosi, András G; Sialana, Fernando J; Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Aher, Yogesh D; Gröger, Marion; Höger, Harald; Bennett, Keiryn L; Lubec, Gert

    2015-08-01

    Several neurotransmitter receptors have been proposed to be involved in memory formation. However, information on receptor complexes (RCs) in the radial arm maze (RAM) is missing. It was therefore the aim of this study to determine major neurotransmitter RCs levels that are modulated by RAM training because receptors are known to work in homo-or heteromeric assemblies. Immediate early gene Arc expression was determined by immunohistochemistry to show if prefrontal cortices (PFC) and hippocampi were activated following RAM training as these regions are known to be mainly implicated in spatial memory. Twelve rats per group, trained and untrained in the twelve arm RAM were used, frontal cortices and hippocampi were taken, RCs in membrane protein were quantified by blue-native PAGE immunoblotting. RCs components were characterised by co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometrical analysis and by the use of the proximity ligation assay. Arc expression was significantly higher in PFC of trained as compared to untrained rats whereas it was comparable in hippocampi. Frontal cortical levels of RCs containing AMPA receptors GluA1, GluA2, NMDA receptors GluN1 and GluN2A, dopamine receptor D1, acetylcholine nicotinic receptor alpha 7 (nAChR-α7) and hippocampal levels of RCs containing D1, GluN1, GluN2B and nAChR-α7 were increased in the trained group; phosphorylated dopamine transporter levels were decreased in the trained group. D1 and GluN1 receptors were shown to be in the same complex. Taken together, distinct RCs were paralleling performance in the RAM which is relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future work on RCs in memory studies. PMID:25930220

  3. Low-dose nicotine facilitates spatial memory in ApoE-knockout mice in the radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Ruby; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Jamal, Mostofa; Miki, Takanori; Tanaka, Naoko; Ono, Junichiro; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yu

    2013-06-01

    Here, we investigated the effects of nicotine on spatial memory in ApoE-knockout (ApoE-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice in a radial arm maze. Training occurred on three consecutive days and the test was performed on day 4, with one trial per day. Then on day 4, animals were administered nicotine (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg) or the antagonist of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) mecamylamine (MEC 2 mg/kg) alone or together with 0.1 mg/kg nicotine. The number of errors in the first eight choices was recorded. The results were that 0.1 mg/kg nicotine decreased errors in ApoE-KO mice, while 0.1 and 0.25 mg/kg nicotine reduced errors in WT mice, indicating that lower doses of nicotine elicit a memory improvement. In contrast, 1.0 mg/kg nicotine increased errors in WT mice, but not in ApoE-KO mice. MEC alone had no noticeable effect on errors in either strain of mice. However, co-administration of 0.1 mg/kg nicotine and MEC increased errors and reduced the effects of nicotine in WT mice, but not in ApoE-KO mice. Our study found a biphasic effect of nicotine in WT mice: it improves spatial memory at lower doses and impairs it at a higher dose. In ApoE-KO mice, nicotine improves memory at a low dose and has no effect at a higher dose, suggesting that the ApoE deficiency may influence the efficacy of nicotine. Moreover, a reversal of nicotinic effects with MEC was seen in WT mice, indicating the likelihood of the involvement of nAChRs in the spatial-memory response to nicotine.

  4. Accelerated senescence prone mouse-8 shows early onset of deficits in spatial learning and memory in the radial six-arm water maze.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yue-Ju; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2004-10-15

    Available data indicate that the senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8) is an appropriate model of brain aging, with impairments in nonspatial learning and memory beginning as early as 2 months of age, and spatial learning and memory deficiencies not becoming apparent until after 4 months of age. However, with other strains (e.g., C57BL mice), the impairment in spatial memory was found earlier than that in nonspatial memory. We considered the possibility that the observed differences could be due to strain-specific differences in the training equipment. In the present study, a new optimized testing apparatus-the radial six-arm water maze (RAWM)-for detecting spatial learning and memory in mice, was employed, to determine whether there is impairment of spatial learning and memory in young SAMP8. The relationship between the spatial learning measures observed with the RAWM and the Morris maze, a classic spatial learning and memory testing apparatus, was also explored. It was found that, in the RAWM, rather than in the Morris maze, the impairment in spatial learning could be measured in SAMP8 mice as early as 3 months old, and the impairment in spatial memory in SAMP8 mice aged 5 months. These results suggested that the spatial learning and memory deficiencies could be found in early life of SAMP8 mice, and that RAWM and Morris maze each detect different aspects of spatial learning and memory.

  5. Navigating to new frontiers in behavioral neuroscience: traditional neuropsychological tests predict human performance on a rodent-inspired radial-arm maze.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Sarah E; Baxter, Leslie C; Grunfeld, Itamar S; Brewer, Gene A; Aiken, Leona S; Engler-Chiurazzi, Elizabeth B; Camp, Bryan W; Acosta, Jazmin I; Braden, B Blair; Schaefer, Keley R; Gerson, Julia E; Lavery, Courtney N; Tsang, Candy W S; Hewitt, Lauren T; Kingston, Melissa L; Koebele, Stephanie V; Patten, K Jakob; Ball, B Hunter; McBeath, Michael K; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2014-01-01

    We constructed an 11-arm, walk-through, human radial-arm maze (HRAM) as a translational instrument to compare existing methodology in the areas of rodent and human learning and memory research. The HRAM, utilized here, serves as an intermediary test between the classic rat radial-arm maze (RAM) and standard human neuropsychological and cognitive tests. We show that the HRAM is a useful instrument to examine working memory ability, explore the relationships between rodent and human memory and cognition models, and evaluate factors that contribute to human navigational ability. One-hundred-and-fifty-seven participants were tested on the HRAM, and scores were compared to performance on a standard cognitive battery focused on episodic memory, working memory capacity, and visuospatial ability. We found that errors on the HRAM increased as working memory demand became elevated, similar to the pattern typically seen in rodents, and that for this task, performance appears similar to Miller's classic description of a processing-inclusive human working memory capacity of 7 ± 2 items. Regression analysis revealed that measures of working memory capacity and visuospatial ability accounted for a large proportion of variance in HRAM scores, while measures of episodic memory and general intelligence did not serve as significant predictors of HRAM performance. We present the HRAM as a novel instrument for measuring navigational behavior in humans, as is traditionally done in basic science studies evaluating rodent learning and memory, thus providing a useful tool to help connect and translate between human and rodent models of cognitive functioning. PMID:25249951

  6. Sex-Specific Effects of Gonadectomy and Hormone Treatment on Acquisition of a 12-Arm Radial Maze Task by Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Robert B.; Johnson, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of gonadectomy and hormone treatment on spatial learning were evaluated in adult male and female rats using a modified version of a 12-arm radial maze task. In this version, procedures were used to minimize the effectiveness of strategies less reliant on working and reference memory. Results demonstrate significant sex differences favoring male performance on the working memory component of the task. In contrast, females performed slightly better than males on the reference memory component of the task. In females, ovariectomy produced a decrease in overall accuracy (i.e. an increase in the number of arm entries necessary to obtain all food pellets) as well as declines in working and reference memory performance. Both accuracy and working memory performance, but not reference memory performance, were restored by estradiol treatment. In males, castration impaired working memory performance but did not significantly affect overall accuracy or reference memory performance. Surprisingly, all groups of males performed poorly on the reference memory component of the task, and testosterone treatment appeared to worsen, rather than improve, both accuracy and reference memory performance in males. This may reflect a male preference for certain strategies that were rendered ineffective on this task. Significant sex differences, as well as treatment effects, on arm preference patterns were also detected; however, these differences were not sufficient to account for the effects of sex and treatment on acquisition. Collectively, the data demonstrate robust effects of gonadectomy and hormone treatment on acquisition of this modified radial arm maze task in females, with lesser effects in males. PMID:18292188

  7. A novel heterocyclic compound targeting the dopamine transporter improves performance in the radial arm maze and modulates dopamine receptors D1-D3.

    PubMed

    Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Aher, Yogesh D; Kalaba, Predrag; Aher, Nilima Y; Zehl, Martin; Korz, Volker; Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Miklosi, Andras G; Zanon, Lisa; Neuhaus, Winfried; Höger, Harald; Langer, Thierry; Urban, Ernst; Leban, Johann; Lubec, Gert

    2016-10-01

    A series of compounds targeting the dopamine transporter (DAT) haS been shown to improve memory performance most probably by re-uptake inhibition. Although specific DAT inhibitors are available, there is limited information about specificity, mechanism and in particular the effect on dopamine receptors. It was therefore the aim of the study to test the DAT inhibitor 4-(diphenyl-methanesulfinylmethyl)-2-methyl-thiazole (code: CE-111), synthetized in our laboratory for the specificity to target DAT, for the effects upon spatial memory and for induced dopamine receptor modulation. Re-uptake inhibition was tested for DAT (IC50=3.2μM), serotonin transporter, SERT (IC50=272291μM) and noradrenaline transporter, NET (IC50=174μM). Spatial memory was studied in the radial arm maze (RAM) in male Sprague-Dawley rats that were intraperitoneally injected with CE-111 (1 or 10mg/kg body weight). Performance in the RAM was improved using 1 and 10mg/kg body weight of CE-111. Training and treatment effects on presynaptic, postsynaptic and extrasynaptic D1 and D2- receptors and dopamine receptor containing complexes as well as on activated DAT were observed. CE-111 was crossing the blood-brain barrier comparable to modafinil and was identified as effective to improve memory performance in the RAM. Dopamine re-uptake inhibition along with modulations in dopamine receptors are proposed as potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:27288589

  8. Effect of the histamine H3-antagonist clobenpropit on spatial memory deficits induced by MK-801 as evaluated by radial maze in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Wen; Hu, Wei-Wei; Chen, Zhong; Zhang, Li-San; Shen, Hai-Qing; Timmerman, Henk; Leurs, Rob; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2004-05-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether or not the histamine H3-antagonist clobenpropit can ameliorate spatial memory deficits induced by MK-801 (0.3 microg per site) as evaluated by an eight-arm radial maze task of rats. A bilateral intrahippocampal (i.h.) injection of clobenpropit (5, 10 microg per site, dose-dependent) markedly improved the working and reference memory deficits induced by MK-801. Its ameliorating effect was potentiated by histidine, but completely antagonized by immepip (2.5 microg per site), a selective H3-agonist. alpha-Fluoromethylhistidine (FMH, 25 microg per site), a selective histidine decarboxylase inhibitor prevented the ameliorating effect of clobenpropit on the working memory deficits induced by MK-801. In addition, the H(1-antagonist pyrilamine, but not the H2-antagonist cimetidine, also inhibited the procognitive effects of clobenpropit. Both FMH and pyrilamine did not significantly modulate the effect of clobenpropit on reference memory. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the procognitive effects of clobenpropit in MK-801-induced working memory deficits is mediated by increasing endogenous histamine release. In addition, the ameliorating effect of clobenpropit on reference memory might be due to the increased release of neurotransmitters other than histamine.

  9. A Novel Heterocyclic Compound CE-104 Enhances Spatial Working Memory in the Radial Arm Maze in Rats and Modulates the Dopaminergic System.

    PubMed

    Aher, Yogesh D; Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Shanmugasundaram, Bharanidharan; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Holy, Marion; Höger, Harald; Beryozkina, Tetyana; Sitte, Harald H; Leban, Johann J; Lubec, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Various psychostimulants targeting monoamine neurotransmitter transporters (MATs) have been shown to rescue cognition in patients with neurological disorders and improve cognitive abilities in healthy subjects at low doses. Here, we examined the effects upon cognition of a chemically synthesized novel MAT inhibiting compound 2-(benzhydrylsulfinylmethyl)-4-methylthiazole (named as CE-104). The efficacy of CE-104 in blocking MAT [dopamine transporter (DAT), serotonin transporter (SERT), and norepinephrine transporter] was determined using in vitro neurotransmitter uptake assay. The effect of the drug at low doses (1 and 10 mg/kg) on spatial memory was studied in male rats in the radial arm maze (RAM). Furthermore, the dopamine receptor and transporter complex levels of frontal cortex (FC) tissue of trained and untrained animals treated either with the drug or vehicle were quantified on blue native PAGE (BN-PAGE). The drug inhibited dopamine (IC50: 27.88 μM) and norepinephrine uptake (IC50: 160.40 μM), but had a negligible effect on SERT. In the RAM, both drug-dose groups improved spatial working memory during the performance phase of RAM as compared to vehicle. BN-PAGE Western blot quantification of dopamine receptor and transporter complexes revealed that D1, D2, D3, and DAT complexes were modulated due to training and by drug effects. The drug's ability to block DAT and its influence on DAT and receptor complex levels in the FC is proposed as a possible mechanism for the observed learning and memory enhancement in the RAM. PMID:26941626

  10. A Novel Heterocyclic Compound CE-104 Enhances Spatial Working Memory in the Radial Arm Maze in Rats and Modulates the Dopaminergic System

    PubMed Central

    Aher, Yogesh D.; Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Shanmugasundaram, Bharanidharan; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R.; Holy, Marion; Höger, Harald; Beryozkina, Tetyana; Sitte, Harald H.; Leban, Johann J.; Lubec, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Various psychostimulants targeting monoamine neurotransmitter transporters (MATs) have been shown to rescue cognition in patients with neurological disorders and improve cognitive abilities in healthy subjects at low doses. Here, we examined the effects upon cognition of a chemically synthesized novel MAT inhibiting compound 2-(benzhydrylsulfinylmethyl)-4-methylthiazole (named as CE-104). The efficacy of CE-104 in blocking MAT [dopamine transporter (DAT), serotonin transporter (SERT), and norepinephrine transporter] was determined using in vitro neurotransmitter uptake assay. The effect of the drug at low doses (1 and 10 mg/kg) on spatial memory was studied in male rats in the radial arm maze (RAM). Furthermore, the dopamine receptor and transporter complex levels of frontal cortex (FC) tissue of trained and untrained animals treated either with the drug or vehicle were quantified on blue native PAGE (BN-PAGE). The drug inhibited dopamine (IC50: 27.88 μM) and norepinephrine uptake (IC50: 160.40 μM), but had a negligible effect on SERT. In the RAM, both drug-dose groups improved spatial working memory during the performance phase of RAM as compared to vehicle. BN-PAGE Western blot quantification of dopamine receptor and transporter complexes revealed that D1, D2, D3, and DAT complexes were modulated due to training and by drug effects. The drug’s ability to block DAT and its influence on DAT and receptor complex levels in the FC is proposed as a possible mechanism for the observed learning and memory enhancement in the RAM. PMID:26941626

  11. Decreased hippocampal homoarginine and increased nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase levels in rats parallel training in a radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Sase, Ajinkya; Nawaratna, Gayan; Hu, Shengdi; Wu, Guoyao; Lubec, Gert

    2016-09-01

    L-homoarginine (hArg) is derived from enzymatic guanidination of lysine. It was demonstrated that hArg is a substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, blocks lysine transport and inhibits the uptake of arginine into synaptosomes and modulates GABA responses ex vivo. As there is limited information on its physiological roles in the brain, the aim of the study was to show whether hippocampal or frontal lobe (FL) hArg is paralleling training in the radial arm maze (RAM) or NO formation. Hippocampi and FL of male Sprague-Dawley rats were taken from trained or yoked in a RAM. Then hArg and metabolites, NO and NO synthase (NOS) were determined by standard methods. The animals learned the task in the RAM showing significant reduction of working memory errors. hArg showed decreased levels in both brain regions of trained animals as compared to yoked animals. Nitrate plus nitrite (NOx) concentrations and NOS activity were significantly increased in hippocampi, F(1,36) = 170.5; P ≤ 0.0001 and FL, F(1,36) = 74.67; P ≤ 0.0001 of trained animals as compared to yoked animals. Levels of hArg were negatively correlated with NOx in hippocampus (r = -0.6355; P = 0.0483) but not in FL and with lysine in the FL (r = -0.6650; P = 0.0358). NOx levels were positively correlated with NOS in both the hippocampus (r = 0.7474; P = 0.0129) and FL (r = 0.9563; P ≤  0.0001). These novel findings indicate that hArg is linked to NO formation in hippocampus but not in FL and is paralleling spatial memory in the RAM. PMID:27178025

  12. The effect of modafinil on the rat dopamine transporter and dopamine receptors D1-D3 paralleling cognitive enhancement in the radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Yasemin; Sase, Sunetra; Aher, Yogesh D; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Cicvaric, Ana; Höger, Harald; Berger, Michael; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Sitte, Harald H; Leban, Johann; Monje, Francisco J; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    A series of drugs have been reported to increase memory performance modulating the dopaminergic system and herein modafinil was tested for its working memory (WM) enhancing properties. Reuptake inhibition of dopamine, serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) by modafinil was tested. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups (modafinil-treated 1-5-10 mg/kg body weight, trained and untrained and vehicle treated trained and untrained rats; daily injected intraperitoneally for a period of 10 days) and tested in a radial arm maze (RAM), a paradigm for testing spatial WM. Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT-CC and pDAT-CC) and complexes containing the D1-3 dopamine receptor subunits (D1-D3-CC) were determined. Modafinil was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 11.11 μM; SERT 1547 μM; NET 182 μM). From day 8 (day 9 for 1 mg/kg body weight) modafinil was decreasing WM errors (WMEs) in the RAM significantly and remarkably at all doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. WMEs were linked to the D2R-CC and the pDAT-CC. pDAT and D1-D3-CC levels were modulated significantly and modafinil was shown to enhance spatial WM in the rat in a well-documented paradigm at all the three doses and dopamine reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1-3-CC is proposed as a possible mechanism of action. PMID:26347626

  13. Effect of repeated administration of phencyclidine on spatial performance in an eight-arm radial maze with delay in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Kim, Chan H; Ichikawa, Junji; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2003-05-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) is an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor channel noncompetitive antagonist that produces some of the symptoms of schizophrenia, including delusions, hallucinations, and negative symptoms as well as cognitive impairment. Thus, administration of PCP to rodents and nonhuman primates has been suggested to provide a potential animal model for schizophrenia. There have been some reports that 7-14 days of PCP administration can bring about enduring impairments in working memory in rodents but not all studies have been consistent in this regard. The present study determined whether repeated PCP administration impaired spatial performance in rats or mice trained to make minimal errors in an eight-arm radial maze task with a delay. Male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6J mice received 14 daily injection of vehicle or PCP (10 mg/kg, s.c.) followed by a withdrawal period of 1 week. The number of arm reentry errors and the distance traveled to complete the task were not significantly different between PCP-treated and vehicle-treated rats on 2, 8, and 14 days of PCP administration or 8 days following withdrawal of PCP. Mice treated with PCP for up to 2 weeks also had no significant differences in the number of arm reentry errors, travel distances, the numbers of visits to different arms during the first eight choices, or latencies to take all eight pellets compared to the vehicle-treated group. Thus, the present study failed to demonstrate that repeated administration of PCP to rats or mice produces enduring memory impairment. Factors potentially contributing to the discrepancies between various studies are discussed.

  14. Decreased hippocampal homoarginine and increased nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase levels in rats parallel training in a radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Sase, Ajinkya; Nawaratna, Gayan; Hu, Shengdi; Wu, Guoyao; Lubec, Gert

    2016-09-01

    L-homoarginine (hArg) is derived from enzymatic guanidination of lysine. It was demonstrated that hArg is a substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, blocks lysine transport and inhibits the uptake of arginine into synaptosomes and modulates GABA responses ex vivo. As there is limited information on its physiological roles in the brain, the aim of the study was to show whether hippocampal or frontal lobe (FL) hArg is paralleling training in the radial arm maze (RAM) or NO formation. Hippocampi and FL of male Sprague-Dawley rats were taken from trained or yoked in a RAM. Then hArg and metabolites, NO and NO synthase (NOS) were determined by standard methods. The animals learned the task in the RAM showing significant reduction of working memory errors. hArg showed decreased levels in both brain regions of trained animals as compared to yoked animals. Nitrate plus nitrite (NOx) concentrations and NOS activity were significantly increased in hippocampi, F(1,36) = 170.5; P ≤ 0.0001 and FL, F(1,36) = 74.67; P ≤ 0.0001 of trained animals as compared to yoked animals. Levels of hArg were negatively correlated with NOx in hippocampus (r = -0.6355; P = 0.0483) but not in FL and with lysine in the FL (r = -0.6650; P = 0.0358). NOx levels were positively correlated with NOS in both the hippocampus (r = 0.7474; P = 0.0129) and FL (r = 0.9563; P ≤  0.0001). These novel findings indicate that hArg is linked to NO formation in hippocampus but not in FL and is paralleling spatial memory in the RAM.

  15. The effect of modafinil on the rat dopamine transporter and dopamine receptors D1–D3 paralleling cognitive enhancement in the radial arm maze

    PubMed Central

    Karabacak, Yasemin; Sase, Sunetra; Aher, Yogesh D.; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R.; Cicvaric, Ana; Höger, Harald; Berger, Michael; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Sitte, Harald H.; Leban, Johann; Monje, Francisco J.; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    A series of drugs have been reported to increase memory performance modulating the dopaminergic system and herein modafinil was tested for its working memory (WM) enhancing properties. Reuptake inhibition of dopamine, serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) by modafinil was tested. Sixty male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into six groups (modafinil-treated 1–5–10 mg/kg body weight, trained and untrained and vehicle treated trained and untrained rats; daily injected intraperitoneally for a period of 10 days) and tested in a radial arm maze (RAM), a paradigm for testing spatial WM. Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT-CC and pDAT-CC) and complexes containing the D1–3 dopamine receptor subunits (D1–D3-CC) were determined. Modafinil was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 11.11 μM; SERT 1547 μM; NET 182 μM). From day 8 (day 9 for 1 mg/kg body weight) modafinil was decreasing WM errors (WMEs) in the RAM significantly and remarkably at all doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. WMEs were linked to the D2R-CC and the pDAT-CC. pDAT and D1–D3-CC levels were modulated significantly and modafinil was shown to enhance spatial WM in the rat in a well-documented paradigm at all the three doses and dopamine reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1–3-CC is proposed as a possible mechanism of action. PMID:26347626

  16. Effects of methimepip and JNJ-5207852 in Wistar rats exposed to an open-field with and without object and in Balb/c mice exposed to a radial-arm maze

    PubMed Central

    Abuhamdah, Rushdie M. A.; van Rensburg, Ruan; Lethbridge, Natasha L.; Ennaceur, Abdel; Chazot, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) in anxiety is controversial, due to limitations in drug selectivity and limited validity of behavioral tests used in previous studies. In the present report, we describe two experiments. In the first one, Wistar rats were treated with an H3R agonist (methimepip), and exposed to an open-field. In the second one, Balb/c mice were treated with H3R agonist (methimepip) or antagonist (JNJ-5207852), and exposed to an open space 3D maze which is a modified version of the radial-arm maze. C57BL/6J saline treated mice were included for comparisons. When exposed to an empty open field, Wistar rats spent more time in the outer area and made very low number of brief crossings in the central area. However, when an object occupied the central area, rats crossed frequently into and spent a long time in the central area. Administration of a range of different doses of methimepip (selective H3R agonist) reduced the entries into the central area with a novel object, indicating enhanced avoidance response. In the 3D maze, both Balb/c and C57BL/6J saline-treated mice crossed frequently onto the bridges that radiate from the central platform but only C57BL/6J mice crossed onto the arms which extend the bridges. This suggests that Balb/c mice are more anxious than C57BL/6J mice. Neither methimepip nor JNJ-5207852 (selective H3R antagonist/inverse agonist) induced entry into the arms of the maze, indicative of lack of anxiolytic effects. PMID:22811660

  17. Pre-training in a radial arm maze abolished anxiety and impaired habituation in C57BL6/J mice treated with dizocilpine.

    PubMed

    Abuhamdah, R M; Hussain, M D; Chazot, P L; Ennaceur, A

    2016-10-01

    Familiarity can imply a reduction of fear and anxiety, which may render learning and memory performance insensitive to NMDA receptor antagonism. Our previous study indicates that MK-801 (dizocilpine), NMDA antagonist, increased anxiety and prevented the acquisition of a spatial memory task. Here, we examined whether MK-801 will produce anxiety in mice that were familiar with the test environment. Male C57BL/6J mice were exposed, one session a day for 7days, to a 3D maze, which consisted of nine arms attached to upward inclined bridges radiating from a nonagonal platform. In this maze, high anxiety mice avoid the arms in the first sessions. One group of mice received saline (SAL) while a second group received MK-801 (MKD1), both on day one. A third group received saline in the first 3 sessions, and MK 801 in subsequent sessions (MKD4). Saline and MK-801 (0.1mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally 30min before the test. MKD4 mice demonstrated an increase in bridge and arm visits, and reached arm/bridge entries ratio close to 1 in session 5. SAL mice also crossed frequently onto the arms, and reached a comparable ratio, but this was achieved with a lower number of arm visits. MKD1 mice demonstrated a reduced number of arm visits in each session compared to SAL and MKD4 mice. Dizocilpine produced anxiety in mice treated from day 1 of the test, but not in those treated from day 4. It also impaired habituation in animals familiar with the test environment; it produced sustained non-habituating hyperactivity.

  18. Determination of the effectiveness of components of the herbal medicine Toki-Shakuyaku-San and fractions of Angelica acutiloba in improving the scopolamine-induced impairment of rat's spatial cognition in eight-armed radial maze test.

    PubMed

    Hatip-Al-Khatib, Izzettin; Egashira, Nobuaki; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Iwasaki, Kiyo; Kurauchi, Kouji; Inui, Keiichiro; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2004-09-01

    The improving effects of various components of Toki-Shakuyaku-San (TSS) and fractions isolated from Angelica acutiloba Radix (Toki) on scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment were investigated in eight-armed radial maze. The scopolamine-induced memory impairment was characterized by prominent increase of error choices in addition to decreased correct choices. Toki, Cnidium officinale Rhizoma (Senkyu), Poria cocos Hoelen (Bukuryo), Alisma orientale Rhizoma (Takusha), and Atractylodes lancea Rhizoma (Sojutsu) increased the correct choices, while only the Toki, Sojutsu, and Takusha decreased the error choices. No effect was produced by Paeonia lactiflora Radix (Shakuyaku). Investigation of effects of fractions isolated from Toki revealed that its activity mainly resided in the butanol layer and its contents of N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide and amines. Moreover, the alkaloid, internal and external solutions (containing poly-, di-, and monosaccharides) obtained by dialysis with Visking cellophane tubing also improved the memory. However, no improving properties were detected for methanol and hexanol layers, L-(-)-tryptophan, L-arginine, L-(-)-lysine, and choline chloride. The results showed that the TSS components could improve the reference and working memory impaired by scopolamine. The improving effect of TSS is produced greatly by the Toki component, the activity of which was greatly produced by the fraction extracted by butanol. PMID:15351791

  19. Kepler Corn Maze

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Dell'Osso Family Farm, located on the outskirts of Lathrop, California held the grand opening of their corn maze that was designed with a NASA theme. The maze is part of a nation-wide group of ...

  20. Comparison of spatial learning in the partially baited radial-arm maze task between commonly used rat strains: Wistar, Spargue-Dawley, Long-Evans, and outcrossed Wistar/Sprague-Dawley.

    PubMed

    Gökçek-Saraç, Çiğdem; Wesierska, Malgorzata; Jakubowska-Doğru, Ewa

    2015-03-01

    Strain-related differences in animals' cognitive ability affect the outcomes of experiments and may be responsible for discrepant results obtained by different research groups. Therefore, behavioral phenotyping of laboratory animals belonging to different strains is important. The aim of the present study was to compare the variation in allothetic visuospatial learning in most commonly used laboratory rat strains: inbred Wistar (W) and Sprague-Dawley (SD), outcrossed Wistar/Sprague-Dawley (W/SD), and outbred Long Evans (LE) rats. All rats were trained to the arbitrary performance criterion of 83 % correct responses in the partially baited 12-arm radial maze allowing for simultaneous evaluation of both working and reference memory. In the present study, testing albino versus pigmented and inbred versus outcrossed rats revealed significant strain-dependent differences with the inbred SD rats manifesting lower performance on all learning measures compared to other strains. On the other hand, the outcrossed W/SD rats showed a lower frequency of reference memory errors and faster rate of task acquisition compared to both LE and W rats, with W rats showing a lower frequency of working memory errors compared to other strains. In conclusion, albinism apparently did not reduce the animals' performance in the allothetic visuospatial learning task, while outcrossing improved the spatial learning. A differential effect of strain on the contribution of each error type to the animals' overall performance was observed. The strain-dependent differences were more pronounced between subpopulations of learning-deficient individuals ("poor" learners), and generally the reference memory errors contributed more to the final behavioral output than did the working memory errors. PMID:25537841

  1. Electric Current Solves Mazes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayrinhac, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We present in this work a demonstration of the maze-solving problem with electricity. Electric current flowing in a maze as a printed circuit produces Joule heating and the right way is instantaneously revealed with infrared thermal imaging. The basic properties of electric current can be discussed in this context, with this challenging question:…

  2. Rook Jumping Maze Design Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neller, Todd W.; Fisher, Adrian; Choga, Munyaradzi T.; Lalvani, Samir M.; McCarty, Kyle D.

    We define the Rook Jumping Maze, provide historical perspective, and describe a generation method for such mazes. When applying stochastic local search algorithms to maze design, most creative effort concerns the definition of an objective function that rates maze quality. We define and discuss several maze features to consider in such a function definition. Finally, we share our preferred design choices, make design process observations, and note the applicability of these techniques to variations of the Rook Jumping Maze.

  3. The imagination maze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Scott; Rylander, Jeff

    2001-05-01

    Working off of a 10,000 Toyota TAPESTRY grant, 80 physics students at Maine East High School in Park Ridge, Illinois, spent the 1999-2000 school year building a gaint pool ball maze in the school's stairwell. The maze sits in a 10 × 11 × 1 ft recess in the wall. It features an 11-ft screwlift operated by a crank accessible to the passing student to raise the balls to the top where they then meander down four possible trails of copper tubing, performing a variety of physics tricks along the way. The project was a great lesson in organization, engineering, building, quality control, and of course, the laws of physics. The maze is now the "property" of all future AP physics classes whose job it will be to fine-tune, repair, replace, and generally take care of the maze.

  4. Geometry definition with MAZE

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeck, H.E.

    1986-08-01

    The MAZE mesh generator represents an arbitrary two dimensional region of space as an ordered collection of quadrilateral elements. Each element is defined by its four corner points (nodes) and an integer material number. Models are created by subdividing the region(s) of interest into one or more PARTS and specifying the element distribution in each part. Then, parts can be merged together to form the meshed representation of the entire region. Applying boundary conditions and describing material properties completes the model construction process. This activity takes place in three distinct phases: phase I-define geometry, subdivide regions into elements; phase II-refine geometry, establish interface and boundary conditions; phase III-describe material properties. This work presents explanations and examples of the phase I commands, along with an overview of the MAZE mesh generation process.

  5. Maze Solving by Chemotactic Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Soh, Siowling; Wesson, Paul J.; Browne, Kevin P.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-01-11

    Droplets emitting surface-active chemicals exhibit chemotaxis toward low-pH regions. Such droplets are self-propelled and navigate through a complex maze to seek a source of acid placed at one of the maze’s exits. In doing so, the droplets find the shortest path through the maze. Chemotaxis and maze solving are due to an interplay between acid/base chemistry and surface tension effects.

  6. Maze model to study spatial learning and memory in freely moving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Tan, Hua; Sun, Ning-Lei; Wang, Jian-Hong; Meng, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Chuan-Yu; Fraser, Wilson A W; Hu, Xin-Tian; Carlson, Synnöve; Ma, Yuan-Ye

    2008-05-15

    Many types of mazes have been used in cognitive brain research and data obtained from those experiments, especially those from rodents' studies, support the idea that the hippocampus is related to spatial learning and memory. But the results from non-human primates researches regarding the role of the hippocampus in spatial learning and memory are controversial and inconsistent with those obtained in rodents. This might be due to the differences of the methods used in non-human primates and rodents. Several kinds of maze models including two-dimensional computerized visual maze models and three-dimensional maze models have been developed for non-human primates, but they all have some defects. Therefore, development of a maze model for non-human primates that is comparable with those used in rodents is necessary to solve the controversy. This paper describes a large-scale, three-dimensional outdoor maze model for non-human primates which can be used to study spatial learning and memory. Monkeys learn to use the maze quickly compared with two-dimensional computerized visual mazes. It has many advantages which could make up the limits of the existing three-dimensional mazes in non-human primates, and can be comparable with radial arm mazes used in rodents. Based on the results, we believe that the new maze model will be valuable in many research areas, especially in studies involving spatial learning and memory in freely moving monkeys.

  7. ASSEMBLY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 8-ARM AND 12-ARM DNA BRANCHED JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules can be assembled into objects and networks directed by sticky-ended cohesion. The connectivity of these species is limited by the number of arms flanking the branch point. To date, the only branched junctions constructed contain six or fewer arms. We report the construction of DNA branched junctions that contain either 8 or 12 double helical arms surrounding a branch point. The design of the 8-arm junction expoits the limits of a previous approach to thwart branch migration, but the design of the 12-arm junction uses a new to principle achieve this end. The 8-arm junction is stable with 16 nucleotide pairs per arm, but the 12-arm junction has been stabilized by 24 nucleotide pairs per arm. Ferguson analysis of these junctions in combination with three, four, five, and six-arm junctions indicates a linear increase in friction constant as the number of arms increases; the four-arm junction migrates anomalously at 4°C., suggesting stacking of its domains. All strands in both the 8-arm and 12-arm junctions show similar responses to hydroxyl radical autofootprinting analysis, indicating that they lack any dominant stacking structures. The stability of the 12-arm junction demonstrates that the number of arms in a junction is not limited to the case of having adjacent identical base pairs flanking the junction. The ability to construct eight-arm and twelve-arm junctions increases the number of objects, graphs and networks that can be built from branched DNA components. In principle, the stick structure corresponding to cubic close packing is now a possible target for assembly by DNA nanotechnology. PMID:17564446

  8. Expanding Learning through Mazes and Visual Imagery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currant, Nanda

    1982-01-01

    The author speculates on the mythic symbolism of the maze and describes her work with learning disabled students who responded favorably to mazes, especially to visualization tasks involving mazes. (CL)

  9. Radial engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kmicikiewicz, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    A radial engine is described comprising: a housing; equally spaced openings disposed in ring-like arrangement on the periphery of the housing; a piston and cylinder arrangement in each of the opening, a piston rod for each arrangement fixed to and extending radially inwardly from its respective piston and through its respective opening; shoe means pivotally attached at the other end of each of the piston rod; radial guide means extending in the housing in line with each of the piston rods, and the shoe means provided with guide means followers to ensure radial reciprocal movement of the piston rods and shoe means; and a connecting ring journaled on a crankshaft for circular translation motion in the housing, the ring including a circular rim. Each shoe means includes an arcuate follower member being slidably connected to the rim of the connecting ring.

  10. Elevated plus maze for mice.

    PubMed

    Komada, Munekazu; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Although the mouse genome is now completely sequenced, the functions of most of the genes expressed in the brain are not known. The influence of a given gene on a specific behavior can be determined by behavioral analysis of mutant mice. If a target gene is expressed in the brain, behavioral phenotype of the mutant mice could elucidate the genetic mechanism of normal behaviors. The elevated plus maze test is one of the most widely used tests for measuring anxiety-like behavior. The test is based on the natural aversion of mice for open and elevated areas, as well as on their natural spontaneous exploratory behavior in novel environments. The apparatus consists of open arms and closed arms, crossed in the middle perpendicularly to each other, and a center area. Mice are given access to all of the arms and are allowed to move freely between them. The number of entries into the open arms and the time spent in the open arms are used as indices of open space-induced anxiety in mice. Unfortunately, the procedural differences that exist between laboratories make it difficult to duplicate and compare results among laboratories. Here, we present a detailed movie demonstrating our protocol for the elevated plus maze test. In our laboratory, we have assessed more than 90 strains of mutant mice using the protocol shown in the movie. These data will be disclosed as a part of a public database that we are now constructing. Visualization of the protocol will promote better understanding of the details of the entire experimental procedure, allowing for standardization of the protocols used in different laboratories and comparisons of the behavioral phenotypes of various strains of mutant mice assessed using this test.

  11. Rotary pin-in-maze discriminator

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.

    1997-01-01

    A discriminator apparatus and method that discriminates between a unique signal and any other (incorrect) signal. The unique signal is a sequence of events; each event can assume one of two possible event states. Given the unique signal, a maze wheel is allowed to rotate fully in one direction. Given an incorrect signal, both the maze wheel and a pin wheel lock in position.

  12. [Glass maze in women's leadership].

    PubMed

    Barberá Heredia, Ester; Ramos López, Amparo; Candela Agulló, Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Psychological gender discrimination explanations have changed over the past thirty years, becoming more complex in order to obtain a better understanding of the social reality. At the present moment, one of the most interesting research areas is the one referring to the 'glass maze' phenomenon in women's management careers. The main purpose of this work is to reveal the theoretical evolution in an attempt to explain the leadership study from a gender perspective. The consecutive hypotheses, starting with the labour sexual division idea, are becoming more interactive in order to understand the current labour-social situation. Social psychology has underlined the role of beliefs, observed via gender stereotyped roles, prejudiced attitudes against women, sexist and neo-sexist ideology, or masculine, feminine and androgynous identity development. New psychological interpretations insist on the variability of the gender concept, where gender is sometimes observed through men and women's behaviours, and other times through those behaviour expectations. But gender is mainly observed though the power relations between men and women during social interactions in labour organizations. PMID:21504666

  13. [Glass maze in women's leadership].

    PubMed

    Barberá Heredia, Ester; Ramos López, Amparo; Candela Agulló, Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Psychological gender discrimination explanations have changed over the past thirty years, becoming more complex in order to obtain a better understanding of the social reality. At the present moment, one of the most interesting research areas is the one referring to the 'glass maze' phenomenon in women's management careers. The main purpose of this work is to reveal the theoretical evolution in an attempt to explain the leadership study from a gender perspective. The consecutive hypotheses, starting with the labour sexual division idea, are becoming more interactive in order to understand the current labour-social situation. Social psychology has underlined the role of beliefs, observed via gender stereotyped roles, prejudiced attitudes against women, sexist and neo-sexist ideology, or masculine, feminine and androgynous identity development. New psychological interpretations insist on the variability of the gender concept, where gender is sometimes observed through men and women's behaviours, and other times through those behaviour expectations. But gender is mainly observed though the power relations between men and women during social interactions in labour organizations.

  14. Rotary pin-in-maze discriminator

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, G.L.

    1997-05-06

    A discriminator apparatus and method that discriminates between a unique signal and any other (incorrect) signal are disclosed. The unique signal is a sequence of events; each event can assume one of two possible event states. Given the unique signal, a maze wheel is allowed to rotate fully in one direction. Given an incorrect signal, both the maze wheel and a pin wheel lock in position. 4 figs.

  15. Spatial and Nonspatial Escape Strategies in the Barnes Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Fiona E.; Reiserer, Randall S.; Tomarken, Andrew J.; McDonald, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    The Barnes maze is a spatial memory task that requires subjects to learn the position of a hole that can be used to escape the brightly lit, open surface of the maze. Two experiments assessed the relative importance of spatial (extra-maze) versus proximal visible cues in solving the maze. In Experiment 1, four groups of mice were trained either…

  16. Distinction between epigenic and hypogenic maze caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur N.

    2011-11-01

    Certain caves formed by dissolution of bedrock have maze patterns composed of closed loops in which many intersecting fractures or pores have enlarged simultaneously. Their origin can be epigenic (by shallow circulation of meteoric groundwater) or hypogenic (by rising groundwater or production of deep-seated solutional aggressiveness). Epigenic mazes form by diffuse infiltration through a permeable insoluble caprock or by floodwater supplied by sinking streams. Most hypogenic caves involve deep sources of aggressiveness. Transverse hypogenic cave origin is a recently proposed concept in which groundwater of mainly meteoric origin rises across strata in the distal portions of large flow systems, to form mazes in soluble rock sandwiched between permeable but insoluble strata. The distinction between maze types is debated and is usually based on examination of diagnostic cave features and relation of caves to their regional setting. In this paper, the principles of mass transfer are applied to clarify the limits of each model, to show how cave origin is related to groundwater discharge, dissolution rate, and time. The results show that diffuse infiltration and floodwater can each form maze caves at geologically feasible rates (typically within 500 ka). Transverse hypogenic mazes in limestone, to enlarge significantly within 1 Ma, require an unusually high permeability of the non-carbonate beds (generally ≥ 10-4 cm/s), large discharge, and calcite saturation no greater than 90%, which is rare in deep diffuse flow in sedimentary rocks. Deep sources of aggressiveness are usually required. The origin of caves by transverse hypogenic flow is much more favorable in evaporite rocks than in carbonate rocks.

  17. Radial Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The ejecta surrounding the crater (off image to the left) in this image has undergone significant erosion by the wind. The wind has stripped the surface features from the ejecta and has started to winnow away the ejecta blanket. Near the margin of the ejecta the wind is eroding along a radial pattern -- taking advantage of radial emplacement. Note the steep margin of the ejecta blanket. Most, if not all, of the fine ejecta material has been removed and the wind in now working on the more massive continuous ejecta blanket.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.5, Longitude 197.4 East (162.6 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  19. A hardware accelerator for maze routing

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Y. ); Sahni, S. . Dept. of Computer Science); El-Ziq, Y. )

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the authors reexamine the problem of developing a suitable hardware accelerator for a maze router. The design is comprised of three 3-stage pipelines and a banked memory. The banked memory permits read/write to occur with no wait and no conflicts.

  20. Striatal versus hippocampal representations during win-stay maze performance.

    PubMed

    Berke, Joshua D; Breck, Jason T; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2009-03-01

    The striatum and hippocampus are widely held to be components of distinct memory systems that can guide competing behavioral strategies. However, some electrophysiological studies have suggested that neurons in both structures encode spatial information and may therefore make similar contributions to behavior. In rats well trained to perform a win-stay radial maze task, we recorded simultaneously from dorsal hippocampus and from multiple striatal subregions, including both lateral areas implicated in motor responses to cues and medial areas that work cooperatively with hippocampus in cognitive operations. In each brain region, movement through the maze was accompanied by the continuous sequential activation of sets of projection neurons. Hippocampal neurons overwhelmingly were active at a single spatial location (place cells). Striatal projection neurons were active at discrete points within the progression of every trial-especially during choices or following reward delivery-regardless of spatial position. Place-cell-type firing was not observed even for medial striatal cells entrained to the hippocampal theta rhythm. We also examined neural coding in earlier training sessions, when rats made use of spatial working memory to guide choices, and again found that striatal cells did not show place-cell-type firing. Prospective or retrospective encoding of trajectory was not observed in either hippocampus or striatum, at either training stage. Our results indicate that, at least in this task, dorsal hippocampus uses a spatial foundation for information processing that is not substantially modulated by spatial working memory demands. By contrast, striatal cells do not use such a spatial foundation, even in medial subregions that cooperate with hippocampus in the selection of spatial strategies. The progressive dominance of a striatum-dependent strategy does not appear to be accompanied by large changes in striatal or hippocampal single-cell representations, suggesting

  1. The Effects of Using Different Procedures to Score Maze Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Rebecca L.; McMaster, Kristen L.; Deno, Stanley L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how different scoring procedures affect interpretation of maze curriculum-based measurements. Fall and spring data were collected from 199 students receiving supplemental reading instruction. Maze probes were scored first by counting all correct maze choices, followed by four scoring variations designed to…

  2. Psychometric Properties of Maze Tasks in Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolar, Tammy D.; Barth, Amy E.; Francis, David J.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Stuebing, Karla K.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Maze tasks have appealing properties as progress-monitoring tools, but there is a need for a thorough examination of the psychometric properties of Maze tasks among middle school students. We evaluated form effects, reliability, validity, and practice effects of Maze among students in Grades 6 through 8. We administered the same (familiar) and…

  3. Guiding brine shrimp through mazes by solving reaction diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Krishma; Fenton, Flavio

    Excitable systems driven by reaction diffusion equations have been shown to not only find solutions to mazes but to also to find the shortest path between the beginning and the end of the maze. In this talk we describe how we can use the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, a generic model for excitable media, to solve a maze by varying the basin of attraction of its two fixed points. We demonstrate how two dimensional mazes are solved numerically using a Java Applet and then accelerated to run in real time by using graphic processors (GPUs). An application of this work is shown by guiding phototactic brine shrimp through a maze solved by the algorithm. Once the path is obtained, an Arduino directs the shrimp through the maze using lights from LEDs placed at the floor of the Maze. This method running in real time could be eventually used for guiding robots and cars through traffic.

  4. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  5. Rapid learning of magnetic compass direction by C57BL/6 mice in a 4-armed 'plus' water maze.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John B; Youmans, Paul W; Muheim, Rachel; Sloan, Kelly A; Landler, Lukas; Painter, Michael S; Anderson, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoreception has been demonstrated in all five vertebrate classes. In rodents, nest building experiments have shown the use of magnetic cues by two families of molerats, Siberian hamsters and C57BL/6 mice. However, assays widely used to study rodent spatial cognition (e.g. water maze, radial arm maze) have failed to provide evidence for the use of magnetic cues. Here we show that C57BL/6 mice can learn the magnetic direction of a submerged platform in a 4-armed (plus) water maze. Naïve mice were given two brief training trials. In each trial, a mouse was confined to one arm of the maze with the submerged platform at the outer end in a predetermined alignment relative to magnetic north. Between trials, the training arm and magnetic field were rotated by 180(°) so that the mouse had to swim in the same magnetic direction to reach the submerged platform. The directional preference of each mouse was tested once in one of four magnetic field alignments by releasing it at the center of the maze with access to all four arms. Equal numbers of responses were obtained from mice tested in the four symmetrical magnetic field alignments. Findings show that two training trials are sufficient for mice to learn the magnetic direction of the submerged platform in a plus water maze. The success of these experiments may be explained by: (1) absence of alternative directional cues (2), rotation of magnetic field alignment, and (3) electromagnetic shielding to minimize radio frequency interference that has been shown to interfere with magnetic compass orientation of birds. These findings confirm that mice have a well-developed magnetic compass, and give further impetus to the question of whether epigeic rodents (e.g., mice and rats) have a photoreceptor-based magnetic compass similar to that found in amphibians and migratory birds.

  6. Rapid learning of magnetic compass direction by C57BL/6 mice in a 4-armed 'plus' water maze.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John B; Youmans, Paul W; Muheim, Rachel; Sloan, Kelly A; Landler, Lukas; Painter, Michael S; Anderson, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoreception has been demonstrated in all five vertebrate classes. In rodents, nest building experiments have shown the use of magnetic cues by two families of molerats, Siberian hamsters and C57BL/6 mice. However, assays widely used to study rodent spatial cognition (e.g. water maze, radial arm maze) have failed to provide evidence for the use of magnetic cues. Here we show that C57BL/6 mice can learn the magnetic direction of a submerged platform in a 4-armed (plus) water maze. Naïve mice were given two brief training trials. In each trial, a mouse was confined to one arm of the maze with the submerged platform at the outer end in a predetermined alignment relative to magnetic north. Between trials, the training arm and magnetic field were rotated by 180(°) so that the mouse had to swim in the same magnetic direction to reach the submerged platform. The directional preference of each mouse was tested once in one of four magnetic field alignments by releasing it at the center of the maze with access to all four arms. Equal numbers of responses were obtained from mice tested in the four symmetrical magnetic field alignments. Findings show that two training trials are sufficient for mice to learn the magnetic direction of the submerged platform in a plus water maze. The success of these experiments may be explained by: (1) absence of alternative directional cues (2), rotation of magnetic field alignment, and (3) electromagnetic shielding to minimize radio frequency interference that has been shown to interfere with magnetic compass orientation of birds. These findings confirm that mice have a well-developed magnetic compass, and give further impetus to the question of whether epigeic rodents (e.g., mice and rats) have a photoreceptor-based magnetic compass similar to that found in amphibians and migratory birds. PMID:24023673

  7. Barnes maze testing strategies with small and large rodent models.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Ferguson, Sherry A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning and memory of laboratory rodents is often assessed via navigational ability in mazes, most popular of which are the water and dry-land (Barnes) mazes. Improved performance over sessions or trials is thought to reflect learning and memory of the escape cage/platform location. Considered less stressful than water mazes, the Barnes maze is a relatively simple design of a circular platform top with several holes equally spaced around the perimeter edge. All but one of the holes are false-bottomed or blind-ending, while one leads to an escape cage. Mildly aversive stimuli (e.g. bright overhead lights) provide motivation to locate the escape cage. Latency to locate the escape cage can be measured during the session; however, additional endpoints typically require video recording. From those video recordings, use of automated tracking software can generate a variety of endpoints that are similar to those produced in water mazes (e.g. distance traveled, velocity/speed, time spent in the correct quadrant, time spent moving/resting, and confirmation of latency). Type of search strategy (i.e. random, serial, or direct) can be categorized as well. Barnes maze construction and testing methodologies can differ for small rodents, such as mice, and large rodents, such as rats. For example, while extra-maze cues are effective for rats, smaller wild rodents may require intra-maze cues with a visual barrier around the maze. Appropriate stimuli must be identified which motivate the rodent to locate the escape cage. Both Barnes and water mazes can be time consuming as 4-7 test trials are typically required to detect improved learning and memory performance (e.g. shorter latencies or path lengths to locate the escape platform or cage) and/or differences between experimental groups. Even so, the Barnes maze is a widely employed behavioral assessment measuring spatial navigational abilities and their potential disruption by genetic, neurobehavioral manipulations, or drug

  8. Barnes maze testing strategies with small and large rodent models.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Ferguson, Sherry A

    2014-02-26

    Spatial learning and memory of laboratory rodents is often assessed via navigational ability in mazes, most popular of which are the water and dry-land (Barnes) mazes. Improved performance over sessions or trials is thought to reflect learning and memory of the escape cage/platform location. Considered less stressful than water mazes, the Barnes maze is a relatively simple design of a circular platform top with several holes equally spaced around the perimeter edge. All but one of the holes are false-bottomed or blind-ending, while one leads to an escape cage. Mildly aversive stimuli (e.g. bright overhead lights) provide motivation to locate the escape cage. Latency to locate the escape cage can be measured during the session; however, additional endpoints typically require video recording. From those video recordings, use of automated tracking software can generate a variety of endpoints that are similar to those produced in water mazes (e.g. distance traveled, velocity/speed, time spent in the correct quadrant, time spent moving/resting, and confirmation of latency). Type of search strategy (i.e. random, serial, or direct) can be categorized as well. Barnes maze construction and testing methodologies can differ for small rodents, such as mice, and large rodents, such as rats. For example, while extra-maze cues are effective for rats, smaller wild rodents may require intra-maze cues with a visual barrier around the maze. Appropriate stimuli must be identified which motivate the rodent to locate the escape cage. Both Barnes and water mazes can be time consuming as 4-7 test trials are typically required to detect improved learning and memory performance (e.g. shorter latencies or path lengths to locate the escape platform or cage) and/or differences between experimental groups. Even so, the Barnes maze is a widely employed behavioral assessment measuring spatial navigational abilities and their potential disruption by genetic, neurobehavioral manipulations, or drug

  9. CaMKII binding to GluN2B is important for massed spatial learning in the Morris water maze

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Ivar S.; Donaldson, Michaela S.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory as well as long-term potentiation (LTP) depend on Ca 2+ influx through the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR) and the resulting activation of the Ca 2+ and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). Ca 2+ influx via the NMDAR triggers CaMKII binding to the NMDAR for enhanced CaMKII accumulation at post-synaptic sites that experience heightened activity as occurring during LTP. Previously, we generated knock-in (KI) mice in which we replaced two residues in the NMDAR GluN2B subunit to impair CaMKII binding to GluN2B. Various forms of LTP at the Schaffer collateral synapses in CA1 are reduced by 50%. Nevertheless, working memory in the win-shift 8 arm maze and learning of the Morris water maze (MWM) task was normal in the KI mice although recall of the task was impaired in these mice during the period of early memory consolidation. We now show that massed training in the MWM task within a single day resulted in impaired learning. However, learning and recall of the Barnes maze task and contextual fear conditioning over one or multiple days were surprisingly unaffected. The differences observed in the MWM compared to the Barnes maze and contextual fear conditioning suggest a differential involvement of CaMKII and the specific interaction with GluN2B, probably depending on varying degrees of stress, cognitive demand or even potentially different plasticity mechanisms associated with the diverse tasks. PMID:25187880

  10. CaMKII binding to GluN2B is important for massed spatial learning in the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ivar S; Donaldson, Michaela S; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory as well as long-term potentiation (LTP) depend on Ca (2+) influx through the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR) and the resulting activation of the Ca (2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). Ca (2+) influx via the NMDAR triggers CaMKII binding to the NMDAR for enhanced CaMKII accumulation at post-synaptic sites that experience heightened activity as occurring during LTP. Previously, we generated knock-in (KI) mice in which we replaced two residues in the NMDAR GluN2B subunit to impair CaMKII binding to GluN2B. Various forms of LTP at the Schaffer collateral synapses in CA1 are reduced by 50%. Nevertheless, working memory in the win-shift 8 arm maze and learning of the Morris water maze (MWM) task was normal in the KI mice although recall of the task was impaired in these mice during the period of early memory consolidation. We now show that massed training in the MWM task within a single day resulted in impaired learning. However, learning and recall of the Barnes maze task and contextual fear conditioning over one or multiple days were surprisingly unaffected. The differences observed in the MWM compared to the Barnes maze and contextual fear conditioning suggest a differential involvement of CaMKII and the specific interaction with GluN2B, probably depending on varying degrees of stress, cognitive demand or even potentially different plasticity mechanisms associated with the diverse tasks.

  11. Solving mazes with memristors: A massively parallel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershin, Yuriy V.; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2011-10-01

    Solving mazes is not just a fun pastime: They are prototype models in several areas of science and technology. However, when maze complexity increases, their solution becomes cumbersome and very time consuming. Here, we show that a network of memristors—resistors with memory—can solve such a nontrivial problem quite easily. In particular, maze solving by the network of memristors occurs in a massively parallel fashion since all memristors in the network participate simultaneously in the calculation. The result of the calculation is then recorded into the memristors’ states and can be used and/or recovered at a later time. Furthermore, the network of memristors finds all possible solutions in multiple-solution mazes and sorts out the solution paths according to their length. Our results demonstrate not only the application of memristive networks to the field of massively parallel computing, but also an algorithm to solve mazes, which could find applications in different fields.

  12. Remote Spatial Memory and the Hippocampus: Effect of Early and Extensive Training in the Radial Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Juan M. J.

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study we showed a temporally graded retrograde amnesia after hippocampal lesions when rats learned a spatial reference memory task in which two types of signals simultaneously indicated the goal arm (shape of the experimental room and extramaze landmarks). To investigate the effect that the navigational demands of the task have on…

  13. Wildlife Researchers Running the Permit Maze

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Ellen; Sikes, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    The study of wildlife, whether in the field or in the lab, may start with a hypothesis, a literature search, or a grant proposal, but in many cases, the work will never happen unless the researcher successfully navigates a maze of permit requirements. A single project can involve multiple permits at the national and state levels, and it can take months to obtain any one permit. Therefore, permits may not have been issued at the time of protocol review, but Public Health Service Policy makes accommodations for this situation. Once in hand, however, the permits convey critical information to the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC): one or more government agencies have determined that the activity will not be detrimental to the population or that any detriment is justified by the scientific knowledge that will be generated. This paper assumes that IACUCs are reviewing all wildlife protocols involving live vertebrates, regardless of the current, albeit temporary, distinction made by Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal Care with regard to birds. PMID:23904528

  14. Chicks' maze learning reinforced by visual pitfall extending downward.

    PubMed

    Hayashibe, K; Hara, M; Tsuji, K

    1989-04-01

    The present study examined whether visually evoked fear of depth could reinforce a particular response of animals, i.e., to special maze learning. The maze was composed of four units of Y-shaped alley. In this maze, the visual pitfalls were set behind corners of the alley in place of a physical barrier. The experiments showed that eight of 13 male chicks could achieve the initial learning and that three successful ones could also achieve reversal learning. The results suggest that the visually evoked fear of depth provided by motion parallax can act as a reinforcer.

  15. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  16. Barnes Maze Testing Strategies with Small and Large Rodent Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning and memory of laboratory rodents is often assessed via navigational ability in mazes, most popular of which are the water and dry-land (Barnes) mazes. Improved performance over sessions or trials is thought to reflect learning and memory of the escape cage/platform location. Considered less stressful than water mazes, the Barnes maze is a relatively simple design of a circular platform top with several holes equally spaced around the perimeter edge. All but one of the holes are false-bottomed or blind-ending, while one leads to an escape cage. Mildly aversive stimuli (e.g. bright overhead lights) provide motivation to locate the escape cage. Latency to locate the escape cage can be measured during the session; however, additional endpoints typically require video recording. From those video recordings, use of automated tracking software can generate a variety of endpoints that are similar to those produced in water mazes (e.g. distance traveled, velocity/speed, time spent in the correct quadrant, time spent moving/resting, and confirmation of latency). Type of search strategy (i.e. random, serial, or direct) can be categorized as well. Barnes maze construction and testing methodologies can differ for small rodents, such as mice, and large rodents, such as rats. For example, while extra-maze cues are effective for rats, smaller wild rodents may require intra-maze cues with a visual barrier around the maze. Appropriate stimuli must be identified which motivate the rodent to locate the escape cage. Both Barnes and water mazes can be time consuming as 4-7 test trials are typically required to detect improved learning and memory performance (e.g. shorter latencies or path lengths to locate the escape platform or cage) and/or differences between experimental groups. Even so, the Barnes maze is a widely employed behavioral assessment measuring spatial navigational abilities and their potential disruption by genetic, neurobehavioral manipulations, or

  17. Windmill pitcher's radial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sinson, G; Zager, E L; Kline, D G

    1994-06-01

    The authors present two cases of severe radial nerve injury with different sites of pathology but a similar mechanism: the "windmill" pitching motion of competitive softball. Both patients required surgical intervention with neurolysis, and both improved postoperatively. The literature on related radial nerve injuries is briefly reviewed and pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Triple acting radial seal

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  19. Radial head arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, M T; Ilyas, A M; Jupiter, J B

    2010-02-01

    In conclusion, radial head fractures with 3 or more fragments have a high incidence of complications when treated with ORIF including hardware failure, malunion, nonunion, and the need for re-operation. Radial head arthroplasty has demonstrated good success in the treatment of complex, comminuted radial head fractures which are not amenable to non-opeative treatment or ORIF. Success can be optimized by diligent surgical dissection, avoiding inadvertent nerve injury, placement of an appropriately sized implant, repair of associated injuries, and early protected motion. PMID:20214854

  20. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  1. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  2. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  3. Shallow water (paddling) variants of water maze tests in mice.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Robert M J

    2013-01-01

    When Richard Morris devised his water maze in 1981(7), most behavioral work was done in rats. However, the greater understanding of mouse genetics led to the mouse becoming increasingly important. But researchers found that some strains of mutant mice were prone to problems like passively floating or diving when they were tested in the Morris water maze(11). This was unsurprising considering their natural habitat; rats swim naturally (classically, the "sewer rat"), whereas mice evolved in the dry areas of central Asia. To overcome these problems, it was considered whether shallow water would be a sufficient stimulus to provide escape motivation for mice. This would also avoid the problems of drying the small creatures with a towel and then putting them in a heated recovery chamber to avoid hypothermia, which is a much more serious problem than with rats; the large ratio of surface area to volume of a mouse makes it particularly vulnerable to rapid heat loss. Another consideration was whether a more natural escape strategy could be used, to facilitate learning. Since animals that fall into water and swim away from the safety of the shore are unlikely to pass on their genes, animals have evolved a natural tendency to swim to the edge of a body of water. The Morris water maze, however, requires them to swim to a hidden platform towards the center of the maze - exactly opposite to their evolved behavior. Therefore the paddling maze should incorporate escape to the edge of the apparatus. This feature, coupled with the use of relatively non-aversive shallow water, embodies the "Refinement" aspect of the "3 Rs" of Russell and Burch(8). Various types of maze design were tried; the common feature was that the water was always shallow (2 cm deep) and escape was via a tube piercing the transparent wall of the apparatus. Other tubes ("false exits") were also placed around the walls but these were blocked off. From the inside of the maze all false exits and the single true exit

  4. Intelligence-Augmented Rat Cyborgs in Maze Solving.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yipeng; Pan, Gang; Gong, Yongyue; Xu, Kedi; Zheng, Nenggan; Hua, Weidong; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Wu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Cyborg intelligence is an emerging kind of intelligence paradigm. It aims to deeply integrate machine intelligence with biological intelligence by connecting machines and living beings via neural interfaces, enhancing strength by combining the biological cognition capability with the machine computational capability. Cyborg intelligence is considered to be a new way to augment living beings with machine intelligence. In this paper, we build rat cyborgs to demonstrate how they can expedite the maze escape task with integration of machine intelligence. We compare the performance of maze solving by computer, by individual rats, and by computer-aided rats (i.e. rat cyborgs). They were asked to find their way from a constant entrance to a constant exit in fourteen diverse mazes. Performance of maze solving was measured by steps, coverage rates, and time spent. The experimental results with six rats and their intelligence-augmented rat cyborgs show that rat cyborgs have the best performance in escaping from mazes. These results provide a proof-of-principle demonstration for cyborg intelligence. In addition, our novel cyborg intelligent system (rat cyborg) has great potential in various applications, such as search and rescue in complex terrains.

  5. Mental walking through a complex maze influences lateralized ultradian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Meier-Koll, A; Albrecht, U; Neuschwander, D

    1998-12-01

    Subjects of two experimental groups, 10 males and 10 females in each group, explored artificial environments represented by compact city mazes. The mazes, a simple and a complex one, were generated by means of a computer program. After turning the program on, a scene with houses, streets, and alleys appeared on a TV screen. The subjects sat in front of the screen and manoeuvered through the simple or the complex maze with the help of a hand-operated device. Correspondingly the street scenes changed in such a way that the subject had the illusion of a normal pace. Each subject explored one maze for eight hours. Every 15 min. an experimenter interrupted the subject's walk and measured tactile discrimination in either hand. Ultradian periodic variations in the tactile error rate of the right and left hands with periods of 2 or 3 hours are found. They are considered manifestations of endogenous rhythms operating separately in the left and right cerebral hemispheres. As demonstrated in a previous paper, lateralized ultradian rhythms in tactile discrimination are different for males and females when tested under quiet laboratory conditions. The present paper shows that the rhythms are specifically influenced in both sexes by the spatial complexity of an artificial environment (maze). These findings are discussed from an evolutionary point of view.

  6. Intelligence-Augmented Rat Cyborgs in Maze Solving

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yipeng; Pan, Gang; Gong, Yongyue; Xu, Kedi; Zheng, Nenggan; Hua, Weidong; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Wu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Cyborg intelligence is an emerging kind of intelligence paradigm. It aims to deeply integrate machine intelligence with biological intelligence by connecting machines and living beings via neural interfaces, enhancing strength by combining the biological cognition capability with the machine computational capability. Cyborg intelligence is considered to be a new way to augment living beings with machine intelligence. In this paper, we build rat cyborgs to demonstrate how they can expedite the maze escape task with integration of machine intelligence. We compare the performance of maze solving by computer, by individual rats, and by computer-aided rats (i.e. rat cyborgs). They were asked to find their way from a constant entrance to a constant exit in fourteen diverse mazes. Performance of maze solving was measured by steps, coverage rates, and time spent. The experimental results with six rats and their intelligence-augmented rat cyborgs show that rat cyborgs have the best performance in escaping from mazes. These results provide a proof-of-principle demonstration for cyborg intelligence. In addition, our novel cyborg intelligent system (rat cyborg) has great potential in various applications, such as search and rescue in complex terrains. PMID:26859299

  7. The effects of 8-arm-PEG-catechol/heparin shielding system and immunosuppressive drug, FK506 on the survival of intraportally allotransplanted islets.

    PubMed

    Im, Bok-Hyeon; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Haque, Muhammad R; Lee, Dong Yun; Ahn, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Ju Eun; Byun, Youngro

    2013-03-01

    This study proposed a double-layer shielding method of using 8-arm-PEG-catechol (PEG(8)) and N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-linked unfractionated heparin (UFH-NHS) for the prevention of instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) and immune reactions against transplanted pancreatic islets. The surface of islet was evenly covered by PEG(8) and UFH-NHS. Both viability and functionality of islets were evaluated in vitro, and the anti-coagulation effect of conjugated heparin on the islet surface was also evaluated. The inhibition effects of PEG(8)/UFH double-layer shielding system on immune reactions and IBMIR induced by transplanted islets were evaluated in an allograft model. When pancreatic islets of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were transplanted in the liver of F344 rats, the mean survival time (MST) of PEG(8)/UFH double-layer shielded islets (6.8 ± 1.6 days) was statistically increased, compared to that of unmodified islets (3.6 ± 1.1 days). Furthermore, when 0.5 mg/kg of FK506 was daily administered, the MST of double-layer shielded islet (15.0 ± 2.1 days) was increased by two-fold, compared to that of unmodified islets treated with the same dose of FK506 (8.0 ± 2.4 days). Therefore, a newly developed strategy of combining the PEG(8)/UFH double-layer shielding system with FK506 would certainly be effective for preventing immune activation and IBMIR against allotransplanted islets.

  8. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on anxious behaviour of BALB/c mice in a 3-dimensional maze.

    PubMed

    Abuhamdah, R M; Hussain, M D; Chazot, P L; Ennaceur, A

    2015-01-01

    Here we used a 3-dimensional (3D) maze, a modification of the radial maze, to assess the effects of treatment for two weeks with a single daily dose of fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) on anxiety in male BALB/c mice. We examined whether anxiolytic effects of fluoxetine can be detected over three daily test sessions. We examined also whether repeated handling associated with chronic treatment interferes with effects of fluoxetine on anxiety responses. The 3D maze comprises nine arms, each connected to an upward inclined bridge radiating from a central platform. In this maze, BALB/c mice cross frequently into the bridges but avoid the arms. This avoidance is used as an index of anxiety. Two separate groups received once a day either saline (SALCH, n = 8) or fluoxetine (FLUCH, n = 8) for 14 days, and up to 30 min before the test during the subsequent 3 days. A third group received saline (SALAC, n = 8) 30 min before the test, once a day for 3 days. SALAC mice did not cross into the arms, and continued this avoidance over 3 sessions. SALCH mice avoided the arms in session 1 whereas FLUCH mice did cross into the arms, and like SALCH mice, increased number of crossings into and time on the arms in subsequent sessions. Fluoxetine evidently had an anxiolytic effect but only in the first session. These results indicate that handling experience decreased fear and anxiety in the mice, which may have masked the anxiolytic effect of fluoxetine in the second and third test sessions.

  9. Rapid Learning of Magnetic Compass Direction by C57BL/6 Mice in a 4-Armed ‘Plus’ Water Maze

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John B.; Youmans, Paul W.; Muheim, Rachel; Sloan, Kelly A.; Landler, Lukas; Painter, Michael S.; Anderson, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoreception has been demonstrated in all five vertebrate classes. In rodents, nest building experiments have shown the use of magnetic cues by two families of molerats, Siberian hamsters and C57BL/6 mice. However, assays widely used to study rodent spatial cognition (e.g. water maze, radial arm maze) have failed to provide evidence for the use of magnetic cues. Here we show that C57BL/6 mice can learn the magnetic direction of a submerged platform in a 4-armed (plus) water maze. Naïve mice were given two brief training trials. In each trial, a mouse was confined to one arm of the maze with the submerged platform at the outer end in a predetermined alignment relative to magnetic north. Between trials, the training arm and magnetic field were rotated by 180° so that the mouse had to swim in the same magnetic direction to reach the submerged platform. The directional preference of each mouse was tested once in one of four magnetic field alignments by releasing it at the center of the maze with access to all four arms. Equal numbers of responses were obtained from mice tested in the four symmetrical magnetic field alignments. Findings show that two training trials are sufficient for mice to learn the magnetic direction of the submerged platform in a plus water maze. The success of these experiments may be explained by: (1) absence of alternative directional cues (2), rotation of magnetic field alignment, and (3) electromagnetic shielding to minimize radio frequency interference that has been shown to interfere with magnetic compass orientation of birds. These findings confirm that mice have a well-developed magnetic compass, and give further impetus to the question of whether epigeic rodents (e.g., mice and rats) have a photoreceptor-based magnetic compass similar to that found in amphibians and migratory birds. PMID:24023673

  10. Searching for cognitive enhancement in the Morris water maze: better and worse performance in D-amino acid oxidase knockout (Dao(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, David; Taylor, Amy M; Barkus, Christopher; Engle, Sandra J; Brandon, Nicholas J; Sharp, Trevor; Foster, Russell G; Harrison, Paul J; Peirson, Stuart N; Bannerman, David M

    2016-04-01

    A common strategy when searching for cognitive-enhancing drugs has been to target the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), given its putative role in synaptic plasticity and learning. Evidence in favour of this approach has come primarily from studies with rodents using behavioural assays like the Morris water maze. D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) degrades neutral D-amino acids such as D-serine, the primary endogenous co-agonist acting at the glycine site of the synaptic NMDAR. Inhibiting DAO could therefore provide an effective and viable means of enhancing cognition, particularly in disorders like schizophrenia, in which NMDAR hypofunction is implicated. Indirect support for this notion comes from the enhanced hippocampal long-term potentiation and facilitated water maze acquisition of ddY/Dao(-) mice, which lack DAO activity due to a point mutation in the gene. Here, in Dao knockout (Dao(-/-) ) mice, we report both better and worse water maze performance, depending on the radial distance of the hidden platform from the side wall of the pool. Dao(-/-) mice displayed an increased innate preference for swimming in the periphery of the maze (possibly due to heightened anxiety), which facilitated the discovery of a peripherally located platform, but delayed the discovery of a centrally located platform. By contrast, Dao(-/-) mice exhibited normal performance in two alternative assays of long-term spatial memory: the appetitive and aversive Y-maze reference memory tasks. Taken together, these results question the proposed relationship between DAO inactivation and enhanced long-term associative spatial memory. They also have generic implications for how Morris water maze studies are performed and interpreted. PMID:26833794

  11. Searching for cognitive enhancement in the Morris water maze: better and worse performance in D-amino acid oxidase knockout (Dao(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, David; Taylor, Amy M; Barkus, Christopher; Engle, Sandra J; Brandon, Nicholas J; Sharp, Trevor; Foster, Russell G; Harrison, Paul J; Peirson, Stuart N; Bannerman, David M

    2016-04-01

    A common strategy when searching for cognitive-enhancing drugs has been to target the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), given its putative role in synaptic plasticity and learning. Evidence in favour of this approach has come primarily from studies with rodents using behavioural assays like the Morris water maze. D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) degrades neutral D-amino acids such as D-serine, the primary endogenous co-agonist acting at the glycine site of the synaptic NMDAR. Inhibiting DAO could therefore provide an effective and viable means of enhancing cognition, particularly in disorders like schizophrenia, in which NMDAR hypofunction is implicated. Indirect support for this notion comes from the enhanced hippocampal long-term potentiation and facilitated water maze acquisition of ddY/Dao(-) mice, which lack DAO activity due to a point mutation in the gene. Here, in Dao knockout (Dao(-/-) ) mice, we report both better and worse water maze performance, depending on the radial distance of the hidden platform from the side wall of the pool. Dao(-/-) mice displayed an increased innate preference for swimming in the periphery of the maze (possibly due to heightened anxiety), which facilitated the discovery of a peripherally located platform, but delayed the discovery of a centrally located platform. By contrast, Dao(-/-) mice exhibited normal performance in two alternative assays of long-term spatial memory: the appetitive and aversive Y-maze reference memory tasks. Taken together, these results question the proposed relationship between DAO inactivation and enhanced long-term associative spatial memory. They also have generic implications for how Morris water maze studies are performed and interpreted.

  12. [Approaches to radial shaft].

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    In the clinical practice, radial shaft may be exposed via two approaches, namely the posterolateral Thompson and volar (anterior) Henry approaches. A feared complication of both of them is the injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve. No consensus has been reached, yet, as to which of the two approaches is more beneficial for the proximal half of radius. According to our anatomical studies and clinical experience, Thompson approach is safe only in fractures of the middle and distal thirds of the radial shaft, but highly risky in fractures of its proximal third. Henry approach may be used in any fracture of the radial shaft and provides a safe exposure of the entire lateral and anterior surfaces of the radius.The Henry approach has three phases. In the first phase, incision is made along the line connecting the biceps brachii tendon and the styloid process of radius. Care must be taken not to damage the lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.In the second phase, fascia is incised and the brachioradialis identified by the typical transition from the muscle belly to tendon and the shape of the tendon. On the lateral side, the brachioradialis lines the space with the radial artery and veins and the superficial branch of the radial nerve running at its bottom. On the medial side, the space is defined by the pronator teres in the proximal part and the flexor carpi radialis in the distal part. The superficial branch of the radial nerve is retracted together with the brachioradialis laterally, and the radial artery medially.In the third phase, the attachment of the pronator teres is identified by its typical tendon in the middle of convexity of the lateral surface of the radial shaft. The proximal half of the radius must be exposed very carefully in order not to damage the deep branch of the radial nerve. Dissection starts at the insertion of the pronator teres and proceeds proximally along its lateral border in interval between this muscle and insertion of the supinator

  13. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  14. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  15. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  16. Maze Busters: Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane & Kathleen Sheehan--Harvard University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Even if one is equipped with an MLS, the 11 libraries that comprise the Harvard College Library can be pretty daunting. That is why Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane and Kathleen Sheehan created Threading the Maze. The online publication is presented to students in expository writing, the one course all undergraduates must take. "This highly effective…

  17. Accessing Information: The Internet--A Highway or a Maze?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoctor, Marge

    2005-01-01

    The Internet is often called "The Information Highway," a metaphor that implies that there is a straight, clearly mapped path to obtaining information. In reality, it is more like a maze with twists and turns and many dead ends. Efficient navigation strategies must be taught; they will not be acquired through osmosis. Schools with a strong…

  18. Interior of hallway (maze) to large xray room with thick ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of hallway (maze) to large x-ray room with thick leaded door - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Water maze testing to identify compounds for cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Rose, Gregory M; Rowe, Wayne B

    2012-12-01

    The water maze task is widely used to evaluate spatial learning and memory in rodents. The basic paradigm requires an animal to swim in a pool until it finds a hidden escape platform. The animals learn to find the platform using extra-maze cues and, after several training trials, are able to swim directly to it from any starting location. Memory for the platform location is assessed by examining swimming behavior with the platform removed from the maze, while sensory, motor and motivational aspects of the task can be examined by making the platform visible to the animals. Described in this unit is the use of the water maze to identify rats with age-related spatial learning and memory impairments. The efficacy of potential pharmacological treatments for alleviating these deficits is then evaluated. This assay provides a means for studying the neurobiology of spatial learning and memory, and to identify potential pharmacotherapies for treating memory-impaired humans. While the use of aged rats is described in this unit, the protocol can also be employed for compound screening with other rodent models that have spatial learning and memory impairments, such as transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. MAZE. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-10

    MAZE is an interactive input generator for two-dimensional finite element codes. MAZE has three phases. In the first phase, lines and parts are defined. The first phase is terminated by the `ASSM` or `PASSM` command which merges all parts. In the second phase, boundary conditions may be specified, slidelines may be defined, parts may be merged to eliminate nodes along common interfaces, boundary nodes may be moved for graded zoning, the mesh may be smoothed, and load curves may be defined. The second phase is terminated by the `WBCD` command which causes MAZE to write the output file as soon as the `T` terminate command is typed. In the third phase, material properties may be defined. Commands that apply to the first phase may not be used in the second or third; likewise, commands that apply in the second may not be used in the first and third, or commands that apply in the third in the first and second. Nine commands - TV, Z, GSET, PLOTS, GRID, NOGRID, FRAME, NOFRAME, and RJET are available in all phases. Comments may be added anywhere in the input stream by prefacing the comment with `C`. Any DYNA2D or NIKE2D material and equation-of-state model may be defined via the MAT and EOS commands, respectively. MAZE may be terminated after phase two; it is not necessary to define the materials.

  1. Relative Clause Processing in Mandarin: Evidence from the Maze Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiao, Xiaomei; Shen, Liyao; Forster, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Contradictory results have been found in Chinese as to whether subject relative clauses are easier to process than object relative clauses. One major disagreement concerns the region where the difficulty arises. In this study, a "maze" task was used to localise processing difficulty by requiring participants to make a choice between two…

  2. MAZE. Generates 2D Input for DYNA, NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-12

    MAZE is an interactive input generator for two-dimensional finite element codes. MAZE has three phases. In the first phase, lines and parts are defined. The first phase is terminated by the `ASSM` or `PASSM` command which merges all parts. In the second phase, boundary conditions may be specified, slidelines may be defined, parts may be merged to eliminate nodes along common interfaces, boundary nodes may be moved for graded zoning, the mesh may be smoothed, and load curves may be defined. The second phase is terminated by the `WBCD` command which causes MAZE to write the output file as soon as the `T` terminate command is typed. In the third phase, material properties may be defined. Commands that apply to the first phase may not be used in the second or third; likewise, commands that apply in the second may not be used in the first and third, or commands that apply in the third in the first and second. Nine commands - TV, Z, GSET, PLOTS, GRID, NOGRID, FRAME, NOFRAME, and RJET are available in all phases. Comments may be added anywhere in the input stream by prefacing the comment with `C`. Any DYNA2D or NIKE2D material and equation-of-state model may be defined via the MAT and EOS commands, respectively. MAZE may be terminated after phase two; it is not necessary to define the materials.

  3. MAZE. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive input generator for two-dimensional finite element codes. MAZE has three phases. In the first phase, lines and parts are defined. The first phase is terminated by the `ASSM` or `PASSM` command which merges all parts. In the second phase, boundary conditions may be specified, slidelines may be defined, parts may be merged to eliminate nodes along common interfaces, boundary nodes may be moved for graded zoning, the mesh may be smoothed, and load curves may be defined. The second phase is terminated by the `WBCD` command which causes MAZE to write the output file as soon as the `T` terminate command is typed. In the third phase, material properties may be defined. Commands that apply to the first phase may not be used in the second or third; likewise, commands that apply in the second may not be used in the first and third, or commands that apply in the third in the first and second. Nine commands - TV, Z, GSET, PLOTS, GRID, NOGRID, FRAME, NOFRAME, and RJET are available in all phases. Comments may be added anywhere in the input stream by prefacing the comment with `C`. Any DYNA2D or NIKE2D material and equation-of-state model may be defined via the MAT and EOS commands, respectively. MAZE may be terminated after phase two; it is not necessary to define the materials.

  4. MAZE. Generates 2D Input for DYNA, NIKE, & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-10

    MAZE is an interactive input generator for two-dimensional finite element codes. MAZE has three phases. In the first phase, lines and parts are defined. The first phase is terminated by the `ASSM` or `PASSM` command which merges all parts. In the second phase, boundary conditions may be specified, slidelines may be defined, parts may be merged to eliminate nodes along common interfaces, boundary nodes may be moved for graded zoning, the mesh may be smoothed, and load curves may be defined. The second phase is terminated by the `WBCD` command which causes MAZE to write the output file as soon as the `T` terminate command is typed. In the third phase, material properties may be defined. Commands that apply to the first phase may not be used in the second or third; likewise, commands that apply in the second may not be used in the first and third, or commands that apply in the third in the first and second. Nine commands - TV, Z, GSET, PLOTS, GRID, NOGRID, FRAME, NOFRAME, and RJET are available in all phases. Comments may be added anywhere in the input stream by prefacing the comment with `C`. Any DYNA2D or NIKE2D material and equation-of-state model may be defined via the MAT and EOS commands, respectively. MAZE may be terminated after phase two; it is not necessary to define the materials.

  5. Mazes and Maps: Can Young Children Find Their Way?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirout, Jamie J.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2014-01-01

    Games provide important informal learning activities for young children, and spatial game play (e.g., puzzles and blocks) has been found to relate to the development of spatial skills. This study investigates 4- and 5-year-old children's use of scaled and unscaled maps when solving mazes, asking whether an important aspect of spatial…

  6. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  7. Instrument Development Procedures for Maze Measures. Technical Report # 08-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Kimy; Sundstrom-Hebert, Krystal; Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne R.; Tindal, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the instrument development of maze measures for grades 3-8. Each maze passage contained twelve omitted words that students filled in by choosing the best-fit word from among the provided options. In this technical report, we describe the process of creating, reviewing, and pilot testing the maze measures.…

  8. Generalizability Theory Analysis of CBM Maze Reliability in Third- through Fifth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Sterett H.; Dufrene, Brad A.; Zoder-Martell, Kimberly; Harpole, Lauren Lestremau; Mitchell, Rachel R.; Blaze, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Despite growing use of CBM Maze in universal screening and research, little information is available regarding the number of CBM Maze probes needed for reliable decisions. The current study extends existing research on the technical adequacy of CBM Maze by investigating the number of probes and assessment durations (1-3 min) needed for reliable…

  9. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  10. Axonemal radial spokes

    PubMed Central

    Pigino, Gaia; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The radial spoke (RS) is a complex of at least 23 proteins that works as a mechanochemical transducer between the central‐pair apparatus and the peripheral microtubule doublets in eukaryotic flagella and motile cilia. The RS contributes to the regulation of the activity of dynein motors, and thus to flagellar motility. Despite numerous biochemical, physiological and structural studies, the mechanism of the function of the radial spoke remains unclear. Detailed knowledge of the 3D structure of the RS protein complex is needed in order to understand how RS regulates dynein activity. Here we review the most important findings on the structure of the RS, including results of our recent cryo‐electron tomographic analysis of the RS protein complex. PMID:22754630

  11. Radial Inflow Turboexpander Redesign

    SciTech Connect

    William G. Price

    2001-09-24

    Steamboat Envirosystems, LLC (SELC) was awarded a grant in accordance with the DOE Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Development. Atlas-Copco Rotoflow (ACR), a radial expansion turbine manufacturer, was responsible for the manufacturing of the turbine and the creation of the new computer program. SB Geo, Inc. (SBG), the facility operator, monitored and assisted ACR's activities as well as provided installation and startup assistance. The primary scope of the project is the redesign of an axial flow turbine to a radial inflow turboexpander to provide increased efficiency and reliability at an existing facility. In addition to the increased efficiency and reliability, the redesign includes an improved reduction gear design, and improved shaft seal design, and upgraded control system and a greater flexibility of application

  12. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  13. Radially inhomogeneous bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri-Khatir, H.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of kinetic theory along with self-consistent field equations, the expressions for dielectric tensor of radially inhomogeneous magnetized plasma columns are obtained. The study of dielectric tensor characteristics allows the accurate analysis of the inhomogeneous properties, beyond limitations that exist in the conventional method. Through the Bessel-Fourier transformation, the localized form of material equations in a radially inhomogeneous medium are obtained. In order to verify the integrity of the model and reveal the effect of inhomogeneity, a special case of a cylindrical plasma waveguide completely filled with inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma was considered. The dispersion relation curves for four families of electromagnetic (EH and HE) and electrostatic (SC and C) modes are obtained and compared with the findings of the conventional model. The numerical analysis indicates that the inhomogeneity effect leads to coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes each having different radial eigen numbers. The study also reveals that the electrostatic modes are more sensitive to inhomogeneous effects than the electromagnetic modes.

  14. Radially inhomogeneous bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri-Khatir, H.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of kinetic theory along with self-consistent field equations, the expressions for dielectric tensor of radially inhomogeneous magnetized plasma columns are obtained. The study of dielectric tensor characteristics allows the accurate analysis of the inhomogeneous properties, beyond limitations that exist in the conventional method. Through the Bessel–Fourier transformation, the localized form of material equations in a radially inhomogeneous medium are obtained. In order to verify the integrity of the model and reveal the effect of inhomogeneity, a special case of a cylindrical plasma waveguide completely filled with inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma was considered. The dispersion relation curves for four families of electromagnetic (EH and HE) and electrostatic (SC and C) modes are obtained and compared with the findings of the conventional model. The numerical analysis indicates that the inhomogeneity effect leads to coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes each having different radial eigen numbers. The study also reveals that the electrostatic modes are more sensitive to inhomogeneous effects than the electromagnetic modes.

  15. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  16. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  17. Evidence for social cooperation in rodents by automated maze

    PubMed Central

    Avital, Avi; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Zubedat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Social cooperation is defined as a joint action for mutual benefit that depends on the individual and the counterparts’ behaviors. To gain valid evidence for social cooperation behavior we conducted a series of experiments in our suggested fully automated non-conditioned maze and depicted three major findings: (i) During 18 days of training the rats showed a progressive social learning curve as well as latent social learning; (ii) Examining the perceptual communication between the cooperating partners, we found a correlation between the available perceptual modalities and the social cooperation performance; and (iii) Investigating contextual learning as a competing process to the social cooperation, we found that additional contextual cues impaired the social cooperation performance. In conclusion, our suggested automated cooperation maze is designed to further our understanding of social cooperation under normal conditions, such as decision-making, and to examine the neural basis of social cooperation. A variety of neuropsychiatric disorders are characterized by disruptions in social behavior and social cognition, including depression, autism spectrum disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. Thus, on the pathological end, our maze for social cooperation evaluation can contribute significantly to the investigation of a wide range of social cooperation impairments in a rodent model. PMID:27378418

  18. Optimal Navigation of Self-Propelled Colloids in Microstructured Mazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuguang; Bevan, Michael

    Controlling navigation of self-propelled microscopic `robots' subject to random Brownian motion in complex microstructured environments (e.g., porous media, tumor vasculature) is important to many emerging applications (e.g., enhanced oil recovery, drug delivery). In this work, we design an optimal feedback policy to navigate an active self-propelled colloidal rod in complex mazes with various obstacle types. Actuation of the rods is modelled based on a light-controlled osmotic flow mechanism, which produces different propulsion velocities along the rod's long axis. Actuator-parameterized Langevin equations, with soft rod-obstacle repulsive interactions, are developed to describe the system dynamics. A Markov decision process (MDP) framework is used for optimal policy calculations with design goals of colloidal rods reaching target end points in minimum time. Simulations show that optimal MDP-based policies are able to control rod trajectories to reach target regions order-of-magnitudes faster than uncontrolled rods, which diverges as maze complexity increases. An efficient multi-graph based implementation for MDP is also presented, which scales linearly with the maze dimension.

  19. Radial inflow turbine study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, S.; Elder, R. L.

    1992-03-01

    The radial inflow turbine is a primary component used both in small gas turbines and turbochargers. Better understanding of the flow processes occurring within the small passages of the machine could well result in the improved design of units. As most of the detailed aerodynamics is still ill-defined, a joint research project with the objective of improving our understanding has been instigated by Cranfield, the US Army and Turbomach (San Diego). This document gives the seventh report on the project and describes progress and measurements taken.

  20. Harvesting the radial artery

    PubMed Central

    Osterday, Robert M.; Brodman, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    The radial artery (RA) has emerged as an important arterial graft for coronary bypass surgery. With improving five-year patency rates and increasing uptake, great attention has been focused on the optimal conduit harvesting technique. We herein present our approach to RA harvesting. Prerequisites of a successful harvest include adherence to important anatomical landmarks, protection of the sensory innervation to the volar forearm, and meticulous handling of the RA branches. Regardless of the harvesting methodology chosen, adherence to a “no-touch” technique will optimize the patency and durability of the RA conduit. PMID:23977633

  1. Radial cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.C.

    1997-01-08

    The project`s aim is to complete development of the Radial Cutting Torch, a pyrotechnic cutter, for use in all downhole tubular cutting operations in the petroleum industry. Project objectives are to redesign and pressure test nozzle seals to increase product quality, reliability, and manufacturability; improve the mechanical anchor to increase its temperature tolerance and its ability to function in a wider variety of wellbore fluids; and redesign and pressure test the RCT nozzle for operation at pressures from 10 to 20 ksi. The proposal work statement is included in the statement of work for the grant via this reference.

  2. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  3. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  4. Effects of MK-801 on learning and memory as assessed using a novel water maze.

    PubMed

    Kant, G J; Wright, W L; Robinson, T N; D'Angelo, C P

    1991-06-01

    The effects of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 [(+)-10,11-dihydro-5-methyl-5H-dibenzo [a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10 imine hydrogen maleate] on learning and memory were assessed using a water maze. The maze was a traditional type of maze with alleys and choices between various paths, but set inside a pool of water to a height of 25 cm. Different mazes could be configured by altering the arrangement of open vs. closed doors. Both the time required to reach an out-of-the-water exit platform and the errors made during the swim from start to finish were recorded. Learning was assessed during the first 10 to 20 trials in a new maze configuration, while memory was tested after the maze was well learned. Three experiments, some with several phases, were performed. These experiments compared the effects of 0.1 mg/kg of either (+)-MK-801, or (-)-MK-801 vs. saline on learning new maze configurations as well as swimming well-learned mazes. Neither of the MK-801 isomers impaired performance of a previously learned maze. (+)-MK-801 clearly slowed learning of new mazes as measured by both maze completion time and errors committed, while (-)-MK-801 had a significant but smaller effect on learning. Rats given (+)- or (-)-MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) for 16 days while learning one maze and then challenged to learn a new maze without drug administration performed no differently on the new maze than controls, suggesting that the acute effect of MK-801 on learning is not long lasting.

  5. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  6. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  7. Allopregnanolone inhibits learning in the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Inga Maj; Birzniece, Vita; Lindblad, Charlotte; Olsson, Tommy; Bäckström, Torbjörn

    2002-05-01

    The progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone (3alpha-OH-5alpha-pregnane-20-one) inhibits neural functions, enhancing the GABA induced GABA(A) receptor activation. This effect is benzodiazepine like and benzodiazepines are known to impair memory. Acute effects of allopregnanolone on the hippocampus dependent spatial learning in the Morris water maze have not been studied. Adult male Wistar rats where injected (i.v.) with allopregnanolone (2 mg/kg), or vehicle, daily for 11 days. At 8 or 20 min after each injection, studies of place navigation were performed in the Morris water maze. Allopregnanolone concentrations in plasma and in nine different brain areas where analyzed by radioimmunoassay. The latency to find the platform was increased 8 min after the allopregnanolone injection, while normal learning was seen after 20 min. Swim speed did not differ between groups. A higher number of rats were swimming close to the pool wall (thigmotaxis) in the 8 min allopregnanolone group compared to the other groups. Allopregnanolone concentrations in the brain tissue at 8 min were 1.5 to 2.5 times higher then at 20 min after the allopregnanolone injections. After vehicle injections the brain concentrations of allopregnanolone were at control levels. Plasma concentrations of allopregnanolone followed the same pattern as in the brain, with the exception of an increase 8 min after vehicle injections. The natural progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone can inhibit learning in the Morris water maze, an effect not caused by motor impairment. The learning impairment might be due to a combination of changed swimming behavior and difficulties in navigation.

  8. Universal Screening of Reading in Late Elementary School: R-CBM versus CBM Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graney, Suzanne Bamonto; Martinez, Rebecca S.; Missall, Kristen N.; Aricak, O. Tolga

    2010-01-01

    Two curriculum-based measurement tools are commonly used to assess progress in reading in elementary school: R-CBM and CBM maze. R-CBM is used in practice more frequently than CBM maze is, although CBM maze is more time efficient to administer than R-CBM is. The technical adequacy of each of these measures has been reported in the literature;…

  9. Goal representation heuristic dynamic programming on maze navigation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhen; He, Haibo; Wen, Jinyu; Xu, Xin

    2013-12-01

    Goal representation heuristic dynamic programming (GrHDP) is proposed in this paper to demonstrate online learning in the Markov decision process. In addition to the (external) reinforcement signal in literature, we develop an adaptively internal goal/reward representation for the agent with the proposed goal network. Specifically, we keep the actor-critic design in heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) and include a goal network to represent the internal goal signal, to further help the value function approximation. We evaluate our proposed GrHDP algorithm on two 2-D maze navigation problems, and later on one 3-D maze navigation problem. Compared to the traditional HDP approach, the learning performance of the agent is improved with our proposed GrHDP approach. In addition, we also include the learning performance with two other reinforcement learning algorithms, namely Sarsa(λ) and Q-learning, on the same benchmarks for comparison. Furthermore, in order to demonstrate the theoretical guarantee of our proposed method, we provide the characteristics analysis toward the convergence of weights in neural networks in our GrHDP approach. PMID:24805221

  10. Goal representation heuristic dynamic programming on maze navigation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhen; He, Haibo; Wen, Jinyu; Xu, Xin

    2013-12-01

    Goal representation heuristic dynamic programming (GrHDP) is proposed in this paper to demonstrate online learning in the Markov decision process. In addition to the (external) reinforcement signal in literature, we develop an adaptively internal goal/reward representation for the agent with the proposed goal network. Specifically, we keep the actor-critic design in heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) and include a goal network to represent the internal goal signal, to further help the value function approximation. We evaluate our proposed GrHDP algorithm on two 2-D maze navigation problems, and later on one 3-D maze navigation problem. Compared to the traditional HDP approach, the learning performance of the agent is improved with our proposed GrHDP approach. In addition, we also include the learning performance with two other reinforcement learning algorithms, namely Sarsa(λ) and Q-learning, on the same benchmarks for comparison. Furthermore, in order to demonstrate the theoretical guarantee of our proposed method, we provide the characteristics analysis toward the convergence of weights in neural networks in our GrHDP approach.

  11. Hypothermia in mice tested in Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Iivonen, Hennariikka; Nurminen, Liisa; Harri, Mikko; Tanila, Heikki; Puoliväli, Jukka

    2003-05-15

    The Morris water maze, one of the most common behavioral tasks to assess learning and memory in rodents, exposes the animals to cold water for a few minutes. Unlike rats, young healthy mice can become severely hypothermic during the task. Five swims of 45 s in 20 degrees C water with 30s between the trials was enough to cause up to 9 degrees C drop in the rectal temperature. The decline in core temperature was accompanied by slowing of the swimming speed. Moreover, the effect was dependent on the sex and genotype of the mice, such that females were more susceptible to hypothermia than males and transgenic mice carrying Alzheimer-associated APP and PS1 mutations more vulnerable than their nontransgenic littermates. Raising the water temperature from 20 to 24 degrees C alleviated the hypothermia, but did not remove the significant drop in core temperature when using 30-s inter-trial interval. However, increasing the break from 30 s to 13 min removed the net cooling effect of five trials on the core temperature and swimming speed. We conclude that the currently most common water maze protocol renders mice hypothermic, which may confound the test results, especially when transgenic female mice are used. We recommend monitoring of the swimming speed on a trial-by-trial basis and using longer inter-trial intervals.

  12. Complex maze learning in rodents as a model of age-related memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D K

    1988-01-01

    Research is reviewed concerning the age-related learning deficit observed in a 14-unit T-maze (Stone maze). Rats and mice of several strains representing different adult age groups are first trained to criterion in one-way active avoidance in a straight runway. Then training in the Stone maze is conducted which involves negotiation of five maze segments to avoid footshock. Results indicate a robust age-related impairment in acquisition observed in males and females, and in outbred, inbred, and hybrid strains. Pharmacological studies using the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine, in young and aged rats indicate cholinergic involvement for accurate encoding during acquisition of this task. Retention aspects of storage and retrieval do not appear to be affected by scopolamine treatment. Bilateral electrolytic lesions to the fimbria-fornix of young rats also produce an acquisition deficit to implicate involvement of the septo-hippocampal cholinergic system in Stone maze learning. A salient feature of Stone maze performance is the tendency to demonstrate an alternation strategy in solving the maze. This strategy is exacerbated by impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission with either scopolamine treatment or fimbria-fornix lesions. Various models of hippocampal function are applied toward the psychological characterization of the Stone maze task without complete success. Future research is outlined to provide more thorough psychological characterization of maze performance, to analyze the specificity of cholinergic involvement in the task, and to test possible therapeutic interventions for alleviating the age-related impairments observed.

  13. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  14. Radial distribution function in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygocki, Wladyslaw

    1997-02-01

    Radial distribution function is a very useful tool for determination of the polymer structure. The connection between the scattered X-ray intensity and radial distribution function is presented. Some examples of RDF for polyethylene and for poly(ethylene terephtalate).

  15. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  16. Task solving by procedural strategies in the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Elisabetta; Lorenzini, Carlo Ambrogi; Corrado, Bucherelli

    2003-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the importance of the "general procedural" components, when for rats it was impossible to employ extramaze allothetic information to reach the goal in the Morris water maze (MWM). Groups of Long-Evans rats (males, 70 days old) were trained (10 trials per day, over five consecutive days) following seven paradigms. Four paradigms differed in context (extramaze cues available; extramaze cues not available) and in platform location (constantly at the center of one quadrant of the water maze; at random at the center of any one of the quadrants). In the fifth paradigm, there were no extramaze cues available, and the platform was located at random distances from the maze wall. In the sixth paradigm, rats underwent the standard MWM training (extramaze cues available, invisible platform constantly placed in the center of one quadrant) but they were administered with scopolamine before the daily trials. In a seventh paradigm, the platform was visible. In all paradigms, the starting point was randomized with respect to the goal. When platform distance from the wall was random, there was no significative better performance after the trials. In all the six paradigms in which platform location was at a constant distance from the wall the times spent before reaching the platform decreased progressively, to become constant on Days 4 and 5. The groups which could not employ the allothetic extramaze component (extramaze cues not available; changing of the quadrant of platform location; scopolamine administration) showed a progressively better performance even though their delays on the last 2 days were longer than those of the "standard MWM" and "visible platform" groups. The slightly less efficient performance is attributable to the rat's search strategy, a "subcircular" swimming pattern within the geometric limits of the central areas of the quadrants, where the platform was constantly placed. That no extramaze allothetic information was

  17. Cognitive Evaluation Using Morris Water Maze in Neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Deng-Bryant, Ying; Leung, Lai Yee; Caudle, Krista; Tortella, Frank; Shear, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The Morris water maze (MWM) task is one of the most widely used and versatile tools in behavioral neuroscience for evaluating spatial learning and memory. With regard to detecting cognitive deficits following central nervous system (CNS) injuries, MWM has been commonly utilized in various animal models of neurotrauma, such as fluid percussion injury (FPI), cortical controlled impact (CCI) injury, weight-drop impact injury, and penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). More importantly, it serves as a therapeutic index for assessing the efficacy of treatment interventions on cognitive performance following neurotrauma. Thus, it is critical to design an MWM testing paradigm that is sensitive yet discriminating for the purpose of evaluating potential therapeutic interventions. In this chapter, we discuss how multiple test manipulations, including the size of platform, numbers of trials per day, the frequency of retesting intervals, and the texture of platform surface, impact MWM's ability to detect cognitive deficits using a rat model of PBBI. PMID:27604737

  18. [Two-ring maze for research behaviour of animals].

    PubMed

    Filatova, E V; Orlov, A A; Afanas'ev, S V

    2014-01-01

    Animal behavior is studied using a two-ring maze in which the animal has to choose one of two paths, the same length and then self-returning to the starting compartment. All sections of the labyrinth: the starting chamber, signal space, arms and food compartment blocked by one-way doors. Time periods of passing different chambers reflect different aspects of behavior: level of motivation, attention, short-term and long-term memory, cognitive (make a decision) and emotion and etc. The analysis of these time parameters allows evaluate various behavioral components, depending on the impact on the animal. We suppose that this behavior model can be useful in various neurophysiology experiments.

  19. Changes in brain oxidative metabolism induced by water maze training.

    PubMed

    Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Vallejo, G; Arias, J L

    2007-03-16

    Although the hippocampus has been shown to be essential for spatial memory, the contribution of associated brain regions is not well established. Wistar rats were trained to find a hidden escape platform in the water maze during eight days. Following training, the oxidative metabolism in different brain regions was evaluated using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Metabolic activations were found in the prelimbic cortex, cornu ammonis (CA) 1 subfield of the dorsal hippocampus and the anterior thalamic nuclei, relative to yoked swim controls and naïve rats. In addition, many cross-correlations in brain metabolism were observed among the latter regions. These results support the implication of a hippocampal-prefrontal-thalamic system to spatial memory in rats. PMID:17222984

  20. Relationship between local brain glucose metabolism and maze patrolling in adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Jucker, M; Meier-Ruge, W; Bättig, K

    1989-10-01

    Rats in the tunnel maze are not rewarded or punished. The active information gathering of the rats in this apparatus is supposed to be guided by learning and memory processes. As assessed by the 2-deoxyglucose method the age-related behavioral changes in rats in this maze are partly reflected in functional-metabolic changes in cortical and hippocampal structures.

  1. Second Language Learning with the Story Maze Task: Examining the Training Effect of Weaving through Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkin, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The maze task is a psycholinguistic experimental procedure that measures real-time incremental sentence processing. The task has recently been tested as a language learning tool with promising results. Therefore, the present study examines the merits of a contextualized version of this task: the story maze. The findings are consistent with…

  2. Elevated zero maze: a paradigm to evaluate antianxiety effects of drugs.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, S K; Singh, K; Bishnoi, M

    2007-06-01

    Elevated zero maze is a modification of the elevated plus maze model of anxiety in rodents. The novel design comprises an elevated annular platform with two opposite, enclosed quadrants and two open quadrants, removing any ambiguity in the interpretation of the time spent in the central square of the traditional design and allowing uninterrupted exploration. In the present study, we validated elevated zero maze as a tool to study antianxiety activity, using various standard anxiolytics belonging to different pharmacological groups, such as benzodiazepines, barbiturates, alcohol etc., and compared the results with elevated plus maze. Bidirectional sensitivity of the model was also assessed using picrotoxin, pentylenetetrazol and flumazenil, the modulators of GABA(A) and benzodiazepine modulators. Animals were administered different standard antianxiety and anxiogenic drugs, and were allowed to explore the elevated zero maze (time spent in open arm, latency to enter in open arm, total number of entries in open arm and number of stretch attend postures [SAPs]) and elevated plus maze (time spent in open arm, latency to enter in open arm, total number of entries in open arm, first preference of the animal [open/closed] and number of stretchings). Selected drugs and doses were then assessed on the mirror chamber paradigm. Results of the present study indicated that elevated zero maze offered a better animal model to study antianxiety activity, when compared with elevated plus maze and mirror chamber.

  3. Disentangling the cognitive components supporting Austin Maze performance in left versus right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Julia; Thomas, Hannah J; Dzafic, Ilvana; Williams, Rebecca J; Reutens, David C; Spooner, Donna M

    2013-12-01

    Neuropsychological tests requiring patients to find a path through a maze can be used to assess visuospatial memory performance in temporal lobe pathology, particularly in the hippocampus. Alternatively, they have been used as a task sensitive to executive function in patients with frontal lobe damage. We measured performance on the Austin Maze in patients with unilateral left and right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), with and without hippocampal sclerosis, compared to healthy controls. Performance was correlated with a number of other neuropsychological tests to identify the cognitive components that may be associated with poor Austin Maze performance. Patients with right TLE were significantly impaired on the Austin Maze task relative to patients with left TLE and controls, and error scores correlated with their performance on the Block Design task. The performance of patients with left TLE was also impaired relative to controls; however, errors correlated with performance on tests of executive function and delayed recall. The presence of hippocampal sclerosis did not have an impact on maze performance. A discriminant function analysis indicated that the Austin Maze alone correctly classified 73.5% of patients as having right TLE. In summary, impaired performance on the Austin Maze task is more suggestive of right than left TLE; however, impaired performance on this visuospatial task does not necessarily involve the hippocampus. The relationship of the Austin Maze task with other neuropsychological tests suggests that differential cognitive components may underlie performance decrements in right versus left TLE.

  4. The Technical Properties of Science Content Maze Passages for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Evelyn S.; Semmelroth, Carrie; Allison, Jennifer; Fritsch, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The use of Curriculum-Based Measures is rapidly expanding to the middle school level, where maze passages are frequently used to monitor progress in reading. At secondary grade levels, the focus of reading is on reading to learn, especially in the content areas. Therefore, we were interested in developing maze passages based on grade-level science…

  5. The Impact of Context and Word Type on Students' Maze Task Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    January, Stacy-Ann A.; Ardoin, Scott P.

    2012-01-01

    Despite evidence that the maze is a reliable measure of reading comprehension, existing research suggests potential problems with the manner in which maze probes are developed. Specifically, research suggests students may be able to respond accurately to a large portion of target words without having to comprehend what they are reading. The…

  6. The Use of the Arabic CBM Maze among Three Levels of Achievers in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Hamour, Bashir

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the applicability of the Arabic version of the Curriculum Based Measurement Maze (CBM Maze) for Jordanian students. A sample of 150 students was recruited from two public primary schools in Jordan. The students were ranked into high, moderate, and low achievers in terms of their performance in the Arabic course. Then all of…

  7. An automated maze task for assessing hippocampus-sensitive memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Pioli, Elsa Y; Gaskill, Brianna N; Gilmour, Gary; Tricklebank, Mark D; Dix, Sophie L; Bannerman, David; Garner, Joseph P

    2014-03-15

    Memory deficits associated with hippocampal dysfunction are a key feature of a number of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. The discrete-trial rewarded alternation T-maze task is highly sensitive to hippocampal dysfunction. Normal mice have spontaneously high levels of alternation, whereas hippocampal-lesioned mice are dramatically impaired. However, this is a hand-run task and handling has been shown to impact crucially on behavioural responses, as well as being labour-intensive and therefore unsuitable for high-throughput studies. To overcome this, a fully automated maze was designed. The maze was attached to the mouse's home cage and the subject earned all of its food by running through the maze. In this study the hippocampal dependence of rewarded alternation in the automated maze was assessed. Bilateral hippocampal-lesioned mice were assessed in the standard, hand-run, discrete-trial rewarded alternation paradigm and in the automated paradigm, according to a cross-over design. A similarly robust lesion effect on alternation performance was found in both mazes, confirming the sensitivity of the automated maze to hippocampal lesions. Moreover, the performance of the animals in the automated maze was not affected by their handling history whereas performance in the hand-run maze was affected by prior testing history. By having more stable performance and by decreasing human contact the automated maze may offer opportunities to reduce extraneous experimental variation and therefore increase the reproducibility within and/or between laboratories. Furthermore, automation potentially allows for greater experimental throughput and hence suitability for use in assessment of cognitive function in drug discovery.

  8. An automated maze task for assessing hippocampus-sensitive memory in mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Pioli, Elsa Y.; Gaskill, Brianna N.; Gilmour, Gary; Tricklebank, Mark D.; Dix, Sophie L.; Bannerman, David; Garner, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Memory deficits associated with hippocampal dysfunction are a key feature of a number of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. The discrete-trial rewarded alternation T-maze task is highly sensitive to hippocampal dysfunction. Normal mice have spontaneously high levels of alternation, whereas hippocampal-lesioned mice are dramatically impaired. However, this is a hand-run task and handling has been shown to impact crucially on behavioural responses, as well as being labour-intensive and therefore unsuitable for high-throughput studies. To overcome this, a fully automated maze was designed. The maze was attached to the mouse's home cage and the subject earned all of its food by running through the maze. In this study the hippocampal dependence of rewarded alternation in the automated maze was assessed. Bilateral hippocampal-lesioned mice were assessed in the standard, hand-run, discrete-trial rewarded alternation paradigm and in the automated paradigm, according to a cross-over design. A similarly robust lesion effect on alternation performance was found in both mazes, confirming the sensitivity of the automated maze to hippocampal lesions. Moreover, the performance of the animals in the automated maze was not affected by their handling history whereas performance in the hand-run maze was affected by prior testing history. By having more stable performance and by decreasing human contact the automated maze may offer opportunities to reduce extraneous experimental variation and therefore increase the reproducibility within and/or between laboratories. Furthermore, automation potentially allows for greater experimental throughput and hence suitability for use in assessment of cognitive function in drug discovery. PMID:24333574

  9. Inference Based on Transitive Relation in Tree Shrews ("Tupaia belangeri") and Rats ("Rattus norvegicus") on a Spatial Discrimination Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Makoto; Ushitani, Tomokazu; Fujita, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Six tree shrews and 8 rats were tested for their ability to infer transitively in a spatial discrimination task. The apparatus was a semicircular radial-arm maze with 8 arms labeled A through H. In Experiment 1, the animals were first trained in sequence on 4 discriminations to enter 1 of the paired adjacent arms, AB, BC, CD, and DE, with right…

  10. Using the Morris water maze to assess spatial learning and memory in weanling mice.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Christopher D; Yang, Dongren; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models have been indispensable for elucidating normal and pathological processes that influence learning and memory. A widely used method for assessing these cognitive processes in mice is the Morris water maze, a classic test for examining spatial learning and memory. However, Morris water maze studies with mice have principally been performed using adult animals, which preclude studies of critical neurodevelopmental periods when the cellular and molecular substrates of learning and memory are formed. While weanling rats have been successfully trained in the Morris water maze, there have been few attempts to test weanling mice in this behavioral paradigm even though mice offer significant experimental advantages because of the availability of many genetically modified strains. Here, we present experimental evidence that weanling mice can be trained in the Morris water maze beginning on postnatal day 24. Maze-trained weanling mice exhibit significant improvements in spatial learning over the training period and results of the probe trial indicate the development of spatial memory. There were no sex differences in the animals' performance in these tasks. In addition, molecular biomarkers of synaptic plasticity are upregulated in maze-trained mice at the transcript level. These findings demonstrate that the Morris water maze can be used to assess spatial learning and memory in weanling mice, providing a potentially powerful experimental approach for examining the influence of genes, environmental factors and their interactions on the development of learning and memory.

  11. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  12. Radial Electromagnetic Press for Ignitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, A.; Capriccioli, A.; Gasparotto, M.; Palmieri, A.; Rita, C.; Roccella, M.; Coppi, B.

    1996-11-01

    The active vertical press included so far in the Ignitor design can be substituted advantageously (e.g. in terms of the machine maintenance procedure) by a radial electromagnetic press, without involving modification of the main machine components. Only the bracing ring of the radial mechanical preloading system that is permanently applied requires some changes. The radial press has to compensate for the reduced ring load (from 200 MN to 120 MN) and the original vertical press load of 35 MN. To get an equivalent preloading system, the radial press load has to be 140 MN, which is 25 MN higher, to account for the lower efficiency of the radial load. The current needed to originate the 140 MN force is about 3.2 MA. The press is active for 2 s starting from the plasma current rise. The temperature increase is about 20 ^oC. The stray field at the plasma border is well within the allowable value and can be easily compensated by varying slightly the current of one couple of poloidal coils. The new machine layout is illustrated and the electromagnetic and mechanical analyses carried out for the new configuration are given. Sponsored by ENEA, CNR and ASP, of Italy, and by the US DoE

  13. Maze learning by a hybrid brain-computer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaohui; Zheng, Nenggan; Zhang, Shaowu; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Gao, Liqiang; Su, Lijuan

    2016-09-01

    The combination of biological and artificial intelligence is particularly driven by two major strands of research: one involves the control of mechanical, usually prosthetic, devices by conscious biological subjects, whereas the other involves the control of animal behaviour by stimulating nervous systems electrically or optically. However, to our knowledge, no study has demonstrated that spatial learning in a computer-based system can affect the learning and decision making behaviour of the biological component, namely a rat, when these two types of intelligence are wired together to form a new intelligent entity. Here, we show how rule operations conducted by computing components contribute to a novel hybrid brain-computer system, i.e., ratbots, exhibit superior learning abilities in a maze learning task, even when their vision and whisker sensation were blocked. We anticipate that our study will encourage other researchers to investigate combinations of various rule operations and other artificial intelligence algorithms with the learning and memory processes of organic brains to develop more powerful cyborg intelligence systems. Our results potentially have profound implications for a variety of applications in intelligent systems and neural rehabilitation.

  14. Maze learning by a hybrid brain-computer system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaohui; Zheng, Nenggan; Zhang, Shaowu; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Gao, Liqiang; Su, Lijuan

    2016-09-13

    The combination of biological and artificial intelligence is particularly driven by two major strands of research: one involves the control of mechanical, usually prosthetic, devices by conscious biological subjects, whereas the other involves the control of animal behaviour by stimulating nervous systems electrically or optically. However, to our knowledge, no study has demonstrated that spatial learning in a computer-based system can affect the learning and decision making behaviour of the biological component, namely a rat, when these two types of intelligence are wired together to form a new intelligent entity. Here, we show how rule operations conducted by computing components contribute to a novel hybrid brain-computer system, i.e., ratbots, exhibit superior learning abilities in a maze learning task, even when their vision and whisker sensation were blocked. We anticipate that our study will encourage other researchers to investigate combinations of various rule operations and other artificial intelligence algorithms with the learning and memory processes of organic brains to develop more powerful cyborg intelligence systems. Our results potentially have profound implications for a variety of applications in intelligent systems and neural rehabilitation.

  15. Maze learning by a hybrid brain-computer system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaohui; Zheng, Nenggan; Zhang, Shaowu; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Gao, Liqiang; Su, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    The combination of biological and artificial intelligence is particularly driven by two major strands of research: one involves the control of mechanical, usually prosthetic, devices by conscious biological subjects, whereas the other involves the control of animal behaviour by stimulating nervous systems electrically or optically. However, to our knowledge, no study has demonstrated that spatial learning in a computer-based system can affect the learning and decision making behaviour of the biological component, namely a rat, when these two types of intelligence are wired together to form a new intelligent entity. Here, we show how rule operations conducted by computing components contribute to a novel hybrid brain-computer system, i.e., ratbots, exhibit superior learning abilities in a maze learning task, even when their vision and whisker sensation were blocked. We anticipate that our study will encourage other researchers to investigate combinations of various rule operations and other artificial intelligence algorithms with the learning and memory processes of organic brains to develop more powerful cyborg intelligence systems. Our results potentially have profound implications for a variety of applications in intelligent systems and neural rehabilitation. PMID:27619326

  16. Maze learning by a hybrid brain-computer system

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhaohui; Zheng, Nenggan; Zhang, Shaowu; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Gao, Liqiang; Su, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    The combination of biological and artificial intelligence is particularly driven by two major strands of research: one involves the control of mechanical, usually prosthetic, devices by conscious biological subjects, whereas the other involves the control of animal behaviour by stimulating nervous systems electrically or optically. However, to our knowledge, no study has demonstrated that spatial learning in a computer-based system can affect the learning and decision making behaviour of the biological component, namely a rat, when these two types of intelligence are wired together to form a new intelligent entity. Here, we show how rule operations conducted by computing components contribute to a novel hybrid brain-computer system, i.e., ratbots, exhibit superior learning abilities in a maze learning task, even when their vision and whisker sensation were blocked. We anticipate that our study will encourage other researchers to investigate combinations of various rule operations and other artificial intelligence algorithms with the learning and memory processes of organic brains to develop more powerful cyborg intelligence systems. Our results potentially have profound implications for a variety of applications in intelligent systems and neural rehabilitation. PMID:27619326

  17. Unicursal random maze tool path for computer-controlled optical surfacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunjin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Qiao

    2015-12-01

    A novel unicursal random maze tool path is proposed in this paper, which can not only implement uniform coverage of the polishing surfaces, but also possesses randomness and multidirectionality. The simulation experiments along with the practical polishing experiments are conducted to make the comparison of three kinds of paths, including maze path, raster path, and Hilbert path. The experimental results validate that the maze path can warrant uniform polishing and avoid the appearance of the periodical structures in the polished surface. It is also more effective than the Hilbert path in restraining the mid-spatial frequency error in computer-controlled optical surfacing process.

  18. Illustrated techniques for performing the Cox-Maze IV procedure through a right mini-thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jason O.; Saint, Lindsey L.; Leidenfrost, Jeremy E.

    2014-01-01

    The Cox-Maze IV procedure has replaced the “cut-and-sew” technique of the original Cox-Maze operation with lines of ablation created using bipolar radiofrequency (RF) and cryothermal energy devices. In select patients, this procedure can be performed through a right mini-thoracotomy. This illustrated review is the first to detail the complete steps of the Cox-Maze IV procedure performed through a right mini-thoracotomy with careful attention paid to operative anatomy and advice. Pre- and post-operative management and outcomes are also discussed. This should be a practical guide for the practicing cardiac surgeon. PMID:24516807

  19. Fractures of the Radial Head.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Klaus Josef; Wegmann, Kilian; Müller, Lars P; Gohlke, Frank E

    2015-11-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures around the elbow. Because they are often accompanied by ligamentous injuries, we recommend considering them to be osteoligamentous injuries rather than simple fractures, even in undisplaced or minimally displaced fractures. Surgeons should always suspect and actively exclude concomitant ligament tears. The incidence of these associated injuries increases with greater severity of the radial head fracture. However, the standard Mason classification system does not adequately address this problem, and all attempts to establish a new classification system that provides concise treatment algorithms have failed. This article discusses the current treatment options and the current controversies in nonsurgical therapy, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) and radial head replacement. PMID:26498543

  20. Slime mold solves maze in one pass, assisted by gradient of chemo-attractants.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    Plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is a large cell, visible by unaided eye, which exhibits sophisticated patterns of foraging behaviour. The plasmodium's behaviour is well interpreted in terms of computation, where data are spatially extended configurations of nutrients and obstacles, and results of computation are networks of protoplasmic tubes formed by the plasmodium. In laboratory experiments and numerical simulation we show that if plasmodium of P. polycephalum is inoculated in a maze's peripheral channel and an oat flake (source of attractants) in a the maze's central chamber then the plasmodium grows toward target oat flake and connects the flake with the site of original inoculation with a pronounced protoplasmic tube. The protoplasmic tube represents a path in the maze. The plasmodium solves maze in one pass because it is assisted by a gradient of chemo-attractants propagating from the target oat flake.

  1. Fast escape of a quantum walker from an integrated photonic maze.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Filippo; Crespi, Andrea; Ciriolo, Anna Gabriella; Sciarrino, Fabio; Osellame, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Escaping from a complex maze, by exploring different paths with several decision-making branches in order to reach the exit, has always been a very challenging and fascinating task. Wave field and quantum objects may explore a complex structure in parallel by interference effects, but without necessarily leading to more efficient transport. Here, inspired by recent observations in biological energy transport phenomena, we demonstrate how a quantum walker can efficiently reach the output of a maze by partially suppressing the presence of interference. In particular, we show theoretically an unprecedented improvement in transport efficiency for increasing maze size with respect to purely quantum and classical approaches. In addition, we investigate experimentally these hybrid transport phenomena, by mapping the maze problem in an integrated waveguide array, probed by coherent light, hence successfully testing our theoretical results. These achievements may lead towards future bio-inspired photonics technologies for more efficient transport and computation.

  2. Analyzing the path of responding in maze-solving and other tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Response time and accuracy are sensitive measures of overall performance but may mask underlying response strategies. For example, analysis of latency and accuracy measures produced in a computerized-maze task does not reveal whether rhesus monkeys really 'solve a maze' or simply move as much as is possible toward the target, negotiating barriers through trial and error as they encounter them. Regression procedures are described for analyzing response path against several hypothetical response curves, and analyses of response path for rhesus monkeys' performance on the computerized MAZE task are presented as an illustration. The data suggest that rhesus monkeys do invoke a response strategy of solving the maze, because the observed response topography is significantly associated with the optimal path of responding. Many experimental paradigms should similarly benefit from analysis of the response paths that subjects exhibit.

  3. Fast escape of a quantum walker from an integrated photonic maze

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Filippo; Crespi, Andrea; Ciriolo, Anna Gabriella; Sciarrino, Fabio; Osellame, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from a complex maze, by exploring different paths with several decision-making branches in order to reach the exit, has always been a very challenging and fascinating task. Wave field and quantum objects may explore a complex structure in parallel by interference effects, but without necessarily leading to more efficient transport. Here, inspired by recent observations in biological energy transport phenomena, we demonstrate how a quantum walker can efficiently reach the output of a maze by partially suppressing the presence of interference. In particular, we show theoretically an unprecedented improvement in transport efficiency for increasing maze size with respect to purely quantum and classical approaches. In addition, we investigate experimentally these hybrid transport phenomena, by mapping the maze problem in an integrated waveguide array, probed by coherent light, hence successfully testing our theoretical results. These achievements may lead towards future bio-inspired photonics technologies for more efficient transport and computation. PMID:27248707

  4. Fast escape of a quantum walker from an integrated photonic maze.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Filippo; Crespi, Andrea; Ciriolo, Anna Gabriella; Sciarrino, Fabio; Osellame, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from a complex maze, by exploring different paths with several decision-making branches in order to reach the exit, has always been a very challenging and fascinating task. Wave field and quantum objects may explore a complex structure in parallel by interference effects, but without necessarily leading to more efficient transport. Here, inspired by recent observations in biological energy transport phenomena, we demonstrate how a quantum walker can efficiently reach the output of a maze by partially suppressing the presence of interference. In particular, we show theoretically an unprecedented improvement in transport efficiency for increasing maze size with respect to purely quantum and classical approaches. In addition, we investigate experimentally these hybrid transport phenomena, by mapping the maze problem in an integrated waveguide array, probed by coherent light, hence successfully testing our theoretical results. These achievements may lead towards future bio-inspired photonics technologies for more efficient transport and computation. PMID:27248707

  5. Parachute drag and radial force

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a combination of old and new wind tunnel data in a format which illustrates the effects of inflated diameter, geometric porosity, reefing line length, suspension line length, number of gores, and number of ribbons on parachute drag. A new definition of radial force coefficient is presented, as well as a universal drag curve for flat circular and conical parachutes.

  6. THE COX-MAZE IV PROCEDURE: PREDICTORS OF LATE RECURRENCE

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Ralph J.; Schwartz, Forrest H.; Bailey, Marci S.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Munfakh, Nabil A.; Moon, Marc R.; Schuessler, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The Cox-Maze III procedure(CMP) achieved high cure rates and became the surgical gold standard for the treatment of atrial fibrillation(AF). Due to its invasiveness, a more simplified ablation-assisted procedure(CMP-IV) has been performed at our institution since January, 2002. The study examined multiple preoperative and perioperative variables to determine predictors of late recurrence. Methods Data were collected prospectively on 282 patients who underwent the CMP-IV from January 2002 through December 2009. Forty-two percent of patients had paroxysmal and 58% had either persistent or long-standing persistent AF. All patients were available for follow-up. Follow-up included ECGs in all patients. Since 2006, 24 hour holter monitoring was obtained in 94% of patients at 3, 6 and 12 months. Data were analyzed by logistic regression analysis at 12 months with 13 preoperative and perioperative variables used as co-variants. Results Sixty-six percent of patients had a concomitant procedure. Following an ablation-assisted CMP, the freedom from AF was 89%, 93%, and 89% at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The freedom from both AF and antiarrhythmic drugs was 63%, 79%, and 78% at 3, 6, and 12 months. The risk factors for AF recurrence at one year were enlarged left atrial(LA) diameter(p=0.027), failure to isolate the entire posterior left atrium(p=0.022), and early atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATAs)(p=0.010). Conclusions The CMP-IV has a high success rate at one year, even with improved follow-up and stricter definitions of failure. In patients with large LA, there may be a need for more extensive size reduction or expanded lesion sets. PMID:21168019

  7. Inflorescence development in petunia: through the maze of botanical terminology.

    PubMed

    Castel, Rob; Kusters, Elske; Koes, Ronald

    2010-05-01

    Flowering plants have developed many ways to arrange their flowers. A flower-bearing branch or system of branches is called an inflorescence. The number of flowers that an inflorescence contains ranges from a single flower to endless flower-clusters. Over the past centuries, botanists have classified inflorescences based on their morphology, which has led to an unfortunate maze of complex botanical terminology. With the rise of molecular developmental biology, research has become increasingly focused on how inflorescences develop, rather than on their morphology. It is the decisions taken by groups of stem cells at the growing tips of shoots, called meristems, on when and where to produce a flower or a shoot that specify the course of inflorescence development. Modelling is a helpful aid to follow the consequences of these decisions for inflorescence development. The so-called transient model can produce the broad inflorescence types: cyme, raceme, and panicle, into which most inflorescences found in nature can be classified. The analysis of several inflorescence branching mutants has led to a solid understanding of cymose inflorescence development in petunia (Petunia hybrida). The cyme of petunia is a distinct body plan compared with the well-studied racemes of Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, which provides an excellent opportunity to study evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) related questions. However, thus far, limited use has been made of this opportunity, which may, at least in part, be due to researchers getting lost in the terminology. Some general issues are discussed here, while focusing on inflorescence development in petunia.

  8. Outcomes Following Radial Head Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John R; Henry, Sarah E; Xu, Peter; Goitz, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    Most current series of radial head arthroplasty include small numbers of patients with short- to medium-term follow-up and significant heterogeneity in patients, treatments, and outcome measures. The purpose of this systematic review was to review outcomes for radial head arthroplasty based on injury chronicity, injury pattern, and type of implant used. The authors systematically searched electronic databases for studies containing radial head arthroplasty or radial head replacement and identified 19 studies for inclusion in the analysis. For each included study, a composite mean was obtained for Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) and range of motion. Outcomes were said to differ significantly if their confidence intervals did not overlap. The MEPS for acute treatment (90) was higher than that for delayed treatment (81). There was no difference in the pooled MEPS between the isolated (89) and complex injury pattern (87) groups or implant material. There was no difference in range of motion between the acute and delayed or isolated and complex groups, but the average degree of pronation was higher in patients treated with titanium implants (76°) compared with cobalt chromium implants (66°). This systematic review suggests that outcomes are improved following acute arthroplasty for treatment of radial head fractures compared with delayed treatment, based on MEPS. The lack of other significant differences detected is likely due to the significant heterogeneity and inadequate power in current studies. Further prospective studies isolating the different variables will be needed to determine their true effect on outcomes. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):153-160.]. PMID:27045484

  9. Escherichia coli antitoxin MazE as transcription factor: insights into MazE-DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Zorzini, Valentina; Buts, Lieven; Schrank, Evelyne; Sterckx, Yann G.J.; Respondek, Michal; Engelberg-Kulka, Hanna; Loris, Remy; Zangger, Klaus; van Nuland, Nico A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are pairs of genes essential for bacterial regulation upon environmental stresses. The mazEF module encodes the MazF toxin and its cognate MazE antitoxin. The highly dynamic MazE possesses an N-terminal DNA binding domain through which it can negatively regulate its own promoter. Despite being one of the first TA systems studied, transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli mazEF remains poorly understood. This paper presents the solution structure of C-terminal truncated E. coli MazE and a MazE-DNA model with a DNA palindrome sequence ∼10 bp upstream of the mazEF promoter. The work has led to a transcription regulator-DNA model, which has remained elusive thus far in the E. coli toxin–antitoxin family. Multiple complementary techniques including NMR, SAXS and ITC show that the long intrinsically disordered C-termini in MazE, required for MazF neutralization, does not affect the interactions between the antitoxin and its operator. Rather, the MazE C-terminus plays an important role in the MazF binding, which was found to increase the MazE affinity for the palindromic single site operator. PMID:25564525

  10. Strategic navigation of two-dimensional alley mazes: comparing capuchin monkeys and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Fragaszy, D; Johnson-Pynn, J; Hirsh, E; Brakke, K

    2003-09-01

    Planning is an important component of cognition that contributes, for example, to efficient movement through space. In the current study we presented novel two-dimensional alley mazes to four chimpanzees and three capuchin monkeys to identify the nature and efficiency of planning in relation to varying task parameters. All the subjects solved more mazes without error than expected by chance, providing compelling evidence that both species planned their choices in some manner. The probability of making a correct choice on mazes designed to be more demanding and presented later in the testing series was higher than on earlier, simpler mazes (chimpanzees), or unchanged (capuchin monkeys), suggesting microdevelopment of strategic choice. Structural properties of the mazes affected both species' choices. Capuchin monkeys were less likely than chimpanzees to take a correct path that initially led away from the goal but that eventually led to the goal. Chimpanzees were more likely to make an error by passing a correct path than by turning onto a wrong path. Chimpanzees and one capuchin made more errors on choices farther in sequence from the goal. Each species corrected errors before running into the end of an alley in approximately 40% of cases. Together, these findings suggest nascent planning abilities in each species, and the prospect for significant development of strategic planning capabilities on tasks presenting multiple simultaneous or sequential spatial relations. The computerized maze paradigm appears well suited to investigate movement planning and spatial perception in human and nonhuman primates alike.

  11. Effects of psychoactive drugs or stress on learning, memory, and performance as assessed using a novel water maze task.

    PubMed

    Kant, G J

    1993-02-01

    A novel water maze was used to assess the potential performance-disrupting effects of psychoactive drugs and stressors (4 mg/kg amphetamine sulfate; 1, 2, or 4 mg/kg diazepam; 30 mg/kg caffeine; 5 or 30 mg/kg atropine sulfate; 15 min of either intermittent foot-shock, forced running, or immobilization). The task utilized a traditional type of maze with walls and doorways set inside a pool. The apparatus could easily be reconfigured to present different mazes of approximately equal difficulty by opening or closing multiple doorways. Performance was measured by number of errors and time required to swim from the "start" to "finish" (a raised platform not in the rat's line of sight). After initial maze training, rats were divided into two groups. One group ran three daily trails through the same maze each day; this group was used to assess memory. The second group was challenged to swim three consecutive trials in a new maze configuration each day as a measure of learning. On any given day, rats from both groups received the same treatment. Drug or stress treatments were interspersed with vehicle or no-treatment trials days. The new maze task was more sensitive than the well-learned maze to the performance disrupting effects of amphetamine, caffeine, and diazepam, while atropine had no significant effect on performance on either maze. Foot-shock stress impaired performance on both mazes, while the other stressors had no significant effect.

  12. Radial coordinates for conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogervorst, Matthijs; Rychkov, Slava

    2013-05-01

    We develop the theory of conformal blocks in CFTd expressing them as power series with Gegenbauer polynomial coefficients. Such series have a clear physical meaning when the conformal block is analyzed in radial quantization: individual terms describe contributions of descendants of a given spin. Convergence of these series can be optimized by a judicious choice of the radial quantization origin. We argue that the best choice is to insert the operators symmetrically. We analyze in detail the resulting “ρ-series” and show that it converges much more rapidly than for the commonly used variable z. We discuss how these conformal block representations can be used in the conformal bootstrap. In particular, we use them to derive analytically some bootstrap bounds whose existence was previously found numerically.

  13. RADIAL STABILITY IN STRATIFIED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Rueda, Jorge A. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2015-03-01

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting any two phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case.

  14. Velocidades radiales en Collinder 121

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se han llevado a cabo observaciones espectroscópicas de unas treinta estrellas que son posibles miembros del cúmulo abierto Collinder 121. Las mismas fueron realizadas con el telescopio de 2.15m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). El análisis de las velocidades radiales derivadas del material obtenido, confirma la realidad de Collinder 121, al menos desde el punto de vista cinemático. La velocidad radial baricentral (LSR) del cúmulo es de +17 ± 3 km.s-1. Esta velocidad coincide, dentro de los errores, con la velocidad radial (LSR) de la nebulosa anillo S308, la cual es de ~20 ± 10 km.s-1. Como S308 se encuentra físicamente asociada a la estrella Wolf-Rayet HD~50896, es muy probable que esta última sea un miembro de Collinder 121. Desde un punto de vista cinemático, la supergigante roja HD~50877 (K3Iab) también pertenecería a Collinder 121. Basándonos en la pertenencia de HD~50896 a Collinder 121, y en la interacción encontrada entre el viento de esta estrella y el medio interestelar circundante a la misma, se estima para este cúmulo una distancia del orden de 1 kpc.

  15. Pulmonary Vein Isolation and Cox-Maze Procedure Only Partially Denervate the Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Shelly C.; Foyil, Kelley V.; Sakamoto, Shun-Ichiro; Voeller, Rochus K.; Boineau, John P.; Damiano, Ralph J.; Schuessler, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The effects of ablation lines on myocardial innervation and response to autonomic stimuli are unclear. This study examined the effects of radiofrequency ablation on atrial autonomic innervation comparing pulmonary vein isolation and the biatrial Cox-Maze. METHODS In twelve acute canines, right and left vagosympathetic trunks and right and left stellate ganglia were isolated. Each nerve was stimulated prior to bipolar ablations, after pulmonary vein isolation, and after Cox-Maze. Nadolol (n=6) and atropine (n=6) were given to block sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, respectively. Changes in heart rate and atrioventricular interval were compared. Changes in QRST area relative to an isoelectric baseline (index of local innervation) were calculated. RESULTS Sympathetic stimulation of each nerve and parasympathetic stimulation of the vagosympathetic trunks caused significant changes in heart rate and atrioventricular interval. After pulmonary vein isolation, the effect of 33% of the nerves on heart rate changes were eliminated. The Cox-Maze procedure eliminated right stellate sympathetic effects on heart rate. Fifty percent of the nerves caused heart rate changes after the Cox-Maze. There was no significant effect of either lesion set on atrioventricular interval changes. Stimulation of 50% of nerves after pulmonary vein isolation produced local area changes significantly different from control. After Cox-Maze, a different 50% of nerves produced local changes different from pulmonary vein isolation. CONCLUSIONS Surgical ablation procedures disrupted innervation affecting heart rate, but not atrioventricular interval. Autonomic innervation affecting the atria was changed by pulmonary vein isolation and additionally by Cox-Maze. Residual autonomic effects were present even after the complete Cox-Maze. PMID:18374777

  16. Evaluation of Early and Intermediate Outcomes of Cryo-MazeProcedure for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoubi, Alireza; Rostamzadeh, Mohsen; Pezeshkian, Masoud; Parvizi, Rezayat; Imani, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in patients with mitral valve disease affecting 50% of patients undergoing mitral valve surgery, contributing to increased risks of systemic embolization, anticoagulant- related hemorrhage and mortality. The maze procedure is an effective way to treat AF. Over the last several years, cryoablation was substituted for atrial incision in many reports to simplify the maze procedure. However, few studies have been carried out to evaluate the results of cryoablation surgery. In the present study we evaluated the results of this procedure. Methods: In this cross sectional study, 47 AF patients were treated with Cryo-Maze surgery method. Rhythm assessment using electrocardiographic and echocardiographic survey was performed in all patients before surgery, during the patients’ hospital stay, on discharge and after six months. Results: Survival rate of the studied patients at six months was 93.6%. Sinus rhythm restoration rate in Cryo-Maze patients was 72.1% on discharge and 76.7% six months after their operation. Conclusion: The present study revealed that Cryo-Maze procedure is an effective and safe therapeutic modality in AF while normal sinus rhythm can be achieved in patients following this intervention. PMID:24251012

  17. Investigation of radiation streaming and maze design for the Taiwan Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Liu, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    This study investigates the radiation streaming through the personnel access maze designed for the Taiwan Photon Source, with special interest in the characteristics of radiation fields along the labyrinth and the comparison of different estimation methods. The effect of maze orientation with respect to the beam direction has also been examined in detail. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the radiation production and transport for a beam loss occurring near a typical three-legged maze. In addition, we have also tested three factorized approximation formulae for the neutron and gamma-ray attenuation in our maze design. It was found that Cossairt's expression fits better and can predict satisfactory results for the neutron attenuation along the maze. We accordingly proposed a set of fitting parameters used with Cossairt's formulae for estimating the gamma-ray attenuation in labyrinths for high-energy electron accelerators. The information presented here will be valuable for our further design revisions and may be useful to those performing similar studies. PMID:20220363

  18. Effects of neocortical ectopias and environmental enrichment on Hebb-Williams maze learning in BXSB mice.

    PubMed

    Hoplight, B J; Sherman, G F; Hyde, L A; Denenberg, V H

    2001-07-01

    Approximately 40-60% of BXSB mice have neocortical ectopias, a developmental anomaly characterized by migration of neurons into the neuron-sparse layer I of cortex. Previous studies have shown that ectopic BXSB mice have superior reference, but inferior working, memory on spatial tasks. Female BXSB mice were housed either in an enriched environment or in standard cages at weaning. Subsequently, these animals were tested on four of the Hebb-Williams mazes in a water-based version of this maze. Theoretically, two of the maze configurations placed greater emphasis on reference memory to find the goal, whereas the other two favored working memory. Ectopics reared in standard housing conditions were better than nonectopics on mazes that favored the use of reference memory, but poorer on mazes that favored working memory. In contrast, subjects raised in the enriched environment showed no ectopia differences. A comparison of enriched and standard housing conditions found that the enriched animals had better reference memory but poorer working memory. The latter effect may be because the enriched environment, although more stimulating, did not change in time or space; and other researchers have shown that daily replacement of stimuli in complex environments is correlated with better working memory.

  19. Acute stress switches spatial navigation strategy from egocentric to allocentric in a virtual Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    van Gerven, Dustin J H; Ferguson, Thomas; Skelton, Ronald W

    2016-07-01

    Stress and stress hormones are known to influence the function of the hippocampus, a brain structure critical for cognitive-map-based, allocentric spatial navigation. The caudate nucleus, a brain structure critical for stimulus-response-based, egocentric navigation, is not as sensitive to stress. Evidence for this comes from rodent studies, which show that acute stress or stress hormones impair allocentric, but not egocentric navigation. However, there have been few studies investigating the effect of acute stress on human spatial navigation, and the results of these have been equivocal. To date, no study has investigated whether acute stress can shift human navigational strategy selection between allocentric and egocentric navigation. The present study investigated this question by exposing participants to an acute psychological stressor (the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task, PASAT), before testing navigational strategy selection in the Dual-Strategy Maze, a modified virtual Morris water maze. In the Dual-Strategy maze, participants can chose to navigate using a constellation of extra-maze cues (allocentrically) or using a single cue proximal to the goal platform (egocentrically). Surprisingly, PASAT stress biased participants to solve the maze allocentrically significantly more, rather than less, often. These findings have implications for understanding the effects of acute stress on cognitive function in general, and the function of the hippocampus in particular.

  20. Acute stress switches spatial navigation strategy from egocentric to allocentric in a virtual Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    van Gerven, Dustin J H; Ferguson, Thomas; Skelton, Ronald W

    2016-07-01

    Stress and stress hormones are known to influence the function of the hippocampus, a brain structure critical for cognitive-map-based, allocentric spatial navigation. The caudate nucleus, a brain structure critical for stimulus-response-based, egocentric navigation, is not as sensitive to stress. Evidence for this comes from rodent studies, which show that acute stress or stress hormones impair allocentric, but not egocentric navigation. However, there have been few studies investigating the effect of acute stress on human spatial navigation, and the results of these have been equivocal. To date, no study has investigated whether acute stress can shift human navigational strategy selection between allocentric and egocentric navigation. The present study investigated this question by exposing participants to an acute psychological stressor (the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task, PASAT), before testing navigational strategy selection in the Dual-Strategy Maze, a modified virtual Morris water maze. In the Dual-Strategy maze, participants can chose to navigate using a constellation of extra-maze cues (allocentrically) or using a single cue proximal to the goal platform (egocentrically). Surprisingly, PASAT stress biased participants to solve the maze allocentrically significantly more, rather than less, often. These findings have implications for understanding the effects of acute stress on cognitive function in general, and the function of the hippocampus in particular. PMID:27174311

  1. Investigation of radiation streaming and maze design for the Taiwan Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Liu, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    This study investigates the radiation streaming through the personnel access maze designed for the Taiwan Photon Source, with special interest in the characteristics of radiation fields along the labyrinth and the comparison of different estimation methods. The effect of maze orientation with respect to the beam direction has also been examined in detail. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the radiation production and transport for a beam loss occurring near a typical three-legged maze. In addition, we have also tested three factorized approximation formulae for the neutron and gamma-ray attenuation in our maze design. It was found that Cossairt's expression fits better and can predict satisfactory results for the neutron attenuation along the maze. We accordingly proposed a set of fitting parameters used with Cossairt's formulae for estimating the gamma-ray attenuation in labyrinths for high-energy electron accelerators. The information presented here will be valuable for our further design revisions and may be useful to those performing similar studies.

  2. The elevated T-maze as a measure of two types of defensive reactions: a factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Torrejais, José Carlos Miranda; Rosa, Camila Castilho Machado; Boerngen-Lacerda, Roseli; Andreatini, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    Using factor analysis, we investigated whether the defensive reactions seen in the elevated T-maze measure different behaviours. Rats were submitted to the elevated T-maze followed by the open-field test. Avoidance 1 and 2 loaded on the same factor, while escape 2 and 3 loaded on a second factor. Baseline avoidance did not load together with locomotor activity in the open-field. These results indicate that the elevated T-maze generates two different defensive behaviours.

  3. Anxiogenic profile of AM-251, a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, in plus-maze-naïve and plus-maze-experienced mice.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Evans, P M; Murphy, A

    2005-09-01

    The notoriously inconsistent effects of cannabinoids on anxiety-like behaviour may be explained by recent research on CB1 receptor knockout (CB1-KO) mice suggesting that cannabinoids exert bidirectional effects via the CB1 receptor (anxiolysis) and a novel rimonabant-sensitive neuronal cannabinoid receptor (anxiogenesis). This hypothesis is supported by the anxiogenic-like profile of AM-251, an analogue of rimonabant that is a potent and selective CB1 receptor antagonist but which, unlike rimonabant, has no activity at the novel receptor. As we have previously shown that rimonabant reduces anxiety-like behaviour in test-experienced animals only, the current study assessed the effects of AM-251 (1.5-3.0 mg/kg) in male Swiss-Webster mice that were either plus-maze-naïve or had been exposed undrugged to the apparatus 24 h prior to testing. Results confirmed that prior maze experience per se significantly increases behavioural indices of anxiety without altering measures of general activity. In maze-naïve mice, the lower dose of AM-251 (1.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced % open-arm time and increased grooming while the higher dose (3.0 mg/kg) additionally reduced open-arm entries and total head-dipping, and increased closed-arm returns. These anxiogenic-like effects were observed in the absence of significant changes in general activity levels. Although AM-251 had a very similar profile in maze-experienced animals, significant drug effects on open-arm avoidance measures were precluded by experientially-induced changes in behavioural baselines (i.e. 'ceiling' effects). Nevertheless, AM-251 again significantly reduced total head-dipping and increased grooming (3.0 mg/kg) and, unlike effects in naïve animals, both doses markedly reduced time spent on the centre platform and increased time spent in the enclosed arms. Against a baseline of almost total open-arm avoidance, the pattern of behavioural change in maze-experienced mice would also be consistent with an anxiogenic

  4. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2011-07-10

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  5. Working together may be better: activation of reward centers during a cooperative maze task.

    PubMed

    Krill, Austen L; Platek, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    Humans use theory of mind when predicting the thoughts and feelings and actions of others. There is accumulating evidence that cooperation with a computerized game correlates with a unique pattern of brain activation. To investigate the neural correlates of cooperation in real-time we conducted an fMRI hyperscanning study. We hypothesized that real-time cooperation to complete a maze task, using a blind-driving paradigm, would activate substrates implicated in theory of mind. We also hypothesized that cooperation would activate neural reward centers more than when participants completed the maze themselves. Of interest and in support of our hypothesis we found left caudate and putamen activation when participants worked together to complete the maze. This suggests that cooperation during task completion is inherently rewarding. This finding represents one of the first discoveries of a proximate neural mechanism for group based interactions in real-time, which indirectly supports the social brain hypothesis.

  6. Anxiety in the elevated zero-maze is augmented in mice after repeated daily exposure.

    PubMed

    Cook, Melloni N; Crounse, Martha; Flaherty, Lorraine

    2002-03-01

    We recently tested three inbred mouse strains (C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, C3H/HeJ) and two F1 hybrids (B6C3F1/J, C3D2F1/J) in an elevated zero-maze for 3 consecutive days. As measured by the latency to enter an open quadrant and percentage of time spent in the open, anxiety increased over the three trials. Furthermore, we observed that some strains used visual cues to avoid the open arms of the zero-maze on the initial exposure, while other strains may have used other sensory cues. These results suggest that strains differentially use or retain information, gathered from the initial exposure, to avoid the open quadrants on subsequent exposure to the maze. Moreover, this repeated trial test may more accurately reflect anxiety in strains that are visually impaired.

  7. Model testing of a 1-kg high-explosive-cell maze

    SciTech Connect

    Bacigalupi, C.M.; Burton, W.A.

    1981-04-01

    The basement of the proposed High Explosives Applications Facility (Building 353) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory includes several explosive test cells for the assembly and/or storage of up to 10 kg of high explosive (HE). This document reports 1/8-scale and 1/4-scale model tests conducted to confirm maze design criteria, to determine the cell explosive weight limit based on an allowable 10 psi reflected shock pressure at the hallway-maze doorway, and to specify permissible areas for handling HE within the cell. The integrity of cube-root scaling of the explosive charges detonated in the 1/8-scale model was verified by explosive testing in a comparable 1/4-scale model. Reflected shock pressures in the hallway adjacent to the maze and the effect of HE charge orientation were investigated and are also reported.

  8. Sulpiride infused into the nucleus accumbens posttraining impairs memory of spatial water maze training.

    PubMed

    Setlow, B; McGaugh, J L

    1998-06-01

    A variety of nucleus accumbens (NA) manipulations induce deficits in spatial learning and memory tasks. It is not known, however, if these deficits reflect influences on memory or on other processes affecting performance. The experiments in this article were undertaken to examine the involvement of the NA in memory consolidation in a spatial task. Rats were given 1 training session in a spatial water maze immediately followed by intra-NA infusions of sulpiride or saline vehicle. A probe test 2 days later revealed an impairing effect of sulpiride on several retention measures. Sulpiride infused into the NA either 2 hr posttraining in the spatial task or immediately posttraining in a cued water maze task did not affect retention performance. These findings suggest that the impairing effects of immediate posttraining sulpiride in the spatial task are due to interference with spatial water maze-specific consolidation processes involving the NA.

  9. The Double-H Maze: A Robust Behavioral Test for Learning and Memory in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Kirch, Robert D; Pinnell, Richard C; Hofmann, Ulrich G; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2015-07-08

    Spatial cognition research in rodents typically employs the use of maze tasks, whose attributes vary from one maze to the next. These tasks vary by their behavioral flexibility and required memory duration, the number of goals and pathways, and also the overall task complexity. A confounding feature in many of these tasks is the lack of control over the strategy employed by the rodents to reach the goal, e.g., allocentric (declarative-like) or egocentric (procedural) based strategies. The double-H maze is a novel water-escape memory task that addresses this issue, by allowing the experimenter to direct the type of strategy learned during the training period. The double-H maze is a transparent device, which consists of a central alleyway with three arms protruding on both sides, along with an escape platform submerged at the extremity of one of these arms. Rats can be trained using an allocentric strategy by alternating the start position in the maze in an unpredictable manner (see protocol 1; §4.7), thus requiring them to learn the location of the platform based on the available allothetic cues. Alternatively, an egocentric learning strategy (protocol 2; §4.8) can be employed by releasing the rats from the same position during each trial, until they learn the procedural pattern required to reach the goal. This task has been proven to allow for the formation of stable memory traces. Memory can be probed following the training period in a misleading probe trial, in which the starting position for the rats alternates. Following an egocentric learning paradigm, rats typically resort to an allocentric-based strategy, but only when their initial view on the extra-maze cues differs markedly from their original position. This task is ideally suited to explore the effects of drugs/perturbations on allocentric/egocentric memory performance, as well as the interactions between these two memory systems.

  10. Orexin-1 receptor antagonism fails to reduce anxiety-like behaviour in either plus-maze-naïve or plus-maze-experienced mice.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Wright, F L; Snow, N F; Taylor, L J

    2013-04-15

    Although several lines of evidence have recently implicated orexins and their receptors in fear and anxiety, there is also a growing number of apparently inconsistent and/or negative findings. In the present study, we have used ethological methods to comprehensively profile the behavioural effects of the orexin-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 (3-30 mg/kg) in mice exposed to the elevated plus-maze. Two experiments were performed, the first involving test-naïve animals and the second using prior undrugged experience of the maze to induce a qualitatively different emotional response to that seen on first exposure. In Experiment 1, a reference benzodiazepine (chlordiazepoxide, CDP, 15 mg/kg) produced a robust anxioselective profile comprising substantial increases in open arm exploration and reduced risk assessment without any signiifcant change in general activity levels. In contrast, SB-334867 failed to produce any behavioural effects over the dose range tested. In Experiment 2, 5 min undrugged experience of the maze 24h prior to testing increased open arm avoidance and abolished the anxiolytic efficacy of CDP. Despite this altered baseline, SB-334867 again failed to alter plus-maze behaviour. These findings agree with several recent reports that orexin receptor antagonists, such as SB-334867 and almorexant, do not alter basal anxiety levels in rats but markedly contrast with the anxiolytic-like effects of the same agents when anxiety levels have been exacerbated by fear conditioning, drug challenge or hypercapnia. This unique pattern of activity suggests that orexin receptor antagonists may have therapeutic value in those clinical anxiety disorders characterised by intense emotional arousal.

  11. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  12. Radial superlattices and single nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Ch.; Jin-Phillipp, N.-Y.; Loa, I.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the wall structure and thermal stability of individual freestanding rolled-up nanotubes (RUNTs) using micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Our studies reveal that the walls of the InAs/GaAs RUNTs consist of a radial superlattice comprising alternating crystalline and noncrystalline layers. Furthermore, we locally heated individual RUNTs with a laser beam, and Raman spectroscopy was used in situ to monitor any structural changes. At about 300 °C the heated part of a RUNT starts to oxidize and eventually transforms into crystalline β-Ga2O3. This result shows that RUNTs can serve as nanoreactors that locally synthesize material at intentional places on a substrate surface.

  13. Variance in Broad Reading Accounted for by Measures of Reading Speed Embedded within Maze and Comprehension Rate Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Andrea D.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Wilhoit, Brian; Ciancio, Dennis; Morrow, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Maze and reading comprehension rate measures are calculated by using measures of reading speed and measures of accuracy (i.e., correctly selected words or answers). In sixth- and seventh-grade samples, we found that the measures of reading speed embedded within our Maze measures accounted for 50% and 39% of broad reading score (BRS) variance,…

  14. The Utility of Maze Accurate Response Rate in Assessing Reading Comprehension in Upper Elementary and Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCane-Bowling, Sara J.; Strait, Andrea D.; Guess, Pamela E.; Wiedo, Jennifer R.; Muncie, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the predictive utility of five formative reading measures: words correct per minute, number of comprehension questions correct, reading comprehension rate, number of maze correct responses, and maze accurate response rate (MARR). Broad Reading cluster scores obtained via the Woodcock-Johnson III (WJ III) Tests of Achievement…

  15. Reading Assessment Methods for Middle-School Students: An Investigation of Reading Comprehension Rate and Maze Accurate Response Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Andrea D.; Henning, Jaime B.; Hawkins, Renee O.; Sheeley, Wesley; Shoemaker, Larissa; Reynolds, Jennifer R.; Moch, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the validity of four different aloud reading comprehension assessment measures: Maze, comprehension questions, Maze accurate response rate (MARR), and reading comprehension rate (RCR). The criterion measures used in this study were the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ-III ACH) Broad Reading…

  16. Just add water: cannabinoid discrimination in a water T-maze with FAAH(-/-) and FAAH(+/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Lefever, Timothy W; Pulley, Nikita S; Marusich, Julie A; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2016-08-01

    Incomplete overlap in the discriminative stimulus effects of Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol has been reported in food-reinforced tasks. The aim of this study was to examine cannabinoid discriminative stimulus effects in a nonappetitive procedure. Adult male mice lacking the gene for AEA's major metabolic enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and FAAH mice were trained to discriminate THC or AEA in a water T-maze, in which the response was swimming to an escape platform on the injection-appropriate side. JZL184, a monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, was also tested. FAAH mice showed faster acquisition than FAAH mice. THC and AEA fully substituted, with only minor cross-procedure potency variations. Incomplete substitution of JZL184 was observed in THC-trained FAAH mice in the water-maze task, as contrasted with full substitution in a food-reinforced nose-poke procedure. Stress-induced changes in AEA and/or 2-arachidonoylglycerol concentrations in the brain may have mediated this attenuation. JZL184 also partially substituted in AEA-trained FAAH mice in the water maze, suggesting incomplete overlap in the stimulus effects of AEA and JZL184. Through the use of a novel water-maze procedure, the present study supports the work of previous behavioral pharmacologists in showing the robustness of the discrimination paradigm. PMID:27385208

  17. Attention-like processes underlying optomotor performance in a Drosophila choice maze.

    PubMed

    van Swinderen, Bruno; Flores, Kristopher A

    2007-02-01

    The authors present a novel paradigm for studying visual responses in Drosophila. An eight-level choice maze was found to reliably segregate fly populations according to their responses to moving stripes displayed on a computer screen. Visual responsiveness was robust in wild-type flies, and performance depended on salience effects such as stimulus color and speed. Analysis of individual fly choices in the maze revealed that stereotypy, or choice persistence, contributed significantly to a strain's performance. On the basis of these observations, the authors bred wild-type flies for divergent visual phenotypes by selecting individual flies displaying extreme stereotypy. Selected flies alternated less often in the sequential choice maze than unselected flies, showing that stereotypy could evolve across generations. The authors found that selection for increased stereotypy impaired flies' responsiveness to competing stimuli in tests for attention-like behavior in the maze. Visual selective attention was further investigated by electrophysiology, and it was found that increased stereotypy also impaired responsiveness to competing stimuli at the level of brain activity. Combined results present a comprehensive approach to studying visual responses in Drosophila, and show that behavioral performance involves attention-like processes that are variable among individuals and thus sensitive to artificial selection.

  18. Predictive Factors of Sustained Sinus Rhythm and Recurrent Atrial Fibrillation after the Maze Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Min Ho; Kuh, Ja Hong; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined perioperative predictors of sustained sinus rhythm (SR) in patients undergoing the Cox maze operation and concomitant cardiac surgery for structural heart disease. Materials and Methods From October 1999 to December 2008, 90 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) underwent the Cox maze operation and other concomitant cardiac surgery. Eighty-nine patients, all except for one postoperative death, were followed-up with serial electrocardiographic studies, 24-hour Holter monitoring tests, and regular echocardiographic studies. Results Eighty-nine patients undergoing the maze operation were divided into two groups according to the presence of SR. At the time of last follow-up (mean follow-up period, 51.0±30.8 months), 79 patients (88.8%) showed SR (SR group) and 10 patients (11.2%) had recurrent AF (AF group). Factors predictive of sustained SR were the immediate postoperative conversion to SR (odds ratio, 97.2; p=0.001) and the presence of SR at the 6th month postoperatively (odds ratio, 155.7; p=0.002). Duration of AF, mitral valve surgery, number of valves undergoing surgery, left atrial dimension, and perioperative left ventricular dimensions and ejection fractions were not predictors of postoperative maintenance of SR. Conclusion Immediate postoperative SR conversion and the presence of SR at the 6th postoperative month were independent predictors of sustained SR after the maze operation. PMID:23614097

  19. Incremental Sentence Processing in Japanese: A Maze Investigation into Scrambled and Control Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witzel, Jeffrey; Witzel, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates preverbal structural and semantic processing in Japanese, a head-final language, using the maze task. Two sentence types were tested--simple scrambled sentences (Experiment 1) and control sentences (Experiment 2). Experiment 1 showed that even for simple, mono-clausal Japanese sentences, (1) there are online processing…

  20. The hippocampus and spatial memory: findings with a novel modification of the water maze.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert E; Broadbent, Nicola J; Squire, Larry R

    2007-06-20

    For many tasks and species, remote memory (but not recent memory) is spared after damage to the hippocampus. An exception to this pattern of findings has been that both recent and remote memory are impaired after hippocampal lesions when rats are trained in the conventional water maze task. We explored the effect of introducing a navigational beacon for rats to use during testing. Four identical beacons were hung directly over each of the water maze quadrants, equidistant from each other (multiple-beacon maze). One of the beacons was always directly over the hidden platform. By using distal spatial cues, rats could select the correct beacon and use that beacon as a guide to the hidden platform. Probe tests indicated that rats did use the beacons to guide performance throughout training. Two months after the completion of training, rats were given hippocampal or sham lesions. Controls performed well, but the lesion group performed at chance on the retention probe trials. Furthermore, the rats with lesions not only searched indiscriminately in all four quadrants, they also did not use the beacons. These results indicate that impaired performance in the water maze after hippocampal damage reflects more than a loss of spatial information.

  1. Spontaneous Recovery of Human Spatial Memory in a Virtual Water Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, David; Martínez, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of spontaneous recovery in human spatial memory was assessed using a virtual environment. In Experiment 1, spatial memory was established by training participants to locate a hidden platform in a virtual water maze using a set of four distal landmarks. In Experiment 2, after learning about the location of a hidden platform, the…

  2. Behavior at the choice point: decision making in hidden pathway maze learning.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Snyder, Peter J; Pietrzak, Robert H; Maruff, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Hidden pathway maze learning tasks (HPMLTs) have been used in neuropsychological research and practice for more than 80 years. These tasks require the use of visual and auditory task feedback signals to learn the order and direction of a pathway, typically within a grid of stepping-stones, or alleys. Hidden pathway maze learning tasks are purported to assess both visuospatial learning and executive processes. The original motivation for the HPMLT paradigm for humans was to reduce a complex tactual planning task to one in which decisions could be directly measured by discrete actions at choice points guided by visual cues. Hidden maze learning paradigms were used extensively throughout the 20th century, initially to study exploratory, anticipatory, and goal-related behavior within the context of memory research, and later as an experimental tool in neuropsychology. Computerization of HPMLTs have allowed for the measurement of different move categories according to the rule structure and ipso facto, clinically meaningful differences in memory and monitoring functions during spatial search and learning. Hidden pathway maze learning tests have been used to understand the cognitive effects of ageing, neurological disorders, and psychopharmacological challenges. We provide a review of historical antecedents relevant to contemporary applications of HPMLTs in neuropsychology. It is suggested that contemporary applications of HPMLTs could be advanced by analysis of component operations necessary for efficient performance that can inform theoretical interpretations of this class of tests in clinically meaningful terms.

  3. Comparing Two CBM Maze Selection Tools: Considering Scoring and Interpretive Metrics for Universal Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Jeremy W.; Missall, Kristen N.; Hosp, John L.; Kuhle, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in maze selection curriculum-based measurement have led to several published tools with technical information for interpretation (e.g., norms, benchmarks, cut-scores, classification accuracy) that have increased their usefulness for universal screening. A range of scoring practices have emerged for evaluating student performance on maze…

  4. Reversible Hippocampal Lesions Disrupt Water Maze Performance during Both Recent and Remote Memory Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    Conventional lesion methods have shown that damage to the rodent hippocampus can impair previously acquired spatial memory in tasks such as the water maze. In contrast, work with reversible lesion methods using a different spatial task has found remote memory to be spared. To determine whether the finding of spared remote spatial memory depends on…

  5. Anxiolytic effect of clonazepam in female rats: grooming microstructure and elevated plus maze tests.

    PubMed

    Nin, Maurício S; Couto-Pereira, Natividade S; Souza, Marilise F; Azeredo, Lucas A; Ferri, Marcelo K; Dalprá, Walesca L; Gomez, Rosane; Barros, Helena M T

    2012-06-01

    Grooming behavior is an adaptation to a stressful environment that can vary in accordance with stress intensity. Direct and indirect GABA(A) receptor agonists decrease duration, frequency, incorrect transitions and uninterrupted bouts of grooming. Hormonal variation during the different phases of the estrous cycle of female rats also changes the grooming behavior. It is known that GABA(A) agonists and endogenous hormones change anxiety-like behaviors observed in the elevated plus maze test, a classical animal model of anxiety. This study was designed to determine the anxiolytic effect of clonazepam in female rats in different estrous phases and to correlate anxiety behaviors in the elevated plus maze and grooming microstructure tests. Our results show that female rats displayed higher anxiety-like behavior scores during the estrus and proestrus phases in the elevated plus maze and that clonazepam (0.25 mg/kg; i.p.) had an anxiolytic effect that was independent of the estrous phase. Grooming behaviors were higher in the proestrus phase but were decreased by clonazepam administration, independent of the estrous phase, demonstrating the anxiolytic effect of this drug in both animal models. Grooming behaviors were moderately associated with anxiolytic-like behaviors in the elevated plus maze test. Here, we describe the anxiolytic effect of clonazepam and the influence of estrous phase on anxiety. Moreover, we show that the grooming microstructure test is a useful tool for detecting anxiolytic-like behaviors in rats.

  6. The Floor Projection Maze: A novel behavioral apparatus for presenting visual stimuli to rats

    PubMed Central

    Furtak, Sharon C.; Cho, Christine E.; Kerr, Kristin M.; Barredo, Jennifer L.; Alleyne, Janelle E.; Patterson, Yolanda R.; Burwell, Rebecca D.

    2010-01-01

    There is a long tradition of studying visual learning in rats by presenting stimuli vertically on cards or monitors. The procedures are often labor intensive and the rate of acquisition can be prohibitively low. Available evidence suggests that rats process visual information presented in the lower visual hemifield more effectively than information presented in the upper visual hemifield. We capitalized on these findings by developing a novel apparatus, the Floor Projection Maze, for presenting visual information directly to the floor of an exploratory maze. Two-dimensional (2D) visual stimuli were presented on the floor by back-projecting an image from a standard digital projector to the semi-transparent underside of the floor of an open maze. Long-Evans rats rapidly acquired easy 2D visual discriminations (Experiment 1). Rats were also able to learn a more difficult shape discrimination in dramatically fewer trials than previously reported for the same discrimination when presented vertically (Experiment 2). The two choice discrimination task was adapted to determine contrast sensitivity thresholds in a naïve group of rats (Experiment 3). Contrast sensitivity thresholds were uniform across three subjects, demonstrating that the Floor Projection Maze can be used for visual psychophysics in rats. Our findings demonstrate that rats can rapidly acquire visual tasks when stimuli are presented horizontally on the floor, suggesting that this novel behavioral apparatus will provide a powerful behavioral paradigm in the future. PMID:19422855

  7. Estrogen replacement in ovariectomized rats affects strategy selection in the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jill M; Lee, Christopher D

    2004-09-01

    While estrogen enhances performance on some tasks of learning and memory, it has impairing or no effects on others. It has been proposed that estrogen differentially affects performance on various tasks of learning and memory by influencing the strategy used to solve a task. The goal of the present study was to determine if estrogen would influence strategy selection in the Morris water maze. Long-Evans rats were ovariectomized and implanted with Silastic capsules containing 25% estradiol diluted in cholesterol or 100% cholesterol. Rats were trained in a water maze task in which multiple strategies were available for use to locate a hidden escape platform that was moved to a new location for each set of four daily trials. During 10 days of acquisition trials, a visible floating landmark was always located in a static position relative to the hidden escape platform. Additionally, fixed extramaze cues visible to the animals surrounded the maze. Following acquisition, 2 days of probe trials were conducted in which the static landmark was removed. Estrogen replacement in ovariectomized rats resulted in impaired performance across 10 days of acquisition. Additionally, while removal of the visible landmark during the probe trials had no effect on the performance of the females receiving estrogen, it significantly disrupted performance of females receiving cholesterol treatment. These results indicate that estrogen replacement in ovariectomized rats biases an animal against using a landmark or static cue to aid in the location of a hidden escape platform in the water maze.

  8. The Maze Test as a Progress Monitor Measure for College Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ari, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings of passageless comprehension by college readers have added to the fallout with standardized reading comprehension tests and have called for theoretically and psychometrically stronger options. Reviewing the research literature, this paper suggests the maze test as an option for college reading assessment. The existing evidence,…

  9. MTR, TRA603. SOURCE STORAGE VAULT IN BASEMENT. MAZE ENTRY. SOLID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. SOURCE STORAGE VAULT IN BASEMENT. MAZE ENTRY. SOLID CONCRETE WALLS. CONCRETE PLUGS, ONE LINED WITH LEAD, AND LIFT HANDLES. FLOOR WELLS SIX FEET DEEP BELOW FLOOR. IDO MTR-603-IDO-5, 12/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-396-110469, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Mixed Effects Modeling of Morris Water Maze Data: Advantages and Cautionary Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael E.; Clark, M. H.; Goffus, Andrea; Hoane, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Morris water maze data are most commonly analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance in which daily test sessions are analyzed as an unordered categorical variable. This approach, however, may lack power, relies heavily on post hoc tests of daily performance that can complicate interpretation, and does not target the nonlinear trends…

  11. An Assessment of Response, Direction and Place Learning by Rats in a Water T-Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Jacqueline T.; Martin, Gerard M.; Skinner, Darlene M.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral data suggest that distinguishable orientations may be necessary for place learning even when distal cues define different start points in the room and a unique goal location. We examined whether changes in orientation are also important in place learning and navigation in a water T-maze. In Experiment 1, rats were trained to locate a…

  12. Cognitive and Neural Determinants of Response Strategy in the Dual-Solution Plus-Maze Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Leonibus, Elvira; Costantini, Vivian J. A.; Massaro, Antonio; Mandolesi, Georgia; Vanni, Valentina; Luvisetto, Siro; Pavone, Flaminia; Oliverio, Alberto; Mele, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Response strategy in the dual-solution plus maze is regarded as a form of stimulus-response learning. In this study, by using an outcome devaluation procedure, we show that it can be based on both action-outcome and stimulus-response habit learning, depending on the amount of training that the animals receive. Furthermore, we show that…

  13. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  14. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  15. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina; Bae, Kee Jeong

    2016-10-01

    "Buttonholing" of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. PMID:27502623

  16. The effect of a paraffin screen on the neutron dose at the maze door of a 15 MV linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Krmar, M.; Kuzmanović, A.; Nikolić, D.; Kuzmanović, Z.; Ganezer, K.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a paraffin screen located at various positions in the maze on the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door.Methods: The neutron dose equivalent was measured at the maze door of a room containing a 15 MV linear accelerator for x-ray therapy. Measurements were performed for several positions of the paraffin screen covering only 27.5% of the cross-sectional area of the maze. The neutron dose equivalent was also measured at all screen positions. Two simple models of the neutron source were considered in which the first assumed that the source was the cross-sectional area at the inner entrance of the maze, radiating neutrons in an isotropic manner. In the second model the reduction in the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door due to the paraffin screen was considered to be a function of the mean values of the neutron fluence and energy at the screen.Results: The results of this study indicate that the equivalent dose at the maze door was reduced by a factor of 3 through the use of a paraffin screen that was placed inside the maze. It was also determined that the contributions to the dosage from areas that were not covered by the paraffin screen as viewed from the dosimeter, were 2.5 times higher than the contributions from the covered areas. This study also concluded that the contributions of the maze walls, ceiling, and floor to the total neutron dose equivalent were an order of magnitude lower than those from the surface at the far end of the maze.Conclusions: This study demonstrated that a paraffin screen could be used to reduce the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door by a factor of 3. This paper also found that the reduction of the neutron dose equivalent was a linear function of the area covered by the maze screen and that the decrease in the dose at the maze door could be modeled as an exponential function of the product φ·E at the screen.

  17. Dopamine depletion in either the dorsomedial or dorsolateral striatum impairs egocentric Cincinnati water maze performance while sparing allocentric Morris water maze learning.

    PubMed

    Braun, Amanda A; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Gutierrez, Arnold; Lundgren, Kerstin H; Seroogy, Kim B; Skelton, Matthew R; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2015-02-01

    Both egocentric route-based learning and spatial learning, as assessed by the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) and Morris water maze (MWM), respectively, are impaired following an 80% dopamine (DA) loss in the neostriatum after 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration in rats. The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) and the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) are implicated in different navigational learning types, namely the DLS is implicated in egocentric learning while the DMS is implicated in spatial learning. This experiment tested whether selective DA loss through 6-OHDA lesions in the DMS or DLS would impair one or both types of navigation. Both DLS and DMS DA loss significantly impaired route-based CWM learning, without affecting spatial or cued MWM performance. DLS 6-OHDA lesions produced a 75% DA loss in this region, with no changes in other monoamine levels in the DLS or DMS. DMS 6-OHDA lesions produced a 62% DA loss in this region, without affecting other monoamine levels in the DMS or DLS. The results indicate a role for DA in DLS and DMS regions in route-based egocentric but not spatial learning and memory. Spatial learning deficits may require more pervasive monoamine reductions within each region before deficits are exhibited. This is the first study to implicate DLS and DMS DA in route-based egocentric navigation. PMID:25451306

  18. The effects of apparatus design and test procedure on learning and memory performance of C57BL/6J mice on the Barnes maze.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Timothy P; Brown, Richard E

    2012-01-30

    The Barnes maze is a visuo-spatial learning and memory test originally designed for use with rats, and later adapted for use with mice. The Barnes maze design and test procedure vary across studies using mice, but the effects of variation in Barnes maze design and test procedure on learning and memory in mice have not yet been investigated. Therefore the present experiment investigates whether test procedures, such as the number of habituation trials and parameters of the probe trial (correct zone size and trial length) influence learning and memory performance on three Barnes maze designs that differed in size and the presence of a wall with intra-maze visual cues. Performance was compared across the three mazes to determine how apparatus design influences visuo-spatial cue use. The number of habituation trials and parameters of the probe trial had small effects on learning and memory performance. Apparatus design, had little effect on acquisition performance but had a significant effect on memory performance. Mice on a maze with a small diameter, external wall and intra-maze visual cues had very poor visuo-spatial memory relative to mice tested on small and large diameter mazes without a wall or intra-maze visual cues. Assessment of visuo-spatial cue use indicated that mice do not rely on visuo-spatial cues to locate the escape hole on the small-diameter maze with a wall and intra-maze visual cues, but show reliable visuo-spatial cue use on small or large diameter mazes with no wall. These results indicate that apparatus design influences search strategy use and memory performance on the Barnes maze, and that including a wall around the edge of the Barnes maze decreases visuo-spatial cue use.

  19. [Primary radial head arthroplasty in trauma : Complications].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Buschbeck, S; Wincheringer, D; Weißenberger, M; Hoffmann, R

    2016-10-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries in elbow trauma. Non-displaced fractures are best treated conservatively. Simple but displaced fractures require anatomic reduction and fixation, typically using screws. The treatment course for complex fractures with multiple fragments is still being debated, as results are less predictable. Radial head resection is not advised if concomitant injuries of the coronoid process or the collateral ligaments with instability are present. Favorable outcomes following open reduction and fixation using plates were reported recently. However, complication rates are very high. Radial head replacement is a valuable tool in treating complex fractures of the radial head with predominantly good and excellent results. Patients who suffer radial head fractures are typically of a younger age, resulting in high functional demands. Certainly, unspecific and specific complications related to radial head arthroplasty were reported in up to 40 % of cases in an acute fracture setting. This article highlights common complications in radial head arthroplasty and aims to present strategies to avoid them. PMID:27600571

  20. Radial head fractures--an update.

    PubMed

    Pike, Jeffrey M; Athwal, George S; Faber, Kenneth J; King, Graham J W

    2009-03-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures occurring around the elbow. Although radial head fractures can occur in isolation, associated fractures and ligament injuries are common. Assembling the clinical presentation, physical examination, and imaging into an effective treatment plan can be challenging. The characteristics of the radial head fracture influence the technique used to optimize the outcome. Fragment number, displacement, impaction, and bone quality are considered when deciding between early motion, fragment excision, and radial head excision, repair, or replacement. Isolated, minimally displaced fractures without evidence of mechanical block can be treated nonsurgically with early active range of motion (ROM). Partial, displaced radial head fractures without evidence of mechanical block can be treated either nonsurgically or with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), as current evidence does not prove superiority of either strategy. For displaced fractures with greater than 3 fragments, radial head replacement is recommended. Radial head arthroplasty may be preferred over tenuous fracture fixation in the setting of associated ligament injuries when maintenance of joint stability could be compromised by ineffective fracture fixation. PMID:19258159

  1. Using the Spatial Learning Index to Evaluate Performance on the Water Maze

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Inês Tomás; Burwell, Rebecca D.

    2016-01-01

    The Morris Water Maze was developed in 1981, and quickly became the standard task for assessing spatial memory and spatial navigation. Twenty years ago, (Gallagher, Burwell, & Burchinal, 1993) reported new variables and measures, including a spatial learning index, that greatly enhanced the utility of the Morris Water Maze for assessing subtle differences in performance on the task. The learning index provided a single number that could be used to elucidate neurobiological measures of hippocampal dysfunction, for example correlation of learning performance with a biomarker of aging. In this review, as part of the commemoration of the 30th anniversary of Behavioral Neuroscience, we describe how the spatial learning index has contributed to the field of learning and memory, how it has advanced our understanding of normal and pathological cognitive aging, and how it has contributed to translation of findings into other species. Finally, we provide instruction into how the learning index can be extended to other tasks and datasets. PMID:26214218

  2. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase causes anxiolytic-like behaviour in an elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Volke, V; Kõks, S; Vasar, E; Bourin, M; Bradwejn, J; Männistö, P T

    1995-07-10

    The action of inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (1-20 mg kg-1) on the exploratory behaviour of rats in the elevated plus-maze was studied. L-NAME induced an anxiolytic-like effect in the plus-maze test, showing a reverse U-shape action behaviour, with a maximal effect at 10 mg kg-1. This effect was not related to a non-specific increase in motor activity, since in the open field test L-NAME did not affect locomotor activity of rats. Pretreatment of rats with L-NAME (1-10 mg kg-1) also tended to attenuate the anti-exploratory action of CCK agonist caerulein (5 micrograms kg-1), but this action was not significant. In conclusion, it appears that NO may be involved in the process that can lead to anxiety in the rat.

  3. Detailed classification of swimming paths in the Morris Water Maze: multiple strategies within one trial.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Tiago V; Luksys, Gediminas; Sandi, Carmen; Vasilaki, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    The Morris Water Maze is a widely used task in studies of spatial learning with rodents. Classical performance measures of animals in the Morris Water Maze include the escape latency, and the cumulative distance to the platform. Other methods focus on classifying trajectory patterns to stereotypical classes representing different animal strategies. However, these approaches typically consider trajectories as a whole, and as a consequence they assign one full trajectory to one class, whereas animals often switch between these strategies, and their corresponding classes, within a single trial. To this end, we take a different approach: we look for segments of diverse animal behaviour within one trial and employ a semi-automated classification method for identifying the various strategies exhibited by the animals within a trial. Our method allows us to reveal significant and systematic differences in the exploration strategies of two animal groups (stressed, non-stressed), that would be unobserved by earlier methods. PMID:26423140

  4. Using the spatial learning index to evaluate performance on the water maze.

    PubMed

    Tomás Pereira, Inês; Burwell, Rebecca D

    2015-08-01

    The Morris water maze was developed in 1981 and quickly became the standard task for assessing spatial memory and spatial navigation. Twenty years ago, Gallagher, Burwell, and Burchinal (1993) reported new variables and measures, including a spatial learning index, that greatly enhanced the utility of the Morris water maze for assessing subtle differences in performance on the task. The learning index provided a single number that could be used to elucidate neurobiological measures of hippocampal dysfunction, for example, correlation of learning performance with a biomarker of aging. In this review, as part of the commemoration of the 30th anniversary of Behavioral Neuroscience, we describe how the spatial learning index has contributed to the field of learning and memory, how it has advanced our understanding of normal and pathological cognitive aging, and how it has contributed to translation of findings into other species. Finally, we provide instruction into how the learning index can be extended to other tasks and data sets.

  5. Model testing of a 10-kg high explosive blast attenuation maze

    SciTech Connect

    Bacigalupi, C.M.; Burton, W.A.

    1981-07-01

    The basement area of the proposed High Explosive Applications Facility (HEAF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory includes 10-kg HE assembly and process cells, and a 10-kg corridor for the transport of up to 10 kg of HE from the receiving dock to the cells and to the experimental firing tanks. Previous model experiments developed a process cell-maze configuration that attenuated the effects of an accidental 10-kg detonation to acceptable levels (maximum of 10 to 11 psi reflected). This document reports 1/8-scale model tests conducted to confirm the maze design and to determine the blast pressures in adjacent areas in the final HEAF building configuration. In addition, pressure/time information was obtained at selected points in the model expansion chamber to provide the architect-engineer with information for structural design.

  6. Effect of MPEP in Morris water maze in adult and old rats.

    PubMed

    Car, Halina; Stefaniuk, Radosław; Wiśniewska, Róza J

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation assessed the effects of 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) on acquisition and reference memory in the Morris water maze in young adult rats aged 3-month and old rats aged 26-month. MPEP reduced the swim speed of the young adult rats during acquisition, shortened the distance they covered and reduced their swim speed in the probe trial. The untreated old rats had impaired acquisition of spatial learning, shortened distance and a lower swim speed in the probe trial in comparison with young rats. MPEP did not influence the activity of the old rats in the water maze. In summary, MPEP did not influence acquisition of spatial learning and reference memory in the young adult and old rats.

  7. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  8. Search Strategies Used by "APP" Transgenic Mice during Navigation in the Morris Water Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janus, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    TgCRND8 mice represent a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, with onset of cognitive impairment and increasing amyloid-[beta] plaques in their brains at 12 weeks of age. In this study, the spatial memory in 25- to 30-week-old TgCRND8 mice was analyzed in two reference and one working memory Morris water maze (MWM) tests. In reference…

  9. Rapid task acquisition of spatial-delayed alternation in an automated T-maze by mice.

    PubMed

    Schaefers, Andrea T U; Winter, York

    2011-11-20

    The spatial-delayed alternation task using a T-maze is the standard method for testing working memory in rodents and is widely used. Until now, however, there has been a gap in the understanding of the underlying brain mechanisms. The development of new manganese-enhanced brain imaging methods now permit a more specific examination of these mechanisms by allowing behavioural brain stimulation to take place outside the MRI scanner and the scan identifying the activation of specific brain regions to take place subsequently. The requirements for this method are a frequent repetition of the behaviour of interest, a control group that differs in only one task parameter and the minimization of unspecific environmental factors to avoid irrelevant stimulation. To meet these requirements, a fully automated spatial-delayed alternation task in a T-maze was developed that used identity detectors and automated gates to route mice individually from their social home cage to the T-maze. An experimental and a control group of mice were trained in procedures that differed only in the parameter "working-memory based alternation". Our data demonstrate that both groups can be trained concurrently with a rapid procedure using the automated T-maze. With its high level of stimulation, the minimization of unspecific stimulation through environmental factors and the simultaneous training of a control group that differs in only one task parameter our set-up and procedure met the requirements of new imaging techniques for the study of the influence of a specific cognitive component of spatial-delayed alternation on activity in specific brain regions.

  10. Visual discrimination learning in the water maze: a novel test for visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Bridge, H; Riedel, G

    2001-02-15

    Learning about space, the environment and specific objects comprising three-dimensional arrangements requires processing of visual information. As learning and memory experiments in mammals rely heavily on normal processing of visual cues, drug-induced disruption of acquisition learning or memory formation necessitates the important control for visual acuity. A popular task used frequently for rats is the Morris water maze. However, previously used visual tasks in the water maze only control for gross visual disturbances. Here we describe a new training procedure enabling visual acuity to be tested in the water maze. Animals were trained to discriminate between two cue cards containing a pattern of vertical black and white stripes. Cards were presented in two adjacent quadrants separated by a barrier with the escape platform located in front of the smaller stripes (1 cm wide). Once 80% correct responses were attained, the wider cue card (normally 5 cm wide stripes) was randomly changed to gratings of 1,2,3,4,5, and 10 cm width. Animals learned the discrimination with acuity of 1.5 c/deg. A detailed analysis of the swim patterns further suggests that, independent of the grating used, animals make a choice immediately after release and swim along the walls towards the cue. In a further acuity test taken a few weeks later when animals were given saline infusions, performance was better than in the first test suggesting an effect of learning. This novel test may prove useful in determining subtle drug-induced deficits in visual acuity that may contribute to disruption of spatial performance in the water maze.

  11. Progesterone, administered prior to kainic acid, reduces decrements in cognitive performance in the Morris Water Maze

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Cheryl A.; Walf, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The nature of progesterone (P4)’s neuroprotective effects is of interest. We investigated effects of P4 when administered prior to, or following, kainic acid, which produces ictal activity and damage to the hippocampus, to mediate effects on spatial performance. The hypothesis was that P4, compared to vehicle, would reduce decrements in Morris Water Maze performance induced by kainic acid. Experiment 1: We examined the effects of kainic acid on plasma stress hormone, corticosterone, and progestogen (P4 and its metabolites) levels in plasma and the hippocampus following subcutaneous (s.c.) P4 administration to ovariectomized rats. Rats administered kainic acid had the highest corticosterone levels immediately following injection. P4 is 5α-reduced to dihydroprogesterone (DHP) and subsequently metabolized to 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (3α,5α-THP) by 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The regimen of P4 utilized produced circulating and hippocampal levels of P4, DHP, and 3α,5α-THP within a physiological range, which decline at 14 hours post-injection, and were not altered by kainic acid. Experiment 2: The physiological P4 regimen was administered to rats before, or following, kainic acid-induced seizures, and later effects on water maze performance were compared to that of rats administered vehicle. Rats administered kainic acid had significantly poorer performance in the water maze (i.e. increased latencies and distances to the hidden platform) than did rats administered vehicle. Administration of P4 before, but not after, kainic acid prevented these performance deficits. Thus, these data suggest that a physiological regimen of P4 can prevent some of the deficits in water maze performance produced by kainic acid. PMID:20715152

  12. Anxiolytic-induced attenuation of thigmotaxis in the Elevated Minus Maze.

    PubMed

    Pickles, A R; Hendrie, C A

    2013-07-01

    Findings using exploration models of anxiety such as the Elevated Plus Maze (EPM) and Elevated Zero Maze (EZM) are remarkably consistent given the differences in layout and number of walls used to describe their closed areas. These factors therefore do not appear to be critical. The present studies were conducted to determine if anxiolytic activity could be detected using an apparatus that presented animals with only one wall. Mice were pre-treated with either vehicle, diazepam (2-4 mg/kg) or 5-10 mg/kg chlordiazepoxide (CDP) and placed for 5 min onto a square platform containing a 12 cm × 14 cm wall. Measures were taken of frequency/duration of contacts with the wall and of general activity. Time spent in contact with the wall was selectively reduced by 4 mg/kg diazepam. 10 mg/kg CDP also decreased this measure but increased measures of general activity, indicating a possible mild stimulant effect. The closed areas of the EPM are described by 3 walls. The EZM uses 2. Current findings show that anxiolytic effects can also be detected in a model with just one wall. It could and these data provide further evidence that variations in the layout of these mazes are not critical for detecting anxiolytic action. Thigmotactic cues remain present regardless of the physical characteristics of these mazes or the local conditions they are employed under. Hence, it is suggested that thigmotactic cues may be the common source of motivation to behave in these models and that this may explain their robustness.

  13. Comparisons of Online Reading Paradigms: Eye Tracking, Moving-Window, and Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witzel, Naoko; Witzel, Jeffrey; Forster, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    This study compares four methodologies used to examine online sentence processing during reading. Specifically, self-paced, non-cumulative, moving-window reading (Just et al. in "J Exp Psychol Gen" 111:228-238, 1982), eye tracking (see e.g., Rayner in "Q J Exp Psychol" 62:1457-1506, 2009), and two versions of the maze task (Forster et al. in…

  14. Place and Response Learning in the Open-field Tower Maze.

    PubMed

    Lipatova, Olga; Campolattaro, Matthew M; Toufexis, Donna J; Mabry, Erin A

    2015-10-28

    This protocol describes how the Open-field Tower Maze (OFTM) paradigm is used to study spatial learning in rodents. This maze is especially useful for examining how rats learn to use a place- or response-learning to successfully navigate in an open-field arena. Additionally, this protocol describes how the OFTM differs from other behavioral maze paradigms that are commonly used to study spatial learning in rodents. The OFTM described in this article was adapted from the one previously described by Cole, Clipperton, and Walt (2007). Specifically, the OFTM was created to test spatial learning in rodents without the experimenter having to consider how "stress" might play a role as a confounding variable. Experiments have shown that stress-alone can significantly affect cognitive function(1). The representative results section contains data from an experiment that used the OFTM to examine the effects of estradiol treatment on place- and response-learning in adult female Sprague Dawley rats(2). Future studies will be designed to examine the role of the hippocampus and striatum in place- and response-learning in the OFTM.

  15. Fractal dimensions: A new paradigm to assess spatial memory and learning using Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surjeet; Kaur, Harpreet; Sandhir, Rajat

    2016-02-15

    Morris water maze has been widely used for analysis of cognitive functions and relies on the time taken by animal to find the platform i.e. escape latency as a parameter to quantify spatial memory and learning. However, escape latency is confounded by swimming speed which is not necessarily a cognitive factor. Rather, path length may be a more appropriate and reliable parameter to assess spatial learning. This paper presents fractal dimension as a new paradigm to assess spatial memory and learning in animals. Male wistar rats were administrated with pentylenetetrazole and scopolamine to induce chronic epilepsy and dementia respectively. Fractal dimension of the random path followed by the animals on Morris water maze was analyzed and statistically compared among different experimental groups; the results suggest that fractal dimension is more reliable and accurate parameter to assess cognitive deficits compared to escape latency. Thus, the present study suggests that fractal dimensions could be used as an independent parameter to assess spatial memory and learning in animals using Morris water maze.

  16. A Wireless EEG Recording Method for Rat Use inside the Water Maze

    PubMed Central

    Pinnell, Richard C.; Almajidy, Rand K.; Kirch, Robert D.; Cassel, Jean C.; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2016-01-01

    With the continued miniaturisation of portable embedded systems, wireless EEG recording techniques are becoming increasingly prevalent in animal behavioural research. However, in spite of their versatility and portability, they have seldom been used inside water-maze tasks designed for rats. As such, a novel 3D printed implant and waterproof connector is presented, which can facilitate wireless water-maze EEG recordings in freely-moving rats, using a commercial wireless recording system (W32; Multichannel Systems). As well as waterproofing the wireless system, battery, and electrode connector, the implant serves to reduce movement-related artefacts by redistributing movement-related forces away from the electrode connector. This implant/connector was able to successfully record high-quality LFP in the hippocampo-striatal brain regions of rats as they undertook a procedural-learning variant of the double-H water-maze task. Notably, there were no significant performance deficits through its use when compared with a control group across a number of metrics including number of errors and speed of task completion. Taken together, this method can expand the range of measurements that are currently possible in this diverse area of behavioural neuroscience, whilst paving the way for integration with more complex behaviours. PMID:26828947

  17. Cued and spatial learning in the water maze: equivalent learning in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Baldan Ramsey, Lissandra C; Pittenger, Christopher

    2010-10-11

    Mammals navigate a complex environment using a variety of strategies, which can operate in parallel and even compete with one another. We have recently described a variant water maze task in which two of these strategies, hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and striatum-dependent cued learning, can be dissociated. Male rodents perform better at some spatial learning tasks, while female rodents more readily learn certain striatum-dependent behavioral strategies. We therefore predicted that sex would differentially influence spatial and cued learning in the water maze. We trained adult male and female C57Bl/6 mice for 7 days in the two-cue variant of the water maze, with probe trials on days 5 and 7. In two independent experiments, males and females performed similarly, with both groups showing good spatial learning after 5 and 7 days of training, and both groups showing trend-level cued learning after 5 days and robust learning after 7. Therefore, contrary to our hypothesis, sex does not significantly affect cued or spatial learning in this task.

  18. Ultra-high field parallel imaging of the superior parietal lobule during mental maze solving.

    PubMed

    Jerde, Trenton A; Lewis, Scott M; Goerke, Ute; Gourtzelidis, Pavlos; Tzagarakis, Charidimos; Lynch, Joshua; Moeller, Steen; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Adriany, Gregor; Trangle, Jeran; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2008-06-01

    We used ultra-high field (7 T) fMRI and parallel imaging to scan the superior parietal lobule (SPL) of human subjects as they mentally traversed a maze path in one of four directions (up, down, left, right). A counterbalanced design for maze presentation and a quasi-isotropic voxel (1.46 x 1.46 x 2 mm thick) collection were implemented. Fifty-one percent of single voxels in the SPL were tuned to the direction of the maze path. Tuned voxels were distributed throughout the SPL, bilaterally. A nearest neighbor analysis revealed a "honeycomb" arrangement such that voxels tuned to a particular direction tended to occur in clusters. Three-dimensional (3D) directional clusters were identified in SPL as oriented centroids traversing the cortical depth. There were 13 same-direction clusters per hemisphere containing 22 voxels per cluster, on the average; the mean nearest-neighbor, same-direction intercluster distance was 9.4 mm. These results provide a much finer detail of the directional tuning in SPL, as compared to those obtained previously at 4 T (Gourtzelidis et al. Exp Brain Res 165:273-282, 2005). The more accurate estimates of quantitative clustering parameters in 3D brain space in this study were made possible by the higher signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios afforded by the higher magnetic field of 7 T as well as the quasi-isotropic design of voxel data collection.

  19. Reversible hippocampal lesions disrupt water maze performance during both recent and remote memory tests.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Nicola J; Squire, Larry R; Clark, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Conventional lesion methods have shown that damage to the rodent hippocampus can impair previously acquired spatial memory in tasks such as the water maze. In contrast, work with reversible lesion methods using a different spatial task has found remote memory to be spared. To determine whether the finding of spared remote spatial memory depends on the lesion method, we reversibly inactivated the hippocampus with lidocaine either immediately (0-DAY) or 1 mo (30-DAY) after training in a water maze. For both the 0-DAY and 30-DAY retention tests, rats that received lidocaine infusions exhibited impaired performance. In addition, when the 0-DAY group was retested 2 d later, (when the drug was no longer active), the effect was reversed. That is, rats that had previously received lidocaine performed as well as control rats did. These findings indicate that the rodent hippocampus is important for both recent and remote spatial memory, as assessed in the water maze. What determines whether remote spatial memory is preserved or impaired following disruption of hippocampal function appears to be the type of task used to assess spatial memory, not the method used to disrupt the hippocampus.

  20. Effect of neonatal rat bisphenol a exposure on performance in the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Carr, Russell; Bertasi, Frances; Betancourt, Angela; Bowers, Susan; Gandy, B Scott; Ryan, Peter; Willard, Scott

    2003-11-14

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen, is a component of many food and beverage containers and can leach into the container contents over time. Due to its estrogenic properties, exposure to BPA during development could alter the appropriate maturation of pathways essential for normal cognitive function at later ages. To investigate this, the effects of repeated postnatal exposure of male and female rats to BPA on spatial learning and memory were investigated using a Morris water maze. Breeders and offspring were maintained on a standard phytoestrogen-free diet. Oral administration of 72 microg/kg 17 beta-estradiol (E(2)), 100 microg/kg BPA (low BPA), 250 microg/kg BPA (high BPA), or the safflower oil vehicle was performed daily from postnatal d 1 (PND1) through PND14. There were no treatment-related effects on swimming ability or motivation (PND33) or on acquisition of maze solution (PND34-37). However, acquisition of maze performance was significantly better in control males than in control females. Treatment with E(2) and low BPA disrupted this normal gender-dependent pattern of acquisition, while treatment with high BPA did not. In a probe trial (PND40), females treated with high BPA spent significantly less time in the escape quadrant. These data indicate that E(2) and low dosages of BPA can alter the normal gender-dependent pattern of acquisition, while higher dosages of BPA alter the retention of spatial information without significantly affecting acquisition.

  1. A Wireless EEG Recording Method for Rat Use inside the Water Maze.

    PubMed

    Pinnell, Richard C; Almajidy, Rand K; Kirch, Robert D; Cassel, Jean C; Hofmann, Ulrich G

    2016-01-01

    With the continued miniaturisation of portable embedded systems, wireless EEG recording techniques are becoming increasingly prevalent in animal behavioural research. However, in spite of their versatility and portability, they have seldom been used inside water-maze tasks designed for rats. As such, a novel 3D printed implant and waterproof connector is presented, which can facilitate wireless water-maze EEG recordings in freely-moving rats, using a commercial wireless recording system (W32; Multichannel Systems). As well as waterproofing the wireless system, battery, and electrode connector, the implant serves to reduce movement-related artefacts by redistributing movement-related forces away from the electrode connector. This implant/connector was able to successfully record high-quality LFP in the hippocampo-striatal brain regions of rats as they undertook a procedural-learning variant of the double-H water-maze task. Notably, there were no significant performance deficits through its use when compared with a control group across a number of metrics including number of errors and speed of task completion. Taken together, this method can expand the range of measurements that are currently possible in this diverse area of behavioural neuroscience, whilst paving the way for integration with more complex behaviours. PMID:26828947

  2. Tolerance development to Morris water maze test impairments induced by acute allopregnanolone.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, S; Löfgren, M; Birzniece, V; Bäckström, T; Johansson, I-M

    2006-05-12

    The progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, like benzodiazepines, reduces learning and impairs memory in rats. Both substances act as GABA agonists at the GABA-A receptor and impair the performance in the Morris water maze test. Women are during the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and during hormone replacement therapy exposed to allopregnanolone or allopregnanolone-like substances for extended periods. Long-term benzodiazepine treatment can cause tolerance against benzodiazepine-induced learning impairments. In this study we evaluated whether a corresponding allopregnanolone tolerance develops in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were pretreated for 3 days with i.v. allopregnanolone injections (2 mg/kg) one or two times a day, or for 7 days with allopregnanolone injections 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally, twice a day. Thereafter the rats were tested in the Morris water maze for 5 days and compared with relevant controls. Rats pretreated with allopregnanolone twice a day had decreased escape latency, path length and thigmotaxis compared with the acute allopregnanolone group that was pretreated with vehicle. Pretreatment for 7 days resulted in learning of the platform position. However, the memory of the platform position was in these tolerant rats not as strong as in controls only given vehicle. Allopregnanolone treatment was therefore seen to induce a partial tolerance against acute allopregnanolone effects in the Morris water maze.

  3. Building a radial spoke: flagellar radial spoke protein 3 (RSP3) is a dimer.

    PubMed

    Wirschell, Maureen; Zhao, Feifei; Yang, Chun; Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis; Gaillard, Anne; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Sale, Winfield S

    2008-03-01

    Radial spokes are critical multisubunit structures required for normal ciliary and eukaryotic flagellar motility. Experimental evidence indicates the radial spokes are mechanochemical transducers that transmit signals from the central pair apparatus to the outer doublet microtubules for local control of dynein activity. Recently, progress has been made in identifying individual components of the radial spoke, yet little is known about how the radial spoke is assembled or how it performs in signal transduction. Here we focus on radial spoke protein 3 (RSP3), a highly conserved AKAP located at the base of the radial spoke stalk and required for radial spoke assembly on the doublet microtubules. Biochemical approaches were taken to further explore the functional role of RSP3 within the radial spoke structure and for control of motility. Chemical crosslinking, native gel electrophoresis, and epitope-tagged RSP3 proteins established that RSP3 forms a dimer. Analysis of truncated RSP3 proteins indicates the dimerization domain coincides with the previously characterized axoneme binding domain in the N-terminus. We propose a model in which each radial spoke structure is built on an RSP3 dimer, and indicating that each radial spoke can potentially localize multiple PKAs or AKAP-binding proteins in position to control dynein activity and flagellar motility. PMID:18157907

  4. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  5. Finger necrosis after accidental radial artery puncture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun Sik; Lee, Tae Rim; Cha, Won Chul; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Keun Jeong; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Radial artery puncture, an invasive procedure, is frequently used for critical patients. Although considered safe, severe complications such as finger necrosis can occur. Herein, we review the clinical course of finger necrosis after accidental radial artery puncture. A 63-year-old woman visited the emergency department (ED) with left second and third finger pain after undergoing intravenous (IV) access in her wrist for procedural sedation. During the IV access, she experienced wrist pain, which increased during the 12 hours prior to her ED presentation. Emergency angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm in her left radial artery and absence of blood flow to the proper palmar digital artery. Subsequent angiointervention and urokinase thrombolysis failed. The second finger was eventually amputated owing to gangrene. Radial artery puncture can occur accidentally during IV wrist access, resulting in severe morbidity. Providers should carefully examine the puncture site and collateral flow, followed by multiple examinations to ensure distal circulation.

  6. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  7. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic.

  8. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  9. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2015-05-15

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order.

  10. Mathematical interpretation of radial shearing interferometers.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D

    1974-08-01

    The procedure for computing a radial shearing interferometric pattern is given. The interferometric pattern is analyzed to obtain the wavefront shape. Restricting the discussion to wavefronts having rotational symmetry, we give two different methods of finding the wavefront. One approach is to scan along a diameter of the interferometric pattern and the other is to examine the shape of the fringes. The relative sensitivity of a radial shearing interferometer with respect to that of a Twyman-Green interferometer is also analyzed.

  11. Sequential Assembly of Flagellar Radial Spokes

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Pinfen; Geimer, Stefan; Cole, Douglas G.; Sale, Winfield S.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas can assemble two 10 μm flagella in one hour from proteins synthesized in the cell body. Targeting and transporting these proteins to the flagella are simplified by preassembly of macromolecular complexes in the cell body. Radial spokes are flagellar complexes that are partially assembled in the cell body before entering the flagella. On the axoneme, radial spokes are “T” shaped structures with a head of 5 proteins and a stalk of 18 proteins that sediment together at 20S. In the cell body, radial spokes are partially assembled; about half of the radial spoke proteins (RSPs) form a 12S complex. In mutants lacking a single radial spoke protein, smaller spoke subassemblies were identified. When extracts from two such mutants were mixed in vitro the 12S complex was assembled from several smaller complexes demonstrating that portions of the stepwise assembly of radial spoke assembly can be carried out in vitro to elucidate the order of spoke assembly in the cell body. PMID:21692193

  12. Disentangling component learning and executive processes in hidden pathway maze learning in children: a process-based approach.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Reeve, Robert; Pietrzak, Robert; Maruff, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Identification of cognitive processes that affect children's ability to manage complex information is critical to understanding the development of executive functions. However, characterization of these processes is hampered by a lack of appropriate tasks and reliance on single outcome measures that are unsuitable for studying complex aspects of executive function. The current study aimed to circumvent these limitations by employing a hidden maze learning paradigm (Groton Maze Learning Test; independence of component cognitive GMLT) to evaluate the processes--spatial memory and rule use--that underlie hidden pathway maze learning in children. Specifically, we investigated the impact of withholding rule instructions (Study 1) and nonrepeating pathways on each trial (Study 2) on the ability to use rules and to locate pathways in 10 × 10 mazes in a sample of 8-year-old children. Results of these studies suggested that manipulations of task rules did not affect spatial memory and that manipulations of the maze pathway did not affect rule use. These findings demonstrate the independence of spatial memory and rule use on the GMLT and provide evidence of a "double dissociation" of cognitive processes that underlie hidden maze learning in children. Implications for understanding the coordination of component cognitive processes that underlie executive function in childhood are discussed.

  13. Neural correlates of olfactory and visual memory performance in 3D-simulated mazes after intranasal insulin application.

    PubMed

    Brünner, Yvonne F; Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Mutic, Smiljana; Benedict, Christian; Freiherr, Jessica

    2016-10-01

    This fMRI study intended to establish 3D-simulated mazes with olfactory and visual cues and examine the effect of intranasally applied insulin on memory performance in healthy subjects. The effect of insulin on hippocampus-dependent brain activation was explored using a double-blind and placebo-controlled design. Following intranasal administration of either insulin (40IU) or placebo, 16 male subjects participated in two experimental MRI sessions with olfactory and visual mazes. Each maze included two separate runs. The first was an encoding maze during which subjects learned eight olfactory or eight visual cues at different target locations. The second was a recall maze during which subjects were asked to remember the target cues at spatial locations. For eleven included subjects in the fMRI analysis we were able to validate brain activation for odor perception and visuospatial tasks. However, we did not observe an enhancement of declarative memory performance in our behavioral data or hippocampal activity in response to insulin application in the fMRI analysis. It is therefore possible that intranasal insulin application is sensitive to the methodological variations e.g. timing of task execution and dose of application. Findings from this study suggest that our method of 3D-simulated mazes is feasible for studying neural correlates of olfactory and visual memory performance. PMID:27492601

  14. The effect of sub-anesthetic and anesthetic ketamine on water maze memory acquisition, consolidation and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Maryam; Yadollahi Khales, Golnaz; Rastegar, Karim; Zarifkar, Asadollah

    2012-02-29

    Ketamine, a non-selective inhibitor of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) channels is used in anesthetic or sub-anesthetic doses to induce analgesia, amnesia, to suppress fear, anxiety and depression. Although the ketamine's effect on memory acquisition is known, its effects on other aspects of memory are controversial. Morris water maze is a task which assesses spatial learning and memory. This study was aimed to assess the ketamine's differential effect on water maze memory acquisition, consolidation and retrieval. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-350 g) were trained in water maze single training session. 24h later a probe trial which was consisted of a single trial without platform was done. To assess the effect of ketamine on water maze memory acquisition it was administered before training; to assess its effect on memory consolidation it was administered immediately after training and to assess its effect on memory retrieval it was injected before probe trial. Ketamine both in sub-anesthetic and anesthetic doses impaired water maze memory acquisition, its anesthetic dose but not sub-anesthetic dose impaired memory consolidation and on retrieval stage, both doses deteriorated memory retrieval. It seems that NMDA receptor activity is not just necessary during water maze memory acquisition but also their post-learning reactivation is required to maintain memory consolidation and retrieval.

  15. Neural correlates of olfactory and visual memory performance in 3D-simulated mazes after intranasal insulin application.

    PubMed

    Brünner, Yvonne F; Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Mutic, Smiljana; Benedict, Christian; Freiherr, Jessica

    2016-10-01

    This fMRI study intended to establish 3D-simulated mazes with olfactory and visual cues and examine the effect of intranasally applied insulin on memory performance in healthy subjects. The effect of insulin on hippocampus-dependent brain activation was explored using a double-blind and placebo-controlled design. Following intranasal administration of either insulin (40IU) or placebo, 16 male subjects participated in two experimental MRI sessions with olfactory and visual mazes. Each maze included two separate runs. The first was an encoding maze during which subjects learned eight olfactory or eight visual cues at different target locations. The second was a recall maze during which subjects were asked to remember the target cues at spatial locations. For eleven included subjects in the fMRI analysis we were able to validate brain activation for odor perception and visuospatial tasks. However, we did not observe an enhancement of declarative memory performance in our behavioral data or hippocampal activity in response to insulin application in the fMRI analysis. It is therefore possible that intranasal insulin application is sensitive to the methodological variations e.g. timing of task execution and dose of application. Findings from this study suggest that our method of 3D-simulated mazes is feasible for studying neural correlates of olfactory and visual memory performance.

  16. Correlations among central serotonergic parameters and age-related emotional and cognitive changes assessed through the elevated T-maze and the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciana; Graeff, Frederico G; Pereira, Silvia R C; Oliveira-Silva, Ieda F; Franco, Glaura C; Ribeiro, Angela Maria

    2010-06-01

    Emotion and spatial cognitive aspects were assessed in adult and middle-aged rats using the elevated T-maze (ETM) and the Morris water maze (MWM) tasks. Both adult and middle-aged rats were able to acquire inhibitory avoidance behaviour, though the middle-aged subjects showed larger latencies along the trials, including the baseline, which was significantly longer than that showed by adult rats. Further, compared to adult rats, middle-aged rats had longer escape latency. In spite of the worse performance in the second session of the spatial cognitive task, the middle-aged rats were able to learn the task and remember the information along the whole probe trial test. Both thalamic serotonin (5-HT) concentration and amygdala serotonergic activity (5-HIAA/5-HT) are significantly correlated, respectively, to escape latency and behavioural extinction in the MWM only for middle-aged rats. A significant correlation between the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the amygdala and behavioural extinction for middle-aged, but not for adult, rats was observed. This result suggests that serotonergic activity in the amygdala may regulate behavioural flexibility in aged animals. In addition, a significant negative correlation was found between hippocampal 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio and the path length at the second training session of the MWM task, although only for adult subjects. This was the only session where a significant difference between the performance of middle-aged and adult rats has occurred. Although the involvement of the hippocampus in learning and memory is well established, the present work shows, for the first time, a correlation between a serotonergic hippocampal parameter and performance of a spatial task, which is lost with ageing.

  17. 5-HTT Deficiency Affects Neuroplasticity and Increases Stress Sensitivity Resulting in Altered Spatial Learning Performance in the Morris Water Maze but Not in the Barnes Maze

    PubMed Central

    Karabeg, Margherita M.; Grauthoff, Sandra; Kollert, Sina Y.; Weidner, Magdalena; Heiming, Rebecca S.; Jansen, Friederike; Popp, Sandy; Kaiser, Sylvia; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Sachser, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether spatial hippocampus-dependent learning is affected by the serotonergic system and stress. Therefore, 5-HTT knockout (-/-), heterozygous (+/-) and wildtype (+/+) mice were subjected to the Barnes maze (BM) and the Morris water maze (WM), the latter being discussed as more aversive. Additionally, immediate early gene (IEG) expression, hippocampal adult neurogenesis (aN), and blood plasma corticosterone were analyzed. While the performance of 5-HTT-/- mice in the BM was undistinguishable from both other genotypes, they performed worse in the WM. However, in the course of the repeated WM trials 5-HTT-/- mice advanced to wildtype level. The experience of a single trial of either the WM or the BM resulted in increased plasma corticosterone levels in all genotypes. After several trials 5-HTT-/- mice exhibited higher corticosterone concentrations compared with both other genotypes in both tests. Corticosterone levels were highest in 5-HTT-/- mice tested in the WM indicating greater aversiveness of the WM and a greater stress sensitivity of 5-HTT deficient mice. Quantitative immunohistochemistry in the hippocampus revealed increased cell counts positive for the IEG products cFos and Arc as well as for proliferation marker Ki67 and immature neuron marker NeuroD in 5-HTT-/- mice compared to 5-HTT+/+ mice, irrespective of the test. Most differences were found in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus of the septal hippocampus. Ki67-immunohistochemistry revealed a genotype x environment interaction with 5-HTT genotype differences in naïve controls and WM experience exclusively yielding more Ki67-positive cells in 5-HTT+/+ mice. Moreover, in 5-HTT-/- mice we demonstrate that learning performance correlates with the extent of aN. Overall, higher baseline IEG expression and increased an in the hippocampus of 5-HTT-/- mice together with increased stress sensitivity may constitute the neurobiological correlate of raised

  18. Intraoperative hemodynamic evaluation of the radial and ulnar arteries during free radial forearm flap procedure.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Fulvio; Giordano, Salvatore; Suominen, Erkki; Asko-Seljavaara, Sirpa; Suominen, Sinikka

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the blood flow of the radial and ulnar arteries before and after radial forearm flap raising. Twenty-two patients underwent radial forearm microvascular reconstruction for leg soft tissue defects. Blood flow of the radial, ulnar, and recipient arteries was measured intraoperatively by transit-time and ultrasonic flowmeter. In the in situ radial artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 47.7 mL/min before, 6.7 +/- 4.1 mL/min after raising the flap, and 5.8 +/- 2.0 mL/min after end-to-end anastomosis to the recipient artery. In the ulnar artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 43.3 mL/min before harvesting the radial forearm flap and significantly increased to 85.7 +/- 57.9 mL/min after radial artery sacrifice. A significant difference was also found between this value and the value of blood flow in the ulnar and radial arteries pooled together ( P < 0.05). The vascular resistance in the ulnar artery decreased significantly after the radial artery flap raising (from 2.7 +/- 3.1 to 1.9 +/- 2.2 peripheral resistance units, P = 0.010). The forearm has a conspicuous arterial vascularization not only through the radial and ulnar arteries but also through the interosseous system. The raising of the radial forearm flap increases blood flow and decreases vascular resistance in the ulnar artery. PMID:19902406

  19. Radial Tunnel Syndrome, Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2015-07-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome is a disease which we should consider it in elbow and forearm pains. It is diagnosed with lateral elbow and dorsal forearm pain may radiate to the wrist and dorsum of the fingers. The disease is more prevalent in women with the age of 30 to 50 years old. It occurs by intermittent compression on the radial nerve from the radial head to the inferior border of the supinator muscle, without obvious extensor muscle weakness. Compression could happen in five different sites but the arcade of Frose is the most common area that radial nerve is compressed. To diagnosis radial tunnel syndrome, clinical examination is more important than paraclinic tests such as electrodiagnsic test and imaging studies. The exact site of the pain which can more specified by rule of nine test and weakness of the third finger and wrist extension are valuable physical exams to diagnosis. MRI studies my show muscle edema or atrophy along the distribution of the posterior interosseous nerve. Although non-surgical treatments such as rest, NSAIDs, injections and physiotherapy do not believe to have permanent relief, but it is justify undergoing them before surgery. Surgery could diminish pain and symptoms in 67 to 93 percents of patients completely.

  20. Radial Tunnel Syndrome, Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2015-01-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome is a disease which we should consider it in elbow and forearm pains. It is diagnosed with lateral elbow and dorsal forearm pain may radiate to the wrist and dorsum of the fingers. The disease is more prevalent in women with the age of 30 to 50 years old. It occurs by intermittent compression on the radial nerve from the radial head to the inferior border of the supinator muscle, without obvious extensor muscle weakness. Compression could happen in five different sites but the arcade of Frose is the most common area that radial nerve is compressed. To diagnosis radial tunnel syndrome, clinical examination is more important than paraclinic tests such as electrodiagnsic test and imaging studies. The exact site of the pain which can more specified by rule of nine test and weakness of the third finger and wrist extension are valuable physical exams to diagnosis. MRI studies my show muscle edema or atrophy along the distribution of the posterior interosseous nerve. Although non-surgical treatments such as rest, NSAIDs, injections and physiotherapy do not believe to have permanent relief, but it is justify undergoing them before surgery. Surgery could diminish pain and symptoms in 67 to 93 percents of patients completely. PMID:26213698

  1. Helical antimicrobial polypeptides with radial amphiphilicity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Menghua; Lee, Michelle W.; Mansbach, Rachael A.; Song, Ziyuan; Bao, Yan; Peek, Richard M.; Yao, Catherine; Chen, Lin-Feng; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Cheng, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    α-Helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) generally have facially amphiphilic structures that may lead to undesired peptide interactions with blood proteins and self-aggregation due to exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Here we report the design of a class of cationic, helical homo-polypeptide antimicrobials with a hydrophobic internal helical core and a charged exterior shell, possessing unprecedented radial amphiphilicity. The radially amphiphilic structure enables the polypeptide to bind effectively to the negatively charged bacterial surface and exhibit high antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, the shielding of the hydrophobic core by the charged exterior shell decreases nonspecific interactions with eukaryotic cells, as evidenced by low hemolytic activity, and protects the polypeptide backbone from proteolytic degradation. The radially amphiphilic polypeptides can also be used as effective adjuvants, allowing improved permeation of commercial antibiotics in bacteria and enhanced antimicrobial activity by one to two orders of magnitude. Designing AMPs bearing this unprecedented, unique radially amphiphilic structure represents an alternative direction of AMP development; radially amphiphilic polypeptides may become a general platform for developing AMPs to treat drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:26460016

  2. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour.

  3. Radial spoke proteins of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Chun; Kohno, Takahiro; Pazour, Gregory J.; Dienes, Jennifer M.; Agrin, Nathan S.; King, Stephen M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Witman, George B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The radial spoke is a ubiquitous component of ‘9+2’ cilia and flagella, and plays an essential role in the control of dynein arm activity by relaying signals from the central pair of microtubules to the arms. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii radial spoke contains at least 23 proteins, only 8 of which have been characterized at the molecular level. Here, we use mass spectrometry to identify 10 additional radial spoke proteins. Many of the newly identified proteins in the spoke stalk are predicted to contain domains associated with signal transduction, including Ca2+-, AKAP- and nucleotide-binding domains. This suggests that the spoke stalk is both a scaffold for signaling molecules and itself a transducer of signals. Moreover, in addition to the recently described HSP40 family member, a second spoke stalk protein is predicted to be a molecular chaperone, implying that there is a sophisticated mechanism for the assembly of this large complex. Among the 18 spoke proteins identified to date, at least 12 have apparent homologs in humans, indicating that the radial spoke has been conserved throughout evolution. The human genes encoding these proteins are candidates for causing primary ciliary dyskinesia, a severe inherited disease involving missing or defective axonemal structures, including the radial spokes. PMID:16507594

  4. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour. PMID:24664922

  5. Fast Radial Flows in Transition Disk Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Chiang, Eugene; Andrews, Sean M.

    2014-02-01

    Protoplanetary "transition" disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  6. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  7. Behavioral profiles displayed by rats in an elevated asymmetric plus-maze: effects of diazepam.

    PubMed

    Ruarte, M B; Alvarez, E O

    1999-01-01

    When rats are exposed to unknown environments where novelty and fear-inducing characteristics are present (conflictive environments), some specific behaviors are induced and exploration is apparently modulated by fear. In our laboratory, a new type of plus-maze was designed as a model of conflictive exploration. The maze is composed of four arms with different geometrical characteristics, differing from each other by the presence or absence of walls. The degree of asymmetry was as follows: NW, no wall arm; SW, a single high wall present; HL, a low and a high wall present, and HH, two high walls present. The four arms were arranged at 90 degrees angles and the apparatus was called the elevated asymmetric plus-maze (APM). The purpose of the present study was to assess the behavioral profile of rats exposed for a single time to the APM with or without treatment with benzodiazepine. Increasing doses of diazepam were injected intraperitoneally in several groups of male, 90-day-old Holtzman rats. Distilled water was injected in control animals. Thirty minutes after treatment all rats were exposed singly to a 5-min test in the APM. Diazepam induced a biphasic modification of exploration in the NW and SW arms. The increase in the exploration score was evident at low doses of diazepam (0.25-1.0 mg/kg body weight) and the decrease in exploration was found with the higher doses of diazepam (2.0-3.0 mg/kg body weight). Non-exploratory behaviors (permanency) were not affected by benzodiazepine treatment. In the HL arm, exploration was not modified but permanency was increased in a dose-dependent manner. In the HH arm, exploration and permanency were not affected. Results are compatible with the idea that exploration-processing mechanisms in conflictive environments are modulated by fear-processing mechanisms of the brain. PMID:10347776

  8. Behavioural and pharmacological characterisation of the elevated "zero-maze" as an animal model of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J K; Grewal, S S; Fletcher, A; Bill, D J; Dourish, C T

    1994-09-01

    The elevated "zero-maze" is a modification of the elevated plus-maze model of anxiety in rats which incorporates both traditional and novel ethological measures in the analysis of drug effects. The novel design comprises an elevated annular platform with two opposite enclosed quadrants and two open, removing any ambiguity in interpretation of time spent on the central square of the traditional design and allowing uninterrupted exploration. Using this model, the reference benzodiazepine anxiolytics, diazepam (0.125-0.5 mg/kg) and chlordiazepoxide (0.5-2.0 mg/kg) significantly increased the percentage of time spent in the open quadrants (% TO) and the frequency of head dips over the edge of the platform (HDIPS), and reduced the frequency of stretched attend postures (SAP) from the closed to open quadrants. In contrast, the anxiogenic drug m-chlorophenyl-piperazine (mCPP; 0.25-1.0 mg/kg) induced the opposite effects, decreasing %TO and HDIPS, and increasing SAP. The 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 0.001-0.1 mg/kg) had no effects on either %TO or HDIPS, but did decrease SAP at 0.01 mg/kg although not at higher or lower doses. Similarly, the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron (0.0001-1.0 mg/kg) decreased SAP and increased %TO at 0.01 mg/kg, but not at other doses. The present data suggest that a combination of the novel "zero-maze" design and a detailed ethological analysis provides a sensitive model for the detection of anxiolytic/anxiogenic drug action.

  9. Temporal analysis of free exploration of an elevated plus-maze in mice.

    PubMed

    Arabo, Arnaud; Potier, Claire; Ollivier, Gaëlle; Lorivel, Thomas; Roy, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    The elevated plus-maze (EPM) is a very common rodent test of anxiety. It is based on an approach-avoidance conflict between secure closed arms and aversive open arms. However, discrepancies remain on the interpretation of animals' behavior in this assay. The purpose of our study was to get a better understanding of the mouse behavior in the EPM. We applied a minute-by-minute analysis to compare the behavior of mice forcibly exposed to the maze or set free to explore the maze from a familiar box. Three strains of mice (CD1, BALB/c, and C57Bl/6) were tested. The combination of our different conditions of the test with the minute-by-minute analysis showed that mice did not avoid open arms during the first 2 min of the test when they were forcibly exposed to the EPM. Conversely, free exploration of the EPM resulted in a pattern of behavior characterized by open arm avoidance from the outset, demonstrating that open arm avoidance in mice is unconditioned. These findings generalize across the 3 mouse strains. These data suggest that rodents enter the open arms to complete spatial information about the apparatus as a whole before their natural tendency to avoid them is expressed. Our data also indicate that a detailed behavioral analysis is needed whenever BALB/c mice are to be exposed by force to the EPM. Further studies are required to fully understand the behavior of rodents in the EPM and to avoid false interpretations in the fields of psychopharmacology and behavioral neuroscience.

  10. Individual differences in the elevated plus-maze and the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Estanislau, Celio; Ramos, Anna Carolina; Ferraresi, Paula Daniele; Costa, Naiara Fernanda; de Carvalho, Heloisa Maria Cotta Pires; Batistela, Silmara

    2011-01-01

    The elevated plus-maze is an apparatus composed of enclosed and open (elevated) arms and time spent in the open arms by a rat can be increased/decreased by anxiolytic/anxiogenic agents. In the forced swim test, floating behavior is used as an index of behavioral despair and can be decreased by antidepressant agents. As the comorbidity between anxiety and depression is a remarkable issue in human behavioral disorders, a possible relationship between the behaviors seen in the cited tests is of great relevance. In the present study, fifty-four male rats (Rattus norvegicus) were submitted to a plus-maze session and to a 2-day forced swim protocol. According to their time in the open arms, they were divided into three groups: Low Open, Medium Open and High Open. Some plus-maze measures were found to be coherent with time in the open arms and are suggested to also be reliable anxiety indexes. In the forced swim test, the Low Open group showed decreases in floating duration from forced swim Session 1 to Session 2, an alteration opposite to that observed in the other groups (particularly, the Medium Open group). The Low Open group also showed increases in floating latency, again in sharp contrast with the alteration found in the other groups. Accordingly, positive and negative correlation were found between time in the open arms and floating duration and latency, respectively. Results are compared to previous studies and mediation of the effect by reactivity to aversive stimulation or alterations induced by open arm exposure is discussed.

  11. Learning, memory and search strategies of inbred mouse strains with different visual abilities in the Barnes maze.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Timothy P; Savoie, Vicki; Brown, Richard E

    2011-01-20

    Visuo-spatial learning and memory were assessed in male and female mice of 13 inbred strains on a small diameter mouse version of the Barnes maze surrounded by a wall and intra-maze visual cues. Mice completed acquisition and reversal training to assess learning, followed by a probe test to assess memory for the spatial location of the escape hole. The C57BL/6J and CAST/EiJ strains showed better learning performance than the other strains. A/J and 129/SvImJ strains showed poor learning performance, which may be due to their low rates of exploration. No differences in memory were found between strains in the probe test. Males showed better learning performance than females in the DBA/2J and C3H/HeJ strains, but there were no sex differences in the other strains. However, mice may not have used visuo-spatial cues to locate the escape hole in this maze, as (1) all strains primarily used the non-spatial serial/thigmotaxic search strategy, (2) no strains showed a reversal effect when the escape hole location was moved, and (3) learning and memory performance were not correlated with measures of visual ability. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance indicated that mice with good visual ability performed better than mice with poor visual ability, but the effect sizes were small. The small diameter of the maze and the presence of a wall around the edge of the maze may promote thigmotaxis in mice, increasing the use of a non-visual search strategy, thereby reducing the influence of vision on performance and decreasing the sensitivity of this maze design to detect strain differences in visuo-spatial learning and memory. These results indicate that the design of the Barnes maze has a significant effect on learning and memory processes.

  12. Marangoni self-propelled capsules in a maze: pollutants 'sense and act' in complex channel environments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Environmental remediation is a highly pressing issue in society. Here we demonstrate that autonomous self-propelled millimeter sized capsules can sense the presence of pollutants, mark sites for visible identification and remove the contamination, while navigating in a complex environment of interconnected channels, the maze. Such long-range self-powered capsules propelled by the Marangoni effect are capable of releasing chemicals to alter the pH and induce aggregation during pollutant flocculation at a faster rate than convection or diffusion. These devices are foreseen to have real-world environmental applications in the near future.

  13. Post-trial flicker stimulation interferes with spatial memory in the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Buresová, O; Panakhova, E; Bures, J

    1985-05-23

    Rats (n = 20) trained under monocular viewing conditions in the working memory version of Morris water maze task received daily a single acquisition trial with a new location of the invisible escape platform followed after 15 min by a single retrieval trial. Escape latency decreased by 50% during retrieval. Flash stimulation (20 Hz, 0.6 J) during the entire 15-min delay disrupted retention, but this effect was not observed when the flashes started 3 or 5 min after acquisition. It is concluded that successful place learning requires a brief interference-free post-acquisition interval.

  14. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-11-07

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  15. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  16. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-17

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  17. Generalized radially self-accelerating helicon beams.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-10-31

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a new class of optical beams that are radially self-accelerating and nondiffracting. These beams continuously evolve on spiraling trajectories while maintaining their amplitude and phase distribution in their rotating rest frame. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of radial self-acceleration and prove our findings experimentally. As radially self-accelerating beams are nonparaxial and a solution to the full scalar Helmholtz equation, they can be implemented in many linear wave systems beyond optics, from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and soft matter. Our work generalized the study of classical helicon beams to a complete set of solutions for rotating complex fields. PMID:25396370

  18. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  19. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  20. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, P.; Bottom, M.; Davison, C.; Mills, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Brinkworth, C.; Tanner, A. M.; Beichman, C. A.; Catanzarite, J.; Crawford, S.; Wallace, J.; Mennesson, B.; Johnson, J. A.; White, R. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; von Braun, K.; Walp, B.; Vasisht, G.; Kane, S. R.; Prato, L. A.; NIRRVs

    2014-01-01

    We present precise radial velocity time-series from a 2.3 micron pilot survey to detect exoplanets around red, low mass, and young stars. We use the CSHELL spectrograph with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility. We present an overview of our Nelder-Mead simplex optimization pipeline for extracting radial velocities. We will also present first light data at 1.6 microns from a near-infrared fiber scrambler used in tandem with our gas cell and CSHELL at IRTF. The fiber scrambler makes use of non-circular core fibers to stabilize the illumination of the slit and echelle grating against changes in seeing, focus, guiding and other sources of systematic radial velocity noise, complementing the wavelength calibration of a gas cell.

  1. Reconstruction for Type IV Radial Polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-09-01

    Type IV radial polydactyly represents a thumb with an extra proximal and distal phalanx. Assessment of the thumb for surgical reconstruction includes observing thumb function, evaluating thumb size and stability, and assessing the first web space. Reconstruction includes excision of the smaller thumb, typically the radial thumb, and re-creating thumb stability and alignment by addressing tendon insertion and joint orientation. Although surgical results are satisfying and complications are uncommon, additional surgical intervention may be required over time owing to thumb malalignment or instability.

  2. Radial elasticity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Palaci, I; Fedrigo, S; Brune, H; Klinke, C; Chen, M; Riedo, E

    2005-05-01

    We report an experimental and a theoretical study of the radial elasticity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a function of external radius. We use atomic force microscopy and apply small indentation amplitudes in order to stay in the linear elasticity regime. The number of layers for a given tube radius is inferred from transmission electron microscopy, revealing constant ratios of external to internal radii. This enables a comparison with molecular dynamics results, which also shed some light onto the applicability of Hertz theory in this context. Using this theory, we find a radial Young modulus strongly decreasing with increasing radius and reaching an asymptotic value of 30+/-10 GPa.

  3. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocity measurements are being made to search for planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. The reflex acceleration induced on stars by planets can be sensed by measuring the small, slow changes in the line-of-site velocities of stars. To detect these planetary perturbations, the data series must be made on a uniform instrumental scale for as long as it takes a planet to orbit its star. A spectrometer of extreme stability and unprecedented sensitivity to changes in stellar radial velocities was operated.

  4. Plasma Signatures of Radial Field Power Dropouts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucek, E.A.; Horbury, T.S.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1998-10-04

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and {beta} during these events.

  5. A robust animal model of state anxiety: fear-potentiated behaviour in the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Korte, S Mechiel; De Boer, Sietse F

    2003-02-28

    Fear (i.e., decreased percentage time spent on open-arm exploration) in the elevated plus-maze can be potentiated by prior inescapable stressor exposure, but not by escapable stress. The use of fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour has several advantages as compared to more traditional animal models of anxiety. (a) In contrast to the traditional (spontaneous) elevated plus-maze, which measures innate fear of open spaces, fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour reflects an enhanced anxiety state (allostatic state). This "state anxiety" can be defined as an unpleasant emotional arousal in face of threatening demands or dangers. A cognitive appraisal of threat is a prerequisite for the experience of this type of emotion. (b) Depending on the stressor used (e.g., fear of shock, predator odour, swim stress, restraint, social defeat, predator stress (cat)), this enhanced anxiety state can last from 90 min to 3 weeks. Stress effects are more severe when rats are isolated in comparison to group housing. (c) Drugs can be administered in the absence of the original stressor and after stressor exposure. As a consequence, retrieval mechanisms are not affected by drug treatment. (d) Fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour is sensitive to proven/putative anxiolytics and anxiogenics which act via mechanisms related to the benzodiazepine-gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor, but it is also sensitive to corticotropin-releasing receptor antagonists and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists and serotonin receptor agonists/antagonists complex (high predictive validity). (e) Fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour is very robust, and experiments can easily be replicated in other labs. (f) Fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour can be measured both in males and females. (g) Neural mechanisms involved in contextual fear conditioning, fear potentiation and state anxiety can be studied.Thus, fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour may be a valuable measure in the understanding of neural mechanisms involved in

  6. A within-subject between-apparatus comparison of impulsive choice: T-maze and two-lever chamber.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Paul J; Kuhn, Robin; Reilly, Mark P

    2015-07-01

    Whereas intertemporal choice procedures are a common method for examining impulsive choice in nonhuman subjects, the apparatus used to implement this procedure varies across studies. The purpose of the present study was to compare impulsive choice between a two-lever chamber and a T-maze. In Experiment 1, rats chose between a smaller, immediate reinforcer and a larger, delayed reinforcer, first in a two-lever chamber and then in a T-maze. Delay to the larger reinforcer changed in an ascending and descending order (0-32 s) across sessions. Experiment 2 examined the same between-apparatus comparison but under steady-state conditions with the delay fixed at 32 s. In Experiment 1, choice for the larger, delayed reinforcer was generally higher in the T-maze than in the two-lever chamber. Similarly in Experiment 2, steady-state choice for the larger, delayed reinforcer was higher in the T-maze. Choice for the 32-s delayed reinforcer was also greater in Experiment 2 than in Experiment 1, suggesting that extended exposure to the delay is required for the T-maze to yield reliable impulsive choice data. While the reasons for the between-apparatus discrepancies are at present unknown, results from both experiments clearly demonstrate that the apparatus matters when assessing overall level and reliability of impulsive choice data.

  7. A computational model for exploratory activity of rats with different anxiety levels in elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ariadne A; Morato, Silvio; Roque, Antonio C; Tinós, Renato

    2014-10-30

    The elevated plus-maze is an apparatus widely used to study the level of anxiety in rodents. The maze is plus-shaped, with two enclosed arms and two open arms, and elevated 50cm from the floor. During a test, which usually lasts for 5min, the animal is initially put at the center and is free to move and explore the entire maze. The level of anxiety is measured by variables such as the percentage of time spent and the number of entries in the enclosed arms. High percentage of time spent at and number of entries in the enclosed arms indicate anxiety. Here we propose a computational model of rat behavior in the elevated plus-maze based on an artificial neural network trained by a genetic algorithm. The fitness function of the genetic algorithm is composed of reward (positive) and punishment (negative) terms, which are incremented as the computational agent (virtual rat) moves in the maze. The punishment term is modulated by a parameter that simulates the effects of different drugs. Unlike other computational models, the virtual rat is built independently of prior known experimental data. The exploratory behaviors generated by the model for different simulated pharmacological conditions are in good agreement with data from real rats.

  8. Different rankings of inbred mouse strains on the Morris maze and a refined 4-arm water escape task.

    PubMed

    Wahlsten, Douglas; Cooper, Sean F; Crabbe, John C

    2005-11-30

    The submerged platform or Morris water escape task is widely used to study genetic variation in spatial learning and memory, but interpretation is sometimes difficult because of wall hugging, jumping off the platform, floating or non-spatial swim strategies. We modified the task by introducing four wide arms into the circular tank and adding features that reduced, eliminated, or compensated for several competing behaviors. Three versions of the 4-arm task were evaluated in detail, and the third version yielded good results for six of eight inbred strains. Furthermore, the 4-arm task could be scored adequately without computerized video tracking. Although performance on the 4-arm task was generally superior to the Morris maze, the extent of the improvement was strain dependent. Two strains with retinal degeneration (C3H/HeJ, FVB/NJ) performed poorly on both the Morris and 4-arm mazes, whereas C57BL/6J and DBA/2J did well on both mazes. A/J performed poorly on the Morris task but became very proficient on the 4-arm maze, despite its strong tendency to hug the walls of the tank. The BALB/cByJ strain, on the other hand, exhibited the best probe trial performance on the Morris maze but was very slow in acquiring the 4-arm task. We conclude that no single task can reveal the full richness of spatially guided behavior in a wide range of mouse genotypes. PMID:16191444

  9. The effect of water maze spatial training on posterior parietal cortex transcallosal evoked field potentials in the rat.

    PubMed

    Beiko, J; Cain, D P

    1998-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is the principal model of synaptic plasticity often used to explain the changes that occur in the brain as a result of learning and memory. In this experiment the relationship between rat posterior parietal cortex (PPC) transcallosal evoked field potentials (TCEPs) and spatial training in the water maze was examined to determine if LTP-like changes (i.e. learning-induced LTP) in PPC TCEPs occur as a result of spatial training. Spatial training consisted of 10 trials per day for 10 consecutive days. The location of the hidden platform was changed over the course of spatial training to ensure the rats' acquisition of several different platform positions. TCEPs were taken 1 and 23 h after each training session. Upon completion of all water maze training, the animals were administered LTP-inducing trains to ensure that the recording arrangement and procedure was capable of detecting LTP. The results showed that the rats quickly acquired the water maze task and that the recording arrangement and procedure were capable of detecting LTP, even after the first session of induction. However, despite robust place learning, the TCEPs taken after water maze training did not differ from those taken before water maze training. Although the present results failed to provide any evidence for a role of neocortical LTP in learning and memory, further studies of this nature are required to determine if the present results generalize to different behavioural tasks and/or cortical areas.

  10. A computational model for exploratory activity of rats with different anxiety levels in elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ariadne A; Morato, Silvio; Roque, Antonio C; Tinós, Renato

    2014-10-30

    The elevated plus-maze is an apparatus widely used to study the level of anxiety in rodents. The maze is plus-shaped, with two enclosed arms and two open arms, and elevated 50cm from the floor. During a test, which usually lasts for 5min, the animal is initially put at the center and is free to move and explore the entire maze. The level of anxiety is measured by variables such as the percentage of time spent and the number of entries in the enclosed arms. High percentage of time spent at and number of entries in the enclosed arms indicate anxiety. Here we propose a computational model of rat behavior in the elevated plus-maze based on an artificial neural network trained by a genetic algorithm. The fitness function of the genetic algorithm is composed of reward (positive) and punishment (negative) terms, which are incremented as the computational agent (virtual rat) moves in the maze. The punishment term is modulated by a parameter that simulates the effects of different drugs. Unlike other computational models, the virtual rat is built independently of prior known experimental data. The exploratory behaviors generated by the model for different simulated pharmacological conditions are in good agreement with data from real rats. PMID:25128721

  11. Modafinil and memory: effects of modafinil on Morris water maze learning and Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Tristan; Wood, Suzanne C; Anagnostaras, Stephan G

    2009-04-01

    Modafinil has been shown to promote wakefulness and some studies suggest the drug can improve cognitive function. Because of many similarities, the mechanism of action may be comparable to classical psychostimulants, although the exact mechanisms of modafinil's actions in wakefulness and cognitive enhancement are unknown. The current study aims to further examine the effects of modafinil as a cognitive enhancer on hippocampus-dependent memory in mice. A high dose of modafinil (75 mg/kg ip) given before training improved acquisition on a Morris water maze. When given only before testing, modafinil did not affect water maze performance. We also examined modafinil (0.075 to 75 mg/kg) on Pavlovian fear conditioning. A low dose of pretraining modafinil (0.75 mg/kg) enhanced memory of contextual fear conditioning (tested off-drug 1 week later) whereas a high dose (75 mg/kg) disrupted memory. Pretraining modafinil did not affect cued conditioning at any dose tested, and immediate posttraining modafinil had no effect on either cued or contextual fear. These results suggest that modafinil's effects of memory are more selective than amphetamine or cocaine and specific to hippocampus-dependent memory.

  12. Path Complexity in Virtual Water Maze Navigation: Differential Associations with Age, Sex, and Regional Brain Volume.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Ana M; Yuan, Peng; Dahle, Cheryl L; Bender, Andrew R; Yang, Yiqin; Raz, Naftali

    2015-09-01

    Studies of human navigation in virtual maze environments have consistently linked advanced age with greater distance traveled between the start and the goal and longer duration of the search. Observations of search path geometry suggest that routes taken by older adults may be unnecessarily complex and that excessive path complexity may be an indicator of cognitive difficulties experienced by older navigators. In a sample of healthy adults, we quantify search path complexity in a virtual Morris water maze with a novel method based on fractal dimensionality. In a two-level hierarchical linear model, we estimated improvement in navigation performance across trials by a decline in route length, shortening of search time, and reduction in fractal dimensionality of the path. While replicating commonly reported age and sex differences in time and distance indices, a reduction in fractal dimension of the path accounted for improvement across trials, independent of age or sex. The volumes of brain regions associated with the establishment of cognitive maps (parahippocampal gyrus and hippocampus) were related to path dimensionality, but not to the total distance and time. Thus, fractal dimensionality of a navigational path may present a useful complementary method of quantifying performance in navigation.

  13. Use of the Open Field Maze to measure locomotor and anxiety-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Seibenhener, Michael L; Wooten, Michael C

    2015-02-06

    Animal models have proven to be invaluable to researchers trying to answer questions regarding the mechanisms of behavior. The Open Field Maze is one of the most commonly used platforms to measure behaviors in animal models. It is a fast and relatively easy test that provides a variety of behavioral information ranging from general ambulatory ability to data regarding the emotionality of the subject animal. As it relates to rodent models, the procedure allows the study of different strains of mice or rats both laboratory bred and wild-captured. The technique also readily lends itself to the investigation of different pharmacological compounds for anxiolytic or anxiogenic effects. Here, a protocol for use of the open field maze to describe mouse behaviors is detailed and a simple analysis of general locomotor ability and anxiety-related emotional behaviors between two strains of C57BL/6 mice is performed. Briefly, using the described protocol we show Wild Type mice exhibited significantly less anxiety related behaviors than did age-matched Knock Out mice while both strains exhibited similar ambulatory ability.

  14. Heading which way? Y-maze chemical assays: not all crustaceans are alike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenning, Matthes; Lehmann, Philipp; Lindström, Magnus; Harzsch, Steffen

    2015-09-01

    In a world full of chemicals, many crustaceans rely on elaborate olfactory systems to guide behaviors related to finding food or to assess the presence of conspecifics and predators. We analyzed the responses of the isopod Saduria entomon to a range of stimuli by which the animal is likely to encounter in its natural habitat using a Y-maze bioassay. In order to document the efficiency of the experimental design, the same bioassay was used to test the behavior of the crayfish Procambarus fallax whose ability to track odors is well documented. The crayfish performed well in the Y-maze and were able to locate the source of a food-related odor with high fidelity. The isopod S. entomon reacted indifferently or with aversion to most of the stimuli applied. In 1800 trials, only four out of 15 different stimuli yielded statistically significant results, and only one odorant was found to be significantly attractive. The findings raise several questions whether the stimuli presented and/or the experimental setup used represents an ecologically relevant situation for S. entomon. In each instance, our experiments illustrate that established methods cannot be readily transferred from one species to another.

  15. Opioid antagonist naloxone potentiates anxiogenic-like action of cholecystokinin agonists in elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Kõks, S; Soosaar, A; Võikar, V; Volke, V; Ustav, M; Männistö, P T; Bourin, M; Vasar, E

    1998-06-01

    This study investigated the interplay of cholecystokinin (CCK) and endogenous opioid peptides in the regulation of anxiety. The acute administration of non-selective CCK agonist caerulein (1 and 5 microg/kg) and a selective CCK(B) receptor agonist BOC-CCK-4 (1, 10 and 50 microg/kg) induced a dose-dependent anxiogenic-like action in the plus-maze model of anxiety. BOC-CCK-4 displayed a similar efficacy with caerulein, indicating that the described effect was mediated via CCK(B) receptor subtype. The opioid antagonist naloxone itself (0.5 mg/kg) did not change the exploratory activity of rats in the plus-maze. However, the combination of naloxone with the sub-effective doses of caerulein (1 microg/kg) and BOC-CCK-4 (1 microg/kg) induced a significant inhibition of exploratory behaviour in rats. Accordingly, CCK and endogenous opioid peptides have an antagonistic role in the exploratory model of anxiety in rats.

  16. Effects of acute fluoxetine, paroxetine and desipramine on rats tested on the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Drapier, Dominique; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Laviolle, Bruno; Millet, Bruno; Allain, Hervé; Bourin, Michel; Reymann, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-25

    Antidepressants are usually prescribed for the treatment of depression but more recently have also been recommended for the treatment of anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anxiogenic- or anxiolytic-like effects of an acute administration of antidepressants (serotonergic and noradrenergic compounds) in male Wistar rats submitted to the elevated plus-maze. Fluoxetine (2.5, 5, 10, 15mg/kg), paroxetine (0.1, 0.5, 3, 12mg/kg) and desipramine (2.5, 5, 10mg/kg) or their vehicles were administered intraperitoneally 30min prior to testing. Diazepam (0.5, 1.5, 2.5mg/kg) was used as a positive comparator for anxiolytic effect. In comparison with control animals, the percentage of time the rats treated with fluoxetine (5 and 10mg/kg) and paroxetine (3 and 12mg/kg) spent in the open arms decreased. The percent of inactive time spent in the open arms also decreased in rats given fluoxetine (5 and 10mg/kg) and paroxetine (12mg/kg). Desipramine was inactive on all these parameters. In conclusion, acute treatment with fluoxetine and paroxetine, but not with desipramine, produced a pattern of anxiety behavior. Thus, the pharmacological mechanism appears to be due more to serotonergic than adrenergic neurotransmission. The elevated plus-maze exhibits good sensitivity for detecting anxiogenic effects of antidepressant drugs and the conventional parameters are sufficient and reliable for detecting such effects.

  17. Vertical T-maze choice assay for arthropod response to odorants.

    PubMed

    Stelinski, Lukasz; Tiwari, Siddharth

    2013-01-01

    Given the economic importance of insects and arachnids as pests of agricultural crops, urban environments or as vectors of plant and human diseases, various technologies are being developed as control tools. A subset of these tools focuses on modifying the behavior of arthropods by attraction or repulsion. Therefore, arthropods are often the focus of behavioral investigations. Various tools have been developed to measure arthropod behavior, including wind tunnels, flight mills, servospheres, and various types of olfactometers. The purpose of these tools is to measure insect or arachnid response to visual or more often olfactory cues. The vertical T-maze olfactometer described here measures choices performed by insects in response to attractants or repellents. It is a high throughput assay device that takes advantage of the positive phototaxis (attraction to light) and negative geotaxis (tendency to walk or fly upward) exhibited by many arthropods. The olfactometer consists of a 30 cm glass tube that is divided in half with a Teflon strip forming a T-maze. Each half serves as an arm of the olfactometer enabling the test subjects to make a choice between two potential odor fields in assays involving attractants. In assays involving repellents, lack of normal response to known attractants can also be measured as a third variable. PMID:23439130

  18. Cross-species translation of the Morris maze for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Possin, Katherine L; Sanchez, Pascal E; Anderson-Bergman, Clifford; Fernandez, Roland; Kerchner, Geoffrey A; Johnson, Erica T; Davis, Allyson; Lo, Iris; Bott, Nicholas T; Kiely, Thomas; Fenesy, Michelle C; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Analogous behavioral assays are needed across animal models and human patients to improve translational research. Here, we examined the extent to which performance in the Morris water maze - the most frequently used behavioral assay of spatial learning and memory in rodents - translates to humans. We designed a virtual version of the assay for human subjects that includes the visible-target training, hidden-target learning, and probe trials that are typically administered in the mouse version. We compared transgenic mice that express human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) and patients with mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (MCI-AD) to evaluate the sensitivity of performance measures in detecting deficits. Patients performed normally during visible-target training, while hAPP mice showed procedural learning deficits. In hidden-target learning and probe trials, hAPP mice and MCI-AD patients showed similar deficits in learning and remembering the target location. In addition, we have provided recommendations for selecting performance measures and sample sizes to make these assays sensitive to learning and memory deficits in humans with MCI-AD and in mouse models. Together, our results demonstrate that with careful study design and analysis, the Morris maze is a sensitive assay for detecting AD-relevant impairments across species.

  19. Possible anxiolytic effects of taurine in the mouse elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si Wei; Kong, Wei Xi; Zhang, Yi Jing; Li, Yu Lei; Mi, Xiao Juan; Mu, Xiao Shuo

    2004-08-01

    The effects of taurine, an inhibitory amino acid, on the behavior of male mice were examined in the elevated plus-maze test of anxiety. Acute taurine treatment (60 mg/kg, PO) significantly increased the percentage of time spent in the open arms. Moreover, when taurine was administered daily for seven days and the plus-maze test was conducted 40 minutes after the last administration, a significant increase of the percentage of time in the open arms was observed even at dose of 2.5 mg/kg, however the open arm entries and the total entries were unaffected at any dose tested. In order to get a comprehensive profile of drug action, detailed behavioral analyses were further exerted. Single administration of 60 mg/kg taurine can significantly reduce the total rears. The results suggest that taurine have some anxiolytic-like properties, although its effects seem more limited and are not consistent with those presented by classic anxiolytics, such as diazepam.

  20. MK-801 and AP5 impair acquisition, but not retention, of the Morris milk maze.

    PubMed

    Heale, V; Harley, C

    1990-05-01

    The effects of the NMDA blockers, AP5 and MK-801, were assessed in two spatial tests. AP5 (10 micrograms in 2 microliters ICV, N = 6), or MK-801 (0.07 mg/kg IP, N = 6), significantly increased open-field activity in male Long-Evans rats in two 3-min tests (Days 1 and 2) compared to control groups receiving equal volume saline injections (N = 12). In the Morris milk maze, NMDA blockade significantly impaired acquisition performance on two blocks of six trials, which followed each open-field test. Only control animals showed evidence of acquisition on a drug-free retention test assessing latency to reach the expected platform area and number of crossings in the area on Day 4. Retention was tested in control animals under NMDA blockade on Day 6. There was no effect of NMDA blockade on retention in the Morris milk maze. These results support the hypothesis that NMDA receptors are critical for the initiation of synaptic modification underlying place learning, but are not necessary in synaptic transmission during retrieval of place information.

  1. Water maze training in aged rats: effects on brain metabolic capacity and behavior.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, J S; Gonzalez-Lima, F; Berndt, J; Barea-Rodriguez, E J

    2002-06-01

    The effects of Morris water maze training on brain metabolism and behavior were compared between aged (20-22 months) and young (2-4 months) Fischer 344 male rats. Each group had yoked controls, which swam the same amount of time as the trained rats but without the platform. This was followed after 9 days by quantitative histochemical mapping of brain cytochrome oxidase, the terminal enzyme for cellular respiration. The aged rats spent a significantly lower percent of time in the correct quadrant and had a longer latency to escape to the hidden platform, relative to the young rats. Metabolic differences between trained aged and young rats were found in regions related to escape under stress: perirhinal cortex, basolateral amygdala and lateral habenula; and vestibular nuclei that guide orientation in three-dimensional space. These differences were not found in the yoked swimming rats. The results suggest that, at the time point investigated, water maze training in aged Fischer 344 rats produces altered oxidative energy metabolism in task-relevant limbic and vestibular regions.

  2. A Navigation Analysis Tool (NAT) to assess spatial behavior in open-field and structured mazes.

    PubMed

    Jarlier, Frédéric; Arleo, Angelo; Petit, Géraldine H; Lefort, Julie M; Fouquet, Céline; Burguière, Eric; Rondi-Reig, Laure

    2013-05-15

    Spatial navigation calls upon mnemonic capabilities (e.g. remembering the location of a rewarding site) as well as adaptive motor control (e.g. fine tuning of the trajectory according to the ongoing sensory context). To study this complex process by means of behavioral measurements it is necessary to quantify a large set of meaningful parameters on multiple time scales (from milliseconds to several minutes), and to compare them across different paradigms. Moreover, the issue of automating the behavioral analysis is critical to cope with the consequent computational load and the sophistication of the measurements. We developed a general purpose Navigation Analysis Tool (NAT) that provides an integrated architecture consisting of a data management system (implemented in MySQL), a core analysis toolbox (in MATLAB), and a graphical user interface (in JAVA). Its extensive characterization of trajectories over time, from exploratory behavior to goal-oriented navigation with decision points using a wide range of parameters, makes NAT a powerful analysis tool. In particular, NAT supplies a new set of specific measurements assessing performances in multiple intersection mazes and allowing navigation strategies to be discriminated (e.g. in the starmaze). Its user interface enables easy use while its modular organization provides many opportunities of extension and customization. Importantly, the portability of NAT to any type of maze and environment extends its exploitation far beyond the field of spatial navigation.

  3. Cognitive enrichment for bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus): evaluation of a novel underwater maze device.

    PubMed

    Clark, Fay E; Davies, Samuel L; Madigan, Andrew W; Warner, Abby J; Kuczaj, Stan A

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enrichment is gaining popularity as a tool to enhance captive animal well-being, but research on captive cetaceans is lacking. Dolphin cognition has been studied intensively since the 1950s, and several hundred bottlenose dolphins are housed in major zoos and aquaria worldwide, but most dolphin enrichment consists of simple floating objects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a novel, underwater maze device (UMD) was cognitively enriching for one group of male and one group of female dolphins at Six Flags Discovery Kingdom, CA. The dolphin's task was to navigate a rubber ball through a maze of pipes, towards an exit pipe. We also tested a modification where an edible gelatine ball fell into the pool once the UMD was solved. The UMD was provided to each group between 8 and 11 times over a 4-week period. Male dolphins used the UMD without prior training, whereas females did not use the UMD at all. Two male dolphins solved the UMD 17 times, using a variety of problem-solving strategies. The UMD had no significant effect on circular (repetitive) swimming patterns, but males spent significantly more time underwater when the UMD was present. Males used the UMD significantly more when it contained the rubber ball, but the gelatine ball stimulated social play. The UMD is a safe and practical device for captive dolphins. It now requires further testing on other dolphins, particularly females, to in order to examine whether the sex differences we observed are a general phenomenon.

  4. Cross-species translation of the Morris maze for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Possin, Katherine L.; Sanchez, Pascal E.; Anderson-Bergman, Clifford; Fernandez, Roland; Kerchner, Geoffrey A.; Johnson, Erica T.; Davis, Allyson; Lo, Iris; Bott, Nicholas T.; Kiely, Thomas; Fenesy, Michelle C.; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Analogous behavioral assays are needed across animal models and human patients to improve translational research. Here, we examined the extent to which performance in the Morris water maze — the most frequently used behavioral assay of spatial learning and memory in rodents — translates to humans. We designed a virtual version of the assay for human subjects that includes the visible-target training, hidden-target learning, and probe trials that are typically administered in the mouse version. We compared transgenic mice that express human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) and patients with mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease (MCI-AD) to evaluate the sensitivity of performance measures in detecting deficits. Patients performed normally during visible-target training, while hAPP mice showed procedural learning deficits. In hidden-target learning and probe trials, hAPP mice and MCI-AD patients showed similar deficits in learning and remembering the target location. In addition, we have provided recommendations for selecting performance measures and sample sizes to make these assays sensitive to learning and memory deficits in humans with MCI-AD and in mouse models. Together, our results demonstrate that with careful study design and analysis, the Morris maze is a sensitive assay for detecting AD-relevant impairments across species. PMID:26784542

  5. Automated Visual Cognitive Tasks for Recording Neural Activity Using a Floor Projection Maze

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Brendon W.; Yang, Fang-Chi; Burwell, Rebecca D.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychological tasks used in primates to investigate mechanisms of learning and memory are typically visually guided cognitive tasks. We have developed visual cognitive tasks for rats using the Floor Projection Maze1,2 that are optimized for visual abilities of rats permitting stronger comparisons of experimental findings with other species. In order to investigate neural correlates of learning and memory, we have integrated electrophysiological recordings into fully automated cognitive tasks on the Floor Projection Maze1,2. Behavioral software interfaced with an animal tracking system allows monitoring of the animal's behavior with precise control of image presentation and reward contingencies for better trained animals. Integration with an in vivo electrophysiological recording system enables examination of behavioral correlates of neural activity at selected epochs of a given cognitive task. We describe protocols for a model system that combines automated visual presentation of information to rodents and intracranial reward with electrophysiological approaches. Our model system offers a sophisticated set of tools as a framework for other cognitive tasks to better isolate and identify specific mechanisms contributing to particular cognitive processes. PMID:24638057

  6. Cholecystokinin tetrapeptide improves water maze performance of neonatally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned young rats.

    PubMed

    Rex, André; Fink, Heidrun

    2004-09-01

    This study addressed the proposed memory-modulating effect of the cholecystokinin (CCK) 2 agonist Boc-CCK-4 in rats using a Morris water maze. In the brain, CCK is colocalized and interacts with dopamine, respectively. To impair dopaminergic neurotransmission, and consequently, dopamine-mediated learning and memory, rat pups received the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the left [Day 5 postnatal (p.n.)] and right (Day 8 p.n.) ventricles (50 microg/5 microl each). After 6-OHDA treatment, dopamine brain levels were reduced by 60% on Day 50 p.n. Lesioned rats had a lower body weight but normal swimming abilities. In the acquisition phase of the water maze (Day 50 p.n.), sham-lesioned rats learned quickly, compared to lesioned rats. Treatment with Boc-CCK-4 (40 microg/kg ip) did not affect performance in sham-lesioned rats but restored the learning curve in lesioned rats without increasing swimming speed indicating a better spatial learning in the dopamine-depleted rats. In summary, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of CCK2 receptors may counteract cognitive deficits of dopamine-depleted rats.

  7. Behaviour in the elevated plus-maze predicts coping after subchronic mild stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Ducottet, C; Belzung, C

    2004-05-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the coping style of mice subjected to a subchronic unpredictable mild stress procedure and its relationship to initial emotional reactivity. Two inbred strains of mice, the BALB/c ByJ and the C57BL/6 J, known to exhibit distinct emotionality, have been used. They were first observed in the elevated plus-maze and the free exploratory paradigm, each provides a separation of the population in high and low emotional mice. Half of the mice of each strain were then confronted to a 2-week subchronic unpredictable mild stress and tested for their responses in different behavioural situations (consumption of a palatable food, physical state, grooming behaviours and reactivity to a conflict situation). Mice were also tested in the light/dark procedure to assess the effect of the subchronic stress on emotional reactivity. First, a relationship between initial emotional reactivity in the elevated plus-maze and behavioural coping style in response to stress was found, high emotional mice (i.e., BALB mice) displaying inhibited behaviours and less emotional mice (i.e., BL/6 mice) exhibiting few behavioural changes. Furthermore, emotional reactivity was increased in stressed mice compared with nonstressed ones. PMID:15135013

  8. Influence of magnetic field on zebrafish activity and orientation in a plus maze.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Elena A; Pavlova, Vera V; Nepomnyashchikh, Valentin A; Krylov, Viacheslav V

    2016-01-01

    We describe an impact of the geomagnetic field (GMF) and its modification on zebrafish's orientation and locomotor activity in a plus maze with four arms oriented to the north, east, south and west. Zebrafish's directional preferences were bimodal in GMF: they visited two arms oriented in opposed directions (east-west) most frequently. This bimodal preference remained stable for same individuals across experiments divided by several days. When the horizontal GMF component was turned 90° clockwise, the preference accordingly shifted by 90° to arms oriented to the north and south. Other modifications of GMF (reversal of both vertical and horizontal GMF components; reversal of vertical component only; and reversal of horizontal component only) did not exert any discernible effect on the orientation of zebrafish. The 90° turn of horizontal component also resulted in a significant increase of fish's locomotor activity in comparison with the natural GMF. This increase became even more pronounced when the horizontal component was repeatedly turned by 90° and back with 1min interval between turns. Our results show that GMF and its variations should be taken into account when interpreting zebrafish's directional preferences and locomotor activity in mazes and other experimental devices. PMID:26589739

  9. Impact of radial migration on stellar and gas radial metallicity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Kawata, Daisuke; Cropper, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Radial migration is defined as the change in guiding centre radius of stars and gas caused by gains or losses of angular momentum that result from gravitational interaction with non-axisymmetric structure. This has been shown to have significant impact on the metallicity distribution in galactic discs, and therefore affects the interpretation of Galactic archaeology. We use a simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy to examine the effect of radial migration on the star and gas radial metallicity distribution. We find that both the star and gas component show significant radial migration. The stellar radial metallicity gradient remains almost unchanged but the radial metallicity distribution of the stars is broadened to produce a greater dispersion at all radii. However, the metallicity dispersion of the gas remains narrow. We find that the main drivers of the gas metallicity distribution evolution are metal enrichment and mixing: more efficient metal enrichment in the inner region maintains a negative slope in the radial metallicity distribution, and the metal mixing ensures the tight relationship of the gas metallicity with the radius. The metallicity distribution function reproduces the trend in the age-metallicity relation found from observations for stars younger than 1.0 Gyr in the Milky Way.

  10. Impairment of water maze behaviour with ageing is counteracted by maze learning earlier in life but not by physical exercise, food restriction or housing conditions.

    PubMed

    Hansalik, Michaela; Skalicky, Monika; Viidik, Andrus

    2006-02-01

    Spatial learning and memory decline with ageing in humans as well as rats. We examined the influence of different interventions on male Sprague Dawley rats with respect to learning ability and memory at the age of 5, 10 and 18 months. The intervention and control groups were: (RW) voluntary exercise in running wheels, (PW) sedentary, food restricted (by about 25%) to keep them at pair weight with RW, (S1) sedentary, fed ad libitum, (TM) forced training in a treadmill, and, (S4) sedentary, fed ad libitum. The animals in all groups were housed individually except those in group S4, which were housed four in each cage. The ability of learning and memory was determined in the Morris water maze. The results showed a significantly better learning ability when young in comparison with their ability when having grown older. At the age of 18 months, the performance was significantly better in the subgroups which had received training also at the age of 10 months compared to the subgroups receiving their first training. None of the various interventions had any significant effect on these functions. Repeated training seems to be the best intervention with respect to retaining learning ability and memory.

  11. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  12. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  13. NASA contributions to radial turbine aerodynamic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief description of the radial turbine and its analysis needs is followed by discussions of five analytical areas; design geometry and performance, off design performance, blade row flow, scroll flow, and duct flow. The functions of the programs, areas of applicability, and limitations and uncertainties are emphasized. Both past contributions and current activities are discussed.

  14. The use of the elevated plus maze as an assay of anxiety-related behavior in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Walf, Alicia A; Frye, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    The elevated plus maze is a widely used behavioral assay for rodents and it has been validated to assess the anti-anxiety effects of pharmacological agents and steroid hormones, and to define brain regions and mechanisms underlying anxiety-related behavior. Briefly, rats or mice are placed at the junction of the four arms of the maze, facing an open arm, and entries/duration in each arm are recorded by a video-tracking system and observer simultaneously for 5 min. Other ethological parameters (i.e., rears, head dips and stretched-attend postures) can also be observed. An increase in open arm activity (duration and/or entries) reflects anti-anxiety behavior. In our laboratory, rats or mice are exposed to the plus maze on one occasion; thus, results can be obtained in 5 min per rodent. PMID:17406592

  15. Radial wave crystals: radially periodic structures from anisotropic metamaterials for engineering acoustic or electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate that metamaterials with anisotropic properties can be used to develop a new class of periodic structures that has been named radial wave crystals. They can be sonic or photonic, and wave propagation along the radial directions is obtained through Bloch states like in usual sonic or photonic crystals. The band structure of the proposed structures can be tailored in a large amount to get exciting novel wave phenomena. For example, it is shown that acoustical cavities based on radial sonic crystals can be employed as passive devices for beam forming or dynamically orientated antennas for sound localization.

  16. Radial forces analysis and rotational speed test of radial permanent magnetic bearing for horizontal axis wind turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriswanto, Jamari

    2016-04-01

    Permanent magnet bearings (PMB) are contact free bearings which utilize the forces generated by the magnets. PMB in this work is a type of radial PMB, which functions as the radial bearings of the Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) rotor shaft. Radial PMB should have a greater radial force than the radial force HAWT rotor shaft (bearing load). This paper presents a modeling and experiments to calculate the radial force of the radial PMB. This paper also presents rotational speed test of the radial PMB compared to conventional bearings for HAWT applications. Modeling using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b with the magnetic fields physics models. Experiments were conducted by measuring the displacement of the rotor to the stator for a given load variation. Results of the two methods showed that the large displacement then the radial force would be greater. Radial forces of radial PMB is greater than radial forces of HAWT rotor shaft. The rotational speed test results of HAWT that used radial PMB produced higher rotary than conventional bearings with an average increase of 87.4%. Increasing rotational speed occured because radial PMB had no friction. HAWT that used radial PMB rotated at very low wind speeds are 1.4 m/s with a torque of 0.043 Nm, while the HAWT which uses conventional bearing started rotating at a wind speed of 4.4 m/s and required higher torque of 0.104 N.

  17. Corticosterone effects on BDNF mRNA expression in the rat hippocampus during morris water maze training.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, M J; Sibug, R M; Duurland, R; Fluttert, M F; Oitzl, M S; De Kloet, E R; Vreugdenhil, E

    1999-12-01

    Corticosterone and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) have both been shown to be involved in spatial memory formation in rats. In the present study we have investigated the effect of corticosterone on hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression after training in the Morris water maze in young adult Wistar rats. Therefore, we first studied BDNF mRNA levels in the hippocampus in relation to corticosterone levels at several time points after 4 training trials in the Morris water maze. Corticosterone levels were significantly increased after this procedure, and hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels only displayed a minor change: an increase in CA1 at 1 hr after training. However, in a previous study we observed dramatically decreased hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels in dentate gyrus and CA1 at 3 hr after injection of corticosterone. In order to analyze this discrepancy, we subsequently investigated if hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression is affected by corticosterone at 3 hr after water maze training. Therefore, we incorporated ADX animals and ADX animals which were injected with corticosterone in our study. ADX animals which were subjected to water maze training displayed similar hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels 3 hr after training compared to control ADX animals. Furthermore, ADX animals which were injected with corticosterone showed decreased BDNF mRNA levels in all hippocampal regions compared to control ADX animals. Water maze training did not alter this effect. Thus, the increased corticosterone levels during water maze training do not affect hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression, although exogenous corticosterone is effective under these conditions. Hence, our results suggest that in this situation BDNF is resistant to regulation by endogenous corticosterone, which may be important for learning and memory processes.

  18. The MacArthur Maze Fire and Roadway Collapse: Consequences for SNF Transportation - 12476

    SciTech Connect

    Bajwa, Christopher S.; Easton, Earl P.; Adkins, Harold; Cuta, Judith; Klymyshyn, Nicholas; Suffield, Sarah

    2012-07-01

    In 2007, a severe transportation accident occurred near Oakland, California, on a section of Interstate 880 known as the 'MacArthur Maze', involving a tractor trailer carrying gasoline which impacted an overpass support column and burst into flames. The subsequent fire caused the collapse of portions of the Interstate 580 overpass onto the remains of the tractor-trailer in less than 20 minutes, due to a reduction of strength in the structural steel exposed to the fire. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is in the process of examining the impacts of this accident on the performance of a spent nuclear fuel transportation package, using detailed analysis models, in order to determine the potential regulatory implications related to the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States. This paper will provide a summary of this effort and present results and conclusions. The detailed thermal models of the MacArthur Maze fire scenario with ANSYS and COBRASFS have produced preliminary results indicating that in a fire of this severity, the peak fuel cladding temperature would almost certainly exceed the short-term limit of 570 deg. C (1058 deg. F), and would likely exceed the Zircaloy burst temperature limit of 750 deg. C (1382 deg. F) assumed in previous transportation studies. Additional work is needed to refine and verify some of the details of these complex models, but the overall results are consistent with previous fire analyses with similar models, and with the results obtained for the HAC fire evaluations with these models. These results as well as future results produced by these models can therefore be considered as reliable estimates of the temperatures that would be experienced in fire conditions of the severity of the MacArthur Maze fire scenario. The structural analyses show that the GA-4 package is robust enough to withstand the impact of the overhead span without suffering major damage or deformation to the containment boundary. The greatest

  19. Palaeohydrology of a 3D-maze cave (Hermannshöhle, Lower Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, Andrea; Plan, Lukas

    2013-04-01

    The 4.4 km-long Hermannshöhle (located in Kirchberg/Wechsel, Lower Austria) is one of the largest caves in the Lower Austroalpine Unit. It is developed in an isolated block of carbonate marble, taking up only 140 x 160 m of ground area and 73 m of elevation difference. The cave is unusual in two respects: (a) its dense network of corridors is arranged in a three-dimensional maze and (b) the most outstanding macro- and micromorphologic features were caused by paragenesis. Speleothems are abundant throughout the cave comprising flowstones, dripstones, helictites, popcorn, calcite rafts, a shield, and moonmilk. Even though most passages are canyon-shaped, the cave shows exclusively phreatic features. Sediment fills are abundant as well, mostly covering the floor of passages to an unknown depth, containing mainly allochthonous material, i.e. schists and gneisses. Besides some vadose dripwater the cave is dry today. A conspicuous feature is the lack of a single water path and instead a maze with multiple flow paths formed. Another interesting feature is that one part of the cave developed below the nearby Ramsbach brook but is still dry. There are small ponors reported from the Ramsbach brook (which were observed during river regulation) indicating an actively draining karst system, which is not yet explored. The aim of this study was to enlighten the palaeohydrology of this cave using morphological and sedimentological observations as well as U/Th dating of speleothems. First results show that the palaeo-environment and the hydrologic setting of the Hermannshöhle were drastically different from today. Undersaturated water sourced from nearby non-karstic gneisses and schists gave rise to well-developed contact karst features. Surprisingly the palaeo flow direction deduced from indicators like scallops and sediment structures was opposite to the flow direction of the present nearby brooks (Rams- and Feistrizbach). Following pulses of clastic sediment input a distinct

  20. Entropy generation of radial rotation convective channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alić, Fikret

    2012-03-01

    The exchange of heat between two fluids is established by radial rotating pipe or a channel. The hotter fluid flows through the pipe, while the cold fluid is ambient air. Total length of pipe is made up of multiple sections of different shape and position in relation to the common axis of rotation. In such heat exchanger the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of the hotter and colder fluid occur. Therefore, the total entropy generated within the radial rotating pipe consists of the total entropy of hotter and colder fluid, taking into account all the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of both fluids. Finding a mathematical model of the total generated entropy is based on coupled mathematical expressions that combine hydraulic and thermal effects of both fluids with the complex geometry of the radial rotating pipe. Mathematical model follows the each section of the pipe and establishes the function between the sections, so the total generated entropy is different from section to section of the pipe. In one section of the pipe thermal irreversibility may dominate over the hydraulic irreversibility, while in another section of the pipe the situation may be reverse. In this paper, continuous analytic functions that connect sections of pipe in geometric meaning are associated with functions that describe the thermo-hydraulic effects of hotter and colder fluid. In this way, the total generated entropy of the radial rotating pipe is a continuous analytic function of any complex geometry of the rotating pipe. The above method of establishing a relationship between the continuous function of entropy with the complex geometry of the rotating pipe enables indirect monitoring of unnecessary hydraulic and thermal losses of both fluids. Therefore, continuous analytic functions of generated entropy enable analysis of hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of individual sections of pipe, as well as the possibility of improving the thermal-hydraulic performance of the rotating

  1. Radial tunnel syndrome. A retrospective review of 30 decompressions of the radial nerve.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T; Mobbs, P; Fortems, Y; Stanley, J K

    1995-08-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome results from compression of the radial nerve by the free edge of the supinator muscle or closely related structures in the vicinity of the elbow joint. Despite numerous reports on the surgical management of this disorder, it remains largely unrecognized and often neglected. The symptoms of radial tunnel syndrome can resemble those of tennis elbow, chronic wrist pain or tenosynovitis. Reliable objective criteria are not available to differentiate between these pathologies. These difficulties are discussed in relation to 29 patients who underwent 30 primary explorations and proximal decompressions of the radial nerve. Excellent or good results were obtained in 70%, fair results in 13% and poor results in 17% of patients. The results can be satisfactory despite the prolonged duration of symptoms. We believe that a diagnosis of radial tunnel syndrome should always be born in mind when dealing with patients with forearm and wrist pain that has not responded to more conventional treatment. Patients with occupations requiring repetitive manual tasks seem to be particularly at risk of developing radial tunnel syndrome and it is also interesting to note that 66% of patients with on-going medico-legal claims had successful outcomes following surgery. PMID:7594982

  2. Intramaze cue utilization in the water maze: effects of sex and estrous cycle in rats.

    PubMed

    Sava, Simona; Markus, Etan J

    2005-06-01

    Rats can use a wide spectrum of intra- and extramaze information while navigating through the environment. The current study examined the relative contribution of an intramaze cue with regard to its proximity to the goal. Three experiments were conducted and the impact of intramaze cue removal or rotation on water maze search was examined. In males, the effect of the intramaze cue declined monotonically in relation to the proximity of the cue to the goal. A more complex relationship between cue location and utilization was found in estrous and proestrus females. Estrous females showed a strong effect of the cue only when it was near the goal, ignoring it when it was situated further away. Conversely proestrus females were affected by the cue under all conditions. It is concluded that previous reports of behavioral differences may stem from the fact that proestrus females are affected by and attend to a wider range of stimuli, while estrous females are more affected by salient stimuli.

  3. Incremental Sentence Processing in Japanese: A Maze Investigation into Scrambled and Control Sentences.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Jeffrey; Witzel, Naoko

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates preverbal structural and semantic processing in Japanese, a head-final language, using the maze task. Two sentence types were tested-simple scrambled sentences (Experiment 1) and control sentences (Experiment 2). Experiment 1 showed that even for simple, mono-clausal Japanese sentences, (1) there are online processing costs associated with parsing noncanonical word orders and (2) these costs are incurred during the incremental integration of constituents into developing sentence representations. Experiment 2 indicated (1) that antecedents are provisionally assigned to empty subjects in Japanese control sentences before verb information becomes available and (2) that this process is guided by an object control bias. Taken together, these findings are interpreted to suggest an important role for preverbal analysis in the processing of displaced constituents and of referential properties for empty elements in head-final languages.

  4. Fracture Networks from a deterministic physical model as 'forerunners' of Maze Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferer, M. V.; Smith, D. H.; Lace, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    'Fractures are the chief forerunners of caves because they transmit water much more rapidly than intergranular pores.[1] Thus, the cave networks can follow the fracture networks from which the Karst caves formed by a variety of processes. Traditional models of continental Karst define water flow through subsurface geologic formations, slowly dissolving the rock along the pathways (e.g. water saturated with respect to carbon dioxide flowing through fractured carbonate formations). We have developed a deterministic, physical model of fracturing in a model geologic layer of a given thickness, when that layer is strained in one direction and subsequently in a perpendicular direction. It was observed that the connected fracture networks from our model visually resemble maps of maze caves. Since these detailed cave maps offer critical tools in modeling cave development patterns and conduit flow in Karst systems, we were able to test the qualitative resemblance by using statistical analyses to compare our model networks in geologic layers of four different thicknesses with the corresponding statistical analyses of four different maze caves, formed in a variety of geologic settings. The statistical studies performed are: i) standard box-counting to determine if either the caves or the model networks are fractal. We found that both are fractal with a fractal dimension Df ≈ 1.75 . ii) for each section inside a closed path, we determined the area and perimeter-length, enabling a study of the tortuosity of the networks. From the dependence of the section's area upon its perimeter-length, we have found a power-law behavior (for sufficiently large sections) characterized by a 'tortuosity' exponent. These exponents have similar values for both the model networks and the maze caves. The best agreement is between our thickest model layer and the maze-like part of Wind Cave in South Dakota where the data from the model and the cave overlie each other. For the present networks from

  5. Habituation under stress: shocked mice show nonassociative learning in a T-maze.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D; Osborne, E W; O'Boyle, M W

    1985-03-01

    Conflicting predictions of reinforcement and neophobia-arousal theories were evaluated in a simple choice task. Four groups of C57BL/6J mice were administered daily two-trial tests in a uniform T-maze for 10 consecutive days. For three groups, the contingencies of footshock treatments were manipulated to reinforce alternation, perseveration, or both. A control group that was not administered footshock alternated, but all three groups that were stressed perseverated more and more across tests, despite the differences in reinforcement contingencies. These results are inconsistent with the predictions of reinforcement theory but consistent with the view that stressed or aroused animals are neophobic and use nonassociative learning (habituation) to distinguish between novel and familiar alternatives.

  6. DSTYK kinase domain ablation impaired the mice capabilities of learning and memory in water maze test.

    PubMed

    Li, Kui; Liu, Ji-Wei; Zhu, Zhi-Chuan; Wang, Hong-Tao; Zu, Yong; Liu, Yong-Jie; Yang, Yan-Hong; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Shen, Xu; Chen, Rui; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Ze-Lan

    2014-01-01

    DSTYK (Dual serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinase) is a putative dual Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinase with unique structural features. It is proposed that DSTYK may play important roles in brain because of its high expression in most brain areas. In the present study, a DSTYK knockout (KO) mouse line with the ablation of C-terminal of DSTYK including the kinase domain was generated to study the physiological function of DSTYK. The DSTYK KO mice are fertile and have no significant morphological defects revealed by Nissl staining compared with wildtype mice. Open field test and rotarod test showed there is no obvious difference in basic motor and balance capacity between the DSTYK homozygous KO mice and DSTYK heterozygous KO mice. In water maze test, however, the DSTYK homozygous KO mice show impaired capabilities of learning and memory compared with the DSTYK heterozygous KO mice.

  7. Decoding the view expectation during learned maze navigation from human fronto-parietal network

    PubMed Central

    Shikauchi, Yumi; Ishii, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Humans use external cues and prior knowledge about the environment to monitor their positions during spatial navigation. View expectation is essential for correlating scene views with a cognitive map. To determine how the brain performs view expectation during spatial navigation, we applied a multiple parallel decoding technique to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) when human participants performed scene choice tasks in learned maze navigation environments. We decoded participants’ view expectation from fMRI signals in parietal and medial prefrontal cortices, whereas activity patterns in occipital cortex represented various types of external cues. The decoder’s output reflected participants’ expectations even when they were wrong, corresponding to subjective beliefs opposed to objective reality. Thus, view expectation is subjectively represented in human brain, and the fronto-parietal network is involved in integrating external cues and prior knowledge during spatial navigation. PMID:26631641

  8. Effects of age and sex on the water maze performance and hippocampal cholinergic fibers in rats.

    PubMed

    Lukoyanov, N V; Andrade, J P; Dulce Madeira, M; Paula-Barbosa, M M

    1999-07-16

    We have examined if age-related deterioration of spatial memory and cholinergic innervation of the dentate gyrus is gender-specific. Aging progressively affected the performance of male and female rats in place discrimination version of the water maze task. On repeated acquisition task, only old males, but not old females, were significantly impaired relative to young and adult animals of both sexes. In parallel, we found that the age-associated reduction of the density of cholinergic fibers in the dentate gyrus was significantly more profound in old males than in age-matched females. These results suggest that, although male and female rats have an identical pattern of reference memory decline, impairment of the working memory and deterioration of the hippocampal cholinergic system are slower to develop in females than in males.

  9. Anxiogenic effect of low-dose methamphetamine in the test of elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Pometlová, M; Nohejlová-Deykun, K; Slamberová, R

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamines (MA) are psychostimulant drugs that are known to change individuals' behavior. Psychostimulants could either evoke positive emotions (e.g. joy and happiness) or attenuate negative emotional states (e.g. anxiety and depression) in humans. In animal experiments, the test of elevated plus-maze (EPM) is widely used. This test is appropriate for evaluation of anxiolytic and anxiogenic drug effects, or for examination of specific subtypes of anxiety disorders. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of acute single dose of MA (1 mg/kg) on the behavior of laboratory rat in the EPM. The detailed ethologic analysis of behavior was performed using a modified protocol based on the study of Fernández Espejo (1997). Our results demonstrated that MA affects rat's behavior in the EPM in the majority of analyzed categories. The present protocol allowed us to determine positive anxiogenic effect of MA.

  10. Sex differences in ICR mice in the Morris water maze task.

    PubMed

    Ge, J F; Qi, C C; Qiao, J P; Wang, C W; Zhou, N J

    2013-01-01

    The Morris water maze (MWM) is one of the most common tasks used to assess spatial learning and memory ability in rodents. Genetic strain and gender are two prominent variants that influence spatial performance. Although it was reported that ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) mice exhibited an unchanged baseline performance in the training phase of the MWM task, this outbred strain has been widely used in learning and memory studies, and little is known regarding the effects of sex on behavioral performance. In this study, we demonstrated that both male and female ICR mice could complete the MWM task. Furthermore, a significant sex difference was observed, with females having shorter escape latencies and longer durations in the target quadrant in both the acquisition and test phases. Our findings emphasize the necessity of careful examination of not only the strain effect on behavioral performance but also the sex effect.

  11. Modeling spatial learning in rats based on Morris water maze experiments.

    PubMed

    Faes, Christel; Aerts, Marc; Geys, Helena; De Schaepdrijver, Luc

    2010-01-01

    The Morris water maze, developed by Morris (J Neurosci Methods 1984: 11: 47-60), is a behavioral experiment designed to test the spatial memory. When repeating the experiment several times, the changes in time (latency) and distance (path) taken to reach the platform are indicators for the learning and memory abilities of the rat. In juvenile toxicity studies, it is of interest to test whether dosing juvenile rats with some compound of interest has an effect on its learning ability. The traditional analysis uses non-parametric tests to check for a possible dose-effect. However, due to the many tests performed, this approach lacks power. Here, an alternative method is proposed, accounting for the longitudinal design of the study, the right-censoring of observations when animals did not find the platform and the correlation between the time and distance taken to reach the platform.

  12. [Participation of progesterone receptors in plus-maze behavior in female mice].

    PubMed

    Galeeva, A Iu; Pivina, S G; Tuohimaa, P; Ordian, N E

    2006-07-01

    The current study tested delayed effect pf progesterone on the anxiety level of female mice. The elevated plus maze (EPM) behavior was assessed in ovariectomized mice injected for 7 days with estradiol benzoate and progesterone or progesterone alone after 6 hrs of the last treatment. One group of ovariectomized mice was injected with progesterone receptor blocker Mifepristone before 2 hrs of the last treatment. The immunocytochemistry method was used to visualize cells in different brain areas having immunoreactivity (ir) for progesterone receptors. In the EPM, progesterone administration significantly increased the anxiety levels of ovariectomized mice as compared with estradiol benzoate and progesterone administration. The participation of nuclear progesterone receptors in anxiety levels regulation is confirmed by high correlation of the change of progesterone receptor-ir cell number in some brain areas and anxiety levels. Mifepristone decreased anxiety levels and progesterone receptor-ir cell number in both groups of mice that suggests involvement of genomic mechanisms in anxiety regulation in female mice.

  13. Depo-provera effects on Wistar rat performance in the Y-maze.

    PubMed

    Okojie, A K; Oyekunle, O A

    2014-06-01

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate is the most commonly used progestin component of hormone therapy. The goal of the present study was to determine whether Medroxyprogesterone affects rat behavior using a Y-maze test. Twenty-four female Wistar rats were randomly selected into three groups; control group, a low dose (13 mg/ml MPA) group and a high dose (33 mg/1 ml MPA) group. Doses of Medroxyprogesterone were delivered by intramuscular injection for a period of 3 weeks. Medroxyprogesterone administration resulted in a decrease in memory and locomotion activity of rats (p < 0.05). Despite Medroxyprogesterone being effective in modulating hormonal interaction to prevent conception in actively reproducing females, cognitive impairment could be one of its adverse effects.

  14. Radial spline assembly for antifriction bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An outer race carrier is constructed for receiving an outer race of an antifriction bearing assembly. The carrier in turn is slidably fitted in an opening of a support wall to accommodate slight axial movements of a shaft. A plurality of longitudinal splines on the carrier are disposed to be fitted into matching slots in the opening. A deadband gap is provided between sides of the splines and slots, with a radial gap at ends of the splines and slots and a gap between the splines and slots sized larger than the deadband gap. With this construction, operational distortions (slope) of the support wall are accommodated by the larger radial gaps while the deadband gaps maintain a relatively high springrate of the housing. Additionally, side loads applied to the shaft are distributed between sides of the splines and slots, distributing such loads over a larger surface area than a race carrier of the prior art.

  15. SpicyNodes Radial Map Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.; Ligierko, G.; Angelov, I.

    2008-10-01

    The need for information has increased exponentially over the past decades. The current systems for constructing, exploring, classifying, organizing, and searching information face the growing challenge of enabling their users to operate efficiently and intuitively in knowledge-heavy environments. This paper presents SpicyNodes, an advanced user interface for difficult interaction contexts. It is based on an underlying structure known as a radial map, which allows users to manipulate and interact in a natural manner with entities called nodes. This technology overcomes certain limitations of existing solutions and solves the problem of browsing complex sets of linked information. SpicyNodes is also an organic system that projects users into a living space, stimulating exploratory behavior and fostering creative thought. Our interactive radial layout is used for educational purposes and has the potential for numerous other applications.

  16. Development of large radial turbine turbochargers

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, K.R.; Hirst, P.; Kay, P.

    1996-12-31

    The use of fully radial turbochargers for medium speed diesel engines have largely been restricted to distillate fuel operation at relatively modest pressure ratios. Pressures on costs per kW have forced the industry to push for increases in rating and range of operation for these machines. The development of a high pressure ratio radial turbocharger with the capability to operate reliably on heavy fuel has become a high priority. This paper discusses the development of a range of such machines to cover engine output of between 500 kW and 1.6 MW. The original design of the first turbocharger in the range, the NAPIER 047, is reviewed together with the development and operational experiences gained to date. These have been incorporated into the latest two turbochargers in the range, the NAPIER 057 and 067. The paper includes descriptions of the means taken to achieve minimum time to market and low cost of manufacture.

  17. Effects of forced-choice runway variations on rats' T-maze serial pattern learning.

    PubMed

    Szelest, Izabela; Cohen, Jerome

    2006-05-01

    Rats learned an ordered RNR/RNN serial pattern task in a T-maze where they were shifted to a different runway on Trial 3 only in the RNR series (shift-win/stay-lose group) or only in the RNN series (stay-win/shift-lose group). The shift-win/stay-lose group developed faster speeds on Trial 3 of the RNR than on Trial 3 of the RNN series more easily than the stay-win/shift-lose group. This difference occurred whether all rats were forced onto the same runway on the first two trials (Experiment 1) or onto a different runway on Trial 2 from that on Trial 1 in each series (Experiment 2). Posttraining probe tests revealed that the shift-win/stay-lose group in each experiment relied on the runway shift event in Trial 3 or on the series position to anticipate the second reward within a series. Such reward expectancies were greater when the runway shift occurred in the same series position as during training. These probe tests revealed that the stay-win/shift-lose group relied only on the series position in Experiment 2. Our findings do not support predictions based on an associative predictive validity model. Rather, they reflect rats' predisposition to spontaneously alternate choices in the T-maze, a tendency corresponding to their inherent win-shift foraging strategy. Rats in each group also reduced their speeds less on the nonrewarded Trial 2 when it preceded a rewarded rather than a nonrewarded Trial 3. This effect suggests that rats were able to determine which series contained a second rewarded trial. We discuss the theoretical implications of this Trial 2 speed effect in terms of rats' uncertainty about where this second rewarded trial might occur in the RNR series.

  18. Panic-modulating effects of alprazolam, moclobemide and sumatriptan in the rat elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, Ana Beatriz; Weffort, Luiz Fernando; de Oliveira Sergio, Thatiane; Gomes, Rafael Calsoni; Frias, Alana Tercino; Matthiesen, Melina; Vilela-Costa, Heloisa Helena; Yamashita, Paula Shimene de Melo; Vasconcelos, Alex Teles; de Bortoli, Valquiria; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta; Zangrossi, Helio

    2016-12-15

    The elevated T-maze was developed to test the hypothesis that serotonin plays an opposing role in the regulation of defensive behaviors associated with anxiety and panic. Previous pharmacological exploitation of this test supports the association between inhibitory avoidance acquisition and escape expression with anxiety and fear/panic, respectively. In the present study, we extend the pharmacological validation of this test by investigating the effects of other putative or clinically effective anxiety- and panic-modulating drugs. The results showed that chronic, but not acute injection of the reversible monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor moclobemide (3, 10 and 30mg/kg) inhibited escape expression, indicating a panicolytic-like effect. The same effect was observed after either acute or chronic treatment with alprazolam (1, 2 and 4mg/kg), a high potency benzodiazepine. This drug also impaired inhibitory avoidance acquisition, suggesting an anxiolytic effect. On the other hand, subcutaneous administration of the 5-HT1D/1B receptor agonist sumatriptan (0.1, 0.5 and 2.5μg/kg) facilitated escape performance, indicating a panicogenic-like effect, while treatment with α-para-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA; 4days i.p injections of 100mg/kg, or a single i.p injection of 300mg/kg), which caused marked 5-HT depletion in the amygdala and striatum, was without effect. Altogether, these results are in full agreement with the clinical effects of these compounds and offer further evidence that the elevated T-maze has broad predictive validity for the effects of anxiety- and panic-modulating drugs. PMID:27531502

  19. Navigating in a virtual three-dimensional maze: how do egocentric and allocentric reference frames interact?

    PubMed

    Vidal, Manuel; Amorim, Michel-Ange; Berthoz, Alain

    2004-05-01

    Spatial navigation in the presence of gravity restricts one's displacement to two-dimensional (2D) planes. Therefore, self-motion only includes translations and yaw rotations. In contrast, in weightlessness, one can translate and turn in any direction. In the first experiment, we compared the ability to memorize a virtual three-dimensional (3D) maze after passive exploration in three self-motion conditions, each using a different set of rotations for turning. Subjects indicated which pathway they traversed among four successive corridors presented from an outside perspective. Results showed that exploring in the terrestrial condition (including only yaw rotations, the viewer's virtual body remaining upright) allowed better recognition of the corridor than in the weightless condition (which included pitch and yaw rotations according to the turns), particularly for more complex 3D structures. The more frequently the viewer-defined (egocentric) and the global environment (allocentric) verticals were aligned during exploration, the more easily subjects could memorize the 3D maze, suggesting that simplifying the relationship between the egocentric and allocentric reference frames facilitates spatial updating. Nevertheless, with practice, performance in the weightless condition improved whereas in the natural terrestrial condition performance remained at its initial maximum, indicating that the cognitive processes involved were innate for this particular condition. The second experiment revealed that single rotations in the terrestrial condition must be performed around the body axis in order to obtain optimal spatial updating performance, and that the latter is independent of the conflict with gravity that might favor this condition when one is actually upright. This suggests that although humans can memorize 3D-structured environments their innate neurocognitive functions appear to be specialized for natural 2D navigation.

  20. Prodynorphin knockout mice demonstrate diminished age-associated impairment in spatial water maze performance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Xuan V; Masse, James; Kumar, Ashok; Vijitruth, Rattanavijit; Kulik, Cynthia; Liu, Mei; Choi, Dong-Young; Foster, Thomas C; Usynin, Ivan; Bakalkin, Georgy; Bing, Guoying

    2005-06-20

    Dynorphins, endogenous kappa-opioid agonists widely expressed in the central nervous system, have been reported to increase following diverse pathophysiological processes, including excitotoxicity, chronic inflammation, and traumatic injury. These peptides have been implicated in cognitive impairment, especially that associated with aging. To determine whether absence of dynorphin confers any beneficial effect on spatial learning and memory, knockout mice lacking the coding exons of the gene encoding its precursor prodynorphin (Pdyn) were tested in a water maze task. Learning and memory assessment using a 3-day water maze protocol demonstrated that aged Pdyn knockout mice (13-17 months) perform comparatively better than similarly aged wild-type (WT) mice, based on acquisition and retention probe trial indices. There was no genotype effect on performance in the cued version of the swim task nor on average swim speed, suggesting the observed genotype effects are likely attributable to differences in cognitive rather than motor function. Young (3-6 months) mice performed significantly better than aged mice, but in young mice, no genotype difference was observed. To investigate the relationship between aging and brain dynorphin expression in mice, we examined dynorphin peptide levels at varying ages in hippocampus and frontal cortex of WT 129SvEv mice. Quantitative radioimmunoassay demonstrated that dynorphin A levels in frontal cortex, but not hippocampus, of 12- and 24-month mice were significantly elevated compared to 3-month mice. Although the underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, the results suggest that chronic increases in endogenous dynorphin expression with age, especially in frontal cortex, may adversely affect learning and memory.

  1. Stress-induced disturbances in Morris water-maze performance: interstrain variability.

    PubMed

    Francis, D D; Zaharia, M D; Shanks, N; Anisman, H

    1995-07-01

    Marked differences were observed across strains of mice (i.e., DBA/2J, C57BL/6J, BALB/cByJ and CD-1 mice) in acquisition, performance and reversal of a place learning response in a Morris water-maze. While DBA/2J, C57BL/6J and CD-1 mice typically learned the response readily, only 20% of BALB/cByJ mice acquired the response. Commensurate with the effects of hippocampal disturbances, the performance deficits in BALB/cByJ mice were not evident when the position of the platform in the water-maze was cued. Exposure to uncontrollable foot shock did not affect the acquisition or performance of this response in the former three strains, but provoked a modest disruption of reversal performance in DBA/2J mice and markedly impaired reversal performance in BALB/cByJ mice. It seemed, however, that the response strategies adopted in these strains could be distinguished from one another. In the reversal paradigm BALB/cByJ mice initially persisted in returning to the original training quadrant rather than to the new goal quadrant. Following 2 days of training the perseveration was no longer apparent and animals seemed to adopt a random search strategy. In contrast, DBA/2J mice, which exhibited a smaller stress-induced disturbance, did not display a perseverative response style. These data suggest that inescapable shock does not disturb response-outcome associations, but may result from the induction of a perseverative response style. However, it appears that the mechanisms responsible for an interference of performance may not be uniform across strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Radial rib antenna surface deviation analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed which analyzes any radial rib antenna with ribs radiating from a central hub. The program has the capability for calculating the antenna surface contour (reversed pillowing effect), the optimum rib shape for minimizing the rms surface error, and the actual rms surface error. Rib deflection due to mesh tension and catenary cable tension can also be compensated for, and the pattern from which the mesh gores are cut can be determined.

  3. Neurons with radial basis like rate functions.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsolt László

    2005-01-01

    Artificial neural networks constructed with "locally tuned processing units" and more generally referred to as "radial basis function networks" have been proposed by a number of workers. In this communication, I submit a conjecture, based on indirect experimental and direct computational evidence of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, that there may be biological neurons in nervous systems for which the rate function is locally tuned. If proved to be valid, this conjecture may simplify neurodynamic models of some functions of nervous systems.

  4. Optimization of Apparatus Design and Behavioral Measures for the Assessment of Visuo-Spatial Learning and Memory of Mice on the Barnes Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Timothy P.; Brown, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that apparatus design can affect visual-spatial cue use and memory performance of mice on the Barnes maze. The present experiment extends these findings by determining the optimal behavioral measures and test procedure for analyzing visuo-spatial learning and memory in three different Barnes maze designs. Male and female…

  5. Development of a Radial Deconsolidation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Helmreich, Grant W.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Hunn, John D.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experiments have been initiated to determine the retention or mobility of fission products* in AGR fuel compacts [Petti, et al. 2010]. This information is needed to refine fission product transport models. The AGR-3/4 irradiation test involved half-inch-long compacts that each contained twenty designed-to-fail (DTF) particles, with 20-μm thick carbon-coated kernels whose coatings were deliberately fabricated such that they would crack under irradiation, providing a known source of post-irradiation isotopes. The DTF particles in these compacts were axially distributed along the compact centerline so that the diffusion of fission products released from the DTF kernels would be radially symmetric [Hunn, et al. 2012; Hunn et al. 2011; Kercher, et al. 2011; Hunn, et al. 2007]. Compacts containing DTF particles were irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) [Collin, 2015]. Analysis of the diffusion of these various post-irradiation isotopes through the compact requires a method to radially deconsolidate the compacts so that nested-annular volumes may be analyzed for post-irradiation isotope inventory in the compact matrix, TRISO outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC), and DTF kernels. An effective radial deconsolidation method and apparatus appropriate to this application has been developed and parametrically characterized.

  6. Approximate theory for radial filtration/consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, F.M.; Kirby, J.M.; Nguyen, H.L.

    1996-10-01

    Approximate solutions are developed for filtration and subsequent consolidation of compactible cakes on a cylindrical filter element. Darcy`s flow equation is coupled with equations for equilibrium stress under the conditions of plane strain and axial symmetry for radial flow inwards. The solutions are based on power function forms involving the relationships of the solidosity {epsilon}{sub s} (volume fraction of solids) and the permeability K to the solids effective stress p{sub s}. The solutions allow determination of the various parameters in the power functions and the ratio k{sub 0} of the lateral to radial effective stress (earth stress ratio). Measurements were made of liquid and effective pressures, flow rates, and cake thickness versus time. Experimental data are presented for a series of tests in a radial filtration cell with a central filter element. Slurries prepared from two materials (Microwate, which is mainly SrSO{sub 4}, and kaolin) were used in the experiments. Transient deposition of filter cakes was followed by static (i.e., no flow) conditions in the cake. The no-flow condition was accomplished by introducing bentonite which produced a nearly impermeable layer with negligible flow. Measurement of the pressure at the cake surface and the transmitted pressure on the central element permitted calculation of k{sub 0}.

  7. Egocentric virtual maze learning in adult survivors of childhood abuse with dissociative disorders: evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Weniger, Godehard; Siemerkus, Jakob; Barke, Antonia; Lange, Claudia; Ruhleder, Mirjana; Sachsse, Ulrich; Schmidt-Samoa, Carsten; Dechent, Peter; Irle, Eva

    2013-05-30

    Present neuroimaging findings suggest two subtypes of trauma response, one characterized predominantly by hyperarousal and intrusions, and the other primarily by dissociative symptoms. The neural underpinnings of these two subtypes need to be better defined. Fourteen women with childhood abuse and the current diagnosis of dissociative amnesia or dissociative identity disorder but without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 14 matched healthy comparison subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while finding their way in a virtual maze. The virtual maze presented a first-person view (egocentric), lacked any topographical landmarks and could be learned only by using egocentric navigation strategies. Participants with dissociative disorders (DD) were not impaired in learning the virtual maze when compared with controls, and showed a similar, although weaker, pattern of activity changes during egocentric learning when compared with controls. Stronger dissociative disorder severity of participants with DD was related to better virtual maze performance, and to stronger activity increase within the cingulate gyrus and the precuneus. Our results add to the present knowledge of preserved attentional and visuospatial mnemonic functioning in individuals with DD. PMID:23522878

  8. Learning Strategy Selection in the Water Maze and Hippocampal CREB Phosphorylation Differ in Two Inbred Strains of Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Jin-Young; Goo, June-Seo; Lee, Dong-Eun; Jin, Da-Qing; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Gallagher, Michela; Han, Jung-Soo

    2008-01-01

    Learning strategy selection was assessed in two different inbred strains of mice, C57BL/6 and DBA/2, which are used for developing genetically modified mouse models. Male mice received a training protocol in a water maze using alternating blocks of visible and hidden platform trials, during which mice escaped to a single location. After training,…

  9. Formation of spatial and nonspatial memory in different condensed versions of short-term learning in Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Zots, M A; Ivashkina, O I; Ivanova, A A; Anokhin, K V

    2014-03-01

    We studied the formation of spatial and nonspatial memory in mice during learning in three different condensed versions of Morris water maze task. Learning in combined version caused the formation of both spatial and nonspatial memory, whereas learning in condensed versions (spatial and nonspatial) led to memory formation specific for the version.

  10. Egocentric virtual maze learning in adult survivors of childhood abuse with dissociative disorders: evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Weniger, Godehard; Siemerkus, Jakob; Barke, Antonia; Lange, Claudia; Ruhleder, Mirjana; Sachsse, Ulrich; Schmidt-Samoa, Carsten; Dechent, Peter; Irle, Eva

    2013-05-30

    Present neuroimaging findings suggest two subtypes of trauma response, one characterized predominantly by hyperarousal and intrusions, and the other primarily by dissociative symptoms. The neural underpinnings of these two subtypes need to be better defined. Fourteen women with childhood abuse and the current diagnosis of dissociative amnesia or dissociative identity disorder but without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 14 matched healthy comparison subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while finding their way in a virtual maze. The virtual maze presented a first-person view (egocentric), lacked any topographical landmarks and could be learned only by using egocentric navigation strategies. Participants with dissociative disorders (DD) were not impaired in learning the virtual maze when compared with controls, and showed a similar, although weaker, pattern of activity changes during egocentric learning when compared with controls. Stronger dissociative disorder severity of participants with DD was related to better virtual maze performance, and to stronger activity increase within the cingulate gyrus and the precuneus. Our results add to the present knowledge of preserved attentional and visuospatial mnemonic functioning in individuals with DD.

  11. Evaluating the Sensitivity of the Maze as an Index of Reading Proficiency for Students Who Are Severely Deficient in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faykus, Suzanne P.; McCurdy, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    The sensitivity of two curriculum-based measurement procedures, maze (a modified cloze procedure), and oral reading, were evaluated with six students with mental retardation and concomitant emotional/behavioral disorders. Although teacher acceptability of the two procedures was equal, ideographic comparisons revealed oral reading fluency to be a…

  12. Age-Related Visual and Kinesthetic Encoding Effects on Spatial Memory of a Maze-Like Floor Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, Jan D.; And Others

    As part of an experimental research program on lifespan naturalistic and laboratory memory for spatial representation, investigators examined interactions between the effects of visual and kinesthetic encoding and age on memory for space using a modification of the Sinnott (1987) human maze paradigm. It was hypothesized that an age effect favoring…

  13. The Canine Sand Maze: An Appetitive Spatial Memory Paradigm Sensitive to Age-Related Change in Dogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvin, Hannah E.; McGreevy, Paul D.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Valenzuela, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Aged dogs exhibit a spectrum of cognitive abilities including a syndrome similar to Alzheimer's disease. A major impediment to research so far has been the lack of a quick and accurate test of visuospatial memory appropriate for community-based animals. We therefore report on the development and validation of the Canine Sand Maze. A 4.5-m-diameter…

  14. Bias Using Maze to Predict High-Stakes Test Performance among Hispanic and Spanish-Speaking Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Robert D.; Hawken, Leanne S.; Kircher, John

    2012-01-01

    Universal screening using curriculum-based measures allows educators to detect students who may be in need of instructional interventions. Curriculum-based measures, such as oral reading fluency and Maze, are effective at accurately and efficiently identifying reading proficiency levels for overall school populations. Nevertheless, little is…

  15. Chronic aspartame affects T-maze performance, brain cholinergic receptors and Na+,K+-ATPase in rats.

    PubMed

    Christian, Brandon; McConnaughey, Kenneth; Bethea, Elena; Brantley, Scott; Coffey, Amy; Hammond, Leigha; Harrell, Shelly; Metcalf, Kasee; Muehlenbein, Danielle; Spruill, Willie; Brinson, Leslie; McConnaughey, Mona

    2004-05-01

    This study demonstrated that chronic aspartame consumption in rats can lead to altered T-maze performance and increased muscarinic cholinergic receptor densities in certain brain regions. Control and treated rats were trained in a T-maze to a particular side and then periodically tested to see how well they retained the learned response. Rats that had received aspartame (250 mg/kg/day) in the drinking water for 3 or 4 months showed a significant increase in time to reach the reward in the T-maze, suggesting a possible effect on memory due to the artificial sweetener. Using [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) (1 nM) to label muscarinic cholinergic receptors and atropine (10(-6) M) to determine nonspecific binding in whole-brain preparations, aspartame-treated rats showed a 31% increase in receptor numbers when compared to controls. In aspartame-treated rats, there was a significant increase in muscarinic receptor densities in the frontal cortex, midcortex, posterior cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum of 80%, 60%, 61%, 65%, 66% and 60%, respectively. The midbrain was the only area where preparations from aspartame-treated rats showed a significant increase in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. It can be concluded from these data that long-term consumption of aspartame can affect T-maze performance in rats and alter receptor densities or enzymes in brain.

  16. Classification Accuracy of Oral Reading Fluency and Maze in Predicting Performance on Large-Scale Reading Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Dawn M.; Hixson, Michael D.; Shaw, Amber; Johnson, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether using a multiple-measure framework yielded better classification accuracy than oral reading fluency (ORF) or maze alone in predicting pass/fail rates for middle-school students on a large-scale reading assessment. Participants were 178 students in Grades 7 and 8 from a Midwestern school district.…

  17. Extending Curriculum-Based Measurement into Middle/Secondary Schools: The Technical Adequacy of the Concept Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twyman, Todd; Tindal, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) is emerging at middle/secondary school settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of a concept maze task to assist middle school teachers in making accurate decisions regarding student content learning. A total sample of 240 middle-school students were randomly assigned to take a…

  18. Cross-Language Comparisons of Maze Use in Spanish and English in Functionally Monolingual and Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedore, Lisa M.; Fiestas, Christine E.; Pena, Elizabeth D.; Nagy, Vanessa J.

    2006-01-01

    Maze use appears to be higher in bilingual speakers than in their functionally monolingual peers. One question is whether this is due to the speaker's bilingual status or to the characteristics of the bilingual's language(s). Narratives for 22 Spanish-English bilingual 4-6-year-olds and their functionally monolingual age-matched peers were…

  19. Rats' Orientation at the Start Point Is Important for Spatial Learning in a Water T-Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peckford, Genieve; McRae, Samantha M.; Thorpe, Christina M.; Martin, Gerard M.; Skinner, Darlene M.

    2013-01-01

    When trained to locate a hidden platform in a T-maze moved between two positions, rats appear to adopt a conditional strategy based on start point discrimination. To determine if location cues or orientation cues at the start point underlie this discrimination, separate groups of rats were trained on two place problems, each with unique start…

  20. The von Restorff effect in rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Reed, P; Richards, A

    1996-06-01

    Two experiments examined the functional equivalence of memory in the rat (Rattus norvegicus) with memory in humans for serially presented items. Memory was assayed with an 8-arm radial maze, in which rats were allowed access to 5 arms of the maze and were then removed. Following a retention interval of 16 min, the rats were replaced in the maze and allowed to retrieve pellets from the 3 unvisited arms. The errors in reentering previously visited arms were noted. Both primacy and recency effects were found as with humans. Presenting a stimulus change after entry to 1 of the maze arms improved recall for that arm relative to when no change occurred. This effect was found using both handling and tone cues, and irrespective of whether the change consisted of presentation or nonpresentation of the cue. These results suggest that rats are subject to a von Restorff-like effect similar to that in humans.

  1. Dose reduction of scattered photons from concrete walls lined with lead: Implications for improvement in design of megavoltage radiation therapy facility mazes

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Affan, I. A. M. Hugtenburg, R. P.; Piliero, M.; Bari, D. S.; Al-Saleh, W. M.; Evans, S.; Al-Hasan, M.; Al-Zughul, B.; Al-Kharouf, S.; Ghaith, A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: This study explores the possibility of using lead to cover part of the radiation therapy facility maze walls in order to absorb low energy photons and reduce the total dose at the maze entrance of radiation therapy rooms. Methods: Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to establish the possibility of using high-Z materials to cover the concrete walls of the maze in order to reduce the dose of the scattered photons at the maze entrance. The dose of the backscattered photons from a concrete wall was measured for various scattering angles. The dose was also calculated by the FLUKA and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. The FLUKA code was also used to simulate an existing radiotherapy room to study the effect of multiple scattering when adding lead to cover the concrete walls of the maze. Monoenergetic photons were used to represent the main components of the x ray spectrum up to 10 MV. Results: It was observed that when the concrete wall was covered with just 2 mm of lead, the measured dose rate at all backscattering angles was reduced by 20% for photons of energy comparable to Co-60 emissions and 70% for Cs-137 emissions. The simulations with FLUKA and EGS showed that the reduction in the dose was potentially even higher when lead was added. One explanation for the reduction is the increased absorption of backscattered photons due to the photoelectric interaction in lead. The results also showed that adding 2 mm lead to the concrete walls and floor of the maze reduced the dose at the maze entrance by up to 90%. Conclusions: This novel proposal of covering part or the entire maze walls with a few millimeters of lead would have a direct implication for the design of radiation therapy facilities and would assist in upgrading the design of some mazes, especially those in facilities with limited space where the maze length cannot be extended to sufficiently reduce the dose.

  2. Optimization of apparatus design and behavioral measures for the assessment of visuo-spatial learning and memory of mice on the Barnes maze.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Timothy P; Brown, Richard E

    2013-01-15

    We have previously shown that apparatus design can affect visual-spatial cue use and memory performance of mice on the Barnes maze. The present experiment extends these findings by determining the optimal behavioral measures and test procedure for analyzing visuo-spatial learning and memory in three different Barnes maze designs. Male and female C57BL/6J mice were trained with a stable or random escape hole location and the sensitivities (statistical power) of four commonly used measures of learning and three measures of memory to detect differences between these training procedures were compared on each maze design. A maze design with a large diameter and no wall was optimal, because mice showed a reliable use of extra-maze visual cues, visuo-spatial search strategies, and spatial memory. A maze design with a small diameter, surrounding wall, and intra-maze visual cues was the least sensitive for determining visuo-spatial learning and memory, because mice showed little evidence of extra-maze cue use. Errors, distance traveled, and hole deviation scores were more sensitive measures of learning than latency to find the escape hole. Measures based on locating the escape hole (primary measures) were more sensitive than measures based on entering the escape hole (total measures). Measures of memory had similar levels of sensitivity on each maze. This experiment demonstrates that both apparatus design and the behavioral measures used as indicators of learning and memory can influence the ability of the Barnes maze to detect visuo-spatial learning and memory impairments in mice.

  3. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  4. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  5. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  6. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  7. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  8. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  9. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  10. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  11. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  12. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  13. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was

  14. Navigating two-dimensional mazes: Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and capuchins (Cebus apella sp.) profit from experience differently

    PubMed Central

    Fragaszy, Dorothy; Kennedy, Erica; Murnane, Aeneas; Menzel, Charles; Brewer, Gene; Johnson-Pynn, Julie; Hopkins, William

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether navigation is impacted by experience in two species of nonhuman primates. Five chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and seven capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) navigated a cursor, using a joystick, through two-dimensional mazes presented on a computer monitor. Subjects completed 192 mazes, each one time. Each maze contained one to five choices, and in up to three of these choices, the correct path required moving the cursor away from the Euclidean direction toward the goal. Some subjects completed these mazes in a random order (Random group); others in a fixed order by ascending number of choices and ascending number of turns away from goal (Ordered group). Chimpanzees in both groups performed equivalently, demonstrated fewer errors and a higher rate of self-correcting errors with increasing experience at solving the mazes, and made significantly fewer errors than capuchin monkeys. Capuchins were more sensitive to the mode of presentation than chimpanzees: Monkeys in the Ordered group made fewer errors than monkeys in the Random group. However, capuchins’ performance across testing changed little, and they remained particularly susceptible to making errors when the correct path required moving away from the goal. Thus, these two species responded differently to the same spatial challenges and same learning contexts. The findings indicate that chimpanzees have a strong advantage in this task compared to capuchins, no matter how the task is presented. We suggest that differences between the species in the dynamic organization of attention and motor processes contribute to their differences in performance on this task, and predict similar differences in other tasks requiring, as this one does, sustained attention to a dynamic visual display and self-produced movements variably towards and away from a goal. PMID:19148688

  15. Intracerebroventricular injection of N omega-nitro-L-arginine in rats impairs learning in a 14-unit T-maze.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D K; Spangler, E L; Kametani, H; Meyer, R C; London, E D

    1998-01-01

    We investigated whether intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (N-Arg), impairs learning in male Sprague-Dawley rats (2-3 months old) in a 14-unit T-maze. Rats were pretrained in one-way active avoidance to a criterion of 13/15 avoidances of foot shock in a straight runway. The next day, rats received i.c.v. injections of either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) as controls or N-Arg (12 microg or 15 microg) 30 min before training in the 14-unit T-maze. The learning contingency was to negotiate each of 5 segments within 10 s to avoid footshock during 15 trials. Performance variables included errors (deviations from the correct pathway), runtime from start to goal, and shock frequency and duration. Compared to controls, the number of errors over the last 10 trials was higher in rats receiving 15 microg N-Arg and over the last 5 trials for those given 12 microg. Runtime, shock frequency and duration were increased in both N-Arg groups. The N-Arg-induced (15 microg i.c.v.) impairment could be attenuated when the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (1 mg/kg), was administered intraperitoneally 1 min prior to maze learning. In a retention test, rats were treated with either aCSF or 15 microg N-Arg i.c.v. 30 min before being retested in the maze 7-10 d following acquisition training. Under these conditions, maze performance was not significantly affected. These results confirmed previous findings that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase impairs acquisition but not retention. Moreover, the N-Arg-induced learning impairment does not appear to be related to noncognitive aspects of performance. PMID:9489850

  16. An old test for new neurons: refining the Morris water maze to study the functional relevance of adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Garthe, Alexander; Kempermann, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    The Morris water maze represents the de-facto standard for testing hippocampal function in laboratory rodents. In the field of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, however, using this paradigm to assess the functional relevance of the new neurons yielded surprisingly inconsistent results. While some authors found aspects of water maze performance to be linked to adult neurogenesis, others obtained different results or could not demonstrate any effect of manipulating adult neurogenesis. In this review we discuss evidence that the large diversity of protocols and setups used is an important aspect in interpreting the differences in the results that have been obtained. Even simple parameters such as pool size, number, and configuration of visual landmarks, or number of trials can become highly relevant for getting the new neurons involved at all. Sets of parameters are often chosen with implicit or explicit concepts in mind and these might lead to different views on the function of adult-generated neurons. We propose that the classical parameters usually used to measure spatial learning performance in the water maze might not be particularly well-suited to sensitively and specifically detect the supposedly highly specific functional changes elicited by the experimental modulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. As adult neurogenesis is supposed to affect specific aspects of information processing only in the hippocampus, any claim for a functional relevance of the new neurons has to be based on hippocampus-specific parameters. We also placed a special emphasis on the fact that the dentate gyrus (DG) facilitates the differentiation between contexts as opposed to just differentiating places. In conclusion, while the Morris water maze has proven to be one of the most effective testing paradigms to assess hippocampus-dependent spatial learning, new and more specific questions ask for new parameters. Therefore, the full potential of the water maze task remains to be tapped

  17. Comminuted radial head fractures treated by the Acumed anatomic radial head system

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Zhefei; Chen, Maohua; Xiong, Yan; Fan, Zhihang; Wang, Aimin; Wang, Ziming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of comminuted radial head fractures is still challenging. A radial head replacement is more effective in comminuted radial head fractures. The aim of this paper was to present the medium-term results of the Acumed anatomic radial head system (AARHS). Methods: This study was performed on 12 patients with traumatic elbow fracture and instability between 2008 and 2011 of whom 12 were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 60.8 months (19 to 77 months). The evaluation included a record of pain, function, muscle strength, contracture and rotation. The outcome was assessed using the Hospital for Special Surgery total elbow scoring and a modified Disability of Arm Shoulder Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Results: The average flexion and extension arc was 130° (range, 110° to 140°). The mean range of elbow supination was 75° (rang, 60° to 85°) and pronation 80° (range, 65° to 90°). There were no complications such as infection, implant loosening, instability of the elbow, cubitus valgus, osteoporosis of the capitellum, or pain in the forearm and wrist. The mean DASH score was 11.9/100 (0 to 25/100). Conclusion: The radial head replacement with the AARHS can provide effectively stability and good clinic results at the middle term following up. Our experience has encouraged us to continue using the AARHS in comminuted fractures, especially when instability of elbow is a potential problem. PMID:26131250

  18. Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting

    DOEpatents

    Bulman, David Edward; Darkins, Jr., Toby George; Stumpf, James Anthony; Schroder, Mark S.; Lipinski, John Joseph

    2012-03-27

    Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

  19. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field Br ˜ (10-4-10-2)(r/ AU)-2 G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ˜1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  20. DESIGN ANALYSIS OF RADIAL INFLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    This program performs a velocity-diagram analysis required for determining geometry and estimating performance for radial-inflow turbines. Input design requirements are power, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative rate. The design variables include stator-exit angle, rotor-exit-tip to rotor-inlet radius ratio, rotor-exit-hub to tip radius ratio, and the magnitude and radial distribution of rotor-exit tangential velocity. The program output includes diameters, total and static efficiences, all absolute and relative temperatures, pressures, and velocities, and flow angles at stator inlet, stator exit, rotor inlet, and rotor exit. Losses accounted for in this program by the internal loss model are three-dimensional (profile plus end wall) viscous losses in the stator and the rotor, the disk-friction loss on the back side of the rotor, the loss due to the clearance between the rotor tip and the outer casing, and the exit velocity loss. The flow analysis is one-dimensional at the stator inlet, stator exit, and rotor inlet, each of these calculation stations being at a constant radius. At the rotor exit where there is a variation in flow-field radius, an axisymmetric two-dimensional analysis is made using constant height sectors. Simple radial equilibrium is used to establish the static pressure gradient at the rotor exit. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a memory requirement of approximately 22K of 36 bit words.

  1. Axial and Radial Oxylipin Transport1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Debora; Chauvin, Adeline; Acosta, Ivan F.; Kurenda, Andrzej; Stolz, Stéphanie; Chételat, Aurore; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Farmer, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonates are oxygenated lipids (oxylipins) that control defense gene expression in response to cell damage in plants. How mobile are these potent mediators within tissues? Exploiting a series of 13-lipoxygenase (13-lox) mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that displays impaired jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis in specific cell types and using JA-inducible reporters, we mapped the extent of the transport of endogenous jasmonates across the plant vegetative growth phase. In seedlings, we found that jasmonate (or JA precursors) could translocate axially from wounded shoots to unwounded roots in a LOX2-dependent manner. Grafting experiments with the wild type and JA-deficient mutants confirmed shoot-to-root oxylipin transport. Next, we used rosettes to investigate radial cell-to-cell transport of jasmonates. After finding that the LOX6 protein localized to xylem contact cells was not wound inducible, we used the lox234 triple mutant to genetically isolate LOX6 as the only JA precursor-producing LOX in the plant. When a leaf of this mutant was wounded, the JA reporter gene was expressed in distal leaves. Leaf sectioning showed that JA reporter expression extended from contact cells throughout the vascular bundle and into extravascular cells, revealing a radial movement of jasmonates. Our results add a crucial element to a growing picture of how the distal wound response is regulated in rosettes, showing that both axial (shoot-to-root) and radial (cell-to-cell) transport of oxylipins plays a major role in the wound response. The strategies developed herein provide unique tools with which to identify intercellular jasmonate transport routes. PMID:26338953

  2. Linear stability of radially-heated circular Couette flow with simulated radial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randy; Weidman, Patrick D.

    2007-05-01

    The stability of circular Couette flow between vertical concentric cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient is considered with an effective “radial gravity.” In addition to terrestrial buoyancy - ρg e z we include the term - ρg m f(r)e r where g m f(r) is the effective gravitational acceleration directed radially inward across the gap. Physically, this body force arises in experiments using ferrofluid in the annular gap of a Taylor Couette cell whose inner cylinder surrounds a vertical stack of equally spaced disk magnets. The radial dependence f(r) of this force is proportional to the modified Bessel function K 1(κr), where 2π/κ is the spatial period of the magnetic stack and r is the radial coordinate. Linear stability calculations made to compare with conditions reported by Ali and Weidman (J. Fluid Mech., 220, 1990) show strong destabilization effects, measured by the onset Rayleigh number R, when the inner wall is warmer, and strong stabilization effects when the outer wall is warmer, with increasing values of the dimensionless radial gravity γ = g m /g. Further calculations presented for the geometry and fluid properties of a terrestrial laboratory experiment reveal a hitherto unappreciated structure of the stability problem for differentially-heated cylinders: multiple wavenumber minima exist in the marginal stability curves. Transitions in global minima among these curves give rise to a competition between differing instabilities of the same spiral mode number, but widely separated axial wavenumbers.

  3. On radial flow between parallel disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, A. Y. L.; Gorin, A.

    2015-04-01

    Approximate analytical solutions are presented for converging flow in between two parallel non rotating disks. The static pressure distribution and radial component of the velocity are developed by averaging the inertial term across the gap in between parallel disks. The predicted results from the first approximation are favourable to experimental results as well as results presented by other authors. The second approximation shows that as the fluid approaches the center, the velocity at the mid channel slows down which is due to the struggle between the inertial term and the flowrate.

  4. Acoustic aspects of a radial diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Krasinski, J.; Sun, S.; Wawszczak, W.

    This paper describes experimental research on the acoustical aspects of an axially-symmetrical radial diffuser. Tests were made at high subsonic and supersonic speeds at the diffuser entry, using compressed air. The results are analyzed from the point of view of the internal flow and Lighthill's theory of sound generated aerodynamically. The outstanding features of this diffuser are a high efficiency in subsonic and supersonic ranges and extreme shortness and powerful sound attenuating capacity. The noise level of a supersonic nozzle at Mach 4.0 was reduced from about 110 dB to 80 dB.

  5. Reactive-infiltration instability in radial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    A planar dissolution front propagating through a homogeneous porous matrix is unstable with respect to small variations in local permeability; regions of high permeability dissolve faster because of enhanced transport of reactants, which leads to increased rippling of the front. This phenomenon, usually referred to known as reactive-infiltration instability is an important mechanism for pattern development in geology, with a range of morphologies and scales, from cave systems running for hundreds of miles to laboratory acidization on the scale of centimeters. In general, this instability is characterized by two length scales: the diffusive length (D/v) and the reactant penetration length (v/r), where v is the Darcy velocity, D - the diffusion constant and r - the dissolution rate. If the latter scale is much smaller than the former one can adopt the so-called thin front limit, where the interface is treated as a discontinuity in porosity, with a completely dissolved phase on one side and an undissolved phase on the other. Linear stability analysis for this case has been carried out by Chadam et al. [1], and the corresponding dispersion relation shows that long wavelengths are unstable, whereas short wavelengths are stabilized by diffusion. In their derivation, Chadam et al. have considered a linear geometry with a uniform pressure gradient applied along one of the directions. However, in many cases (e.g. in the acidization techniques used in oil industry) the reactive fluids are injected through a well and thus the relevant geometry is radial rather than linear. Motivated by this, we have carried out the linear stability analysis of the reactive-infiltration problem in radial geometry, with the fluid injection at the centre of the system. We stay within the thin-front limit and derive the corresponding dispersion relation, which shows the stable regions for both the long-wavelength and short-wavelength modes, and the unstable region in between. Next, we study how

  6. Radial Neck Osteotomy for Malunion of Radial Neck Fracture in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Vandergugten, Simon; Troussel, Serge; Lefebvre, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In a case of a neglected radial neck fracture in childhood, the management of initial fracture and its complications are subjected to discussion. In children, open reduction should be avoided but an angulation less than 30° must be obtained. Several techniques exist to manage symptomatic malunion in adults, including resection, prosthesis, and osteotomy. When performing an osteotomy, it is important first to preserve an intact osseous hinge to avoid avascular necrosis and second to align the edge of the radial head articular surface with the lateral edge of the coronoid process, in order to avoid overstuffing elbow joint. PMID:26347364

  7. Distinct epigenetic and gene expression changes in rat hippocampal neurons after Morris water maze training

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Sylvia D.; Mifsud, Karen R.; Reul, Johannes M. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Gene transcription and translation in the hippocampus is of critical importance in hippocampus-dependent memory formation, including during Morris water maze (MWM) learning. Previous work using gene deletion models has shown that the immediate-early genes (IEGs) c-Fos, Egr-1, and Arc are crucial for such learning. Recently, we reported that induction of IEGs in sparse dentate gyrus neurons requires ERK MAPK signaling and downstream formation of a distinct epigenetic histone mark (i.e., phospho-acetylated histone H3). Until now, this signaling, epigenetic and gene transcriptional pathway has not been comprehensively studied in the MWM model. Therefore, we conducted a detailed study of the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and serine10 in histone H3 (H3S10p) and induction of IEGs in the hippocampus of MWM trained rats and matched controls. MWM training evoked consecutive waves of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and H3S10 phosphorylation, as well as c-Fos, Egr-1, and Arc induction in sparse hippocampal neurons. The observed effects were most pronounced in the dentate gyrus. A positive correlation was found between the average latency to find the platform and the number of H3S10p-positive dentate gyrus neurons. Furthermore, chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) revealed a significantly increased association of phospho-acetylated histone H3 (H3K9ac-S10p) with the gene promoters of c-Fos and Egr-1, but not Arc, after MWM exposure compared with controls. Surprisingly, however, we found very little difference between IEG responses (regarding both protein and mRNA) in MWM-trained rats compared with matched swim controls. We conclude that exposure to the water maze evokes ERK MAPK activation, distinct epigenetic changes and IEG induction predominantly in sparse dentate gyrus neurons. It appears, however, that a specific role for IEGs in the learning aspect of MWM training may become apparent in downstream AP-1- and Egr-1-regulated (second wave) genes and Arc-dependent effector mechanisms

  8. An analytical estimate of the coefficient for radial charged particle diffusion in Jupiter's magnetosphere using plasma radial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubar, Yu. I.

    2015-11-01

    A radial profile of the plasma mass distribution in Jupiter's magnetosphere in the region beyond Io's orbit up to ˜15 Jupiter radii R J constructed according to the results of measurements on the Voyager 1 and Galileo spacecraft is used to determine the radial dependence and radial diffusion coefficient D LL . The initial profile is approximated by a function decreasing as L -5 ± 1. For this radial mass distribution, radial ion diffusion outside of Io's orbit caused by centrifugal forces is possible. An estimate of (1.2-6.7)10-11 L 6 ± 1 for D LL was obtained.

  9. Dropwise Condensation on a Radial Gradient Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    In transient dropwise condensation from steam onto a cool surface, distributions of drops evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence. This study examines how surface functionalization affects drop growth and coalescence. Surfaces are treated by silanization to deliver either a spatially uniform contact-angle (hydrophilic, neutral, and hydrophobic) or a radial gradient of contact-angles. The time evolution of number-density and associated drop-size distributions are reported. For a typical condensation experiment on a uniform angle surface, the number-density curves show two regimes: an initial increase in number-density as a result of nucleation and a subsequent decrease in number-density as a result of larger scale coalescence events. Without a removal mechanism, the fractional coverage, regardless of treatment, approaches unity. For the same angle-surface, the associated drop-size distributions progress through four different shapes along the growth curve. In contrast, for a radial gradient surface where removal by sweeping occurs, the number-density increases and then levels off to a value close to the maximum number-density that is well below unity coverage and only two shapes of distributions are observed. Implications for heat transfer will be discussed. This work was supported by a NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  10. First results from the Radial Velocity Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabroke, George; Cropper, Mark; Katz, David; Sartoretti, Paola; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Marchal, Olivier; Gueguen, Alain; Benson, Kevin; Dolding, Chris; Huckle, Howard; Smith, Mike; Baker, Steve

    2015-08-01

    Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) has been operating in routine phase for nearly one year since initial commissioning. RVS continues to work well but the higher than expected levels of stray light reduce the limiting magnitude. The end-of-mission radial velocity performance requirements are 15 km/s for G2V stars at V = 16.5 mag. 15 km/s accuracy is achieved at V ~ 15 mag, in agreement with simulations that predict a loss of 1.4 mag. RVS spectra are read out from the Gaia CCDs using windows, currently with a fixed Across Scan (AC) width of 10 pixels. Simulations suggest that adapting the AC window size and limiting magnitude to the observing conditions could recover ~0.1 mag of the faint-end performance loss. Consequently Gaia's onboard software will be upgraded in spring/summer 2015 (TBC) to include two new configurable functionalities: an adaptive RVS AC window size scheme and an adaptive RVS limiting magnitude scheme. The status of this new commissioning period will be presented, as well as the latest scientific performance of the on-ground processing of RVS spectra.

  11. RADIAL VELOCITY ECLIPSE MAPPING OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-20

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter–McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin–orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  12. Calibration of cameras with radially symmetric distortion.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Jean-Philippe; Sturm, Peter; Trudeau, Martin; Roy, Sébastien

    2009-09-01

    We present algorithms for plane-based calibration of general radially distorted cameras. By this, we understand cameras that have a distortion center and an optical axis such that the projection rays of pixels lying on a circle centered on the distortion center form a right viewing cone centered on the optical axis. The camera is said to have a single viewpoint (SVP) if all such viewing cones have the same apex (the optical center); otherwise, we speak of NSVP cases. This model encompasses the classical radial distortion model [5], fisheyes, and most central or noncentral catadioptric cameras. Calibration consists in the estimation of the distortion center, the opening angles of all viewing cones, and their optical centers. We present two approaches of computing a full calibration from dense correspondences of a single or multiple planes with known euclidean structure. The first one is based on a geometric constraint linking viewing cones and their intersections with the calibration plane (conic sections). The second approach is a homography-based method. Experiments using simulated and a broad variety of real cameras show great stability. Furthermore, we provide a comparison with Hartley-Kang's algorithm [12], which, however, cannot handle such a broad variety of camera configurations, showing similar performance.

  13. A radial transmission line material measurement apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Moyer, R.D.; Koontz, T.E.; Morris, M.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radial transmission line material measurement sample apparatus (sample holder, offset short standards, measurement software, and instrumentation) is described which has been proposed, analyzed, designed, constructed, and tested. The purpose of the apparatus is to obtain accurate surface impedance measurements of lossy, possibly anisotropic, samples at low and intermediate frequencies (vhf and low uhf). The samples typically take the form of sections of the material coatings on conducting objects. Such measurements thus provide the key input data for predictive numerical scattering codes. Prediction of the sample surface impedance from the coaxial input impedance measurement is carried out by two techniques. The first is an analytical model for the coaxial-to-radial transmission line junction. The second is an empirical determination of the bilinear transformation model of the junction by the measurement of three full standards. The standards take the form of three offset shorts (and an additional lossy Salisbury load), which have also been constructed. The accuracy achievable with the device appears to be near one percent.

  14. Dietary early-life exposure to contaminated eels does not impair spatial cognitive performances in adult offspring mice as assessed in the Y-maze and the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Imen; Leroy, Delphine; Guignard, Cédric; Scholl, Georges; Bohn, Torsten; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Eppe, Gauthier; Soulimani, Rachid; Bouayed, Jaouad

    2014-12-01

    Many environmental contaminants are introduced via the diet and may act as neurotoxins and endocrine disrupters, especially influencing growing organisms in early life. The purpose of this study was to examine whether dietary exposure of dams to fish naturally contaminated with xenobiotics, especially with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metals (e.g., mercury and lead), resulted in cognitive function deficits in adult offspring mice. Daily, four groups of dams (n = 10/group) ingested standard diet plus paste with/without eels, during gestation and lactation, from gestational day (GD) six until post natal day (PND) 21 (weaning). Dams orally ingested a standardized amount of eel (0.8 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) containing the six non-dioxin-like (NDL) PCBs (Σ6 NDL-PCBs: 28, 52, 101, 138, 153, and 180) at 0, 85, 216, and 400 ng kg(-1) d(-1). Results showed that early-life exposure to contaminated eels did not (compared to non-exposed controls) impair immediate working memory in the Y-maze in the offspring assessed at PND 38. Furthermore, it did not significantly impact spatial learning and retention memory as measured in the Morris water maze in adult offspring mice (PND 120-123). Our results suggest that perinatal exposure to contaminated eels does not affect spatial cognitive performances, as assessed by the Y-maze and Morris water maze at adult age. Adverse effects of xenobiotics reported earlier might be camouflaged by beneficial eel constituents, such as n-3 fatty acids. However, additional studies are needed to differentiate between potential positive and negative effects following consumption of food items both rich in nutrients and contaminants.

  15. Myristic Acid Produces Anxiolytic-Like Effects in Wistar Rats in the Elevated Plus Maze

    PubMed Central

    García-Ríos, Rosa Isela; Cueto-Escobedo, Jonathan; Guillen-Ruiz, Gabriel; Bernal-Morales, Blandina

    2014-01-01

    A mixture of eight fatty acids (linoleic, palmitic, stearic, myristic, elaidic, lauric, oleic, and palmitoleic acids) at similar concentrations identified in human amniotic fluid produces anxiolytic-like effects comparable to diazepam in Wistar rats. However, individual effects of each fatty acid remain unexplored. In Wistar rats, we evaluated the separate action of each fatty acid at the corresponding concentrations previously found in human amniotic fluid on anxiety-like behaviour. Individual effects were compared with vehicle, an artificial mixture of the same eight fatty acids, and a reference anxiolytic drug (diazepam, 2 mg/kg). Myristic acid, the fatty acid mixture, and diazepam increased the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze and reduced the anxiety index compared with vehicle, without altering general locomotor activity. The other fatty acids had no effect on anxiety-like behaviour, but oleic acid reduced locomotor activity. Additionally, myristic acid produced anxiolytic-like effects only when the concentration corresponded to the one identified in human amniotic fluid (30 𝜇g/mL) but did not alter locomotor activity. We conclude that of the eight fatty acids contained in the fatty acid mixture, only myristic acid produces anxiolytic-like effects when administered individually at a similar concentration detected in human amniotic fluid. PMID:25328885

  16. Unraveling cognitive traits using the Morris water maze unbiased strategy classification (MUST-C) algorithm.

    PubMed

    Illouz, Tomer; Madar, Ravit; Louzon, Yoram; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Okun, Eitan

    2016-02-01

    The assessment of spatial cognitive learning in rodents is a central approach in neuroscience, as it enables one to assess and quantify the effects of treatments and genetic manipulations from a broad perspective. Although the Morris water maze (MWM) is a well-validated paradigm for testing spatial learning abilities, manual categorization of performance in the MWM into behavioral strategies is subject to individual interpretation, and thus to biases. Here we offer a support vector machine (SVM) - based, automated, MWM unbiased strategy classification (MUST-C) algorithm, as well as a cognitive score scale. This model was examined and validated by analyzing data obtained from five MWM experiments with changing platform sizes, revealing a limitation in the spatial capacity of the hippocampus. We have further employed this algorithm to extract novel mechanistic insights on the impact of members of the Toll-like receptor pathway on cognitive spatial learning and memory. The MUST-C algorithm can greatly benefit MWM users as it provides a standardized method of strategy classification as well as a cognitive scoring scale, which cannot be derived from typical analysis of MWM data. PMID:26522398

  17. The water maze paradigm in experimental studies of chronic cognitive disorders: Theory, protocols, analysis, and inference.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Minesh; Xu, Josie; Sakic, Boris

    2016-09-01

    An instrumental step in assessing the validity of animal models of chronic cognitive disorders is to document disease-related deficits in learning/memory capacity. The water maze (WM) is a popular paradigm because of its low cost, relatively simple protocol and short procedure time. Despite being broadly accepted as a spatial learning task, inference of generalized, bona fide "cognitive" dysfunction can be challenging because task accomplishment is also reliant on non-cognitive processes. We review theoretical background, testing procedures, confounding factors, as well as approaches to data analysis and interpretation. We also describe an extended protocol that has proven useful in detecting early performance deficits in murine models of neuropsychiatric lupus and Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we highlight the need for standardization of inferential criteria on "cognitive" dysfunction in experimental rodents and exclusion of preparations of a limited scientific merit. A deeper appreciation for the multifactorial nature of performance in WM may also help to reveal other deficits that herald the onset of neurodegenerative brain disorders. PMID:27229758

  18. Molecular docking and panicolytic effect of 8-prenylnaringenin in the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Bagatin, Mariane Cristovão; Tozatti, Camila Santos Suniga; Abiko, Layara Akemi; Yamazaki, Diego Alberto dos Santos; Silva, Priscila Rebeca Alves; Perego, Leonardo Martins; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Seixas, Flavio Augusto Vicente; Basso, Ernani Abicht; Gauze, Gisele de Freitas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the chronic administration of a racemic mixture of 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) on rats submitted to the elevated T-maze (ETM) model of generalized anxiety and panic disorders. The selective serotonin (SERT) reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine was used as a positive control. Rat locomotion was assessed in a circular arena following each drug treatment. The administration of racemic 8-PN for 21 d in rats increased one-way escape latencies from the ETM open arm, indicating a panicolytic effect. To evaluate the interactions of 8-PN with monoamine transporters, a docking study was performed for both the R and S configurations of 8-PN towards SERT, norepinephrine (NET) and dopamine transporters (DAT). The application of the docking protocol showed that (R)-8-PN provides greater affinity to all transporters than does the S enantiomer. This result suggests that enantiomer (R)-8-PN is the active form in the in vivo test of the racemic mixture.

  19. Morris Water Maze Test: Optimization for Mouse Strain and Testing Environment.

    PubMed

    Weitzner, Daniel S; Engler-Chiurazzi, Elizabeth B; Kotilinek, Linda A; Ashe, Karen Hsiao; Reed, Miranda Nicole

    2015-06-22

    The Morris water maze (MWM) is a commonly used task to assess hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory in transgenic mouse models of disease, including neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. However, the background strain of the mouse model used can have a substantial effect on the observed behavioral phenotype, with some strains exhibiting superior learning ability relative to others. To ensure differences between transgene negative and transgene positive mice can be detected, identification of a training procedure sensitive to the background strain is essential. Failure to tailor the MWM protocol to the background strain of the mouse model may lead to under- or over- training, thereby masking group differences in probe trials. Here, a MWM protocol tailored for use with the F1 FVB/N x 129S6 background is described. This is a frequently used background strain to study the age-dependent effects of mutant P301L tau (rTg(TauP301L)4510 mice) on the memory deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. Also described is a strategy to re-optimize, as dictated by the particular testing environment utilized.

  20. Environmental enrichment to alleviate maze performance deficits in rats with microcephaly induced by X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shibagaki, M.; Seo, M.; Asano, T.; Kiyono, S. . Inst. for Developmental Research)

    1981-11-01

    Pregnant rats received 150 R of X-irradiation on day 17 of gestation. The male offspring were reared under environmentally enriched (EC), standard colony (SC) or impoverished conditions (IC) for 30 days after weaning. Then the Hebb-Williams maze test was carried out. The effects of X-irradiation and environment were both significant in initial, repetitive and total error scores and running time. Further analysis revealed that both EC-SC and EC-IC differences in initial, repetitive and total error scores were significant in X-irradiated animals, whereas only the EC-IC difference in initial and total error scores was significant in sham-irradiated control animals. Total protein, protein/g cortex, total benzodiazepine and muscarine cholinergic receptor bindings, and muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding/mg protein in the cerebral cortex were decreased in X-irradiated groups, compared to controls, but the effect of environment was not significant in these items. The results confirmed that environmental enrichment is a useful tool to alleviate the learning decrements in prenatally X-irradiated microcephalic rats.

  1. Subchronic phencyclidine in rats: alterations in locomotor activity, maze performance, and GABA(A) receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Beninger, Richard J; Beuk, Jonathan; Banasikowski, Tomek J; van Adel, Michael; Boivin, Gregory A; Reynolds, James N

    2010-02-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP), an antagonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of ionotropic glutamatergic receptors, decreases gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic inhibition, suggesting that changes in GABAergic receptor function underlie behavioral and cognitive deficits resulting from repeated administration of PCP. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with PCP (4.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, twice a day for 7 consecutive days) or saline were tested in behavioral and cognitive tasks 7 days after injections. The PCP group showed increased amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg)-stimulated locomotor activity, and exhibited a greater number of errors in the double Y-maze memory task, when compared with controls. Subchronic PCP treatment increased [H]muscimol-binding sites and decreased affinity for [H]muscimol binding in frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum in comparison with controls. There were no changes in the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase or the GABA membrane transporter protein. These data show that subchronic PCP administration induces an impaired performance of a previously learned task and an enhanced response to amphetamine in the rat. The observed changes in GABAA receptors in the rat brain are consistent with the notion that alterations in GABAergic receptor function contribute to the behavioral and cognitive impairments associated with repeated exposure to PCP. PMID:19949321

  2. Postoperative environmental enrichment attenuates fimbria-fornix lesion-induced impairments in Morris maze performance.

    PubMed

    van Rijzingen, I M; Gispen, W H; Spruijt, B M

    1997-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were given a bilateral or a unilateral transection of the fimbria-fornix; subsequently they were kept in standard laboratory housing conditions or in enriched environments for 6 weeks, after which they were tested in the Morris maze. In the acquisition phase of the experiment rats with a bilateral lesion of the fimbria-fornix were markedly impaired in their ability to locate the hidden platform, while rats with unilateral lesions displayed no such impairment. However, rats with a bilateral lesion displayed a less severe deficit when they had been housed postoperatively in the enriched environment. In the retention phase of the experiment rats with a bilateral lesion swam markedly less time in the platform zone only when they had been housed in standard conditions. They also spent more time in the edge zone than the other groups. Rats with a bilateral lesion that were housed enriched did not swim more in the edge zone. Despite their good performance during acquisition they did not display a clear preference for the platform zone. Thus, it was speculated that enriched rats with a bilateral lesion had learned to leave the side of the pool to search for the platform and with the aid of this different strategy improved their performance.

  3. Impaired water maze learning performance without altered dopaminergic function in mice heterozygous for the GDNF mutation.

    PubMed

    Gerlai, R; McNamara, A; Choi-Lundberg, D L; Armanini, M; Ross, J; Powell-Braxton, L; Phillips, H S

    2001-10-01

    Exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) exhibits potent survival-promoting effects on dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway that is implicated in Parkinson's disease and also protects neurons in forebrain ischemia of animal models. However, a role for endogenous GDNF in brain function has not been established. Although mice homozygous for a targeted deletion of the GDNF gene have been generated, these mice die within hours of birth because of deficits in kidney morphogenesis, and, thus, the effect of the absence of GDNF on brain function could not be studied. Herein, we sought to determine whether adult mice, heterozygous for a GDNF mutation on two different genetic backgrounds, demonstrate alterations in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system or in cognitive function. While both neurochemical and behavioural measures suggested that reduction of GDNF gene expression in the mutant mice does not alter the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system, it led to a significant and selective impairment of performance in the spatial version of the Morris water maze. A standard panel of blood chemistry tests and basic pathological analyses did not reveal alterations in the mutants that could account for the observed performance deficit. These results suggest that endogenous GDNF may not be critical for the development and functioning of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system but it plays an important role in cognitive abilities. PMID:11683907

  4. The scientific learning approach using multimedia-based maze game to improve learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Wawan; Hafitriani, Sarah; Prabawa, Harsa Wara

    2016-02-01

    The objective of curriculum 2013 is to improve the quality of education in Indonesia, which leads to improving the quality of learning. The scientific approach and supported empowerment media is one approach as massaged of curriculum 2013. This research aims to design a labyrinth game based multimedia and apply in the scientific learning approach. This study was conducted in one of the Vocational School in Subjects of Computer Network on 2 (two) classes of experimental and control. The method used Mix Method Research (MMR) which combines qualitative in multimedia design, and quantitative in the study of learning impact. The results of a survey showed that the general of vocational students like of network topology material (68%), like multimedia (74%), and in particular, like interactive multimedia games and flash (84%). Multimediabased maze game developed good eligibility based on media and material aspects of each value 840% and 82%. Student learning outcomes as a result of using a scientific approach to learning with a multimediabased labyrinth game increase with an average of gain index about (58%) and higher than conventional multimedia with index average gain of 0.41 (41%). Based on these results the scientific approach to learning by using multimediabased labyrinth game can improve the quality of learning and increase understanding of students. Multimedia of learning based labyrinth game, which developed, got a positive response from the students with a good qualification level (75%).

  5. Light/dark cycle manipulation influences mice behaviour in the elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Clénet, Florence; Bouyon, Eric; Hascoët, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The sensitization of animal models of anxiety is of great importance to detect potential anxiolytic drugs. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of manipulations of the light/dark cycle on the basal anxious behaviour of mice and the efficacy of two anxiolytic treatments in the mouse elevated plus maze (EPM). Male Swiss mice were exposed to different conditions of illumination for one week prior to testing. In the first experiment of the study, we evaluated the anxiolytic effects of diazepam, at the dose of 1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered 30 min before the test. In the second experiment, we examined the effects of WAY 100635, a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, at the doses of 0.03 and 2 mg/kg, i.p. administered 30 min before the test. The locomotor activity of control mice and the anxiolytic efficacy of diazepam in the EPM were not affected by manipulation of the light/dark cycle. Conversely, the effects of WAY 100635, which were qualitatively different from those of diazepam, seemed to be influenced by the illumination conditions imposed before the test. We can conclude that diazepam's effect, which is characterized by a strong "disinhibition", was more robust than the 5-HT(1A) antagonist's effect, which was more anxioselective. Moreover, the light conditions imposed on mice before the test may be an important factor in the variability of the response to serotonergic but not to benzodiazepine treatments.

  6. Language control in bilingual language comprehension: evidence from the maze task.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Most empirical evidence on switch costs is based on bilingual production and interpreted as a result of inhibitory control. It is unclear whether such a top-down control process exists in language switching during comprehension. This study investigates whether a non-lexical switch cost is involved in reading code-switched sentences and its relation to language dominance with cross-script bilingual readers. A maze task is adopted in order to separate top-down inhibitory effects, from lexical effects driven by input. The key findings are: (1) switch costs were observed in both L1-L2 and L2-L1 directions; (2) these effects were driven by two mechanisms: lexical activation and inhibitory control; (3) language dominance modulated the lexical effects, but did not affect the inhibitory effects. These results suggest that a language control mechanism is involved in bilingual reading, even though the control process is not driven by selection as in production. At the theoretical level, these results lend support for the Inhibitory Control model during language switching in comprehension; while the BIA/BIA+ model needs to incorporate a top-down control mechanism to be able to explain the current findings. PMID:26347675

  7. Intracerebellar vermis histamine facilitates memory consolidation in the elevated T maze model.

    PubMed

    Silva-Marques, Bruna; Gianlorenço, Anna Carolyna Lepesteur; Mattioli, Rosana

    2016-05-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that the cerebellum plays a more complex role in learning than simply regulating the motor response. Rather, it is thought to play a significant role in the consolidation of emotional memory in mice. Due to the difficulty of interpreting fear and anxiety behaviors-the standard methodology for the study of the histaminergic system and emotional memory-in mice, we propose a behavioral assessment of mice subjected to the Elevated T-maze after histamine microinjection of the cerebellar vermis. Young male Swiss albino mice weighing 25-35g were used. In addition, locomotor activity was tested in an open field test. Our data suggest that histamine did not affect memory consolidation during escape or open field behavior at the doses used in this study. However, we observed a significant increase in inhibitory avoidance on the second day in animals receiving a dose of 6.8nmol/0.5μl, suggesting that histamine facilitates the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance in mice.

  8. The differential hippocampal phosphoproteome of Apodemus sylvaticus paralleling spatial memory retrieval in the Barnes maze.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Csaszar, Edina; Szodorai, Edit; Patil, Sudarshan; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2014-05-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a well-known and well-documented mechanism in memory processes. Although a large series of protein kinases involved in memory processes have been reported, information on phosphoproteins is limited. It was therefore the aim of the study to determine a partial and differential phosphoproteome along with the corresponding network in hippocampus of a wild caught mouse strain with excellent performance in several paradigms of spatial memory. Apodemus sylvaticus mice were trained in the Barnes maze, a non-invasive test system for spatial memory and untrained mice served as controls. Animals were sacrificed 6h following memory retrieval, hippocampi were taken, proteins extracted and in-solution digestion was carried out with subsequent iTRAQ double labelling. Phosphopeptides were enriched by a TiO2-based method and semi-quantified using two fragmentation principles on the LTQ-orbitrap Velos. In hippocampi of trained animals phosphopeptide levels representing signalling, neuronal, synaptosomal, cytoskeletal and metabolism proteins were at least twofold reduced or increased. Furthermore, a network revealing a link to pathways of ubiquitination, the androgen receptor, small GTPase Rab5 and MAPK signaling as well as synucleins was constructed. This work is relevant for interpretation of previous work and the design of future studies on protein phosphorylation in spatial memory.

  9. Hippocampal dysfunction and behavioral deficit in the water maze in mice: an unresolved issue?

    PubMed

    Gerlai, Robert T; McNamara, Alexander; Williams, Simon; Phillips, Heidi S

    2002-01-01

    Dysfunction of the hippocampal formation manifests as impaired relational learning and memory in humans and animals. One of the most frequently applied relational learning paradigms in animals is the Morris water maze (MWM), in which the subject is required to learn complex spatial relationships of visual cues. MWM has been employed as a diagnostic tool to investigate effects of drugs and mutations. However, the validity of this test and its ability to properly detect hippocampal dysfunction have been questioned. In order to corroborate the role of hippocampus in spatial learning, we employed ibotenic acid lesioning and ablated the hippocampus bilaterally or unilaterally in mice, as ascertained by magnetic resonance imaging. We found a significant impairment in response to hippocampal disruption that was more pronounced in mice with bilateral lesion than with unilateral lesion. However, the results also indicated that even the mice with bilateral lesion could improve their performance, which confirms the notion that the MWM has an important non-hippocampal component. It is thus possible that experimental alteration of brain function does not manifest as modified performance in MWM, even when hippocampal function is modified (false-negative finding), or manifest as altered performance without varying hippocampal function (false-positive finding), possibilities that have important implications for studies using genetic and pharmacological manipulation of the brain.

  10. Ovarian hormone replacement to aged ovariectomized female rats benefits acquisition of the morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Markham, J A; Pych, J C; Juraska, J M

    2002-11-01

    Ovarian steroids have been suggested to aid in preserving cognitive functioning during aging in both humans and other animals. Spatial memory relies heavily on the hippocampus, a structure that is sensitive to the influence of both ovarian hormones and aging. The present study investigated the outcome of ovarian hormone replacement during aging on performance in a spatial version of the Morris water maze. Female rats were ovariectomized at 14 months of age and received one of three types of replacement prior to testing at 16 months: acute estrogen replacement (2 days), chronic estrogen replacement (28 days), or chronic replacement of both estrogen and progesterone (28 days). Control animals, which did not receive replacement hormones, displayed significant overnight forgetting during acquisition of the task. Ovarian hormone replacement, both acute and chronic, prevented forgetting. Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of ovarian hormones are detrimental to performance of young adult female rats on this task (Warren and Juraska, 1997; Chesler and Juraska, 2000). The current study found an opposite effect during aging: ovarian hormone replacement was beneficial. This suggests that animal models of menopause, aimed at exploring the protective effects of hormone replacement therapy on cognition during human female aging, require the use of aged female animals.

  11. Morris water maze performance deficit produced by intermittent swim stress is partially mediated by norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy A; Drugan, Robert C

    2012-03-01

    Intermittent swim stress (ISS) exposes a rat to cold water and the effects of the procedure produce detrimental results on activity measures 24h later. The ISS model can be used with the Morris water maze (MWM) to investigate the impact of stress on a spatial learning and memory task, known to involve the hippocampus. We investigated if the ISS model produced performance deficits in the MWM (experiments 1 and 2). We also investigated the role of norepinephrine by using an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist (i.e., clonidine) to exacerbate ISS-induced deficits (experiment 3), and using antidepressants (i.e., desipramine and reboxetine) that enhance the synaptic availability of norepinephrine to reduce ISS-induced deficits (experiments 4 and 5). Results indicated a main effect for stress in all experiments, with the exception of experiment 2, as ISS did induce performance deficits in the MWM. Clonidine enhanced ISS-induced deficits only in the learning trials, while desipramine and reboxetine reduced ISS-induced deficits in the learning trials. Additionally, only reboxetine reduced memory deficits in the MWM. These findings provide evidence that norepinephrine may act as a partial mediator of ISS-induced deficits in MWM performance.

  12. The effects of intrahippocampal testosterone and flutamide on spatial localization in the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Naghdi, N; Nafisy, N; Majlessi, N

    2001-04-01

    The high density of the androgen receptors in fundamental centers of learning and memory, such as hippocampus, shows that there must be some relationships between the androgen receptors and cognitive aspects. To determine the role of hippocampal androgen receptors in spatial learning, the current research has been conducted to assess the effect of testosterone enanthate, as the agonist, and flutamide, as the antagonist, of these receptors on spatial discrimination of rats, using the Morris water maze (MWM). Adult male rats were bilaterally cannulated into the CA1 region of their hippocampus. Different groups received different doses of flutamide (2, 5, 10 and 20 microg/0.5 microl) or testosterone enanthate (20, 40 and 80 microg/0.5 microl) through the cannulas 30 min before training for 3 days. The results showed dose-dependent increases in latencies and traveled distances to find the invisible platform both in flutamide- and testosterone-treated groups as compared to the control group, with peak effects at doses of 5 microg/0.5 microl for flutamide and 80 microg/0.5 microl for testosterone. Therefore, it seems that both androgen receptor blockade and exogenous testosterone can effect spatial localization of adult, male rats.

  13. Overexpression of alpha2C-adrenoceptors impairs water maze navigation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, M; Sirviö, J; Riekkinen, M; Sallinen, J; Scheinin, M; Riekkinen, P

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of overexpression of alpha2C-adrenoceptors in water maze navigation in mice transgenically manipulated to have a threefold overexpression of the alpha2C-adrenoreceptors. Alpha2C-adrenoreceptors overexpressing mice swam more in the peripheral annulus of the pool and did not find the hidden escape platform as well as the wild type control mice. A subtype-nonselective alpha2-adrenoreceptor antagonist, atipamezole (ATI, 1000 microg/kg, s.c.), fully reversed the deficit in platform finding and search strategy in overexpressing mice. Noradrenaline depletion (-95%) induced by N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) did not impair platform finding of wild type or overexpressing mice. The DSP-4 lesion slightly increased swimming in the peripheral annulus in wild type mice, but not in overexpressing mice. The DSP-4 lesion produced a dissociable effect on the action of atipamezole to improve platform finding and search strategy in overexpressing mice: atipamezole did not alleviate the platform finding deficit in DSP-4 lesioned overexpressing mice, but normalized their abnormal search strategy. These results suggest that the abnormal search pattern and deficit in the accuracy of platform finding are mediated by constitutive activity of overexpressed alpha2C-adrenoreceptors.

  14. Gerbils exhibit stable open-arms exploration across repeated testing on the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Rico, Javier Leonardo; Penagos-Gil, Marion; Castañeda, Anderson F; Corredor, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Repeated testing on the elevated plus-maze (EPM) leads rats and mice to avoid the open-arms of the apparatus. The effect of multiple exposures to the EPM on the behavioral profile of gerbils is unknown. In this study, young and middle-aged gerbils were exposed to the EPM and four retests were carried out 24, 48, 72 and 96h after the first trial in order to determine whether animals exhibited open-arms avoidance. In addition, groups of young and middle-aged gerbils were exposed to the EPM for 20-min followed by a 5-min retest trial 24h apart to analyze the effect of a prolonged exposure to the EPM on open-arms exploration during first trial and retest. Gerbils exhibited high exploration of open-arms during the first trial and progressive locomotor decrease across repeated testing. Unlike previous reports for rats and mice, young gerbils showed a stable open-arms exploration both across multiple exposures and during a prolonged exposure to EPM. Middle-aged gerbils also exhibited a stable open-arms exploration during retest prior to the 20-min test. Results suggest a reliable repeated test paradigm for the EPM using our proposed methodology for gerbils.

  15. Language control in bilingual language comprehension: evidence from the maze task

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Most empirical evidence on switch costs is based on bilingual production and interpreted as a result of inhibitory control. It is unclear whether such a top–down control process exists in language switching during comprehension. This study investigates whether a non-lexical switch cost is involved in reading code-switched sentences and its relation to language dominance with cross-script bilingual readers. A maze task is adopted in order to separate top–down inhibitory effects, from lexical effects driven by input. The key findings are: (1) switch costs were observed in both L1–L2 and L2–L1 directions; (2) these effects were driven by two mechanisms: lexical activation and inhibitory control; (3) language dominance modulated the lexical effects, but did not affect the inhibitory effects. These results suggest that a language control mechanism is involved in bilingual reading, even though the control process is not driven by selection as in production. At the theoretical level, these results lend support for the Inhibitory Control model during language switching in comprehension; while the BIA/BIA+ model needs to incorporate a top–down control mechanism to be able to explain the current findings. PMID:26347675

  16. Anxiolytic effects of Lavandula angustifolia odour on the Mongolian gerbil elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Bradley, B F; Starkey, N J; Brown, S L; Lea, R W

    2007-05-22

    Lavender is a popular treatment for stress and mild anxiety in Europe and the USA. The present study investigated the effects of (Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (Lamiaceae)) lavender odour inhalation over 2 weeks or 24 h periods, on gerbil behaviour in the elevated plus maze in mature male and female gerbils, and compared results with the effects of diazepam (1 mg/kg) i.p. after 30 min and 2-week administration. Traditional measures of open entries showed an increasing trend over the 2 weeks exposure, whereas ethological measures indicative of anxiety; stretch-attend frequency and percentage protected head-dips, were significantly lower. Exploratory behaviour, total head-dip frequency, increased after 24 h lavender and 2 weeks exposure. These results are comparable with diazepam administration. There were sex differences in protected head-dip an ethological indicator of anxiety: females showed a significant decrease in protected head-dips compared to both males and to female controls. In conclusion exposure to lavender odour may have an anxiolytic profile in gerbils similar to that of the anxiolytic diazepam. In addition, prolonged, 2-week lavender odour exposure increased exploratory behaviour in females indicating a further decrease in anxiety in this sex.

  17. Spatial learning of the water maze: progression of brain circuits mapped with cytochrome oxidase histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Gonzalez-Lima, F; Arias, J L

    2010-03-01

    The progression of brain circuits involved in spatial learning tasks is still a matter of debate. In addition, the participation of individual regions at different stages of spatial learning remains a controversial issue. In order to address these questions, we used quantitative cytochrome oxidase histochemistry as a metabolic brain mapping method applied to rats (Rattus norvegicus) trained in a water maze for 1, 3 or 5 days of training. Sustained changes throughout training were found in the lateral septal nucleus and anteroventral thalamic nucleus. As compared to naïve or habituation groups, rats with 1 day of training in the spatial learning task showed involvement of the lateral mammillary nucleus, basolateral amygdala and anterodorsal thalamic nucleus. By 5 days of training, there were mean changes in the hippocampal CA3 field and the prefrontal cortex. The regions involved and their pattern of network interactions changed progressively over days of training. At 1-day there was an open serial network of pairwise correlations. At 3-days there was a more closed reciprocal network of intercorrelations. At 5-days there were three separate parallel networks. In addition, brain-behavior correlations showed that CA1 and CA3 hippocampal fields together with the parietal cortex are related to the mastery of the spatial learning task. The present study extends previous findings on the progressive contribution of neural networks to spatial learning. PMID:19969098

  18. Morris Water Maze Test: Optimization for Mouse Strain and Testing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Weitzner, Daniel S.; Engler-Chiurazzi, Elizabeth B.; Kotilinek, Linda A.; Ashe, Karen Hsiao; Reed, Miranda Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The Morris water maze (MWM) is a commonly used task to assess hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory in transgenic mouse models of disease, including neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. However, the background strain of the mouse model used can have a substantial effect on the observed behavioral phenotype, with some strains exhibiting superior learning ability relative to others. To ensure differences between transgene negative and transgene positive mice can be detected, identification of a training procedure sensitive to the background strain is essential. Failure to tailor the MWM protocol to the background strain of the mouse model may lead to under- or over- training, thereby masking group differences in probe trials. Here, a MWM protocol tailored for use with the F1 FVB/N x 129S6 background is described. This is a frequently used background strain to study the age-dependent effects of mutant P301L tau (rTg(TauP301L)4510 mice) on the memory deficits associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Also described is a strategy to re-optimize, as dictated by the particular testing environment utilized. PMID:26132096

  19. Maze solving automatons for self-healing of open interconnects: Modular add-on for circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Aswathi; Raghunandan, Karthik; Yaswant, Vaddi; Pillai, Sreelal S.; Sambandan, Sanjiv

    2015-03-01

    We present the circuit board integration of a self-healing mechanism to repair open faults. The electric field driven mechanism physically restores fractured interconnects in electronic circuits and has the ability to solve mazes. The repair is performed by conductive particles dispersed in an insulating fluid. We demonstrate the integration of the healing module onto printed circuit boards and the ability of maze solving. We model and perform experiments on the influence of the geometry of conductive particles as well as the terminal impedances of the route on the healing efficiency. The typical heal rate is 10 μm/s with healed route having mean resistance of 8 kΩ across a 200 micron gap and depending on the materials and concentrations used.

  20. Observation and manipulation of the as-grown maze domain structure in lead germanate by scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, E. I.; Shur, V. Ya.; Schlaphof, F.; Eng, L. M.

    2006-06-01

    The ferroelectric domain structure of single crystalline Pb5Ge3O11 was inspected and manipulated using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). The irregularly shaped three-dimensional maze reflecting the as-grown domain structure on the micron and submicron scale was resolved with both PFM and KPFM. The temporal stability and recovery of that equilibrium structure was tested with macroscopic and local electric fields. Fractal analysis was applied for quantitative characterization of the complicated domain geometry. While spatially extended fields lead to a partial decay of the maze structure, local electric fields applied by the PFM tip result in addition in pronounced surface charging. The time constants of charge decay were extracted by KPFM and could be attributed to mobile charge redistribution and backswitching.

  1. Beacon training in a water maze can facilitate and compete with subsequent room cue learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, William; Sinning, Susan A; Leffel, Joseph K

    2007-07-01

    In Stage 1 of 4 experiments in which rats completed a water-maze blocking procedure, experimental groups were trained to use a predictive beacon (hanging above, connected to, or displaced from the platform) to find a submerged escape platform in the presence of predictive or irrelevant background cues and in the presence or absence of irrelevant landmarks. In Stage 2, a fixed beacon, landmarks, and background cues all predicted the platform location. A Room Test (landmarks and background cues only) showed that Stage 1 training with a fixed hanging beacon or the moving displaced beacon facilitated Stage 2 learning of predictive room cues for experimental relative to control subjects. In contrast, Stage 1 training with a moving pole beacon interfered with Stage 2 learning about predictive room cues relative to controls, whereas training with a fixed pole or moving hanging beacon had no effect. We conclude that multiple spatial learning processes influence locating an escape platform in the water maze.

  2. [The effects on the learning process of 4 pyrrolidine derivatives and of cyticholine (experiments on rats in a water maze)].

    PubMed

    Getova, D; Petkov, V

    1990-01-01

    The experiments were carried out on 104 male white rats and the effects of pyracetamat, aniracetamat and 2 newly synthesized pirolidine derivatives P-CL, P-p as well as of cytidin-diphosphat choline (cyticholine) were examined on training in a water maze. All investigated substances were administered immediately after morning training orally in a dose of 100 mg/kg for a period of 5 days. Ten trainings were undertaken each day twice. Two parameters were determined: time of stay of the rat in the water maze (in seconds) and the number of mistakes (entrance of blind canals). Pyracetamat and cyticholine improved training of rats while the other examined substances showed insignificant effect. A conclusion is made that chemically close nootropic drugs could be differentiated substantially in respect to spatial memory as well.

  3. Maze solving automatons for self-healing of open interconnects: Modular add-on for circuit boards

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Aswathi; Raghunandan, Karthik; Yaswant, Vaddi; Sambandan, Sanjiv E-mail: ssanjiv@isu.iisc.ernet.in; Pillai, Sreelal S.

    2015-03-23

    We present the circuit board integration of a self-healing mechanism to repair open faults. The electric field driven mechanism physically restores fractured interconnects in electronic circuits and has the ability to solve mazes. The repair is performed by conductive particles dispersed in an insulating fluid. We demonstrate the integration of the healing module onto printed circuit boards and the ability of maze solving. We model and perform experiments on the influence of the geometry of conductive particles as well as the terminal impedances of the route on the healing efficiency. The typical heal rate is 10 μm/s with healed route having mean resistance of 8 kΩ across a 200 micron gap and depending on the materials and concentrations used.

  4. Fabricating Radial Groove Gratings Using Projection Photolithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Projection photolithography has been used as a fabrication method for radial grove gratings. Use of photolithographic method for diffraction grating fabrication represents the most significant breakthrough in grating technology in the last 60 years, since the introduction of holographic written gratings. Unlike traditional methods utilized for grating fabrication, this method has the advantage of producing complex diffractive groove contours that can be designed at pixel-by-pixel level, with pixel size currently at the level of 45 45 nm. Typical placement accuracy of the grating pixels is 10 nm over 30 nm. It is far superior to holographic, mechanically ruled or direct e-beam written gratings and results in high spatial coherence and low spectral cross-talk. Due to the smooth surface produced by reactive ion etch, such gratings have a low level of randomly scattered light. Also, due to high fidelity and good surface roughness, this method is ideally suited for fabrication of radial groove gratings. The projection mask is created using a laser writer. A single crystal silicon wafer is coated with photoresist, and then the projection mask, with its layer of photoresist, is exposed for patterning in a stepper or scanner. To develop the photoresist, the fabricator either removes the exposed areas (positive resist) of the unexposed areas (negative resist). Next, the patterned and developed photoresist silicon substrate is subjected to reactive ion etching. After this step, the substrate is cleaned. The projection mask is fabricated according to electronic design files that may be generated in GDS file format using any suitable CAD (computer-aided design) or other software program. Radial groove gratings in off-axis grazing angle of incidence mount are of special interest for x-ray spectroscopy, as they allow achieving higher spectral resolution for the same grating area and have lower alignment tolerances than traditional in-plane grating scheme. This is especially

  5. Mapping the radial structure of AGN tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, M.; Hönig, S. F.; Antonucci, R.; Millour, F.; Tristram, K. R. W.; Weigelt, G.

    2011-12-01

    We present mid-IR interferometric observations of six type 1 AGNs at multiple baseline lengths ranging from 27 m to 130 m, reaching high angular resolutions up to λ/B ~ 0.02 arcsec. For two of the targets, we have simultaneous near-IR interferometric measurements as well, taken within a week. We find that all the objects are partially resolved at long baselines in these IR wavelengths. The multiple-baseline data directly probe the radial distribution of the material on sub-pc scales. We show that for our sample, which is small but spans over ~2.5 orders of magnitudes in the UV/optical luminosity L of the central engine, the radial distribution clearly and systematically changes with luminosity. The brightness distribution at a given mid-IR wavelength seems to be rather well described by a power law, which makes a simple Gaussian or ring size estimation quite inadequate. In this case, a half-light radius R1/2 can be used as a representative size. We show that the higher luminosity objects become more compact in normalized half-light radii R1/2/Rin in the mid-IR, where Rin is the dust sublimation radius empirically given by the L1/2 fit of the near-IR reverberation radii. This means that, contrary to previous studies, the physical mid-IR emission size (e.g. in pc) is not proportional to L1/2, but increases with L much more slowly. With our current datasets, we find that R1/2 ∝ L0.21 ± 0.05 at 8.5 μm, and R1/2 nearly constant at 13 μm. The derived size information also seems to correlate with the properties of the total flux spectrum, in particular the smaller R1/2/Rin objects having bluer mid-IR spectral shape. We use a power-law temperature/density gradient model as a reference, and infer that the radial surface density distribution of the heated dust grains at a radius r changes from a steep ~r-1 structure in high luminosity objects to a shallower ~r0 structure in those of lower luminosity. The inward dust temperature distribution does not seem to smoothly

  6. Dorsolateral striatum implicated in the acquisition, but not expression, of immediate response learning in rodent submerged T-maze

    PubMed Central

    Asem, Judith S. A.; Holland, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Animals can use multiple strategies when learning about, and navigating within, their environment. Typically, in the frequently-studied food-rewarded T-maze, rats initially adopt a flexible, hippocampal-dependent place strategy. However, as learning progresses, rats switch to an automatic, striatal-dependent response strategy (Packard & McGaugh, 1996). Interestingly, in a similar but aversively motivating water-submerged T-maze, rats exhibit the opposite behavioral pattern, initially adopting a response strategy but switching to a place strategy with extended training (Asem & Holland, 2013). Here, we examined the effects of transient lidocaine inactivation of the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) on rats’ acquisition and expression of place and response strategies in the submerged T-maze. DLS inactivation prior to probe tests had no effect on rats’ initial expression of a response strategy nor on their transition to the use of a place strategy with further training. Nevertheless, in a second experiment using the same rats, identical inactivation parameters significantly affected performance in an appetitively motivating positive control task, which required a response strategy. Furthermore, in a third experiment, DLS inactivation prior to early learning trials interfered with the acquisition of the response strategy in the submerged T-maze. These differences in DLS inactivation effects across appetitive and aversive tasks support the view that task motivation plays crucial roles in guiding learning, memory, and behavior. Additionally, differences in DLS inactivation effects between tests of acquisition and expression suggest that the DLS is required during early acquisition but not expression of the response learning strategy. PMID:26095514

  7. Effects of morphine dependence on the performance of rats in reference and working versions of the water maze.

    PubMed

    Miladi Gorji, Hossein; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Fathollahi, Yaghoub

    2008-02-27

    Numerous studies have dealt with the role of opiate system in tasks aimed at measurement of cognitive behavior, but the role of morphine dependence on learning and memory is still controversial. In this study chronic exposure to morphine was employed to evaluate learning ability and spatial short-term memory (working memory) and long-term memory (reference memory) in the water maze task. Male albino rats were made dependent by chronic administration of morphine in drinking water that lasted at least 21 days. In Experiment 1, the performance of animals was evaluated in reference memory version of the water maze. Rats were submitted to a session of 6 trials for 6 consecutive days to find the submerged platform that was located in the center of a quadrant. Latency and traveled distance to find the platform were measured as indexes of learning. Memory retention was tested 24 h after the last training session in a probe trial (60 s) in which there was no platform and the time spent in each quadrant of the water maze was recorded. Results indicated that latency and traveled distance to find the platform were same in control and dependent rats during training days, but during the probe test morphine-dependent group spent significantly less time in the target quadrant. In Experiment 2, training on working memory version of the water maze task was started. Only two trials per day were given until the performance of animals was stabilized (at least 5 days). Final test was done at day 6. Acquisition-retention interval was 75 min. No significant differences were found on acquisition and retention trials between morphine and control groups. Our findings indicate that chronic exposure to morphine did not impair learning ability, but partially impaired retention of spatial long-term (reference) memory. Moreover, dependence on morphine did not affect either acquisition or retention of spatial short (working) memory.

  8. Bayesian planet searches in radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Phil

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic stellar variability caused by magnetic activity and convection has become the main limiting factor for planet searches in both transit and radial velocity (RV) data. New spectrographs are under development like ESPRESSO and EXPRES that aim to improve RV precision by a factor of approximately 100 over the current best spectrographs, HARPS and HARPS-N. This will greatly exacerbate the challenge of distinguishing planetary signals from stellar activity induced RV signals. At the same time good progress has been made in simulating stellar activity signals. At the Porto 2014 meeting, “Towards Other Earths II,” Xavier Dumusque challenged the community to a large scale blind test using the simulated RV data to understand the limitations of present solutions to deal with stellar signals and to select the best approach. My talk will focus on some of the statistical lesson learned from this challenge with an emphasis on Bayesian methodology.

  9. Radial propagation of geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Robert; Hallatschek, Klaus

    2009-07-15

    The GAM group velocity is estimated from the ratio of the radial free energy flux to the total free energy applying gyrokinetic and two-fluid theory. This method is much more robust than approaches that calculate the group velocity directly and can be generalized to include additional physics, e.g., magnetic geometry. The results are verified with the gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the two-fluid code NLET[K. Hallatschek and A. Zeiler, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2554 (2000)], and analytical calculations. GAM propagation must be kept in mind when discussing the windows of GAM activity observed experimentally and the match between linear theory and experimental GAM frequencies.

  10. Radial expansion for spinning conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Hansen, Tobias; Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio

    2016-07-01

    This paper develops a method to compute any bosonic conformal block as a series expansion in the optimal radial coordinate introduced by Hogervorst and Rychkov. The method reduces to the known result when the external operators are all the same scalar operator, but it allows to compute conformal blocks for external operators with spin. Moreover, we explain how to write closed form recursion relations for the coefficients of the expansions. We study three examples of four point functions in detail: one vector and three scalars; two vectors and two scalars; two spin 2 tensors and two scalars. Finally, for the case of two external vectors, we also provide a more efficient way to generate the series expansion using the analytic structure of the blocks as a function of the scaling dimension of the exchanged operator.

  11. Precise radial velocities in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.

    Since the first detection of a planet outside our Solar System byWolszczan & Frail (1992), over 500 exoplanets have been found to date2, none of which resemble the Earth. Most of these planets were discovered by measuring the radial velocity (hereafter, RV) of the host star, which wobbles under the gravitational influence of any existing planetary companions. However, this method has yet to achieve the sub-m/s precision necessary to detect an Earth-mass planet in the Habitable Zone (the region around a star that can support liquid water; hereafter, HZ) (Kasting et al. 1993) around a Solar-type star. Even though Kepler (Borucki et al. 2010) has announced several Earth-sized HZ candidates, these targets will be exceptionally difficult to confirm with current astrophysical spectrographs (Borucki et al. 2011). The fastest way to discover and confirm potentiallyhabitable Earth-mass planets is to observe stars with lower masses - in particular, late M dwarfs. While M dwarfs are readily abundant, comprising some 70% of the local stellar population, their low optical luminosity presents a formidable challenge to current optical RV instruments. By observing in the near-infrared (hereafter, NIR), where the flux from M dwarfs peaks, we can potentially reach low RV precisions with significantly less telescope time than would be required by a comparable optical instrument. However, NIR precision RV measurements are a relatively new idea and replete with challenges: IR arrays, unlike CCDs, are sensitive to the thermal background; modal noise is a bigger issue in the NIR than in the optical; and the NIR currently lacks the calibration sources like the very successful thorium-argon (hereafter, ThAr) hollow-cathode lamp and Iodine gas cell of the optical. The PSU Pathfinder (hereafter, Pathfinder) was designed to explore these technical issues with the intention of mitigating these problems for future NIR high-resolution spectrographs, such as the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HZPF

  12. Precision Radial Velocities in the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Hugh

    2007-08-01

    The Precision Radial Velocity Spectrometer (PRVS) is designed to provide high throughput Doppler reflex measurements. PRVS is designed to always be available and provide 1.0 to 1.8 micron high-resolution spectroscopy with very high stability over several years. We have constructed models simulating likely candidates and demonstrated the ability to recover exoplanetary RV signals in the infrared. We have conducted limited experiments with a brass-board instrument to explore real-world issues yielding precisions of better than 10 m/s. We are thus confident that PRVS can provide for the detection of terrestrial-mass extra-solar planets in the habitable zones of low-mass stars. PRVS is scheduled to be the next ASPEN-process instrument for the Gemini telescopes and if funded in 2007 first light is expected by 2011.

  13. Fungal keratitis presenting as radial keratoneuritis

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Aditya; Jain, Rajat; Sahu, Srikant; Sangwan, Virender

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with severe pain, redness, watering and photophobia for 10 days in the right eye without any history of trauma. Diagnosis of herpes simplex disciform keratitis was made and he was prescribed topical steroids. The patient showed clinical worsening and presented with ring infiltrate, diffuse stromal oedema and radial keratoneuritis, a finding pathognomic of acanthamoeba keratitis. With two inconclusive corneal scrapings and the patient showing clinical worsening, an urgent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was carried out. Histopathological and microbiological examination of the excised corneal button revealed the presence of fungus. At 5 weeks follow-up, the patient has best-corrected visual acuity 20/40 with no recurrence of infection. PMID:24717856

  14. Radial evolution of ion distribution functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsch, E.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of solar wind ion velocity distributions and derived parameters (temperature, ion differential speed, heat flux, adiabatic invariants) is presented with emphasis on the heliocentric distance range between 0.3 and 1 AU traversed by the Helios solar probe. The radial evolution of nonthermal features are discussed which are observed to be most pronounced at perihelion. Within the framework of quasilinear plasma theory, wave particle interactions that may shape the ion distributions are considered. Some results of a self consistent model calculation are presented accounting for ion acceleration and heating by resonant momentum and energy exchange with ion cyclotron and magnetosonic waves propagating away from the Sun along the interplanetary magnetic field. Another tentative explanation for the occurrence of large perpendicular proton temperatures is offered in terms of heating by Landau damping of lower hybrid waves.

  15. Radial thickness variations of Orientale basin ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordell, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    Moore et al. (1974) measure the thickness of Orientale basin ejecta on the basis of filling of individual prebasin craters and a depth-diameter relation for fresh lunar craters. In the reported investigation the concept of filling of preexisting craters with basin ejecta is utilized somewhat differently to ascertain Orientale basin ejecta thicknesses and volume from the Cordillera ring with a radius of 450 km out to almost 2 radii. Briefly, the approach is to assume a reasonable geometric model for the form of Orientale ejecta, calculate how many pre-Orientale craters would be destroyed by the deposition of the ejecta, and match the model to Orientale crater statistics. The results of the investigation show that a radial ejecta thickness function can be derived from crater statistics.

  16. Generalization performance of radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yunwen; Ding, Lixin; Zhang, Wensheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper studies the generalization performance of radial basis function (RBF) networks using local Rademacher complexities. We propose a general result on controlling local Rademacher complexities with the L1 -metric capacity. We then apply this result to estimate the RBF networks' complexities, based on which a novel estimation error bound is obtained. An effective approximation error bound is also derived by carefully investigating the Hölder continuity of the lp loss function's derivative. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the RBF network minimizing an appropriately constructed structural risk admits a significantly better learning rate when compared with the existing results. An empirical study is also performed to justify the application of our structural risk in model selection.

  17. Generalized multiscale radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Billings, Stephen A; Wei, Hua-Liang; Balikhin, Michael A

    2007-12-01

    A novel modelling framework is proposed for constructing parsimonious and flexible multiscale radial basis function networks (RBF). Unlike a conventional standard single scale RBF network, where all the basis functions have a common kernel width, the new network structure adopts multiscale Gaussian functions as the bases, where each selected centre has multiple kernel widths, to provide more flexible representations with better generalization properties for general nonlinear dynamical systems. As a direct extension of the traditional single scale Gaussian networks, the new multiscale network is easy to implement and is quick to learn using standard learning algorithms. A k-means clustering algorithm and an improved orthogonal least squares (OLS) algorithm are used to determine the unknown parameters in the network model including the centres and widths of the basis functions, and the weights between the basis functions. It is demonstrated that the new network can lead to a parsimonious model with much better generalization property compared with the traditional single width RBF networks.

  18. Nonlinear radial oscillations of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gabler, Michael; Sperhake, Ulrich; Andersson, Nils

    2009-09-15

    The effects of nonlinear oscillations in compact stars are attracting considerable current interest. In order to study such phenomena in the framework of fully nonlinear general relativity, highly accurate numerical studies are required. A numerical scheme specifically tailored for such a study is based on formulating the time evolution in terms of deviations from a stationary equilibrium configuration. Using this technique, we investigate over a wide range of amplitudes nonlinear effects in the evolution of radial oscillations of neutron stars. In particular, we discuss mode coupling due to nonlinear interaction, the occurrence of resonance phenomena, shock formation near the stellar surface as well as the capacity of nonlinearities to stabilize perturbatively unstable neutron star models.

  19. Anxiolytic effects of short- and long-term administration of cacao mass on rat elevated T-maze test.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Yamada, Yasushi; Okano, Yasuyo; Terashima, Takehiko; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrated the effects of short- and long-term administration of cacao mass on anxiety in the elevated T-maze test, which is an animal model of anxiety. In the first study, we administered cacao mass (100 mg/100 g body weight) per os and immediately performed the elevated T-maze test. Short-term cacao mass significantly abolished delayed avoidance latency compared with the control but did not change escape latency. This result suggested that cacao mass administration reduced conditional fear-relating behavior. Short-term cacao mass administration did not affect the concentration of brain monoamines, emotion-related neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine, in the rat brain. In the next study, we fed a cacao mass-containing diet to rats for 2 weeks and performed the elevated T-maze test. Contrary to short-term administration, chronic consumption of cacao mass tended to increase avoidance latency and did not change escape latency. Brain serotonin concentration and its turnover were enhanced by chronic consumption of cacao mass. These results suggested that chronic consumption of cacao did not affect fear-related behavior but was involved in brain monoamine metabolism. In conclusion, we suggest that short-term cacao mass consumption showed an anxiolytic effect but chronic consumption did not.

  20. Retrospective and prospective responses arising in a modeled hippocampus during maze navigation by a brain-based device.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Jason G; Gally, Joseph A; Edelman, Gerald M; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2007-02-27

    Recent recordings of place field activity in rodent hippocampus have revealed correlates of current, recent past, and imminent future events in spatial memory tasks. To analyze these properties, we used a brain-based device, Darwin XI, that incorporated a detailed model of medial temporal structures shaped by experience-dependent synaptic activity. Darwin XI was tested on a plus maze in which it approached a goal arm from different start arms. In the task, a journey corresponded to the route from a particular starting point to a particular goal. During maze navigation, the device developed place-dependent responses in its simulated hippocampus. Journey-dependent place fields, whose activity differed in different journeys through the same maze arm, were found in the recordings of simulated CA1 neuronal units. We also found an approximately equal number of journey-independent place fields. The journey-dependent responses were either retrospective, where activity was present in the goal arm, or prospective, where activity was present in the start arm. Detailed analysis of network dynamics of the neural simulation during behavior revealed that many different neural pathways could stimulate any single CA1 unit. That analysis also revealed that place activity was driven more by hippocampal and entorhinal cortical influences than by sensory cortical input. Moreover, journey-dependent activity was driven more strongly by hippocampal influence than journey-independent activity. PMID:17360681

  1. Retrospective and prospective responses arising in a modeled hippocampus during maze navigation by a brain-based device.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Jason G; Gally, Joseph A; Edelman, Gerald M; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2007-02-27

    Recent recordings of place field activity in rodent hippocampus have revealed correlates of current, recent past, and imminent future events in spatial memory tasks. To analyze these properties, we used a brain-based device, Darwin XI, that incorporated a detailed model of medial temporal structures shaped by experience-dependent synaptic activity. Darwin XI was tested on a plus maze in which it approached a goal arm from different start arms. In the task, a journey corresponded to the route from a particular starting point to a particular goal. During maze navigation, the device developed place-dependent responses in its simulated hippocampus. Journey-dependent place fields, whose activity differed in different journeys through the same maze arm, were found in the recordings of simulated CA1 neuronal units. We also found an approximately equal number of journey-independent place fields. The journey-dependent responses were either retrospective, where activity was present in the goal arm, or prospective, where activity was present in the start arm. Detailed analysis of network dynamics of the neural simulation during behavior revealed that many different neural pathways could stimulate any single CA1 unit. That analysis also revealed that place activity was driven more by hippocampal and entorhinal cortical influences than by sensory cortical input. Moreover, journey-dependent activity was driven more strongly by hippocampal influence than journey-independent activity.

  2. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  3. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Császár, Nikolaus B. M.; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Milz, Stefan; Sprecher, Christoph M.; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed; Furia, John P.; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. Methods and Findings We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical Systems, Nyon, Switzerland; D-Actor 200; Storz Medical, Tägerwillen, Switzerland) and a vibrating massage device (Vibracare; G5/General Physiotherapy, Inc., Earth City, MO, USA). To assert potential bioeffects of these treatment modalities we investigated the influence of rESWT and vibrating massage devices on locomotion ability of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms. Results FOPH measurements demonstrated that both rESWT devices generated acoustic waves with comparable pressure and energy flux density. Furthermore, both rESWT devices generated cavitation as evidenced by high-speed imaging and caused mechanical damage on the surface of x-ray film. The vibrating massage device did not show any of these characteristics. Moreover, locomotion ability of C. elegans was statistically significantly impaired after exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves but was unaffected after exposure of worms to the vibrating massage device. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that both energy signature and bioeffects of rESWT devices are fundamentally different from those of vibrating massage devices. Clinical Relevance Prior ESWT studies have shown that tissues treated with sufficient quantities of acoustic sound waves undergo cavitation build-up, mechanotransduction, and ultimately, a biological alteration that “kick-starts” the healing response. Due to their different treatment indications and contra-indications rESWT devices cannot be equated to vibrating

  4. Origin of the radial nerve branch innervating the brachialis muscle.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Won, Hyung-Sun; Lee, Kyu-Seok; Chung, In-Hyuk

    2009-05-01

    The brachialis muscle is dually innervated by the musculocutaneous nerve running via the anterior division of the brachial plexus and the radial nerve running via the posterior division of the plexus. There have been inconsistent descriptions of the pathway of the radial nerve branch at the brachial plexus. This study investigated the route of the radial nerve branch innervating the brachialis muscle at the brachial plexus. In 20 samples, the radial nerve branch innervating the brachialis muscle was separated and traced up to the cervical nerve under a surgical microscope. All the radial nerve branches innervating the muscle ran via the posterior cord, the posterior division, and the superior or middle trunk at the brachial plexus. The radial nerve branches arose from C5 in 5 cases, C6 in 11 cases, C5 and C6 in 3 cases, and C6 and C7 in 1 case. PMID:19260072

  5. Porcine radial artery decellularization by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Many types of decellularized tissues have been studied and some have been commercially used in clinics. In this study, small-diameter vascular grafts were made using HHP to decellularize porcine radial arteries. One decellularization method, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), has been used to prepare the decellularized porcine tissues. Low-temperature treatment was effective in preserving collagen and collagen structures in decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The collagen and elastin structures and mechanical properties of HHP-decellularized radial arteries were similar to those of untreated radial arteries. Xenogeneic transplantation (into rats) was performed using HHP-decellularized radial arteries and an untreated porcine radial artery. Two weeks after transplantation into rat carotid arteries, the HHP-decellularized radial arteries were patent and without thrombosis. In addition, the luminal surface of each decellularized artery was covered by recipient endothelial cells and the arterial medium was fully infiltrated with recipient cells.

  6. Reelin signaling directly affects radial glia morphology and biochemical maturation.

    PubMed

    Hartfuss, Eva; Förster, Eckart; Bock, Hans H; Hack, Michael A; Leprince, Pierre; Luque, Juan M; Herz, Joachim; Frotscher, Michael; Götz, Magdalena

    2003-10-01

    Radial glial cells are characterized, besides their astroglial properties, by long radial processes extending from the ventricular zone to the pial surface, a crucial feature for the radial migration of neurons. The molecular signals that regulate this characteristic morphology, however, are largely unknown. We show an important role of the secreted molecule reelin for the establishment of radial glia processes. We describe a significant reduction in ventricular zone cells with long radial processes in the absence of reelin in the cortex of reeler mutant mice. These defects were correlated to a decrease in the content of brain lipid-binding protein (Blbp) and were detected exclusively in the cerebral cortex, but not in the basal ganglia of reeler mice. Conversely, reelin addition in vitro increased the Blbp content and process extension of radial glia from the cortex, but not the basal ganglia. Isolation of radial glia by fluorescent-activated cell sorting showed that these effects are due to direct signaling of reelin to radial glial cells. We could further demonstrate that this signaling requires Dab1, as the increase in Blbp upon reelin addition failed to occur in Dab1-/- mice. Taken together, these results unravel a novel role of reelin signaling to radial glial cells that is crucial for the regulation of their Blbp content and characteristic morphology in a region-specific manner.

  7. Analysis of radial velocities in the Antlia cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faifer, F. R.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Calderón, J. P.; Caso, J. P.; Bassino, L. P.; Cellone, S. A.; Richtler, T.

    We present preliminary results of a radial velocity survey in the central re- gion of the Antlia cluster. These velocities have been measured on spec- tra obtained, in the 2008A and 2009A semesters, with GMOS (GEMINI South). In this way, several dwarf galaxies that had no previous radial ve- locities, have been confirmed as cluster members. Our work is based on the Ferguson & Sandage (1990) catalogue, in which originally only 6% of the catalogued galaxies (375) had radial velocities. Thanks to the newly determined radial velocities we are able to begin to disentangle the cluster internal structure. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  8. Current concepts in the management of radial head fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kodde, Izaäk F; Kaas, Laurens; Flipsen, Mark; van den Bekerom, Michel PJ; Eygendaal, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Fracture of the radial head is a common injury. Over the last decades, the radial head is increasingly recognized as an important stabilizer of the elbow. In order to maintain stability of the injured elbow, goals of treatment of radial head fractures have become more and more towards restoring function and stability of the elbow. As treatment strategies have changed over the years, with an increasing amount of literature on this subject, the purpose of this article was to provide an overview of current concepts of the management of radial head fractures. PMID:26716091

  9. Should Radial Modes Always Be Regarded as p-Modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, M.

    2013-12-01

    As standard textbooks of stellar oscillations say, the only restoring force of radial modes in spherically symmetric stars is the pressure gradient, whereas the buoyancy force does not operate because no horizontal inhomogeneity is generated by radial oscillations. This is the physical reason why all radial modes should be classified as p-modes. In this presentation, however, we numerically demonstrate that unstable (adiabatic) radial modes should not be regraded as p-modes, because they are closely related to f-modes or g-modes of nonradial oscillations.

  10. Carbon star radial velocities and dark matter in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1986-01-01

    Optical radial velocities of carbon stars in the Milky Way are compared to center-of-mass velocities derived from CO radio emission produced in their circumstellar envelopes. It seems that there is an intrinsic velocity dispersion in the optically measured radial velocities. If the carbon stars in the dwarf spheroidals behave in a fashion similar to those in the Milky Way, then the use of their optical radial velocities to infer the mass-to-light ratio of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and the nature of the dark matter in the universe is suspect. Measurement of the radial velocities of K giants may possibly avoid these uncertainties associated with atmospheric motions.

  11. Preoperative study of the surface ECG for the prognosis of atrial fibrillation maze surgery outcome at discharge.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio; Alcaraz, Raúl; Hornero, Fernando; Rieta, José Joaquín

    2014-07-01

    The Cox-maze surgery is an effective procedure for terminating atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients requiring open-heart surgery associated with another heart disease. After the intervention, regardless of the patient's rhythm, all are treated with oral anticoagulants and antiarrhythmic drugs prior to discharge. Furthermore, patients maintaining AF before discharge could also be treated with electrical cardioversion (ECV). In view of this, a preoperative prognosis of the patient's rhythm at discharge would be helpful for optimizing drug therapy planning as well as for advancing ECV therapy. This work analyzes 30 preoperative electrocardiograms (ECGs) from patients suffering from AF in order to predict the Cox-maze surgery outcome at discharge. Two different characteristics of the AF pattern have been studied. On the one hand, the atrial activity (AA) organization, which provides information about the number of propagating wavelets in the atria, was investigated. AA organization has been successfully used in previous studies related to spontaneous reversion of paroxysmal AF and to the outcome of ECV. To assess organization, the dominant atrial frequency (DAF) and sample entropy (SampEn) have been computed. On the other hand, the second characteristic studied was the fibrillatory wave (f-wave) amplitude, which has been demonstrated to be a valuable indicator of the Cox-maze surgery outcome in previous studies. Moreover, this parameter has been obtained through a new methodology, based on computing the f-wave average power (fWP). Finally, all the computed indices were combined in a decision tree in order to improve prediction capability. Results for the DAF yielded a sensitivity (Se), a specificity (Sp) and an accuracy (Acc) of 61.54%, 82.35% and 73.33%, respectively. For SampEn the values were 69.23%, 76.00% and 73.33%, respectively, and for fWP they were 92.31%, 82.35% and 86.67%, respectively. Finally, the decision tree combining the three parameters analyzed

  12. Mildly impaired water maze performance in male Fmr1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    D'Hooge, R; Nagels, G; Franck, F; Bakker, C E; Reyniers, E; Storm, K; Kooy, R F; Oostra, B A; Willems, P J; De Deyn, P P

    1997-01-01

    Fmr1 knockout mice constitute a putative model of fragile X syndrome, the most common form of heritable mental disability in humans. We have compared the performance of transgenic mice with an Fmr1 knockout with that of normal littermates in hidden- and visible-platform water maze learning, and showed that knockouts exhibit subnormal spatial learning abilities and marginal motor performance deficits. During 12 training trials of the hidden-platform task, escape latency and path length decreased significantly in knockouts and control littermates, and no effect of genotype was found. During four ensuing reversal trials, however, significant differences were found between knockouts and control littermates both in escape latency and path length. During the visible-platform condition, the reversal trials also revealed a difference between knockouts and normal littermates in escape latency, but not in path length. Possibly due to marginal motor incapacity, knockouts swam significantly slower than controls during these latter trials. During both probe trials of the hidden-platform task, knockouts as well as normal littermates spent more time in the target quadrant than in the other quadrants, and percent of time spent in the target quadrant was the same in both groups; swimming velocity was not significantly different between knockouts and normal littermates during these trials. Entries in the target area during the probe trials did show a significant effect of genotype on number of entries. The present results largely confirm and extend our previous findings. Impaired spatial abilities in Fmr1 knockouts might have been due to relatively low response flexibility or high memory interference in Fmr1 knockouts. It remains unclear, however, which brain region or neurochemical system might be involved in these disabilities. We conclude that Fmr1 knockout mice might be a valid model of fragile X mental retardation.

  13. Flavonoids from Tilia americana with anxiolytic activity in plus-maze test.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Tortoriello, Jaime; Jiménez-Ferrer, J Enrique

    2008-07-23

    The aerial parts of Tilia americana var. mexicana (Schltdl) Hardin (Tiliaceae) have been widely used in Mexican traditional medicine to relieve sleeplessness, headache, and nervous excitement. The anxiolytic effect of four extracts and several flavonoid fractions from the bracts of Tilia americana subsp.mexicana, var. mexicana (Schltdl) Hardin or Tilia mexicana (Tiliaceae) was studied. Administration of 100mg/kg of n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and aqueous extracts to elevated plus-maze (EPM)-exposed mice displayed no anxiolytic effect; however, identical doses of methanol extract was able to increase the time percentage that mice spent in the EPM's open arms, as well as the percentage of crossings in the EPM's arms. The dose-response curve produced by methanol extract showed anxiolytic activity since 25mg/kg; animals showed no motor activity alteration in the open field test (OFT). Methanol extract was subjected to a bioassay-guided fractionation to obtain four ascendant polarity fractions (F1-F4) which were administrated at 100mg/kg. Data results indicate that F1 displayed the main anxiolytic effect. The purification of F1 produced a rich flavonoid anxiolytic mixture (F1C). This fraction was purified by RP-18 open chromatographic column to obtain four polar descent fractions: F1C(1), F1C(2), F1C(3), and F1C(4), respectively. Tiliroside was the major ingredient from the active fraction. High performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that F1C was constituted principally of tiliroside, quercetin, quercitrin, kaempherol, and their glycosides. These results supported the use of Tilia americana in Mexican traditional medicine as well as the anxiolytic effect of a rich flavonoid fraction without affect motor activity.

  14. Atorvastatin improves Y-maze learning behaviour in nicotine treated male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Das S, Syam; Nair, Saritha S; Kavitha, S; Febi, John; Indira, M

    2015-11-01

    Nicotine is a parasympathomimetic alkaloid present in tobacco which can induce hyperlipidemia and has a direct effect on neural functions. Statins, competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxymethyl-3-glutaryl-coenzyme-A reductase, are cholesterol lowering drugs. It has some neuroprotective effects. Hence we analysed the combined effect of nicotine and statin on the learning behaviour of male albino rats. We employed Y-Maze conditional discrimination task. Rats were divided into 4 groups with six rats in each group. (1) Control, (2) Atorvastatin (10mg/kgb.wt), (3) Nicotine (0.6mg/kgb.wt) and (4) Atorvastatin (10mg/kgb.wt)+Nicotine (0.6mg/kgb.wt). After 30days of treatment rats from each group were selected for behavioural study and they were observed for 30days. At the end of the experimental period rats were sacrificed, and brain and liver were dissected out for further biochemical analysis. Nicotine treated group showed least performance in learning in comparison with control, atorvastatin and atorvastatin+nicotine treated groups. Co-administration of atorvastatin and nicotine improved learning behaviour compared to nicotine treated group. Reactive oxygen species level was significantly increased in nicotine group compared to control. The level of neurotransmitter serotonin which has a significant role in learning was found to be decreased in nicotine treated group compared to the control group. Activity of Na(+) K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase and glutathione content was significantly reduced in nicotine treated group compared to control. The activity of acetylcholine esterase was significantly increased in the nicotine treated group. Expression studies showed significant decrease in N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and increase in mono amine oxidase-A and mono amine oxidase-B in nicotine treated group and was reversed in atorvastatin + nicotine treated group. It can be concluded that co-administration of nicotine with statin ameliorates the neural functional alterations caused

  15. NMDA-complexes linked to spatial memory performance in the Barnes maze in CD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ghafari, Maryam; Patil, Sudarshan S; Höger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2011-08-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) is a well-documented key element in the formation of several memories including spatial, olfactory and contextual memory. Although receptor subunits have been linked to memory formation, data on the involvement of the NMDAR complexes is limited. In previous work CD1 mice were trained in the Barnes maze, a low-stress landmaze, and yoked controls were serving as controls. Hippocampal samples from this behavioural study were taken for comparing NMDAR complexes. Hippocampi were taken and stored until analysis at -80 °C. Membrane proteins were extracted from hippocampi using an ultracentrifugation step and applied on Blue Native gels that in turn were used for immunoblotting with antibodies against subunits NR1, NR2A and NR2B. The subunit content of the complexes was determined by denaturing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent immunoblotting. An NMDAR complex with an apparent molecular weight between between 146 and 242 kDa, probably representing an NR1 dimer was the only complex that was significantly different between trained and yoked animals. A series of NMDAR complexes containing modulatory subunits NR2A or NR2B or both were detected. All complexes contained the NR1 subunit. The NR1 dimer complex level, increased in memory formation, may be directly or indirectly involved in the process of spatial memory formation in the CD1 mouse. The results are enabling and challenging further NMDAR studies, both, at the pharmacological and molecular level. Moreover, several NMDAR complexes in the CD1 mouse were shown to be mainly heteropolymers of subunits NR1, NR2A and NR2B, although other recently described subunits were not tested due to unavailability of specific antibodies. Determination of native receptor complexes rather than individual subunits is mandatory and provides the molecular basis for understanding mechanisms of spatial memory.

  16. Harvard v. Canada: the myc mouse that still squeaks in the maze of biopatent law.

    PubMed

    Deftos, L J

    2001-07-01

    The Canadian Supreme Court will soon make a decision about Harvard University's long-standing application for a Canadian patent on a mouse transgenic for the myc oncogene. That decision could reignite in North America the controversy that continues in Europe and elsewhere to surround the patenting of life forms. The tortuous steps in this 15-year patent maze are marked by the arguments about life patents that attended the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Diamond v. Chakrabarty. This patent dispute about oil-digesting bacteria cracked open the door for animal patents in the United States and other countries, even though the legal arguments involved were based on patent applications for corn seeds and oysters, not mammals. The patent challenge to the Harvard mouse by the Canadian government now threatens to close this door in Canada. The arguments against life patents are commonly based on moral and religious grounds that regard the sanctity of life and oppose its commodification. The most compelling arguments for such patents are based on the benefits they deliver through commercial exploitation of inventions. The debate about patenting animals has been more heated outside North America and cacaphonic in the Third World. However, the Canadian debate could be amplified by the U.S. Supreme Court's recent entry on the biopatent stage through the side door of a new corn seed patent dispute. A narrow legal analysis by the Canadian Supreme Court would award the mouse patent to Harvard, while a policy analysis might support the government's challenge of the patent. Although the impact of the Harvard mouse patent process in Canada could be just a squeak, opponents of patenting life can mount the myc mouse to once again roar their opposition to animal patents. And the sound could resonate through the arguments about both biopatents and human cloning, with potentially important effects for academia, industry, and the public.

  17. Impaired water maze navigation of Wistar rats with retrosplenial cortex lesions: effect of nonspatial pretraining.

    PubMed

    Lukoyanov, Nikolai V; Lukoyanova, Elena A; Andrade, José P; Paula-Barbosa, Manuel M

    2005-03-01

    Damage to the retrosplenial cortex (RC) impairs the performance of rodents on spatial learning and memory tasks, but the extent of these deficits was previously reported to be influenced by the lesion type, rat strain, and behavioral task used. The present study addressed the issue of whether or not cytotoxic damage to RC impairs place navigation of Wistar rats in the Morris water maze and, if so, whether this is merely attributable to spatial learning deficits or to impaired learning of general (nonspatial) behavioral strategies required to correctly perform this task or both. Behaviorally naive rats with bilateral lesions to RC were significantly impaired relative to sham-lesioned rats both during the period of initial learning of the task and during the later phases of training. In addition, these animals showed enhanced thigmotaxis, indicating that the lesion was associated with considerable abnormalities in nonspatial learning. In contrast, RC-lesioned animals that have been previously familiarized with general task rules in a series of shaping trials did not show more thigmotaxis than did their respective controls. Furthermore, although these rats were still impaired in the middle of the training process, their performance during the period of initial learning as well as by the end of training was found to now be normal. Our results confirm those of earlier studies indicating that RC is important for spatial navigation. The findings herein reported are also consistent with the notion that, in addition to spatial information processing, RC is involved in cognitive processes underlying the ability of subjects to properly respond to general task demands.

  18. Perinatal iron deficiency affects locomotor behavior and water maze performance in adult male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Stephane L; Iqbal, Umar; Reynolds, James N; Adams, Michael A; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2008-05-01

    Iron deficiency during early growth and development adversely affects multiple facets of cognition and behavior in adult rats. The purpose of this study was to assess the nature of the learning and locomotor behavioral deficits observed in male and female rats in the absence of depressed brain iron levels at the time of testing. Adult female Wistar rats were fed either an iron-enriched diet (>225 mg/kg Fe) or an iron-restricted diet (3 mg/kg Fe) for 2 wk prior to and throughout gestation, and a nonpurified diet (270 mg/kg Fe) thereafter. Open-field (OF) and Morris water maze (MWM) testing began when the offspring reached early adulthood (12 wk). At birth, perinatal iron-deficient (PID) offspring had reduced (P < 0.001) hematocrits (-33%), liver iron stores (-83%), and brain iron concentrations (-38%) compared with controls. Although there were no differences in iron status in adults, the PID males and females exhibited reduced OF exploratory behavior, albeit only PID males had an aversion to the center of the apparatus (2.5 vs. 6.9% in controls, P < 0.001). Additionally, PID males required greater path lengths to reach the hidden platform in the MWM, had reduced spatial bias for the target quadrant, and had a tendency for greater thigmotactic behavior in the probe trials (16.5 vs. 13.0% in controls; P = 0.06). PID females had slower swim speeds in all testing phases (-6.2%; P < 0.001). These results suggest that PID has detrimental programming effects in both male and female rats, although the behaviors suggest different mechanisms may be involved in each sex.

  19. Androgen insensitive male rats display increased anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Hamson, Dwayne K; Jones, Bryan A; Csupity, Attila S; Ali, Faezah M; Watson, Neil V

    2014-02-01

    Male rats carrying the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm-affected males) are insensitive to androgens, resulting in a female-typical peripheral phenotype despite possession of inguinal testes that are androgen secretory. Androgen-dependent neural and behavioral processes may likewise show atypical sexual differentiation. Interestingly, these mutant rats display elevated serum corticosterone, suggesting a chronic anxiety phenotype and dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In order to understand if elevated anxiety-like behavior is a possible mediating variable affecting the display of certain androgen-dependent behaviors, we compared the performance of Tfm-affected males to wild type males and females in the elevated plus maze (EPM). Two well-established indicators of anxiety-like behavior in the EPM were analyzed: total percentage of time spent on the open arms, and the percentage of open arm entries. We also analyzed the total number of open arm entries. Interestingly, Tfm-affected males spent less percentage of time on the open arms than both males and females, suggesting increased anxiety-like behavior. Percentage of open arm entries and the total number of arm entries was comparable between the groups, indicating that the observed decrease in the percentage of time spent on the open arms was not due to a global reduction in exploratory behavior. These data, in contrast to earlier reports, thus implicate androgen receptor-mediated functions in the expression of anxiety behaviors in male rats. Given that anxiety is widely reported as a precipitating factor in depression, studying the role of the androgen receptor in anxiety may give insights into the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder.

  20. Ethopharmacological analysis of the open elevated plus-maze in mice.

    PubMed

    Sorregotti, Tatiani; Mendes-Gomes, Joyce; Rico, Javier Leonardo; Rodgers, Robert John; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of rodents to an open elevated plus-maze (oEPM) elicits antinociception and increases plasma corticosterone levels. However, no studies have yet assessed the defensive behaviour repertoire of animals in this modified test. In Experiment 1, factor analysis was employed to characterise the behavioural profile of mice exposed to the oEPM. Experiments 2 and 3 assessed the effects of acute alprazolam (0.5-1.5mg/kg; diazepam 0.5-1.5mg/kg), pentylenetetrazole (10.0-30.0mg/kg), yohimbine (2.0-6.0mg/kg), mCPP (0.3-3.0mg/kg), and acute and chronic fluoxetine (10.0-30.0mg/kg) and imipramine (1.0-15.0mg/kg) on behaviours identified in Experiment 1. The factor analyses revealed that behaviour in the oEPM can largely (77% total variance) be accounted for in terms of 3 factors: factor 1 ('depth exploration'; e.g. head-dipping on the arms), factor 2 ('cautious exploration of arms'; e.g. flatback approach), and factor 3 ('risk assessment'; stretched attend postures - SAP). Experiments 2 and 3 showed that, over the dose range used, alprazolam selectively attenuated all measures of defensiveness. Similar, though more modest, effects were seen with diazepam. Confirming the intensity of the emotional response to the oEPM (nociceptive, endocrine and behavioural), relatively few significant behavioural changes were seen in response to the anxiogenic compounds tested. Although acute fluoxetine or imipramine treatment failed to modify behaviour in the oEPM, chronic fluoxetine (but not chronic imipramine) attenuated total flat back approach and increased head dipping outside the central square. Together, the results indicate that the oEPM induces behavioural defensive responses that are sensitive to alprazolam and chronic fluoxetine.

  1. Corticosterone does not change open elevated plus maze-induced antinociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Gomes, Joyce; Miguel, Tarciso Tadeu; Amaral, Vanessa Cristiane Santana; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2011-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that the exposure of rodents to the standard elevated plus-maze (sEPM: 2 open and 2 enclosed arms) elicits defensive behavioral reactions and antinociception and also activates the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We have recently reported that EPM-induced antinociception is particularly observed when rats and mice are exposed to a totally open EPM (oEPM: 4 open arms). Given that the oEPM seems to be a more aversive situation than the sEPM, we hypothesized that oEPM exposure would induce higher plasma levels of corticosterone than sEPM exposure in mice. In this study, we investigated the influence of exposure to eEPM (enclosed EPM: 4 enclosed arms), sEPM or oEPM on plasma corticosterone levels in mice, with or without prior nociceptive stimulation (2.5% formalin injection into the right hind paw). We also tested whether the nociceptive response in the formalin test and oEPM-induced antinociception are altered by adrenalectomy. Results showed that oEPM-exposed mice spent less time licking the injected paw than sEPM- and eEPM-exposed animals. All three types of EPM exposure increased plasma corticosterone when compared to the basal group, but sEPM- and oEPM-exposed mice showed higher corticosterone levels than eEPM-exposed mice. Prior nociceptive stimulation (formalin injection) did not enhance the plasma corticosterone response induced by the three types of EPM exposure. Indeed, formalin injection appeared to provoke a ceiling effect on plasma corticosterone concentration. Furthermore, neither the nociceptive response in the formalin test nor oEPM-induced antinociception was changed by adrenalectomy. Present results suggest that oEPM antinociception does not depend on corticosterone release in mice.

  2. Looking Ahead? Computerized Maze Task Performance by Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta), Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella), and Human Children (Homo sapiens)

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Michael J.; Parrish, Audrey E.; Futch, Sara E.; Evans, Theodore A.; Perdue, Bonnie M.

    2015-01-01

    Human and nonhuman primates are not mentally constrained to the present. They can remember the past and – at least to an extent – anticipate the future. Anticipation of the future ranges from long-term prospection such as planning for retirement to more short-term future oriented cognition such as planning a route through a maze. Here we tested a great ape species (chimpanzees), an Old World monkey species (rhesus macaques) a New World monkey species (capuchin monkeys) and human children on a computerized maze task. All subjects had to move a cursor through a maze to reach a goal at the bottom of the screen. For best performance on the task, subjects had to “plan ahead” to the end of the maze to move the cursor in the correct direction, avoid traps, and reverse directions if necessary. Mazes varied in difficulty. Chimpanzees were better than both monkey species, and monkeys showed a particular deficit when moving away from the goal or changing directions was required. Children showed a similar pattern to monkeys regarding the effects of reversals and moves away from the goal, but their overall performance in terms of correct maze completion was similar to the chimpanzees. The results highlight similarities as well as differences in planning across species and the role that inhibitory control may play in future oriented cognition in primates. PMID:25798793

  3. Looking ahead? Computerized maze task performance by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella), and human children (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Beran, Michael J; Parrish, Audrey E; Futch, Sara E; Evans, Theodore A; Perdue, Bonnie M

    2015-05-01

    Human and nonhuman primates are not mentally constrained to the present. They can remember the past and-at least to an extent-anticipate the future. Anticipation of the future ranges from long-term prospection such as planning for retirement to more short-term future-oriented cognition such as planning a route through a maze. Here we tested a great ape species (chimpanzees), an Old World monkey species (rhesus macaques), a New World monkey species (capuchin monkeys), and human children on a computerized maze task. All subjects had to move a cursor through a maze to reach a goal at the bottom of the screen. For best performance on the task, subjects had to "plan ahead" to the end of the maze to move the cursor in the correct direction, avoid traps, and reverse directions if necessary. Mazes varied in difficulty. Chimpanzees were better than both monkey species, and monkeys showed a particular deficit when moving away from the goal or changing directions was required. Children showed a similar pattern to monkeys regarding the effects of reversals and moves away from the goal, but their overall performance in terms of correct maze completion was similar to the chimpanzees. The results highlight similarities as well as differences in planning across species and the role that inhibitory control may play in future-oriented cognition in primates. PMID:25798793

  4. Looking ahead? Computerized maze task performance by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella), and human children (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Beran, Michael J; Parrish, Audrey E; Futch, Sara E; Evans, Theodore A; Perdue, Bonnie M

    2015-05-01

    Human and nonhuman primates are not mentally constrained to the present. They can remember the past and-at least to an extent-anticipate the future. Anticipation of the future ranges from long-term prospection such as planning for retirement to more short-term future-oriented cognition such as planning a route through a maze. Here we tested a great ape species (chimpanzees), an Old World monkey species (rhesus macaques), a New World monkey species (capuchin monkeys), and human children on a computerized maze task. All subjects had to move a cursor through a maze to reach a goal at the bottom of the screen. For best performance on the task, subjects had to "plan ahead" to the end of the maze to move the cursor in the correct direction, avoid traps, and reverse directions if necessary. Mazes varied in difficulty. Chimpanzees were better than both monkey species, and monkeys showed a particular deficit when moving away from the goal or changing directions was required. Children showed a similar pattern to monkeys regarding the effects of reversals and moves away from the goal, but their overall performance in terms of correct maze completion was similar to the chimpanzees. The results highlight similarities as well as differences in planning across species and the role that inhibitory control may play in future-oriented cognition in primates.

  5. Spectrographs for the Measurement of Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.

    A radial-velocity measurement derives from a shift in position of spectral features at the focus of a spectrographic instrument. We do not often think about how small these shifts are. It is not generally appreciated that the accuracy to which this shift must be measured is a tiny fraction of a pixel. Or, if we prefer to calculate in microns a surprising minuteness. What precautions should we be taking for the measurement of such small shifts? It is true that, thanks to computers, modern reduction methods allows us to correct for a wide variety of pertubations, provided that these are foreseen and understood; but such reduction procedures will give the best results if such pertubations are kept very small. We must therefore analyse these pertubations and think about how we can control them. The correlation method initiated in its modern form by Roger Griffin, and which we developed further with an optical mask in CORAVEL twenty-five years ago and more recently with a numerical mask in ELODIE, has demonstrated its power. In terms of these methods, the problem of high precision is to improve the correlation peak. Can this be done? Does the correlation method allow us to distinguish the overall radial velocity of the object from possible distortions of the lines? This is certainly a major problem which must be solved. The luminous efficiency of high-precision spectrographs is low. If the use of an optical fibre with scrambling for feeding the spectrograph seems inevitable to us today, it seems to me that the transmission of this system can be considerably improved by a better choice of the F-ratio of the image beam of the telescope which is to be matched with that of the spectrograph. This problem, common to all spectrographs, could be resolved with a specialised focal-plane instrument, giving a much greater than usual F-ratio, resulting in a simplification of the spectrograph optics, and hence an improvement in transmission and a serious decrease in size (which is

  6. Combining axial and radial nanowire heterostructures: radial Esaki diodes and tunnel field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anil W; Svensson, Johannes; Ek, Martin; Lind, Erik; Thelander, Claes; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing demand on high-performance electronics has generated transistors with very impressive figures of merit (Radosavljevic et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2009, 1-4 and Cho et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2011, 15.1.1-15.1.4). The continued scaling of the supply voltage of field-effect transistors, such as tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), requires the implementation of advanced transistor architectures including FinFETs and nanowire devices. Moreover, integration of novel materials with high electron mobilities, such as III-V semiconductors and graphene, are also being considered to further enhance the device properties (del Alamo, Nature 2011, 479, 317-323, and Liao et al., Nature 2010, 467, 305-308). In nanowire devices, boosting the drive current at a fixed supply voltage or maintaining a constant drive current at a reduced supply voltage may be achieved by increasing the cross-sectional area of a device, however at the cost of deteriorated electrostatics. A gate-all-around nanowire device architecture is the most favorable electrostatic configuration to suppress short channel effects; however, the arrangement of arrays of parallel vertical nanowires to address the drive current predicament will require additional chip area. The use of a core-shell nanowire with a radial heterojunction in a transistor architecture provides an attractive means to address the drive current issue without compromising neither chip area nor device electrostatics. In addition to design advantages of a radial transistor architecture, we in this work illustrate the benefit in terms of drive current per unit chip area and compare the experimental data for axial GaSb/InAs Esaki diodes and TFETs to their radial counterparts and normalize the electrical data to the largest cross-sectional area of the nanowire, i.e. the occupied chip area, assuming a vertical device geometry. Our data on lateral devices show that radial Esaki diodes deliver almost 7 times higher peak

  7. Combining axial and radial nanowire heterostructures: radial Esaki diodes and tunnel field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anil W; Svensson, Johannes; Ek, Martin; Lind, Erik; Thelander, Claes; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing demand on high-performance electronics has generated transistors with very impressive figures of merit (Radosavljevic et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2009, 1-4 and Cho et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2011, 15.1.1-15.1.4). The continued scaling of the supply voltage of field-effect transistors, such as tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), requires the implementation of advanced transistor architectures including FinFETs and nanowire devices. Moreover, integration of novel materials with high electron mobilities, such as III-V semiconductors and graphene, are also being considered to further enhance the device properties (del Alamo, Nature 2011, 479, 317-323, and Liao et al., Nature 2010, 467, 305-308). In nanowire devices, boosting the drive current at a fixed supply voltage or maintaining a constant drive current at a reduced supply voltage may be achieved by increasing the cross-sectional area of a device, however at the cost of deteriorated electrostatics. A gate-all-around nanowire device architecture is the most favorable electrostatic configuration to suppress short channel effects; however, the arrangement of arrays of parallel vertical nanowires to address the drive current predicament will require additional chip area. The use of a core-shell nanowire with a radial heterojunction in a transistor architecture provides an attractive means to address the drive current issue without compromising neither chip area nor device electrostatics. In addition to design advantages of a radial transistor architecture, we in this work illustrate the benefit in terms of drive current per unit chip area and compare the experimental data for axial GaSb/InAs Esaki diodes and TFETs to their radial counterparts and normalize the electrical data to the largest cross-sectional area of the nanowire, i.e. the occupied chip area, assuming a vertical device geometry. Our data on lateral devices show that radial Esaki diodes deliver almost 7 times higher peak

  8. Outcome of Radial Head Arthroplasty in Comminuted Radial Head Fractures: Short and Midterm Results

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Arash; Raven, Tim Friedrich; Dremel, Eike; Studier-Fischer, Stefan; Grutzner, Paul Alfred; Biglari, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Comminuted radial head fractures are often associated with secondary injuries and elbow instability. Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate how well the modular metallic radial head implant EVOLVE® prosthesis restores functional range of motion (ROM) and stability of the elbow in acute care. Patients and Methods: Eighty-five patients with comminuted radial head fractures and associated injuries received treatment with an EVOLVE® prosthesis between May 2001 and November 2009. Seventy-five patients were available for follow-up. On average, patients were followed for 41.5 months (33.0: 4.0 - 93.0). Outcome assessment was done on the basis of pain, ROM, strength, radiographic findings, and functional rating scores such as Broberg and Morrey, the Mayo elbow performance index (MEPI), and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH). Our study is currently the largest analysis of clinical outcome of a modular radial head replacement in the literature. Results: Overall, there were 2 (2.7%) Mason II fractures, 21 (28%) Mason III fractures, and 52 (69.3%) Mason IV fractures. Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur osteosynthesefragen (AO) classification was also determined. Of the 85 patients in our study, 75 were available for follow-up. Follow-up averaged 41.5 months (range, 4 - 93 months). Average scores for the cohort were as follows: Morrey, 85.7 (median 90.2; range 44.4 - 100); MEPI, 83.3 (85.0; 40.0 - 100); and DASH 26.1 points (22.5; 0.0 - 75.8). Mean flexion/extension in the affected joint was 125.7°/16.5°/0° in comparison to the noninjured side 138.5°/0°/1.2°. Mean pronation/supination was 70.5°/0°/67.1° in comparison to the noninjured side 83.6°/0°/84.3°. Handgrip strength of the injured compared to the non-injured arm was 78.8%. The following complications were also documented: 58 patients had periprosthetic radioluceny shown to be neither clinically significant nor relevant according to evaluated scores; 26 patients had

  9. RADIAL VELOCITY VARIABILITY OF FIELD BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, L.; Mace, G. N.; Rice, E. L.; McLean, I. S.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Burgasser, A. J.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2015-07-20

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity (RV) precision of ∼2 km s{sup −1}, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1σ upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included seven known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant RV variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant fraction of the orbital period. Specialized techniques are required to reach the high precisions sensitive to motion in orbits of very low-mass systems. For eight objects, including six T dwarfs, we present the first published high-resolution spectra, many with high signal to noise, that will provide valuable comparison data for models of brown dwarf atmospheres.

  10. The ITER Radial Neutron Camera Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Marocco, D.; Belli, F.; Esposito, B.; Petrizzi, L.; Riva, M.; Bonheure, G.; Kaschuck, Y.

    2008-03-12

    A multichannel neutron detection system (Radial Neutron Camera, RNC) will be installed on the ITER equatorial port plug 1 for total neutron source strength, neutron emissivity/ion temperature profiles and n{sub t}/n{sub d} ratio measurements [1]. The system is composed by two fan shaped collimating structures: an ex-vessel structure, looking at the plasma core, containing tree sets of 12 collimators (each set lying on a different toroidal plane), and an in-vessel structure, containing 9 collimators, for plasma edge coverage. The RNC detecting system will work in a harsh environment (neutron fiux up to 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} s, magnetic field >0.5 T or in-vessel detectors), should provide both counting and spectrometric information and should be flexible enough to cover the high neutron flux dynamic range expected during the different ITER operation phases. ENEA has been involved in several activities related to RNC design and optimization [2,3]. In the present paper the up-to-date design and the neutron emissivity reconstruction capabilities of the RNC will be described. Different options for detectors suitable for spectrometry and counting (e.g. scintillators and diamonds) focusing on the implications in terms of overall RNC performance will be discussed. The increase of the RNC capabilities offered by the use of new digital data acquisition systems will be also addressed.

  11. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillen, R. S.; Smith, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Stars are observed with a ground-based instrument designed to measure small changes in the line-of-sight velocities. The purpose of the observations is to detect large planets by the oscillatory reflex motion they induce on the stars they are orbiting. The instrument is an optical spectrometer for which wavelengths are first calibrated by transmission through a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon interferometer. Changes in the line-of-sight velocities are revealed by changes in the Doppler shift of the absorption-line spectra of stars. The scrambling of incident light by an optical fiber and the stability of wavelength calibration by a tilt-tunable Fabry-Perot etalon provide immunity to systematic errors that historically have effected more conventional radial velocity spectrographs. A cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph spatially separates the orders of constructive interference transmitted through the etalon. Selecting several echelle diffraction orders in the vicinity of 4250 to 4750 A, which are imaged on a CCD, about 350 points on the profile of the stellar spectrum are sampled by successive orders of interferometric transmission through the etalon.

  12. Fabrication of cooled radial turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, A. N.; Aigret, G. G.; Psichogios, T. P.; Rodgers, C.

    1986-01-01

    A design and fabrication program was conducted to evaluate a unique concept for constructing a cooled, high temperature radial turbine rotor. This concept, called split blade fabrication was developed as an alternative to internal ceramic coring. In this technique, the internal cooling cavity is created without flow dividers or any other detail by a solid (and therefore stronger) ceramic plate which can be more firmly anchored within the casting shell mold than can conventional detailed ceramic cores. Casting is conducted in the conventional manner, except that the finished product, instead of having finished internal cooling passages, is now a split blade. The internal details of the blade are created separately together with a carrier sheet. The inserts are superalloy. Both are produced by essentially the same software such that they are a net fit. The carrier assemblies are loaded into the split blade and the edges sealed by welding. The entire wheel is Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIPed), braze bonding the internal details to the inside of the blades. During this program, two wheels were successfully produced by the split blade fabrication technique.

  13. Radially uniform circular sweep of ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmetov, T.D.; Davydenko, V.I.; Ivanov, A.A.; Kobets, V.V.; Medvedko, A.S.; Skorobogatov, D.N.; Tiunov, M.A.

    2006-03-15

    A spiral sweep of the ion beam was suggested to provide sufficiently uniform irradiation of a circular target. It is shown that if the beam radius is small enough, the radius of the beam center should increase as a square root of time to provide uniform radial irradiation of the target. In the complex for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, the proton beam sweep will be performed by a sweeper with uniform magnetic field with strength up to 500 G and axial length {approx}20 cm, rotating at 100-2000 Hz, and scanning over the radius at a 1-10 Hz frequency. The sweeper field is produced by four longitudinal flat current windings placed near the inner walls of a box-shaped yoke with the inner opening of a square cross section. A similar sweeping technique can be used in a 200 keV oxygen implanter, which is also under development at the Budker Institute.

  14. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Pribulla, Theodor; Fischer, Debra E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  15. Camera Calibration with Radial Variance Component Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélykuti, B.; Kruck, E. J.

    2014-11-01

    Camera calibration plays a more and more important role in recent times. Beside real digital aerial survey cameras the photogrammetric market is dominated by a big number of non-metric digital cameras mounted on UAVs or other low-weight flying platforms. The in-flight calibration of those systems has a significant role to enhance the geometric accuracy of survey photos considerably. It is expected to have a better precision of photo measurements in the center of images then along the edges or in the corners. With statistical methods the accuracy of photo measurements in dependency of the distance of points from image center has been analyzed. This test provides a curve for the measurement precision as function of the photo radius. A high number of camera types have been tested with well penetrated point measurements in image space. The result of the tests led to a general consequence to show a functional connection between accuracy and radial distance and to give a method how to check and enhance the geometrical capability of the cameras in respect to these results.

  16. A case of dextrocardia, radial ray malformation and renal anomaly.

    PubMed

    Nallegowda, M; Singh, U; Shivananda; Shukla, R; Kabra, M

    2003-10-01

    A 12-year-old boy is described with bilateral radial club hands, scoliosis, hypospadias, isolated dextrocardia, hypoplastic ribs, an ectopic kidney and spina bifida occulta. Although some of the clinical features of this patient are seen in VATER association and sacrococcygeal dysgenesis, the presence of dextrocardia, facial dysmorphism, radial, renal and vertebral anomalies preclude these diagnoses.

  17. Detail of elevation gauge, radial gate hoist mechanism, and concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of elevation gauge, radial gate hoist mechanism, and concrete walkway on top of the gate. View to the south-southwest - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Radial Gate Check with Drop, Wellton Canal 9.9, West of Avenue 34 East & north of County Ninth Street, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  18. Outlet side of gate, showing the Radial Gate, hoist mechanism ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Outlet side of gate, showing the Radial Gate, hoist mechanism and concrete walkway across the canal. The concrete baffle separating the afterbay and the cipoletti weir is in the foreground - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Radial Gate Check with Drop, Wellton Canal 9.9, West of Avenue 34 East & north of County Ninth Street, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  19. Improved photographic prints with a linear radial transmission filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, L. M.

    1973-01-01

    Linear Radial Transmission Filter (LRTF) is easy to use and yet results in prints which depict more information contained in negative than can be shown by direct printing. LRTF is optical-quality filter which has maximum transmission in center and linear drop in transmission radially out from center.

  20. Off-Design Performance of Radial-Inflow Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.; Glassman, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Computer code determines rotor exit flow from hub to tip. RTOD (Radial Turbine Off-Design), computes off-design performance of radial turbine by modeling flow with stator viscous and trailing-edge losses, and with vaneless space loss between stator and rotor, and with rotor incidence, viscous, clearance, trailing-edge, and disk friction losses.