Science.gov

Sample records for 8-bromo cyclic gmp

  1. Effects of 8-bromo cyclic GMP and verapamil on depolarization-evoked Ca2+ signal and contraction in rat aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Salomone, S; Morel, N; Godfraind, T

    1995-01-01

    1. The pharmacological action of NO donors is usually attributed to a cellular rise in guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP), but this hypothesis is based only on indirect evidence. Therefore, we have studied the effects of cyclic GMP on Ca2+ movements and contraction in rat isolated endothelium-denuded aorta stimulated by KCl depolarizing solution using the permeant analogue 8-bromo cyclic GMP (BrcGMP). Isometric contraction and fura-2 Ca2+ signals were measured simultaneously in preparations treated with BrcGMP and with verapamil. The activation of calcium channels was estimated by measuring the quenching rate of the intracellular fura-2 signal by Mn2+ and by the depolarization-dependent influx of 45Ca2+. 2. Stimulation with 67 mM KCl-solution evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) and a contractile response which were inhibited by pretreatment with verapamil (0.1 microM) or BrcGMP (0.1-1 mM). However, the inhibition of the fura-2 Ca2+ signal was significantly higher with verapamil than with BrcGMP, whereas the contraction was inhibited to a similar extent. 3. When preparations were exposed to K(+)-depolarizing solution in which the calcium concentration was cumulatively increased, the related increase in fura-2 Ca2+ signal was barely affected by BrcGMP, whereas the contractile tension was strongly and significantly inhibited. 4. Cellular Ca2+ changes were also estimated with 45Ca2+. 45Ca2+ influx in resting preparations was significantly reduced by BrcGMP (0.1 mM) but not by verapamil (0.1 microM); 45Ca2+ influx in KCl-depolarized preparations was reduced by verapamil but was unaffected by BrcGMP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7599942

  2. Modulation of relaxation to levcromakalim by S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and 8-bromo cyclic GMP in the rat isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard; Hiley, C Robin

    1998-01-01

    Levcromakalim caused concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine-induced tone in both endothelium-denuded and intact vessels. Its potency was reduced by the nitric oxide donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 0.1 μM or 1 μM) in both denuded and intact vessels. The maximal relaxation (Rmax) was reduced only in denuded vessels. SNAP was more potent in endothelium-denuded than intact vessels but there were no differences in Rmax. Glibenclamide (10 μM) did not affect relaxation to SNAP in endothelium-denuded or intact vessels. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 μM) increased the potency and Rmax of levcromakalim in endothelium-intact vessels. ODQ had no effect in denuded vessels. ODQ (10 μM) reduced the vasorelaxant potency of SNAP in both intact and endothelium-denuded vessels by 190-fold and 620-fold, respectively. 8-bromo cyclic GMP (10 or 30 μM) reduced both the potency and Rmax of levcromakalim in de-endothelialized vessels, but had no effect in intact vessels although it reduced both the potency and Rmax of levcromakalim in intact vessels incubated with ODQ (10 μM). In the presence of ODQ (10 μM), SNAP (0.1 μM or 1 μM) reduced the potency of levcromakalim in intact vessels, without altering Rmax, but had no effect in denuded vessels. SNAP (50 μM) reduced both the potency and Rmax of levcromakalim in intact and endothelium-denuded vessels. Therefore, although SNAP causes relaxation principally through generation of cyclic GMP, it can modulate the actions of levcromakalim through mechanisms both dependent on, and independent of, cyclic GMP; the former predominate in endothelium-denuded vessels and the latter in intact vessels. PMID:9720794

  3. 8-Bromo-cyclic inosine diphosphoribose: towards a selective cyclic ADP-ribose agonist

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Tanja; Moreau, Christelle; Wagner, Gerd K.; Fliegert, Ralf; Siebrands, Cornelia C.; Nebel, Merle; Schmid, Frederike; Harneit, Angelika; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2009-01-01

    cADPR (cyclic ADP-ribose) is a universal Ca2+ mobilizing second messenger. In T-cells cADPR is involved in sustained Ca2+ release and also in Ca2+ entry. Potential mechanisms for the latter include either capacitative Ca2+ entry, secondary to store depletion by cADPR, or direct activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPM2 (transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily melastatin, member 2). Here we characterize the molecular target of the newly-described membrane-permeant cADPR agonist 8-Br-N1-cIDPR (8-bromo-cyclic IDP-ribose). 8-Br-N1-cIDPR evoked Ca2+ signalling in the human T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat and in primary rat T-lymphocytes. Ca2+ signalling induced by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR consisted of Ca2+ release and Ca2+ entry. Whereas Ca2+ release was sensitive to both the RyR (ryanodine receptor) blocker RuRed (Ruthenium Red) and the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR (8-bromo-cyclic ADP-ribose), Ca2+ entry was inhibited by the Ca2+ entry blockers Gd3+ (gadolinium ion) and SKF-96365, as well as by 8-Br-cADPR. To unravel a potential role for TRPM2 in sustained Ca2+ entry evoked by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR, TRPM2 was overexpressed in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. However, though activation by H2O2 was enhanced dramatically in those cells, Ca2+ signalling induced by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR was almost unaffected. Similarly, direct analysis of TRPM2 currents did not reveal activation or co-activation of TRPM2 by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR. In summary, the sensitivity to the Ca2+ entry blockers Gd3+ and SKF-96365 is in favour of the concept of capacitative Ca2+ entry, secondary to store depletion by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR. Taken together, 8-Br-N1-cIDPR appears to be the first cADPR agonist affecting Ca2+ release and secondary Ca2+ entry, but without effect on TRPM2. PMID:19492987

  4. Cyclic GMP and Cilia Motility

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia of the lungs respond to environmental challenges by increasing their ciliary beat frequency in order to enhance mucociliary clearance as a fundamental tenant of innate defense. One important second messenger in transducing the regulable nature of motile cilia is cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP). In this review, the history of cGMP action is presented and a survey of the existing data addressing cGMP action in ciliary motility is presented. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of cGMP in ciliated cells is presented in the context of alcohol-induced cilia function and dysfunction. PMID:26264028

  5. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Lei; Hu, Yanfeng; Wei, Yuantao; Liang, Xiaolei; Mao, Lina; Bi, Yurong

    2014-04-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCF(TIR1) ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation.

  6. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Bi, Yurong

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCFTIR1 ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation. PMID:24591051

  7. Additional evidence for the cyclic GMP signaling pathway resulting in the photophobic behavior of Stentor coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Walerczyk, M; Fabczak, S

    2001-12-01

    We report that exo- and endogenous guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) specifically influenced the photophobic response. In behavioral experiments the slowly hydrolyzable and membrane-permeable analogs of cGMP (8-bromo-cGMP [Br-cGMP] and N6,2'-o-dibutyryl-cGMP) dramatically prolonged the time for ciliary stop response and decreased the duration of ciliary reversal in a dose-dependent manner. When analogs of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) (8-bromo-cAMP or N6,2'-o-dibutyryl-cAMP) were used, no essential effects were detected on the kinetics of the photophobic response. Both nonspecific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity inhibitors (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine [IBMX] and 1,3-dimethylxanthine [theophylline]) and the highly specific cGMP-PDE activity inhibitor 1,4-dihydro-5-[2-propoxyphenyl]-7H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidine-7-one (zaprinast) mimicked the effects of cGMP analogs. Treatment of cells with an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase activity (6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione [LY 83583]) exerted an effect opposite to that of cGMP analogs and PDE activity inhibitors. The positive physiological effect of LY 83583 was significantly diminished in ciliates that were treated simultaneously with Br-cGMP. In an assay of cell cyclic nucleotide content, the exposure of dark-adapted Stentor to light evoked a transient decrease in the basal level of intracellular cGMP. Alterations in internal cGMP levels were more distinct when the intensity of applied illumination was increased. In the presence of IBMX or theophylline the basal content of cGMP was markedly enhanced, and the photoinduced changes in cGMP level were less pronounced. In this paper the possible whole molecular mechanism by which the ciliary orientation in Stentor is controlled by light is presented. PMID:11783940

  8. Involvement of platelet cyclic GMP but not cyclic AMP suppression in leukocyte-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Nezu, A.; Shinoda, H.; Minami, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence or the presence of PAF (10 nM) markedly increased platelet cyclic AMP levels, which were significantly decreased by indomethacin (3 microM). Co-incubation of endothelial cells and platelets with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) did not change the platelet cyclic AMP levels. 2. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence of PAF increased platelet cyclic GMP levels, which were increased 3.5 fold by PAF. These cyclic GMP levels were significantly decreased by NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM), and completely by methylene blue (10 microM). When endothelial cells and platelets were co-incubated with PMNs, the cyclic GMP level in the cell mixture was 42.5 and 65.3% lower than that in endothelial cells and platelets without and with PAF stimulation, respectively. 3. PAF induced platelet adhesion to endothelial cells only when PMNs were present. Methylene blue dose-dependently potentiated the PMN-dependent platelet adhesion induced by PAF, although it had no effect in the absence of PMNs. 4. Sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo cyclic GMP but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP significantly, although partially, inhibited the platelet adhesion. Inhibition of cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase by zaprinast slightly inhibited the PMN-induced platelet adhesion and potentiated the inhibitory effect of 8-bromo cyclic GMP, while these drugs markedly inhibited the adhesion of platelet aggregates induced by PMN sonicates. 5. These results suggest that the impairment by activated PMNs of EDRF-induced platelet cyclic GMP formation is involved in part in the mechanism of PMN-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by PAF in vitro. The precise mechanism still remains to be clarified. PMID:8789382

  9. The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway and synaptic plasticity in the rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Southam, E.; Charles, S. L.; Garthwaite, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have investigated the possibility that nitric oxide (NO) and soluble guanylyl cyclase, an enzyme that synthesizes guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in response to NO, contributes to plasticity of synaptic transmission in the rat isolated superior cervical ganglion (SCG). 2. Exposure of ganglia to the NO donor, nitroprusside, caused a concentration-dependent accumulation of cyclic GMP which was augmented in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The compound, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), a selective inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, completely blocked this cyclic GMP response. 3. As assessed by extracellular recording, nitroprusside (100 microM) and another NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (30 microM) increased the efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission in response to electrical stimulation of the preganglionic nerve, an effect that was reversible and which could be replicated by the cyclic GMP analogue, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Ganglionic depolarizations resulting from stimulation of nicotinic receptors with carbachol were not increased by nitroprusside. The potentiating actions of the NO donors on synaptic transmission, but not that of 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, were inhibited by ODQ. 4. Brief tetanic stimulation of the preganglionic nerve resulted in a long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission that was unaffected by ODQ, either in the absence or presence of the NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 100 microM). A lack of influence of L-NOARG was confirmed in intracellular recordings of LTP of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. Furthermore, under conditions where tetanically-induced LTP was saturated, nitroprusside was still able to potentiate synaptic transmission, as judged from extracellular recording. 5. We conclude that NO is capable of potentiating ganglionic neurotransmission and this effect is mediated through the stimulation of soluble guanylyl

  10. Cyclic GMP reduces ventricular myocyte stunning after simulated ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, A; Yan, L; Scholz, P M; Huang, M W; Weiss, H R

    1999-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the second messenger activated by nitric oxide, cyclic GMP, would reduce the effects of myocyte stunning following simulated ischemia-reperfusion and that this was related to cyclic GMP protein kinase. Ventricular cardiac myocytes were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits (n = 8). Cell shortening was measured by a video edge detector and protein phosphorylation was determined autoradiographically after SDS gel electrophoresis. Cell shortening data were acquired at: (i) baseline followed by 8-Bromo-cGMP 10(-6) M (8-Br-cGMP) and then KT 5823 10(-6) M (cyclic GMP protein kinase inhibitor) and (ii) simulated ischemia (20 min of 95% N(2)-5% CO(2) at 37 degrees C) followed by simulated reperfusion (reoxygenation) with addition of 8-Br-cGMP 10(-6) M followed by KT 5823 10(-6) M, (iii) addition of 8-Br-cGMP prior to ischemia followed by the addition of KT 5823 10(-6) M after 30 min of reoxygenation. In the control group, 8-Br-cGMP 10(-6) M decreased percentage shortening (%short) (5.0 +/- 0.6 vs 3.8 +/- 0. 4) and the maximum velocity (V(max), microm/s) (48.6 +/- 6.9 vs 40.2 +/- 6.4). KT 5823 10(-6) M added after 8-Br-cGMP partially restored %short (4.6 +/- 0.5) and V(max) (46.6 +/- 8.0). After stunning, baseline myocytes had decreased %short (3.4 +/- 0.2) and V(max) (36. 0 +/- 4.2). After the addition of 8-Br-cGMP, the %short (2.7 +/- 0. 2) and V(max) (27.6 +/- 2.5) decreased further. The addition of KT 5823 did not change either the %short or the V(max). The myocytes with 8-Br-cGMP during ischemia had increased %short (4.2 +/- 0.2) and V(max) (37.2 +/- 3.4) when compared to the stunned group. The addition of KT 5823 did not significantly alter %short (3.3 +/- 0.4) or V(max) (29.2 +/- 5.0) in the myocytes pretreated with 8-Br-cGMP. Protein phosphorylation was increased by 8-Br-cGMP in control and stunned myocytes. KT 5823 blocked this effect in control but not stunned myocytes, suggesting some change in the cyclic GMP protein kinase

  11. A cyclic GMP-dependent signalling pathway regulates bacterial phytopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-Qi; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Febrer, Melanie; McCarthy, Yvonne; Yang, Jauo-Guey; Liu, Chung-Liang; Swarbreck, David; Rogers, Jane; Maxwell Dow, J; Chou, Shan-Ho; Ryan, Robert P

    2013-09-11

    Cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic GMP) is a second messenger whose role in bacterial signalling is poorly understood. A genetic screen in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc) identified that XC_0250, which encodes a protein with a class III nucleotidyl cyclase domain, is required for cyclic GMP synthesis. Purified XC_0250 was active in cyclic GMP synthesis in vitro. The linked gene XC_0249 encodes a protein with a cyclic mononucleotide-binding (cNMP) domain and a GGDEF diguanylate cyclase domain. The activity of XC_0249 in cyclic di-GMP synthesis was enhanced by addition of cyclic GMP. The isolated cNMP domain of XC_0249 bound cyclic GMP and a structure-function analysis, directed by determination of the crystal structure of the holo-complex, demonstrated the site of cyclic GMP binding that modulates cyclic di-GMP synthesis. Mutation of either XC_0250 or XC_0249 led to a reduced virulence to plants and reduced biofilm formation in vitro. These findings describe a regulatory pathway in which cyclic GMP regulates virulence and biofilm formation through interaction with a novel effector that directly links cyclic GMP and cyclic di-GMP signalling.

  12. Opposing functional effects of cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP may act through protein phosphorylation in rabbit cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yan, L; Lee, H; Huang, M W; Scholz, P M; Weiss, H R

    2000-04-01

    1. We tested the hypothesis that the negative functional effects of cyclic GMP (cGMP) oppose the positive effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in cardiac myocytes through interaction at the level of their respective protein kinases. 2. Cell shortening was studied using a video-edge detector. The O2 consumption of a suspension of rabbit ventricular myocytes was measured using O2 electrodes. Protein phosphorylation was measured autoradiographically following SDS-PAGE. Data were collected with: (1) 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) 10(-7) or 10(-5) M; (2) 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP) 10(-7) or 10(-5) M; (3) 8-Br-cAMP 10(-5) M followed by 8-Br-cGMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M; (4) 8-Br-cGMP 10(-5) M followed by 8-Br-cAMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M; (5) 8-Br-cGMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M followed by KT 5720 (cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor) or KT 5823 (cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor) 10(-6) M; and (6) 8-Br-cAMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M followed by KT 5720 or KT 5823 10(-6) M. 3. 8-Br-cGMP 10(-5) M decreased percent shortening (Pcs) from 6.3+/-0.6 to 3.6+/-0.4% and rate of shortening (Rs) from 66.7+/-4.4 to 41.8+/-4.2 microm s(-1). 8-Br-cAMP 10(-5) M increased Pcs (from 3.7+/-0.2 to 4.8+/-0.2) and Rs (from 50.0+/-3.0 to 60.0+/-3.1). With 8-Br-cAMP 10(-5) M, 8-Br-cGMP 10(-5) M decreased Pcs and Rs less. The positive functional effects of 8-Br-cAMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M were also diminished with 8-Br-cGMP 10(-5) M. Following 8-Br-cGMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M, KT 5720 10(-6) M further decreased Pcs to 2.5+/-0.3 and Rs to 30.0+/-4.1. KT 5823 10(-6) M returned Pcs to 4.7+/-0.4 and Rs to 61.3+/-5.3. Following 8-Br-cAMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M, KT 5720 decreased the elevated Pcs and Rs significantly and KT 5823 10(-6) M further increased these parameters. 4. cGMP and cAMP phosphorylated the same five protein bands. With KT 5720 or KT 5823, all of the bands were lighter at the same concentration of 8-Br-cAMP and 8-Br-cGMP. 5. We conclude that, in rabbit ventricular myocytes, the opposing functional effects of cGMP and c

  13. Smooth muscle cell expression of type I cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase is suppressed by continuous exposure to nitrovasodilators, theophylline, cyclic GMP, and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Soff, G A; Cornwell, T L; Cundiff, D L; Gately, S; Lincoln, T M

    1997-01-01

    A key component of the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in smooth muscle cells (SMC) is the type I GMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-G I). Activation of PK-G I mediates the reduction of cytoplasmic calcium concentrations and vasorelaxation. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that continuous exposure of SMC in culture to the nitrovasodilators S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) results in approximately 75% suppression of PK-G I mRNA by 48 h. PK-G I mRNA and protein were also suppressed by continuous exposure to cGMP analogues 8-bromo- and 8-(4-chlorophenylthio) guanosine-3,5-monophosphate or the cAMP analogue dibutyryl cAMP. These results suggest that activation of one or both of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases mediates PK-G I mRNA suppression. Using isoform-specific cDNA probes, only the PK-G I alpha was detected in SMC, either at baseline or after suppression, while PK-G I beta was not detected, indicating that isoform switch was not contributing to the gene regulation. Using the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, the PK-G I mRNA half-life in bovine SMC was observed to be 5 h. The half-life was not affected by the addition of SNAP to actinomycin D, indicating no effect on PK-G I mRNA stability. Nuclear runoff studies indicated a suppression of PK-G I gene transcription by SNAP. PK-G I suppression was also observed in vivo in rats given isosorbide dinitrate in the drinking water, with a dose-dependent suppression of PK-G I protein in the aorta. PK-G I antigen in whole rat lung extract was also suppressed by administration of isosorbide or theophylline in the drinking water. These data may contribute to our understanding of nitrovasodilator resistance, a phenomenon resulting from continuous exposure to nitroglycerin or other nitrovasodilators. PMID:9366573

  14. Evidence for a cyclic GMP-independent mechanism in the anti-platelet action of S-nitrosoglutathione

    PubMed Central

    Gordge, M P; Hothersall, J S; Noronha-Dutra, A A

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the ability of a range of NO donor compounds to stimulate cyclic GMP accumulation and inhibit collagen-induced aggregation of human washed platelets. In addition, the rate of spontaneous release of NO from each donor has been measured spectrophotometrically by the oxidation of oxyhaemoglobin to methaemoglobin. The NO donors used were five s-nitrosothiol compounds: S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), S-nitrosocysteine (cysNO), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-cysteine (SNAC), S-nitrosohomocysteine (homocysNO), and two non-nitrosothiol compounds: diethylamine NONOate (DEANO) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP).Using 10 μM of each donor compound, mean±s.e.mean rate of NO release ranged from 0.04±0.001 nmol min−1 (for SNP) to 3.15±0.29 nmol min−1 (for cysNO); cyclic GMP accumulation ranged from 0.43±0.05 pmol per 108 platelets (for SNP) to 2.67±0.31 pmol per 108 platelets (for cysNO), and inhibition of platelet aggregation ranged from 40±6.4% (for SNP) to 90±3.8% (for SNAC).There was a significant positive correlation between the rate of NO release and the ability of the different NO donors to stimulate intra-platelet cyclic GMP accumulation (r=0.83; P=0.02). However, no significant correlation was observed between the rate of NO release and the inhibition of platelet aggregation by the different NO donors (r=−0.17), nor was there a significant correlation between cyclic GMP accumulation and inhibition of aggregation by the different NO donor compounds (r=0.34).Comparison of the dose-response curves obtained with GSNO, DEANO and 8-bromo cyclic GMP showed DEANO to be the most potent stimulator of intraplatelet cyclic GMP accumulation (P<0.001 vs both GSNO and 8-bromo cyclic GMP), but GSNO to be the most potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation (P<0.01 vs DEANO, and P<0.001 vs 8-bromo cyclic GMP).The rate of NO release from GSNO, and its ability both to stimulate intra-platelet cyclic GMP accumulation and to

  15. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms.

  16. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms. PMID:26055114

  17. Reversal of radiation-induced cisplatin resistance in murine fibrosarcoma cells by selective modulation of the cyclic GMP-dependent transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Eichholtz-Wirth, H.

    1995-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance, induced in murine fibrosarcoma cells (SSK) in vitro or in vivo by low-dose irradiation, can be overcome by activation of the cyclic GMP(cGMP)-dependent transduction pathway. This is mediated either by stimulating cGMP formation with sodium nitroprusside or by replacing cGMP with a selective activator of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase, 8-bromo-cGMP. The cyclic AMP-dependent transduction pathway is not involved in cisplatin resistance. Instead, activation of cAMP sensitises both parental and resistant SSK cells equally to the action of cisplatin. There is a 1.8 to 2.5-fold increase in drug toxicity, depending on the activating agent. Enhancement of cisplatin sensitivity is induced by specific inhibition of cAMP hydrolysis, increase in cAMP formation or by increasing the activation potential to cAMP-dependent protein kinase by specific cAMP analogues. Cells that have lost cisplatin resistance respond to cGMP- or cAMP-elevating agents in the same way as the parental SSK cells. The radiation sensitivity is unchanged in all cell lines, even after activation of cAMP or cGMP. These results suggest that specific DNA repair pathways are altered by radiation but affected only in cisplatin damage repair, which is regulated by cGMP. Although there is ample cooperativity and interaction between the cAMP- and the cGMP-dependent transduction pathways, specific substrate binding by cGMP appears to play an important role in radiation-induced cisplatin resistance. PMID:7640207

  18. Nitric oxide-cyclic GMP signaling in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP (NO-cGMP) pathway mediates important physiological functions associated with various integrative body systems including the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Furthermore, NO regulates cell growth, survival, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation at the cellular level. To understand the significance of the NO-cGMP pathway in development and differentiation, studies have been conducted both in developing embryos and stem cells. Manipulation of the NO-cGMP pathway by employing activators and inhibitors as pharmacological probes and/or genetic manipulation of NO signaling components has implicated the involvement of this pathway in regulation of stem cell differentiation. This review will focus on some of the work pertaining to the role of NO-cGMP in differentiation of stem cells into cells of various lineages particularly into myocardial cells and stem cell based therapy. PMID:22019632

  19. Evidence that spontaneous contractile activity in the rat myometrium is not inhibited by NO-mediated increases in tissue levels of cyclic GMP

    PubMed Central

    Hennan, James K; Diamond, Jack

    1998-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence in the literature concerning the role of cyclic GMP in the regulation of myometrial contractility and the importance of hormonal status on the uterine response to cyclic GMP-elevating agents. The objective of the present study was to investigate further the importance of cyclic GMP in the control of uterine contractility, by monitoring the effects of cyclic GMP-elevating agents on spontaneous contractions and cyclic GMP levels in myometrial strips from pregnant rats and from ovariectomized rats under the influence of oestrogen and/or progesterone.Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) 5 mM, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) 100 nM, L-arginine 1 mM and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP 100 mM had no relaxant effect on the spontaneous contractions of myometria from pregnant rats or from ovariectomized rats under the influence of oestrogen or progesterone.Tissue levels of cyclic GMP were significantly elevated by SNP in all treatment groups, including pregnant animals. For example, in ovariectomized, progesterone-treated rats, SNP raised cyclic GMP levels approximately 8 fold from a basal level of 2.9±0.4 pmol mg−1 protein to 24.8±4.0 pmol mg−1 protein. ANP increased cyclic GMP levels approximately 2 fold in all treatment groups, except in the pregnant animals. L-Arginine elevated cyclic GMP significantly only in ovariectomized, vehicle-treated myometria.The activity of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) was significantly increased (3 fold) in myometria exposed to SNP (5 mM). Thus, the inability of SNP to relax uterine preparations was not due to a failure of SNP-elevated cyclic GMP to activate PKG.The more potent NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), at a concentration of 100 μM was able to inhibit spontaneous contractions significantly in myometrial preparations from both non-ovariectomized and ovariectomized rats treated with oestrogen or progesterone.Tissue levels of cyclic GMP were markedly increased by SNAP at

  20. Effect of atrial natriuretic factor and 8-bromo cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate on ( sup 3 H)acetylcholine outflow from myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle of the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Matusak, O.; Kuchel, O.; Hamet, P. )

    1991-04-01

    We report that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) inhibits electrically induced cholinergic twitches of longitudinal muscle in whole intestinal segments and myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle (MPLM) strips from the guinea pig ileum. To elucidate the possible presynaptic mechanism of ANF's action, we studied spontaneous and stimulation-evoked radiolabeled acetylcholine (ACh) outflow from MPLM after incubation with ({sup 3}H)choline. We developed a method of mounting and treating MPLM preparations, which allowed us, at the same time, to record isometric contractions and to determine ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow upon electrical stimulation by a train of three pulses. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8}M), norepinephrine (2 x 10{sup {minus} 7}) M and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (10{sup {minus} 3} M) in nearly equieffective concentrations caused a similar inhibition of cholinergic twitches. However, ANF had no effect on ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow, whereas norepinephrine was found to suppress ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cGMP to enhanced ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8} M) caused a 7.0-fold increase of cGMP over control values, predominantly in muscle layers, whereas Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin (12.5 U/ml) elicited a 35-fold increment of cGMP in the extramuscular layer. Thus, ANF is able to elevate cGMP in intestinal smooth muscle and to inhibit cholinergic contractions of MPLM. This inhibition is mimicked by exogenous cGMP and by endogenously generated cyclic nucleotides. We suggest that the depressive action of ANF on cholinergic contractions of MPLM is mediated via its postsynaptic impact implicating elevation of cGMP in smooth muscle.

  1. Cyclic gmp is a measure of physiologic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, K. A.; Singh, G. J.; Simpkins, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether patients who were critically ill evidenced elevated levels of blood cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels correlated with severity of illness as measured by the APACHE II severity of illness scoring system (p < 0.01). Cyclic guanosine monophosphate also correlated with the level of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) (p < 0.001). The correlation between cGMP and creatinine was p < 0.0001. Patients with end-stage disease (renal or liver) tended to have elevated levels of cGMP (p < 0.0001). We conclude that the induction of these two molecules may be linked in patients with increasing severity of illness. PMID:11491275

  2. Involvement of cyclic GMP and protein kinase G in the regulation of apoptosis and survival in neural cells.

    PubMed

    Fiscus, Ronald R

    2002-01-01

    Our current understanding of nitric oxide (NO), cyclic GMP (cGMP) and protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathways in the nervous systems has its origins in the early studies conducted on vascular tissues during the late 1970s and early to mid-1980s. The pioneering research into the NO/cGMP/PKG pathway in blood vessels conducted by the laboratories of Drs. Ferid Murad, Louis Ignarro and Robert Furchgott ultimately led to the awarding of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to these three scientists. On the basis of further pioneering studies by Drs. John Garthwaite, Solomon Snyder, Steven Vincent and many other neuroscientists during the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s, it became recognized that NO serves as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the central and peripheral nervous systems and that certain neural cells possess a cGMP signaling pathway similar to that in vascular smooth muscle cells. Although NO (at high concentrations) is toxic and thought to participate in neuronal cell death during stroke and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, HIV dementia and Parkinson's disease), recent evidence suggests that NO at low physiological concentrations can act as an antiapoptotic/prosurvival factor in certain neural cells (e.g. PC12 cells, motor neurons and neurons of dorsal root ganglia, hippocampus and sympathetic nerves). The antiapoptotic effects of NO are mediated, in part, by cGMP and a downstream target protein, PKG. Other cGMP-elevating factors (e.g. atrial and brain natriuretic peptides) and direct PKG activator (e.g. 8-bromo-cGMP) also have antiapoptotic effects which have been quantified by the new capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detector technology. Inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase and lowering of basal cGMP levels cause apoptosis in unstressed neural cells (NG108-15 and N1E-115 cells). The cGMP/PKG pathway appears to play an essential role in preventing activation

  3. Induction of differentiation in v-Ha-ras-transformed MDCK cells by prostaglandin E2 and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP is associated with a decrease in steady-state level of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y Y; Lin, M C

    1990-01-01

    We used Ha-ras-transformed Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as a model to study possible signal transduction mechanisms underlying the induction of glucagon responsiveness by the differentiation inducers prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 8-bromo-cyclic (8-Br-cAMP) AMP and the inhibition of induction by phorbol ester or a serum factor. The steady-state level of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) was higher in Ha-ras-transformed MDCK cells than in parental MDCK cells. In contrast, the steady-state level of intracellular cAMP of transformed cells was similar to that of normal cells. PGE2 and 8-Br-cAMP increased cAMP content but decreased IP3 levels in a concentration-dependent fashion after 5 days of treatment. We examined the time course for effects of PGE2 and 8-Br-cAMP and found that there was a lag period of 8 to 16 h between elevation of cAMP after the addition of 8-Br-cAMP or PGE2 and the decrease of IP3 levels. Another lag period of 2 days existed before the induction of differentiation. Both the reduction of IP3 levels and the induction of glucagon responsiveness were blocked by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or serum, suggesting that a decrease in the IP3 level might be causally involved in induction of differentiation in transformed MDCK cells. However, induction of differentiation was not due to changes in the expression or guanine nucleotide-binding properties of p21 protein. It is likely that cAMP has a direct regulatory effect on the phospholipid signaling pathway. We conclude that perturbation of the inositol phosphate signaling pathway may be responsible for the induction of differentiation by PGE2 and 8-Br-cAMP in transformed MDCK cells. Images PMID:2152966

  4. Cyclic GMP-dependent and cyclic GMP-independent actions of nitric oxide on the renal afferent arteriole

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Greg; Triggle, Chris R; O'Neill, Sean K; Loutzenhiser, Rodger

    1998-01-01

    The effects of exogenous NO and endothelial-derived NO (EDNO) on the afferent arteriole were investigated in the in vitro perfused hydronephrotic rat kidney. Vessels were pre-constricted with angiotensin II (0.1–0.3 nM) or KCl (30 mM). NO was infused directly into the renal artery at concentrations ranging from 30–9000 nM. ODQ (10, 30 μM) was administered to examine the effects of guanylyl cyclase inhibition. Kidneys were treated with ibuprofen (10 μM) to avoid actions of prostaglandins.During angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction, NO elicited vasodilation at concentrations of 30–900 nM (EC50=200 nM) and ODQ caused a 10 fold shift in NO-sensitivity (EC50 1600 nM). During KCl-induced vasoconstriction, NO elicited a maximal dilation of 82±9% at 9000 nM (EC50 2000 nM) and ODQ had no effect. Thus in the presence of ODQ, the NO concentration-response curves for KCl- and angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction were identical (P>0.2).To assess the possible role of cyclic GMP-independent mechanisms in the actions of EDNO, we compared the effects of L-NAME, ODQ and ODQ+L-NAME on acetylcholine-induced vasodilation. Angiotensin II reduced afferent arteriolar diameters from 16.7±0.5 to 8.1±0.8 microns and acetylcholine fully reversed this effect (16.9±0.5 microns). ODQ restored the angiotensin II response in the presence of acetylcholine (7.1±0.6 microns) and the subsequent addition of L-NAME had no further effect (6.8±0.7 microns). Similarly, L-NAME alone, fully reversed the actions of acetylcholine.Our findings indicate that exogenous NO is capable of eliciting renal afferent arteriolar vasodilation through both cyclic GMP-dependent and cyclic GMP-independent mechanisms. The cyclic GMP-independent action of NO did not require K+ channel activation, as it could be elicited in the presence of 30 mM KCl. Finally, although cyclic GMP-independent effects of exogenous NO could be demonstrated in our model, EDNO appears to act exclusively

  5. Preparation of stable sup 125 I cyclic GMP tyrosine methyl ester suitable for 3',5' cyclic GMP radioimmunoassay by HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.R.; Luttrell, M.; Giannella, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Determination of the concentration of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by radioimmunoassay (RIA) depends upon the availability of suitable radiolabeled tracers and antibody to detect the product. Reverse phase chromatographic techniques can easily separate the reaction products of chloramine-T iodination of succinyl cGMP tyrosine methyl ester. The binding characteristics of the iodination reaction products to anti-cGMP antibody have been determined. Purified succinyl cyclic nucleotide 125I-tyrosine methyl ester binds to cGMP antisera identically as commercially available tracer. The tracer is stable for greater than three months.

  6. Cyclic GMP-AMP Displays Mucosal Adjuvant Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Škrnjug, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity – a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines. PMID:25295996

  7. Correlation between organophosphate poisoning, acetylcholinesterase inhibition, and increased cyclic GMP levels in malathion-treated insects.

    PubMed

    Bodnaryk, R P

    1977-05-01

    Organophosphate poisoning with malathion caused large increases (up to 125 and 440%, respectively) in the level of cyclic GMP in larvae of Mamestra configurata Wlk. and in the fly Sarcophaga bullata Parker. Cyclic AMP was little affected. The malathion-induced increase in cyclic GMP was time and dose dependent. Time-course studies with the head and thorax of S. bullata demonstrated that the increase in cyclic GMP level occurred precipitously after a lag period of about 1 h, during which time the activity of acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) was progressively inhibited. The abrupt increase in cyclic GMP began when acetylcholinesterase activity had been inhibited to a sufficient extent to permit accumulation of acetylcholine. It is suggested that the accumulation of acetylcholine in the malathion-poisoned insects caused cyclic GMP levels to rise. Cyclic GMP may have a role in cholinergic transmission in normally functioning insect neural tissue. Increased levels of cyclic GMP induced by organophosphate and organocholorine (Bodnaryk, R. P. (1976) Can. J. Biochem. 54, 957-962) insecticides appear to be a vital and previously unrecognized biochemical lesion in insects poisoned by these compounds.

  8. Novel cyclic di-GMP effectors of the YajQ protein family control bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-qi; Caly, Delphine L; McCarthy, Yvonne; Murdoch, Sarah L; Ward, Joseph; Febrer, Melanie; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P

    2014-10-01

    Bis-(3',5') cyclic di-guanylate (cyclic di-GMP) is a key bacterial second messenger that is implicated in the regulation of many critical processes that include motility, biofilm formation and virulence. Cyclic di-GMP influences diverse functions through interaction with a range of effectors. Our knowledge of these effectors and their different regulatory actions is far from complete, however. Here we have used an affinity pull-down assay using cyclic di-GMP-coupled magnetic beads to identify cyclic di-GMP binding proteins in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). This analysis identified XC_3703, a protein of the YajQ family, as a potential cyclic di-GMP receptor. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the purified XC_3703 protein bound cyclic di-GMP with a high affinity (K(d)∼2 µM). Mutation of XC_3703 led to reduced virulence of Xcc to plants and alteration in biofilm formation. Yeast two-hybrid and far-western analyses showed that XC_3703 was able to interact with XC_2801, a transcription factor of the LysR family. Mutation of XC_2801 and XC_3703 had partially overlapping effects on the transcriptome of Xcc, and both affected virulence. Electromobility shift assays showed that XC_3703 positively affected the binding of XC_2801 to the promoters of target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by cyclic di-GMP. Genetic and functional analysis of YajQ family members from the human pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia showed that they also specifically bound cyclic di-GMP and contributed to virulence in model systems. The findings thus identify a new class of cyclic di-GMP effector that regulates bacterial virulence.

  9. Stimulation of phosphatidic acid of calcium influx and cyclic GMP synthesis in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ohsako, S; Deguchi, T

    1981-11-10

    Phosphatidic acid added to the medium markedly elevated intracellular cyclic GMP content in cultured neuroblastoma N1E 115 cells. There was a significant elevation of cyclic GMP with 1 micrograms/ml and a maximum (70-fold) elevation with 100 micrograms/ml of phosphatidic acid. Other natural phospholipids did not increase, or increased only slightly, the cyclic GMP content in the cells. The elevation of cyclic GMP content by phosphatidic acid was absolutely dependent on extracellular calcium. Phosphatidic acid stimulated the influx of calcium into neuroblastoma cells 2- to 5-fold. The pattern of the calcium influx induced by phosphatidic acid was comparable to that of cyclic GMP elevation. The stimulation of calcium influx by phosphatidic acid was also observed in cultured heart cells, indicating that phosphatidic acid acts as a calcium ionophore or opens a specific calcium-gate in a variety of cell membranes. Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with phospholipase C increased 32Pi labeling of phosphatidic acid, stimulated the influx of calcium, and elevated the cyclic GMP content in the cells. Thus exogenous as well as endogenous phosphatidic acid stimulates the translocation of calcium across cell membranes and, as a consequence, induces the synthesis of cyclic GMP in the neuroblastoma cells.

  10. Biofilms and Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Signaling: Lessons from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Martina

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) second messenger represents a signaling system that regulates many bacterial behaviors and is of key importance for driving the lifestyle switch between motile loner cells and biofilm formers. This review provides an up-to-date compendium of c-di-GMP pathways connected to biofilm formation, biofilm-associated motilities, and other functionalities in the ubiquitous and opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This bacterium is frequently adopted as a model organism to study bacterial biofilm formation. Importantly, its versatility and adaptation capabilities are linked with a broad range of complex regulatory networks, including a large set of genes involved in c-di-GMP biosynthesis, degradation, and transmission. PMID:27129226

  11. Biofilms and Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Signaling: Lessons from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Martina; Filloux, Alain

    2016-06-10

    The cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) second messenger represents a signaling system that regulates many bacterial behaviors and is of key importance for driving the lifestyle switch between motile loner cells and biofilm formers. This review provides an up-to-date compendium of c-di-GMP pathways connected to biofilm formation, biofilm-associated motilities, and other functionalities in the ubiquitous and opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa This bacterium is frequently adopted as a model organism to study bacterial biofilm formation. Importantly, its versatility and adaptation capabilities are linked with a broad range of complex regulatory networks, including a large set of genes involved in c-di-GMP biosynthesis, degradation, and transmission.

  12. Cyclic di-GMP: the First 25 Years of a Universal Bacterial Second Messenger

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Twenty-five years have passed since the discovery of cyclic dimeric (3′→5′) GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP). From the relative obscurity of an allosteric activator of a bacterial cellulose synthase, c-di-GMP has emerged as one of the most common and important bacterial second messengers. Cyclic di-GMP has been shown to regulate biofilm formation, motility, virulence, the cell cycle, differentiation, and other processes. Most c-di-GMP-dependent signaling pathways control the ability of bacteria to interact with abiotic surfaces or with other bacterial and eukaryotic cells. Cyclic di-GMP plays key roles in lifestyle changes of many bacteria, including transition from the motile to the sessile state, which aids in the establishment of multicellular biofilm communities, and from the virulent state in acute infections to the less virulent but more resilient state characteristic of chronic infectious diseases. From a practical standpoint, modulating c-di-GMP signaling pathways in bacteria could represent a new way of controlling formation and dispersal of biofilms in medical and industrial settings. Cyclic di-GMP participates in interkingdom signaling. It is recognized by mammalian immune systems as a uniquely bacterial molecule and therefore is considered a promising vaccine adjuvant. The purpose of this review is not to overview the whole body of data in the burgeoning field of c-di-GMP-dependent signaling. Instead, we provide a historic perspective on the development of the field, emphasize common trends, and illustrate them with the best available examples. We also identify unresolved questions and highlight new directions in c-di-GMP research that will give us a deeper understanding of this truly universal bacterial second messenger. PMID:23471616

  13. Structure of STING bound to cyclic di-GMP reveals the mechanism of cyclic dinucleotide recognition by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Watts, Tylan; Kao, C Cheng; Li, Pingwei

    2012-06-24

    STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is an innate immune sensor of cyclic dinucleotides that regulates the induction of type I interferons. STING's C-terminal domain forms a V-shaped dimer and binds a cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) at the dimer interface by both direct and solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds. Guanines of c-di-GMP stack against the phenolic rings of a conserved tyrosine, and mutations at the c-di-GMP binding surface reduce nucleotide binding and affect signaling.

  14. NO, nitrotyrosine, and cyclic GMP in signal transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanafy, K. A.; Krumenacker, J. S.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in biology has evolved from being recognized as an environmental pollutant to an endogenously produced substance involved in cell communication and signal transduction. NO is produced by a family of enzymes called nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), which can be stimulated by a variety of factors that mediate responses to various stimuli. NO can initiate its biological effects through activation of the heterodimeric enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), or through several other chemical reactions. Activation of sGC results in the production of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), an intracellular second messenger signaling molecule, which can subsequently mediate such diverse physiological events such as vasodilatation and immunomodulation. Chemically reactive NO can affect physiological changes through modifications to cellular proteins, one of which is tyrosine nitration. The demonstration that NO is involved in so many biological pathways indicates the importance of this endogenously produced substance, and suggests that there is much more to be discovered about its role in biology in years to come.

  15. Targeting cyclic di-GMP signalling: a strategy to control biofilm formation?

    PubMed

    Caly, Delphine L; Bellini, Domenico; Walsh, Martin A; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a second messenger found in almost all eubacteria that acts to regulate a wide range of functions including developmental transitions, adhesion and biofilm formation. Cyclic di-GMP is synthesised from two GTP molecules by diguanylate cyclases that have a GGDEF domain and is degraded by phosphodiesterases with either an EAL or an HD-GYP domain. Proteins with these domains often contain additional signal input domains, suggesting that their enzymatic activity may be modulated as a response to different environmental or cellular cues. Cyclic di-GMP exerts a regulatory action through binding to diverse receptors that include a small protein domain called PilZ, enzymatically inactive GGDEF, EAL or HD-GYP domains, transcription factors and riboswitches. In many bacteria, high cellular levels of cyclic di-GMP are associated with a sessile, biofilm lifestyle, whereas low levels of the nucleotide promote motility and virulence factor synthesis in pathogens. Elucidation of the roles of cyclic di-GMP signalling in biofilm formation has suggested strategies whereby modulation of the levels of the nucleotide or interference with signalling pathways may lead to inhibition of biofilm formation or promotion of biofilm dispersal. In this review we consider these approaches for the control of biofilm formation, beginning with an overview of cyclic di-GMP signalling and the different ways that it can act in regulation of biofilm dynamics.

  16. Ca sup 2+ current is regulated by cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase in mammalian cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mery, P-F.; Fischmeister, R. ); Lohmann, S.M.; Walter, U. )

    1991-02-15

    Regulation of cardiac contraction by neurotransmitters and hormones is often correlated with regulation of the L-type Ca{sup 2+}-channel current (I{sub Ca}) through the opposite actions for two second messengers, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. While cyclic AMP stimulation of I{sub Ca} is mediated by the activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, inhibition of I{sub Ca} by cyclic GMP in frog heart is largely mediated by activation of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. The present patch-clamp study reveals that, in rat ventricular cells, cyclic GMP can also regulate I{sub Ca} via activation of endogenous cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (cGMP-PK). Indeed, the effect of cyclic GMP on I{sub Ca} was mimicked by intracellular perfusion with the proteolytic active fragment of purified cGMP-PK. Moreover, cGMP-PK immunoreactivity was detected in pure rat ventricular myocytes by using a specific polyclonal antibody. These results demonstrate a dual mechanism for the inhibitory action of cyclic GMP in heart, as well as a physiological role for cGMP-PK in the control of mammalian heart function.

  17. A new role for a classical gene: white transports cyclic GMP.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jennifer M; Day, Jonathan P; Cabrero, Pablo; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-Anne

    2008-03-01

    Guanosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) are important regulators of cell and tissue function. However, cGMP and cAMP transport have received relatively limited attention, especially in model organisms where such studies can be conducted in vivo. The Drosophila Malpighian (renal) tubule transports cGMP and cAMP and utilises these as signalling molecules. We show here via substrate competition and drug inhibition studies that cAMP transport - but not cGMP transport - requires the presence of di- or tri-carboxylates; and that transport of both cyclic nucleotides occurs via ATP binding cassette sub-family G2 (ABCG2), but not via ABC sub-family C (ABCC), transporters. In Drosophila, the white (w) gene is known for the classic eye colour mutation. However, gene expression data show that of all adult tissues, w is most highly expressed in Malpighian tubules. Furthermore, as White is a member of the ABCG2 transporter class, it is a potential candidate for a tubule cGMP transporter. Assay of cGMP transport in w(-) (mutant) tubules shows that w is required for cGMP transport but not cAMP transport. Targeted over-expression of w in w(-) tubule principal cells significantly increases cGMP transport compared with that in w(-) controls. Conversely, treatment of wild-type tubules with cGMP increases w mRNA expression levels, implying that cGMP is a physiologically relevant substrate for White. Immunocytochemical localisation reveals that White is expressed in intracellular vesicles in tubule principal cells, suggesting that White participates in vesicular transepithelial transport of cGMP. PMID:18310115

  18. Occurrence of Cyclic di-GMP-Modulating Output Domains in Cyanobacteria: an Illuminating Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, Marco; Koestler, Benjamin J.; Waters, Christopher M.; Williams, Barry L.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microorganisms use a variety of metabolites to respond to external stimuli, including second messengers that amplify primary signals and elicit biochemical changes in a cell. Levels of the second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) are regulated by a variety of environmental stimuli and play a critical role in regulating cellular processes such as biofilm formation and cellular motility. Cyclic di-GMP signaling systems have been largely characterized in pathogenic bacteria; however, proteins that can impact the synthesis or degradation of c-di-GMP are prominent in cyanobacterial species and yet remain largely underexplored. In cyanobacteria, many putative c-di-GMP synthesis or degradation domains are found in genes that also harbor light-responsive signal input domains, suggesting that light is an important signal for altering c-di-GMP homeostasis. Indeed, c-di-GMP-associated domains are often the second most common output domain in photoreceptors—outnumbered only by a histidine kinase output domain. Cyanobacteria differ from other bacteria regarding the number and types of photoreceptor domains associated with c-di-GMP domains. Due to the widespread distribution of c-di-GMP domains in cyanobacteria, we investigated the evolutionary origin of a subset of genes. Phylogenetic analyses showed that c-di-GMP signaling systems were present early in cyanobacteria and c-di-GMP genes were both vertically and horizontally inherited during their evolution. Finally, we compared intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in two cyanobacterial species under different light qualities, confirming that light is an important factor for regulating this second messenger in vivo. PMID:23943760

  19. Cyclic Di-GMP Riboswitch-Regulated Type IV Pili Contribute to Aggregation of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Eric; Purcell, Erin B.; Lafontaine, Daniel A.; Fortier, Louis-Charles; Tamayo, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium that causes intestinal infections with symptoms ranging from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that typically regulates the switch from motile, free-living to sessile and multicellular behaviors in Gram-negative bacteria. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP concentration in C. difficile was recently shown to reduce flagellar motility and to increase cell aggregation. In this work, we investigated the role of the primary type IV pilus (T4P) locus in c-di-GMP-dependent cell aggregation. Inactivation of two T4P genes, pilA1 (CD3513) and pilB1 (CD3512), abolished pilus formation and significantly reduced cell aggregation under high c-di-GMP conditions. pilA1 is preceded by a putative c-di-GMP riboswitch, predicted to be transcriptionally active upon c-di-GMP binding. Consistent with our prediction, high intracellular c-di-GMP concentration increased transcript levels of T4P genes. In addition, single-round in vitro transcription assays confirmed that transcription downstream of the predicted transcription terminator was dose dependent and specific to c-di-GMP binding to the riboswitch aptamer. These results support a model in which T4P gene transcription is upregulated by c-di-GMP as a result of its binding to an upstream transcriptionally activating riboswitch, promoting cell aggregation in C. difficile. PMID:25512308

  20. Cyclic di-GMP riboswitch-regulated type IV pili contribute to aggregation of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Eric; Purcell, Erin B; Lafontaine, Daniel A; Fortier, Louis-Charles; Tamayo, Rita; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium that causes intestinal infections with symptoms ranging from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that typically regulates the switch from motile, free-living to sessile and multicellular behaviors in Gram-negative bacteria. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP concentration in C. difficile was recently shown to reduce flagellar motility and to increase cell aggregation. In this work, we investigated the role of the primary type IV pilus (T4P) locus in c-di-GMP-dependent cell aggregation. Inactivation of two T4P genes, pilA1 (CD3513) and pilB1 (CD3512), abolished pilus formation and significantly reduced cell aggregation under high c-di-GMP conditions. pilA1 is preceded by a putative c-di-GMP riboswitch, predicted to be transcriptionally active upon c-di-GMP binding. Consistent with our prediction, high intracellular c-di-GMP concentration increased transcript levels of T4P genes. In addition, single-round in vitro transcription assays confirmed that transcription downstream of the predicted transcription terminator was dose dependent and specific to c-di-GMP binding to the riboswitch aptamer. These results support a model in which T4P gene transcription is upregulated by c-di-GMP as a result of its binding to an upstream transcriptionally activating riboswitch, promoting cell aggregation in C. difficile.

  1. Stimulation of innate immunity by in vivo cyclic di-GMP synthesis using adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Seregin, Sergey S; Rastall, David P W; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-11-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) stimulates inflammation by initiating innate immune cell recruitment and triggering the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. These properties make c-di-GMP a promising candidate for use as a vaccine adjuvant, and numerous studies have demonstrated that administration of purified c-di-GMP with different antigens increases protection against infection in animal models. Here, we have developed a novel approach to produce c-di-GMP inside host cells as an adjuvant to exploit a host-pathogen interaction and initiate an innate immune response. We have demonstrated that c-di-GMP can be synthesized in vivo by transducing a diguanylate cyclase (DGC) gene into mammalian cells using an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector. Expression of DGC led to the production of c-di-GMP in vitro and in vivo, and this was able to alter proinflammatory gene expression in murine tissues and increase the secretion of numerous cytokines and chemokines when administered to animals. Furthermore, coexpression of DGC modestly increased T-cell responses to a Clostridium difficile antigen expressed from an adenovirus vaccine, although no significant differences in antibody titers were observed. This adenovirus c-di-GMP delivery system offers a novel method to administer c-di-GMP as an adjuvant to stimulate innate immunity during vaccination.

  2. Application of Synthetic Peptide Arrays To Uncover Cyclic Di-GMP Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Düvel, Juliane; Bense, Sarina; Möller, Stefan; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwede, Frank; Morr, Michael; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Jänsch, Lothar; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Frank, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High levels of the universal bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) promote the establishment of surface-attached growth in many bacteria. Not only can c-di-GMP bind to nucleic acids and directly control gene expression, but it also binds to a diverse array of proteins of specialized functions and orchestrates their activity. Since its development in the early 1990s, the synthetic peptide array technique has become a powerful tool for high-throughput approaches and was successfully applied to investigate the binding specificity of protein-ligand interactions. In this study, we used peptide arrays to uncover the c-di-GMP binding site of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein (PA3740) that was isolated in a chemical proteomics approach. PA3740 was shown to bind c-di-GMP with a high affinity, and peptide arrays uncovered LKKALKKQTNLR to be a putative c-di-GMP binding motif. Most interestingly, different from the previously identified c-di-GMP binding motif of the PilZ domain (RXXXR) or the I site of diguanylate cyclases (RXXD), two leucine residues and a glutamine residue and not the charged amino acids provided the key residues of the binding sequence. Those three amino acids are highly conserved across PA3740 homologs, and their singular exchange to alanine reduced c-di-GMP binding within the full-length protein. IMPORTANCE In many bacterial pathogens the universal bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP governs the switch from the planktonic, motile mode of growth to the sessile, biofilm mode of growth. Bacteria adapt their intracellular c-di-GMP levels to a variety of environmental challenges. Several classes of c-di-GMP binding proteins have been structurally characterized, and diverse c-di-GMP binding domains have been identified. Nevertheless, for several c-di-GMP receptors, the binding motif remains to be determined. Here we show that the use of a synthetic peptide array allowed the identification of a c-di-GMP binding motif of a putative c-di-GMP

  3. Secreted Cyclic Di-GMP Induces Stalk Cell Differentiation in the Eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-hui

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is currently recognized as the most widely used intracellular signal molecule in prokaryotes, but roles in eukaryotes were only recently discovered. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, c-di-GMP, produced by a prokaryote-type diguanylate cyclase, induces the differentiation of stalk cells, thereby enabling the formation of spore-bearing fruiting bodies. In this review, we summarize the currently known mechanisms that control the major life cycle transitions of Dictyostelium and focus particularly on the role of c-di-GMP in stalk formation. Stalk cell differentiation has characteristics of autophagic cell death, a process that also occurs in higher eukaryotes. We discuss the respective roles of c-di-GMP and of another signal molecule, differentiation-inducing factor 1, in autophagic cell death in vitro and in stalk formation in vivo. PMID:26013485

  4. Secreted Cyclic Di-GMP Induces Stalk Cell Differentiation in the Eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-hui; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is currently recognized as the most widely used intracellular signal molecule in prokaryotes, but roles in eukaryotes were only recently discovered. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, c-di-GMP, produced by a prokaryote-type diguanylate cyclase, induces the differentiation of stalk cells, thereby enabling the formation of spore-bearing fruiting bodies. In this review, we summarize the currently known mechanisms that control the major life cycle transitions of Dictyostelium and focus particularly on the role of c-di-GMP in stalk formation. Stalk cell differentiation has characteristics of autophagic cell death, a process that also occurs in higher eukaryotes. We discuss the respective roles of c-di-GMP and of another signal molecule, differentiation-inducing factor 1, in autophagic cell death in vitro and in stalk formation in vivo. PMID:26013485

  5. Secreted Cyclic Di-GMP Induces Stalk Cell Differentiation in the Eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-hui; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is currently recognized as the most widely used intracellular signal molecule in prokaryotes, but roles in eukaryotes were only recently discovered. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, c-di-GMP, produced by a prokaryote-type diguanylate cyclase, induces the differentiation of stalk cells, thereby enabling the formation of spore-bearing fruiting bodies. In this review, we summarize the currently known mechanisms that control the major life cycle transitions of Dictyostelium and focus particularly on the role of c-di-GMP in stalk formation. Stalk cell differentiation has characteristics of autophagic cell death, a process that also occurs in higher eukaryotes. We discuss the respective roles of c-di-GMP and of another signal molecule, differentiation-inducing factor 1, in autophagic cell death in vitro and in stalk formation in vivo.

  6. Role of soluble guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP signaling in tumor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Sharin, Vladislav G.; Martin, Emil; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Sloan, Courtney; Nikonoff, Lubov E.; Kots, Alexander Y; Murad, Ferid

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrate a differential expression of nitric oxide (NO) signaling components in ES cells and our recent study demonstrated an enhanced differentiation of ES cells into myocardial cells with NO donors and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activators. Since NO-cGMP pathway exhibits a diverse role in cancer, we were interested in evaluating the role of the NO receptor sGC and other components of the pathway in regulation of the tumor cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate a differential expression of the sGC subunits, NOS-1 and PKG mRNA and protein levels in various human cancer models. In contrast to sGCα1, robust levels of sGC β1 were observed in OVCAR-3 (ovarian) and MDA-MB-468 (breast) cancer cells which correlated well with the sGC activity and a marked increase in cGMP levels upon exposure to the combination of a NO donor and a sGC activator. NOC-18 (DETA NONOate; NO donor), BAY41-2272 (3-(4-Amino-5-cyclopropylpyrimidin-2-yl)-1-(2-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine); sGC activator), NOC-18+BAY41-2272, IBMX (3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine; phosphodiesterase inhibitor) and 8-bromo-cGMP (cGMP analog) caused growth inhibition and apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in growth inhibition, we evaluated the effect of activators/inhibitors on ERK phosphorylation. Our studies indicate that BAY41-2272 or the combination NOC18+BAY41-2272 caused inhibition of the basal ERK1/2 phosphorylation in OVCAR-3 (high sGC activity), SK-OV-3 and SK-Br-3 (low sGC activity) cell lines and in some cases the inhibition was rescued by the sGC inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one). These studies suggest that the effects of activators/inhibitors of NO-sGC-cGMP in tumor cell proliferation is mediated by both cGMP-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:19948239

  7. Intercellular signaling via cyclic GMP diffusion through gap junctions restarts meiosis in mouse ovarian follicles

    PubMed Central

    Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Egbert, Jeremy R.; Norris, Rachael P.; Lampe, Paul D.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Feil, Robert; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis in mammalian oocytes is paused until luteinizing hormone (LH) activates receptors in the mural granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle. Prior work has established the central role of cyclic GMP (cGMP) from the granulosa cells in maintaining meiotic arrest, but it is not clear how binding of LH to receptors that are located up to 10 cell layers away from the oocyte lowers oocyte cGMP and restarts meiosis. Here, by visualizing intercellular trafficking of cGMP in real-time in live follicles from mice expressing a FRET sensor, we show that diffusion of cGMP through gap junctions is responsible not only for maintaining meiotic arrest, but also for rapid transmission of the signal that reinitiates meiosis from the follicle surface to the oocyte. Before LH exposure, the cGMP concentration throughout the follicle is at a uniformly high level of ∼2–4 μM. Then, within 1 min of LH application, cGMP begins to decrease in the peripheral granulosa cells. As a consequence, cGMP from the oocyte diffuses into the sink provided by the large granulosa cell volume, such that by 20 min the cGMP concentration in the follicle is uniformly low, ∼100 nM. The decrease in cGMP in the oocyte relieves the inhibition of the meiotic cell cycle. This direct demonstration that a physiological signal initiated by a stimulus in one region of an intact tissue can travel across many layers of cells via cyclic nucleotide diffusion through gap junctions could provide a general mechanism for diverse cellular processes. PMID:25775542

  8. Intercellular signaling via cyclic GMP diffusion through gap junctions restarts meiosis in mouse ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Shuhaibar, Leia C; Egbert, Jeremy R; Norris, Rachael P; Lampe, Paul D; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Feil, Robert; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2015-04-28

    Meiosis in mammalian oocytes is paused until luteinizing hormone (LH) activates receptors in the mural granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle. Prior work has established the central role of cyclic GMP (cGMP) from the granulosa cells in maintaining meiotic arrest, but it is not clear how binding of LH to receptors that are located up to 10 cell layers away from the oocyte lowers oocyte cGMP and restarts meiosis. Here, by visualizing intercellular trafficking of cGMP in real-time in live follicles from mice expressing a FRET sensor, we show that diffusion of cGMP through gap junctions is responsible not only for maintaining meiotic arrest, but also for rapid transmission of the signal that reinitiates meiosis from the follicle surface to the oocyte. Before LH exposure, the cGMP concentration throughout the follicle is at a uniformly high level of ∼2-4 μM. Then, within 1 min of LH application, cGMP begins to decrease in the peripheral granulosa cells. As a consequence, cGMP from the oocyte diffuses into the sink provided by the large granulosa cell volume, such that by 20 min the cGMP concentration in the follicle is uniformly low, ∼100 nM. The decrease in cGMP in the oocyte relieves the inhibition of the meiotic cell cycle. This direct demonstration that a physiological signal initiated by a stimulus in one region of an intact tissue can travel across many layers of cells via cyclic nucleotide diffusion through gap junctions could provide a general mechanism for diverse cellular processes.

  9. Clinical relevance of cyclic GMP modulators: A translational success story of network pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Oettrich, J M; Dao, V T; Frijhoff, J; Kleikers, Pwm; Casas, A I; Hobbs, A J; Schmidt, H H H W

    2016-04-01

    Therapies that modulate cyclic guanosine-3'-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) have emerged as one of the most successful areas in recent drug discovery and clinical pharmacology. Historically, their focus has been on cardiovascular disease phenotypes; however, cGMP's relevance is likely to go beyond this rather limited organ-based set of indications. Moreover, the multitude of targets and their apparent interchangeability is a proof-of-concept of network pharmacology.

  10. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity.

    PubMed

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie W C; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease.

  11. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity

    PubMed Central

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie WC; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease. PMID:24874800

  12. Interactions between the subunits of transducin and cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase in Rana catesbiana rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, A; Hayashi, F; Tatsumi, M; Bitensky, M W; George, J S

    1990-07-15

    In bullfrog (Rana catesbiana) rods the activity of cyclic GMP (cGMP) phosphodiesterase was stimulated 10 times by washing disc membranes with an isotonic, GTP-containing buffer. This stimulation was maintained following hydrolysis of GTP and after removal of guanine nucleotides. At least 60-70% of the inhibitory gamma subunit of cGMP phosphodiesterase (P gamma) was physically released from membranes by these washing procedures. When cGMP phosphodiesterase was activated by a hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogue, P gamma was found in the supernatant complexed with the transducin alpha subunit (T alpha) using three chromatography systems. When GTP was used to activate cGMP phosphodiesterase, P gamma was also found in the supernatant complexed with GDP.T alpha. This complex was also isolated using the same three chromatography systems, indicating that P gamma remained tightly bound to T alpha even after bound GTP was hydrolyzed. Interaction with the beta,gamma subunits of transducin, which remained associated with disc membranes, was required for the release of P gamma from the GDP.T alpha complex, which resulted in the deactivation of active cGMP phosphodiesterase. We conclude that during activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase, P gamma is complexed with T alpha (both GTP and GDP forms) in the supernatant and that, following GTP hydrolysis, beta,gamma subunits of transducin are necessary for the release of P gamma from the complex and the resulting inactivation of cGMP phosphodiesterase in frog photoreceptors. PMID:2164007

  13. The cyclic-di-GMP signaling pathway in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Novak, Elizabeth A; Sultan, Syed Z; Motaleb, Md A

    2014-01-01

    In nature, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi cycles between the unrelated environments of the Ixodes tick vector and mammalian host. In order to survive transmission between hosts, B. burgdorferi must be able to not only detect changes in its environment, but also rapidly and appropriately respond to these changes. One manner in which this obligate parasite regulates and adapts to its changing environment is through cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. c-di-GMP has been shown to be instrumental in orchestrating the adaptation of B. burgdorferi to the tick environment. B. burgdorferi possesses only one set of c-di-GMP-metabolizing genes (one diguanylate cyclase and two distinct phosphodiesterases) and one c-di-GMP-binding PilZ-domain protein designated as PlzA. While studies in the realm of c-di-GMP signaling in B. burgdorferi have exploded in the last few years, there are still many more questions than answers. Elucidation of the importance of c-di-GMP signaling to B. burgdorferi may lead to the identification of mechanisms that are critical for the survival of B. burgdorferi in the tick phase of the enzootic cycle as well as potentially delineate a role (if any) c-di-GMP may play in the transmission and virulence of B. burgdorferi during the enzootic cycle, thereby enabling the development of effective drugs for the prevention and/or treatment of Lyme disease.

  14. Interaction of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, melatonin, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in the control of melanogenesis in hair follicle melanocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, B; Logan, A

    1981-07-01

    In short-term (48 h) cultures of hair follicles alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and cyclic AMP stimulated melanogenesis through an increase in tyrosinase activity. In contrast cyclic GMP mimicked the effects of melatonin by inhibiting melanin production without causing a concomitant decrease in tyrosinase activity. Both cyclic GMP and melatonin blocked the stimulatory effects of cyclic AMP and alpha-MSH on melanin production but they left the increased levels of tyrosinase activity unaffected. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (3-isobutyl-1--methylxanthine and papaverine) simultaneously stimulated tyrosinase activity and inhibited melanin production, presumably by allowing endogenous cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP to accumulate intracellularly. It is suggested that whereas MSH stimulates melanogenesis through a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism there must also be an inhibitory cyclic GMP-dependent mechanism, perhaps activated by melatonin, which operates at some post-tyrosinase step in the melanin biosynthetic pathway. PMID:6267154

  15. An Extended Cyclic Di-GMP Network in the Predatory Bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Or; Nesper, Jutta; Borovok, Ilya; Gorovits, Rena; Kolot, Mikhail; Pasternak, Zohar; Shin, Irina; Glatter, Timo; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Jenal, Urs

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the course of the last 3 decades the role of the second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a master regulator of bacterial physiology was determined. Although the control over c-di-GMP levels via synthesis and breakdown and the allosteric regulation of c-di-GMP over receptor proteins (effectors) and riboswitches have been extensively studied, relatively few effectors have been identified and most are of unknown functions. The obligate predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus has a peculiar dimorphic life cycle, in which a phenotypic transition from a free-living attack phase (AP) to a sessile, intracellular predatory growth phase (GP) is tightly regulated by specific c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclases. B. bacteriovorus also bears one of the largest complement of defined effectors, almost none of known functions, suggesting that additional proteins may be involved in c-di-GMP signaling. In order to uncover novel c-di-GMP effectors, a c-di-GMP capture-compound mass-spectroscopy experiment was performed on wild-type AP and host-independent (HI) mutant cultures, the latter serving as a proxy for wild-type GP cells. Eighty-four proteins were identified as candidate c-di-GMP binders. Of these proteins, 65 did not include any recognized c-di-GMP binding site, and 3 carried known unorthodox binding sites. Putative functions could be assigned to 59 proteins. These proteins are included in metabolic pathways, regulatory circuits, cell transport, and motility, thereby creating a potentially large c-di-GMP network. False candidate effectors may include members of protein complexes, as well as proteins binding nucleotides or other cofactors that were, respectively, carried over or unspecifically interacted with the capture compound during the pulldown. Of the 84 candidates, 62 were found to specifically bind the c-di-GMP capture compound in AP or in HI cultures, suggesting c-di-GMP control over the whole-cell cycle of the bacterium. High affinity and

  16. Cyclic Di-GMP Regulates Type IV Pilus-Dependent Motility in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Skotnicka, Dorota; Petters, Tobias; Heering, Jan; Hoppert, Michael; Kaever, Volkhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleotide-based second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is involved in regulating a plethora of processes in bacteria that are typically associated with lifestyle changes. Myxococcus xanthus undergoes major lifestyle changes in response to nutrient availability, with the formation of spreading colonies in the presence of nutrients and spore-filled fruiting bodies in the absence of nutrients. Here, we investigated the function of c-di-GMP in M. xanthus and show that this bacterium synthesizes c-di-GMP during growth. Manipulation of the c-di-GMP level by expression of either an active, heterologous diguanylate cyclase or an active, heterologous phosphodiesterase correlated with defects in type IV pilus (T4P)-dependent motility, whereas gliding motility was unaffected. An increased level of c-di-GMP correlated with reduced transcription of the pilA gene (which encodes the major pilin of T4P), reduced the assembly of T4P, and altered cell agglutination, whereas a decreased c-di-GMP level correlated with altered cell agglutination. The systematic inactivation of the 24 genes in M. xanthus encoding proteins containing GGDEF, EAL, or HD-GYP domains, which are associated with c-di-GMP synthesis, degradation, or binding, identified three genes encoding proteins important for T4P-dependent motility, whereas all mutants had normal gliding motility. Purified DmxA had diguanylate cyclase activity, whereas the hybrid histidine protein kinases TmoK and SgmT, each of which contains a GGDEF domain, did not have diguanylate cyclase activity. These results demonstrate that c-di-GMP is important for T4P-dependent motility in M. xanthus. IMPORTANCE We provide the first direct evidence that M. xanthus synthesizes c-di-GMP and demonstrate that c-di-GMP is important for T4P-dependent motility, whereas we did not obtain evidence that c-di-GMP regulates gliding motility. The data presented uncovered a novel mechanism for regulation of T4P

  17. Modulation by cyclic GMP of the odour sensitivity of vertebrate olfactory receptor cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leinders-Zufall, T.; Shepherd, G. M.; Zufall, F.

    1996-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated a significant role for the cGMP second messenger system in vertebrate olfactory transduction but no clear functions have been identified for cGMP so far. Here, we have examined the effects of 8-Br-cGMP and carbon monoxide (CO) on odour responses of salamander olfactory receptor neurons using perforated patch recordings. We report that 8-Br-cGMP strongly down-regulates the odour sensitivity of the cells, with a K1/2 of 460 nM. This adaptation-like effect can be mimicked by CO, an activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, with a K1/2 of 1 microM. Sensitivity modulation is achieved through a regulatory chain of events in which cGMP stimulates a persistent background current due to the activation of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. This in turn leads to sustained Ca2+ entry providing a negative feedback signal. One consequence of the Ca2+ entry is a shift to the right of the stimulus-response curve and a reduction in saturating odour currents. Together, these two effects can reduce the sensory generator current by up to twenty-fold. Thus, cGMP functions to control the gain of the G-protein coupled cAMP pathway. Another consequence of the action of cGMP is a marked prolongation of the odour response kinetics. The effects of CO/cGMP are long-lasting and can continue for minutes. Hence, we propose that cGMP helps to prevent saturation of the cell's response by adjusting the operational range of the cAMP cascade and contributes to olfactory adaptation by decreasing the sensitivity of olfactory receptor cells to repeated odour stimuli.

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using {sup 125}I-ANP{sub 8-33}. Specific {sup 125}I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP.

  19. Both cyclic-AMP and cyclic-GMP can act as regulators of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2013-09-01

    Cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP) are important signaling molecules that control a range of cellular functions and modulate different reactions. It is known that under abiotic or biotic stress plant cells synthesize these nucleotides and that they also enhance the activity of the phenylpropanoid pathway. Wondering what is the relation between these two facts, we investigated how the exogenously applied membrane-permeable derivatives, 8-Br-cAMP or 8-Br-cGMP, which are believed to act as the original cyclic nucleotides, affect the expression of the genes for and the specific activity of three enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We found that the expression of the genes of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL2), 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL1) and chalcone synthase (CHS), and the specific activities of PAL (EC 4.3.1.5), 4CL (EC 6.2.1.12) and CHS (EC 2.3.1.74) were induced in the same way by either of these cyclic nucleotides used at 5 μM concentration. None of the possible cAMP and cGMP degradation products (AMP, GMP, adenosine or guanosine) evoked such effects. Expression of PAL1, 4CL2 and 4CL3 were practically not affected. Although the investigated nucleotides induced rapid expression of the aforementioned enzymes, they did not affect the level of anthocyanins within the same period. We discuss the effects exerted by the exogenously administered cyclic nucleotides, their relation with stress and the role which the phenylpropanoid pathways the cyclic nucleotides may play in plants.

  20. Bacterial Signal Transduction by Cyclic Di-GMP and Other Nucleotide Second Messengers.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Regine; Gründling, Angelika; Jenal, Urs; Ryan, Robert; Yildiz, Fitnat

    2016-01-01

    The first International Symposium on c-Di-GMP Signaling in Bacteria (22 to 25 March 2015, Harnack-Haus, Berlin, Germany)brought together 131 molecular microbiologists from 17 countries to discuss recent progress in our knowledge of bacterial nucleotide second messenger signaling. While the focus was on signal input, synthesis, degradation, and the striking diversity of the modes of action of the current second messenger paradigm, i.e., cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), “classics” like cAMP and (p)ppGpp were also presented, in novel facets, and more recent “newcomers,” such as c-di-AMP and c-AMP-GMP, made an impressive appearance. A number of clear trends emerged during the 30 talks, on the 71 posters, and in the lively discussions, including (i)c-di-GMP control of the activities of various ATPases and phosphorylation cascades, (ii) extensive cross talk between c-di-GMP and other nucleotide second messenger signaling pathways, and (iii) a stunning number of novel effectors for nucleotide second messengers that surprisingly include some long-known master regulators of developmental pathways. Overall, the conference made it amply clear that second messenger signaling is currently one of the most dynamic fields within molecular microbiology,with major impacts in research fields ranging from human health to microbial ecology. PMID:26055111

  1. Cyclic-di-GMP signalling regulates motility and biofilm formation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Federico; Ha, Dae-Gon; O'Toole, George A.; Hozbor, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The signalling molecule bis-(3′–5′)-cyclic-dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of diverse cellular functions, including motility, biofilm formation, cell cycle progression and virulence, in bacteria. Multiple diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase-domain-containing proteins (GGDEF and EAL/HD-GYP, respectively) modulate the levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP to transmit signals and obtain such specific cellular responses. In the genus Bordetella this c-di-GMP network is poorly studied. In this work, we evaluated the expression of two phenotypes in Bordetella bronchiseptica regulated by c-di-GMP, biofilm formation and motility, under the influence of ectopic expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins with EAL or GGDEF domains that regulates the c-di-GMP level. In agreement with previous reports for other bacteria, we observed that B. bronchiseptica is able to form biofilm and reduce its motility only when GGDEF domain protein is expressed. Moreover we identify a GGDEF domain protein (BB3576) with diguanylate cyclase activity that participates in motility and biofilm regulation in B. bronchiseptica. These results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, the presence of c-di-GMP regulatory signalling in B. bronchiseptica. PMID:23475948

  2. The Nitric Oxide/Cyclic GMP Pathway in Organ Transplantation: Critical Role in Successful Lung Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, David J.; Naka, Yoshifumi; Chowdhury, Nepal C.; Liao, Hui; Oz, Mehmet C.; Michler, Robert E.; Kubaszewski, Eugeniusz; Malinski, Tadeusz; Stern, David M.

    1994-12-01

    Reestablishment of vascular homeostasis following ex vivo preservation is a critical determinant of successful organ transplantation. Because the nitric oxide (NO) pathway modulates pulmonary vascular tone and leukocyte/endothelial interactions, we hypothesized that reactive oxygen intermediates would lead to decreased NO (and hence cGMP) levels following pulmonary reperfusion, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and leukostasis. Using an orthotopic rat model of lung transplantation, a porphyrinic microsensor was used to make direct in vivo measurements of pulmonary NO. NO levels measured at the surface of the transplanted lung plummeted immediately upon reperfusion, with levels moderately increased by topical application of superoxide dismutase. Because cGMP levels declined in preserved lungs after reperfusion, this led us to buttress the NO pathway by adding a membrane-permeant cGMP analog to the preservation solution. Compared with grafts stored in its absence, grafts stored with supplemental 8-Br-cGMP and evaluated 30 min after reperfusion demonstrated lower pulmonary vascular resistances with increased graft blood flow, improved arterial oxygenation, decreased neutrophil infiltration, and improved recipient survival. These beneficial effects were dose dependent, mimicked by the type V phosphodiesterase inhibitor 2-o-propoxyphenyl-8-azapurin-6-one, and inhibited by a cGMP-dependent protein kinase antagonist, the R isomer of 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate. Augmenting the NO pathway at the level of cGMP improves graft function and recipient survival following lung transplantation.

  3. Bacterial Signal Transduction by Cyclic Di-GMP and Other Nucleotide Second Messengers

    PubMed Central

    Gründling, Angelika; Jenal, Urs; Ryan, Robert; Yildiz, Fitnat

    2015-01-01

    The first International Symposium on c-Di-GMP Signaling in Bacteria (22 to 25 March 2015, Harnack-Haus, Berlin, Germany) brought together 131 molecular microbiologists from 17 countries to discuss recent progress in our knowledge of bacterial nucleotide second messenger signaling. While the focus was on signal input, synthesis, degradation, and the striking diversity of the modes of action of the current second messenger paradigm, i.e., cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), “classics” like cAMP and (p)ppGpp were also presented, in novel facets, and more recent “newcomers,” such as c-di-AMP and c-AMP-GMP, made an impressive appearance. A number of clear trends emerged during the 30 talks, on the 71 posters, and in the lively discussions, including (i) c-di-GMP control of the activities of various ATPases and phosphorylation cascades, (ii) extensive cross talk between c-di-GMP and other nucleotide second messenger signaling pathways, and (iii) a stunning number of novel effectors for nucleotide second messengers that surprisingly include some long-known master regulators of developmental pathways. Overall, the conference made it amply clear that second messenger signaling is currently one of the most dynamic fields within molecular microbiology, with major impacts in research fields ranging from human health to microbial ecology. PMID:26055111

  4. Cyclic di-GMP acts as a cell cycle oscillator to drive chromosome replication.

    PubMed

    Lori, C; Ozaki, S; Steiner, S; Böhm, R; Abel, S; Dubey, B N; Schirmer, T; Hiller, S; Jenal, U

    2015-07-01

    Fundamental to all living organisms is the capacity to coordinate cell division and cell differentiation to generate appropriate numbers of specialized cells. Whereas eukaryotes use cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases to balance division with cell fate decisions, equivalent regulatory systems have not been described in bacteria. Moreover, the mechanisms used by bacteria to tune division in line with developmental programs are poorly understood. Here we show that Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium with an asymmetric division cycle, uses oscillating levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) to drive its cell cycle. We demonstrate that c-di-GMP directly binds to the essential cell cycle kinase CckA to inhibit kinase activity and stimulate phosphatase activity. An upshift of c-di-GMP during the G1-S transition switches CckA from the kinase to the phosphatase mode, thereby allowing replication initiation and cell cycle progression. Finally, we show that during division, c-di-GMP imposes spatial control on CckA to install the replication asymmetry of future daughter cells. These studies reveal c-di-GMP to be a cyclin-like molecule in bacteria that coordinates chromosome replication with cell morphogenesis in Caulobacter. The observation that c-di-GMP-mediated control is conserved in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens suggests a general mechanism through which this global regulator of bacterial virulence and persistence coordinates behaviour and cell proliferation.

  5. Bacterial Signal Transduction by Cyclic Di-GMP and Other Nucleotide Second Messengers.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Regine; Gründling, Angelika; Jenal, Urs; Ryan, Robert; Yildiz, Fitnat

    2016-01-01

    The first International Symposium on c-Di-GMP Signaling in Bacteria (22 to 25 March 2015, Harnack-Haus, Berlin, Germany)brought together 131 molecular microbiologists from 17 countries to discuss recent progress in our knowledge of bacterial nucleotide second messenger signaling. While the focus was on signal input, synthesis, degradation, and the striking diversity of the modes of action of the current second messenger paradigm, i.e., cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), “classics” like cAMP and (p)ppGpp were also presented, in novel facets, and more recent “newcomers,” such as c-di-AMP and c-AMP-GMP, made an impressive appearance. A number of clear trends emerged during the 30 talks, on the 71 posters, and in the lively discussions, including (i)c-di-GMP control of the activities of various ATPases and phosphorylation cascades, (ii) extensive cross talk between c-di-GMP and other nucleotide second messenger signaling pathways, and (iii) a stunning number of novel effectors for nucleotide second messengers that surprisingly include some long-known master regulators of developmental pathways. Overall, the conference made it amply clear that second messenger signaling is currently one of the most dynamic fields within molecular microbiology,with major impacts in research fields ranging from human health to microbial ecology.

  6. Cyclic-di-GMP signalling regulates motility and biofilm formation in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Federico; Ha, Dae-Gon; O'Toole, George A; Hozbor, Daniela; Fernández, Julieta

    2013-05-01

    The signalling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic-dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of diverse cellular functions, including motility, biofilm formation, cell cycle progression and virulence, in bacteria. Multiple diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase-domain-containing proteins (GGDEF and EAL/HD-GYP, respectively) modulate the levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP to transmit signals and obtain such specific cellular responses. In the genus Bordetella this c-di-GMP network is poorly studied. In this work, we evaluated the expression of two phenotypes in Bordetella bronchiseptica regulated by c-di-GMP, biofilm formation and motility, under the influence of ectopic expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins with EAL or GGDEF domains that regulates the c-di-GMP level. In agreement with previous reports for other bacteria, we observed that B. bronchiseptica is able to form biofilm and reduce its motility only when GGDEF domain protein is expressed. Moreover we identify a GGDEF domain protein (BB3576) with diguanylate cyclase activity that participates in motility and biofilm regulation in B. bronchiseptica. These results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, the presence of c-di-GMP regulatory signalling in B. bronchiseptica.

  7. An endogenous protectant effect of cardiac cyclic GMP against reperfusion-induced ventricular fibrillation in the rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Pabla, R.; Bland-Ward, P.; Moore, P. K.; Curtis, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. After a period of myocardial ischaemia, reperfusion of the myocardium can elicit cardiac arrhythmias. Susceptibility to these arrhythmias declines with time, such that a preceding period of more than approximately 40 min ischaemia is associated with few reperfusion-induced arrhythmias. We have tested the hypothesis that this decline in susceptibility occurs, in part, because of protection by endogenous guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP). 2. Rat isolated hearts were subjected to 60 min left regional ischaemia followed by reperfusion (n = 10 per group). Methylene blue (20 microM), a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, raised the incidence of reperfusion-induced ventricular fibrillation (VF) from 10% in control hearts to 80% (P < 0.05). This effect of methylene blue was abolished by co-perfusion with zaprinast (100 microM), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor which, in the rat heart, is cyclic GMP-specific (specific for the type-V phosphodiesterase isozyme). 3. Methylene blue reduced cyclic GMP levels in the ischaemic, non-ischaemic and reperfused myocardium (P < 0.05) to 50 +/- 10, 52 +/- 12 and 70 +/- 7 fmol mg-1 tissue wet weight, respectively from control values of 143 +/- 38, 147 +/- 43 and 156 +/- 15 fmol mg-1. Co-perfusion with zaprinast prevented this effect, and cyclic GMP levels were actually elevated (P < 0.05) to 366 +/- 102, 396 +/- 130 and 293 +/- 22 fmol mg-1 in ischaemic, non-ischaemic and reperfused myocardium, respectively. Zaprinast by itself also elevated cyclic GMP content. Cyclic AMP levels were not affected by zaprinast or methylene blue. 4. In conclusion, when endogenous cardiac cyclic GMP synthesis is reduced, susceptibility to reperfusion-induced VF after sustained ischaemia is substantially increased. The effect is prevented by inhibiting cyclic GMP degradation. Therefore cyclic GMP appears to be an endogenous intracellular cardioprotectant, and its actions may account for the low susceptibility to VF normally encountered in

  8. Cyclic-di-GMP signaling in the Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Eric; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    The anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile causes intestinal infections responsible for symptoms ranging from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Like other bacteria, C. difficile needs to sense and integrate environmental signals in order to adapt to changes and thrive in its environment. The second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) was recently recognized as a quasi-ubiquitous phenotype coordinator in bacteria. Mostly known to be involved in the transition from motile to sessile and multicellular behaviors in Gammaproteobacteria, c-di-GMP is now known to regulate many other phenotypes from cell morphogenesis to virulence, in many Gram-negative and a few Gram-positive bacteria. Herein, we review recent advances in our understanding of c-di-GMP signaling in the lifecycle of C. difficile.

  9. A staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein regulates biofilm formation independently of cyclic dimeric GMP.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda M; O'Donnell, Sinéad T; Ryjenkov, Dmitri A; Gomelsky, Larissa; Slater, Shawn R; Fey, Paul D; Gomelsky, Mark; O'Gara, James P

    2008-08-01

    Cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is an important biofilm regulator that allosterically activates enzymes of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Proteobacterial genomes usually encode multiple GGDEF domain-containing diguanylate cyclases responsible for c-di-GMP synthesis. In contrast, only one conserved GGDEF domain protein, GdpS (for GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus), and a second protein with a highly modified GGDEF domain, GdpP, are present in the sequenced staphylococcal genomes. Here, we investigated the role of GdpS in biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Inactivation of gdpS impaired biofilm formation in medium supplemented with NaCl under static and flow-cell conditions, whereas gdpS overexpression complemented the mutation and enhanced wild-type biofilm development. GdpS increased production of the icaADBC-encoded exopolysaccharide, poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine, by elevating icaADBC mRNA levels. Unexpectedly, c-di-GMP synthesis was found to be irrelevant for the ability of GdpS to elevate icaADBC expression. Mutagenesis of the GGEEF motif essential for diguanylate cyclase activity did not impair GdpS, and the N-terminal fragment of GdpS lacking the GGDEF domain partially complemented the gdpS mutation. Furthermore, heterologous diguanylate cyclases expressed in trans failed to complement the gdpS mutation, and the purified GGDEF domain from GdpS possessed no diguanylate cyclase activity in vitro. The gdpS gene from Staphylococcus aureus exhibited similar characteristics to its S. epidermidis ortholog, suggesting that the GdpS-mediated signal transduction is conserved in staphylococci. Therefore, GdpS affects biofilm formation through a novel c-di-GMP-independent mechanism involving increased icaADBC mRNA levels and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Our data raise the possibility that staphylococci cannot synthesize c-di-GMP and have only remnants of a c-di-GMP signaling pathway.

  10. A staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein regulates biofilm formation independently of cyclic dimeric GMP.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda M; O'Donnell, Sinéad T; Ryjenkov, Dmitri A; Gomelsky, Larissa; Slater, Shawn R; Fey, Paul D; Gomelsky, Mark; O'Gara, James P

    2008-08-01

    Cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is an important biofilm regulator that allosterically activates enzymes of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Proteobacterial genomes usually encode multiple GGDEF domain-containing diguanylate cyclases responsible for c-di-GMP synthesis. In contrast, only one conserved GGDEF domain protein, GdpS (for GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus), and a second protein with a highly modified GGDEF domain, GdpP, are present in the sequenced staphylococcal genomes. Here, we investigated the role of GdpS in biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Inactivation of gdpS impaired biofilm formation in medium supplemented with NaCl under static and flow-cell conditions, whereas gdpS overexpression complemented the mutation and enhanced wild-type biofilm development. GdpS increased production of the icaADBC-encoded exopolysaccharide, poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine, by elevating icaADBC mRNA levels. Unexpectedly, c-di-GMP synthesis was found to be irrelevant for the ability of GdpS to elevate icaADBC expression. Mutagenesis of the GGEEF motif essential for diguanylate cyclase activity did not impair GdpS, and the N-terminal fragment of GdpS lacking the GGDEF domain partially complemented the gdpS mutation. Furthermore, heterologous diguanylate cyclases expressed in trans failed to complement the gdpS mutation, and the purified GGDEF domain from GdpS possessed no diguanylate cyclase activity in vitro. The gdpS gene from Staphylococcus aureus exhibited similar characteristics to its S. epidermidis ortholog, suggesting that the GdpS-mediated signal transduction is conserved in staphylococci. Therefore, GdpS affects biofilm formation through a novel c-di-GMP-independent mechanism involving increased icaADBC mRNA levels and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Our data raise the possibility that staphylococci cannot synthesize c-di-GMP and have only remnants of a c-di-GMP signaling pathway. PMID:18502872

  11. Cyclic di-GMP sensing via the innate immune signaling protein STING.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Tian, Yuan; Kabaleeswaran, Venkataraman; Jiang, Xiaomo; Tu, Daqi; Eck, Michael J; Chen, Zhijian J; Wu, Hao

    2012-06-29

    Detection of foreign materials is the first step of successful immune responses. Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) was shown to directly bind cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP), a bacterial second messenger, and to elicit strong interferon responses. Here we elucidate the structural features of the cytosolic c-di-GMP binding domain (CBD) of STING and its complex with c-di-GMP. The CBD exhibits an α + β fold and is a dimer in the crystal and in solution. Surprisingly, one c-di-GMP molecule binds to the central crevice of a STING dimer, using a series of stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. We show that STING is autoinhibited by an intramolecular interaction between the CBD and the C-terminal tail (CTT) and that c-di-GMP releases STING from this autoinhibition by displacing the CTT. The structures provide a remarkable example of pathogen-host interactions in which a unique microbial molecule directly engages the innate immune system.

  12. Immunohistochemical Localization of Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Suzanne M.; Walter, Ulrich; Miller, Penelope E.; Greengard, Paul; de Camilli, Pietro

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase in rat brain has been studied by an immunological approach involving radioimmunoassay and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Data obtained by radioimmunoassay indicate that cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase is 20- to 40-fold more concentrated in cerebellum than in other brain regions. Immunohistochemical experiments demonstrate that the high concentration of immunoreactivity of the protein kinase in cerebellum is attributable to Purkinje cells. Immunoreactivity in these cells is homogeneously distributed throughout the cell (perikarya, dendrites, and axons) with the exception of the nucleus. No other neurons either in the cerebellum or in other brain regions were stained by antiserum to the protein kinase. Immunoreactivity, however, was found throughout the brain on smooth muscle cells of blood vessels.

  13. A minimalist biosensor: Quantitation of cyclic di-GMP using the conformational change of a riboswitch aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Kellenberger, Colleen A; Sales-Lee, Jade; Pan, Yuchen; Gassaway, Madalee M; Herr, Amy E; Hammond, Ming C

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a second messenger that is important in regulating bacterial physiology and behavior, including motility and virulence. Many questions remain about the role and regulation of this signaling molecule, but current methods of detection are limited by either modest sensitivity or requirements for extensive sample purification. We have taken advantage of a natural, high affinity receptor of c-di-GMP, the Vc2 riboswitch aptamer, to develop a sensitive and rapid electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) for c-di-GMP quantitation that required minimal engineering of the RNA. PMID:26114964

  14. A minimalist biosensor: Quantitation of cyclic di-GMP using the conformational change of a riboswitch aptamer.

    PubMed

    Kellenberger, Colleen A; Sales-Lee, Jade; Pan, Yuchen; Gassaway, Madalee M; Herr, Amy E; Hammond, Ming C

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a second messenger that is important in regulating bacterial physiology and behavior, including motility and virulence. Many questions remain about the role and regulation of this signaling molecule, but current methods of detection are limited by either modest sensitivity or requirements for extensive sample purification. We have taken advantage of a natural, high affinity receptor of c-di-GMP, the Vc2 riboswitch aptamer, to develop a sensitive and rapid electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) for c-di-GMP quantitation that required minimal engineering of the RNA.

  15. Characterization of noradrenaline-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in brain astrocytes in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Agulló, L; García, A

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic GMP accumulation induced by noradrenaline in astrocyte-enriched primary cultures from rat cerebrum involves synthesis of NO, as evidenced by the competitive inhibition exerted by the NO synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (IC50 = 3 microM). Furthermore, the noradrenaline effect was potently inhibited by haemoglobin (IC50 = 25 nM) and potentiated by superoxide dismutase, indicating that NO synthesis and cyclic GMP formation may occur in different subsets of astrocytes. Investigation of the receptors implicated by using selective adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists indicates that about 75% of the NO-dependent noradrenaline response is mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors and the rest by beta-adrenoceptors, with no evidence for potentiating effects between the two receptor types. This noradrenaline effect appears to require Ca2+ entry, since it is strongly dependent on extracellular Ca2+ but is not affected by conditions that will abolish intracellular Ca2+ mobilization (incubation with neomycin or pretreatment with carbachol). Inhibition by pretreatment with pertussis toxin is in agreement with involvement of the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype in this Ca(2+)-dependent effect. However, implication of an unknown alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtype cannot be disregarded, because a similar inhibition is exerted by the presumably selective alpha 1B- and alpha 1C-adrenoceptor blocking agent chloroethylclonidine. Treatment of the cultures with the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate inhibits to a great extent the noradrenaline-induced cyclic GMP formation. PMID:1334410

  16. Role of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP signaling in melanocyte response to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Lambers, Britta; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Block, Ingrid; Gerzer, Rupert

    Nitric oxide (NO) has a prominent role in many (patho)physiological processes in the skin including erythema, inflammation, and cancerogenesis. The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a key transducer in NO signaling, catalyzes the formation of the second messenger guanosine 3´,5´-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic cGMP or cGMP). For human melanocytes, which are responsible for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin, it has been reported that the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway is involved in UVB-induced melanogenesis. Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress. It may also act as a photosensitizer that generates active oxygen species upon UV irradiation, which may initiate hypopigmentary disorders (e.g., vitiligo) as well as UV-induced oncogene cell transformation. In addition, melanoma, a deadly skin cancer, which arises from transformed melanocytes, is characterized by a resistance to chemotherapy. In our studies we have shown that NO can induce perturbation of melanocyte-extracellular matrix component interactions, which may contribute to loss of melanocytes or melanoma metastasis. Such NO effects appear to be modulated partly via cGMP. Moreover, we found that different guanylyl cyclase isoforms are responsible for cGMP synthesis in melanocytic cells. Normal human melanocytes and nonmetastatic melanoma cells predominantly express sGC, which appears to be associated with melanogenesis, whereas absence of NO-sensitive GC, but up-regulated activities of the natriuretic peptide-sensitive membrane guanylyl cyclase isoforms were found in highly metastatic phenotypes. Due to the growing interest in the regulation of signaling activities in normal and transformed cells under altered gravity conditions, we have further investigated whether the NO/cGMP signaling is involved in melanocyte response to gravitational stress. We found that normal human melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cell lines, but not highly metastatic cells

  17. Zolpidem, a novel nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic. II. Effects on cerebellar cyclic GMP levels and cerebral monoamines.

    PubMed

    Scatton, B; Claustre, Y; Dennis, T; Nishikawa, T

    1986-05-01

    The effect of zolpidem, a novel nonbenzodiazepine short-acting hypnotic, on cerebellar cyclic GMP (cGMP) and biochemical indices of cerebral norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine metabolism has been investigated in the rat and mouse. Zolpidem diminished the levels of cerebellar cGMP in the rat markedly (ED50 = 0.7 mg/kg i.p.). This effect was antagonized, in a competitive manner, by the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788. The zolpidem-induced decrease of cerebellar cGMP levels was rapid in onset and of short duration (less than 1 hr). When given in combination with muscimol (in a dose which by itself did not alter cerebellar cGMP content) zolpidem potentiated the diminution of the cyclic nucleotide levels induced by the gamma-aminobutyric acid mimetic. Zolpidem (up to 30 mg/kg i.p.) failed to alter the rate of utilization of norepinephrine or the levels of total 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethyleneglycol or 3-methoxy, 4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol sulfate in the rat brain. However, the compound (10-30 mg/kg) diminished serotonin synthesis in the hippocampus, striatum and frontal cortex. At high doses (30-100 mg/kg i.p.), zolpidem also decreased the rate of utilization of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in the rat striatum. Moreover, zolpidem (10 mg/kg i.p.) prevented partially the haloperidol-induced increase in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid concentrations in both striatum and frontal cortex. Finally, zolpidem prevented the increase in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in the frontal cortex induced by electric footshock stress in rats (ED50 = 2 mg/kg i.p.) and BALB/C mice. This effect was antagonized by coadministration of Ro 15-1788. PMID:2871179

  18. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Lin, Tien-Huang; Wu, Chien-Chen; Wan, Lei; Huang, Chun-Fa; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP and c-di-GMP

  19. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Lin, Tien-Huang; Wu, Chien-Chen; Wan, Lei; Huang, Chun-Fa; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP and c-di-GMP

  20. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Lin, Tien-Huang; Wu, Chien-Chen; Wan, Lei; Huang, Chun-Fa; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP and c-di-GMP

  1. Detection and localization of a putative cyclic-GMP-activated channel protein in the protozoan ciliate Stentor coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Walerczyk, M; Fabczak, H; Fabczak, S

    2006-05-01

    Immunoblotting and immunocytochemical assays were employed to identify and localize a channel protein activated by cyclic GMP (cGMP) in the protozoan ciliate Stentor coeruleus. Analysis of whole-cell homogenate with antibodies raised against the alpha-subunit of the cGMP-activated channel protein from bovine rod outer segments and against cGMP revealed four major protein bands with molecular masses of 40 kDa, 63 kDa, and over 120 kDa, which bound cGMP. However, only a cGMP-binding protein of 63 kDa, corresponding to the alpha-subunit of the cGMP-activated ion channel protein from bovine rod outer segments, was found in the ciliate cortex fraction. The functional cGMP-activated channel protein was also shown to be present in the cortex fraction of S. coeruleus by patch-clamp measurements of artificial liposomes. Incorporation of the cortex fraction into liposomes resulted in the appearance of ion channel activity related to cGMP. The reconstituted protein channels were strongly inhibited by l-cis-diltiazem, a known potent blocker of many types of cyclic-nucleotide-activated channels. The results presented here are the first demonstration of the existence and localization of a putative cGMP-activated channel protein in the ciliate S. coeruleus. Cyclic-nucleotide-activated channel proteins are nonspecific cation channels which mediate the receptor potentials in photoreceptor cells and in cells of the olfactory epithelium. On the basis of these data, we suggest that the 63 kDa protein identified in Stentor coeruleus is also a cGMP-activated ion channel and that it may be involved as an effector in the photosensory transduction pathway leading to the motile photophobic response in this ciliate protist. PMID:16736256

  2. The cyclic nucleotide cGMP is involved in plant hormone signalling and alters phosphorylation of Arabidopsis thaliana root proteins

    PubMed Central

    Isner, Jean Charles; Nühse, Thomas; Maathuis, Frans J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide cGMP has been shown to play important roles in plant development and responses to abiotic and biotic stress. Yet much controversy remains regarding the exact role of this second messenger. Progress in unravelling cGMP function in plants was hampered by laborious and time-consuming methodology to measure changes in cellular [cGMP] but the development of fluorescence-based reporters has removed this disadvantage. This study used the FlincG cGMP reporter to investigate potential interactions between phytohormone and cGMP signalling and found a rapid and significant effect of the hormones abscisic acid (ABA), auxin (IAA), and jasmonic acid (JA) on cytoplasmic cGMP levels. In contrast, brassinosteroids and cytokinin did not evoke a cGMP signal. The effects of ABA, IAA, and JA were apparent at external concentrations in the nanomolar range with EC50 values of around 1000, 300, and 0.03 nmoles for ABA, IAA, and JA respectively. To examine potential mechanisms for how hormone-induced cGMP signals are propagated, the role of protein phosphorylation was tested. A phosphoproteomics analysis on Arabidopsis thaliana root microsomal proteins in the absence and presence of membrane-permeable cGMP showed 15 proteins that rapidly (within minutes) changed in phosphorylation status. Out of these, nine were previously shown to also alter phosphorylation status in response to plant hormones, pointing to protein phosphorylation as a target for hormone-induced cGMP signalling. PMID:22345640

  3. Opposing actions of dibutyryl cyclic AMP and GMP on temperature in conscious guinea-pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williaes, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the intracerebroventricular administration of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Db-cAMP) induced hyperthermia in guinea pigs which was not mediated through prostaglandins or norepinephrine since a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor and an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocking agent did not antagonize the hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to Db-cAMP was attenuated by the central administration of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, which indicates that cAMP may be involved, through beta-adrenergic receptors, in the central regulation of heat production and conservation. The central administration of Db-cGMP produced hypothermia which was not mediated via histamine H1 or H2 receptors and serotonin. The antagonism of hypothermia induced by Db-cGMP and acetylcholine + physostigmine by central administration of a cholinergic muscarine receptor antagonist and not by a cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist suggests that cholinoceptive neurons and endogenous cGMP may regulate heat loss through cholinergic muscarine receptors. It is concluded that these results indicate a regulatory role in thermoregulation provided by a balance between opposing actions of cAMP and cGMP in guinea pigs.

  4. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling.

  5. [Networks involving quorum sensing, cyclic-di-GMP and nitric oxide on biofilm production in bacteria].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mata, Alberto; Fernández-Domínguez, Ileana J; Nuñez-Reza, Karen J; Xiqui-Vázquez, María L; Baca, Beatriz E

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, and their flexibility is derived in part from a complex extracellular matrix that can be made-to-order to cope with environmental demand. Although common developmental stages leading to biofilm formation have been described, an in-depth knowledge of genetic and signaling is required to understand biofilm formation. Bacteria detect changes in population density by quorum sensing and particular environmental conditions, using signals such as cyclic di-GMP or nitric oxide. The significance of understanding these signaling pathways lies in that they control a broad variety of functions such as biofilm formation, and motility, providing benefits to bacteria as regards host colonization, defense against competitors, and adaptation to changing environments. Due to the importance of these features, we here review the signaling network and regulatory connections among quorum sensing, c-di-GMP and nitric oxide involving biofilm formation.

  6. Regulation of biofilm formation and cellular buoyancy through modulating intracellular cyclic di-GMP levels in engineered cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Marco; Waters, Christopher M; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric (3'→5') GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in the transition between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation, cellular aggregation or flocculation, and cellular buoyancy are under the control of c-di-GMP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) and Fremyella diplosiphon. Synechocystis is a unicellular cyanobacterium and displays lower levels of c-di-GMP; F. diplosiphon is filamentous and displays higher intracellular c-di-GMP levels. We transformed Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon with a plasmid for constitutive expression of genes encoding diguanylate cylase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, respectively. These engineered strains allowed us to modulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Biofilm formation and cellular deposition were induced in the DGC-expressing Synechocystis strain which exhibited high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP; whereas strains expressing PDE in Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon to drive low intracellular levels of c-di-GMP exhibited enhanced cellular buoyancy. In addition, the PDE-expressing F. diplosiphon strain showed elevated chlorophyll levels. These results imply roles for coordinating c-di-GMP homeostasis in regulating native cyanobacterial phenotypes. Engineering exogenous DGC or PDE proteins to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels represents an effective tool for uncovering cryptic phenotypes or modulating phenotypes in cyanobacteria for practical applications in biotechnology applicable in photobioreactors and in green biotechnologies, such as energy-efficient harvesting of cellular biomass or the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters.

  7. Role of nitric oxide/cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP in beta3 adrenoceptor-chronotropic response.

    PubMed

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Bernabeo, Gustavo; Ganzinelli, Sabrina; Joensen, Lilian; Borda, Enri

    2006-04-01

    In this study we determine different signaling pathways involved in beta(3) adrenoceptor (beta(3)-AR) dependent frequency stimulation in isolated rodent atria. Promiscuous coupling between different G-proteins and beta(3)-AR could explain the multiple functional effects of beta(3)-AR stimulation. We examine the mechanisms and functional consequences of dual adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase pathways coupling to beta(3)-AR in isolated rodent atria. The beta(3)-AR selective agonists ZD 7114 and ICI 215001 stimulated in a dose-dependent manner the contraction frequency that significantly correlated with cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase shifted the chronotropic effect to the right. On the other hand, the ZD 7114 activity on frequency was enhanced by the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and soluble guanylate cyclase. This countervailing negative chronotropic nitric oxide-cyclic GMP (NO-cGMP) significantly correlated with the increase on NOS activity and cGMP accumulation. Current analysis showed a negative cross talk between cAMP chronotropic and NO-cGMP effects by inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC), calcium/calmodulin (CaM), protein kinase C (PKC), NOS isoforms and Gi-protein on the effects of beta(3)-AR stimulation. RT-PCR detected both eNOS and nNOS in isolated rat atria. NOS isoforms performed independently. Only nNOS participated in limiting the effect of beta(3)-AR stimulation. In eNOS-KO (eNOS-/-) mice the chronotropic effect of beta(3)-AR agonists did not differ from wild type (WT) mice atria, but it was increased by the inhibition of nNOS activity. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency by beta(3)-AR activation on isolated rodent atria is associated to a parallel increases in cAMP. The nNOS-cGMP pathway negatively modulates beta(3)-AR activation. Multiple signal transduction pathways between G-protein and beta(3)-AR may protect myocardium from catecholamine-induced cardiotoxic effects. PMID:16510153

  8. Mangiferin Prevents Guinea Pig Tracheal Contraction via Activation of the Nitric Oxide-Cyclic GMP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Aline B.; Coelho, Luciana P.; Insuela, Daniella B. R.; Carvalho, Vinicius F.; dos Santos, Marcelo H.; Silva, Patricia MR.; Martins, Marco A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have described the antispasmodic effect of mangiferin, a natural glucoside xanthone (2-C-β-Dgluco-pyranosyl-1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone) that is present in mango trees and other plants, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the potential contribution of the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway to the antispasmodic effect of mangiferin on isolated tracheal rings preparations. The functional effect of mangiferin on allergic and non-allergic contraction of guinea pig tracheal rings was assessed in conventional organ baths. Cultured tracheal rings were exposed to mangiferin or vehicle, and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 3 and cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels were quantified using western blotting and enzyme immunoassays, respectively. Mangiferin (0.1–10 µM) inhibited tracheal contractions induced by distinct stimuli, such as allergen, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine or carbachol, in a concentration-dependent manner. Mangiferin also caused marked relaxation of tracheal rings that were precontracted by carbachol, suggesting that it has both anti-contraction and relaxant properties that are prevented by removing the epithelium. The effect of mangiferin was inhibited by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (100 µM), and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1], [2], [4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10 µM), but not the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 9-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)adenine (SQ22536) (100 µM). The antispasmodic effect of mangiferin was also sensitive to K+ channel blockers, such as tetraethylammonium (TEA), glibenclamide and apamin. Furthermore, mangiferin inhibited Ca2+-induced contractions in K+ (60 mM)-depolarised tracheal rings preparations. In addition, mangiferin increased NOS3 protein levels and cGMP intracellular levels in cultured tracheal rings. Finally, mangiferin-induced increase in cGMP levels was abrogated by co-incubation with either ODQ or L

  9. Liposomes loaded with a STING pathway ligand, cyclic di-GMP, enhance cancer immunotherapy against metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Miyabe, Hiroko; Hyodo, Mamoru; Sato, Yusuke; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-10-28

    Malignant melanomas escape immunosurveillance via the loss/down-regulation of MHC-I expression. Natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to function as essential effector cells for eliminating melanomas. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a ligand of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signal pathway, can be thought of as a new class of adjuvant against cancer. However, it is yet to be tested, because technologies for delivering c-di-GMP to the cytosol are required. Herein, we report that c-di-GMP efficiently activates NK cells and induces antitumor effects against malignant melanomas when loaded in YSK05 lipid containing liposomes, by assisting in the efficient delivery of c-di-GMP to the cytosol. The intravenous administration of c-di-GMP encapsulated within YSK05-liposomes (c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip) into mice efficiently induced the production of type I interferon (IFN) as well as the activation of NK cells, resulting in a significant antitumor effect in a lung metastasis mouse model using B16-F10. This antitumor effect was dominated by NK cells. The infiltration of NK cells was observed in the lungs with B16-F10 melanomas. These findings indicate that the c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip induces MHC-I non-restricted antitumor immunity mediated by NK cells. Consequently, c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip represents a potentially new adjuvant system for use in immunotherapy against malignant melanomas.

  10. [Two types of relaxation responses mediated by cyclic GMP in cerebral arteries].

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, K; Waga, S; Kojima, T; Fujimoto, K

    1989-06-01

    It has been reported that endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) possesses chemical and pharmacological properties that are indistinguishable from those of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, NO is the active chemical species responsible for endothelium-independent vasodilation produced by nitrogen oxide-containing substances including glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Both EDRF and GTN activate soluble guanylate cyclase and consequently increase cyclic GMP level in various artery preparations. However, there have been few reports regarding cyclic GMP accumulation induced by EDRF or GTN in canine cerebral arteries. Therefore, it was investigated whether EDRF and GTN cause vasodilation through the common pathway mediated by cyclic GMP in the canine basilar artery. The relaxation responses induced by EDRF or GTN were studied in the canine basilar artery by an isometric tension-recording method. EDRF was induced by calcium ionophore A 23187. A 23187 did not relax the vascular tissue in the absence of the endothelial cells. On the other hand, GTN did induce relaxation in either the presence or absence of endothelial cells. FeSO4 at 3 X 10(-5) M reversed A23187-induced relaxation, but not GTN-induced relaxation (N = 10). Since Fe2+ is able to catalyse the formation of O2- in oxygenated phosphate buffer, these findings suggest that Fe2+ antagonizes EDRF by inactivating it via the generation of O2-. By the addition of 10(-5) M methylene blue, both A 23187- and GTN-induced relaxations were reversed (N = 8). Moreover, pretreatment with 10(-5) M methylene blue augmented contractile responses to 3 X 10(-6) M prostaglandin F2 alpha (N = 5).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Identification of a cyclic-di-GMP-modulating response regulator that impacts biofilm formation in a model sulfate reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Altenburg, Sara; Zane, Grant M; Baidoo, Edward E K; Catena, Michela; Keasling, Jay D; Wall, Judy D; Fields, Matthew W; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-01-01

    We surveyed the eight putative cyclic-di-GMP-modulating response regulators (RRs) in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough that are predicted to function via two-component signaling. Using purified proteins, we examined cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) production or turnover in vitro of all eight proteins. The two RRs containing only GGDEF domains (DVU2067, DVU0636) demonstrated c-di-GMP production activity in vitro. Of the remaining proteins, three RRs with HD-GYP domains (DVU0722, DVUA0086, and DVU2933) were confirmed to be Mn(2+)-dependent phosphodiesterases (PDEs) in vitro and converted c-di-GMP to its linear form, pGpG. DVU0408, containing both c-di-GMP production (GGDEF) and degradation domains (EAL), showed c-di-GMP turnover activity in vitro also with production of pGpG. No c-di-GMP related activity could be assigned to the RR DVU0330, containing a metal-dependent phosphohydrolase HD-OD domain, or to the HD-GYP domain RR, DVU1181. Studies included examining the impact of overexpressed cyclic-di-GMP-modulating RRs in the heterologous host E. coli and led to the identification of one RR, DVU0636, with increased cellulose production. Evaluation of a transposon mutant in DVU0636 indicated that the strain was impaired in biofilm formation and demonstrated an altered carbohydrate:protein ratio relative to the D. vulgaris wild type biofilms. However, grown in liquid lactate/sulfate medium, the DVU0636 transposon mutant showed no growth impairment relative to the wild-type strain. Among the eight candidates, only the transposon disruption mutant in the DVU2067 RR presented a growth defect in liquid culture. Our results indicate that, of the two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) that function as part of two-component signaling, DVU0636 plays an important role in biofilm formation while the function of DVU2067 has pertinence in planktonic growth.

  12. Identification of a cyclic-di-GMP-modulating response regulator that impacts biofilm formation in a model sulfate reducing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G.; Altenburg, Sara; Zane, Grant M.; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Catena, Michela; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-01-01

    We surveyed the eight putative cyclic-di-GMP-modulating response regulators (RRs) in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough that are predicted to function via two-component signaling. Using purified proteins, we examined cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) production or turnover in vitro of all eight proteins. The two RRs containing only GGDEF domains (DVU2067, DVU0636) demonstrated c-di-GMP production activity in vitro. Of the remaining proteins, three RRs with HD-GYP domains (DVU0722, DVUA0086, and DVU2933) were confirmed to be Mn2+-dependent phosphodiesterases (PDEs) in vitro and converted c-di-GMP to its linear form, pGpG. DVU0408, containing both c-di-GMP production (GGDEF) and degradation domains (EAL), showed c-di-GMP turnover activity in vitro also with production of pGpG. No c-di-GMP related activity could be assigned to the RR DVU0330, containing a metal-dependent phosphohydrolase HD-OD domain, or to the HD-GYP domain RR, DVU1181. Studies included examining the impact of overexpressed cyclic-di-GMP-modulating RRs in the heterologous host E. coli and led to the identification of one RR, DVU0636, with increased cellulose production. Evaluation of a transposon mutant in DVU0636 indicated that the strain was impaired in biofilm formation and demonstrated an altered carbohydrate:protein ratio relative to the D. vulgaris wild type biofilms. However, grown in liquid lactate/sulfate medium, the DVU0636 transposon mutant showed no growth impairment relative to the wild-type strain. Among the eight candidates, only the transposon disruption mutant in the DVU2067 RR presented a growth defect in liquid culture. Our results indicate that, of the two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) that function as part of two-component signaling, DVU0636 plays an important role in biofilm formation while the function of DVU2067 has pertinence in planktonic growth. PMID:25120537

  13. Systematic Identification of Cyclic-di-GMP Binding Proteins in Vibrio cholerae Reveals a Novel Class of Cyclic-di-GMP-Binding ATPases Associated with Type II Secretion Systems.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Kevin G; Jones, Christopher J; Helman, Sarah R; Shang, Xiaoran; Orr, Mona W; Goodson, Jonathan R; Galperin, Michael Y; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Lee, Vincent T

    2015-10-01

    Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule that regulates a variety of complex processes through a diverse set of c-di-GMP receptor proteins. We have utilized a systematic approach to identify c-di-GMP receptors from the pathogen Vibrio cholerae using the Differential Radial Capillary Action of Ligand Assay (DRaCALA). The DRaCALA screen identified a majority of known c-di-GMP binding proteins in V. cholerae and revealed a novel c-di-GMP binding protein, MshE (VC0405), an ATPase associated with the mannose sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) type IV pilus. The known c-di-GMP binding proteins identified by DRaCALA include diguanylate cyclases, phosphodiesterases, PilZ domain proteins and transcription factors VpsT and VpsR, indicating that the DRaCALA-based screen of open reading frame libraries is a feasible approach to uncover novel receptors of small molecule ligands. Since MshE lacks the canonical c-di-GMP-binding motifs, a truncation analysis was utilized to locate the c-di-GMP binding activity to the N-terminal T2SSE_N domain. Alignment of MshE homologs revealed candidate conserved residues responsible for c-di-GMP binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of these candidate residues revealed that the Arg9 residue is required for c-di-GMP binding. The ability of c-di-GMP binding to MshE to regulate MSHA dependent processes was evaluated. The R9A allele, in contrast to the wild type MshE, was unable to complement the ΔmshE mutant for the production of extracellular MshA to the cell surface, reduction in flagella swimming motility, attachment to surfaces and formation of biofilms. Testing homologs of MshE for binding to c-di-GMP identified the type II secretion ATPase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14_29490) as a c-di-GMP receptor, indicating that type II secretion and type IV pili are both regulated by c-di-GMP. PMID:26506097

  14. Systematic Identification of Cyclic-di-GMP Binding Proteins in Vibrio cholerae Reveals a Novel Class of Cyclic-di-GMP-Binding ATPases Associated with Type II Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xiaoran; Orr, Mona W.; Goodson, Jonathan R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Lee, Vincent T.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule that regulates a variety of complex processes through a diverse set of c-di-GMP receptor proteins. We have utilized a systematic approach to identify c-di-GMP receptors from the pathogen Vibrio cholerae using the Differential Radial Capillary Action of Ligand Assay (DRaCALA). The DRaCALA screen identified a majority of known c-di-GMP binding proteins in V. cholerae and revealed a novel c-di-GMP binding protein, MshE (VC0405), an ATPase associated with the mannose sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) type IV pilus. The known c-di-GMP binding proteins identified by DRaCALA include diguanylate cyclases, phosphodiesterases, PilZ domain proteins and transcription factors VpsT and VpsR, indicating that the DRaCALA-based screen of open reading frame libraries is a feasible approach to uncover novel receptors of small molecule ligands. Since MshE lacks the canonical c-di-GMP-binding motifs, a truncation analysis was utilized to locate the c-di-GMP binding activity to the N-terminal T2SSE_N domain. Alignment of MshE homologs revealed candidate conserved residues responsible for c-di-GMP binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of these candidate residues revealed that the Arg9 residue is required for c-di-GMP binding. The ability of c-di-GMP binding to MshE to regulate MSHA dependent processes was evaluated. The R9A allele, in contrast to the wild type MshE, was unable to complement the ΔmshE mutant for the production of extracellular MshA to the cell surface, reduction in flagella swimming motility, attachment to surfaces and formation of biofilms. Testing homologs of MshE for binding to c-di-GMP identified the type II secretion ATPase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14_29490) as a c-di-GMP receptor, indicating that type II secretion and type IV pili are both regulated by c-di-GMP. PMID:26506097

  15. Systematic Identification of Cyclic-di-GMP Binding Proteins in Vibrio cholerae Reveals a Novel Class of Cyclic-di-GMP-Binding ATPases Associated with Type II Secretion Systems.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Kevin G; Jones, Christopher J; Helman, Sarah R; Shang, Xiaoran; Orr, Mona W; Goodson, Jonathan R; Galperin, Michael Y; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Lee, Vincent T

    2015-10-01

    Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule that regulates a variety of complex processes through a diverse set of c-di-GMP receptor proteins. We have utilized a systematic approach to identify c-di-GMP receptors from the pathogen Vibrio cholerae using the Differential Radial Capillary Action of Ligand Assay (DRaCALA). The DRaCALA screen identified a majority of known c-di-GMP binding proteins in V. cholerae and revealed a novel c-di-GMP binding protein, MshE (VC0405), an ATPase associated with the mannose sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) type IV pilus. The known c-di-GMP binding proteins identified by DRaCALA include diguanylate cyclases, phosphodiesterases, PilZ domain proteins and transcription factors VpsT and VpsR, indicating that the DRaCALA-based screen of open reading frame libraries is a feasible approach to uncover novel receptors of small molecule ligands. Since MshE lacks the canonical c-di-GMP-binding motifs, a truncation analysis was utilized to locate the c-di-GMP binding activity to the N-terminal T2SSE_N domain. Alignment of MshE homologs revealed candidate conserved residues responsible for c-di-GMP binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of these candidate residues revealed that the Arg9 residue is required for c-di-GMP binding. The ability of c-di-GMP binding to MshE to regulate MSHA dependent processes was evaluated. The R9A allele, in contrast to the wild type MshE, was unable to complement the ΔmshE mutant for the production of extracellular MshA to the cell surface, reduction in flagella swimming motility, attachment to surfaces and formation of biofilms. Testing homologs of MshE for binding to c-di-GMP identified the type II secretion ATPase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14_29490) as a c-di-GMP receptor, indicating that type II secretion and type IV pili are both regulated by c-di-GMP.

  16. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling. PMID:26839412

  17. Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase activation in the absence of negative inotropic effects in the rat ventricle

    PubMed Central

    MacDonell, Karen L; Diamond, Jack

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that activation of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is a necessary step in the chain of events leading to the production of negative inotropy by muscarinic receptor agonists in mammalian ventricles, and that some cyclic GMP-elevating agents, such as sodium nitroprusside (SNP), fail to exert a negative inotropic effect because they elevate cyclic GMP levels in a pool that does not activate the kinase. This hypothesis was tested in the present study by monitoring the effects of carbachol, SNP and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on contractility, cyclic GMP content and PKG activity in rat intact ventricular preparations and freshly isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes.The presence of PKG in both the intact vehicle and in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes was confirmed by MonoQ anion exchange chromatography and Western blotting. The elution profile indicated that the conditions of the PKG assay were selective for measuring PKG activity.Carbachol induced a marked negative inotropic effect in intact, perfused hearts and ventricular strips in the presence of isoproterenol. The negative inotropic effect of carbachol was not associated with significant changes in cyclic GMP content or PKG activity in intact ventricular tissue, or in PKG activity in isolated cardiomyocytes.SNP and ANP significantly increased cyclic GMP levels and activated PKG in intact ventricular preparations. Both drugs also activated PKG in isolated cardiomyocytes. However, neither drug had any negative inotropic effect in isoprenaline-stimulated perfused hearts and ANP did not change the contractility of isoprenaline-stimulated isolated cardiomyocytes.The results of this study demonstrate that the negative inotropic effects of muscarinic receptor agonists can occur in the absence of significant activation of PKG. Conversely, marked increases in ventricular cyclic GMP content and PKG activity caused by SNP or ANP were not accompanied by a negative inotropic effect

  18. Systematic analysis of cyclic di-GMP signaling enzymes and their role in biofilm formation and virulence in Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Bobrov, Alexander G.; Kirillina, Olga; Ryjenkov, Dmitri A.; Waters, Christopher M.; Price, Paul A.; Fetherston, Jacqueline D.; Mack, Dietrich; Goldman, William E.; Gomelsky, Mark; Perry, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a signaling molecule that governs the transition between planktonic and biofilm states. Previously we showed that the diguanylate cyclase HmsT and the putative c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase HmsP inversely regulate biofilm formation through control of HmsHFRS-dependent poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. Here, we systematically examine the functionality of the genes encoding putative c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes in Yersinia pestis. We determine that, in addition to hmsT and hmsP, only the gene y3730 encodes a functional enzyme capable of synthesizing c-di-GMP. The seven remaining genes are pseudogenes or encode proteins that do not function catalytically or are not expressed. Furthermore, we show that HmsP has c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase activity. We report that a mutant incapable of c-di-GMP synthesis is unaffected in virulence in plague mouse models. Conversely, an hmsP mutant, unable to degrade c-di-GMP, is defective in virulence by a subcutaneous route of infection due to poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine overproduction. This suggests that c-di-GMP signaling is not only dispensable but deleterious for Y. pestis virulence. Our results show that a key event in the evolution of Y. pestis from the ancestral Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was a significant reduction in the complexity of its c-di-GMP signaling network likely resulting from the different disease cycles of these human pathogens. PMID:21219468

  19. High levels of cyclic-di-GMP in plant-associated Pseudomonas correlate with evasion of plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Saur, Isabel Marie-Luise; Rathjen, John Paul; Zipfel, Cyril; Malone, Jacob George

    2016-05-01

    The plant innate immune system employs plasma membrane-localized receptors that specifically perceive pathogen/microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs). This induces a defence response called pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) to fend off pathogen attack. Commensal bacteria are also exposed to potential immune recognition and must employ strategies to evade and/or suppress PTI to successfully colonize the plant. During plant infection, the flagellum has an ambiguous role, acting as both a virulence factor and also as a potent immunogen as a result of the recognition of its main building block, flagellin, by the plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2). Therefore, strict control of flagella synthesis is especially important for plant-associated bacteria. Here, we show that cyclic-di-GMP [bis-(3'-5')-cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate], a central regulator of bacterial lifestyle, is involved in the evasion of PTI. Elevated cyclic-di-GMP levels in the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000, the opportunist P. aeruginosa PAO1 and the commensal P. protegens Pf-5 inhibit flagellin synthesis and help the bacteria to evade FLS2-mediated signalling in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana. Despite this, high cellular cyclic-di-GMP concentrations were shown to drastically reduce the virulence of Pto DC3000 during plant infection. We propose that this is a result of reduced flagellar motility and/or additional pleiotropic effects of cyclic-di-GMP signalling on bacterial behaviour.

  20. Cyclic Di-GMP Regulates Multiple Cellular Functions in the Symbiotic Alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Schäper, Simon; Krol, Elizaveta; Skotnicka, Dorota; Kaever, Volkhard; Hilker, Rolf; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sinorhizobium meliloti undergoes major lifestyle changes between planktonic states, biofilm formation, and symbiosis with leguminous plant hosts. In many bacteria, the second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, or cdG) promotes a sessile lifestyle by regulating a plethora of processes involved in biofilm formation, including motility and biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides (EPS). Here, we systematically investigated the role of cdG in S. meliloti Rm2011 encoding 22 proteins putatively associated with cdG synthesis, degradation, or binding. Single mutations in 21 of these genes did not cause evident changes in biofilm formation, motility, or EPS biosynthesis. In contrast, manipulation of cdG levels by overproducing endogenous or heterologous diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) or phosphodiesterases (PDEs) affected these processes and accumulation of N-Acyl-homoserine lactones in the culture supernatant. Specifically, individual overexpression of the S. meliloti genes pleD, SMb20523, SMb20447, SMc01464, and SMc03178 encoding putative DGCs and of SMb21517 encoding a single-domain PDE protein had an impact and resulted in increased levels of cdG. Compared to the wild type, an S. meliloti strain that did not produce detectable levels of cdG (cdG0) was more sensitive to acid stress. However, it was symbiotically potent, unaffected in motility, and only slightly reduced in biofilm formation. The SMc01790-SMc01796 locus, homologous to the Agrobacterium tumefaciens uppABCDEF cluster governing biosynthesis of a unipolarly localized polysaccharide, was found to be required for cdG-stimulated biofilm formation, while the single-domain PilZ protein McrA was identified as a cdG receptor protein involved in regulation of motility. IMPORTANCE We present the first systematic genome-wide investigation of the role of 3′,5′-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, or cdG) in regulation of motility, biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and symbiosis in a

  1. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis. PMID:25621620

  2. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis. PMID:25621620

  3. Cyclic GMP-activated channels of salamander retinal rods: spatial distribution and variation of responsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Karpen, J W; Loney, D A; Baylor, D A

    1992-01-01

    1. Patch-clamp methods were used to investigate the areal density and spatial location of cyclic GMP-activated channels in the surface membrane of salamander rod outer segments. 2. The density of active channels (i.e. channels able to respond to cyclic GMP) in patches excised from outer segments was determined from the number of active channels, N, and the membrane area, A. N was estimated from the current induced by a saturating concentration of cyclic GMP, while A was estimated from the electrical capacitance of the patch. 3. In patches excised from forty-one isolated outer segments prepared in the light the active channel density varied over a remarkable range: 0.34-629 microns-2, with a mean of 166 microns-2. Density was not correlated with patch area in this or any of the conditions studied. 4. The spatial distribution of open channels on the outer segment of a transducing rod was measured by recording the local dark current at various positions with a loose-patch electrode. The apparent density of open channels varied by only about +/- 50% around the circumference of the outer segment and up and down its length. This indicates that the wide range of densities in excised patches did not result from sampling a non-uniform spatial distribution of channels. 5. Patches excised from sixteen dark-adapted whole cells with healthy appearances and saturating light responses of normal size had active channel densities of 1.1-200 microns-2, with a mean of 60 microns-2. Patches from twenty light-adapted whole cells had similar densities. Many densities from the whole cells were much lower than expected. This, and the wide variation in densities, suggests that obtaining a patch often lowered the density of active channels. The number of channels in a patch was quite stable from 1 s to 30 min after excision, ruling out progressive denaturation or adsorption of channels to the glass as a cause for this effect. 6. The mean active channel density in patches excised from whole

  4. Inactivation of Cyclic Di-GMP Binding Protein TDE0214 Affects the Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence of Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Liu, Xiangyang; Cheng, Yi-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    As a ubiquitous second messenger, cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) has been studied in numerous bacteria. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen associated with human periodontitis, has a complex c-di-GMP signaling network. However, its function remains unexplored. In this report, a PilZ-like c-di-GMP binding protein (TDE0214) was studied to investigate the role of c-di-GMP in the spirochete. TDE0214 harbors a PilZ domain with two signature motifs: RXXXR and DXSXXG. Biochemical studies showed that TDE0214 binds c-di-GMP in a specific manner, with a dissociation constant (Kd) value of 1.73 μM, which is in the low range compared to those of other reported c-di-GMP binding proteins. To reveal the role of c-di-GMP in T. denticola, a TDE0214 deletion mutant (TdΔ214) was constructed and analyzed in detail. First, swim plate and single-cell tracking analyses showed that TdΔ214 had abnormal swimming behaviors: the mutant was less motile and reversed more frequently than the wild type. Second, we found that biofilm formation of TdΔ214 was substantially repressed (∼6.0-fold reduction). Finally, in vivo studies using a mouse skin abscess model revealed that the invasiveness and ability to induce skin abscesses and host humoral immune responses were significantly attenuated in TdΔ214, indicative of the impact that TDE0214 has on the virulence of T. denticola. Collectively, the results reported here indicate that TDE0214 plays important roles in motility, biofilm formation, and virulence of the spirochete. This report also paves a way to further unveil the roles of the c-di-GMP signaling network in the biology and pathogenicity of T. denticola. PMID:23794624

  5. Effects of saline loading during head down tilt on ANP and cyclic GMP levels and on urinary fluid excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, C.; Lang, R. E.; Baisch, F.; Blomqvist, G.; Heer, M.; Gerzer, R.

    In the present study the renal and humoral effects of acute saline infusions were investigated in six healthy male volunteers before, during and after a ten day period of -6° head-down-tilt (HDT). During the whole 23-day study period the subjects received a standardized diet including 40 ml water and 125 mg NaCl per kg body weight per day. After the infusion of 0.9% saline (22 ml/kg within 20 minutes) plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels were only slightly increased (not significant) at the end of the infusion, while plasma cyclic GMP levels were significantly increased by about 40% (p<0.05) one hour later. No difference was observed in the plasma ANP and cyclic GMP changes between the pre-HDT, the HDT and the post-HDT infusion experiment. Urine flow, sodium excretion and urinary cyclic GMP excretion were significantly increased (p<0.05 and below) by 100 to 300% during the second and third hour after each saline infusion. However, during these short-term periods only 20% of the infused water and less than 20% of the infused sodium were excreted. Furthermore, a significantly increased volume, sodium and cyclic GMP excretion was observed for over 48 hours after each fluid load experiment. These data suggest that HDT does not induce major alterations in the regulation of an acute saline infusion and plasma ANP does not play a major role in the diuretic/natriuretic effects of volume loading.

  6. Mechanistic insight into the conserved allosteric regulation of periplasmic proteolysis by the signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Cooley, Richard B; Boyd, Chelsea D; Mehl, Ryan A; O'Toole, George A; Sondermann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Stable surface adhesion of cells is one of the early pivotal steps in bacterial biofilm formation, a prevalent adaptation strategy in response to changing environments. In Pseudomonas fluorescens, this process is regulated by the Lap system and the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP. High cytoplasmic levels of cyclic-di-GMP activate the transmembrane receptor LapD that in turn recruits the periplasmic protease LapG, preventing it from cleaving a cell surface-bound adhesin, thereby promoting cell adhesion. In this study, we elucidate the molecular basis of LapG regulation by LapD and reveal a remarkably sensitive switching mechanism that is controlled by LapD's HAMP domain. LapD appears to act as a coincidence detector, whereby a weak interaction of LapG with LapD transmits a transient outside-in signal that is reinforced only when cyclic-di-GMP levels increase. Given the conservation of key elements of this receptor system in many bacterial species, the results are broadly relevant for cyclic-di-GMP- and HAMP domain-regulated transmembrane signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03650.001 PMID:25182848

  7. Bovine rhodopsin: amino acid substitutions Asp-83----Asn and Glu-134----Gln prevent activation of cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V V; Zozulya, S A; Zerf, E P; Pokrovskaya, I D; Obukhova, T A; Garnovskaya, M N; Dumler, I L; Rychkova, M P

    1990-01-01

    Two bovine rhodopsin mutants with substitutions of negatively charged residues within transmembrane domains II and III by uncharged ones (Asp-83----Asn and Glu-134----Gln) were constructed. Both mutants stimulated transducin GTPase with slightly lowered efficiency, but were completely unable to activate cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase. PMID:1966786

  8. Mechanistic insight into the conserved allosteric regulation of periplasmic proteolysis by the signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Cooley, Richard B; Boyd, Chelsea D; Mehl, Ryan A; O'Toole, George A; Sondermann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Stable surface adhesion of cells is one of the early pivotal steps in bacterial biofilm formation, a prevalent adaptation strategy in response to changing environments. In Pseudomonas fluorescens, this process is regulated by the Lap system and the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP. High cytoplasmic levels of cyclic-di-GMP activate the transmembrane receptor LapD that in turn recruits the periplasmic protease LapG, preventing it from cleaving a cell surface-bound adhesin, thereby promoting cell adhesion. In this study, we elucidate the molecular basis of LapG regulation by LapD and reveal a remarkably sensitive switching mechanism that is controlled by LapD's HAMP domain. LapD appears to act as a coincidence detector, whereby a weak interaction of LapG with LapD transmits a transient outside-in signal that is reinforced only when cyclic-di-GMP levels increase. Given the conservation of key elements of this receptor system in many bacterial species, the results are broadly relevant for cyclic-di-GMP- and HAMP domain-regulated transmembrane signaling.

  9. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein.

  10. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein. PMID:27231351

  11. GEMM-I riboswitches from Geobacter sense the bacterial second messenger cyclic AMP-GMP

    PubMed Central

    Kellenberger, Colleen A.; Wilson, Stephen C.; Hickey, Scott F.; Gonzalez, Tania L.; Su, Yichi; Hallberg, Zachary F.; Brewer, Thomas F.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Carlson, Hans K.; Hsieh, Yu-Fang; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides are an expanding class of signaling molecules that control many aspects of bacterial physiology. A synthase for cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG, also referenced as 3′-5′, 3′-5′ cGAMP) called DncV is associated with hyperinfectivity of Vibrio cholerae but has not been found in many bacteria, raising questions about the prevalence and function of cAG signaling. We have discovered that the environmental bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces cAG and uses a subset of GEMM-I class riboswitches (GEMM-Ib, Genes for the Environment, Membranes, and Motility) as specific receptors for cAG. GEMM-Ib riboswitches regulate genes associated with extracellular electron transfer; thus cAG signaling may control aspects of bacterial electrophysiology. These findings expand the role of cAG beyond organisms that harbor DncV and beyond pathogenesis to microbial geochemistry, which is important to environmental remediation and microbial fuel cell development. Finally, we have developed an RNA-based fluorescent biosensor for live-cell imaging of cAG. This selective, genetically encodable biosensor will be useful to probe the biochemistry and cell biology of cAG signaling in diverse bacteria. PMID:25848022

  12. Vibrio cholerae VpsT Regulates Matrix Production and Motility by Directly Sensing Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Krasteva, P.; Fong, J; Shikuma, N; Beyhan, S; Navarro, M; Yildiz, F; Sondermann, H

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms can switch from a planktonic, free-swimming life-style to a sessile, colonial state, called a biofilm, which confers resistance to environmental stress. Conversion between the motile and biofilm life-styles has been attributed to increased levels of the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), yet the signaling mechanisms mediating such a global switch are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcriptional regulator VpsT from Vibrio cholerae directly senses c-di-GMP to inversely control extracellular matrix production and motility, which identifies VpsT as a master regulator for biofilm formation. Rather than being regulated by phosphorylation, VpsT undergoes a change in oligomerization on c-di-GMP binding.

  13. Cyclic di-GMP-mediated repression of swarming motility by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 requires the MotAB stator.

    PubMed

    Kuchma, S L; Delalez, N J; Filkins, L M; Snavely, E A; Armitage, J P; O'Toole, G A

    2015-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) plays a critical role in the regulation of motility. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, c-di-GMP inversely controls biofilm formation and surface swarming motility, with high levels of this dinucleotide signal stimulating biofilm formation and repressing swarming. P. aeruginosa encodes two stator complexes, MotAB and MotCD, that participate in the function of its single polar flagellum. Here we show that the repression of swarming motility requires a functional MotAB stator complex. Mutating the motAB genes restores swarming motility to a strain with artificially elevated levels of c-di-GMP as well as stimulates swarming in the wild-type strain, while overexpression of MotA from a plasmid represses swarming motility. Using point mutations in MotA and the FliG rotor protein of the motor supports the conclusion that MotA-FliG interactions are critical for c-di-GMP-mediated swarming inhibition. Finally, we show that high c-di-GMP levels affect the localization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-MotD fusion, indicating a mechanism whereby this second messenger has an impact on MotCD function. We propose that when c-di-GMP level is high, the MotAB stator can displace MotCD from the motor, thereby affecting motor function. Our data suggest a newly identified means of c-di-GMP-mediated control of surface motility, perhaps conserved among Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, and other organisms that encode two stator systems.

  14. Active Site Metal Occupancy and Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Activity of Thermotoga maritima HD-GYP.

    PubMed

    Miner, Kyle D; Kurtz, Donald M

    2016-02-16

    HD-GYPs make up a subclass of the metal-dependent HD phosphohydrolase superfamily and catalyze conversion of cyclic di(3',5')-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'→5')-guanosine (pGpG) and GMP. Until now, the only reported crystal structure of an HD-GYP that also exhibits c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity contains a His/carboxylate ligated triiron active site. However, other structural and phylogenetic correlations indicate that some HD-GYPs contain dimetal active sites. Here we provide evidence that an HD-GYP c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, TM0186, from Thermotoga maritima can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. We show that an as-isolated iron-containing TM0186 has an oxo/carboxylato-bridged diferric site, and that the reduced (diferrous) form is necessary and sufficient to catalyze conversion of c-di-GMP to pGpG, but that conversion of pGpG to GMP requires more than two metals per active site. Similar c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activities were obtained with divalent iron or manganese. On the basis of activity correlations with several putative metal ligand residue variants and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that TM0186 can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. Our results also suggest that a Glu residue conserved in a subset of HD-GYPs is required for formation of the trimetal site and can also serve as a labile ligand to the dimetal site. Given the anaerobic growth requirement of T. maritima, we suggest that this HD-GYP can function in vivo with either divalent iron or manganese occupying di- and trimetal sites.

  15. Output targets and transcriptional regulation by a cyclic dimeric GMP-responsive circuit in the Vibrio parahaemolyticus Scr network.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rosana B R; Chodur, Daniel M; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Trimble, Michael J; McCarter, Linda L

    2012-03-01

    The Vibrio parahaemolyticus Scr system modulates decisions pertinent to surface colonization by affecting the cellular level of cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP). In this work, we explore the scope and mechanism of this regulation. Transcriptome comparison of ΔscrABC and wild-type strains revealed expression differences with respect to ∼100 genes. Elevated c-di-GMP repressed genes in the surface-sensing regulon, including those encoding the lateral flagellar and type III secretion systems and N-acetylglucosamine-binding protein GpbA while inducing genes encoding other cell surface molecules and capsular polysaccharide. The transcription of a few regulatory genes was also affected, and the role of one was characterized. Mutations in cpsQ suppressed the sticky phenotype of scr mutants. cpsQ encodes one of four V. parahaemolyticus homologs in the CsgD/VpsT family, members of which have been implicated in c-di-GMP signaling. Here, we demonstrate that CpsQ is a c-di-GMP-binding protein. By using a combination of mutant and reporter analyses, CpsQ was found to be the direct, positive regulator of cpsA transcription. This c-di-GMP-responsive regulatory circuit could be reconstituted in Escherichia coli, where a low level of this nucleotide diminished the stability of CpsQ. The molecular interplay of additional known cps regulators was defined by establishing that CpsS, another CsgD family member, repressed cpsR, and the transcription factor CpsR activated cpsQ. Thus, we are developing a connectivity map of the Scr decision-making network with respect to its wiring and output strategies for colonizing surfaces and interaction with hosts; in doing so, we have isolated and reproduced a c-di-GMP-sensitive regulatory module in the circuit.

  16. Structural analysis of the STING adaptor protein reveals a hydrophobic dimer interface and mode of cyclic di-GMP binding.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Songying; Song, Xianqiang; Wang, Yaya; Ru, Heng; Shaw, Neil; Jiang, Yan; Niu, Fengfeng; Zhu, Yanping; Qiu, Weicheng; Parvatiyar, Kislay; Li, Yang; Zhang, Rongguang; Cheng, Genhong; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-06-29

    STING is an essential signaling molecule for DNA and cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-mediated type I interferon (IFN) production via TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) pathway. It contains an N-terminal transmembrane region and a cytosolic C-terminal domain (CTD). Here, we describe crystal structures of STING CTD alone and complexed with c-di-GMP in a unique binding mode. The strictly conserved aa 153-173 region was shown to be cytosolic and participated in dimerization via hydrophobic interactions. The STING CTD functions as a dimer and the dimerization was independent of posttranslational modifications. Binding of c-di-GMP enhanced interaction of a shorter construct of STING CTD (residues 139-344) with TBK1. This suggests an extra TBK1 binding site, other than serine 358. This study provides a glimpse into the unique architecture of STING and sheds light on the mechanism of c-di-GMP-mediated TBK1 signaling.

  17. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Badri N; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-09-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling. PMID:27652341

  18. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Badri N.; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di–guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling. PMID:27652341

  19. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Badri N.; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di–guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling.

  20. ChIP-seq reveals the global regulator AlgR mediating cyclic di-GMP synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weina; Zhao, Jingru; Kang, Huaping; Zhu, Miao; Zhou, Tianhong; Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua

    2015-01-01

    AlgR is a key transcriptional regulator required for the expression of multiple virulence factors, including type IV pili and alginate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the regulon and molecular regulatory mechanism of AlgR have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, among 157 loci that were identified by a ChIP-seq assay, we characterized a gene, mucR, which encodes an enzyme that synthesizes the intracellular second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). A ΔalgR strain produced lesser biofilm than did the wild-type strain, which is consistent with a phenotype controlled by c-di-GMP. AlgR positively regulates mucR via direct binding to its promoter. A ΔalgRΔmucR double mutant produced lesser biofilm than did the single ΔalgR mutant, demonstrating that c-di-GMP is a positive regulator of biofilm formation. AlgR controls the levels of c-di-GMP synthesis via direct regulation of mucR. In addition, the cognate sensor of AlgR, FimS/AlgZ, also plays an important role in P. aeruginosa virulence. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the AlgR regulon and reveals the involvement of c-di-GMP in the mechanism underlying AlgR regulation. PMID:26206672

  1. ChIP-seq reveals the global regulator AlgR mediating cyclic di-GMP synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weina; Zhao, Jingru; Kang, Huaping; Zhu, Miao; Zhou, Tianhong; Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua

    2015-09-30

    AlgR is a key transcriptional regulator required for the expression of multiple virulence factors, including type IV pili and alginate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the regulon and molecular regulatory mechanism of AlgR have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, among 157 loci that were identified by a ChIP-seq assay, we characterized a gene, mucR, which encodes an enzyme that synthesizes the intracellular second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). A ΔalgR strain produced lesser biofilm than did the wild-type strain, which is consistent with a phenotype controlled by c-di-GMP. AlgR positively regulates mucR via direct binding to its promoter. A ΔalgRΔmucR double mutant produced lesser biofilm than did the single ΔalgR mutant, demonstrating that c-di-GMP is a positive regulator of biofilm formation. AlgR controls the levels of c-di-GMP synthesis via direct regulation of mucR. In addition, the cognate sensor of AlgR, FimS/AlgZ, also plays an important role in P. aeruginosa virulence. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the AlgR regulon and reveals the involvement of c-di-GMP in the mechanism underlying AlgR regulation.

  2. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Badri N; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-09-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling.

  3. Bacterial rotary export ATPases are allosterically regulated by the nucleotide second messenger cyclic-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Trampari, Eleftheria; Stevenson, Clare E M; Little, Richard H; Wilhelm, Thomas; Lawson, David M; Malone, Jacob G

    2015-10-01

    The widespread second messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP (cdG) regulates the transition from motile and virulent lifestyles to sessile, biofilm-forming ones in a wide range of bacteria. Many pathogenic and commensal bacterial-host interactions are known to be controlled by cdG signaling. Although the biochemistry of cyclic dinucleotide metabolism is well understood, much remains to be discovered about the downstream signaling pathways that induce bacterial responses upon cdG binding. As part of our ongoing research into the role of cdG signaling in plant-associated Pseudomonas species, we carried out an affinity capture screen for cdG binding proteins in the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. The flagella export AAA+ ATPase FliI was identified as a result of this screen and subsequently shown to bind specifically to the cdG molecule, with a KD in the low micromolar range. The interaction between FliI and cdG appears to be very widespread. In addition to FliI homologs from diverse bacterial species, high affinity binding was also observed for the type III secretion system homolog HrcN and the type VI ATPase ClpB2. The addition of cdG was shown to inhibit FliI and HrcN ATPase activity in vitro. Finally, a combination of site-specific mutagenesis, mass spectrometry, and in silico analysis was used to predict that cdG binds to FliI in a pocket of highly conserved residues at the interface between two FliI subunits. Our results suggest a novel, fundamental role for cdG in controlling the function of multiple important bacterial export pathways, through direct allosteric control of export ATPase proteins.

  4. Inherent regulation of EAL domain-catalyzed hydrolysis of second messenger cyclic di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Amit; Massa, Claudia; Samoray, Dietrich; Zehender, Fabian; Sharpe, Timothy; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2014-03-01

    The universal second messenger cyclic di-GMP (cdG) is involved in the regulation of a diverse range of cellular processes in bacteria. The intracellular concentration of the dinucleotide is determined by the opposing actions of diguanylate cyclases and cdG-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Whereas most PDEs have accessory domains that are involved in the regulation of their activity, the regulatory mechanism of this class of enzymes has remained unclear. Here, we use biophysical and functional analyses to show that the isolated EAL domain of a PDE from Escherichia coli (YahA) is in a fast thermodynamic monomer-dimer equilibrium, and that the domain is active only in its dimeric state. Furthermore, our data indicate thermodynamic coupling between substrate binding and EAL dimerization with the dimerization affinity being increased about 100-fold upon substrate binding. Crystal structures of the YahA-EAL domain determined under various conditions (apo, Mg(2+), cdG·Ca(2+) complex) confirm structural coupling between the dimer interface and the catalytic center. The built-in regulatory properties of the EAL domain probably facilitate its modular, functional combination with the diverse repertoire of accessory domains.

  5. Next-generation RNA-based fluorescent biosensors enable anaerobic detection of cyclic di-GMP

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin C.; Wilson, Stephen C.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria occupy a diverse set of environmental niches with differing oxygen availability. Anaerobic environments such as mammalian digestive tracts and industrial reactors harbor an abundance of both obligate and facultative anaerobes, many of which play significant roles in human health and biomanufacturing. Studying bacterial function under partial or fully anaerobic conditions, however, is challenging given the paucity of suitable live-cell imaging tools. Here, we introduce a series of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors that respond selectively to cyclic di-GMP, an intracellular bacterial second messenger that controls cellular motility and biofilm formation. We demonstrate the utility of these biosensors in vivo under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and we show that biosensor expression does not interfere with the native motility phenotype. Together, our results attest to the effectiveness and versatility of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors, priming further development and application of these and other analogous sensors to study host–microbial and microbial–microbial interactions through small molecule signals. PMID:27382070

  6. Next-generation RNA-based fluorescent biosensors enable anaerobic detection of cyclic di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin C; Wilson, Stephen C; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-09-30

    Bacteria occupy a diverse set of environmental niches with differing oxygen availability. Anaerobic environments such as mammalian digestive tracts and industrial reactors harbor an abundance of both obligate and facultative anaerobes, many of which play significant roles in human health and biomanufacturing. Studying bacterial function under partial or fully anaerobic conditions, however, is challenging given the paucity of suitable live-cell imaging tools. Here, we introduce a series of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors that respond selectively to cyclic di-GMP, an intracellular bacterial second messenger that controls cellular motility and biofilm formation. We demonstrate the utility of these biosensors in vivo under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and we show that biosensor expression does not interfere with the native motility phenotype. Together, our results attest to the effectiveness and versatility of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors, priming further development and application of these and other analogous sensors to study host-microbial and microbial-microbial interactions through small molecule signals.

  7. Next-generation RNA-based fluorescent biosensors enable anaerobic detection of cyclic di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin C; Wilson, Stephen C; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-09-30

    Bacteria occupy a diverse set of environmental niches with differing oxygen availability. Anaerobic environments such as mammalian digestive tracts and industrial reactors harbor an abundance of both obligate and facultative anaerobes, many of which play significant roles in human health and biomanufacturing. Studying bacterial function under partial or fully anaerobic conditions, however, is challenging given the paucity of suitable live-cell imaging tools. Here, we introduce a series of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors that respond selectively to cyclic di-GMP, an intracellular bacterial second messenger that controls cellular motility and biofilm formation. We demonstrate the utility of these biosensors in vivo under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and we show that biosensor expression does not interfere with the native motility phenotype. Together, our results attest to the effectiveness and versatility of RNA-based fluorescent biosensors, priming further development and application of these and other analogous sensors to study host-microbial and microbial-microbial interactions through small molecule signals. PMID:27382070

  8. Regulation by mitochondrial superoxide and NADPH oxidase of cellular formation of nitrated cyclic GMP: potential implications for ROS signalling.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khandaker Ahtesham; Sawa, Tomohiro; Ihara, Hideshi; Kasamatsu, Shingo; Yoshitake, Jun; Rahaman, Md Mizanur; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Fujii, Shigemoto; Akaike, Takaaki

    2012-01-15

    8-Nitro-cGMP (8-nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate) is a nitrated derivative of cGMP, which can function as a unique electrophilic second messenger involved in regulation of an antioxidant adaptive response in cells. In the present study, we investigated chemical and biochemical regulatory mechanisms involved in 8-nitro-cGMP formation, with particular focus on the roles of ROS (reactive oxygen species). Chemical analyses demonstrated that peroxynitrite-dependent oxidation and myeloperoxidase-dependent oxidation of nitrite in the presence of H2O2 were two major pathways for guanine nucleotide nitration. Among the guanine nucleotides examined, GTP was the most sensitive to peroxynitrite-mediated nitration. Immunocytochemical and tandem mass spectrometric analyses revealed that formation of 8-nitro-cGMP in rat C6 glioma cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide plus pro-inflammatory cytokines depended on production of both superoxide and H2O2. Using the mitochondria-targeted chemical probe MitoSOX Red, we found that mitochondria-derived superoxide can act as a direct determinant of 8-nitro-cGMP formation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Nox2 (NADPH oxidase 2)-generated H2O2 regulated mitochondria-derived superoxide production, which suggests the importance of cross-talk between Nox2-dependent H2O2 production and mitochondrial superoxide production. The results of the present study suggest that 8-nitro-cGMP can serve as a unique second messenger that may be implicated in regulating ROS signalling in the presence of NO.

  9. Resonance Raman characterization of different forms of ground-state 8-bromo-7-hydroxyquinoline caged acetate in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    An, Hui-Ying; Ma, Chensheng; Nganga, Jameil L; Zhu, Yue; Dore, Timothy M; Phillips, David Lee

    2009-03-26

    The 8-bromo-7-hydroxyquinolinyl group (BHQ) is a derivative of 7-hydroxyquinoline (7-HQ) and BHQ molecules coexisting as different forms in aqueous solution. Absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopic methods were used to examine 8-bromo-7-hydroxyquinoline protected acetate (BHQ-OAc) in acetonitrile (MeCN), H(2)O/MeCN (60:40, v/v, pH 6 approximately 7), and NaOH-H(2)O/MeCN (60:40, v/v, pH 11 approximately 12) to obtain a better characterization of the forms of the ground-state species of BHQ-OAc in aqueous solutions and to examine their properties. The absorption spectra of BHQ-OAc in water show no absorption bands of the tautomeric species unlike the strong band at about 400 nm observed for the tautomeric form in 7-HQ aqueous solution. The resonance Raman spectra in conjunction with Raman spectra predicted from density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the observation of a double Raman band system characteristic of the neutral form (the nominal C=C ring stretching, C-N stretching, and O-H bending modes at 1564 and 1607 cm(-1)) and a single Raman band diagnostic of the enol-deprotonated anionic form (the nominal C=C ring, C-N, and C-O(-) stretching modes in the 1593 cm(-1) region). These results suggest that the neutral form of BHQ-OAc is the major species in neutral aqueous solution. There is a modest increase in the amount of the anionic form and a big decrease in the amount of the tautomeric form of the molecules for BHQ-OAc compared to 7-HQ in neutral aqueous solution. The presence of the 8-bromo group and/or competitive hydrogen bonding that hinder the formation and transfer process of a BHQ-OAc-water cyclic complex may be responsible for this large substituent effect. PMID:19296708

  10. Cyclic di-GMP contributes to adaption and virulence of Bacillus thuringiensis through a riboswitch-regulated collagen adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing; Yin, Kang; Qian, Hongliang; Zhao, Youwen; Wang, Wen; Chou, Shan-Ho; Fu, Yang; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes in bacteria by binding to various protein or riboswitch effectors. In Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171, a c-di-GMP riboswitch termed Bc2 RNA resides in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of an mRNA that encodes a collagen adhesion protein (Cap). The expression of cap was strongly repressed in parent strain BMB171 because of the presence of Bc2 RNA but was significantly promoted in the Bc2 RNA markerless deletion mutant. Bc2 RNA acts as a genetic "on" switch, which forms an anti-terminator structure to promote cap read-through transcription upon c-di-GMP binding. As a result, cap transcription was de-repressed under high c-di-GMP levels. Therefore, Bc2 RNA regulates cap expression using a repression/de-repression model. Bc2 RNA-regulated Cap was also found to be tightly associated with motility, aggregation, exopolysaccharide secretion, biofilm formation, and virulence of B. thuringiensis BMB171 against its host insect Helicoverpa armigera. PMID:27381437

  11. Systematic Nomenclature for GGDEF and EAL Domain-Containing Cyclic Di-GMP Turnover Proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Regine; Galperin, Michael Y; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Gomelsky, Mark; Green, Jeffrey; Hughes, Kelly T; Jenal, Urs; Landini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, Escherichia coli has served as one of a few model bacterial species for studying cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. The widely used E. coli K-12 laboratory strains possess 29 genes encoding proteins with GGDEF and/or EAL domains, which include 12 diguanylate cyclases (DGC), 13 c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE), and 4 "degenerate" enzymatically inactive proteins. In addition, six new GGDEF and EAL (GGDEF/EAL) domain-encoding genes, which encode two DGCs and four PDEs, have recently been found in genomic analyses of commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. As a group of researchers who have been studying the molecular mechanisms and the genomic basis of c-di-GMP signaling in E. coli, we now propose a general and systematic dgc and pde nomenclature for the enzymatically active GGDEF/EAL domain-encoding genes of this model species. This nomenclature is intuitive and easy to memorize, and it can also be applied to additional genes and proteins that might be discovered in various strains of E. coli in future studies.

  12. The cyclic GMP/protein kinase G pathway as a therapeutic target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Traci R; Mierzwa, Michelle L; Wells, Susanne I; Fox, Sejal R; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2016-01-28

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. Treatments, which can result in significant morbidity, have not substantially changed in three decades. The second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP), which targets protein kinase G (PKG), is generated by guanylate cyclases (GCs), and is rapidly hydrolyzed by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Activation of the cGMP/PKG pathway is antineoplastic in several cancer types, but its impact on HNSCC has not been fully exploited. We found differential expression of critical components of this pathway in four HNSCC cell lines. Several activators of soluble GC (sGC), as well as inhibitors of PDE5, increased intracellular cGMP, reduced cell viability, and induced apoptosis in HNSCC cells. The apoptotic effects of the sGC activator BAY 41-2272 and the PDE5 inhibitor Tadalafil (Cialis) were mediated by PKG. Furthermore, Tadalafil substantially reduced the growth of CAL27-derived tumors in athymic mice. Several drugs which either activate sGC or inhibit PDE5 are approved for treatment of nonmalignant conditions. These drugs could be repurposed as novel and effective therapeutics in patients with head and neck cancer.

  13. Cyclic di-GMP contributes to adaption and virulence of Bacillus thuringiensis through a riboswitch-regulated collagen adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing; Yin, Kang; Qian, Hongliang; Zhao, Youwen; Wang, Wen; Chou, Shan-Ho; Fu, Yang; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes in bacteria by binding to various protein or riboswitch effectors. In Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171, a c-di-GMP riboswitch termed Bc2 RNA resides in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of an mRNA that encodes a collagen adhesion protein (Cap). The expression of cap was strongly repressed in parent strain BMB171 because of the presence of Bc2 RNA but was significantly promoted in the Bc2 RNA markerless deletion mutant. Bc2 RNA acts as a genetic "on" switch, which forms an anti-terminator structure to promote cap read-through transcription upon c-di-GMP binding. As a result, cap transcription was de-repressed under high c-di-GMP levels. Therefore, Bc2 RNA regulates cap expression using a repression/de-repression model. Bc2 RNA-regulated Cap was also found to be tightly associated with motility, aggregation, exopolysaccharide secretion, biofilm formation, and virulence of B. thuringiensis BMB171 against its host insect Helicoverpa armigera.

  14. Systematic Nomenclature for GGDEF and EAL Domain-Containing Cyclic Di-GMP Turnover Proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Regine; Galperin, Michael Y; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Gomelsky, Mark; Green, Jeffrey; Hughes, Kelly T; Jenal, Urs; Landini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, Escherichia coli has served as one of a few model bacterial species for studying cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. The widely used E. coli K-12 laboratory strains possess 29 genes encoding proteins with GGDEF and/or EAL domains, which include 12 diguanylate cyclases (DGC), 13 c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE), and 4 "degenerate" enzymatically inactive proteins. In addition, six new GGDEF and EAL (GGDEF/EAL) domain-encoding genes, which encode two DGCs and four PDEs, have recently been found in genomic analyses of commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. As a group of researchers who have been studying the molecular mechanisms and the genomic basis of c-di-GMP signaling in E. coli, we now propose a general and systematic dgc and pde nomenclature for the enzymatically active GGDEF/EAL domain-encoding genes of this model species. This nomenclature is intuitive and easy to memorize, and it can also be applied to additional genes and proteins that might be discovered in various strains of E. coli in future studies. PMID:26148715

  15. Cyclic di-GMP contributes to adaption and virulence of Bacillus thuringiensis through a riboswitch-regulated collagen adhesion protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing; Yin, Kang; Qian, Hongliang; Zhao, Youwen; Wang, Wen; Chou, Shan-Ho; Fu, Yang; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes in bacteria by binding to various protein or riboswitch effectors. In Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171, a c-di-GMP riboswitch termed Bc2 RNA resides in the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of an mRNA that encodes a collagen adhesion protein (Cap). The expression of cap was strongly repressed in parent strain BMB171 because of the presence of Bc2 RNA but was significantly promoted in the Bc2 RNA markerless deletion mutant. Bc2 RNA acts as a genetic “on” switch, which forms an anti-terminator structure to promote cap read-through transcription upon c-di-GMP binding. As a result, cap transcription was de-repressed under high c-di-GMP levels. Therefore, Bc2 RNA regulates cap expression using a repression/de-repression model. Bc2 RNA-regulated Cap was also found to be tightly associated with motility, aggregation, exopolysaccharide secretion, biofilm formation, and virulence of B. thuringiensis BMB171 against its host insect Helicoverpa armigera. PMID:27381437

  16. Photosensory transduction in ciliates. IV. Modulation of the photomovement response of Blepharisma japonicum by cGMP.

    PubMed

    Fabczak, H; Tao, N; Fabczak, S; Song, P S

    1993-05-01

    The effect of various modulators of cytoplasmic guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) level on the step-up photophobic responses in Blepharisma japonicum has been investigated to clarify the possible role of cGMP in the mechanism of photosensory signal transduction. Membrane-permeable analogs of cGMP, 8-bromo-guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate or dibutyryl cGMP, caused a marked dose-dependent prolongation of the latency for the photophobic response, resulting in inhibition of the photophobic response in Blepharisma japonicum. A similar effect was observed when cells were treated with 3'-isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and pertussis toxin, a G-protein activity modulator. The G-protein activator, fluoroaluminate, and 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY 83583), an agent which effectively lowers the cytoplasmic cGMP level, significantly enhanced the photoresponsiveness of these ciliates to visible light stimuli. These results suggest that cellular cGMP serves as a signal modulator in the photophobic response of Blepharisma japonicum.

  17. Alterations in the Cerebellar (Phospho)Proteome of a Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent Protein Kinase Knockout Mouse*

    PubMed Central

    Corradini, Eleonora; Vallur, Raghavan; Raaijmakers, Linsey M.; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert; Heck, Albert J. R.; Scholten, Arjen

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in learning and memory, but its signaling mechanisms in the mammalian brain are not fully understood. Using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics, we evaluated how the cerebellum adapts its (phospho)proteome in a knockout mouse model of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI). Our data reveal that a small subset of proteins in the cerebellum (∼3% of the quantified proteins) became substantially differentially expressed in the absence of cGKI. More changes were observed at the phosphoproteome level, with hundreds of sites being differentially phosphorylated between wild-type and knockout cerebellum. Most of these phosphorylated sites do not represent known cGKI substrates. An integrative computational network analysis of the data indicated that the differentially expressed proteins and proteins harboring differentially phosphorylated sites largely belong to a tight network in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum involving important cGMP/cAMP signaling nodes (e.g. PDE5 and PKARIIβ) and Ca2+ signaling (e.g. SERCA3). In this way, removal of cGKI could be linked to impaired cerebellar long-term depression at Purkinje cell synapses. In addition, we were able to identify a set of novel putative (phospho)proteins to be considered in this network. Overall, our data improve our understanding of cerebellar cGKI signaling and suggest novel players in cGKI-regulated synaptic plasticity. PMID:24925903

  18. Activation of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase by self-DNA causes autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gao, Daxing; Li, Tuo; Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Xiang; Li, Quan-Zhen; Wight-Carter, Mary; Chen, Zhijian J

    2015-10-20

    TREX1 is an exonuclease that digests DNA in the cytoplasm. Loss-of-function mutations of TREX1 are linked to Aicardi-Goutieres Syndrome (AGS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in humans. Trex1(-/-) mice exhibit autoimmune and inflammatory phenotypes that are associated with elevated expression of interferon (IFN)-induced genes (ISGs). Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates the IFN pathway. Upon binding to DNA, cGAS is activated to catalyze the synthesis of cGAMP, which functions as a second messenger that binds and activates the adaptor protein STING to induce IFNs and other cytokines. Here we show that genetic ablation of cGas in Trex1(-/-) mice eliminated all detectable pathological and molecular phenotypes, including ISG induction, autoantibody production, aberrant T-cell activation, and lethality. Even deletion of just one allele of cGas largely rescued the phenotypes of Trex1(-/-) mice. Similarly, deletion of cGas in mice lacking DNaseII, a lysosomal enzyme that digests DNA, rescued the lethal autoimmune phenotypes of the DNaseII(-/-) mice. Through quantitative mass spectrometry, we found that cGAMP accumulated in mouse tissues deficient in Trex1 or DNaseII and that this accumulation was dependent on cGAS. These results demonstrate that cGAS activation causes the autoimmune diseases in Trex1(-/-) and DNaseII(-/-) mice and suggest that inhibition of cGAS may lead to prevention and treatment of some human autoimmune diseases caused by self-DNA. PMID:26371324

  19. Escherichia coli K-12 YfgF is an anaerobic cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase with roles in cell surface remodelling and the oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Melissa M; Partridge, Jonathan D; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-09-01

    The Escherichia coli K-12 yfgF gene encodes a protein with domains associated with cyclic di-GMP signalling: GGDEF (associated with diguanylate cyclase activity) and EAL (associated with cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity). Here, it is shown that yfgF is expressed under anaerobic conditions from a class II FNR (regulator of fumarate and nitrate reduction)-dependent promoter. Anaerobic expression of yfgF is greatest in stationary phase, and in cultures grown at 28 degrees C, suggesting that low growth rates promote yfgF expression. Mutation of yfgF resulted in altered cell surface properties and enhanced sensitivity when anaerobic cultures were exposed to peroxides. The purified YfgF GGDEF-EAL (YfgF(GE)) and EAL (YfgF(E)) domains possessed cyclic di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase activity, but lacked diguanylate cyclase activity. However, the catalytically inactive GGDEF domain was required for YfgF(GE) dimerization and enhanced cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity in the presence of physiological concentrations of Mg(2+). The cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity of YfgF(GE) and YfgF(E) was inhibited by the product of the reaction, 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'-5')-guanosine (pGpG). Thus, it is shown that the yfgF gene encodes an anaerobic cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase that is involved in remodelling the cell surface of E. coli K-12 and in the response to peroxide shock, with implications for integrating three global regulatory networks, i.e. oxygen regulation, cyclic di-GMP signalling and the oxidative stress response.

  20. The Second Messenger Cyclic Di-GMP Regulates Clostridium difficile Toxin Production by Controlling Expression of sigD

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Robert W.; Mangalea, Mihnea R.; Purcell, Erin B.; Borchardt, Erin K.

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive obligate anaerobe Clostridium difficile causes potentially fatal intestinal diseases. How this organism regulates virulence gene expression is poorly understood. In many bacterial species, the second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) negatively regulates flagellar motility and, in some cases, virulence. c-di-GMP was previously shown to repress motility of C. difficile. Recent evidence indicates that flagellar gene expression is tightly linked with expression of the genes encoding the two C. difficile toxins TcdA and TcdB, which are key virulence factors for this pathogen. Here, the effect of c-di-GMP on expression of the toxin genes tcdA and tcdB was determined, and the mechanism connecting flagellar and toxin gene expressions was examined. In C. difficile, increasing c-di-GMP levels reduced the expression levels of tcdA and tcdB, as well as that of tcdR, which encodes an alternative sigma factor that activates tcdA and tcdB expression. We hypothesized that the C. difficile orthologue of the flagellar alternative sigma factor SigD (FliA; σ28) mediates regulation of toxin gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Indeed, ectopic expression of sigD in C. difficile resulted in increased expression levels of tcdR, tcdA, and tcdB. Furthermore, sigD expression enhanced toxin production and increased the cytopathic effect of C. difficile on cultured fibroblasts. Finally, evidence is provided that SigD directly activates tcdR expression and that SigD cannot activate tcdA or tcdB expression independent of TcdR. Taken together, these data suggest that SigD positively regulates toxin genes in C. difficile and that c-di-GMP can inhibit both motility and toxin production via SigD, making this signaling molecule a key virulence gene regulator in C. difficile. PMID:24039264

  1. Dissimilarities between methylene blue and cyanide on relaxation and cyclic GMP formation in endothelium-intact intrapulmonary artery caused by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and acetylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to ascertain whether cyanide shares the properties of methylene blue as a selective inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle relaxation elicited by agents that stimulate the formation of cyclic GMP. Experiments were performed with endothelium-intact rings prepared from bovine intrapulmonary artery. Methylene blue, a good inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, antagonized both arterial relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation in response to sodium nitroprusside, glyceryl trinitrate, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and acetylcholine. In contrast, cyanide inhibited only the responses to sodium nitroprusside. Increasing concentrations of methylene blue depressed resting arterial levels of cyclic GMP and caused slowly developing but marked contractions whereas cyanide was without effect. Contractile responses to phenylephrine, potassium and U46619 were potentiated by methylene blue but not by cyanide. Preincubation of dilute solutions of cyanide containing sodium nitroprusside in oxygenated Krebs' buffer at 37 degrees C for 15 min before addition to bath chambers depressed relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation caused by sodium nitroprusside markedly. Similar treatment of glyceryl trinitrate, however, failed to alter its effects in arterial rings. A chemical inactivation of sodium nitroprusside by cyanide appears to account for the specific inhibitory action of cyanide on arterial responses to sodium nitroprusside. This study indicates clearly that cyanide does not share the properties of methylene blue as an inhibitor of arterial relaxation elicited by vasodilators that stimulate cyclic GMP formation.

  2. Investigation of the role of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP in both the activation and inhibition of human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Wanikiat, P; Woodward, D F; Armstrong, R A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the role of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP in chemotaxis and superoxide anion generation (SAG) by human neutrophils, by use of selective inhibitors of NO and cyclic GMP pathways. In addition, inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by NO releasing compounds and increases in neutrophil nitrate/nitrite and cyclic GMP levels were examined. The ultimate aim of this work was to resolve the paradox that NO both activates and inhibits human neutrophils. A role for NO as a mediator of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced chemotaxis was supported by the finding that the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NMMA (500 μM) inhibited chemotaxis; EC50 for fMLP 28.76±5.62 and 41.13±4.77 pmol/106 cells with and without L-NMMA, respectively. Similarly the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO (100 μM) inhibited chemotaxis; EC50 for fMLP 19.71±4.23 and 31.68±8.50 pmol/106 cells with and without carboxy-PTIO, respectively. A role for cyclic GMP as a mediator of chemotaxis was supported by the finding that the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor LY 83583 (100 μM) completely inhibited chemotaxis and suppressed the maximal response; EC50 for fMLP 32.53±11.18 and 85.21±15.14 pmol/106 cells with and without LY 83583, respectively. The same pattern of inhibition was observed with the G-kinase inhibitor KT 5823 (10 μM); EC50 for fMLP 32.16±11.35 and >135 pmol/106 cells with and without KT 5823, respectively. The phosphatase inhibitor, 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid (DPG) (100 μM) which inhibits phospholipase D, attenuated fMLP-induced chemotaxis; EC50 for fMLP 19.15±4.36 and 61.52±16.2 pmol/106 cells with and without DPG, respectively. Although the NOS inhibitors L-NMMA and L-canavanine (500 μM) failed to inhibit fMLP-induced SAG, carboxy-PTIO caused significant inhibition (EC50 for fMLP 36.15±7.43 and 86.31±14.06 nM and reduced the maximal response from 22.14±1.5 to 9.8±1.6 nmol O2−/106 cells/10 min with and without

  3. Evidence that additional mechanisms to cyclic GMP mediate the decrease in intracellular calcium and relaxation of rabbit aortic smooth muscle to nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Griswold, Mark C; Yaghoubi, Mohammad; Komalavilas, Padmini; Lincoln, Thomas M; Cohen, Richard A

    1998-01-01

    The role of cyclic GMP in the ability of nitric oxide (NO) to decrease intracellular free calcium concentration [Ca2+]i and divalent cation influx was studied in rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells in primary culture. In cells stimulated with angiotensin II (AII, 10−7 M), NO (10−10–10−6 M) increased cyclic GMP levels measured by radioimmunoassay and decreased [Ca2+]i and cation influx as indicated by fura-2 fluorimetry.Zaprinast (10−4 M), increased NO-stimulated levels of cyclic GMP by 3–20 fold. Although the phosphodiesterase inhibitor lowered the level of [Ca2+]i reached after administration of NO, the initial decreases in [Ca2+]i initiated by NO were not significantly different in magnitude or duration from those that occurred in the absence of zaprinast.The guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, H-(1,2,4) oxadiazolo(4,3-a) quinoxallin-1-one (ODQ, 10−5 M), blocked cyclic GMP accumulation and activation of protein kinase G, as measured by back phosphorylation of the inositol trisphosphate receptor. ODQ and Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS, a protein kinase G inhibitor, decreased the effects of NO, 10−10–10−8 M, but the decrease in [Ca2+]i or cation influx caused by higher concentrations of NO (10−7–10−6 M) were unaffected. Relaxation of intact rabbit aorta rings to NO (10−7–10−5 M) also persisted in the presence of ODQ without a significant increase in cyclic GMP. Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS blocked the decreases in cation influx caused by a cell permeable cyclic GMP analog, but ODQ and/or the protein kinase G inhibitor had no significant effect on the decrease caused by NO.Although inhibitors of cyclic GMP, protein kinase G and phosphodiesterase can be shown to affect the decrease in [Ca2+]i and cation influx via protein kinase G, these studies indicate that when these mechanisms are blocked, cyclic GMP-independent mechanisms also contribute significantly to the decrease in [Ca2+]i and smooth muscle relaxation to NO. PMID:9886761

  4. A label-free and self-assembled electrochemical biosensor for highly sensitive detection of cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) based on RNA riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingyun; Zhao, Fulin; Liu, Hongrui; Shan, Yanke; Liu, Fei

    2015-07-01

    Cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is an important second messenger that regulates a variety of complex physiological processes involved in motility, virulence, biofilm formation and cell cycle progression in several bacteria. Herein we report a simple label-free and self-assembled RNA riboswitch-based biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of c-di-GMP. The detectable concentration range of c-di-GMP is from 50 nM to 1 μM with a detection limit of 50 nM.

  5. In Vivo Synthesis of Cyclic-di-GMP Using a Recombinant Adenovirus Preferentially Improves Adaptive Immune Responses against Extracellular Antigens.

    PubMed

    Alyaqoub, Fadel S; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Koestler, Benjamin J; Bruger, Eric L; Seregin, Sergey S; Pereira-Hicks, Cristiane; Godbehere, Sarah; Waters, Christopher M; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    There is a compelling need for more effective vaccine adjuvants to augment induction of Ag-specific adaptive immune responses. Recent reports suggested the bacterial second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic-dimeric-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) acts as an innate immune system modulator. We recently incorporated a Vibrio cholerae diguanylate cyclase into an adenovirus vaccine, fostering production of c-di-GMP as well as proinflammatory responses in mice. In this study, we recombined a more potent diguanylate cyclase gene, VCA0848, into a nonreplicating adenovirus serotype 5 (AdVCA0848) that produces elevated amounts of c-di-GMP when expressed in mammalian cells in vivo. This novel platform further improved induction of type I IFN-β and activation of innate and adaptive immune cells early after administration into mice as compared with control vectors. Coadministration of the extracellular protein OVA and the AdVCA0848 adjuvant significantly improved OVA-specific T cell responses as detected by IFN-γ and IL-2 ELISPOT, while also improving OVA-specific humoral B cell adaptive responses. In addition, we found that coadministration of AdVCA0848 with another adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing the HIV-1-derived Gag Ag or the Clostridium difficile-derived toxin B resulted in significant inhibitory effects on the induction of Gag and toxin B-specific adaptive immune responses. As a proof of principle, these data confirm that in vivo synthesis of c-di-GMP stimulates strong innate immune responses that correlate with enhanced adaptive immune responses to concomitantly administered extracellular Ag, which can be used as an adjuvant to heighten effective immune responses for protein-based vaccine platforms against microbial infections and cancers. PMID:26792800

  6. In Vivo Synthesis of Cyclic-di-GMP Using a Recombinant Adenovirus Preferentially Improves Adaptive Immune Responses against Extracellular Antigens.

    PubMed

    Alyaqoub, Fadel S; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Koestler, Benjamin J; Bruger, Eric L; Seregin, Sergey S; Pereira-Hicks, Cristiane; Godbehere, Sarah; Waters, Christopher M; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    There is a compelling need for more effective vaccine adjuvants to augment induction of Ag-specific adaptive immune responses. Recent reports suggested the bacterial second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic-dimeric-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) acts as an innate immune system modulator. We recently incorporated a Vibrio cholerae diguanylate cyclase into an adenovirus vaccine, fostering production of c-di-GMP as well as proinflammatory responses in mice. In this study, we recombined a more potent diguanylate cyclase gene, VCA0848, into a nonreplicating adenovirus serotype 5 (AdVCA0848) that produces elevated amounts of c-di-GMP when expressed in mammalian cells in vivo. This novel platform further improved induction of type I IFN-β and activation of innate and adaptive immune cells early after administration into mice as compared with control vectors. Coadministration of the extracellular protein OVA and the AdVCA0848 adjuvant significantly improved OVA-specific T cell responses as detected by IFN-γ and IL-2 ELISPOT, while also improving OVA-specific humoral B cell adaptive responses. In addition, we found that coadministration of AdVCA0848 with another adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing the HIV-1-derived Gag Ag or the Clostridium difficile-derived toxin B resulted in significant inhibitory effects on the induction of Gag and toxin B-specific adaptive immune responses. As a proof of principle, these data confirm that in vivo synthesis of c-di-GMP stimulates strong innate immune responses that correlate with enhanced adaptive immune responses to concomitantly administered extracellular Ag, which can be used as an adjuvant to heighten effective immune responses for protein-based vaccine platforms against microbial infections and cancers.

  7. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3′, 3′-cGAMP)

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, Zachary F.; Wang, Xin C.; Wright, Todd A.; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C.

    2016-01-01

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3′, 3′-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling. PMID:26839412

  8. DNA-Mediated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Motani, Kou; Ito, Shinji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-05-15

    Cytoplasmic DNA activates cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) to produce cyclic 2'-5'3'-5'GMP-AMP dinucleotide (2'5 'cGAMP). The binding of 2'5'cGAMP to an adaptor protein, stimulator of IFN genes (STING), activates a transcription factor, IFN regulatory factor 3, leading to the induction of IFN and chemokine gene expression. In this study, we found that the 2'5'cGAMP-dependent STING activation induced highly upregulated CXCL10 gene expression. Formation of a distinct STING dimer, which was detected by native PAGE, was induced by 2'5'cGAMP, but not 3'-5'3'-5'cGAMP. Analysis of DNase II(-/-) mice, which constitutively produce IFN-β and CXCL10, showed the accumulation of 2'5'cGAMP in their fetal livers and spleens, suggesting that the undigested DNA accumulating in DNase II(-/-) cells may have leaked from the lysosomes into the cytoplasm. The DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts produced 2'5'cGAMP in a cGAS-dependent manner during apoptotic cell engulfment. However, cGAS deficiency did not impair the STING-dependent upregulation of CXCL10 in DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that was induced by apoptotic cell engulfment or DNA lipofection. These results suggest the involvement of a cGAS-independent additional DNA sensor(s) that induces the STING-dependent activation of innate immunity.

  9. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Thormann, Kai M.; Duttler, Stefanie; Saville, Renee; Hyodo, Mamoru; Shukla, Soni; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2006-04-01

    Stability and resilience against environmental perturbations are critical properties of medical and environmental biofilms and pose important targets for their control. Biofilm stability is determined by two mutually exclusive processes: attachment of cells to and detachment from the biofilm matrix. Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally versatile, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) mineral -reducing microorganism, we identified mxdABCD as a new set of genes essential for formation of a three-dimensional biofilm. Molecular analysis revealed that mxdA encodes a cyclic bis(3',5')guanylic acid (cyclic di-GMP)-forming enzyme with an unusual GGDEF motif, i.e., NVDEF, which is essential for its function. mxdB encodes a putative membrane-associated glycosyl transferase. Both genes are essential for matrix attachment. The attachment-deficient phenotype of a Delta mxdA mutant was rescued by ectopic expression of VCA0956, encoding another diguanylate cyclase. Interestingly, a rapid cellular detachment from the biofilm occurred upon induction of yhjH, a gene encoding an enzyme that has been shown to have phosphodiesterase activity. In this way, it was possible to bypass the previously identified sudden depletion of molecular oxygen as an environmental trigger to induce biofilm dissolution. We propose a model for c-di-GMP as a key intracellular regulator for controlling biofilm stability by shifting the state of a biofilm cell between attachment and detachment in a concentration-dependent manner.

  10. Oligoribonuclease is the primary degradative enzyme for pGpG in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that is required for cyclic-di-GMP turnover.

    PubMed

    Orr, Mona W; Donaldson, Gregory P; Severin, Geoffrey B; Wang, Jingxin; Sintim, Herman O; Waters, Christopher M; Lee, Vincent T

    2015-09-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls biofilm formation and other phenotypes relevant to pathogenesis. Cyclic-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs). Phosphodiesterases (PDE-As) end signaling by linearizing c-di-GMP to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3',5')-guanosine (pGpG), which is then hydrolyzed to two GMP molecules by yet unidentified enzymes termed PDE-Bs. We show that pGpG inhibits a PDE-A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a dual DGC and PDE-A reaction, excess pGpG extends the half-life of c-di-GMP, indicating that removal of pGpG is critical for c-di-GMP homeostasis. Thus, we sought to identify the PDE-B enzyme(s) responsible for pGpG degradation. A differential radial capillary action of ligand assay-based screen for pGpG binding proteins identified oligoribonuclease (Orn), an exoribonuclease that hydrolyzes two- to five-nucleotide-long RNAs. Purified Orn rapidly converts pGpG into GMP. To determine whether Orn is the primary enzyme responsible for degrading pGpG, we assayed cell lysates of WT and ∆orn strains of P. aeruginosa PA14 for pGpG stability. The lysates from ∆orn showed 25-fold decrease in pGpG hydrolysis. Complementation with WT, but not active site mutants, restored hydrolysis. Accumulation of pGpG in the ∆orn strain could inhibit PDE-As, increasing c-di-GMP concentration. In support, we observed increased transcription from the c-di-GMP-regulated pel promoter. Additionally, the c-di-GMP-governed auto-aggregation and biofilm phenotypes were elevated in the ∆orn strain in a pel-dependent manner. Finally, we directly detect elevated pGpG and c-di-GMP in the ∆orn strain. Thus, we identified that Orn serves as the primary PDE-B enzyme that removes pGpG, which is necessary to complete the final step in the c-di-GMP degradation pathway. PMID:26305945

  11. Oligoribonuclease is the primary degradative enzyme for pGpG in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that is required for cyclic-di-GMP turnover.

    PubMed

    Orr, Mona W; Donaldson, Gregory P; Severin, Geoffrey B; Wang, Jingxin; Sintim, Herman O; Waters, Christopher M; Lee, Vincent T

    2015-09-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls biofilm formation and other phenotypes relevant to pathogenesis. Cyclic-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs). Phosphodiesterases (PDE-As) end signaling by linearizing c-di-GMP to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3',5')-guanosine (pGpG), which is then hydrolyzed to two GMP molecules by yet unidentified enzymes termed PDE-Bs. We show that pGpG inhibits a PDE-A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a dual DGC and PDE-A reaction, excess pGpG extends the half-life of c-di-GMP, indicating that removal of pGpG is critical for c-di-GMP homeostasis. Thus, we sought to identify the PDE-B enzyme(s) responsible for pGpG degradation. A differential radial capillary action of ligand assay-based screen for pGpG binding proteins identified oligoribonuclease (Orn), an exoribonuclease that hydrolyzes two- to five-nucleotide-long RNAs. Purified Orn rapidly converts pGpG into GMP. To determine whether Orn is the primary enzyme responsible for degrading pGpG, we assayed cell lysates of WT and ∆orn strains of P. aeruginosa PA14 for pGpG stability. The lysates from ∆orn showed 25-fold decrease in pGpG hydrolysis. Complementation with WT, but not active site mutants, restored hydrolysis. Accumulation of pGpG in the ∆orn strain could inhibit PDE-As, increasing c-di-GMP concentration. In support, we observed increased transcription from the c-di-GMP-regulated pel promoter. Additionally, the c-di-GMP-governed auto-aggregation and biofilm phenotypes were elevated in the ∆orn strain in a pel-dependent manner. Finally, we directly detect elevated pGpG and c-di-GMP in the ∆orn strain. Thus, we identified that Orn serves as the primary PDE-B enzyme that removes pGpG, which is necessary to complete the final step in the c-di-GMP degradation pathway.

  12. Cyclic GMP signaling in cardiomyocytes modulates fatty acid trafficking and prevents triglyceride accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the balance between carbohydrates and fatty acids for energy production appears to be crucial for cardiac homeostasis, much remains to be learned about the molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship. Given the reported benefits of cGMP signaling on the myocardium, we investigated the im...

  13. Systems Pharmacology and Rational Polypharmacy: Nitric Oxide-Cyclic GMP Signaling Pathway as an Illustrative Example and Derivation of the General Case.

    PubMed

    Garmaroudi, Farshid S; Handy, Diane E; Liu, Yang-Yu; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO˙)-cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) signaling has been observed in many cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. There are several enzymatic determinants of cGMP levels in this pathway, including soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) itself, the NO˙-activated form of sGC, and phosphodiesterase(s) (PDE). Therapies for some of these disorders with PDE inhibitors have been successful at increasing cGMP levels in both cardiac and vascular tissues. However, at the systems level, it is not clear whether perturbation of PDE alone, under oxidative stress, is the best approach for increasing cGMP levels as compared with perturbation of other potential pathway targets, either alone or in combination. Here, we develop a model-based approach to perturbing this pathway, focusing on single reactions, pairs of reactions, or trios of reactions as targets, then monitoring the theoretical effects of these interventions on cGMP levels. Single perturbations of all reaction steps within this pathway demonstrated that three reaction steps, including the oxidation of sGC, NO˙ dissociation from sGC, and cGMP degradation by PDE, exerted a dominant influence on cGMP accumulation relative to other reaction steps. Furthermore, among all possible single, paired, and triple perturbations of this pathway, the combined perturbations of these three reaction steps had the greatest impact on cGMP accumulation. These computational findings were confirmed in cell-based experiments. We conclude that a combined perturbation of the oxidatively-impaired NO˙-cGMP signaling pathway is a better approach to the restoration of cGMP levels as compared with corresponding individual perturbations. This approach may also yield improved therapeutic responses in other complex pharmacologically amenable pathways. PMID:26985825

  14. Systems Pharmacology and Rational Polypharmacy: Nitric Oxide−Cyclic GMP Signaling Pathway as an Illustrative Example and Derivation of the General Case

    PubMed Central

    Garmaroudi, Farshid S.; Handy, Diane E.; Liu, Yang-Yu; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO˙)-cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) signaling has been observed in many cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. There are several enzymatic determinants of cGMP levels in this pathway, including soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) itself, the NO˙-activated form of sGC, and phosphodiesterase(s) (PDE). Therapies for some of these disorders with PDE inhibitors have been successful at increasing cGMP levels in both cardiac and vascular tissues. However, at the systems level, it is not clear whether perturbation of PDE alone, under oxidative stress, is the best approach for increasing cGMP levels as compared with perturbation of other potential pathway targets, either alone or in combination. Here, we develop a model-based approach to perturbing this pathway, focusing on single reactions, pairs of reactions, or trios of reactions as targets, then monitoring the theoretical effects of these interventions on cGMP levels. Single perturbations of all reaction steps within this pathway demonstrated that three reaction steps, including the oxidation of sGC, NO˙ dissociation from sGC, and cGMP degradation by PDE, exerted a dominant influence on cGMP accumulation relative to other reaction steps. Furthermore, among all possible single, paired, and triple perturbations of this pathway, the combined perturbations of these three reaction steps had the greatest impact on cGMP accumulation. These computational findings were confirmed in cell-based experiments. We conclude that a combined perturbation of the oxidatively-impaired NO˙-cGMP signaling pathway is a better approach to the restoration of cGMP levels as compared with corresponding individual perturbations. This approach may also yield improved therapeutic responses in other complex pharmacologically amenable pathways. PMID:26985825

  15. Comparative effects of vinpocetine and 8-Br-cyclic GMP on the contraction and /sup 45/Ca-fluxes in the rabbit aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, P.J.; Tetzloff, G.; Ahn, H.S.; Sybertz, E.J.

    1988-07-01

    Vinpocetine is a highly specific inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase (CaM-PDE) with an IC50 of 19 microM and produces a significant accumulation of cyclic GMP but not cyclic AMP in rabbit aorta. In isolated rabbit aortic strips, vinpocetine (0.01 and 0.1 mM) inhibited the contraction and /sup 45/Ca uptake due to both phenylephrine (1 microM) and KCl (40 mM), whereas 8-Br-cyclic GMP (0.1-1mM) selectively impaired phenylephrine-induced responses. Furthermore, the KCl-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux in normal Ca2+ buffer, which reflects elevated cytosolic Ca2+, was greatly diminished by vinpocetine but not by 8-Br-cyclic GMP. However, phenylephrine-induced /sup 45/Ca efflux and contraction in Ca2+-free buffer, which reflect Ca2+ release from intracellular sites, were similarly inhibited by both vinpocetine and 8-Br-cyclic GMP. The results suggest that vinpocetine may effect vasodilatation through blockade of the slow channel and selective inhibition of CaM-PDE in the vascular smooth muscle.

  16. Nitric oxide-related cyclic GMP-independent relaxing effect of N-acetylcysteine in lipopolysaccharide-treated rat aorta

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Bernard; Kleschyov, Andrei L; Malblanc, Sophie; Stoclet, Jean-Claude

    1998-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated the formation of protein-bound dinitrosyl-iron complexes (DNIC) in rat aortic rings exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and shown that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can promote vasorelaxation in these arteries, possibly via the release of nitric oxide (NO) as low molecular weight DNIC from these storage sites. The aim of the present study was to investigate further the mechanism of the relaxation induced by NAC in LPS-treated vessels.In rings incubated with LPS (10 μg ml−1 for 18 h) and precontracted with noradrenaline (NA, 3 μM) plus Nω-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME, 3 mM), the relaxation evoked by NAC (0.1 to 10 mM) was abolished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 1 μM, a selective inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase) but not affected by Rp-8-bromoguanosine 3′5′-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-8BrcGMPS, 60 μM a selective inhibitor of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase). Tetrabutylammonium (TBA, 3 mM, as a non selective K+ channels blocker) or elevated concentration of external KCl (25 or 50 mM) significantly attenuated the NAC-induced relaxation. Selective K+ channels blockers (10 μM glibenclamide, 0.1 μM charybdotoxin, 0.5 μM apamin or 3 mM 4-aminopyridine) did not affect the NAC-induced relaxation. The relaxing effect of NAC (10 mM) was not associated with an elevation of guanosine 3′ : 5′ cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in LPS-treated rings.In aortic rings precontracted with NA (0.1 μM), low molecular weight DNIC (with thiosulphate as ligand, 1 nM to 10 μM) evoked a concentration-dependent relaxation which was antagonized by ODQ (1 μM) and Rp-8BrcGMPS (150 μM) but not significantly affected by TBA (3 mM) or by the use of KCl (50 mM) as preconstricting agent. The relaxation produced by DNIC (0.1 μM) was associated with an 11 fold increase in aortic cyclic GMP content, which was completely abolished by ODQ (1 μM).Taken together with

  17. Nitric oxide attenuates matrix metalloproteinase-9 production by endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meschiari, Cesar A; Izidoro-Toledo, Tatiane; Gerlach, Raquel F; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases involve critical mechanisms including impaired nitric oxide (NO) levels and abnormal matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. While NO downregulates MMP expression in some cell types, no previous study has examined whether NO downregulates MMP levels in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that NO donors could attenuate MMP-9 production by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a result of less NFκB activation or cyclic GMP (cGMP)-mediated mechanisms. We studied the effects of DetaNONOate (10-400 μM) or SNAP (50-400 μM) on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 10 nM)-induced increases in MMP-9 activity (by gel zymography) or concentrations (by ELISA) as well as on a tissue inhibitor of MMPs' (TIMP)-1 concentrations (by ELISA) in the conditioned medium of HUVECs incubated for 24 h with these drugs. We also examined whether the irreversible inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase ODQ modified the effects of SNAP or whether 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable analog of cGMP) influenced PMA-induced effects on MMP-9 expression. Total and phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations were measured in HUVEC lysates to assess NFκB activation. Both NO donors attenuated PMA-induced increases in MMP-9 activity and concentrations without significantly affecting TIMP-1 concentrations. This effect was not modified by ODQ, and 8-bromo-cGMP did not affect MMP-9 concentrations. While PMA increased phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations, SNAP had no influence on this effect. In conclusion, this study shows that NO donors may attenuate imbalanced MMP expression and activity in endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms. Our results may offer an important pharmacological strategy to approach cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Nitric oxide attenuates matrix metalloproteinase-9 production by endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meschiari, Cesar A; Izidoro-Toledo, Tatiane; Gerlach, Raquel F; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases involve critical mechanisms including impaired nitric oxide (NO) levels and abnormal matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. While NO downregulates MMP expression in some cell types, no previous study has examined whether NO downregulates MMP levels in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that NO donors could attenuate MMP-9 production by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a result of less NFκB activation or cyclic GMP (cGMP)-mediated mechanisms. We studied the effects of DetaNONOate (10-400 μM) or SNAP (50-400 μM) on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 10 nM)-induced increases in MMP-9 activity (by gel zymography) or concentrations (by ELISA) as well as on a tissue inhibitor of MMPs' (TIMP)-1 concentrations (by ELISA) in the conditioned medium of HUVECs incubated for 24 h with these drugs. We also examined whether the irreversible inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase ODQ modified the effects of SNAP or whether 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable analog of cGMP) influenced PMA-induced effects on MMP-9 expression. Total and phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations were measured in HUVEC lysates to assess NFκB activation. Both NO donors attenuated PMA-induced increases in MMP-9 activity and concentrations without significantly affecting TIMP-1 concentrations. This effect was not modified by ODQ, and 8-bromo-cGMP did not affect MMP-9 concentrations. While PMA increased phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations, SNAP had no influence on this effect. In conclusion, this study shows that NO donors may attenuate imbalanced MMP expression and activity in endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms. Our results may offer an important pharmacological strategy to approach cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23456480

  19. Low-power laser irradiation of blood inhibits platelet function: role of cyclic GMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Alexander G.; Brill, Gregory E.; Shenkman, Boris; Tamarin, Ilya; Dardik, Rima; Varon, David; Savion, Naphtali

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate effect of low power laser irradiation (LPLI) on platelet function in vitro. He-Ne laser (Optronix, USA; (lambda) - 632.8 nm, output power - 7 mW) was employed. Platelet adhesion and aggregation in whole blood (WB) under defined shear conditions were assayed by a Cone and Plate(let) Analyzer. Platelet activation was evaluated by flow cytometry. Level of platelet cGMP was estimated by immunoenzyme assay. Experiments performed showed that LPLI of WB resulted in decrease of platelet deposition on extracellular matrix at high shear rate (1300 s-1). Similar results were obtained using surfaces precoated with either collagen type I or von Willebrand factor. LPLI inhibited fibrinogen binding as well as P-selectin expression on the platelet membrane, induced by thrombin analogue. It was found out that primary acceptor of laser energy responsible for the effect on platelets was located in platelets themselves and not in blood plasma or in other blood cells. LPLI of gel- filtered platelets resulted in increase of intracellular level of cGMP both in the absence and in presence of izobutylmethylxantine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor) suggesting stimulation of synthesis rather than destruction of cGMP under the influence of LPLI. It is suggested that guanylate cyclase and/or NO-synthase might serve as primary acceptors of He-Ne laser light in platelets.

  20. The Malaria Parasite Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Plays a Central Role in Blood-Stage Schizogony▿ † §

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Helen M.; McRobert, Louisa; Grainger, Munira; Sicard, Audrey; Dluzewski, Anton R.; Hopp, Christine S.; Holder, Anthony A.; Baker, David A.

    2010-01-01

    A role for the Plasmodium falciparum cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PfPKG) in gametogenesis in the malaria parasite was elucidated previously. In the present study we examined the role of PfPKG in the asexual blood-stage of the parasite life cycle, the stage that causes malaria pathology. A specific PKG inhibitor (compound 1, a trisubstituted pyrrole) prevented the progression of P. falciparum schizonts through to ring stages in erythrocyte invasion assays. Addition of compound 1 to ring-stage parasites allowed normal development up to 30 h postinvasion, and segmented schizonts were able to form. However, synchronized schizonts treated with compound 1 for ≥6 h became large and dysmorphic and were unable to rupture or liberate merozoites. To conclusively demonstrate that the effect of compound 1 on schizogony was due to its selective action on PfPKG, we utilized genetically manipulated P. falciparum parasites expressing a compound 1-insensitive PfPKG. The mutant parasites were able to complete schizogony in the presence of compound 1 but not in the presence of the broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine. This shows that PfPKG is the primary target of compound 1 during schizogony and provides direct evidence of a role for PfPKG in this process. Discovery of essential roles for the P. falciparum PKG in both asexual and sexual development demonstrates that cGMP signaling is a key regulator of both of these crucial life cycle phases and defines this molecule as an exciting potential drug target for both therapeutic and transmission blocking action against malaria. PMID:19915077

  1. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PilZ Domain Proteins Function Differentially in Cyclic di-GMP Binding and Regulation of Virulence and Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Chen, Huamin; Hutchins, William; Yang, Ching-Hong; He, Chenyang

    2015-07-01

    The PilZ domain proteins have been demonstrated to be one of the major types of receptors mediating cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathways in several pathogenic bacteria. However, little is known about the function of PilZ domain proteins in c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in the bacterial blight pathogen of rice Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Here, the roles of PilZ domain proteins PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 in c-di-GMP binding, regulation of virulence and motility, and subcellular localization were characterized in comparison with PXO_02715, identified previously as an interactor with the c-di-GMP receptor Filp to regulate virulence. The c-di-GMP binding motifs in the PilZ domains were conserved in PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but were less well conserved in PXO_02715. PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but not PXO_02715 proteins bound to c-di-GMP with high affinity in vitro, and the R(141) and R(10) residues in the PilZ domains of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374, respectively, were crucial for c-di-GMP binding. Gene deletion of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 resulted in significant increases in virulence and hrp gene transcription, indicating their negative regulation of virulence via type III secretion system expression. All mutants showed significant changes in sliding motility but not exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. In trans expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of each gene in the relevant mutants led to restoration of the phenotype to wild-type levels. Moreover, PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 displayed mainly multisite subcellular localizations, whereas PXO_02715 showed nonpolar distributions in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. Therefore, this study demonstrated the different functions of the PilZ domain proteins in mediation of c-di-GMP regulation of virulence and motility in X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  2. Molecular basis for the specific recognition of the metazoan cyclic GMP-AMP by the innate immune adaptor protein STING.

    PubMed

    Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Chen, Zhijian J; Chen, Chuo

    2015-07-21

    Cyclic GMP-AMP containing a unique combination of mixed phosphodiester linkages (2'3'-cGAMP) is an endogenous second messenger molecule that activates the type-I IFN pathway upon binding to the homodimer of the adaptor protein STING on the surface of endoplasmic reticulum membrane. However, the preferential binding of the asymmetric ligand 2'3'-cGAMP to the symmetric dimer of STING represents a physicochemical enigma. Here we show that 2'3'-cGAMP, but not its linkage isomers, adopts an organized free-ligand conformation that resembles the STING-bound conformation and pays low entropy and enthalpy costs in converting into the active conformation. Our results demonstrate that analyses of free-ligand conformations can be as important as analyses of protein conformations in understanding protein-ligand interactions.

  3. Oligoribonuclease is the primary degradative enzyme for pGpG in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that is required for cyclic-di-GMP turnover

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Mona W.; Donaldson, Gregory P.; Severin, Geoffrey B.; Wang, Jingxin; Sintim, Herman O.; Waters, Christopher M.; Lee, Vincent T.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls biofilm formation and other phenotypes relevant to pathogenesis. Cyclic-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs). Phosphodiesterases (PDE-As) end signaling by linearizing c-di-GMP to 5ʹ-phosphoguanylyl-(3ʹ,5ʹ)-guanosine (pGpG), which is then hydrolyzed to two GMP molecules by yet unidentified enzymes termed PDE-Bs. We show that pGpG inhibits a PDE-A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a dual DGC and PDE-A reaction, excess pGpG extends the half-life of c-di-GMP, indicating that removal of pGpG is critical for c-di-GMP homeostasis. Thus, we sought to identify the PDE-B enzyme(s) responsible for pGpG degradation. A differential radial capillary action of ligand assay-based screen for pGpG binding proteins identified oligoribonuclease (Orn), an exoribonuclease that hydrolyzes two- to five-nucleotide-long RNAs. Purified Orn rapidly converts pGpG into GMP. To determine whether Orn is the primary enzyme responsible for degrading pGpG, we assayed cell lysates of WT and ∆orn strains of P. aeruginosa PA14 for pGpG stability. The lysates from ∆orn showed 25-fold decrease in pGpG hydrolysis. Complementation with WT, but not active site mutants, restored hydrolysis. Accumulation of pGpG in the ∆orn strain could inhibit PDE-As, increasing c-di-GMP concentration. In support, we observed increased transcription from the c-di-GMP–regulated pel promoter. Additionally, the c-di-GMP–governed auto-aggregation and biofilm phenotypes were elevated in the ∆orn strain in a pel-dependent manner. Finally, we directly detect elevated pGpG and c-di-GMP in the ∆orn strain. Thus, we identified that Orn serves as the primary PDE-B enzyme that removes pGpG, which is necessary to complete the final step in the c-di-GMP degradation pathway. PMID:26305945

  4. An activator of protein kinase C (phorbol dibutyrate) attenuates atrial-natriuretic-factor-stimulated cyclic GMP accumulation in smooth-muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nambi, P; Whitman, M; Aiyar, N; Stassen, F; Crooke, S T

    1987-01-01

    Rat thoracic aortic smooth-muscle cells (A-10; A.T.C.C. CRL 1476) displays a high density of vasopressin and atrial-natriuretic-factor (ANF) receptors and a low density of beta-adrenergic receptors. ANF stimulates cGMP (cyclic GMP) accumulation in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Pretreatment of these cells with phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), a known activator of protein kinase C, attenuated ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation without affecting basal cGMP concentrations. This effect was concentration-dependent and was observed as early as 2 min after treatment. 4 alpha-Phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (alpha PDD), which does not activate protein kinase C, did not inhibit the cGMP accumulation. PDBu pretreatment did not affect the density and affinity of ANF receptors. These data suggest that PDBu, presumably via activation of protein kinase C, might stimulate phosphorylation of a key regulatory protein in the ANF/cGMP pathway. PMID:2822009

  5. Identification of a negative feedback loop between cyclic di-GMP-induced levels of IFI16 and p202 cytosolic DNA sensors and STING.

    PubMed

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Xin, Duan; Choubey, Divaker

    2014-10-01

    A host type I IFN response is induced by cytosolic sensing of the bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) by STING (stimulator of IFN genes). Because the STING, an adaptor protein, links the cytosolic detection of DNA by the cytosolic DNA sensors such as the IFN-inducible human IFI16 and murine p202 proteins to the TBK1/IRF3 axis, we investigated whether c-di-GMP-induced signaling could regulate expression of IFI16 and p202 proteins. Here, we report that activation of c-di-GMP-induced signaling in human and murine cells increased steady-state levels of IFI16 and p202 proteins. The increase was c-di-GMP concentration- and time-dependent. Unexpectedly, treatment of cells with type I IFN decreased levels of the adaptor protein STING. Therefore, we investigated whether the IFI16 or p202 protein could regulate the expression of STING and activation of the TBK1/IRF3 axis. We found that constitutive knockdown of IFI16 or p202 expression in cells increased steady-state levels of STING. Additionally, the knockdown of IFI16 resulted in activation of the TBK1/IRF3 axis. Accordingly, increased levels of the IFI16 or p202 protein in cells decreased STING levels. Together, our observations identify a novel negative feedback loop between c-di-GMP-induced levels of IFI16 and p202 cytosolic DNA sensors and the adaptor protein STING.

  6. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases reveals a role for bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic-GMP in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kulesekara, Hemantha; Lee, Vincent; Brencic, Anja; Liberati, Nicole; Urbach, Jonathan; Miyata, Sachiko; Lee, Daniel G.; Neely, Alice N.; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Lory, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals and chronic respiratory disease in patients with cystic fibrosis. Cyclic nucleotides are known to play a variety of roles in the regulation of virulence-related factors in pathogenic bacteria. A set of P. aeruginosa genes, encoding proteins that contain putative domains characteristic of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that are responsible for the maintenance of cellular levels of the second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) was identified in the annotated genomes of P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 and PA14. Although the majority of these genes are components of the P. aeruginosa core genome, several are located on presumptive horizontally acquired genomic islands. A comprehensive analysis of P. aeruginosa genes encoding the enzymes of c-di-GMP metabolism (DGC- and PDE-encoding genes) was carried out to analyze the function of c-di-GMP in two disease-related phenomena, cytotoxicity and biofilm formation. Analysis of the phenotypes of DGC and PDE mutants and overexpressing clones revealed that certain virulence-associated traits are controlled by multiple DGCs and PDEs through alterations in c-di-GMP levels. A set of mutants in selected DGC- and PDE-encoding genes exhibited attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. Given that insertions in different DGC and PDE genes result in distinct phenotypes, it seems likely that the formation or degradation of c-di-GMP by these enzymes is in highly localized and intimately linked to particular targets of c-di-GMP action. PMID:16477007

  7. Photosensory transduction in ciliates. II. Possible role of G-protein and cGMP in Stentor coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Fabczak, H; Park, P B; Fabczak, S; Song, P S

    1993-04-01

    The heterotrichous ciliate, Stentor coeruleus, exhibits a well-defined photophobic response to a sudden increase in the intensity of visible light. The phobic reactions usually appear with a latency period (i.e. a time delay between the onset of the stimulus and the stop response). This latency of phobic response was significantly increased when the cells were incubated with 8-bromo-guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. In the presence of this nucleotide, a reduction of cell responsiveness (i.e. the number of photophobically responding cells) was also observed. Similar effects were observed when cells were treated with pertussis toxin, a G-protein activity modulator, and 3'-isobutyl-methylxanthine, an inhibitor of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase. The G-protein activator fluoroaluminate and 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY 83583) (an effective agent for lowering cellular cGMP levels) showed opposite effects on the cell photophobic response. These results indirectly suggest that the level of cytoplasmic cGMP, possibly modulated by a G-protein-coupled cGMP phosphodiesterase, plays a phototransducing role in Stentor. In addition, using an antiserum raised against bovine transducin, a cross-reacting protein with an apparent molecular mass of 39 kDa was detected on immunoblots. The alpha-subunit of a Stentor G-protein has also been partially cloned and sequenced. However, the possible coupling between the G-protein and the putative phosphodiesterase remains to be established. PMID:8389485

  8. Cyclic GMP signaling in cardiomyocytes modulates fatty acid trafficking and prevents triglyceride accumulation.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, Ramzi J; Khairallah, Maya; Gélinas, Roselle; Bouchard, Bertrand; Young, Martin E; Allen, Bruce G; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Deschepper, Christian F; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2008-08-01

    While the balance between carbohydrates and fatty acids for energy production appears to be crucial for cardiac homeostasis, much remains to be learned about the molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship. Given the reported benefits of cGMP signaling on the myocardium, we investigated the impact of its chronic activation on cardiac energy metabolism using mice overexpressing a constitutively active cytoplasmic guanylate cyclase (GC(+/0)) in cardiomyocytes. Ex vivo working GC(+/0) heart perfusions with (13)C-labeled substrates revealed an altered pattern of exogenous substrate fuel selection compared to controls, namely a 38+/-9% lower contribution of exogenous fatty acids to acetyl-CoA formation, while that of carbohydrates remains unchanged despite a two-fold increase in glycolysis. The lower contribution of exogenous fatty acids to energy production is not associated with changes in energy demand or supply (contractile function, oxygen consumption, tissue acetyl-CoA or CoA levels, citric acid cycle flux rate) or in the regulation of beta-oxidation (acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity, tissue malonyl-CoA levels). However, GC(+/0) hearts show a two-fold increase in the incorporation of exogenous oleate into triglycerides. Furthermore, the following molecular data are consistent with a concomitant increase in triglyceride hydrolysis: (i) increased abundance of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) protein (24+/-11%) and mRNA (22+/-4%) as well as (ii) several phosphorylation events related to HSL inhibitory (AMPK) and activation (ERK 1/2) sites, which should contribute to enhance its activity. These changes in exogenous fatty acid trafficking in GC(+/0) hearts appear to be functionally relevant, as demonstrated by their resistance to fasting-induced triglyceride accumulation. While the documented metabolic profile of GC(+/0) mouse hearts is partly reminiscent of hypertrophied hearts, the observed changes in lipid trafficking have not been previously documented, and may

  9. Genome-Based Comparison of Cyclic Di-GMP Signaling in Pathogenic and Commensal Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Povolotsky, Tatyana L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitous bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) has recently become prominent as a trigger for biofilm formation in many bacteria. It is generated by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs; with GGDEF domains) and degraded by specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs; containing either EAL or HD-GYP domains). Most bacterial species contain multiples of these proteins with some having specific functions that are based on direct molecular interactions in addition to their enzymatic activities. Escherichia coli K-12 laboratory strains feature 29 genes encoding GGDEF and/or EAL domains, resulting in a set of 12 DGCs, 13 PDEs, and four enzymatically inactive “degenerate” proteins that act by direct macromolecular interactions. We present here a comparative analysis of GGDEF/EAL domain-encoding genes in 61 genomes of pathogenic, commensal, and probiotic E. coli strains (including enteric pathogens such as enteroaggregative, enterohemorrhagic, enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic, and adherent and invasive Escherichia coli and the 2011 German outbreak O104:H4 strain, as well as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, such as uropathogenic and meningitis-associated E. coli). We describe additional genes for two membrane-associated DGCs (DgcX and DgcY) and four PDEs (the membrane-associated PdeT, as well as the EAL domain-only proteins PdeW, PdeX, and PdeY), thus showing the pangenome of E. coli to contain at least 35 GGDEF/EAL domain proteins. A core set of only eight proteins is absolutely conserved in all 61 strains: DgcC (YaiC), DgcI (YliF), PdeB (YlaB), PdeH (YhjH), PdeK (YhjK), PdeN (Rtn), and the degenerate proteins CsrD and CdgI (YeaI). In all other GGDEF/EAL domain genes, diverse point and frameshift mutations, as well as small or large deletions, were discovered in various strains. IMPORTANCE Our analysis reveals interesting trends in pathogenic Escherichia coli that could reflect different host cell adherence mechanisms. These may either benefit from or be

  10. Identification of cyclic GMP-activated nonselective Ca2+-permeable cation channels and associated CNGC5 and CNGC6 genes in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Fei; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Ren, Hui-Min; Robert, Nadia; Han, Michelle; Puzõrjova, Irina; Kollist, Hannes; Lee, Stephen; Mori, Izumi; Schroeder, Julian I

    2013-10-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) in guard cells plays an important role in stomatal movement responses to environmental stimuli. These cytosolic Ca(2+) increases result from Ca(2+) influx through Ca(2+)-permeable channels in the plasma membrane and Ca(2+) release from intracellular organelles in guard cells. However, the genes encoding defined plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity remain unknown in guard cells and, with some exceptions, largely unknown in higher plant cells. Here, we report the identification of two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cation channel genes, CNGC5 and CNGC6, that are highly expressed in guard cells. Cytosolic application of cyclic GMP (cGMP) and extracellularly applied membrane-permeable 8-Bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-cGMP both activated hyperpolarization-induced inward-conducting currents in wild-type guard cells using Mg(2+) as the main charge carrier. The cGMP-activated currents were strongly blocked by lanthanum and gadolinium and also conducted Ba(2+), Ca(2+), and Na(+) ions. cngc5 cngc6 double mutant guard cells exhibited dramatically impaired cGMP-activated currents. In contrast, mutations in CNGC1, CNGC2, and CNGC20 did not disrupt these cGMP-activated currents. The yellow fluorescent protein-CNGC5 and yellow fluorescent protein-CNGC6 proteins localize in the cell periphery. Cyclic AMP activated modest inward currents in both wild-type and cngc5cngc6 mutant guard cells. Moreover, cngc5 cngc6 double mutant guard cells exhibited functional abscisic acid (ABA)-activated hyperpolarization-dependent Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel currents, intact ABA-induced stomatal closing responses, and whole-plant stomatal conductance responses to darkness and changes in CO2 concentration. Furthermore, cGMP-activated currents remained intact in the growth controlled by abscisic acid2 and abscisic acid insensitive1 mutants. This research demonstrates that the CNGC5 and CNGC6 genes encode unique cGMP-activated nonselective Ca(2

  11. Gating Kinetics of the Cyclic-GMP-Activated Channel of Retinal Rods: Flash Photolysis and Voltage-Jump Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Jeffrey W.; Zimmerman, Anita L.; Stryer, Lubert; Baylor, Denis A.

    1988-02-01

    The gating kinetics of the cGMP-activated cation channel of salamander retinal rods have been studied in excised membrane patches. Relaxations in patch current were observed after two kinds of perturbation: (i) fast jumps of cGMP concentration, generated by laser flash photolysis of a cGMP ester (``caged'' cGMP), and (ii) membrane voltage jumps, which perturb activation of the channel by cGMP. In both methods the speed of activation increased with the final cGMP concentration. The results are explained by a simple kinetic model in which activation involves three sequential cGMP binding steps with bimolecular rate constants close to the diffusion-controlled limit; fully liganded channels undergo rapid open-closed transitions. Voltage perturbs activation by changing the rate constant for channel closing, which increases with hyperpolarization. Intramolecular transitions of the fully liganded channel limit the kinetics of activation at high cGMP concentrations (>50 μ M), whereas at physiological cGMP concentrations (<5 μ M), the kinetics of activation are limited by the third cGMP binding step. The channel appears to be optimized for rapid responses to changes in cytoplasmic cGMP concentration.

  12. Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Foreign-Body Biofilm Infections through Reduction of the Cyclic Di-GMP Level in the Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Louise D.; van Gennip, Maria; Rybtke, Morten T.; Wu, Hong; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Alhede, Morten; Høiby, Niels; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria can engage in biofilm-based infections that evade immune responses and develop into chronic conditions. Because conventional antimicrobials cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. It has recently been established that the secondary messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) functions as a positive regulator of biofilm formation in several different bacteria. In the present study we investigated whether manipulation of the c-di-GMP level in bacteria potentially can be used for biofilm control in vivo. We constructed a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in which a reduction in the c-di-GMP level can be achieved via induction of the Escherichia coli YhjH c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. Initial experiments showed that induction of yhjH expression led to dispersal of the majority of the bacteria in in vitro-grown P. aeruginosa biofilms. Subsequently, we demonstrated that P. aeruginosa biofilms growing on silicone implants, located in the peritoneal cavity of mice, dispersed after induction of the YhjH protein. Bacteria accumulated temporarily in the spleen after induction of biofilm dispersal, but the mice tolerated the dispersed bacteria well. The present work provides proof of the concept that modulation of the c-di-GMP level in bacteria is a viable strategy for biofilm control. PMID:23690403

  13. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Ling; Shen, Lunda; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Bhuwan, Manish; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Hwan-You

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c)-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA), a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27175902

  14. Luteinizing Hormone Reduces the Activity of the NPR2 Guanylyl Cyclase in Mouse Ovarian Follicles, Contributing to the Cyclic GMP Decrease that Promotes Resumption of Meiosis in Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jerid W.; Zhang, Meijia; Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Norris, Rachael P.; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Eppig, John J.; Potter, Lincoln R.; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2012-01-01

    In preovulatory ovarian follicles of mice, meiotic prophase arrest in the oocyte is maintained by cyclic GMP from the surrounding granulosa cells that diffuses into the oocyte through gap junctions. The cGMP is synthesized in the granulosa cells by the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) in response to the agonist C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). In response to luteinizing hormone (LH), cGMP in the granulosa cells decreases, and as a consequence, oocyte cGMP decreases and meiosis resumes. Here we report that within 20 minutes, LH treatment results in decreased guanylyl cyclase activity of NPR2, as determined in the presence of a maximally activating concentration of CNP. This occurs by a process that does not reduce the amount of NPR2 protein. We also show that by a slower process, first detected at 2 hours, LH decreases the amount of CNP available to bind to the receptor. Both of these LH actions contribute to decreasing cGMP in the follicle, thus signaling meiotic resumption in the oocyte. PMID:22546688

  15. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yi-Ling; Shen, Lunda; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Bhuwan, Manish; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Hwan-You

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c)-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA), a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa.

  16. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yi-Ling; Shen, Lunda; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Bhuwan, Manish; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Hwan-You

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c)-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA), a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27175902

  17. Hydrogen peroxide induced relaxation in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro is mediated by EDRF and cyclic GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zellers, T.; McCormick, J. )

    1991-03-15

    Xanthine and xanthine oxidase induced relaxations in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro are augmented in the presence of the endothelium and abolished by catalase, implicating hydrogen peroxide as an endothelium-dependent effector. To determine the mechanism whereby H{sub 2}O{sub 2} causes relaxations, isolated rings of fifth order porcine pulmonary artery, with (E{sup +}) and without (E{sup {minus}}) endothelium, were suspended in organ baths filled with buffer, and isometric tension was recorded. Hydrogen peroxide caused concentration-dependent, endothelium-augmented relaxations which were abolished by catalase and hydroquinone and reversed by L-nitroarginine and methylene blue. Prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}) levels, measured after a two minute exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in rings with endothelium were comparable to controls. This concentration of PGI{sub 2} does not cause relaxations in these rings. These data suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulates the release of an EDRF, causing relaxations mediated by cyclic GMP, which is independent of prostacyclin.

  18. A structural basis for the regulation of an H-NOX-associated cyclic-di-GMP synthase/phosphodiesterase enzyme by nitric oxide-bound H-NOX.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Tanaya; Luan, Bowu; Raleigh, Daniel P; Boon, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Biofilms are surface-attached communities of bacteria enclosed in a polysaccharide matrix. Bacteria in a biofilm are extremely resistant to antibiotics. Several recent reports have linked the signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) with biofilm dispersal. We have previously reported that an H-NOX (heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding) protein in the biofilm-dwelling bacterium Shewanella woodyi mediates NO-induced biofilm dispersal. In S. woodyi, H-NOX (SwH-NOX) is cocistronic with a gene encoding a dual-functioning diguanylate cyclase/phosphodiesterase enzyme, designated here as HaCE (H-NOX-associated cyclic-di-GMP processing enzyme). Enzymes such as these are responsible for regulating the intracellular concentrations of cyclic-di-GMP, a secondary signaling molecule essential to biofilm formation in bacteria. We have demonstrated that NO-bound SwH-NOX regulates both enzymatic activities of SwHaCE, resulting in decreased cellular cyclic-di-GMP levels and disruption of biofilm formation. Thus, H-NOX/HaCE represents a potential drug target for regulating biofilm formation. In this work, the SwH-NOX surface residues critical for the formation of a protein complex with SwHaCE are identified using nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence quenching, and cosedimentation. Enzyme assays confirm this protein-protein interface and its importance for H-NOX/HaCE function.

  19. Catalytic mechanism of cyclic di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase: a study of the EAL domain-containing RocR from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rao, Feng; Yang, Ye; Qi, Yaning; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2008-05-01

    EAL domain proteins are the major phosphodiesterases for maintaining the cellular concentration of second-messenger cyclic di-GMP in bacteria. Given the pivotal roles of EAL domains in the regulation of many bacterial behaviors, the elucidation of their catalytic and regulatory mechanisms would contribute to the effort of deciphering the cyclic di-GMP signaling network. Here, we present data to show that RocR, an EAL domain protein that regulates the expression of virulence genes and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO-1, catalyzes the hydrolysis of cyclic di-GMP by using a general base-catalyzed mechanism with the assistance of Mg(2+) ion. In addition to the five essential residues involved in Mg(2+) binding, we propose that the essential residue E(352) functions as a general base catalyst assisting the deprotonation of Mg(2+)-coordinated water to generate the nucleophilic hydroxide ion. The mutation of other conserved residues caused various degree of changes in the k(cat) or K(m), leading us to propose their roles in residue positioning and substrate binding. With functions assigned to the conserved groups in the active site, we discuss the molecular basis for the lack of activity of some characterized EAL domain proteins and the possibility of predicting the phosphodiesterase activities for the vast number of EAL domains in bacterial genomes in light of the catalytic mechanism.

  20. Nucleotide binding by the widespread high-affinity cyclic di-GMP receptor MshEN domain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Chuan; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Tu, Zhi-Le; He, Jin; Jones, Christopher J.; Sanchez, David Zamorano; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2016-01-01

    C-di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger regulating various cellular functions. Many bacteria contain c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes but lack known c-di-GMP receptors. Recently, two MshE-type ATPases associated with bacterial type II secretion system and type IV pilus formation were shown to specifically bind c-di-GMP. Here we report crystal structure of the MshE N-terminal domain (MshEN1-145) from Vibrio cholerae in complex with c-di-GMP at a 1.37 Å resolution. This structure reveals a unique c-di-GMP-binding mode, featuring a tandem array of two highly conserved binding motifs, each comprising a 24-residue sequence RLGxx(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxG(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxxxLxxxLxxQ that binds half of the c-di-GMP molecule, primarily through hydrophobic interactions. Mutating these highly conserved residues markedly reduces c-di-GMP binding and biofilm formation by V. cholerae. This c-di-GMP-binding motif is present in diverse bacterial proteins exhibiting binding affinities ranging from 0.5 μM to as low as 14 nM. The MshEN domain contains the longest nucleotide-binding motif reported to date. PMID:27578558

  1. Nucleotide binding by the widespread high-affinity cyclic di-GMP receptor MshEN domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chuan; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Tu, Zhi-Le; He, Jin; Jones, Christopher J; Sanchez, David Zamorano; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Galperin, Michael Y; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2016-01-01

    C-di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger regulating various cellular functions. Many bacteria contain c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes but lack known c-di-GMP receptors. Recently, two MshE-type ATPases associated with bacterial type II secretion system and type IV pilus formation were shown to specifically bind c-di-GMP. Here we report crystal structure of the MshE N-terminal domain (MshEN1-145) from Vibrio cholerae in complex with c-di-GMP at a 1.37 Å resolution. This structure reveals a unique c-di-GMP-binding mode, featuring a tandem array of two highly conserved binding motifs, each comprising a 24-residue sequence RLGxx(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxG(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxxxLxxxLxxQ that binds half of the c-di-GMP molecule, primarily through hydrophobic interactions. Mutating these highly conserved residues markedly reduces c-di-GMP binding and biofilm formation by V. cholerae. This c-di-GMP-binding motif is present in diverse bacterial proteins exhibiting binding affinities ranging from 0.5 μM to as low as 14 nM. The MshEN domain contains the longest nucleotide-binding motif reported to date. PMID:27578558

  2. Nucleotide binding by the widespread high-affinity cyclic di-GMP receptor MshEN domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chuan; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Tu, Zhi-Le; He, Jin; Jones, Christopher J; Sanchez, David Zamorano; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Galperin, Michael Y; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2016-01-01

    C-di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger regulating various cellular functions. Many bacteria contain c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes but lack known c-di-GMP receptors. Recently, two MshE-type ATPases associated with bacterial type II secretion system and type IV pilus formation were shown to specifically bind c-di-GMP. Here we report crystal structure of the MshE N-terminal domain (MshEN1-145) from Vibrio cholerae in complex with c-di-GMP at a 1.37 Å resolution. This structure reveals a unique c-di-GMP-binding mode, featuring a tandem array of two highly conserved binding motifs, each comprising a 24-residue sequence RLGxx(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxG(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxxxLxxxLxxQ that binds half of the c-di-GMP molecule, primarily through hydrophobic interactions. Mutating these highly conserved residues markedly reduces c-di-GMP binding and biofilm formation by V. cholerae. This c-di-GMP-binding motif is present in diverse bacterial proteins exhibiting binding affinities ranging from 0.5 μM to as low as 14 nM. The MshEN domain contains the longest nucleotide-binding motif reported to date.

  3. Cyclic diGMP Regulates Production of Sortase Substrates of Clostridium difficile and Their Surface Exposure through ZmpI Protease-mediated Cleavage*

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Johann; Shaw, Helen A.; Couchman, Edward C.; Dawson, Lisa F.; Yu, Lu; Choudhary, Jyoti S.; Kaever, Volkhard; Wren, Brendan W.; Fairweather, Neil F.

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-positive pathogens, surface proteins may be covalently anchored to the bacterial peptidoglycan by sortase, a cysteine transpeptidase enzyme. In contrast to other Gram-positive bacteria, only one single sortase enzyme, SrtB, is conserved between strains of Clostridium difficile. Sortase-mediated peptidase activity has been reported in vitro, and seven potential substrates have been identified. Here, we demonstrate the functionality of sortase in C. difficile. We identify two sortase-anchored proteins, the putative adhesins CD2831 and CD3246, and determine the cell wall anchor structure of CD2831. The C-terminal PPKTG sorting motif of CD2831 is cleaved between the threonine and glycine residues, and the carboxyl group of threonine is amide-linked to the side chain amino group of diaminopimelic acid within the peptidoglycan peptide stem. We show that CD2831 protein levels are elevated in the presence of high intracellular cyclic diGMP (c-diGMP) concentrations, in agreement with the control of CD2831 expression by a c-diGMP-dependent type II riboswitch. Low c-diGMP levels induce the release of CD2831 and presumably CD3246 from the surface of cells. This regulation is mediated by proteolytic cleavage of CD2831 and CD3246 by the zinc metalloprotease ZmpI, whose expression is controlled by a type I c-diGMP riboswitch. These data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for expression of two sortase substrates by the secondary messenger c-diGMP, on which surface anchoring is dependent. PMID:26283789

  4. Cyclic diGMP regulates production of sortase substrates of Clostridium difficile and their surface exposure through ZmpI protease-mediated cleavage.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Johann; Shaw, Helen A; Couchman, Edward C; Dawson, Lisa F; Yu, Lu; Choudhary, Jyoti S; Kaever, Volkhard; Wren, Brendan W; Fairweather, Neil F

    2015-10-01

    In Gram-positive pathogens, surface proteins may be covalently anchored to the bacterial peptidoglycan by sortase, a cysteine transpeptidase enzyme. In contrast to other Gram-positive bacteria, only one single sortase enzyme, SrtB, is conserved between strains of Clostridium difficile. Sortase-mediated peptidase activity has been reported in vitro, and seven potential substrates have been identified. Here, we demonstrate the functionality of sortase in C. difficile. We identify two sortase-anchored proteins, the putative adhesins CD2831 and CD3246, and determine the cell wall anchor structure of CD2831. The C-terminal PPKTG sorting motif of CD2831 is cleaved between the threonine and glycine residues, and the carboxyl group of threonine is amide-linked to the side chain amino group of diaminopimelic acid within the peptidoglycan peptide stem. We show that CD2831 protein levels are elevated in the presence of high intracellular cyclic diGMP (c-diGMP) concentrations, in agreement with the control of CD2831 expression by a c-diGMP-dependent type II riboswitch. Low c-diGMP levels induce the release of CD2831 and presumably CD3246 from the surface of cells. This regulation is mediated by proteolytic cleavage of CD2831 and CD3246 by the zinc metalloprotease ZmpI, whose expression is controlled by a type I c-diGMP riboswitch. These data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for expression of two sortase substrates by the secondary messenger c-diGMP, on which surface anchoring is dependent. PMID:26283789

  5. Differential modulation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway by distinct neurosteroids in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cauli, O; González-Usano, A; Agustí, A; Felipo, V

    2011-09-01

    The glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway mediates many responses to activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, including modulation of some types of learning and memory. The glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway is modulated by GABAergic neurotransmission. Activation of GABA(A) receptors reduces the function of the pathway. Several neurosteroids modulate the activity of GABA(A) and/or NMDA receptors, suggesting that they could modulate the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway. The aim of this work was to assess, by in vivo microdialysis, the effects of several neurosteroids with different effects on GABA(A) and NMDA receptors on the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo. To assess the effects of the neurosteroids on the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, they were administered through the microdialysis probe before administration of NMDA and the effects on NMDA-induced increase in extracellular cGMP were analyzed. We also assessed the effects of the neurosteroids on basal levels of extracellular cGMP. To assess the effects of neurosteroids on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and on NMDA-induced activation of NOS, we also measured the effects of the neurosteroids on extracellular citrulline. Pregnanolone and tetrahydrodeoxy-corticosterone (THDOC) behave as agonists of GABA(A) receptors and completely block NMDA-induced increase in cGMP. Pregnanolone but not THDOC also reduced basal levels of extracellular cGMP. Pregnenolone did not affect extracellular cGMP or its increase by NMDA administration. Pregnenolone sulfate increased basal extracellular cGMP and potentiated NMDA-induced increase in cGMP, behaving as an enhancer of NMDA receptors activation. Allopregnanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate behave as antagonists of NMDA receptors, increasing basal cGMP and blocking completely NMDA-induced increase in cGMP. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate seems to do this by activating sigma receptors. These data support the concept that, at

  6. ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq Reveal an AmrZ-Mediated Mechanism for Cyclic di-GMP Synthesis and Biofilm Development by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher J.; Newsom, David; Kelly, Benjamin; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jennings, Laura K.; Xu, Binjie; Limoli, Dominique H.; Harrison, Joe J.; Parsek, Matthew R.; White, Peter; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor AmrZ regulates genes important for P. aeruginosa virulence, including type IV pili, extracellular polysaccharides, and the flagellum; however, the global effect of AmrZ on gene expression remains unknown, and therefore, AmrZ may directly regulate many additional genes that are crucial for infection. Compared to the wild type strain, a ΔamrZ mutant exhibits a rugose colony phenotype, which is commonly observed in variants that accumulate the intracellular second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). Cyclic di-GMP is produced by diguanylate cyclases (DGC) and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDE). We hypothesized that AmrZ limits the intracellular accumulation of c-di-GMP through transcriptional repression of gene(s) encoding a DGC. In support of this, we observed elevated c-di-GMP in the ΔamrZ mutant compared to the wild type strain. Consistent with other strains that accumulate c-di-GMP, when grown as a biofilm, the ΔamrZ mutant formed larger microcolonies than the wild-type strain. This enhanced biofilm formation was abrogated by expression of a PDE. To identify potential target DGCs, a ChIP-Seq was performed and identified regions of the genome that are bound by AmrZ. RNA-Seq experiments revealed the entire AmrZ regulon, and characterized AmrZ as an activator or repressor at each binding site. We identified an AmrZ-repressed DGC-encoding gene (PA4843) from this cohort, which we named AmrZ dependent cyclase A (adcA). PAO1 overexpressing adcA accumulates 29-fold more c-di-GMP than the wild type strain, confirming the cyclase activity of AdcA. In biofilm reactors, a ΔamrZ ΔadcA double mutant formed smaller microcolonies than the single ΔamrZ mutant, indicating adcA is responsible for the hyper biofilm phenotype of the ΔamrZ mutant. This study combined the techniques of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq to define the comprehensive regulon of a bifunctional transcriptional regulator. Moreover, we identified a c-di-GMP mediated mechanism for Amr

  7. Regulation of Growth, Cell Shape, Cell Division, and Gene Expression by Second Messengers (p)ppGpp and Cyclic Di-GMP in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kuldeepkumar Ramnaresh; Baloni, Priyanka; Indi, Shantinath S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alarmone (p)ppGpp regulates transcription, translation, replication, virulence, lipid synthesis, antibiotic sensitivity, biofilm formation, and other functions in bacteria. Signaling nucleotide cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates biofilm formation, motility, virulence, the cell cycle, and other functions. In Mycobacterium smegmatis, both (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP are synthesized and degraded by bifunctional proteins RelMsm and DcpA, encoded by relMsm and dcpA genes, respectively. We have previously shown that the ΔrelMsm and ΔdcpA knockout strains are antibiotic resistant and defective in biofilm formation, show altered cell surface properties, and have reduced levels of glycopeptidolipids and polar lipids in their cell wall (K. R. Gupta, S. Kasetty, and D. Chatterji, Appl Environ Microbiol 81:2571–2578, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.03999-14). In this work, we have explored the phenotypes that are affected by both (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP in mycobacteria. We have shown that both (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP are needed to maintain the proper growth rate under stress conditions such as carbon deprivation and cold shock. Scanning electron microscopy showed that low levels of these second messengers result in elongated cells, while high levels reduce the cell length and embed the cells in a biofilm-like matrix. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the elongated ΔrelMsm and ΔdcpA cells are multinucleate, while transmission electron microscopy showed that the elongated cells are multiseptate. Gene expression analysis also showed that genes belonging to functional categories such as virulence, detoxification, lipid metabolism, and cell-wall-related processes were differentially expressed. Our results suggests that both (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP affect some common phenotypes in M. smegmatis, thus raising a possibility of cross talk between these two second messengers in mycobacteria. IMPORTANCE Our work has expanded the horizon of (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP signaling in

  8. Direct myocardial anti-ischaemic effect of GTN in both nitrate-tolerant and nontolerant rats: a cyclic GMP-independent activation of KATP.

    PubMed

    Csont, T; Szilvássy, Z; Fülöp, F; Nedeianu, S; Páli, T; Tosaki, A; Dux, L; Ferdinandy, P

    1999-12-01

    1. We have recently demonstrated that glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) exerts a direct myocardial anti-ischaemic effect in both GTN-tolerant and nontolerant rats. Here we examined if this effect is mediated by GTN-derived nitric oxide (NO) and involves guanosine 3'5' cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) and ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP). 2. Rats were treated with 100 mg kg-1 GTN or vehicle s.c. three times a day for 3 days to induce vascular GTN-tolerance or nontolerance. Isolated working hearts obtained from either GTN-tolerant or nontolerant rats were subjected to 10 min coronary occlusion in the presence of 10-7 M GTN or its solvent. 3. GTN improved myocardial function and reduced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release during coronary occlusion in both GTN-tolerant and nontolerant hearts. 4. Cardiac NO content significantly increased after GTN administration in both GTN-tolerant and nontolerant hearts as assessed by electron spin resonance. However, cardiac cyclic GMP content measured by radioimmunoassay was not changed by GTN administration. 5. When hearts from both GTN-tolerant and nontolerant rats were subjected to coronary occlusion in the presence of the KATP-blocker glibenclamide (10-7 M), the drug itself did not affect myocardial function and LDH release, however, it abolished the anti-ischaemic effect of GTN. 6. We conclude that GTN opens KATP via a cyclic GMP-independent mechanism, thereby leading to an anti-ischaemic effect in the heart in both GTN-tolerant and nontolerant rats.

  9. Solution structure of the PilZ domain protein PA4608 complex with cyclic di-GMP identifies charge clustering as molecular readout.

    PubMed

    Habazettl, Judith; Allan, Martin G; Jenal, Urs; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2011-04-22

    Cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that controls the switch from a single-cell lifestyle to surface-attached, multicellular communities called biofilms. PilZ domain proteins are a family of bacterial c-di-GMP receptors, which control various cellular processes. We have solved the solution structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa single-domain PilZ protein PA4608 in complex with c-di-GMP by NMR spectroscopy. Isotope labeling by (13)C and (15)N of both the ligand and the protein made it possible to define the structure of c-di-GMP in the complex at high precision by a large number of intermolecular and intraligand NOEs and by two intermolecular hydrogen bond scalar couplings. Complex formation induces significant rearrangements of the C- and N-terminal parts of PA4608. c-di-GMP binds as an intercalated, symmetric dimer to one side of the β-barrel, thereby displacing the C-terminal helix of the apo state. The N-terminal RXXXR PilZ domain motif, which is flexible in the apo state, wraps around the ligand and in turn ties the displaced C terminus in a loose manner by a number of hydrophobic contacts. The recognition of the dimeric ligand is achieved by numerous H-bonds and stacking interactions involving residues Arg(8), Arg(9), Arg(10), and Arg(13) of the PilZ motif, as well as β-barrel residues Asp(35) and Trp(77). As a result of the rearrangement of the N and C termini, a highly negative surface is created on one side of the protein complex. We propose that the movement of the termini and the resulting negative surface form the basis for downstream signaling. PMID:21310957

  10. Interactions between divalent cations and the gating machinery of cyclic GMP-activated channels in salamander retinal rods

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The effects of divalent cations on the gating of the cGMP-activated channel, and the effects of gating on the movement of divalent cations in and out of the channel's pore were studied by recording macroscopic currents in excised membrane patches from salamander retinal rods. The fractional block of cGMP-activated Na+ currents by internal and external Mg2+ as well as internal Ca2+ was nearly independent of cGMP concentration. This indicates that Mg2+ and Ca2+ bind with similar affinity to open and closed states of the channel. In contrast, the efficiency of block by internal Cd2+ or Zn2+ increased in proportion to the fraction of open channels, indicating that these ions preferentially occupy open channels. The kinetics of block by internal Ni2+, which competes with Mg2+ but blocks more slowly, were found to be unaffected by the fraction of channels open. External Ni2+, however, blocked and unblocked much more rapidly when channels were mostly open. This suggests that within the pore a gate is located between the binding site(s) for ions and the extracellular mouth of the channel. Micromolar concentrations of the transition metal divalent cations Ni2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, and Mn2+ applied to the cytoplasmic surface of a patch potentiated the response to subsaturating concentrations of cGMP without affecting the maximum current induced by saturating cGMP. The concentration of cGMP that opened half the channels was often lowered by a factor of three or more. Potentiation persisted after the experimental chamber was washed with divalent-free solution and fresh cGMP was applied, indicating that it does not result from an interaction between divalent cations and cGMP in solution; 1 mM EDTA or isotonic MgCl2 reversed potentiation. Voltage-jump experiments suggest that potentiation results from an increase in the rate of cGMP binding. Lowering the ionic strength of the bathing solution enhanced potentiation, suggesting that it involves electrostatic interactions. The strong

  11. Release of prostaglandins from the isolated frog ventricle and associated changes in endogenous cyclic nucleotide levels.

    PubMed Central

    Flitney, F W; Singh, J

    1980-01-01

    reached: thus, 8-bromo-3'5'-cyclic GMP accelerates the decline in contractility and depresses the steady-state level, whereas dibutyryl 3'5'-cyclic AMP delays the development of hypodynamic depression, and elevates the final twitch tension. The effects of both 3'5' cyclic nucleotide derivatives are dose-dependent. 7. The possible involvement of prostaglandins and 3'5'-cyclic nucleotides as causal agents in the mechanism of hypodynamic depression is discussed. The biochemical basis for the implied antangonistic effects of 3'5'-cyclic AMP and 3'5'-cyclic GMP in regulating ventricular contractility is considered in the following paper (Flitney & Singh, 1980). PMID:6255139

  12. Regulation of cyclic GMP metabolism in toad photoreceptors. Definition of the metabolic events subserving photoexcited and attenuated states

    SciTech Connect

    Dawis, S.M.; Graeff, R.M.; Heyman, R.A.; Walseth, T.F.; Goldberg, N.D.

    1988-06-25

    Photoreceptor metabolism of cGMP and its regulation were characterized in isolated toad retinas by determining the intensity and time dependence of light-induced changes in the following metabolic parameters: cGMP hydrolytic flux determined by the rate of 18O incorporation from 18O-water into retinal guanine nucleotide alpha-phosphoryls; changes in the total concentrations of the guanine nucleotide metabolic intermediates; and changes in the concentration of metabolic GDP calculated from the fraction of the alpha-GDP that undergoes labeling with 18O. With narrow band 500 nm light that preferentially stimulates red rod photoreceptors, a range of intensities covering approximately 5 log units produced increases of over 10-fold in cGMP metabolic flux. However, the characteristics of the cGMP metabolic response over the first 2.5 log units of intensity are readily distinguishable from those at higher intensities which exhibit progressive attenuation by an intensity- and time-dependent process. Over the range of low intensities the metabolic response is characterized by 1) increases in cGMP hydrolytic flux of up to 8-fold as a logarithmic function of intensity of photic stimulation that are sustained for at least 200 s; 2) small increases or no change in the concentration of total cGMP; 3) large increases of up to 10-fold in the concentration of metabolically active GDP as a linear function of intensity with no significant change in the tissue concentrations of total GDP or GTP; and 4) amplification of the photosignal by the metabolism of approximately 10,000 molecules of cGMP per photoisomerization with the major site of amplification at the level of the interaction of bleached rhodopsin with G-protein.

  13. The cyclic-di-GMP diguanylate cyclase CdgA has a role in biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production in Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mata, Alberto; López-Lara, Lilia I; Xiqui-Vázquez, Ma Luisa; Jijón-Moreno, Saúl; Romero-Osorio, Angelica; Baca, Beatriz E

    2016-04-01

    In bacteria, proteins containing GGDEF domains are involved in production of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Here we report that the cdgA gene encoding diguanylate cyclase A (CdgA) is involved in biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. Biofilm quantification using crystal violet staining revealed that inactivation of cdgA decreased biofilm formation. In addition, confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of green-fluorescent protein-labeled bacteria showed that, during static growth, the biofilms had differential levels of development: bacteria harboring a cdgA mutation exhibited biofilms with considerably reduced thickness compared with those of the wild-type Sp7 strain. Moreover, DNA-specific staining and treatment with DNase I, and epifluorescence studies demonstrated that extracellular DNA and EPS are components of the biofilm matrix in Azospirillum. After expression and purification of the CdgA protein, diguanylate cyclase activity was detected. The enzymatic activity of CdgA-producing cyclic c-di-GMP was determined using GTP as a substrate and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD(+)) and Mg(2)(+) as cofactors. Together, our results revealed that A. brasilense possesses a functional c-di-GMP biosynthesis pathway.

  14. The cyclic-di-GMP diguanylate cyclase CdgA has a role in biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production in Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mata, Alberto; López-Lara, Lilia I; Xiqui-Vázquez, Ma Luisa; Jijón-Moreno, Saúl; Romero-Osorio, Angelica; Baca, Beatriz E

    2016-04-01

    In bacteria, proteins containing GGDEF domains are involved in production of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Here we report that the cdgA gene encoding diguanylate cyclase A (CdgA) is involved in biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. Biofilm quantification using crystal violet staining revealed that inactivation of cdgA decreased biofilm formation. In addition, confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of green-fluorescent protein-labeled bacteria showed that, during static growth, the biofilms had differential levels of development: bacteria harboring a cdgA mutation exhibited biofilms with considerably reduced thickness compared with those of the wild-type Sp7 strain. Moreover, DNA-specific staining and treatment with DNase I, and epifluorescence studies demonstrated that extracellular DNA and EPS are components of the biofilm matrix in Azospirillum. After expression and purification of the CdgA protein, diguanylate cyclase activity was detected. The enzymatic activity of CdgA-producing cyclic c-di-GMP was determined using GTP as a substrate and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD(+)) and Mg(2)(+) as cofactors. Together, our results revealed that A. brasilense possesses a functional c-di-GMP biosynthesis pathway. PMID:26708984

  15. Rat hippocampal neurons express genes for both rod retinal and olfactory cyclic nucleotide-gated channels: novel targets for cAMP/cGMP function.

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, P A; Zufall, F; Barnstable, C J

    1996-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are Ca(2+)-permeable, nonspecific cation channels that can be activated through direct interaction with cAMP and/or cGMP. Recent electrophysiological evidence for these channels in cultured hippocampal neurons prompted us to investigate the expression of CNG channel genes in hippocampus. PCR amplification detected the expression of transcripts for subunit 1 of both the rod photoreceptor (RCNGC1) and the olfactory receptor cell (OCNGC1) subtype of CNG channel in adult rat hippocampus. In situ hybridization detected expression of both channel subtypes in most principal neurons, including pyramidal cells of the CA1 through CA3 regions and granule cells of the dentate gyrus. From the hybridization patterns, we conclude that the two genes are colocalized in individual neurons. Comparison of the patterns of expression of type 1 cGMP-dependent protein kinase and the CNG channels suggests that hippocampal neurons can respond to changes in cGMP levels with both rapid changes in CNG channel activity and slower changes induced by phosphorylation. Future models of hippocampal function should include CNG channels and their effects on both electrical responses and intracellular Ca2+ levels. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8816819

  16. Cyclic GMP/PKG-dependent inhibition of TRPC6 channel activity and expression negatively regulates cardiomyocyte NFAT activation Novel mechanism of cardiac stress modulation by PDE5 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Koitabashi, Norimichi; Aiba, Takeshi; Hesketh, Geoffrey G; Rowell, Janelle; Zhang, Manling; Takimoto, Eiki; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Kass, David A

    2010-04-01

    Increased cyclic GMP from enhanced synthesis or suppressed catabolism (e.g. PDE5 inhibition by sildenafil, SIL) activates protein kinase G (PKG) and blunts cardiac pathological hypertrophy. Suppressed calcineurin (Cn)-NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) signaling appears to be involved, though it remains unclear how this is achieved. One potential mechanism involves activation of Cn/NFAT by calcium entering via transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels (notably TRPC6). Here, we tested the hypothesis that PKG blocks Cn/NFAT activation by modifying and thus inhibiting TRPC6 current to break the positive feedback loop involving NFAT and NFAT-dependent TRPC6 upregulation. TRPC6 expression rose with pressure-overload in vivo, and angiotensin (ATII) or endothelin (ET1) stimulation in neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes in vitro. 8Br-cGMP and SIL reduced ET1-stimulated TRPC6 expression and NFAT dephosphorylation (activity). TRPC6 upregulation was absent if its promoter was mutated with non-functional NFAT binding sites, whereas constitutively active NFAT triggered TRPC6 expression that was not inhibited by SIL. PKG phosphorylated TRPC6, and both T70 and S322 were targeted. Both sites were functionally relevant, as 8Br-cGMP strongly suppressed current in wild-type TRPC6 channels, but not in those with phospho-silencing mutations (T70A, S322A or S322Q). NFAT activation and increased protein synthesis stimulated by ATII or ET1 was blocked by 8Br-cGMP or SIL. However, transfection with T70A or S322Q TRPC6 mutants blocked this inhibitory effect, whereas phospho-mimetic mutants (T70E, S322E, and both combined) suppressed NFAT activation. Thus PDE5-inhibition blocks TRPC6 channel activation and associated Cn/NFAT activation signaling by PKG-dependent channel phosphorylation.

  17. Host cell contact induces expression of virulence factors and VieA, a cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase, in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Dey, Amit K; Bhagat, Abha; Chowdhury, Rukhsana

    2013-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae, a noninvasive bacterium, colonizes the intestinal epithelium and secretes cholera toxin (CT), a potent enterotoxin that causes the severe fluid loss characteristic of the disease cholera. In this study, we demonstrate that adherence of V. cholerae to the intestinal epithelial cell line INT 407 strongly induces the expression of the major virulence genes ctxAB and tcpA and the virulence regulatory gene toxT. No induction of toxR and tcpP, which encode transcriptional activators of toxT, was observed in adhered bacteria, and the adherence-dependent upregulation of toxT expression was independent of ToxR and TcpP. A sharp increase in the expression of the vieA gene, which encodes a cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) phosphodiesterase, was observed in INT 407-adhered V. cholerae immediately after infection. Induction of toxT, ctxAB, and tcpA in INT 407-adhered vieA mutant strain O395 ΔvieA was consistently lower than in the parent strain, although no effect was observed in unadhered bacteria, suggesting that VieA has a role in the upregulation of toxT expression specifically in host cell-adhered V. cholerae. Furthermore, though VieA has both a DNA binding helix-turn-helix domain and an EAL domain conferring c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity, the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity of VieA is necessary and sufficient for the upregulation of toxT expression.

  18. Mutational analysis of structural elements in a class-I cyclic di-GMP riboswitch to elucidate its regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Inuzuka, Saki; Nishimura, Kei-Ichiro; Kakizawa, Hitoshi; Fujita, Yuki; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2016-09-01

    The Vc2 riboswitch possesses an aptamer domain belonging to the class-I c-di-GMP riboswitch family. This domain has been analysed and the molecular mechanism by which it recognizes the c-di-GMP ligand has been elucidated. On the other hand, the regulatory mechanism of the full-length Vc2 riboswitch to control its downstream open reading frame (ORF) remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed in vivo reporter assays and in vitro biochemical analyses of the full-length riboswitch and its aptamer domain. We evaluated the results of in vivo and in vitro analyses to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of the Vc2 riboswitch. The present results suggest that recognition of c-di-GMP ligand by the Vc2 riboswitch aptamer domain downregulates expression of its downstream ORF primarily at the translational level.

  19. Complex interactions of NO/cGMP/PKG systems on Ca2+ signaling in afferent arteriolar vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Susan K; Arendshorst, William J

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and the cyclic GMP (cGMP)/protein kinase G (PKG) system on Ca(2+) signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) of resistance vessels in general and afferent arterioles in particular. We tested the hypotheses that cGMP-, Ca(2+)-dependent big potassium channels (BK(Ca(2+))) buffer the Ca(2+) response to depolarization by high extracellular KCl and that NO inhibits adenosine diphosphoribose (ADPR) cyclase, thereby reducing the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. We isolated rat afferent arterioles, utilizing the magnetized microsphere method, and measured cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) with fura-2, a preparation in which endothelial cells do not participate in [Ca(2+)](i) responses. KCl (50 mM)-induced depolarization causes an immediate increase in [Ca(2+)](i) of 151 nM. The blockers N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (of nitric oxide synthase), 1,2,4-oxodiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, of guanylyl cyclase), KT-5823 (of PKG activation), and iberiotoxin (IBX, of BK(Ca(2+)) activity) do not alter the [Ca(2+)](i) response to KCl, suggesting no discernible endogenous NO production under basal conditions. The NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) reduces the [Ca(2+)](i) response to 77 nM; IBX restores the response to control values. These data show that activation of BK(Ca(2+)) in the presence of NO/cGMP provides a brake on KCl-induced [Ca(2+)](i) responses. Experiments with the inhibitor of cyclic ADPR 8-bromo-cyclic ADPR (8-Br-cADPR) and SNP + downstream inhibitors of PKG and BK(Ca(2+)) suggest that NO inhibits ADPR cyclase in intact arterioles. When we pretreat afferent arterioles with 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP; 10 muM), the response to KCl is 143 nM. However, in the presence of both IBX and 8-Br-cGMP, we observe a surprising doubling of the [Ca(2+)](i) response to KCl. In summary, we present evidence for effects of the NO/cGMP/PKG system to reduce [Ca(2+)](i), via

  20. Voltage-gated calcium channel currents in human coronary myocytes. Regulation by cyclic GMP and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Quignard, J F; Frapier, J M; Harricane, M C; Albat, B; Nargeot, J; Richard, S

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels contribute to the maintenance of contractile tone in vascular myocytes and are potential targets for vasodilating agents. There is no information available about their nature and regulation in human coronary arteries. We used the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique to characterize Ca2+-channel currents immediately after enzymatic dissociation and after primary culture of coronary myocytes taken from heart transplant patients. We recorded a dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type current in both freshly isolated and primary cultured cells. A T-type current was recorded only in culture. The L- (but not the T-) type current was inhibited by permeable analogues of cGMP in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was mimicked by the nitric oxide-generating agents S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine which increased intracellular cGMP. Methylene blue, known to inhibit guanylate cyclase, antagonized the effect of SNAP. Inhibitions by SNAP and cGMP were not additive and seemed to occur through a common pathway. We conclude that (a) L-type Ca2+ channels are the major pathway for voltage-gated Ca2+ entry in human coronary myocytes; (b) their inhibition by agents stimulating nitric oxide and/or intracellular cGMP production is expected to contribute to vasorelaxation and may be involved in the therapeutic effect of nitrovasodilators; and (c) the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in culture may be triggered by cell proliferation. PMID:9005986

  1. Regulation of cyclic GMP metabolism in toad photoreceptors. Definition of the metabolic events subserving photoexcited and attenuated states.

    PubMed

    Dawis, S M; Graeff, R M; Heyman, R A; Walseth, T F; Goldberg, N D

    1988-06-25

    Photoreceptor metabolism of cGMP and its regulation were characterized in isolated toad retinas by determining the intensity and time dependence of light-induced changes in the following metabolic parameters: cGMP hydrolytic flux determined by the rate of 18O incorporation from 18O-water into retinal guanine nucleotide alpha-phosphoryls; changes in the total (protein-bound and unbound) concentrations of the guanine nucleotide metabolic intermediates; and changes in the concentration of metabolic (unbound) GDP calculated from the fraction of the alpha-GDP that undergoes labeling with 18O. The latter is interpreted to reflect the state of the equilibrium between GDP- and GTP-complexed forms of G-protein. With narrow band 500 nm light that preferentially stimulates red rod photoreceptors, a range of intensities covering approximately 5 log units produced increases of over 10-fold in cGMP metabolic flux. However, the characteristics of the cGMP metabolic response over the first 2.5 log units of intensity are readily distinguishable from those at higher intensities which exhibit progressive attenuation by an intensity- and time-dependent process. Over the range of low intensities (0.6-3 log photons.micron-2.s-1) the metabolic response is characterized by 1) increases in cGMP hydrolytic flux of up to 8-fold as a logarithmic function of intensity of photic stimulation that are sustained for at least 200 s; 2) small increases or no change in the concentration of total cGMP; 3) large increases of up to 10-fold in the concentration of metabolically active GDP as a linear function of intensity with no significant change in the tissue concentrations of total GDP or GTP; and 4) amplification of the photosignal by the metabolism of approximately 10,000 molecules of cGMP per photoisomerization with the major site of amplification at the level of the interaction of bleached rhodopsin with G-protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Cross-talk between a regulatory small RNA, cyclic-di-GMP signalling and flagellar regulator FlhDC for virulence and bacterial behaviours.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaochen; Khokhani, Devanshi; Wu, Xiaogang; Yang, Fenghuan; Biener, Gabriel; Koestler, Benjamin J; Raicu, Valerica; He, Chenyang; Waters, Christopher M; Sundin, George W; Tian, Fang; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a globally dispersed phytopathogen which causes diseases on a wide range of host plants. This pathogen utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress host defense responses, and secretes pectate lyase (Pel) to degrade the plant cell wall. Although the regulatory small RNA (sRNA) RsmB, cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) and flagellar regulator have been reported to affect the regulation of these two virulence factors or multiple cell behaviours such as motility and biofilm formation, the linkage between these regulatory components that coordinate the cell behaviours remain unclear. Here, we revealed a sophisticated regulatory network that connects the sRNA, c-di-GMP signalling and flagellar master regulator FlhDC. We propose multi-tiered regulatory mechanisms that link the FlhDC to the T3SS through three distinct pathways including the FlhDC-FliA-YcgR3937 pathway; the FlhDC-EcpC-RpoN-HrpL pathway; and the FlhDC-rsmB-RsmA-HrpL pathway. Among these, EcpC is the most dominant factor for FlhDC to positively regulate T3SS expression. PMID:26462993

  3. Cross-talk between a regulatory small RNA, cyclic-di-GMP signalling and flagellar regulator FlhDC for virulence and bacterial behaviours.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaochen; Khokhani, Devanshi; Wu, Xiaogang; Yang, Fenghuan; Biener, Gabriel; Koestler, Benjamin J; Raicu, Valerica; He, Chenyang; Waters, Christopher M; Sundin, George W; Tian, Fang; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a globally dispersed phytopathogen which causes diseases on a wide range of host plants. This pathogen utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress host defense responses, and secretes pectate lyase (Pel) to degrade the plant cell wall. Although the regulatory small RNA (sRNA) RsmB, cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) and flagellar regulator have been reported to affect the regulation of these two virulence factors or multiple cell behaviours such as motility and biofilm formation, the linkage between these regulatory components that coordinate the cell behaviours remain unclear. Here, we revealed a sophisticated regulatory network that connects the sRNA, c-di-GMP signalling and flagellar master regulator FlhDC. We propose multi-tiered regulatory mechanisms that link the FlhDC to the T3SS through three distinct pathways including the FlhDC-FliA-YcgR3937 pathway; the FlhDC-EcpC-RpoN-HrpL pathway; and the FlhDC-rsmB-RsmA-HrpL pathway. Among these, EcpC is the most dominant factor for FlhDC to positively regulate T3SS expression.

  4. Can selective inhibitors of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphadiesterase type 5 (PDE 5) offer protection against contrast induced nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Morcos, Sameh K

    2014-08-01

    Parenchymal hypoxia within the renal outer medulla plays an important role in the pathogenesis of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN). Nitric oxide (NO) is crucial for medullary oxygenation by enhancing regional blood flow. Augmenting the effect of NO in the renal medulla by the use of selective inhibitors of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphadiesterase type 5 (PDE 5) such as sildenafil (Viagra™), vardenafil (Levitra™) or tadalafil (Cialis™) could reduce the severity of the hypoxic insult induced by the contrast medium and reduce the risk of CIN. Prophylactic administration of one of these drugs particularly the long acting one tadalafil before and after the administration of CM could offer a simple and rational approach to reduce the risk of this complication. This hypothesis deserves serious investigation to determine its clinical efficacy.

  5. Can selective inhibitors of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphadiesterase type 5 (PDE 5) offer protection against contrast induced nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Morcos, Sameh K

    2014-08-01

    Parenchymal hypoxia within the renal outer medulla plays an important role in the pathogenesis of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN). Nitric oxide (NO) is crucial for medullary oxygenation by enhancing regional blood flow. Augmenting the effect of NO in the renal medulla by the use of selective inhibitors of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphadiesterase type 5 (PDE 5) such as sildenafil (Viagra™), vardenafil (Levitra™) or tadalafil (Cialis™) could reduce the severity of the hypoxic insult induced by the contrast medium and reduce the risk of CIN. Prophylactic administration of one of these drugs particularly the long acting one tadalafil before and after the administration of CM could offer a simple and rational approach to reduce the risk of this complication. This hypothesis deserves serious investigation to determine its clinical efficacy. PMID:25202655

  6. Physical and genetic localization of the [gamma] subunit of the cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase on the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q25)

    SciTech Connect

    Dollfus, H.; Rozet, J.M.; Delrieu, O.; Munnich, A.; Kaplan, J. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-08-01

    Cyclic GMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) is a major component of the phosphotransduction cascade that takes place in the outer segment of the rods. This heterotetrameric enzyme is composed of two large catalytic subunits ([alpha] and [beta]) and two small inhibitory [gamma] subunits. The retinal degeneration of the rd mouse has been ascribed to mutations in the [beta] subunit of the PDE complex. Until now, however, no mutations in the [gamma] subunit (PDEG) have been reported. The cDNA encoding the human PDEG has been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q21.1). Here, the authors refine the physical mapping of the PDEG gene and provide evidence for a more distal localization (17q25) with respect to previous reports. Moreover, they present genetic data supporting the telomeric location of the gene on the distal long arm of chromosome 17. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Soluble guanylyl cyclase-activated cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits arterial smooth muscle cell migration independent of VASP-serine 239 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Holt, Andrew W; Martin, Danielle N; Shaver, Patti R; Adderley, Shaquria P; Stone, Joshua D; Joshi, Chintamani N; Francisco, Jake T; Lust, Robert M; Weidner, Douglas A; Shewchuk, Brian M; Tulis, David A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) accounts for over half of all cardiovascular disease-related deaths. Uncontrolled arterial smooth muscle (ASM) cell migration is a major component of CAD pathogenesis and efforts aimed at attenuating its progression are clinically essential. Cyclic nucleotide signaling has long been studied for its growth-mitigating properties in the setting of CAD and other vascular disorders. Heme-containing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) synthesizes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and maintains vascular homeostasis predominantly through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling. Considering that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can interfere with appropriate sGC signaling by oxidizing the cyclase heme moiety and so are associated with several CVD pathologies, the current study was designed to test the hypothesis that heme-independent sGC activation by BAY 60-2770 (BAY60) maintains cGMP levels despite heme oxidation and inhibits ASM cell migration through phosphorylation of the PKG target and actin-binding vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). First, using the heme oxidant ODQ, cGMP content was potentiated in the presence of BAY60. Using a rat model of arterial growth, BAY60 significantly reduced neointima formation and luminal narrowing compared to vehicle (VEH)-treated controls. In rat ASM cells BAY60 significantly attenuated cell migration, reduced G:F actin, and increased PKG activity and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation (pVASP·S239) compared to VEH controls. Site-directed mutagenesis was then used to generate overexpressing full-length wild type VASP (FL-VASP/WT), VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-mimetic (FL-VASP/239D) and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-resistant (FL-VASP/239A) ASM cell mutants. Surprisingly, FL-VASP/239D negated the inhibitory effects of FL-VASP/WT and FL-VASP/239A cells on migration. Furthermore, when FL-VASP mutants were treated with BAY60, only the FL-VASP/239D group showed reduced migration compared to its VEH controls

  8. cGMP/Protein Kinase G Signaling Suppresses Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Phosphorylation and Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Photoreceptors of Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Channel-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwei; Butler, Michael R.; Thapa, Arjun; Belcher, Josh; Yang, Fan; Baehr, Wolfgang; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels play a pivotal role in phototransduction. Mutations in the cone CNG channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with achromatopsia and cone dystrophies. We have shown endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated apoptotic cone death and increased phosphorylation of the ER Ca2+ channel inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor 1 (IP3R1) in CNG channel-deficient mice. We also presented a remarkable elevation of cGMP and an increased activity of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase G, PKG) in CNG channel deficiency. This work investigated whether cGMP/PKG signaling regulates ER stress and IP3R1 phosphorylation in CNG channel-deficient cones. Treatment with PKG inhibitor and deletion of guanylate cyclase-1 (GC1), the enzyme producing cGMP in cones, were used to suppress cGMP/PKG signaling in cone-dominant Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− mice. We found that treatment with PKG inhibitor or deletion of GC1 effectively reduced apoptotic cone death, increased expression levels of cone proteins, and decreased activation of Müller glial cells. Furthermore, we observed significantly increased phosphorylation of IP3R1 and reduced ER stress. Our findings demonstrate a role of cGMP/PKG signaling in ER stress and ER Ca2+ channel regulation and provide insights into the mechanism of cone degeneration in CNG channel deficiency. PMID:26124274

  9. The Gac/Rsm and cyclic-di-GMP signalling networks coordinately regulate iron uptake in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Visaggio, Daniela; Heeb, Stephan; Kaever, Volkhard; Cámara, Miguel; Visca, Paolo; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile bacterial pathogen capable of occupying diverse ecological niches. To cope with iron limitation, P. aeruginosa secretes two siderophores, pyoverdine and pyochelin, whose ability to deliver iron to the cell is crucial for biofilm formation and pathogenicity. In this study, we describe a link between iron uptake and the Gac/Rsm system, a conserved signal transducing pathway of P. aeruginosa that controls the production of extracellular products and virulence factors, as well as the switch from planktonic to biofilm lifestyle. We have observed that pyoverdine and pyochelin production in P. aeruginosa is strongly dependent on the activation state of the Gac/Rsm pathway, which controls siderophore regulatory and biosynthetic genes at the transcriptional level, in a manner that does not involve regulation of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) expression. Gac/Rsm-mediated regulation of iron uptake genes appears to be conserved in different P. aeruginosa strains. Further experiments led to propose that the Gac/Rsm system regulates siderophore production through modulation of the intracellular levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP, indicating that the c-di-GMP and the Gac/Rsm regulatory networks essential for biofilm formation can also coordinately control iron uptake in P. aeruginosa. PMID:23796404

  10. A cyclic dinucleotide containing 2-aminopurine is a general fluorescent sensor for c-di-GMP and 3',3'-cGAMP.

    PubMed

    Roembke, Benjamin T; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Yue; Sayre, David; Lizardo, Allan; Bernard, Laurentee; Sintim, Herman O

    2014-06-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides have emerged as second messengers that regulate diverse processes in bacteria, as well as regulating the production of type I interferons in metazoans. Fluorescent sensors for these important second messengers are highly sought-after for high-throughput inhibitor discovery, yet most sensors reported to date are not amenable for high-throughput screening purposes. Herein, we demonstrate that a new analog, 3',3'-cG(d2AP)MP, which is a 2-aminopurine (2AP)-containing cyclic dinucleotide, self-associates in the presence of Mn(2+) with an association constant of 120,000 M(-1). 3'3'-cG(d2AP)MP can also form a heterodimer with cGAMP, activator of immune regulator, STING, or the bacterial biofilm regulator, c-di-GMP in the presence of Mn(II). Upon dimer formation, the fluorescence of 3',3'-cG(d2AP)MP is quenched and this provides a convenient method to monitor the enzymatic processing of both DGC and PDE enzymes, opening up several opportunities for the discovery of inhibitors of nucleotide signaling.

  11. Type I Interferon Induction by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Dual Requirement of Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase and Toll-like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Warrison A; Agarwal, Sarika; Mo, Shunyan; Shaffer, Scott A; Dillard, Joseph P; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Golenbock, Douglas T

    2016-06-14

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). Exposure of cells to GC lipooligosaccharides induces a strong immune response, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production via TLR4/MD-2. In addition to living freely in the extracellular space, GC can invade the cytoplasm to evade detection and elimination. Double-stranded DNA introduced into the cytosol binds and activates the enzyme cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which produces 2'3'-cGAMP and triggers STING/TBK-1/IRF3 activation, resulting in type I IFN expression. Here, we reveal a cytosolic response to GC DNA that also contributes to type I IFN induction. We demonstrate that complete IFN-β induction by live GC depends on both cGAS and TLR4. Type I IFN is detrimental to the host, and dysregulation of iron homeostasis genes may explain lower bacteria survival in cGAS(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) cells. Collectively, these observations reveal cooperation between TLRs and cGAS in immunity to GC infection.

  12. Type I Interferon Induction by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Dual Requirement of Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase and Toll-like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Warrison A; Agarwal, Sarika; Mo, Shunyan; Shaffer, Scott A; Dillard, Joseph P; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Golenbock, Douglas T

    2016-06-14

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). Exposure of cells to GC lipooligosaccharides induces a strong immune response, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production via TLR4/MD-2. In addition to living freely in the extracellular space, GC can invade the cytoplasm to evade detection and elimination. Double-stranded DNA introduced into the cytosol binds and activates the enzyme cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which produces 2'3'-cGAMP and triggers STING/TBK-1/IRF3 activation, resulting in type I IFN expression. Here, we reveal a cytosolic response to GC DNA that also contributes to type I IFN induction. We demonstrate that complete IFN-β induction by live GC depends on both cGAS and TLR4. Type I IFN is detrimental to the host, and dysregulation of iron homeostasis genes may explain lower bacteria survival in cGAS(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) cells. Collectively, these observations reveal cooperation between TLRs and cGAS in immunity to GC infection. PMID:27264171

  13. Cyclic di-GMP modulates gene expression in Lyme disease spirochetes at the tick-mammal interface to promote spirochete survival during the blood meal and tick-to-mammal transmission.

    PubMed

    Caimano, Melissa J; Dunham-Ems, Star; Allard, Anna M; Cassera, Maria B; Kenedy, Melisha; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, couples environmental sensing and gene regulation primarily via the Hk1/Rrp1 two-component system (TCS) and Rrp2/RpoN/RpoS pathways. Beginning with acquisition, we reevaluated the contribution of these pathways to spirochete survival and gene regulation throughout the enzootic cycle. Live imaging of B. burgdorferi caught in the act of being acquired revealed that the absence of RpoS and the consequent derepression of tick-phase genes impart a Stay signal required for midgut colonization. In addition to the behavioral changes brought on by the RpoS-off state, acquisition requires activation of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis by the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS; B. burgdorferi lacking either component is destroyed during the blood meal. Prior studies attributed this dramatic phenotype to a metabolic lesion stemming from reduced glycerol uptake and utilization. In a head-to-head comparison, however, the B. burgdorferi Δglp mutant had a markedly greater capacity to survive tick feeding than B. burgdorferi Δhk1 or Δrrp1 mutants, establishing unequivocally that glycerol metabolism is only one component of the protection afforded by c-di-GMP. Data presented herein suggest that the protective response mediated by c-di-GMP is multifactorial, involving chemotactic responses, utilization of alternate substrates for energy generation and intermediary metabolism, and remodeling of the cell envelope as a means of defending spirochetes against threats engendered during the blood meal. Expression profiling of c-di-GMP-regulated genes through the enzootic cycle supports our contention that the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS functions primarily, if not exclusively, in ticks. These data also raise the possibility that c-di-GMP enhances the expression of a subset of RpoS-dependent genes during nymphal transmission.

  14. Cyclic di-GMP Modulates Gene Expression in Lyme Disease Spirochetes at the Tick-Mammal Interface To Promote Spirochete Survival during the Blood Meal and Tick-to-Mammal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dunham-Ems, Star; Allard, Anna M.; Cassera, Maria B.; Kenedy, Melisha; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, couples environmental sensing and gene regulation primarily via the Hk1/Rrp1 two-component system (TCS) and Rrp2/RpoN/RpoS pathways. Beginning with acquisition, we reevaluated the contribution of these pathways to spirochete survival and gene regulation throughout the enzootic cycle. Live imaging of B. burgdorferi caught in the act of being acquired revealed that the absence of RpoS and the consequent derepression of tick-phase genes impart a Stay signal required for midgut colonization. In addition to the behavioral changes brought on by the RpoS-off state, acquisition requires activation of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis by the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS; B. burgdorferi lacking either component is destroyed during the blood meal. Prior studies attributed this dramatic phenotype to a metabolic lesion stemming from reduced glycerol uptake and utilization. In a head-to-head comparison, however, the B. burgdorferi Δglp mutant had a markedly greater capacity to survive tick feeding than B. burgdorferi Δhk1 or Δrrp1 mutants, establishing unequivocally that glycerol metabolism is only one component of the protection afforded by c-di-GMP. Data presented herein suggest that the protective response mediated by c-di-GMP is multifactorial, involving chemotactic responses, utilization of alternate substrates for energy generation and intermediary metabolism, and remodeling of the cell envelope as a means of defending spirochetes against threats engendered during the blood meal. Expression profiling of c-di-GMP-regulated genes through the enzootic cycle supports our contention that the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS functions primarily, if not exclusively, in ticks. These data also raise the possibility that c-di-GMP enhances the expression of a subset of RpoS-dependent genes during nymphal transmission. PMID:25987708

  15. Novel Functions of (p)ppGpp and Cyclic di-GMP in Mycobacterial Physiology Revealed by Phenotype Microarray Analysis of Wild-Type and Isogenic Strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kuldeepkumar Ramnaresh; Kasetty, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial second messengers (p)ppGpp and bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) regulate important functions, such as transcription, virulence, biofilm formation, and quorum sensing. In mycobacteria, they regulate long-term survival during starvation, pathogenicity, and dormancy. Recently, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain lacking (p)ppGpp was shown to be sensitive to multiple classes of antibiotics and defective in biofilm formation. We were interested to find out whether Mycobacterium smegmatis strains lacking the gene for either (p)ppGpp synthesis (ΔrelMsm) or c-di-GMP synthesis (ΔdcpA) would display similar phenotypes. We used phenotype microarray technology to compare the growth of the wild-type and the knockout strains in the presence of several antibiotics. Surprisingly, the ΔrelMsm and ΔdcpA strains showed enhanced survival in the presence of many antibiotics, but they were defective in biofilm formation. These strains also displayed altered surface properties, like impaired sliding motility, rough colony morphology, and increased aggregation in liquid cultures. Biofilm formation and surface properties are associated with the presence of glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) in the cell walls of M. smegmatis. Thin-layer chromatography analysis of various cell wall fractions revealed that the levels of GPLs and polar lipids were reduced in the knockout strains. As a result, the cell walls of the knockout strains were significantly more hydrophobic than those of the wild type and the complemented strains. We hypothesize that reduced levels of GPLs and polar lipids may contribute to the antibiotic resistance shown by the knockout strains. Altogether, our data suggest that (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP may be involved in the metabolism of glycopeptidolipids and polar lipids in M. smegmatis. PMID:25636840

  16. Novel functions of (p)ppGpp and Cyclic di-GMP in mycobacterial physiology revealed by phenotype microarray analysis of wild-type and isogenic strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kuldeepkumar Ramnaresh; Kasetty, Sanjay; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2015-04-01

    The bacterial second messengers (p)ppGpp and bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) regulate important functions, such as transcription, virulence, biofilm formation, and quorum sensing. In mycobacteria, they regulate long-term survival during starvation, pathogenicity, and dormancy. Recently, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain lacking (p)ppGpp was shown to be sensitive to multiple classes of antibiotics and defective in biofilm formation. We were interested to find out whether Mycobacterium smegmatis strains lacking the gene for either (p)ppGpp synthesis (ΔrelMsm) or c-di-GMP synthesis (ΔdcpA) would display similar phenotypes. We used phenotype microarray technology to compare the growth of the wild-type and the knockout strains in the presence of several antibiotics. Surprisingly, the ΔrelMsm and ΔdcpA strains showed enhanced survival in the presence of many antibiotics, but they were defective in biofilm formation. These strains also displayed altered surface properties, like impaired sliding motility, rough colony morphology, and increased aggregation in liquid cultures. Biofilm formation and surface properties are associated with the presence of glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) in the cell walls of M. smegmatis. Thin-layer chromatography analysis of various cell wall fractions revealed that the levels of GPLs and polar lipids were reduced in the knockout strains. As a result, the cell walls of the knockout strains were significantly more hydrophobic than those of the wild type and the complemented strains. We hypothesize that reduced levels of GPLs and polar lipids may contribute to the antibiotic resistance shown by the knockout strains. Altogether, our data suggest that (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP may be involved in the metabolism of glycopeptidolipids and polar lipids in M. smegmatis.

  17. Unraveling the Mechanism of the Photodeprotection Reaction of 8-Bromo- and 8-Chloro-7-hydroxyquinoline Caged Acetates

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiani; Rea, Adam C; An, Huiying; Ma, Chensheng; Guan, Xiangguo; Li, Ming-De; Su, Tao; Yeung, Chi Shun; Harris, Kyle T; Zhu, Yue; Nganga, Jameil L; Fedoryak, Olesya D; Dore, Timothy M; Phillips, David Lee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Photoremovable protecting groups (PPGs) when conjugated to biological effectors forming “caged compounds” are a powerful means to regulate the action of physiologically active messengers in vivo through 1-photon excitation (1PE) and 2-photon excitation (2PE). Understanding the photodeprotection mechanism is important for their physiological use. We compared the quantum efficiencies and product outcomes in different solvent and pH conditions for the photolysis reactions of (8-chloro-7-hydroxyquinolin-2-yl)methyl acetate (CHQ-OAc) and (8-bromo-7-hydroxyquinolin-2-yl)methyl acetate (BHQ-OAc), representatives of the quinoline class of phototriggers for biological use, and conducted nanosecond time-resolved spectroscopic studies using transient emission (ns-EM), transient absorption (ns-TA), transient resonance Raman (ns-TR2), and time-resolved resonance Raman (ns-TR3) spectroscopies. The results indicate differences in the photochemical mechanisms and product outcomes, and reveal that the triplet excited state is most likely on the pathway to the product and that dehalogenation competes with release of acetate from BHQ-OAc, but not CHQ-OAc. A high fluorescence quantum yield and a more efficient excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) in CHQ-OAc compared to BHQ-OAc explain the lower quantum efficiency of CHQ-OAc relative to BHQ-OAc. PMID:22511356

  18. Cyclic GMP kinase II (cGKII) inhibits NHE3 by altering its trafficking and phosphorylating NHE3 at three required sites: identification of a multifunctional phosphorylation site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiane; Kocinsky, Hetal S; Cha, Boyoung; Murtazina, Rakhilya; Yang, Jianbo; Tse, C Ming; Singh, Varsha; Cole, Robert; Aronson, Peter S; de Jonge, Hugo; Sarker, Rafiquel; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-23

    The epithelial brush-border Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE3 is acutely inhibited by cGKII/cGMP, but how cGKII inhibits NHE3 is unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that cGMP inhibits NHE3 by phosphorylating it and altering its membrane trafficking. Studies were carried out in PS120/NHERF2 and in Caco-2/Bbe cells overexpressing HA-NHE3 and cGKII, and in mouse ileum. NHE3 activity was measured with 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-S-(and 6)carboxyfluorescein acetoxy methylester/fluorometry. Surface NHE3 was determined by cell surface biotinylation. Identification of NHE3 phosphorylation sites was by iTRAQ/LC-MS/MS with TiO2 enrichment and immunoblotting with specific anti-phospho-NHE3 antibodies. cGMP/cGKII rapidly inhibited NHE3, which was associated with reduced surface NHE3. cGMP/cGKII increased NHE3 phosphorylation at three sites (rabbit Ser(554), Ser(607), and Ser(663), equivalent to mouse Ser(552), Ser(605), and Ser(659)), all of which had to be present at the same time for cGMP to inhibit NHE3. NHE3-Ser(663) phosphorylation was not necessary for cAMP inhibition of NHE3. Dexamethasone (4 h) stimulated wild type NHE3 activity and increased surface expression but failed to stimulate NHE3 activity or increase surface expression when NHE3 was mutated to either S663A or S663D. We conclude that 1) cGMP inhibition of NHE3 is associated with phosphorylation of NHE3 at Ser(554), Ser(607), and Ser(663), all of which are necessary for cGMP/cGKII to inhibit NHE3. 2) Dexamethasone stimulates NHE3 by phosphorylation of a single site, Ser(663). The requirement for three phosphorylation sites in NHE3 for cGKII inhibition, and for phosphorylation of one of these sites for dexamethasone stimulation of NHE3, is a unique example of regulation by phosphorylation.

  19. Cyclic-di-GMP signalling and biofilm-related properties of the Shiga toxin-producing 2011 German outbreak Escherichia coli O104:H4

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Anja M; Povolotsky, Tatyana L; Wieler, Lothar H; Hengge, Regine

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, nearly 4,000 people in Germany were infected by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 with > 22% of patients developing haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). Genome sequencing showed the outbreak strain to be related to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), suggesting its high virulence results from EAEC-typical strong adherence and biofilm formation combined to Stx production. Here, we report that the outbreak strain contains a novel diguanylate cyclase (DgcX)—producing the biofilm-promoting second messenger c-di-GMP—that shows higher expression than any other known E. coli diguanylate cyclase. Unlike closely related E. coli, the outbreak strain expresses the c-di-GMP-controlled biofilm regulator CsgD and amyloid curli fibres at 37°C, but is cellulose-negative. Moreover, it constantly generates derivatives with further increased and deregulated production of CsgD and curli. Since curli fibres are strongly proinflammatory, with cellulose counteracting this effect, high c-di-GMP and curli production by the outbreak O104:H4 strain may enhance not only adherence but may also contribute to inflammation, thereby facilitating entry of Stx into the bloodstream and to the kidneys where Stx causes HUS. PMID:25361688

  20. The Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Gene Rv1357c/BCG1419c Affects BCG Pellicle Production and In Vivo Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Pedroza-Roldán, César; Vega-Domínguez, Perla Jazmín; Prado-Montes de Oca, Ernesto; Bravo-Madrigal, Jorge; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Koestler, Ben; Waters, Christopher M

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria living in a surface-attached community that contains a heterogeneous population, coated with an extracellular matrix, and showing drug tolerance (biofilms) are often linked to chronic infections. In mycobacteria, the pellicle mode of growth has been equated to an in vitro biofilm and meets several of the criteria mentioned above, while tuberculosis infection presents a chronic (latent) phase of infection. As mycobacteria lack most genes required to control biofilm production by other microorganisms, we deleted or expressed from the hsp60 strong promoter the only known c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. We found changes in pellicle production, cellular protein profiles, lipid production, resistance to nitrosative stress and maintenance in lungs and spleens of immunocompetent BALB/mice. Our results show that pellicle production and capacity to remain within the host are linked in BCG.

  1. Dual Activation of a Sex Pheromone-Dependent Ion Channel from Insect Olfactory Dendrites by Protein Kinase C Activators and Cyclic GMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zufall, Frank; Hatt, Hanns

    1991-10-01

    Olfactory transduction is thought to take place in the outer dendritic membrane of insect olfactory receptor neurons. Here we show that the outer dendritic plasma membrane of silkmoth olfactory receptor neurons seems to be exclusively equipped with a specific ion channel activated by low concentrations of the species-specific sex pheromone component. This so-called AC_1 channel has a conductance of 56 pS and is nonselectively permeable to cations. The AC_1 channel can be activated from the intracellular side by protein kinase C activators such as diacylglycerol and phorbolester and by cGMP but not by Ca2+, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, or cAMP. Our results imply that phosphorylation of this ion channel by protein kinase C could be the crucial step in channel opening by sex pheromones.

  2. Imidazopyridazine Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Also Target Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase and Heat Shock Protein 90 To Kill the Parasite at Different Stages of Intracellular Development

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Robert W.; Whalley, David; Bowyer, Paul W.; Wallace, Claire; Rochani, Ankit; Nageshan, Rishi K.; Howell, Steven A.; Grainger, Munira; Jones, Hayley M.; Ansell, Keith H.; Chapman, Timothy M.; Taylor, Debra L.; Osborne, Simon A.; Baker, David A.; Tatu, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Imidazopyridazine compounds are potent, ATP-competitive inhibitors of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1) and of Plasmodium falciparum parasite growth in vitro. Here, we show that these compounds can be divided into two classes depending on the nature of the aromatic linker between the core and the R2 substituent group. Class 1 compounds have a pyrimidine linker and inhibit parasite growth at late schizogony, whereas class 2 compounds have a nonpyrimidine linker and inhibit growth in the trophozoite stage, indicating different modes of action for the two classes. The compounds also inhibited cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and their potency against this enzyme was greatly reduced by substitution of the enzyme's gatekeeper residue at the ATP binding site. The effectiveness of the class 1 compounds against a parasite line expressing the modified PKG was also substantially reduced, suggesting that these compounds kill the parasite primarily through inhibition of PKG rather than CDPK1. HSP90 was identified as a binding partner of class 2 compounds, and a representative compound bound to the ATP binding site in the N-terminal domain of HSP90. Reducing the size of the gatekeeper residue of CDPK1 enabled inhibition of the enzyme by bumped kinase inhibitors; however, a parasite line expressing the modified enzyme showed no change in sensitivity to these compounds. Taken together, these findings suggest that CDPK1 may not be a suitable target for further inhibitor development and that the primary mechanism through which the imidazopyridazines kill parasites is by inhibition of PKG or HSP90. PMID:26711771

  3. InsP3R-associated cGMP kinase substrate determines inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor susceptibility to phosphoregulation by cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Wataru; Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Yule, David I

    2010-11-26

    Ca(2+) release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP(3)R) can be modulated by numerous factors, including input from other signal transduction cascades. These events shape the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Ca(2+) signal and provide fidelity essential for the appropriate activation of effectors. In this study, we investigate the regulation of Ca(2+) release via InsP(3)R following activation of cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases in the presence and absence of expression of a binding partner InsP(3)R-associated cGMP kinase substrate (IRAG). cGMP-dependent kinase (PKG) phosphorylation of only the S2+ InsP(3)R-1 subtype resulted in enhanced Ca(2+) release in the absence of IRAG expression. In contrast, IRAG bound to each InsP(3)R subtype, and phosphorylation of IRAG by PKG attenuated Ca(2+) release through all InsP(3)R subtypes. Surprisingly, simply the expression of IRAG attenuated phosphorylation and inhibited the enhanced Ca(2+) release through InsP(3)R-1 following cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activation. In contrast, IRAG expression did not influence the PKA-enhanced activity of the InsP(3)R-2. Phosphorylation of IRAG resulted in reduced Ca(2+) release through all InsP(3)R subtypes during concurrent activation of PKA and PKG, indicating that IRAG modulation is dominant under these conditions. These studies yield mechanistic insight into how cells with various complements of proteins integrate and prioritize signals from ubiquitous signaling pathways.

  4. The effect of the gamma-subunit of the cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase of bovine and frog (Rana catesbiana) retinal rod outer segments on the kinetic parameters of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, M M; Bitensky, M W; Takemoto, D J

    1990-01-01

    Rod-outer-segment cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) (subunit composition alpha beta gamma 2) contains catalytic activity in alpha beta. The gamma-subunits are inhibitors. Removal of the gamma-subunits increases Vmax. without affecting the Km. The inhibitory effect of a single gamma-subunit (alpha beta gamma) on the Vmax. of alpha beta is much greater in bovine than in frog (Rana catesbiana) PDE. Bovine PDE in the alpha beta gamma 2 state has a Vmax. that is 2.6 +/- 0.4% of the Vmax. of alpha beta. The removal of one gamma-subunit to give alpha beta gamma results in a Vmax. 5.2 +/- 1% of that for maximal activity. Frog alpha beta gamma 2 has a Vmax. 10.8 +/- 2%, and alpha beta gamma has a Vmax. 50 +/- 18%, of the Vmax. of alpha beta. These data suggest that a single gamma-subunit can inhibit the catalytic activity of active sites on both alpha- and beta-subunits in bovine, but not in frog, rod-outer-segment PDE. PMID:2154965

  5. The effect of the gamma-subunit of the cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase of bovine and frog (Rana catesbiana) retinal rod outer segments on the kinetic parameters of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Whalen, M M; Bitensky, M W; Takemoto, D J

    1990-02-01

    Rod-outer-segment cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) (subunit composition alpha beta gamma 2) contains catalytic activity in alpha beta. The gamma-subunits are inhibitors. Removal of the gamma-subunits increases Vmax. without affecting the Km. The inhibitory effect of a single gamma-subunit (alpha beta gamma) on the Vmax. of alpha beta is much greater in bovine than in frog (Rana catesbiana) PDE. Bovine PDE in the alpha beta gamma 2 state has a Vmax. that is 2.6 +/- 0.4% of the Vmax. of alpha beta. The removal of one gamma-subunit to give alpha beta gamma results in a Vmax. 5.2 +/- 1% of that for maximal activity. Frog alpha beta gamma 2 has a Vmax. 10.8 +/- 2%, and alpha beta gamma has a Vmax. 50 +/- 18%, of the Vmax. of alpha beta. These data suggest that a single gamma-subunit can inhibit the catalytic activity of active sites on both alpha- and beta-subunits in bovine, but not in frog, rod-outer-segment PDE. PMID:2154965

  6. Optimization of RNA-based c-di-GMP fluorescent sensors through tuning their structural modules.

    PubMed

    Inuzuka, Saki; Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a second messenger of bacteria and its detection is an important issue in basic and applied microbiology. As c-di-GMP riboswitch ligand-binding domains (aptamer domains) capture c-di-GMP with high affinity and selectivity, they are promising platforms for the development of RNA-based c-di-GMP sensors. We analyzed two previously reported c-di-GMP sensor RNAs derived from the Vc2 riboswitch. We also designed and tested their variants, some of which showed improved properties as RNA-based c-di-GMP sensors.

  7. Functional characteristics of urinary tract smooth muscles in mice lacking cGMP protein kinase type I.

    PubMed

    Persson, K; Pandita, R K; Aszòdi, A; Ahmad, M; Pfeifer, A; Fässler, R; Andersson, K E

    2000-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation is mediated by cGMP through activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI). We studied the importance of cGKI for lower urinary tract function in mice lacking the gene for cGKI (cGKI-/-) and in litter-matched wild-type mice (cGKI+/+) in vitro and in vivo. cGKI deficiency did not result in any changes in bladder gross morphology or weight. Urethral strips from cGKI-/- mice showed an impaired relaxant response to nerve-derived NO. The cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP (8-BrcGMP) and the NO-donor SIN-1 relaxed the wild-type urethra (50-60%) but had only marginal effects in the cGKI-deficient urethra. Bladder strips from cGKI-/- mice responded normally to electrical field stimulation and to carbachol but not to 8-BrcGMP. In vivo, the cGKI-deficient mice showed bladder hyperactivity characterized by decreased intercontraction intervals and nonvoiding bladder contractions. Loss of cGKI abolishes NO-cGMP-dependent relaxations of urethral smooth muscle and results in hyperactive voiding. These data suggest that certain voiding disturbances may be associated with impaired NO-cGKI signaling. PMID:10956273

  8. Control and localization of rat adrenal cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate. Comparison with adrenal cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, T H; Stowe, N W; Ong, S H; ey, R L; Steiner, A L

    1975-01-01

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP were measured in rat adrenal glands after either hypophysectomy alone or after hypophysectomy and treatment with ACTH. Adrenal cyclic GMP levels rise in acutely hypophysectomized rats to a maximum at 1 h of approximately 200% of control levels; there is a return to base line at 4-12 h after hypophysectomy. In contrast, adrenal cyclic AMP falls immediately to about 50% of control levels after hypophysectomy and remains at approximately 1 pmol per mg tissue. Doses of ACTH beyond the physiological range markedly suppress adrenal cyclic GMP while producing a 50-fold or greater rise in cyclic AMP in hypophysectomized rats. This pattern of adrenal cyclic GMP rise was unchanged in acutely hypophysectomized animals treated with desamethasone. N-6-2'-0 dibutyryl cyclic AMP acted similarly to the effect of ACTH in bringing about a suppression of adrenal cyclic GMP levels. Physiological i.v. pulse doses of ACTH produced a rapid dose related increase in adrenal cyclic GMP. In vitro incubation of quartered adrenal pairs with 500 mU ACTH produced elevated cyclic AMP levels and suppression of cyclic GMP. Whereas adrenal cyclic AMP fell rapidly to 50% of control levels after hypophysectomy and remained at about 1 pmol per mg tissue for 7 days, adrenal cyclic GMP showed a biphasic rhythm in long-term hypophysectomized animals. After an initial peak at 1 h after hypophysectomy, adrenal cyclic GMP declined to baseline at 4-12 h but thereafter progressively rose with time, eventually reaching levels over 1 pmol per mg tissue. Fluorescent immunocytochemical staining of rat adrenal zona fasciculata showed cyclic AMP largely confined to cytoplasmic elements with little fluorescence contained in nuclei. In constant, cyclic GMP was found discretely positioned in nuclei with prominent fluorescence in nucleoli in addition to cytoplasmic localization. It is concluded that in hypophysectomized rats ACTH, either directly or in conjunction with altertion of adrenal

  9. Control of bacterial exoelectrogenesis by c-AMP-GMP

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, James W.; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Phillips, Grace E.; Stav, Shira; Lünse, Christina E.; McCown, Phillip J.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Major changes in bacterial physiology including biofilm and spore formation involve signaling by the cyclic dinucleotides c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Recently, another second messenger dinucleotide, c-AMP-GMP, was found to control chemotaxis and colonization by Vibrio cholerae. We have identified a superregulon of genes controlled by c-AMP-GMP in numerous Deltaproteobacteria, including Geobacter species that use extracellular insoluble metal oxides as terminal electron acceptors. This exoelectrogenic process has been studied for its possible utility in energy production and bioremediation. Many genes involved in adhesion, pilin formation, and others that are important for exoelectrogenesis are controlled by members of a variant riboswitch class that selectively bind c-AMP-GMP. These RNAs constitute, to our knowledge, the first known specific receptors for c-AMP-GMP and reveal that this molecule is used by many bacteria to control specialized physiological processes. PMID:25848023

  10. Control of bacterial exoelectrogenesis by c-AMP-GMP.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James W; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Phillips, Grace E; Stav, Shira; Lünse, Christina E; McCown, Phillip J; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-28

    Major changes in bacterial physiology including biofilm and spore formation involve signaling by the cyclic dinucleotides c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Recently, another second messenger dinucleotide, c-AMP-GMP, was found to control chemotaxis and colonization by Vibrio cholerae. We have identified a superregulon of genes controlled by c-AMP-GMP in numerous Deltaproteobacteria, including Geobacter species that use extracellular insoluble metal oxides as terminal electron acceptors. This exoelectrogenic process has been studied for its possible utility in energy production and bioremediation. Many genes involved in adhesion, pilin formation, and others that are important for exoelectrogenesis are controlled by members of a variant riboswitch class that selectively bind c-AMP-GMP. These RNAs constitute, to our knowledge, the first known specific receptors for c-AMP-GMP and reveal that this molecule is used by many bacteria to control specialized physiological processes.

  11. One-electron reduction of 8-bromo-2-aminoadenosine in the aqueous phase: radiation chemical and DFT studies of the mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kaloudis, Panagiotis; D'Angelantonio, Mila; Guerra, Maurizio; Gimisis, Thanasis; Mulazzani, Quinto G; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos

    2008-04-24

    Two tautomeric forms of one-electron oxidized 2-aminoadenosine (2AA) have been produced by reactions of hydrated electrons (e aq-) with 8-bromo-2-aminoadenosine (8-Br-2AA) at natural pH, whereas only one tautomer is formed by oxidation of 2AA. Tailored experiments by pulse radiolysis and time-dependent DFT (TD-B3LYP/6-311G**//B1B95/6-31+G**) calculations allowed the definition of the reaction mechanism in some detail. The electron adducts of 8-Br-2AA protonated at C8 eject Br- and produce the two short-lived tautomers (8 and 9). The first observable species decays by first-order kinetics to produce the second intermediate, which is also obtained by oxidation of 2AA by SO4*-. The rate of tautomerization (k taut = 4.5 x 104 s-1) is strongly accelerated by phosphate and is retarded in D2O (kinetic isotope effect 7). B1B95/6-31+G** calculations showed that the tautomerization is a water-assisted process. In acidic or basic solutions, the "instantaneous" formation of one-electron oxidized 2AA or its deprotonated forms has been produced by reactions of e aq- with 8-Br-2AA. gamma-Radiolysis of 8-Br-2AA in aqueous solutions followed by product studies led to the formation of 2AA as a single product.

  12. Cyclic nucleotides of cone-dominant retinas. Reduction of cyclic AMP levels by light and by cone degeneration.

    PubMed

    Farber, D B; Souza, D W; Chase, D G; Lolley, R N

    1981-01-01

    Dark-adapted retinas or whole eyes of 13-line ground squirrels (Citellus tridecemlineatus) and western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) contain higher levels of cyclic AMP than of cyclic GMP. In these cone-dominant retinas, light reduces cyclic AMP content selectively. Freezing of dark- or light-adapted retinas or eyes also reduces cyclic AMP content, with only minimal changes in cyclic GMP levels. In addition, exposure of frozen retinas of dark-adapted ground squirrel to light results in a significant decrease in cyclic AMP content. The destruction of cone visual cells of ground squirrel retina by iodoacetic acid injection decreases the cyclic nucleotide content of the dark-adapted retina. Considering the relative loss of cyclic nucleotides from cone degeneration, we estimate that the content of cyclic AMP in visual cells of ground squirrel retina is about four times greater than that of cyclic GMP. PMID:6256308

  13. Specific labeling and permanent activation of the retinal rod cGMP-activated channel by the photoaffinity analog 8-p-azidophenacylthio-cGMP.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R L; Gerber, W V; Karpen, J W

    1993-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels play a key role in visual excitation and a variety of other signaling pathways. The photoaffinity probe 8-p-azidophenacylthio-cGMP (APT-cGMP) has been developed for structural and functional studies of the cGMP-activated channel of retinal rod outer segments. Using this analog, we have demonstrated both specific labeling of the channel in a partially purified biochemical preparation from bovine rod outer segments and permanent activation of the channel current in excised membrane patches from salamander outer segments. After UV illumination, a 32P-labeled version of APT-cGMP was shown by SDS/PAGE and autoradiography to be covalently attached to the 63-kDa channel subunit. This incorporation was significantly reduced by 8-Br-cGMP but was not reduced by 5'-GMP. In patch-clamp experiments APT-cGMP was a potent activator of the channel; APT-cGMP typically opened half of the channels in a patch at a 10-fold lower concentration than cGMP. Exposure of membrane patches to UV light in the presence of APT-cGMP resulted in a persistent current observed in the absence of bath-applied nucleotide. This current increased with repeated exposure of the patch to both UV light and fresh APT-cGMP, approaching the maximum current originally evoked by saturating (500 microM) cGMP. At this point, addition of 500 microM cGMP caused a negligible increase in current. The persistent current had several other properties expected of current through cGMP-activated channels: it was outwardly rectifying; outward current was blocked > 90% by 2 mM internal Mg2+, whereas inward current was blocked much less efficiently; a low concentration of cGMP caused a larger increase in current atop a half-maximal persistent current than it did originally. We conclude that the persistent current was caused by the covalent tethering of cGMP moieties to channel binding sites, resulting in irreversible channel activation. APT-cGMP should prove useful for further studies of

  14. In vitro selection of allosteric ribozymes that sense the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Gu, Hongzhou; Breaker, Ronald R

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a number of study have shown the ligand-dependent allosteric ribozymes can be harnessed as biosensors, high-throughput screening, and agents for the control of gene expression in vivo, called artificial riboswitches. In this chapter, we describe how in vitro selection can be used to create an allosteric ribozyme that senses bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). A hammerhead ribozyme was joined to a natural c-di-GMP class I riboswitch aptamer via communication modules. Both c-di-GMP-activating and -inhibiting ribozyme can be obtained by this approach. PMID:24549622

  15. Endo-S-c-di-GMP analogues-polymorphism and binding studies with class I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Sayre, David A; Wang, Jingxin; Pahadi, Nirmal; Sintim, Herman O

    2012-01-01

    C-di-GMP, a cyclic guanine dinucleotide, has been shown to regulate biofilm formation as well as virulence gene expression in a variety of bacteria. Analogues of c-di-GMP have the potential to be used as chemical probes to study c-di-GMP signaling and could even become drug leads for the development of anti-biofilm compounds. Herein we report the synthesis and biophysical studies of a series of c-di-GMP analogues, which have both phosphate and sugar moieties simultaneously modified (called endo-S-c-di-GMP analogues). We used computational methods to predict the relative orientation of the guanine nucleobases in c-di-GMP and analogues. DOSY NMR of the endo-S-c-di-GMP series showed that the polymorphism of c-di-GMP can be tuned with conservative modifications to the phosphate and sugar moieties (conformational steering). Binding studies with Vc2 RNA (a class I c-di-GMP riboswitch) revealed that conservative modifications to the phosphate and 2'-positions of c-di-GMP dramatically affected binding to class I riboswitch. PMID:23143150

  16. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thunemann, Martin; Schmidt, Kjestine; de Wit, Cor; Han, Xiaoxing; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1) epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2) ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to “watch” biochemistry, (patho-)physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism. PMID:25352809

  17. cGMP is tightly bound to bovine retinal rod phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, P G; Beavo, J A

    1989-01-01

    Although the total concentration of cGMP in rod outer segments is thought to be substantially greater than the free concentration, no quantitatively relevant site for the bound cGMP has been described in mammalian photoreceptors. We have found that preparations of purified bovine rod photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) contain 1.8 +/- 0.3 mol of tightly bound cGMP per mol of PDE. When subunits of the purified PDE were separated by reverse-phase HPLC in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid and acetonitrile, a peak of material having spectral properties characteristic of a guanine ring was seen. This material was identified as cGMP by comigration with authentic cGMP on HPLC, conversion to 5-GMP by trypsin-activated rod PDE, and conversion to guanosine by a combination of trypsin-activated PDE and 5'-nucleotidase-containing snake venom. When incubated with 1 microM [3H]cGMP, only 0.1 mol of [3H]cGMP bound per mol of purified PDE, presumably because nearly all binding sites were occupied by tightly bound endogenous cGMP carried through the purification. Scatchard plots of [3H]cGMP binding have indicated that two classes of binding sites are present on the rod PDE. The off-rate of cGMP from the slowly dissociating site is extremely slow; it has a t1/2 of approximately 4 hr at 37 degrees C. At lower temperatures, very little cGMP dissociates; the amount of [3H]cGMP bound to rod PDE after 2 hr at 4 degrees C was essentially the same as at the beginning of the incubation. The observation that stoichiometric amounts of cGMP are tightly bound to PDE accounts for the inability to purify the bovine rod PDE on cGMP affinity columns or to demonstrate stoichiometric high-affinity binding sites with [3H]cGMP. More significantly, the tightly bound cGMP may resolve the apparent discrepancy between the free and total cGMP concentrations of photoreceptor outer segments. PMID:2542968

  18. Intracellular photoactivation of caged cGMP induces myosin II and actin responses in motile cells.

    PubMed

    Pfannes, Eva K B; Anielski, Alexander; Gerhardt, Matthias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger in eukaryotic cells. It is assumed to regulate the association of myosin II with the cytoskeleton of motile cells. When cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum are exposed to chemoattractants or to increased osmotic stress, intracellular cGMP levels rise, preceding the accumulation of myosin II in the cell cortex. To directly investigate the impact of intracellular cGMP on cytoskeletal dynamics in a living cell, we released cGMP inside the cell by laser-induced photo-cleavage of a caged precursor. With this approach, we could directly show in a live cell experiment that an increase in intracellular cGMP indeed induces myosin II to accumulate in the cortex. Unexpectedly, we observed for the first time that also the amount of filamentous actin in the cell cortex increases upon a rise in the cGMP concentration, independently of cAMP receptor activation and signaling. We discuss our results in the light of recent work on the cGMP signaling pathway and suggest possible links between cGMP signaling and the actin system. PMID:24136144

  19. Vascular relaxation and cyclic guanosine monophosphate in hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Y.; DiPiero, A.; Lockette, W.

    1986-03-01

    Isolated aortae from hypertensive rats have a decreased relaxation response to acetylcholine (Ach), A23187, and nitroprusside (SNP). Since cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) has been shown to increase in response to these vasodilators, the authors measured cGMP in response to these agents in isolated aortae from normotensive rats and DOCA, 1K1C, and coarctation induced hypertension. cGMP was measured by radioimmunoassay in vessels after exposure to phenylephrine followed by either Ach, A23187, or SNP. The aortae from the hypertensive rats had decreased basal levels of cGMP and attenuated increases in cGMP in response to Ach and A23187. Rises in cGMP in response to SNP were also attenuated in aortae from the hypertensive rats, even at concentrations which induced similar relaxation in normotensive and hypertensive blood vessels. The data suggest that changes in cGMP do not necessarily reflect changes in endothelium independent vascular relaxation in hypertension.

  20. Cyclic nucleotide responses and radiation-induced mitotic delay in Physarum polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.W.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1984-02-01

    The response of the plasmodial levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in Physarum polycephalum to several putative phosphodiesterase inhibitors and to ionizing radiation has been measured. Isobutylmethylxanthine (2 mM) induces a rapid transient threefold elevation of cyclic AMP alone, with maximum response in about 10 min and return to the base line in about 30 min. Theophylline (2 mM) induces a rapid, sustained twofold elevation of cyclic GMP only. Caffeine (2mM) and Ro-20-1724 (18 ..mu..M) both elicit a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP, resembling the isobutylmethylxanthine response, and a slow transient elevation of the cyclic GMP level. Of particular interest is the rapid threefold transient elevation of the cyclic AMP, but not of the cyclic GMP, level by ..gamma.. radiation.

  1. Glial potassium channels activated by neuronal firing or intracellular cyclic AMP in Helix.

    PubMed Central

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1996-01-01

    1. Cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells adhering to the cell body of neurones in situ within the nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia. The underlying neurone was under current or voltage-clamp control. 2. Neuronal firing induced a delayed (20-30 s) persistent (3-4 min) increase in the opening probability of glial K+ channels. The channels were also activated by perfusing the ganglion with a depolarizing high-K+ saline, except when the underlying neurone was prevented from depolarizing under voltage-clamp conditions. 3. Two K(+)-selective channels were detected in the glial membrane. The channel responding to neuronal firing was present in 95% of the patches (n = 393). It had a unitary conductance of 56 pS, a Na+ :K+ permeability ratio < 0.02 and displayed slight inward rectification in symmetrical [K+] conditions. It was sensitive to TEA, Ba2+ and Cs+. The following results refer to this channel as studied in the cell-attached configuration. 4. The glial K+ channel was activated by bath application of the membrane-permeant cyclic AMP derivatives 8-bromo-cAMP and dibutyryl-cAMP, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the diesterase inhibitors IBMX, theophylline and caffeine. It was insensitive to cyclic GMP activators and to conditions that might alter the intracellular [Ca2+] (ionomycin, low-Ca2+ saline and Ca2+ channel blockers). 5. The forskolin-induced changes in channel behaviour (open and closed time distributions, burst duration, short and long gaps within bursts) could be accounted for by a four-state model (3 closed states, 1 open state) by simply changing one of the six rate parameters. 6. The present results suggest that the signal sent by an active neurone to satellite glial cells is confined to the glial cells round that neurone. The effect of this signal on the class of glial K+ channels studied can be mimicked by an increase in glial cAMP concentration. The subsequent delayed opening

  2. Near-infrared Light Responsive Synthetic c-di-GMP Module for Optogenetic Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enormous potential of cell-based therapeutics is hindered by the lack of effective means to control genetically engineered cells in mammalian tissues. Here, we describe a synthetic module for remote photocontrol of engineered cells that can be adapted for such applications. The module involves photoactivated synthesis of cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), a stable small molecule that is not produced by higher eukaryotes and therefore is suitable for orthogonal regulation. The key component of the photocontrol module is an engineered bacteriophytochrome diguanylate cyclase, which synthesizes c-di-GMP from GTP in a light-dependent manner. Bacteriophytochromes are particularly attractive photoreceptors because they respond to light in the near-infrared window of the spectrum, where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and also because their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally available in mammalian cells. The second component of the photocontrol module, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, maintains near-zero background levels of c-di-GMP in the absence of light, which enhances the photodynamic range of c-di-GMP concentrations. In the E. coli model used in this study, the intracellular c-di-GMP levels could be upregulated by light by >50-fold. Various c-di-GMP-responsive proteins and riboswitches identified in bacteria can be linked downstream of the c-di-GMP-mediated photocontrol module for orthogonal regulation of biological activities in mammals as well as in other organisms lacking c-di-GMP signaling. Here, we linked the photocontrol module to a gene expression output via a c-di-GMP-responsive transcription factor and achieved a 40-fold photoactivation of gene expression. PMID:24926804

  3. Near-infrared light responsive synthetic c-di-GMP module for optogenetic applications.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-11-21

    Enormous potential of cell-based therapeutics is hindered by the lack of effective means to control genetically engineered cells in mammalian tissues. Here, we describe a synthetic module for remote photocontrol of engineered cells that can be adapted for such applications. The module involves photoactivated synthesis of cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), a stable small molecule that is not produced by higher eukaryotes and therefore is suitable for orthogonal regulation. The key component of the photocontrol module is an engineered bacteriophytochrome diguanylate cyclase, which synthesizes c-di-GMP from GTP in a light-dependent manner. Bacteriophytochromes are particularly attractive photoreceptors because they respond to light in the near-infrared window of the spectrum, where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and also because their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally available in mammalian cells. The second component of the photocontrol module, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, maintains near-zero background levels of c-di-GMP in the absence of light, which enhances the photodynamic range of c-di-GMP concentrations. In the E. coli model used in this study, the intracellular c-di-GMP levels could be upregulated by light by >50-fold. Various c-di-GMP-responsive proteins and riboswitches identified in bacteria can be linked downstream of the c-di-GMP-mediated photocontrol module for orthogonal regulation of biological activities in mammals as well as in other organisms lacking c-di-GMP signaling. Here, we linked the photocontrol module to a gene expression output via a c-di-GMP-responsive transcription factor and achieved a 40-fold photoactivation of gene expression.

  4. An emerging role of cGMP in the treatment of schizophrenia: A review.

    PubMed

    Shim, Seong; Shuman, Michael; Duncan, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a progressive psychotic disorder with devastating effects on the broad aspects of human emotion, perception, thought, and psychosocial interactions. Although treatment with antipsychotic drugs, the mainstay in the treatment of schizophrenia, the large number of patients with schizophrenia respond poorly to the pharmacological and, the large number of patients with schizophrenia poorly respond to the pharmacological treatment. Although a variety of novel therapeutics have long been tested, to date, no drugs clinically efficacious for schizophrenia are available. The multiple lines of evidence strongly suggest that the modulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a promising target in promoting the novel therapeutic strategies of schizophrenia beyond the "receptor-dependent" psychopharmacology. cGMP is modulated via regulating its synthesis by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and nitric oxide (NO), which regulate guannylyl cyclase (GC), the enzyme producing cGMP. cGMP is also regulated by phosphodiesterase (PDE), the enzyme hydrolyzing cGMP. In this review, we critically evaluate the therapeutic potential of agents modulating cGMP activity by regulating cGMP synthesis including NMDAR enhancers, NO enhancers, NO inhibitors including minocycline with anti-inflammatory properties and PDE inhibitors in improving the negative, cognitive and positive symptoms of schizophrenia. We also discuss the possible mechanisms by which these agents produce therapeutic effects on schizophrenia including cGMP signaling pathways, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation.

  5. Effect of sildenafil on platelet function and platelet cGMP of patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Akand, M; Gencer, E; Yaman, Ö; Erişgen, G; Tekin, D; Özdiler, E

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sildenafil on platelet function and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction, we evaluated the association between erectile function and platelet responses after administration of 100 mg sildenafil. Erectile responses were monitored after 8 daily doses of the drug. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and simultaneous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and cGMP levels were determined before and after sildenafil therapy. Basal levels for platelet aggregation, ATP release and cGMP were compared with age-matched controls. There was no difference among basal levels of platelet responses between patients and controls, except for ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). It was significantly higher in the patient group. Analysis of the responses to sildenafil revealed that for the patients who showed a positive erectile response, there was a significant increase in platelet cGMP (P = 0.028) and a decrease in ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). However, for those who showed a negative or poor erectile response, there was no change in platelet cGMP levels and platelet functions. Sildenafil did not affect collagen-induced platelet responses although cGMP levels of the responders increased. It is concluded that sildenafil increases platelet cGMP in the patients with positive erectile response. Therefore, it has been speculated that platelet cGMP may be used as an index for erectile response.

  6. Structural Basis of Ligand Binding by a C-di-GMP Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Lipchock, S; Ames, T; Wang, J; Breaker, R; Strobel, S

    2009-01-01

    The second messenger signaling molecule bis-(3{prime}-5{prime})-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) regulates many processes in bacteria, including motility, pathogenesis and biofilm formation. c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches are important downstream targets in this signaling pathway. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, of a c-di-GMP riboswitch aptamer from Vibrio cholerae bound to c-di-GMP, showing that the ligand binds within a three-helix junction that involves base-pairing and extensive base-stacking. The symmetric c-di-GMP is recognized asymmetrically with respect to both the bases and the backbone. A mutant aptamer was engineered that preferentially binds the candidate signaling molecule c-di-AMP over c-di-GMP. Kinetic and structural data suggest that genetic regulation by the c-di-GMP riboswitch is kinetically controlled and that gene expression is modulated through the stabilization of a previously unidentified P1 helix, illustrating a direct mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling.

  7. c-di-GMP induction of Dictyostelium cell death requires the polyketide DIF-1.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Luciani, Marie-Françoise; Giusti, Corinne; Golstein, Pierre

    2015-02-15

    Cell death in the model organism Dictyostelium, as studied in monolayers in vitro, can be induced by the polyketide DIF-1 or by the cyclical dinucleotide c-di-GMP. c-di-GMP, a universal bacterial second messenger, can trigger innate immunity in bacterially infected animal cells and is involved in developmental cell death in Dictyostelium. We show here that c-di-GMP was not sufficient to induce cell death in Dictyostelium cell monolayers. Unexpectedly, it also required the DIF-1 polyketide. The latter could be exogenous, as revealed by a telling synergy between c-di-GMP and DIF-1. The required DIF-1 polyketide could also be endogenous, as shown by the inability of c-di-GMP to induce cell death in Dictyostelium HMX44A cells and DH1 cells upon pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DIF-1 biosynthesis. In these cases, c-di-GMP-induced cell death was rescued by complementation with exogenous DIF-1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that c-di-GMP could trigger cell death in Dictyostelium only in the presence of the DIF-1 polyketide or its metabolites. This identified another element of control to this cell death and perhaps also to c-di-GMP effects in other situations and organisms.

  8. Structural basis of ligand binding by a c-di-GMP riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathryn D; Lipchock, Sarah V; Ames, Tyler D; Wang, Jimin; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2009-12-01

    The second messenger signaling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) regulates many processes in bacteria, including motility, pathogenesis and biofilm formation. c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches are important downstream targets in this signaling pathway. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.7 A resolution, of a c-di-GMP riboswitch aptamer from Vibrio cholerae bound to c-di-GMP, showing that the ligand binds within a three-helix junction that involves base-pairing and extensive base-stacking. The symmetric c-di-GMP is recognized asymmetrically with respect to both the bases and the backbone. A mutant aptamer was engineered that preferentially binds the candidate signaling molecule c-di-AMP over c-di-GMP. Kinetic and structural data suggest that genetic regulation by the c-di-GMP riboswitch is kinetically controlled and that gene expression is modulated through the stabilization of a previously unidentified P1 helix, illustrating a direct mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling. PMID:19898477

  9. sGC-cGMP signaling: target for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid

    2014-01-01

    The biologic endogenous production of cGMP was reported in the 1960s and followed by the demonstration of guanylyl cyclase activity and the isoforms of soluble and membrane-bound guanylyl cyclases. During the same period, cGMP specific phosphodiesterases also was discovered. Murad's lab established link between the endothelium derived relaxation factor (EDRF) and elevated cGMP concentration in the vascular system. October 12, 1998, the Nobel Assembly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology to scientists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad for their discoveries concerning nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. In contrast with the short research history of the enzymatic synthesis of NO, the introduction of nitrate-containing compounds for medicinal purposes marked its 150th anniversary in 1997. Glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin; GTN) is the first compound of this category. Alfred Nobel (the founder of the Nobel Prize) himself had suffered from angina pectoris and was prescribed nitroglycerin for his chest pain while he refused to take due to the induction of headaches. Almost a century after its first chemical use, research in the nitric oxide and 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) pathway has dramatically expanded and the role of NO/cGMP in physiology and pathology has been extensively studied. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the receptor for NO. The α1β1 heterodimer is the predominant isoform of sGC that is obligatory for catalytic activity. NO binds to the ferrous (Fe(2+)) heme at histidine 105 of the β1 subunit and leads to an increase in sGC activity and cGMP production of at least 200-fold. In this chapter, we reviewed the studies of sGC-cGMP signaling in cell proliferation; introduced our work of targeting sGC-cGMP signaling for cancer therapy; and explored the role of sGC-cGMP signaling in the chromatin-microenvironment.

  10. Crystal Structure of PKG I:cGMP Complex Reveals a cGMP-Mediated Dimeric Interface that Facilitates cGMP-Induced Activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Joo; Lorenz, Robin; Arold, Stefan T; Reger, Albert S; Sankaran, Banumathi; Casteel, Darren E; Herberg, Friedrich W; Kim, Choel

    2016-05-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is a key regulator of smooth muscle and vascular tone and represents an important drug target for treating hypertensive diseases and erectile dysfunction. Despite its importance, its activation mechanism is not fully understood. To understand the activation mechanism, we determined a 2.5 Å crystal structure of the PKG I regulatory (R) domain bound with cGMP, which represents the activated state. Although we used a monomeric domain for crystallization, the structure reveals that two R domains form a symmetric dimer where the cGMP bound at high-affinity pockets provide critical dimeric contacts. Small-angle X-ray scattering and mutagenesis support this dimer model, suggesting that the dimer interface modulates kinase activation. Finally, structural comparison with the homologous cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase reveals that PKG is drastically different from protein kinase A in its active conformation, suggesting a novel activation mechanism for PKG.

  11. The Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mónica, F Z; Bian, K; Murad, F

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3'-5' guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling plays a critical role on smooth muscle tone, platelet activity, cardiac contractility, renal function and fluid balance, and cell growth. Studies of the 1990s established endothelium dysfunction as one of the major causes of cardiovascular diseases. Therapeutic strategies that benefit NO bioavailability have been applied in clinical medicine extensively. Basic and clinical studies of cGMP regulation through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) or inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) have resulted in effective therapies for pulmonary hypertension, erectile dysfunction, and more recently benign prostatic hyperplasia. This section reviews (1) how endothelial dysfunction and NO deficiency lead to cardiovascular diseases, (2) how soluble cGMP regulation leads to beneficial effects on disorders of the circulation system, and (3) the epigenetic regulation of NO-sGC pathway components in the cardiovascular system. In conclusion, the discovery of the NO-cGMP pathway revolutionized the comprehension of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in cardiovascular and other diseases. However, considering the expression "from bench to bedside" the therapeutic alternatives targeting NO-cGMP did not immediately follow the marked biochemical and pathophysiological revolution. Some therapeutic options have been effective and released on the market for pulmonary hypertension and erectile dysfunction such as inhaled NO, PDE5 inhibitors, and recently sGC stimulators. The therapeutic armamentarium for many other disorders is expected in the near future. There are currently numerous active basic and clinical research programs in universities and industries attempting to develop novel therapies for many diseases and medical applications.

  12. A functional CFTR protein is required for mouse intestinal cAMP-, cGMP- and Ca(2+)-dependent HCO3- secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, U; Blumenstein, I; Kretz, A; Viellard-Baron, D; Rossmann, H; Colledge, W H; Evans, M; Ratcliff, R; Gregor, M

    1997-01-01

    1. Most segments of the gastrointestinal tract secrete HCO3-, but the molecular nature of the secretory mechanisms has not been identified. We had previously speculated that the regulator for intestinal electrogenic HCO3- secretion is the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) channel. To prove this hypothesis, we have now measured HCO3- secretion by pH-stat titration, and recorded the electrical parameters of in vitro duodenum, jejunum and ileum of mice deficient in the gene for the CFTR protein ('CF-mice') and their normal littermates. 2. Basal HCO3- secretory rates were reduced in all small intestinal segments of CF mice. Forskolin, PGE2, 8-bromo-cAMP and VIP (cAMP-dependent agonists), heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa), guanylin and 8-bromo-cGMP (cGMP-dependent agonists) and carbachol (Ca2+ dependent) stimulated both the short-circuit current (Isc) and the HCO3- secretory rate (JHCO3-) in all intestinal segments in normal mice, whereas none of these agonists had any effect on JHCO3- in the intestine of CF mice. 3. To investigate whether Cl(-)-HCO3- exchangers, which have been implicated in mediating the response to some of these agonists in the intestine, were similarly active in the small intestine of normal and CF mice, we studied Cl- gradient-driven 36Cl- uptake into brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles isolated from normal and CF mouse small intestine. Both the time course and the peak value for 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2',2-disulphonic acid (DIDS)-inhibited 36Cl- uptake was similar in normal and CF mice BBM vesicles. 4. In summary, the results demonstrate that the presence of the CFTR channel is necessary for agonist-induced stimulation of electrogenic HCO3- secretion in all segments of the small intestine, and all three intracellular signal transduction pathways stimulate HCO3- secretion exclusively via activation of the CFTR channel. PMID:9423183

  13. New insights into Legionella pneumophila biofilm regulation by c-di-GMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Pécastaings, Sophie; Allombert, Julie; Lajoie, Barbora; Doublet, Patricia; Roques, Christine; Vianney, Anne

    2016-09-01

    The waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila grows as a biofilm, freely or inside amoebae. Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a bacterial second messenger frequently implicated in biofilm formation, is synthesized and degraded by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs), respectively. To characterize the c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes involved in L. pneumophila biofilm regulation, the consequences on biofilm formation and the c-di-GMP concentration of each corresponding gene inactivation were assessed in the Lens strain. The results showed that one DGC and two PDEs enhance different aspects of biofilm formation, while two proteins with dual activity (DGC/PDE) inhibit biofilm growth. Surprisingly, only two mutants exhibited a change in global c-di-GMP concentration. This study highlights that specific c-di-GMP pathways control L. pneumophila biofilm formation, most likely via temporary and/or local modulation of c-di-GMP concentration. Furthermore, Lpl1054 DGC is required to enable the formation a dense biofilm in response to nitric oxide, a signal for biofilm dispersion in many other species. PMID:27494738

  14. New insights into Legionella pneumophila biofilm regulation by c-di-GMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Pécastaings, Sophie; Allombert, Julie; Lajoie, Barbora; Doublet, Patricia; Roques, Christine; Vianney, Anne

    2016-09-01

    The waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila grows as a biofilm, freely or inside amoebae. Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a bacterial second messenger frequently implicated in biofilm formation, is synthesized and degraded by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs), respectively. To characterize the c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes involved in L. pneumophila biofilm regulation, the consequences on biofilm formation and the c-di-GMP concentration of each corresponding gene inactivation were assessed in the Lens strain. The results showed that one DGC and two PDEs enhance different aspects of biofilm formation, while two proteins with dual activity (DGC/PDE) inhibit biofilm growth. Surprisingly, only two mutants exhibited a change in global c-di-GMP concentration. This study highlights that specific c-di-GMP pathways control L. pneumophila biofilm formation, most likely via temporary and/or local modulation of c-di-GMP concentration. Furthermore, Lpl1054 DGC is required to enable the formation a dense biofilm in response to nitric oxide, a signal for biofilm dispersion in many other species.

  15. A calcium-permeable cGMP-activated cation conductance in hippocampal neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leinders-Zufall, T.; Rosenboom, H.; Barnstable, C. J.; Shepherd, G. M.; Zufall, F.

    1995-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamp recordings detected a previously unidentified cGMP-activated membrane conductance in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This conductance is nonselectively permeable for cations and is completely but reversibly blocked by external Cd2+. The Ca2+ permeability of the hippocampal cGMP-activated conductance was examined in detail, indicating that the underlying ion channels display a high relative permeability for Ca2+. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons contain a cGMP-activated membrane conductance that has some properties similar to the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels previously shown in sensory receptor cells and retinal neurons. In hippocampal neurons this conductance similarly could mediate membrane depolarization and Ca2+ fluxes in response to intracellular cGMP elevation.

  16. The expanding roles of c-di-GMP in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides and secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2015-05-01

    The cyclic dinucleotide c-di-GMP has emerged in the last decade as a prevalent intracellular messenger that orchestrates the transition between the motile and sessile lifestyles of many bacterial species. The motile-to-sessile transition is often associated with the formation of extracellular matrix-encased biofilm, an organized community of bacterial cells that often contributes to antibiotic resistance and host-pathogen interaction. It is increasingly clear that c-di-GMP controls motility, biofilm formation and bacterial pathogenicity partially through regulating the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and small-molecule secondary metabolites. This review summarizes our current understanding of the regulation of EPS biosynthesis by c-di-GMP in a diversity of bacterial species and highlights the emerging role of c-di-GMP in the biosynthesis of small-molecule secondary metabolites.

  17. Critical Role of Nitric Oxide-cGMP Cascade in the Formation of cAMP-Dependent Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aonuma, Hitoshi; Mizunami, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Unoki, Sae

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic AMP pathway plays an essential role in formation of long-term memory (LTM). In some species, the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic GMP pathway has been found to act in parallel and complementary to the cAMP pathway for LTM formation. Here we describe a new role of the NO-cGMP pathway, namely, stimulation of the cAMP pathway to induce LTM. We have…

  18. Identification and Characterization of Two Unusual cGMP-stimulated Phoshodiesterases in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Bosgraaf, Leonard; Russcher, Henk; Snippe, Helena; Bader, Sonya; Wind, Joyce; Van Haastert, Peter J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we recognized two genes, gbpA and gbpB, encoding putative cGMP-binding proteins with a Zn2+-hydrolase domain and two cyclic nucleotide binding domains. The Zn2+-hydrolase domains belong to the superfamily of β-lactamases, also harboring a small family of class II phosphodiesterases from bacteria and lower eukaryotes. Gene inactivation and overexpression studies demonstrate that gbpA encodes the cGMP-stimulated cGMP-phosphodiesterase that was characterized biochemically previously and was shown to be involved in chemotaxis. cAMP neither activates nor is a substrate of GbpA. The gbpB gene is expressed mainly in the multicellular stage and seems to encode a dual specificity phosphodiesterase with preference for cAMP. The enzyme hydrolyses cAMP ∼9-fold faster than cGMP and is activated by cAMP and cGMP with a KA value of ∼0.7 and 2.3 μM, respectively. Cells with a deletion of the gbpB gene have increased basal and receptor stimulated cAMP levels and are sporogeneous. We propose that GbpA and GbpB hydrolyze the substrate in the Zn2+-hydrolase domain, whereas the cyclic nucleotide binding domains mediate activation. The human cGMP-stimulated cAMP/cGMP phosphodiesterase has similar biochemical properties, but a completely different topology: hydrolysis takes place by a class I catalytic domain and GAF domains mediate cGMP activation. PMID:12429832

  19. Cyclic nucleotide signalling in kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schinner, Elisabeth; Wetzl, Veronika; Schlossmann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Kidney fibrosis is an important factor for the progression of kidney diseases, e.g., diabetes mellitus induced kidney failure, glomerulosclerosis and nephritis resulting in chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) were implicated to suppress several of the above mentioned renal diseases. In this review article, identified effects and mechanisms of cGMP and cAMP regarding renal fibrosis are summarized. These mechanisms include several signalling pathways of nitric oxide/ANP/guanylyl cyclases/cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP/Epac/adenylyl cyclases/cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Furthermore, diverse possible drugs activating these pathways are discussed. From these diverse mechanisms it is expected that new pharmacological treatments will evolve for the therapy or even prevention of kidney failure. PMID:25622251

  20. Synthetic Peptides as cGMP-Independent Activators of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Iα.

    PubMed

    Moon, Thomas M; Tykocki, Nathan R; Sheehe, Jessica L; Osborne, Brent W; Tegge, Werner; Brayden, Joseph E; Dostmann, Wolfgang R

    2015-12-17

    PKG is a multifaceted signaling molecule and potential pharmaceutical target due to its role in smooth muscle function. A helix identified in the structure of the regulatory domain of PKG Iα suggests a novel architecture of the holoenzyme. In this study, a set of synthetic peptides (S-tides), derived from this helix, was found to bind to and activate PKG Iα in a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-independent manner. The most potent S-tide derivative (S1.5) increased the open probability of the potassium channel KCa1.1 to levels equivalent to saturating cGMP. Introduction of S1.5 to smooth muscle cells in isolated, endothelium-denuded cerebral arteries through a modified reversible permeabilization procedure inhibited myogenic constriction. In contrast, in endothelium-intact vessels S1.5 had no effect on myogenic tone. This suggests that PKG Iα activation by S1.5 in vascular smooth muscle would be sufficient to inhibit augmented arterial contractility that frequently occurs following endothelial damage associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26687482

  1. Cyclic nucleotides of canine antral smooth muscle. Effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin.

    PubMed

    Baur, S; Grant, B; Wooton, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin on the intracellular content of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in antral circular muscle have been determined. 2. Acetylcholine results in a significant but transient increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 3. Isoproterenol and norepinephrine increase intracellular cyclic AMP. Based on half-maximal effective doses, isoproterenol is 2.7-times more effective than norepinephrine. The increase in intracellular cyclic AMP by both agents is inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine, indicating that both agents act on the muscle cell by a beta-receptor-coupled mechanism. 4. Gastrin has no demonstrable effect on either cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. This suggests that while gastrin and acetylcholine can produce a like myoelectric response in the muscle cell, the action of gastrin is mediated by a separate receptor, presumably on the muscle cell, and not by a release of acetylcholine.

  2. Smooth muscle phosphatase is regulated in vivo by exclusion of phosphorylation of threonine 696 of MYPT1 by phosphorylation of Serine 695 in response to cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Anne A; MacDonald, Justin A; Erdodi, Ferenc; Ma, Chaoyu; Borman, Meredith A; Hartshorne, David J; Haystead, Timothy A J

    2004-08-13

    Regulation of smooth muscle myosin phosphatase (SMPP-1M) is thought to be a primary mechanism for explaining Ca(2+) sensitization/desensitization in smooth muscle. Ca(2+) sensitization induced by activation of G protein-coupled receptors acting through RhoA involves phosphorylation of Thr-696 (of the human isoform) of the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT1) of SMPP-1M inhibiting activity. In contrast, agonists that elevate intracellular cGMP and cAMP promote Ca(2+) desensitization in smooth muscle through apparent activation of SMPP-1M. We show that cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG)/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) efficiently phosphorylates MYPT1 in vitro at Ser-692, Ser-695, and Ser-852 (numbering for human isoform). Although phosphorylation of MYPT1 by PKA/PKG has no direct effect on SMPP-1M activity, a primary site of phosphorylation is Ser-695, which is immediately adjacent to the inactivating Thr-696. In vitro, phosphorylation of Ser-695 by PKA/PKG appeared to prevent phosphorylation of Thr-696 by MYPT1K. In ileum smooth muscle, Ser-695 showed a 3-fold increase in phosphorylation in response to 8-bromo-cGMP. Addition of constitutively active recombinant MYPT1K to permeabilized smooth muscles caused phosphorylation of Thr-696 and Ca(2+) sensitization; however, this phosphorylation was blocked by preincubation with 8-bromo-cGMP. These findings suggest a mechanism of Ca(2+) desensitization in smooth muscle that involves mutual exclusion of phosphorylation, whereby phosphorylation of Ser-695 prevents phosphorylation of Thr-696 and therefore inhibition of SMPP-1M.

  3. cGMP-dependent ABA-induced stomatal closure in the ABA-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant abi1-1.

    PubMed

    Dubovskaya, Lyudmila V; Bakakina, Yulia S; Kolesneva, Ekaterina V; Sodel, Dmitry L; McAinsh, Martin R; Hetherington, Alistair M; Volotovski, Igor D

    2011-07-01

    • The drought hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is widely known to produce reductions in stomatal aperture in guard cells. The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) is thought to form part of the signalling pathway by which ABA induces stomatal closure. • We have examined the signalling events during cGMP-dependent ABA-induced stomatal closure in wild-type Arabidopsis plants and plants of the ABA-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant abi1-1. • We show that cGMP acts downstream of hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2) ) and nitric oxide (NO) in the signalling pathway by which ABA induces stomatal closure. H(2) O(2) - and NO-induced increases in the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+) ](cyt) ) were cGMP-dependent, positioning cGMP upstream of [Ca(2+) ](cyt) , and involved the action of the type 2C protein phosphatase ABI1. Increases in cGMP were mediated through the stimulation of guanylyl cyclase by H(2) O(2) and NO. We identify nucleoside diphosphate kinase as a new cGMP target protein in Arabidopsis. • This study positions cGMP downstream of ABA-induced changes in H(2) O(2) and NO, and upstream of increases in [Ca(2+) ](cyt) in the signalling pathway leading to stomatal closure.

  4. Modulation of cGMP by human HO-1 retrovirus gene transfer in pulmonary microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Nader G; Quan, Shuo; Mieyal, Paul A; Yang, Liming; Burke-Wolin, Theresa; Mingone, Christopher J; Goodman, Alvin I; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wolin, Michael S

    2002-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) stimulates guanylate cyclase (GC) and increases guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels. We transfected rat-lung pulmonary endothelial cells with a retrovirus-mediated human heme oxygenase (hHO)-1 gene. Pulmonary cells that expressed hHO-1 exhibited a fourfold increase in HO activity associated with decreases in the steady-state levels of heme and cGMP without changes in soluble GC (sGC) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins or basal nitrite production. Heme elicited significant increases in CO production and intracellular cGMP levels in both pulmonary endothelial and pulmonary hHO-1-expressing cells. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS, significantly decreased cGMP levels in heme-treated pulmonary endothelial cells but not heme-treated hHO-1-expressing cells. In the presence of exogenous heme, CO and cGMP levels in hHO-1-expressing cells exceeded the corresponding levels in pulmonary endothelial cells. Acute exposure of endothelial cells to SnCl2, which is an inducer of HO-1, increased cGMP levels, whereas chronic exposure decreased heme and cGMP levels. These results indicate that prolonged overexpression of HO-1 ultimately decreases sGC activity by limiting the availability of cellular heme. Heme activates sGC and enhances cGMP levels via a mechanism that is largely insensitive to NOS inhibition.

  5. Elevated level of the second messenger c-di-GMP in Comamonas testosteroni enhances biofilm formation and biofilm-based biodegradation of 3-chloroaniline.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichao; Ding, Yuanzhao; Cohen, Yehuda; Cao, Bin

    2015-02-01

    The bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger that determines bacterial lifestyle between the planktonic and biofilm modes of life. Although the role of c-di-GMP signaling in biofilm development and dispersal has been extensively studied, how c-di-GMP signaling influences environmental bioprocess activities such as biodegradation remains unexplored. To elucidate the impacts of elevating c-di-GMP level on environmental bioprocesses, we constructed a Comamonas testosteroni strain constitutively expressing a c-di-GMP synthase YedQ from Escherichia coli and examined its capability in biofilm formation and biodegradation of 3-chloroaniline (3-CA). The high c-di-GMP strain exhibited an increased binding to Congo red dye, a decreased motility, and an enhanced biofilm formation capability. In planktonic cultures, the strain with an elevated c-di-GMP concentration and the wild type could degrade 3-CA comparably well. However, under batch growth conditions with a high surface to volume ratio, an elevated c-di-GMP concentration in C. testosteroni significantly increased the contribution of biofilms in 3-CA biodegradation. In continuous submerged biofilm reactors, C. testosteroni with an elevated c-di-GMP level exhibited an enhanced 3-CA biodegradation and a decreased cell detachment rate. Taken together, this study provides a novel strategy to enhance biofilm-based biodegradation of toxic xenobiotic compounds through manipulating bacterial c-di-GMP signaling.

  6. Structural Insight into the Mechanism of c-di-GMP hydrolysis by EAL domain phosphodiesterases.

    SciTech Connect

    Tchigvintsev, A.; Xu, X.; Singer, A.; Chang, C.; Brown, G.; Proudfoot, M.; Cui, H.; Flick, R.; Anderson, W.; Joachimiak, A.; Galperin, M.; Savchenko, A.; Yakunin, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Northwestern Univ.; NIH

    2010-08-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (or bis-(3'-5') cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate; c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular functions, including motility, biofilm formation, cell cycle progression, and virulence in bacteria. In the cell, degradation of c-di-GMP is catalyzed by highly specific EAL domain phosphodiesterases whose catalytic mechanism is still unclear. Here, we purified 13 EAL domain proteins from various organisms and demonstrated that their catalytic activity is associated with the presence of 10 conserved EAL domain residues. The crystal structure of the TBD1265 EAL domain was determined in free state (1.8 {angstrom}) and in complex with c-di-GMP (2.35 {angstrom}), and unveiled the role of conserved residues in substrate binding and catalysis. The structure revealed the presence of two metal ions directly coordinated by six conserved residues, two oxygens of c-di-GMP phosphate, and potential catalytic water molecule. Our results support a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism of c-di-GMP hydrolysis by EAL domain phosphodiesterases.

  7. Structural Basis for c-di-GMP-Mediated Inside-Out Signaling Controlling Periplasmic Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Dean R.; O'Toole, George A.; Sondermann, Holger

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial second messenger bis-(3′–5′) cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) has emerged as a central regulator for biofilm formation. Increased cellular c-di-GMP levels lead to stable cell attachment, which in Pseudomonas fluorescens requires the transmembrane receptor LapD. LapD exhibits a conserved and widely used modular architecture containing a HAMP domain and degenerate diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase domains. c-di-GMP binding to the LapD degenerate phosphodiesterase domain is communicated via the HAMP relay to the periplasmic domain, triggering sequestration of the protease LapG, thus preventing cleavage of the surface adhesin LapA. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanism of autoinhibition and activation of LapD based on structure–function analyses and crystal structures of the entire periplasmic domain and the intracellular signaling unit in two different states. In the absence of c-di-GMP, the intracellular module assumes an inactive conformation. Binding of c-di-GMP to the phosphodiesterase domain disrupts the inactive state, permitting the formation of a trans-subunit dimer interface between adjacent phosphodiesterase domains via interactions conserved in c-di-GMP-degrading enzymes. Efficient mechanical coupling of the conformational changes across the membrane is realized through an extensively domain-swapped, unique periplasmic fold. Our structural and functional analyses identified a conserved system for the regulation of periplasmic proteases in a wide variety of bacteria, including many free-living and pathogenic species. PMID:21304926

  8. CPT-cGMP Is A New Ligand of Epithelial Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Long; Nie, Hong-Guang; Chang, Yongchang; Lian, Qizhou; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) are localized at the apical membrane of the epithelium, and are responsible for salt and fluid reabsorption. Renal ENaC takes up salt, thereby controlling salt content in serum. Loss-of-function ENaC mutations lead to low blood pressure due to salt-wasting, while gain-of-function mutations cause impaired sodium excretion and subsequent hypertension as well as hypokalemia. ENaC activity is regulated by intracellular and extracellular signals, including hormones, neurotransmitters, protein kinases, and small compounds. Cyclic nucleotides are broadly involved in stimulating protein kinase A and protein kinase G signaling pathways, and, surprisingly, also appear to have a role in regulating ENaC. Increasing evidence suggests that the cGMP analog, CPT-cGMP, activates αβγ-ENaC activity reversibly through an extracellular pathway in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the parachlorophenylthio moiety and ribose 2'-hydroxy group of CPT-cGMP are essential for facilitating the opening of ENaC channels by this compound. Serving as an extracellular ligand, CPT-cGMP eliminates sodium self-inhibition, which is a novel mechanism for stimulating salt reabsorption in parallel to the traditional NO/cGMP/PKG signal pathway. In conclusion, ENaC may be a druggable target for CPT-cGMP, leading to treatments for kidney malfunctions in salt reabsorption. PMID:27019621

  9. Phosphodiesterase 9A Controls Nitric-oxide Independent cGMP and Hypertrophic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong I.; Zhu, Guangshuo; Sasaki, Takashi; Cho, Gun-Sik; Hamdani, Nazha; Holewinski, Ronald; Jo, Su-Hyun; Danner, Thomas; Zhang, Manling; Rainer, Peter P.; Bedja, Djahida; Kirk, Jonathan A.; Ranek, Mark J.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Kwon, Chulan; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Paulus, Walter J.; Takimoto, Eiki; Kass, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a second messenger molecule that transduces nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptide (NP) coupled signaling, stimulating phosphorylation changes by protein kinase G (PKG). Enhancing cGMP synthesis or blocking its degradation by phosphodiesterase type 5A (PDE5A) protects against cardiovascular disease1,2. However, cGMP stimulation alone is limited by counter-adaptions including PDE upregulation3. Furthermore, though PDE5A regulates NO-generated cGMP4,5, NO-signaling is often depressed by heart disease6. PDEs controlling NP-coupled cGMP remain uncertain. Here we show that cGMP-selective PDE9A7,8 is expressed in mammalian heart including humans, and is upregulated by hypertrophy and cardiac failure. PDE9A regulates NP rather than NO-stimulated cGMP in heart myocytes and muscle, and its genetic or selective pharmacological inhibition protects against pathological responses to neuro-hormones, and sustained pressure-overload stress. PDE9A inhibition reverses pre-established heart disease independent of NO-synthase (NOS) activity, whereas PDE5A inhibition requires active NOS. Transcription factor activation and phospho-proteome analyses of myocytes with each PDE selectively inhibited reveals substantial differential targeting, with phosphorylation changes from PDE5A inhibition being more sensitive to NOS activation. Thus, unlike PDE5A, PDE9A can regulate cGMP signaling independent of the NO-pathway, and its role in stress-induced heart disease suggests potential as a therapeutic target. PMID:25799991

  10. Reciprocal effects of an inhibitory factor on catalytic activity and noncatalytic cGMP binding sites of rod phosphodiesterase. [Rana catesbiana

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, A.; Bartucca, F.; Ting, A.; Bitensky, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    In illuminated rod outer segment membranes, GTP and guanosine 5'-(..beta..,..gamma..-imido)triphosphate (p(NH)ppG) have reciprocal effects on cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEase; 3':5'-cyclic-nucleotide 5'-nucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.17) activity and cGMP binding to noncatalytic sites on that enzyme. Two micromolar p(NH)ppG increased PDEase activity more than 2-fold while inhibiting cGMP binding more than 40%. Reduction of noncatalytic cGMP binding, which followed addition of p(NH)ppG, was not a result of PDEase activation. Both effects of p(NH)ppG were completely dependent on the presence of bleached rhodopsin. A heat-stable factor has been found to inhibit PDEase activity and also to stimulate cGMP binding to noncatalytic cGMP binding sites. Addition of p(NH)ppG reversed the effects of this factor on both PDEase activity and cGMP binding. During purification of this material, the activity peaks for both PDEase inhibition and activation of noncatalytic cGMP binding comigrated on both Blue Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography and sucrose density gradients centrifugation, suggesting that the same factor could be responsible for both inhibition of PDEase activity and enhancement of noncatalytic cGMP binding. Limited tryptic proteolysis of PDEase, which markedly reduced cGMP binding to the noncatalytic sites, and experiments using highly purified cAMP (free of cGMP) as substrate for PDEase showed that the binding of cGMP to noncatalytic sites was not required for the heat-stable inhibitory factor to inhibit PDEase activity. We discuss possible relationships between the regulation of PDEase and the binding of cGMP to noncatalytic sites.

  11. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C

    2014-04-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants.

  12. 2'-deoxy cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphate ribose derivatives: importance of the 2'-hydroxyl motif for the antagonistic activity of 8-substituted cADPR derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wagner, Gerd K; Weber, Karin; Garnham, Clive; Morgan, Anthony J; Galione, Antony; Guse, Andreas H; Potter, Barry V L

    2008-03-27

    The structural features needed for antagonism at the cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) receptor are unclear. Chemoenzymatic syntheses of novel 8-substituted 2'-deoxy-cADPR analogues, including 8-bromo-2'-deoxy-cADPR 7, 8-amino-2'-deoxy-cADPR 8, 8- O-methyl-2'-deoxy-cADPR 9, 8-phenyl-2'-deoxy-cADPR 10 and its ribose counterpart 8-phenyl-cADPR 5 are reported, including improved syntheses of established antagonists 8-amino-cADPR 2 and 8-bromo-cADPR 3. Aplysia californica ADP-ribosyl cyclase tolerates even the bulky 8-phenyl-nicotinamide adenine 5'-dinucleotide as a substrate. Structure-activity relationships of 8-substituted cADPR analogues in both Jurkat T-lymphocytes and sea urchin egg homogenate (SUH) were investigated. 2'-OH Deletion decreased antagonistic activity (at least for the 8-amino series), showing it to be an important motif. Some 8-substituted 2'-deoxy analogues showed agonist activity at higher concentrations, among which 8-bromo-2'-deoxy-cADPR 7 was, unexpectedly, a weak but almost full agonist in SUH and was membrane-permeant in whole eggs. Classical antagonists 2 and 3 also showed previously unobserved agonist activity at higher concentrations in both systems. The 2'-OH group, without effect on the Ca (2+)-mobilizing ability of cADPR itself, is an important motif for the antagonistic activities of 8-substituted cADPR analogues. PMID:18303825

  13. Thiazole orange-induced c-di-GMP quadruplex formation facilitates a simple fluorescent detection of this ubiquitous biofilm regulating molecule.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shizuka; Kelsey, Ilana; Wang, Jingxin; Roelofs, Kevin; Stefane, Bogdan; Luo, Yiling; Lee, Vincent T; Sintim, Herman O

    2011-04-01

    Recently, there has been an explosion of research activities in the cyclic dinucleotides field. Cyclic dinucleotides, such as c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP, have been shown to regulate bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. c-di-GMP can exist in different aggregate forms, and it has been demonstrated that the polymorphism of c-di-GMP is influenced by the nature of cation that is present in solution. In previous work, polymorphism of c-di-GMP could only be demonstrated at hundreds of micromolar concentrations of the dinucleotide, and it has been a matter of debate if polymorphism of c-di-GMP exists under in vivo conditions. In this Article, we demonstrate that c-di-GMP can form G-quadruplexes at low micromolar concentrations when aromatic molecules such as thiazole orange template the quadruplex formation. We then use this property of aromatic molecule-induced G-quadruplex formation of c-di-GMP to design a thiazole orange-based fluorescent detection of this important signaling molecule. We determine, using this thiazole orange assay on a crude bacterial cell lysate, that WspR D70E (a constitutively activated diguanylate cyclase) is functional in vivo when overexpressed in E. Coli . The intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP in an E. Coli cell that is overexpressed with WspR D70E is very high and can reach 2.92 mM.

  14. cGMP regulates hydrogen peroxide accumulation in calcium-dependent salt resistance pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Jisheng; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yanli; Jia, Honglei; Bi, Yurong

    2011-10-01

    3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important second messenger in plants. In the present study, roles of cGMP in salt resistance in Arabidopsis roots were investigated. Arabidopsis roots were sensitive to 100 mM NaCl treatment, displaying a great increase in electrolyte leakage and Na(+)/K(+) ratio and a decrease in gene expression of the plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase. However, application of exogenous 8Br-cGMP (an analog of cGMP), H(2)O(2) or CaCl(2) alleviated the NaCl-induced injury by maintaining a lower Na(+)/K(+) ratio and increasing the PM H(+)-ATPase gene expression. In addition, the inhibition of root elongation and seed germination under salt stress was removed by 8Br-cGMP. Further study indicated that 8Br-cGMP-induced higher NADPH levels for PM NADPH oxidase to generate H(2)O(2) by regulating glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity. The effect of 8Br-cGMP and H(2)O(2) on ionic homeostasis was abolished when Ca(2+) was eliminated by glycol-bis-(2-amino ethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, a Ca(2+) chelator) in Arabidopsis roots under salt stress. Taken together, cGMP could regulate H(2)O(2) accumulation in salt stress, and Ca(2+) was necessary in the cGMP-mediated signaling pathway. H(2)O(2), as the downstream component of cGMP signaling pathway, stimulated PM H(+)-ATPase gene expression. Thus, ion homeostasis was modulated for salt tolerance.

  15. The effect of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane on levels of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in two species of insects.

    PubMed

    Bodnaryk, R P

    1976-11-01

    Within 1 h after topical application of a convulsive dose (4 mug per fly, 47 mg/kg) of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) to the adult male of Sarcophaga bullata Parker, guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) levels rose by 71.5% (P less than 0.05) in the head, 159.5% (P less than 0.01) in the thorax, and 23.4% (P greater than 0.05) in the abdomen compared to controls. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels were not significantly affected by the DDT treatment. A convulsive dose (100 mug per larva, 250 mg/kg) of DDT applied to larvae of Mamestra configurata Wlk. caused the whole body level of cyclic GMP to rise by 81.6% (P less than 0.01) after 1 h, and by 95.9% (P less than 0.01) after 3 h. Levels of cyclic AMP were not affected. A hypothesis is advanced suggesting that an abnormally high rate of discharge of acetylcholine (and in the later stages of poisoning, its actual accumulation) at central cholinergic synapses causes cyclic GMP levels to rise, perhaps in post-synaptic cells. The elevated cyclic GMP-cyclic AMP ratio found in DDT-poisoned insects may be of fundamental importance in the complex sequence of events leading to tremor, hyperexcitability, paralysis, and death.

  16. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Moreover, calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. Our results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.

  17. Novel cGMP efflux inhibitors identified by virtual ligand screening (VLS) and confirmed by experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Sager, Georg; Ørvoll, Elin Ø; Lysaa, Roy A; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Ravna, Aina W

    2012-04-12

    Elevated intracellular levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) may induce apoptosis, and at least some cancer cells seem to escape this effect by increased efflux of cGMP, as clinical studies have shown that extracellular cGMP levels are elevated in various types of cancer. The human ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCC5 transports cGMP out of cells, and inhibition of ABCC5 may have cytotoxic effects. Sildenafil inhibits cGMP efflux by binding to ABCC5, and in order to search for potential novel ABCC5 inhibitors, we have identified sildenafil derivates using structural and computational guidance and tested them for the cGMP efflux effect. Eleven compounds from virtual ligand screening (VLS) were tested in vitro, using inside-out vesicles (IOV), for inhibition of cGMP efflux. Seven of 11 compounds predicted by VLS to bind to ABCC5 were more potent than sildenafil, and the two most potent showed K(i) of 50-100 nM. PMID:22380603

  18. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGES

    Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZmore » domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Moreover, calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. Our results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.« less

  19. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Whitney, John C; Whitfield, Gregory B; Marmont, Lindsey S; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E; Howell, P Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. These results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.

  20. Dimeric c-di-GMP Is Required for Post-translational Regulation of Alginate Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, John C.; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. These results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa. PMID:25817996

  1. c-di-GMP signalling and the regulation of developmental transitions in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew J; Tschowri, Natalia; Schlimpert, Susan; Flärdh, Klas; Buttner, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    The complex life cycle of streptomycetes involves two distinct filamentous cell forms: the growing (or vegetative) hyphae and the reproductive (or aerial) hyphae, which differentiate into long chains of spores. Until recently, little was known about the signalling pathways that regulate the developmental transitions leading to sporulation. In this Review, we discuss important new insights into these pathways that have led to the emergence of a coherent regulatory network, focusing on the erection of aerial hyphae and the synchronous cell division event that produces dozens of unigenomic spores. In particular, we highlight the role of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in controlling the initiation of development, and the role of the master regulator BldD in mediating c-di-GMP signalling.

  2. Detection of cyclic diguanylate G-octaplex assembly and interaction with proteins.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Ori J; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Lee, Vincent T

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial signaling networks control a wide variety of cellular processes including growth, metabolism, and pathogenesis. Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (cdiGMP) is a secondary signaling nucleotide that controls cellulose synthesis, biofilm formation, motility and virulence in a wide range of gram-negative bacterial species. CdiGMP is a dynamic molecule that forms different tertiary structures in vitro, including a trans-monomer, cis-monomer, cis-dimer and G-octaplex (G8). Although the monomer and dimer have been shown to be physiologically relevant in modulating protein activity and transcription, the biological effects of the cdiGMP G8 has not yet been described. Here, we have developed a TLC-based assay to detect radiolabeled cdiGMP G8 formation. Utilizing the radiolabeled cdiGMP G8, we have also shown a novel inhibitory interaction between the cdiGMP G8 and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and that the cdiGMP G8 does not interact with proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa known to bind monomeric and dimeric cdiGMP. These results suggest that the radiolabeled cdiGMP G8 can be used to measure interactions between the cdiGMP G8 and cellular proteins, providing an avenue through which the biological significance of this molecule could be investigated.

  3. Formation and dimerization of the phosphodiesterase active site of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa MorA, a bi-functional c-di-GMP regulator.

    PubMed

    Phippen, Curtis William; Mikolajek, Halina; Schlaefli, Henry George; Keevil, Charles William; Webb, Jeremy Stephen; Tews, Ivo

    2014-12-20

    Diguanylate cyclases (DGC) and phosphodiesterases (PDE), respectively synthesise and hydrolyse the secondary messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), and both activities are often found in a single protein. Intracellular c-di-GMP levels in turn regulate bacterial motility, virulence and biofilm formation. We report the first structure of a tandem DGC-PDE fragment, in which the catalytic domains are shown to be active. Two phosphodiesterase states are distinguished by active site formation. The structures, in the presence or absence of c-di-GMP, suggest that dimerisation and binding pocket formation are linked, with dimerisation being required for catalytic activity. An understanding of PDE activation is important, as biofilm dispersal via c-di-GMP hydrolysis has therapeutic effects on chronic infections.

  4. Identification and characterization of DdPDE3, a cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase from Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Kuwayama, H; Snippe, H; Derks, M; Roelofs, J; Van Haastert, P J

    2001-01-01

    In Dictyostelium cAMP and cGMP have important functions as first and second messengers in chemotaxis and development. Two cyclic-nucleotide phosphodiesterases (DdPDE 1 and 2) have been identified previously, an extracellular dual-specificity enzyme and an intracellular cAMP-specific enzyme (encoded by the psdA and regA genes respectively). Biochemical data suggest the presence of at least one cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) that is activated by cGMP. Using bioinformatics we identified a partial sequence in the Dictyostelium expressed sequence tag database that shows a high degree of amino acid sequence identity with mammalian PDE catalytic domains (DdPDE3). The deduced amino acid sequence of a full-length DdPDE3 cDNA isolated in this study predicts a 60 kDa protein with a 300-residue C-terminal PDE catalytic domain, which is preceded by approx. 200 residues rich in asparagine and glutamine residues. Expression of the DdPDE3 catalytic domain in Escherichia coli shows that the enzyme has Michaelis-Menten kinetics and a higher affinity for cGMP (K(m)=0.22 microM) than for cAMP (K(m)=145 microM); cGMP does not stimulate enzyme activity. The enzyme requires bivalent cations for activity; Mn(2+) is preferred to Mg(2+), whereas Ca(2+) yields no activity. DdPDE3 is inhibited by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine with an IC(50) of approx. 60 microM. Overexpression of the DdPDE3 catalytic domain in Dictyostelium confirms these kinetic properties without indications of its activation by cGMP. The properties of DdPDE3 resemble those of mammalian PDE9, which also shows the highest sequence similarity within the catalytic domains. DdPDE3 is the first cGMP-selective PDE identified in lower eukaryotes. PMID:11171061

  5. Regulation by guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate of phospholipid methylation during chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, S; García Gil, M; Mato, J M

    1980-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, the chemoattractant cyclic AMP activates the enzyme guanylate cyclase, giving a brief up to 10-fold increase in the intracellular cyclic GMP content. The addition of physiological cyclic GMP concentrations to a homogenate of D. discoideum cells markedly increased the incorporation of the 3H-labeled methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-[methyl-3H]methionine into mono- and dimethylated phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Lipid methylation was inhibited by S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, which inhibits transmethylation. When whole cells prelabeled with L-[methyl-3H]methionine were exposed to cyclic AMP, a rapid transient increase in the amount of [methyl-3H]phosphatidylcholine was observed. The time course of [methyl-3H]phosphatidylcholine formation agrees with its being mediated by the intracellular increase in cyclic GMP originating during chemotactic stimulation. Addition of the 8-Br derivative of cyclic GMP to whole cells also increased the levels of labeled phosphatidylcholine. It is therefore likely that cyclic GMP contributes to chemotaxis by regulating membrane function via phospholipid methylation. PMID:6261233

  6. Nitrite circumvents canonical cGMP signaling to enhance proliferation of myocyte precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Totzeck, Matthias; Schicho, Andreas; Stock, Pia; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue has a remarkable high regenerative capacity. The underlying cellular events are governed by complex signaling processes, and the proliferation of skeletal myoblasts is a key initial event. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in cell cycle regulation is well-appreciated. Nitrite, an NO oxidation product, is a stable source for NO-like bioactivity particularly in cases when oxygen shortage compromises NO-synthases activity. Although numerous studies suggest that nitrite effects are largely related to NO-dependent signaling, emerging evidence also implicates that nitrite itself can activate protein pathways albeit under physiological, normoxic conditions. This includes a recently demonstrated cyclic guanosine monophosphate-(cGMP)-independent enhancement of endothelial cell proliferation. Whether nitrite itself has the potential to affect myoblast proliferation and metabolism with or without activation of the canonical NO/cGMP pathway to subsequently support muscle cell regeneration is not known. Here we show that nitrite increases proliferation and metabolic activity of murine cultured myoblasts dose-dependently. This effect is not abolished by the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimida-zoline-1-oxyl-3 oxide and does not affect intracellular cGMP levels, implicating a cGMP-independent mechanism. Nitrite circumvents the rapamycin induced attenuation of myoblast proliferation and enhances mTOR activity. Our results provide evidence for a novel potential physiological and therapeutic approach of nitrite in skeletal muscle regeneration processes under normoxia independent of NO and cGMP. PMID:25501648

  7. Temperature affects c-di-GMP signalling and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Townsley, Loni; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-11-01

    Biofilm formation is crucial to the environmental survival and transmission of Vibrio cholerae, the facultative human pathogen responsible for the disease cholera. During its infectious cycle, V. cholerae experiences fluctuations in temperature within the aquatic environment and during the transition between human host and aquatic reservoirs. In this study, we report that biofilm formation is induced at low temperatures through increased levels of the signalling molecule, cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). Strains harbouring in frame deletions of all V. cholerae genes that are predicted to encode diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) or phosphodiesterases (PDEs) were screened for their involvement in low-temperature-induced biofilm formation and Vibrio polysaccharide gene expression. Of the 52 mutants tested, deletions of six DGCs and three PDEs were found to affect these phenotypes at low temperatures. Unlike wild type, a strain lacking all six DGCs did not exhibit a low-temperature-dependent increase in c-di-GMP, indicating that these DGCs are required for temperature modulation of c-di-GMP levels. We also show that temperature modulates c-di-GMP levels in a similar fashion in the Gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not in the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. This study uncovers the role of temperature in environmental regulation of biofilm formation and c-di-GMP signalling.

  8. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Costa, P.G.; Branco, L.G.S.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress. PMID:25387672

  9. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Costa, P G; Branco, L G S; Leite-Panissi, C R A

    2014-12-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress. PMID:25387672

  10. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Costa, P G; Branco, L G S; Leite-Panissi, C R A

    2014-09-19

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress. PMID:25250589

  11. The c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm development in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Fernández, Alicia; López-Sánchez, Aroa; Calero, Patricia; Govantes, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    We previously showed the isolation of biofilmpersistent Pseudomonas putida mutants that fail to undergo biofilm dispersal upon entry in stationary phase. Two such mutants were found to bear insertions in PP0914, encoding a GGDEF/EAL domain protein with high similarity to Pseudomon asaeruginosa BifA. Here we show the phenotypic characterization of a ΔbifA mutant in P. putida KT2442.This mutant displayed increased biofilm and pellicle formation, cell aggregation in liquid medium and decreased starvation-induced biofilm dispersal relative to the wild type. Unlike its P. aeruginosa counterpart, P. putida BifA did not affect swarming motility. The hyperadherent phenotype of the ΔbifA mutant correlates with a general increase in cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels, Congo Red-binding exopolyaccharide production and transcription of the adhesin-encoding lapA gene. Integrity of the EAL motif and a modified GGDEF motif (altered to GGDQF)were crucial for BifA activity, and c-di-GMP depletion by overexpression of a heterologous c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase in the ΔbifA mutant restored wild-type biofilm dispersal and lapA expression.Our results indicate that BifA is a phosphodiesterase involved in the regulation of the c-di-GMP pool and required for the generation of the low c-di-GMP signal that triggers starvation-induced biofilm dispersal.

  12. Bacterial c-di-GMP affects hematopoietic stem/progenitors and their niches through STING.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Chiharu I; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Karigane, Daiki; Haeno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Sato, Taku; Ohteki, Toshiaki; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Barber, Glen N; Kurokawa, Mineo; Suda, Toshio; Takubo, Keiyo

    2015-04-01

    Upon systemic bacterial infection, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to the periphery in order to supply a sufficient number of immune cells. Although pathogen-associated molecular patterns reportedly mediate HSPC activation, how HSPCs detect pathogen invasion in vivo remains elusive. Bacteria use the second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) for a variety of activities. Here, we report that c-di-GMP comprehensively regulated both HSPCs and their niche cells through an innate immune sensor, STING, thereby inducing entry into the cell cycle and mobilization of HSPCs while decreasing the number and repopulation capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells. Furthermore, we show that type I interferon acted as a downstream target of c-di-GMP to inhibit HSPC expansion in the spleen, while transforming growth factor-β was required for c-di-GMP-dependent splenic HSPC expansion. Our results define machinery underlying the dynamic regulation of HSPCs and their niches during bacterial infection through c-di-GMP/STING signaling.

  13. Diacylglycerol analogs inhibit the rod cGMP-gated channel by a phosphorylation-independent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, S. E.; Downing-Park, J.; Tam, B.; Zimmerman, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The electrical response to light in retinal rods is mediated by cyclic nucleotide-gated, nonselective cation channels in the outer segment plasma membrane. Although cGMP appears to be the primary light-regulated second messenger, cellular levels of other substances, including Ca2+ and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, are also sensitive to the level of illumination. We now show that diacylglycerol (DAG) analogs reversibly suppress the cGMP-activated conductance in excised patches from frog rod outer segments. This suppression did not require nucleoside triphosphates, indicating that a phosphorylation reaction was not involved. DAG was more effective at low than at high [cGMP]: with 50 microM 8-Br-cGMP, the DAG analog 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (1,2-DiC8) reduced the current with an IC50 of approximately 22 microM (Hill coefficient, 0.8), whereas with 1.2 microM 8-Br-cGMP, only approximately 1 microM 1,2-DiC8 was required to halve the current. DAG reduced the apparent affinity of the channels for cGMP: 4 microM 1,2-DiC8 produced a threefold increase in the K1/2 for channel activation by 8-Br-cGMP, as well as a threefold reduction in the maximum current, without changing the apparent stoichiometry or cooperativity of cGMP binding. Inhibition by 1,2-DiC8 was not relieved by supersaturating concentrations of 8-Br-cGMP, suggesting that DAG did not act by competitive inhibition of cGMP binding. Furthermore, DAG did not seem to significantly reduce single-channel conductance. A DAG analog similar to 1,2-DiC8--1,3-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (1,3-DiC8)--suppressed the current with the same potency as 1,2-DiC8, whereas an ethylene glycol of identical chain length (DiC8-EG) was much less effective. Our results suggest that DAG allosterically interferes with channel opening, and raise the question of whether DAG is involved in visual transduction. PMID:8527654

  14. CYCLIC DI-NUCLEOTIDE SIGNALLING ENTERS THE EUKARYOTE DOMAIN

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is the prevalent intracellular signalling intermediate in bacteria. It triggers a spectrum of responses that cause bacteria to shift from a swarming motile phase to sessile biofilm formation. However, additional functions for c-di-GMP and roles for related molecules, such as c-di-AMP and c-AMP-GMP continue to be uncovered. The first usage of cyclic-di-nucleotide (c-di-NMP) signalling in the eukaryote domain emerged only recently. In Dictyostelid social amoebas, c-di-GMP is a secreted signal that induces motile amoebas to differentiate into sessile stalk cells. In humans, c-di-NMPs, which are either produced endogenously in response to foreign DNA or by invading bacterial pathogens, trigger the innate immune system by activating the expression of interferon genes. STING, the human c-di-NMP receptor, is conserved throughout metazoa and their closest unicellular relatives, suggesting protist origins for human c-di-NMP signalling. Compared to the limited number of conserved protein domains that detect the second messengers cAMP and cGMP, the domains that detect the c-di-NMPs are surprisingly varied. PMID:24136904

  15. A Minimal Threshold of c-di-GMP Is Essential for Fruiting Body Formation and Sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Skotnicka, Dorota; Trampari, Eleftheria; Liang, Jennifer; Kaever, Volkhard; Malone, Jacob G.; Singer, Mitchell; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Generally, the second messenger bis-(3’-5’)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates the switch between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. Here, we show that c-di-GMP is an essential regulator of multicellular development in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. In response to starvation, M. xanthus initiates a developmental program that culminates in formation of spore-filled fruiting bodies. We show that c-di-GMP accumulates at elevated levels during development and that this increase is essential for completion of development whereas excess c-di-GMP does not interfere with development. MXAN3735 (renamed DmxB) is identified as a diguanylate cyclase that only functions during development and is responsible for this increased c-di-GMP accumulation. DmxB synthesis is induced in response to starvation, thereby restricting DmxB activity to development. DmxB is essential for development and functions downstream of the Dif chemosensory system to stimulate exopolysaccharide accumulation by inducing transcription of a subset of the genes encoding proteins involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis. The developmental defects in the dmxB mutant are non-cell autonomous and rescued by co-development with a strain proficient in exopolysaccharide synthesis, suggesting reduced exopolysaccharide accumulation as the causative defect in this mutant. The NtrC-like transcriptional regulator EpsI/Nla24, which is required for exopolysaccharide accumulation, is identified as a c-di-GMP receptor, and thus a putative target for DmxB generated c-di-GMP. Because DmxB can be—at least partially—functionally replaced by a heterologous diguanylate cyclase, these results altogether suggest a model in which a minimum threshold level of c-di-GMP is essential for the successful completion of multicellular development in M. xanthus. PMID:27214040

  16. A direct screen for c-di-GMP modulators reveals a Salmonella Typhimurium periplasmic ʟ-arginine-sensing pathway.

    PubMed

    Mills, Erez; Petersen, Erik; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-06-01

    Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that transduces internal and external signals and regulates bacterial motility and biofilm formation. Some organisms encode more than 100 c-di-GMP-modulating enzymes, but only for a few has a signal been defined that modulates their activity. We developed and applied a high-throughput, real-time flow cytometry method that uses a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor of free c-di-GMP to screen for signals that modulate its concentration within Salmonella Typhimurium. We identified multiple compounds, including glucose, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, salicylic acid, and ʟ-arginine, that modulated the FRET signal and therefore the free c-di-GMP concentration. By screening a library of mutants, we identified proteins required for the c-di-GMP response to each compound. Furthermore, low micromolar concentrations of ʟ-arginine induced a rapid translation-independent increase in c-di-GMP concentrations and c-di-GMP-dependent cellulose synthesis, responses that required the regulatory periplasmic domain of the diguanylate cyclase STM1987. ʟ-Arginine signaling also required the periplasmic putative ʟ-arginine-binding protein ArtI, implying that ʟ-arginine sensing occurred in the periplasm. Among the 20 commonly used amino acids, S. Typhimurium specifically responded to ʟ-arginine with an increase in c-di-GMP, suggesting that ʟ-arginine may serve as a signal during S. Typhimurium infection. Our results demonstrate that a second-messenger biosensor can be used to identify environmental signals and define pathways that alter microbial behavior.

  17. A Minimal Threshold of c-di-GMP Is Essential for Fruiting Body Formation and Sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Skotnicka, Dorota; Smaldone, Gregory T; Petters, Tobias; Trampari, Eleftheria; Liang, Jennifer; Kaever, Volkhard; Malone, Jacob G; Singer, Mitchell; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2016-05-01

    Generally, the second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates the switch between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. Here, we show that c-di-GMP is an essential regulator of multicellular development in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. In response to starvation, M. xanthus initiates a developmental program that culminates in formation of spore-filled fruiting bodies. We show that c-di-GMP accumulates at elevated levels during development and that this increase is essential for completion of development whereas excess c-di-GMP does not interfere with development. MXAN3735 (renamed DmxB) is identified as a diguanylate cyclase that only functions during development and is responsible for this increased c-di-GMP accumulation. DmxB synthesis is induced in response to starvation, thereby restricting DmxB activity to development. DmxB is essential for development and functions downstream of the Dif chemosensory system to stimulate exopolysaccharide accumulation by inducing transcription of a subset of the genes encoding proteins involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis. The developmental defects in the dmxB mutant are non-cell autonomous and rescued by co-development with a strain proficient in exopolysaccharide synthesis, suggesting reduced exopolysaccharide accumulation as the causative defect in this mutant. The NtrC-like transcriptional regulator EpsI/Nla24, which is required for exopolysaccharide accumulation, is identified as a c-di-GMP receptor, and thus a putative target for DmxB generated c-di-GMP. Because DmxB can be-at least partially-functionally replaced by a heterologous diguanylate cyclase, these results altogether suggest a model in which a minimum threshold level of c-di-GMP is essential for the successful completion of multicellular development in M. xanthus.

  18. Cyclic diguanylate regulation of Bacillus cereus group biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Annette; Smith, Veronika; Røhr, Åsmund K; Lindbäck, Toril; Parmer, Marthe P; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Reubsaet, Leon; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Biofilm formation can be considered a bacterial virulence mechanism. In a range of Gram-negatives, increased levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) promotes biofilm formation and reduces motility. Other bacterial processes known to be regulated by c-di-GMP include cell division, differentiation and virulence. Among Gram-positive bacteria, where the function of c-di-GMP signalling is less well characterized, c-di-GMP was reported to regulate swarming motility in Bacillus subtilis while having very limited or no effect on biofilm formation. In contrast, we show that in the Bacillus cereus group c-di-GMP signalling is linked to biofilm formation, and to several other phenotypes important to the lifestyle of these bacteria. The Bacillus thuringiensis 407 genome encodes eleven predicted proteins containing domains (GGDEF/EAL) related to c-di-GMP synthesis or breakdown, ten of which are conserved through the majority of clades of the B. cereus group, including Bacillus anthracis. Several of the genes were shown to affect biofilm formation, motility, enterotoxin synthesis and/or sporulation. Among these, cdgF appeared to encode a master diguanylate cyclase essential for biofilm formation in an oxygenated environment. Only two cdg genes (cdgA, cdgJ) had orthologs in B. subtilis, highlighting differences in c-di-GMP signalling between B. subtilis and B. cereus group bacteria.

  19. Importance of NO/cGMP signalling via cGMP-dependent protein kinase II for controlling emotionality and neurobehavioural effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Werner, Claudia; Raivich, Gennadij; Cowen, Michael; Strekalova, Tatyana; Sillaber, Inge; Buters, Jeroen T; Spanagel, Rainer; Hofmann, Franz

    2004-12-01

    Cyclic GMP is a second messenger for nitric oxide (NO) that acts as a mediator for many different physiological functions. The cGMP-dependent protein kinases (cGKs) mediate cellular signalling induced by NO and cGMP. Here, we explored the localization of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII) in the mouse brain. In situ hybridization revealed high levels of cGKII mRNA in cerebral cortex, thalamic nuclei, hypothalamic nuclei, and in several basal forebrain regions including medial septum, striatum and amygdala. The close link to NO and the distribution pattern of cGKII suggested that this enzyme might be involved in emotional reactions and responses to drugs of abuse. Therefore, cGKII knockout animals (cGKII-/-) were compared with littermate controls in behavioural tests (i) for emotion-linked and (ii) for acute and chronic ethanol responses. Deletion of cGKII did not influence aggressive behaviour but led to enhanced anxiety-like behaviour. In terms of acute responses to ethanol, cGKII-/- mice were hyposensitive to hypnotic doses of ethanol as measured by the loss of righting reflex, without an alteration in their blood alcohol elimination. In a two-bottle free choice test, cGKII-/- mice showed elevated alcohol consumption. No taste differences to sweet solutions were observed compared to control animals. In summary, our data show that cGKII activity modulates anxiety-like behaviour and neurobehavioural effects of alcohol.

  20. May Cyclic Nucleotides Be a Source for Abiotic RNA Synthesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Pino, Samanta; Botta, Giorgia; Saladino, Raffaele; di Mauro, Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    Nucleic bases are obtained by heating formamide in the presence of various catalysts. Formamide chemistry also allows the formation of acyclonucleosides and the phosphorylation of nucleosides in every possible position, also affording 2',3' and 3',5' cyclic forms. We have reported that 3',5' cyclic GMP and 3',5' cyclic AMP polymerize in abiotic conditions yielding short oligonucleotides. The characterization of this reaction is being pursued, several of its parameters have been determined and experimental caveats are reported. The yield of non-enzymatic polymerization of cyclic purine nucleotides is very low. Polymerization is strongly enhanced by the presence of base-complementary RNA sequences.

  1. In Search of Enzymes with a Role in 3', 5'-Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Metabolism in Plants.

    PubMed

    Gross, Inonge; Durner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    In plants, nitric oxide (NO)-mediated 3', 5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis plays an important role during pathogenic stress response, stomata closure upon osmotic stress, the development of adventitious roots and transcript regulation. The NO-cGMP dependent pathway is well characterized in mammals. The binding of NO to soluble guanylate cyclase enzymes (GCs) initiates the synthesis of cGMP from guanosine triphosphate. The produced cGMP alters various cellular responses, such as the function of protein kinase activity, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels and cGMP-regulated phosphodiesterases. The signal generated by the second messenger is terminated by 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDEs) enzymes that hydrolyze cGMP to a non-cyclic 5'-guanosine monophosphate. To date, no homologues of mammalian cGMP-synthesizing and degrading enzymes have been found in higher plants. In the last decade, six receptor proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana have been reported to have guanylate cyclase activity in vitro. Of the six receptors, one was shown to be a NO dependent guanylate cyclase enzyme (NOGC1). However, the role of these proteins in planta remains to be elucidated. Enzymes involved in the degradation of cGMP remain elusive, albeit, PDE activity has been detected in crude protein extracts from various plants. Additionally, several research groups have partially purified and characterized PDE enzymatic activity from crude protein extracts. In this review, we focus on presenting advances toward the identification of enzymes involved in the cGMP metabolism pathway in higher plants. PMID:27200049

  2. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid tellurite (TeO32–) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO32– further increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO32–. P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/plac-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO32– exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to TeO32–. Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. PMID:25992876

  3. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

    PubMed

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

  4. Structures of the PelD Cyclic Diguanylate Effector Involved in Pellicle Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Chen, Jui-Hui; Hao, Yue; Nair, Satish K.

    2012-01-01

    The second messenger bis-(3′–5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays a vital role in the global regulation in bacteria. Here, we describe structural and biochemical characterization of a novel c-di-GMP effector PelD that is critical to the formation of pellicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present high-resolution structures of a cytosolic fragment of PelD in apo form and its complex with c-di-GMP. The structure contains a bi-domain architecture composed of a GAF domain (commonly found in cyclic nucleotide receptors) and a GGDEF domain (found in c-di-GMP synthesizing enzymes), with the latter binding to one molecule of c-di-GMP. The GGDEF domain has a degenerate active site but a conserved allosteric site (I-site), which we show binds c-di-GMP with a Kd of 0.5 μm. We identified a series of residues that are crucial for c-di-GMP binding, and confirmed the roles of these residues through biochemical characterization of site-specific variants. The structures of PelD represent a novel class of c-di-GMP effector and expand the knowledge of scaffolds that mediate c-di-GMP recognition. PMID:22810222

  5. Permanent depression of plasma cGMP during long-term space flight.

    PubMed

    Rössler, A; Noskov, V; László, Z; Polyakow, V V; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate plasma concentrations of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during and after real and simulated space flight. Venous blood was obtained 3 min after the beginning and 2 min after the lower body negative pressure maneuver in two cosmonauts preflight (supine), inflight, and postflight (supine) and in five other subjects before, at the end, and 4 days after a 5-day head-down tilt (-6 degrees) bed rest. In cosmonaut 1 (10 days in space), plasma cGMP fell from preflight 4.3 to 1.4 nM on flight day 6, and was 3.0 nM on the fourth day after landing. In cosmonaut 2 (438 days in space), it fell from preflight 4.9 to 0.5 nM on on flight day 3, and stayed <0.1 nM with 5, 9, and 14 months in space, as well as on the fourth day after landing. Three months after the flight his plasma cGMP was back to normal (6.3 nM). Cosmonaut 2 also displayed relatively low inflight ANP values but returned to preflight level immediately after landing. In a ground-based simulation on five other persons, supine plasma cGMP was reduced by an average of 30% within 5 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt bed rest. The data consistently demonstrate lowered plasma cGMP with real and simulated weightlessness, and a complete disappearance of cGMP from plasma during, and shortly after long-duration space flight.

  6. Receptors and cGMP signalling mechanism for E. coli enterotoxin in opossum kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, L.R.; Krause, W.J.; Freeman, R.H. Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Medical Center, Columbia, MO )

    1988-11-01

    Receptors for the heat-stable enterotoxin produced by Escherichia coli were found in the kidney and intestine of the North American opossum and in cultured renal cell lines. The enterotoxin markedly increased guanosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) production in slices of kidney cortex and medulla, in suspensions of intestinal mucosa, and in the opossum kidney (OK) and rat kangaroo kidney (PtK-2) cell lines. In contrast, atrial natriuretic factor elicited much smaller increases in cGMP levels of kidney, intestine, or cultured kidney cell lines. The enterotoxin receptors in OK cells had a molecular mass of approximately 120 kDa when measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of receptors crosslinked with {sup 125}I-enterotoxin. The occurrence of receptors for the E. coli peptide in OK implies that these receptors may be involved in the regulation of renal tubular function in the opossum. E. coli enterotoxin caused a much larger increase in urine cGMP excretion than did atrial natriuretic factor when these peptides were injected intravenously into opossums. However, atrial natriuretic factor elicited a marked diuresis, natriuresis, and increased urinary excretion of calcium, phosphate, potassium, and magnesium. In contrast, the enterotoxin did not acutely influence OK fluid and electrolyte excretion. Thus the substantial increase in cGMP synthesis produced by the bacterial peptide in OK cortex and medulla in vitro and the increased renal excretion of cGMP in vivo were not associated with changes in electrolyte or water excretion. Whether cGMP represents a second messenger molecule in the kidney is an interesting question that was raised but not answered in this series of experiments.

  7. Modification of radiosensitivity of mammalian cells by cyclic nucleotides. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, D.; Prasad, K.N.

    1981-07-06

    Some in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) may be one of the important factors in determining the radiosensitivity of certain mammalian cells; however, the role of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in radiosensitivity of mammalian cells is completely unknown. Recent data also suggest that the mechanism of radiation protection afforded by moderate hypoxia and SH-containing compounds may involve an alteration in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP. At least one in vivo study shows that cyclic AMP protects hair follicles and gut epithelial cells against radiation damage; however, it does not protect lymphosarcoma and breast carcinoma in mice. If a similar phenomenon is found in humans, an elevation of the intracellular level of cyclic AMP during radiation exposure may improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy in those cases where the radiation damage of normal tissue becomes the limiting factor for a continuation of the therapy program.

  8. Regulation of hippocampal cGMP levels as a candidate to treat cognitive deficits in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Ana; Giralt, Albert; Arumí, Helena; Alberch, Jordi; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) patients and mouse models show learning and memory impairment associated with hippocampal dysfunction. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase/3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (nNOS/cGMP) pathway is implicated in synaptic plasticity, and in learning and memory processes. Here, we examined the nNOS/cGMP pathway in the hippocampus of HD mice to determine whether it can be a good therapeutic target for cognitive improvement in HD. We analyzed hippocampal nNOS and phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 and 9 levels in R6/1 mice, and cGMP levels in the hippocampus of R6/1, R6/2 and Hdh(Q7/Q111) mice, and of HD patients. We also investigated whether sildenafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, could improve cognitive deficits in R6/1 mice. We found that hippocampal cGMP levels were 3-fold lower in 12-week-old R6/1 mice, when they show deficits in object recognition memory and in passive avoidance learning. Consistent with hippocampal cGMP levels, nNOS levels were down-regulated, while there were no changes in the levels of PDE5 and PDE9 in R6/1 mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of sildenafil (3 mg/Kg) immediately after training increased cGMP levels, and improved memory in R6/1 mice, as assessed by using the novel object recognition and the passive avoidance test. Importantly, cGMP levels were also reduced in R6/2 mouse and human HD hippocampus. Therefore, the regulation of hippocampal cGMP levels can be a suitable treatment for cognitive impairment in HD. PMID:24040016

  9. Nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in the eye.

    PubMed

    Murad, Ferid

    2008-06-01

    This brief review describes the components and pathways utilized in nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling. Since the discovery of the effects of NO and cGMP on smooth muscle relaxation about 30 years ago, the field has expanded in many directions such that many, but not all, biochemical and biological effects seem to be regulated by these unique signaling molecules. While many of the effects of NO are due to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that can be considered the receptor for NO, cGMP, in turn, can activate a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) to phosphorylate an array of proteins. Some of the effects of cGMP can be independent of PKG and are due to effects on ion channels or cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases. Also, some of the effects of NO can be independent of sGC activation. The isoenzymes and macromolecules that participate in these signaling pathways can serve as molecular targets to identify compounds that increase or decrease their activation and thus serve as chemical leads for discovering novel drugs for a variety of diseases. Some examples are given. However, with about 90,000 publications in the field since our first reports in 1977, this brief review can only give the readers a sample of the excitement and opportunities we have found in this cell signaling system.

  10. Cyclic diguanylate signaling in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Erin B; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The nucleotide second messenger 3'-5' cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of the transition between motile and non-motile lifestyles in bacteria, favoring sessility. Most research investigating the functions of c-di-GMP has focused on Gram-negative species, especially pathogens. Recent work in Gram-positive species has revealed that c-di-GMP plays similar roles in Gram-positives, though the precise targets and mechanisms of regulation may differ. The majority of bacterial life exists in a surface-associated state, with motility allowing bacteria to disseminate and colonize new environments. c-di-GMP signaling regulates flagellum biosynthesis and production of adherence factors and appears to be a primary mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to surfaces. Ultimately, c-di-GMP influences the ability of a bacterium to alter its transcriptional program, physiology and behavior upon surface contact. This review discusses how bacteria are able to sense a surface via flagella and type IV pili, and the role of c-di-GMP in regulating the response to surfaces, with emphasis on studies of Gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Cyclic diguanylate signaling in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Erin B; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The nucleotide second messenger 3'-5' cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of the transition between motile and non-motile lifestyles in bacteria, favoring sessility. Most research investigating the functions of c-di-GMP has focused on Gram-negative species, especially pathogens. Recent work in Gram-positive species has revealed that c-di-GMP plays similar roles in Gram-positives, though the precise targets and mechanisms of regulation may differ. The majority of bacterial life exists in a surface-associated state, with motility allowing bacteria to disseminate and colonize new environments. c-di-GMP signaling regulates flagellum biosynthesis and production of adherence factors and appears to be a primary mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to surfaces. Ultimately, c-di-GMP influences the ability of a bacterium to alter its transcriptional program, physiology and behavior upon surface contact. This review discusses how bacteria are able to sense a surface via flagella and type IV pili, and the role of c-di-GMP in regulating the response to surfaces, with emphasis on studies of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27354347

  12. Sulindac selectively inhibits colon tumor cell growth by activating the cGMP/PKG pathway to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Xi, Yaguang; Tinsley, Heather N; Gurpinar, Evrim; Gary, Bernard D; Zhu, Bing; Li, Yonghe; Chen, Xi; Keeton, Adam B; Abadi, Ashraf H; Moyer, Mary P; Grizzle, William E; Chang, Wen-Chi; Clapper, Margie L; Piazza, Gary A

    2013-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) display promising antineoplastic activity for colorectal and other cancers, but toxicity from COX inhibition limits their long-term use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the basis for their tumor cell growth inhibitory activity does not require COX inhibition, although the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we report that the NSAID sulindac sulfide inhibits cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) activity to increase intracellular cGMP levels and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) at concentrations that inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of colon tumor cells. Sulindac sulfide did not activate the cGMP/PKG pathway, nor affect proliferation or apoptosis in normal colonocytes. Knockdown of the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme by siRNA and PDE5-specific inhibitors tadalafil and sildenafil also selectively inhibited the growth of colon tumor cells that expressed high levels of PDE5 compared with colonocytes. The mechanism by which sulindac sulfide and the cGMP/PKG pathway inhibits colon tumor cell growth involves the transcriptional suppression of β-catenin to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin T-cell factor transcriptional activity, leading to downregulation of cyclin D1 and survivin. These observations suggest that safer and more efficacious sulindac derivatives can be developed for colorectal cancer chemoprevention by targeting PDE5 and possibly other cGMP-degrading isozymes. PMID:23804703

  13. Sulindac selectively inhibits colon tumor cell growth by activating the cGMP/PKG pathway to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Xi, Yaguang; Tinsley, Heather N.; Gurpinar, Evrim; Gary, Bernard D.; Zhu, Bing; Li, Yonghe; Chen, Xi; Keeton, Adam B.; Abadi, Ashraf H.; Moyer, Mary P.; Grizzle, William E.; Chang, Wen-chi; Clapper, Margie L.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    NSAIDs display promising antineoplastic activity for colorectal and other cancers, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limits their long-term use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the basis for their tumor cell growth inhibitory activity does not required COX inhibition, although the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here we report that the NSAID, sulindac sulfide (SS) inhibits cyclic guanosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) activity to increase intracellular cGMP levels and activate cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG) at concentrations that inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of colon tumor cells. SS did not activate the cGMP/PKG pathway, nor affect proliferation or apoptosis in normal colonocytes. Knockdown of the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme by siRNA and PDE5-specific inhibitors, tadalafil and sildenafil, also selectively inhibited the growth of colon tumor cells that expressed high levels of PDE5 compared with colonocytes. The mechanism by which SS and the cGMP/PKG pathway inhibits colon tumor cell growth appears to involve the transcriptional suppression of β-catenin to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin TCF transcriptional activity, leading to down-regulation of cyclin D1 and survivin. These observations suggest that safer and more efficacious sulindac derivatives can be developed for colorectal cancer chemoprevention by targeting PDE5 and possibly other cGMP degrading isozymes. PMID:23804703

  14. Cyclic Dinucleotide-Controlled Regulatory Pathways in Streptomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cyclic dinucleotides cyclic 3′,5′-diguanylate (c-di-GMP) and cyclic 3′,5′-diadenylate (c-di-AMP) have emerged as key components of bacterial signal transduction networks. These closely related second messengers follow the classical general principles of nucleotide signaling by integrating diverse signals into regulatory pathways that control cellular responses to changing environments. They impact distinct cellular processes, with c-di-GMP having an established role in promoting bacterial adhesion and inhibiting motility and c-di-AMP being involved in cell wall metabolism, potassium homeostasis, and DNA repair. The involvement of c-dinucleotides in the physiology of the filamentous, nonmotile streptomycetes remained obscure until recent discoveries showed that c-di-GMP controls the activity of the developmental master regulator BldD and that c-di-AMP determines the level of the resuscitation-promoting factor A(RpfA) cell wall-remodelling enzyme. Here, I summarize our current knowledge of c-dinucleotide signaling in Streptomyces species and highlight the important roles of c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP in the biology of these antibiotic-producing, multicellular bacteria. PMID:26216850

  15. Mutants of PC12 cells with altered cyclic AMP responses

    SciTech Connect

    Block, T.; Kon, C.; Breckenridge, B.M.

    1984-10-01

    PCl2 cells, derived from a rat pheochromocytoma, were mutagenized and selected in media containing agents known to elevate intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP (cAMP). More than 40 clones were isolated by selection with cholera toxin or 2-chloroadenosine or both. The variants that were deficient in accumulating cAMP were obtained by using a protocol in which 1 ..mu..m 8-bromo-cAMP was included in addition to the agonist. Certain of these variants were partially characterized with respect to the site of altered cAMP metabolism. The profiles of adenylate cyclase activity responsiveness of certain variants to guanosine-5'-(BETA,..gamma..-imido) triphosphate and to forskolin resembled those of UNC and cyc phenotypes of S49 lymphoma cells, which are functionally deficient in the GTP-sensitive coupling protein, N/sub s/. Other variants were characterized by increased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity at low substrate concentration. Diverse morphological traits were observed among the variants, but it was not possible to assign them to a particular cAMP phenotype. Two revertants of a PCl2 mutant were isolated and observed to have regained a cellular cAMP response to 2-chloroadenosine and to forskolin. It is hoped that these PCl2 mutants will have utility for defining cAMP-mediated functions, including any links to the action of nerve growth factor, in cells derived from the neural crest.

  16. Diminished plasma cGMP during weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Roessler, A; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H; Noskov, V; Laszlo, Z; Polyakov, V V

    1997-07-01

    We performed an experiment within the project "RLF" (Russian long-term flight) on a cosmonaut onboard the space station MIR. For creating an analogue to orthostatic stress, we used lower body negative pressure (LBNP) as stimulus. Decrease in central and peripheral baroreceptor load by LBNP can be used as a cardiovascular countermeasure in cosmonauts or for inducing endocrine responses. Altered steady-state plasma concentration values of volume sensitive hormones have been observed inflight as well as postflight. Within this project we measured plasma ANP and cGMP as second messenger. Changes in plasma cGMP concentration are generally considered to be a good indicator of those in ANP activity. However, in our experiments depression of cGMP during space flight was more impressive than ANP decline. We are not aware of previous measurements of plasma cGMP under these conditions, and believe to be the first to report complete suppression of plasma cGMP during long-term stay in space.

  17. In Search of Enzymes with a Role in 3′, 5′-Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Metabolism in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Inonge; Durner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    In plants, nitric oxide (NO)-mediated 3′, 5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis plays an important role during pathogenic stress response, stomata closure upon osmotic stress, the development of adventitious roots and transcript regulation. The NO-cGMP dependent pathway is well characterized in mammals. The binding of NO to soluble guanylate cyclase enzymes (GCs) initiates the synthesis of cGMP from guanosine triphosphate. The produced cGMP alters various cellular responses, such as the function of protein kinase activity, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels and cGMP-regulated phosphodiesterases. The signal generated by the second messenger is terminated by 3′, 5′-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDEs) enzymes that hydrolyze cGMP to a non-cyclic 5′-guanosine monophosphate. To date, no homologues of mammalian cGMP-synthesizing and degrading enzymes have been found in higher plants. In the last decade, six receptor proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana have been reported to have guanylate cyclase activity in vitro. Of the six receptors, one was shown to be a NO dependent guanylate cyclase enzyme (NOGC1). However, the role of these proteins in planta remains to be elucidated. Enzymes involved in the degradation of cGMP remain elusive, albeit, PDE activity has been detected in crude protein extracts from various plants. Additionally, several research groups have partially purified and characterized PDE enzymatic activity from crude protein extracts. In this review, we focus on presenting advances toward the identification of enzymes involved in the cGMP metabolism pathway in higher plants. PMID:27200049

  18. Regulation of guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate in ovine tracheal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Range, Simon P; Holland, Elaine D; Basten, Graham P; Knox, Alan J

    1997-01-01

    Guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) is an important second messenger mediating the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides. Cyclic GMP pathways regulate several aspects of lung pathophysiology in a number of airway cells. The regulation of this system has not been extensively studied in pulmonary epithelial tissue.We have studied the production of cyclic GMP by suspensions of ovine tracheal epithelial cells in response to activators of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) and particulate guanylyl cyclase (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and E. coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa)).Both 10−710−3 M and 10−710−3 M SNAP generated a concentration-dependent marked elevation in cyclic GMP production when incubated with 10−3 M 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) (both greater than 25×baseline values with highest drug concentration).The increase in production of cyclic GMP in response to 10−6 M SNP and 10−5 M SNAP was markedly inhibited by both 5×10−5 M haemoglobin (102% and 92% inhibition) and 5×10−5 M methylene blue (82% and 84% inhibition).The increase in cyclic GMP in response to 10−3 M SNP was measured following co-incubation with the phosphodiesterase inhibitors 10−710−3 M IBMX, 10−710−4 M milrinone and 10−710−4 M SKF 96231. Only 10−410−3 M IBMX significantly increased cyclic GMP levels.Cyclic GMP production was also significantly elevated from baseline by 10−5 M ANP, 10−5 M BNP, 10−5 M CNP and 200 iu ml−1 of E. coli STa toxin in the presence of 10−3 M IBMX. Increases with these natriuretic peptides and STa toxin were smaller in magnitude (24 fold) than those seen with SNP and SNAP. CNP was the most potent of the natriuretic peptides studied suggesting type B membrane bound guanylate cyclase is the predominant form expressed

  19. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments. PMID:27375563

  20. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments.

  1. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments. PMID:27375563

  2. Documentation and Records: Harmonized GMP Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Patel, KT; Chotai, NP

    2011-01-01

    ‘If it’s not written down, then it didn’t happen!’ The basic rules in any good manufacturing practice (GMP) regulations specify that the pharmaceutical manufacturer must maintain proper documentation and records. Documentation helps to build up a detailed picture of what a manufacturing function has done in the past and what it is doing now and, thus, it provides a basis for planning what it is going to do in the future. Regulatory inspectors, during their inspections of manufacturing sites, often spend much time examining a company’s documents and records. Effective documentation enhances the visibility of the quality assurance system. In light of above facts, we have made an attempt to harmonize different GMP requirements and prepare comprehensive GMP requirements related to ‘documentation and records,’ followed by a meticulous review of the most influential and frequently referred regulations. PMID:21731360

  3. Activation of NO-cGMP Signaling Rescues Age-Related Memory Impairment in Crickets

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Matsumoto, Chihiro S.; Takahashi, Toshihumi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Age-related memory impairment (AMI) is a common feature and a debilitating phenotype of brain aging in many animals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying AMI are still largely unknown. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is a useful experimental animal for studying age-related changes in learning and memory capability; because the cricket has relatively short life-cycle and a high capability of olfactory learning and memory. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms underlying memory formation in crickets have been examined in detail. In the present study, we trained male crickets of different ages by multiple-trial olfactory conditioning to determine whether AMI occurs in crickets. Crickets 3 weeks after the final molt (3-week-old crickets) exhibited levels of retention similar to those of 1-week-old crickets at 30 min or 2 h after training; however they showed significantly decreased levels of 1-day retention, indicating AMI in long-term memory (LTM) but not in anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) in olfactory learning of crickets. Furthermore, 3-week-old crickets injected with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, a cyclic GMP (cGMP) analog or a cyclic AMP (cAMP) analog into the hemolymph before conditioning exhibited a normal level of LTM, the same level as that in 1-week-old crickets. The rescue effect by NO donor or cGMP analog injection was absent when the crickets were injected after the conditioning. For the first time, an NO donor and a cGMP analog were found to antagonize the age-related impairment of LTM formation, suggesting that deterioration of NO synthase (NOS) or molecules upstream of NOS activation is involved in brain-aging processes. PMID:27616985

  4. Activation of NO-cGMP Signaling Rescues Age-Related Memory Impairment in Crickets

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Matsumoto, Chihiro S.; Takahashi, Toshihumi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Age-related memory impairment (AMI) is a common feature and a debilitating phenotype of brain aging in many animals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying AMI are still largely unknown. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is a useful experimental animal for studying age-related changes in learning and memory capability; because the cricket has relatively short life-cycle and a high capability of olfactory learning and memory. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms underlying memory formation in crickets have been examined in detail. In the present study, we trained male crickets of different ages by multiple-trial olfactory conditioning to determine whether AMI occurs in crickets. Crickets 3 weeks after the final molt (3-week-old crickets) exhibited levels of retention similar to those of 1-week-old crickets at 30 min or 2 h after training; however they showed significantly decreased levels of 1-day retention, indicating AMI in long-term memory (LTM) but not in anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) in olfactory learning of crickets. Furthermore, 3-week-old crickets injected with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, a cyclic GMP (cGMP) analog or a cyclic AMP (cAMP) analog into the hemolymph before conditioning exhibited a normal level of LTM, the same level as that in 1-week-old crickets. The rescue effect by NO donor or cGMP analog injection was absent when the crickets were injected after the conditioning. For the first time, an NO donor and a cGMP analog were found to antagonize the age-related impairment of LTM formation, suggesting that deterioration of NO synthase (NOS) or molecules upstream of NOS activation is involved in brain-aging processes.

  5. Activation of NO-cGMP Signaling Rescues Age-Related Memory Impairment in Crickets.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Matsumoto, Chihiro S; Takahashi, Toshihumi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Age-related memory impairment (AMI) is a common feature and a debilitating phenotype of brain aging in many animals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying AMI are still largely unknown. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is a useful experimental animal for studying age-related changes in learning and memory capability; because the cricket has relatively short life-cycle and a high capability of olfactory learning and memory. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms underlying memory formation in crickets have been examined in detail. In the present study, we trained male crickets of different ages by multiple-trial olfactory conditioning to determine whether AMI occurs in crickets. Crickets 3 weeks after the final molt (3-week-old crickets) exhibited levels of retention similar to those of 1-week-old crickets at 30 min or 2 h after training; however they showed significantly decreased levels of 1-day retention, indicating AMI in long-term memory (LTM) but not in anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) in olfactory learning of crickets. Furthermore, 3-week-old crickets injected with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, a cyclic GMP (cGMP) analog or a cyclic AMP (cAMP) analog into the hemolymph before conditioning exhibited a normal level of LTM, the same level as that in 1-week-old crickets. The rescue effect by NO donor or cGMP analog injection was absent when the crickets were injected after the conditioning. For the first time, an NO donor and a cGMP analog were found to antagonize the age-related impairment of LTM formation, suggesting that deterioration of NO synthase (NOS) or molecules upstream of NOS activation is involved in brain-aging processes. PMID:27616985

  6. Structures of the activator of K. pneumonia biofilm formation, MrkH, indicates PilZ domains involved in c-di-GMP and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Klebsiella pneumonia is linked to the bacteria's ability to form biofilms. Mannose-resistant Klebsiella-like (Mrk) hemagglutinins are critical for K pneumonia biofilm development, and the expression of the genes encoding these proteins is activated by a 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)-regulated transcription factor, MrkH. To gain insight into MrkH function, we performed structural and biochemical analyses. Data revealed MrkH to be a monomer with a two-domain architecture consisting of a PilZ C-domain connected to an N domain that unexpectedly also harbors a PilZ-like fold. Comparison of apo- and c-di-GMP-bound MrkH structures reveals a large 138° interdomain rotation that is induced by binding an intercalated c-di-GMP dimer. c-di-GMP interacts with PilZ C-domain motifs 1 and 2 (RxxxR and D/NxSxxG) and a newly described c-di-GMP-binding motif in the MrkH N domain. Strikingly, these c-di-GMP-binding motifs also stabilize an open state conformation in apo MrkH via contacts from the PilZ motif 1 to residues in the C-domain motif 2 and the c-di-GMP-binding N-domain motif. Use of the same regions in apo structure stabilization and c-di-GMP interaction allows distinction between the states. Indeed, domain reorientation by c-di-GMP complexation with MrkH, which leads to a highly compacted structure, suggests a mechanism by which the protein is activated to bind DNA. To our knowledge, MrkH represents the first instance of specific DNA binding mediated by PilZ domains. The MrkH structures also pave the way for the rational design of inhibitors that target K pneumonia biofilm formation. PMID:27551088

  7. Time-dependent inhibitory effects of cGMP-analogues on thrombin-induced platelet-derived microparticles formation, platelet aggregation, and P-selectin expression.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Gyrid; Herfindal, Lars; Kopperud, Reidun; Aragay, Anna M; Holmsen, Holm; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Kleppe, Rune; Selheim, Frode

    2014-07-01

    In platelets, nitric oxide (NO) activates cGMP/PKG signalling, whereas prostaglandins and adenosine signal through cAMP/PKA. Cyclic nucleotide signalling has been considered to play an inhibitory role in platelets. However, an early stimulatory effect of NO and cGMP-PKG signalling in low dose agonist-induced platelet activation have recently been suggested. Here, we investigated whether different experimental conditions could explain some of the discrepancy reported for platelet cGMP-PKG-signalling. We treated gel-filtered human platelets with cGMP and cAMP analogues, and used flow cytometric assays to detect low dose thrombin-induced formation of small platelet aggregates, single platelet disappearance (SPD), platelet-derived microparticles (PMP) and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP)-induced P-selectin expression. All four agonist-induced platelet activation phases were blocked when platelets were costimulated with the PKG activators 8-Br-PET-cGMP or 8-pCPT-cGMP and low-doses of thrombin or TRAP. However, extended incubation with 8-Br-PET-cGMP decreased its inhibition of TRAP-induced P-selectin expression in a time-dependent manner. This effect did not involve desensitisation of PKG or PKA activity, measured as site-specific VASP phosphorylation. Moreover, PKG activators in combination with the PKA activator Sp-5,6-DCL-cBIMPS revealed additive inhibitory effect on TRAP-induced P-selectin expression. Taken together, we found no evidence for a stimulatory role of cGMP/PKG in platelets activation and conclude rather that cGMP/PKG signalling has an important inhibitory function in human platelet activation.

  8. Structures of the activator of K. pneumonia biofilm formation, MrkH, indicates PilZ domains involved in c-di-GMP and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Klebsiella pneumonia is linked to the bacteria's ability to form biofilms. Mannose-resistant Klebsiella-like (Mrk) hemagglutinins are critical for K pneumonia biofilm development, and the expression of the genes encoding these proteins is activated by a 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)-regulated transcription factor, MrkH. To gain insight into MrkH function, we performed structural and biochemical analyses. Data revealed MrkH to be a monomer with a two-domain architecture consisting of a PilZ C-domain connected to an N domain that unexpectedly also harbors a PilZ-like fold. Comparison of apo- and c-di-GMP-bound MrkH structures reveals a large 138° interdomain rotation that is induced by binding an intercalated c-di-GMP dimer. c-di-GMP interacts with PilZ C-domain motifs 1 and 2 (RxxxR and D/NxSxxG) and a newly described c-di-GMP-binding motif in the MrkH N domain. Strikingly, these c-di-GMP-binding motifs also stabilize an open state conformation in apo MrkH via contacts from the PilZ motif 1 to residues in the C-domain motif 2 and the c-di-GMP-binding N-domain motif. Use of the same regions in apo structure stabilization and c-di-GMP interaction allows distinction between the states. Indeed, domain reorientation by c-di-GMP complexation with MrkH, which leads to a highly compacted structure, suggests a mechanism by which the protein is activated to bind DNA. To our knowledge, MrkH represents the first instance of specific DNA binding mediated by PilZ domains. The MrkH structures also pave the way for the rational design of inhibitors that target K pneumonia biofilm formation.

  9. Analysis of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Cory D; Pires, Anthony; Norby, Shong-Wan; Boudko, Dmitri; Moroz, Leonid L; Hadfield, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    The gas nitric oxide (NO), and in some cases its downstream second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function in different taxa to regulate the timing of life-history transitions. Increased taxonomic sampling is required to foster conclusions about the evolution and function of NO/cGMP signaling during life-history transitions. We report on the function and localization of NO and cGMP signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae. Pharmacological manipulation of NO or cGMP production in larvae modulated responses to a natural settlement cue from the coral Porites compressa in a manner that suggest inhibitory function for NO/cGMP signaling. However, these treatments were not sufficient to induce metamorphosis in the absence of cue, a result unique to this animal. We show that induction of metamorphosis in response to the settlement cue is associated with a reduction in NO production. We documented the expression of putative NO synthase (NOS) and the production of cGMP during larval development and observed no larval cells in which NOS and cGMP were both detected. The production of cGMP in a bilaterally symmetrical group of cells fated to occupy the distal tip of rhinophores is correlated with competence to respond to the coral settlement cue. These results suggest that endogenous NO and cGMP are involved in modulating responses of P. sibogae to a natural settlement cue. We discuss these results with respect to habitat selection and larval ecology. PMID:18460091

  10. Regulation of cGMP levels by guanylate cyclase in truncated frog rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Cyclic GMP is the second messenger in phototransduction and regulates the photoreceptor current. In the present work, we tried to understand the regulation mechanism of cytoplasmic cGMP levels in frog photoreceptors by measuring the photoreceptor current using a truncated rod outer segment (tROS) preparation. Since exogenously applied substance diffuses into tROS from the truncated end, we could examine the biochemical reactions relating to the cGMP metabolism by manipulating the cytoplasmic chemical condition. In tROS, exogenously applied GTP produced a dark current whose amplitude was half-maximal at approximately 0.4 mM GTP. The conductance for this current was suppressed by light in a fashion similar to when it is activated by cGMP. In addition, no current was produced in the absence of Mg2+, which is known to be necessary for the guanylate cyclase activity. These results indicate that guanylate cyclase was present in tROS and synthesized cGMP from exogenously applied GTP. The enzyme activity was distributed throughout the rod outer segment. The amount of synthesized cGMP increased as the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of tROS decreased, which indicated the activation of guanylate cyclase at low Ca2+ concentrations. Half-maximal effect of Ca2+ was observed at approximately 100 nM. tROS contained the proteins involved in the phototransduction mechanism and therefore, we could examine the regulation of the light response waveform by Ca2+. At low Ca2+ concentrations, the time course of the light response was speeded up probably because cGMP recovery was facilitated by activation of the cyclase. Then, if the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of a photoreceptor decreases during light stimulation, the Ca2+ decrease may explain the acceleration of the light response during light adaptation. In tROS, however, we did observe an acceleration during repetitive light flashes when the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration increased during the stimulation. This result suggests the

  11. cGMP modulates stem cells differentiation to neurons in brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pinedo, U; Rodrigo, R; Cauli, O; Herraiz, S; Garcia-Verdugo, J-M; Pellicer, B; Pellicer, A; Felipo, V

    2010-02-17

    During brain development neural stem cells may differentiate to neurons or to other cell types. The aim of this work was to assess the role of cGMP (cyclic GMP) in the modulation of differentiation of neural stem cells to neurons or non-neuronal cells. cGMP in brain of fetuses was reduced to 46% of controls by treating pregnant rats with nitroarginine-methylester (L-NAME) and was restored by co-treatment with sildenafil.Reducing cGMP during brain development leads to reduced differentiation of stem cells to neurons and increased differentiation to non-neuronal cells. The number of neurons in the prefrontal cortex originated from stem cells proliferating on gestational day 14 was 715+/-14/mm(2) in control rats and was reduced to 440+/-29/mm(2) (61% of control) in rats treated with L-NAME. In rats exposed to L-NAME plus sildenafil, differentiation to neurons was completely normalized, reaching 683+/-11 neurons/mm(2). In rats exposed to sildenafil alone the number of cells labelled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and NeuN was 841+/-16/mm(2). In prefrontal cortex of control rats 48% of the neural stem cells proliferating in gestational day 14 differentiate to neurons, but only 24% in rats exposed to L-NAME. This was corrected by sildenafil, 40% of cells differentiate to neurons. Similar results were obtained for neurons proliferating during all developmental period. Treatment with L-NAME did not reduce the total number of cells labelled with BrdU, further supporting that L-NAME reduces selectively the differentiation of stem cells to neurons. Similar results were obtained in hippocampus. Treatment with L-NAME reduced the differentiation of neural stem cells to neurons, although the effect was milder than in prefrontal cortex. These results support that cGMP modulates the fate of neural stem cells in brain in vivo and suggest that high cGMP levels promote its differentiation to neurons while reduced cGMP levels promote differentiation to non-neuronal cells.

  12. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  13. Concerted Regulation of cGMP and cAMP Phosphodiesterases in Early Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Mokni, Walid; Keravis, Thérèse; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Walter, Alison; Kane, Modou O.; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B.; Lugnier, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy leads to heart failure and represents a high risk leading to premature death. Cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP) play a major role in heart contractility and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are involved in different stages of advanced cardiac diseases. We have investigated their contributions in the very initial stages of left ventricular hypertrophy development. Wistar male rats were treated over two weeks by chronic infusion of angiotensin II using osmotic mini-pumps. Left cardiac ventricles were used as total homogenates for analysis. PDE1 to PDE5 specific activities and protein and mRNA expressions were explored. Rats developed arterial hypertension associated with a slight cardiac hypertrophy (+24%). cAMP-PDE4 activity was specifically increased while cGMP-PDE activities were broadly increased (+130% for PDE1; +76% for PDE2; +113% for PDE5) and associated with increased expressions for PDE1A, PDE1C and PDE5A. The cGMP-PDE1 activation by Ca2+/CaM was reduced. BNP expression was increased by 3.5-fold, while NOX2 expression was reduced by 66% and AMP kinase activation was increased by 64%. In early cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II, all specific PDE activities in left cardiac ventricles were increased, favoring an increase in cGMP hydrolysis by PDE1, PDE2 and PDE5. Increased cAMP hydrolysis was related to PDE4. We observed the establishment of two cardioprotective mechanisms and we suggest that these mechanisms could lead to increase intracellular cGMP: i) increased expression of BNP could increase “particulate” cGMP pool; ii) increased activation of AMPK, subsequent to increase in PDE4 activity and 5′AMP generation, could elevate “soluble” cGMP pool by enhancing NO bioavailability through NOX2 down-regulation. More studies are needed to support these assumptions. Nevertheless, our results suggest a potential link between PDE4 and AMPK/NOX2 and they point out that cGMP-PDEs, especially PDE1 and PDE2

  14. Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) is a cGMP-dependent kinase anchoring protein (GKAP) specific for the cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iβ isoform.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Eleonora; Burgers, Pepijn P; Plank, Michael; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2015-03-20

    Protein-protein interactions are important in providing compartmentalization and specificity in cellular signal transduction. Many studies have hallmarked the well designed compartmentalization of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) through its anchoring proteins. Much less data are available on the compartmentalization of its closest homolog, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), via its own PKG anchoring proteins (GKAPs). For the enrichment, screening, and discovery of (novel) PKA anchoring proteins, a plethora of methodologies is available, including our previously described chemical proteomics approach based on immobilized cAMP or cGMP. Although this method was demonstrated to be effective, each immobilized cyclic nucleotide did not discriminate in the enrichment for either PKA or PKG and their secondary interactors. Hence, with PKG signaling components being less abundant in most tissues, it turned out to be challenging to enrich and identify GKAPs. Here we extend this cAMP-based chemical proteomics approach using competitive concentrations of free cyclic nucleotides to isolate each kinase and its secondary interactors. Using this approach, we identified Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) as a putative novel GKAP. Through sequence alignment with known GKAPs and secondary structure prediction analysis, we defined a small sequence domain mediating the interaction with PKG Iβ but not PKG Iα. In vitro binding studies and site-directed mutagenesis further confirmed the specificity and affinity of HAP1 binding to the PKG Iβ N terminus. These data fully support that HAP1 is a GKAP, anchoring specifically to the cGMP-dependent protein kinase isoform Iβ, and provide further evidence that also PKG spatiotemporal signaling is largely controlled by anchoring proteins.

  15. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  16. Defining specificity determinants of cGMP mediated gustatory sensory transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heidi K; Luo, Linjiao; O'Halloran, Damien; Guo, Dagang; Huang, Xin-Yun; Samuel, Aravinthan D T; Hobert, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a key secondary messenger used in signal transduction in various types of sensory neurons. The importance of cGMP in the ASE gustatory receptor neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was deduced by the observation that multiple receptor-type guanylyl cyclases (rGCs), encoded by the gcy genes, and two presently known cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel subunits, encoded by the tax-2 and tax-4 genes, are essential for ASE-mediated gustatory behavior. We describe here specific mechanistic features of cGMP-mediated signal transduction in the ASE neurons. First, we assess the specificity of the sensory functions of individual rGC proteins. We have previously shown that multiple rGC proteins are expressed in a left/right asymmetric manner in the functionally lateralized ASE neurons and are required to sense distinct salt cues. Through domain swap experiments among three different rGC proteins, we show here that the specificity of individual rGC proteins lies in their extracellular domains and not in their intracellular, signal-transducing domains. Furthermore, we find that rGC proteins are also sufficient to confer salt sensory responses to other neurons. Both findings support the hypothesis that rGC proteins are salt receptor proteins. Second, we identify a novel, likely downstream effector of the rGC proteins in gustatory signal transduction, a previously uncharacterized cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channel, encoded by the che-6 locus. che-6 mutants show defects in gustatory sensory transduction that are similar to defects observed in animals lacking the tax-2 and tax-4 CNG channels. In contrast, thermosensory signal transduction, which also requires tax-2 and tax-4, does not require che-6, but requires another CNG, cng-3. We propose that CHE-6 may form together with two other CNG subunits, TAX-2 and TAX-4, a gustatory neuron-specific heteromeric CNG channel complex. PMID:23695300

  17. Optogenetic manipulation of cGMP in cells and animals by the tightly light-regulated guanylyl-cyclase opsin CyclOp.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiqiang; Nagpal, Jatin; Schneider, Martin W; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Nagel, Georg; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) signalling regulates multiple biological functions through activation of protein kinase G and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. In sensory neurons, cGMP permits signal modulation, amplification and encoding, before depolarization. Here we implement a guanylyl cyclase rhodopsin from Blastocladiella emersonii as a new optogenetic tool (BeCyclOp), enabling rapid light-triggered cGMP increase in heterologous cells (Xenopus oocytes, HEK293T cells) and in Caenorhabditis elegans. Among five different fungal CyclOps, exhibiting unusual eight transmembrane topologies and cytosolic N-termini, BeCyclOp is the superior optogenetic tool (light/dark activity ratio: 5,000; no cAMP production; turnover (20 °C) ∼17 cGMP s(-1)). Via co-expressed CNG channels (OLF in oocytes, TAX-2/4 in C. elegans muscle), BeCyclOp photoactivation induces a rapid conductance increase and depolarization at very low light intensities. In O2/CO2 sensory neurons of C. elegans, BeCyclOp activation evokes behavioural responses consistent with their normal sensory function. BeCyclOp therefore enables precise and rapid optogenetic manipulation of cGMP levels in cells and animals.

  18. Optogenetic manipulation of cGMP in cells and animals by the tightly light-regulated guanylyl-cyclase opsin CyclOp

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shiqiang; Nagpal, Jatin; Schneider, Martin W.; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Nagel, Georg; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) signalling regulates multiple biological functions through activation of protein kinase G and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. In sensory neurons, cGMP permits signal modulation, amplification and encoding, before depolarization. Here we implement a guanylyl cyclase rhodopsin from Blastocladiella emersonii as a new optogenetic tool (BeCyclOp), enabling rapid light-triggered cGMP increase in heterologous cells (Xenopus oocytes, HEK293T cells) and in Caenorhabditis elegans. Among five different fungal CyclOps, exhibiting unusual eight transmembrane topologies and cytosolic N-termini, BeCyclOp is the superior optogenetic tool (light/dark activity ratio: 5,000; no cAMP production; turnover (20 °C) ∼17 cGMP s−1). Via co-expressed CNG channels (OLF in oocytes, TAX-2/4 in C. elegans muscle), BeCyclOp photoactivation induces a rapid conductance increase and depolarization at very low light intensities. In O2/CO2 sensory neurons of C. elegans, BeCyclOp activation evokes behavioural responses consistent with their normal sensory function. BeCyclOp therefore enables precise and rapid optogenetic manipulation of cGMP levels in cells and animals. PMID:26345128

  19. Optogenetic manipulation of cGMP in cells and animals by the tightly light-regulated guanylyl-cyclase opsin CyclOp.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiqiang; Nagpal, Jatin; Schneider, Martin W; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Nagel, Georg; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) signalling regulates multiple biological functions through activation of protein kinase G and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. In sensory neurons, cGMP permits signal modulation, amplification and encoding, before depolarization. Here we implement a guanylyl cyclase rhodopsin from Blastocladiella emersonii as a new optogenetic tool (BeCyclOp), enabling rapid light-triggered cGMP increase in heterologous cells (Xenopus oocytes, HEK293T cells) and in Caenorhabditis elegans. Among five different fungal CyclOps, exhibiting unusual eight transmembrane topologies and cytosolic N-termini, BeCyclOp is the superior optogenetic tool (light/dark activity ratio: 5,000; no cAMP production; turnover (20 °C) ∼17 cGMP s(-1)). Via co-expressed CNG channels (OLF in oocytes, TAX-2/4 in C. elegans muscle), BeCyclOp photoactivation induces a rapid conductance increase and depolarization at very low light intensities. In O2/CO2 sensory neurons of C. elegans, BeCyclOp activation evokes behavioural responses consistent with their normal sensory function. BeCyclOp therefore enables precise and rapid optogenetic manipulation of cGMP levels in cells and animals. PMID:26345128

  20. A c-di-GMP Effector System Controls Cell Adhesion by Inside-Out Signaling and Surface Protein Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Peter D.; Boyd, Chelsea D.; Sondermann, Holger; O'Toole, George A.

    2011-01-01

    In Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 the availability of inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an environmental signal that controls biofilm formation through a cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathway. In low Pi conditions, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) RapA is expressed, depleting cellular c-di-GMP and causing the loss of a critical outer-membrane adhesin LapA from the cell surface. This response involves an inner membrane protein LapD, which binds c-di-GMP in the cytoplasm and exerts a periplasmic output promoting LapA maintenance on the cell surface. Here we report how LapD differentially controls maintenance and release of LapA: c-di-GMP binding to LapD promotes interaction with and inhibition of the periplasmic protease LapG, which targets the N-terminus of LapA. We identify conserved amino acids in LapA required for cleavage by LapG. Mutating these residues in chromosomal lapA inhibits LapG activity in vivo, leading to retention of the adhesin on the cell surface. Mutations with defined effects on LapD's ability to control LapA localization in vivo show concomitant effects on c-di-GMP-dependent LapG inhibition in vitro. To establish the physiological importance of the LapD-LapG effector system, we track cell attachment and LapA protein localization during Pi starvation. Under this condition, the LapA adhesin is released from the surface of cells and biofilms detach from the substratum. This response requires c-di-GMP depletion by RapA, signaling through LapD, and proteolytic cleavage of LapA by LapG. These data, in combination with the companion study by Navarro et al. presenting a structural analysis of LapD's signaling mechanism, give a detailed description of a complete c-di-GMP control circuit—from environmental signal to molecular output. They describe a novel paradigm in bacterial signal transduction: regulation of a periplasmic enzyme by an inner membrane signaling protein that binds a cytoplasmic second messenger. PMID:21304920

  1. Establishment of a High-throughput Setup for Screening Small Molecules That Modulate c-di-GMP Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rugjee, Kushal N; An, Shi-Qi; Ryan, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has driven research attempts to identify new drug targets in recently discovered regulatory pathways. Regulatory systems that utilize intracellular cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a second messenger are one such class of target. c-di-GMP is a signaling molecule found in almost all bacteria that acts to regulate an extensive range of processes including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. The understanding of how c-di-GMP signaling controls aspects of antibiotic resistant biofilm development has suggested approaches whereby alteration of the cellular concentrations of the nucleotide or disruption of these signaling pathways may lead to reduced biofilm formation or increased susceptibility of the biofilms to antibiotics. We describe a simple high-throughput bioreporter protocol, based on green fluorescent protein (GFP), whose expression is under the control of the c-di-GMP responsive promoter cdrA, to rapidly screen for small molecules with the potential to modulate c-di-GMP cellular levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). This simple protocol can screen upwards of 3,500 compounds within 48 hours and has the ability to be adapted to multiple microorganisms. PMID:27404278

  2. Functional analysis of rod monochromacy-associated missense mutations in the CNGA3 subunit of the cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated channel.

    PubMed

    Muraki-Oda, Sanae; Toyoda, Futoshi; Okada, Akira; Tanabe, Shoko; Yamade, Shinichi; Ueyama, Hisao; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Ohji, Masahito

    2007-10-12

    Thirty-nine missense mutations, which had been identified in rod monochromacy or related disorders, in the CNGA3 subunit of cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated channels were analyzed. HEK293 cells were transfected with cDNA of the human CNGA3 subunit harboring each of these mutations in an expression vector. Patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that 32 of the 39 mutants did not show cGMP-activated current, suggesting that these 32 mutations cause a loss of function of the channels. From the remaining 7 mutants that showed cGMP-activated current, two mutations in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, T565M or E593K, were further studied. The half-maximal activating concentration (K(1/2)) for cGMP in the homomeric CNGA3-T565M channels (160microM) was 17.8-fold higher than that of the homomeric wild-type CNGA3 channels (9.0microM). Conversely, the K(1/2) for cGMP in the homomeric CNGA3-E593K channels (3.0microM) was 3-fold lower than that of the homomeric wild-type CNGA3 channels. These results suggest that the T565M and E593K mutations alter the apparent affinity for cGMP of the channels to cause cone dysfunction, resulting in rod monochromacy. PMID:17693388

  3. Establishment of a High-throughput Setup for Screening Small Molecules That Modulate c-di-GMP Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rugjee, Kushal N.; An, Shi-qi; Ryan, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has driven research attempts to identify new drug targets in recently discovered regulatory pathways. Regulatory systems that utilize intracellular cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a second messenger are one such class of target. c-di-GMP is a signaling molecule found in almost all bacteria that acts to regulate an extensive range of processes including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. The understanding of how c-di-GMP signaling controls aspects of antibiotic resistant biofilm development has suggested approaches whereby alteration of the cellular concentrations of the nucleotide or disruption of these signaling pathways may lead to reduced biofilm formation or increased susceptibility of the biofilms to antibiotics. We describe a simple high-throughput bioreporter protocol, based on green fluorescent protein (GFP), whose expression is under the control of the c-di-GMP responsive promoter cdrA, to rapidly screen for small molecules with the potential to modulate c-di-GMP cellular levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). This simple protocol can screen upwards of 3,500 compounds within 48 hours and has the ability to be adapted to multiple microorganisms. PMID:27404278

  4. Establishment of a High-throughput Setup for Screening Small Molecules That Modulate c-di-GMP Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rugjee, Kushal N; An, Shi-Qi; Ryan, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has driven research attempts to identify new drug targets in recently discovered regulatory pathways. Regulatory systems that utilize intracellular cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a second messenger are one such class of target. c-di-GMP is a signaling molecule found in almost all bacteria that acts to regulate an extensive range of processes including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. The understanding of how c-di-GMP signaling controls aspects of antibiotic resistant biofilm development has suggested approaches whereby alteration of the cellular concentrations of the nucleotide or disruption of these signaling pathways may lead to reduced biofilm formation or increased susceptibility of the biofilms to antibiotics. We describe a simple high-throughput bioreporter protocol, based on green fluorescent protein (GFP), whose expression is under the control of the c-di-GMP responsive promoter cdrA, to rapidly screen for small molecules with the potential to modulate c-di-GMP cellular levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). This simple protocol can screen upwards of 3,500 compounds within 48 hours and has the ability to be adapted to multiple microorganisms.

  5. Complex regulatory network encompassing the Csr, c-di-GMP and motility systems of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kristina; Edwards, Adrianne N; Ahmad, Irfan; Romeo, Tony; Römling, Ute; Melefors, Ojar

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial survival depends on the ability to switch between sessile and motile lifestyles in response to changing environmental conditions. In many species, this switch is governed by (3'-5')-cyclic-diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), a signalling molecule, which is metabolized by proteins containing GGDEF and/or EAL domains. Salmonella Typhimurium contains 20 such proteins. Here, we show that the RNA-binding protein CsrA regulates the expression of eight genes encoding GGDEF, GGDEF-EAL and EAL domain proteins. CsrA bound directly to the mRNA leaders of five of these genes, suggesting that it may regulate these genes post-transcriptionally. The c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase STM3611, which reciprocally controls flagella function and production of biofilm matrix components, was regulated by CsrA binding to the mRNA, but was also indirectly regulated by CsrA through the FlhDC/FliA flagella cascade and STM1344. STM1344 is an unconventional (c-di-GMP-inactive) EAL domain protein, recently identified as a negative regulator of flagella gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that CsrA directly downregulates expression of STM1344, which in turn regulates STM3611 through fliA and thus reciprocally controls motility and biofilm factors. Altogether, our data reveal that the concerted and complex regulation of several genes encoding GGDEF/EAL domain proteins allows CsrA to control the motility-sessility switch in S. Typhimurium at multiple levels.

  6. The role of telencephalic NO and cGMP in avoidance conditioning in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojuan; Bentley, Jordan; Miller, Todd; Zmolek, Katherine; Kovaleinen, Travis; Goodman, Evan; Foster, Terri

    2009-06-01

    Our previous study with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist D-AP5 suggested that NMDA receptors were involved in learning but not memory consolidation of avoidance conditioning. The present study investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) were involved in memory consolidation but not learning of avoidance conditioning in goldfish. Experiments 1 to 3 investigated amnestic and performance effects of NO inhibitor L-NAME and cGMP inhibitor LY-83583. Experiment 4 investigated whether posttraining intratelencephalic injection of NO donor SNAP ameliorated anterograde amnestic effects of pretraining NO inhibitor L-NAME. The results showed that L-NAME and LY-83583 produced significant anterograde and retrograde amnesia at doses that did not impair performance processes, and the drugs produced more severe retrograde than anterograde amnesia. Furthermore, posttraining SNAP significantly ameliorated anterograde amnestic effects of pretraining L-NAME. Thus, our previous results with D-AP5 and current results with L-NAME and LY-83583 together suggest that the NMDA receptors are involved in learning or the process that is completed during training, whereas the NO and cGMP are involved in memory consolidation or the process that is normally completed sometime following the learning experience.

  7. Gibberelic acid and cGMP-dependent transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, René; Dawe, Adam; Meier, Stuart; Ludidi, Ndiko; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2010-01-01

    An ever increasing amount of transcriptomic data and analysis tools provide novel insight into complex responses of biological systems. Given these resources we have undertaken to review aspects of transcriptional regulation in response to the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) and its second messenger guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in Arabidopsis thaliana, both wild type and selected mutants. Evidence suggests enrichment of GA-responsive (GARE ) elements in promoters of genes that are transcriptionally upregulated in response to cGMP but downregulated in a GA insensitive mutant (ga1-3). In contrast, in the genes upregulated in the mutant, no enrichment in the GARE is observed suggesting that GARE motifs are diagnostic for GA-induced and cGMP-dependent transcriptional upregulation. Further, we review how expression studies of GA-dependent transcription factors and transcriptional networks based on common promoter signatures derived from ab initio analyses can contribute to our understanding of plant responses at the systems level. PMID:20118660

  8. cGMP phosphodiesterase activity evaluation in human carcinoma of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Mariani, A; Santoleri, F; Fioroni, M; Vitale, D; Piatelli, A; Di Nicola, M; Rubini, C

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate differences of cGMP-PDE activity in salivary glands, between a control group and different benign tumour groups and, where present, with malign tumour groups. Endogen cGMP was evaluated too. The enzymatic reaction used the method of Spoto et al., with minor variations. The samples were organized in six groups: A (Adenolymphoma and Warthins tumour); B (Pleomorphic Adenoma); C (Basaloid Adenoma); D (Myoepitelioma). The control group was represented by healthy patients. In A and B groups, we have analyzed malign pathologies (Adenocarcinoma and Parotid Lymphoma) The benign tumours have more activity than controls, especially in Myoepitelioma (D) but with a decrement in the C group, which presents lower values of cGMP than the other three groups, where the concentration is similar. Between A and B groups, the activity values of malign tumours are similar, higher than controls and than the other benign pathologies, but not higher than in myoepitelioma. The cyclic concentration is similar for malign pathologies, with concentrations lower than controls, similar to Basaloid Adenoma (C).

  9. DNA-binding properties of a cGMP-binding CRP homologue that controls development of metabolically dormant cysts of Rhodospirillum centenum

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury, Sugata; Dong, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Rhodospirillum centenum utilizes 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) as a messenger to regulate development of desiccation-resistant cysts. In this study, we demonstrated that gcyA, gcyB and gcyC, coding for putative subunits of a guanylyl cyclase, increase expression from 8- to 500-fold when cells transition from vegetative to cyst phases of growth. This induction did not occur in a strain that is defective in cGMP synthesis or in a strain that contains a deletion of cgrA that codes for a cGMP-binding homologue of Escherichia coli catabolite repressor protein (CRP). We also demonstrated that cgrA auto-induces its own expression in the presence of cGMP, indicating that a feed-forward loop is used to ramp up cGMP production as cells undergo encystment. Inspection of an intragenic region upstream of gcyB revealed a sequence that is identical to the CRP consensus sequence from E. coli. DNase I and fluorescence anisotropy analyses demonstrated that CgrA bound to this target sequence at a protein : cGMP ratio of 1 : 2 with Kd ∼61 nM. This was in contrast to CgrA in the presence of cAMP, which exhibited Kd ∼1795 nM. CgrA thus constitutes a novel variant of CRP that utilizes cGMP to regulate production of cGMP synthase for the control of cyst development. PMID:26362215

  10. Cyclic nucleotides in tissues during long-term hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makeyeva, V. F.; Komolova, G. S.; Yegorov, I. A.; Serova, L. V.; Chelnaya, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    Male Wistar rates were kept hypokinetic by placing them in small containers for 22 days. Blood plasma cAMP content was subsequently found increased, and cGMP content decreased, in the experimental animals. Liver and thymus cAMP content was similar in the control and experimental animals. There was a 20 and 38% decrease of cAMP content in the kidneys and spleen, respectively. Hypokinesia's reduction of cyclic nucleotides seems to inhibit RNA and protein synthesis.

  11. [Behavior of cellular cyclic nucleotides after hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulation of the canine pancreas].

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Joseph, W; Loeschke, K; Forell, M M

    1981-05-01

    The studies deal with the influence of secretin and various ecbolic secretagogues on tissue levels of cAMP and cGMP in vivo and in the isolated perfused canine pancreas. The mutual behaviour of cellular cAMP and cGMP is observed and compared with the time course of the respective secretory events. Synthetic secretin as well as CCK, acetylcholine or Caerulein likewise elevate tissue cAMP and cGMP simultaneously. There exists no difference in the magnitude of increase and in the time course of changes in tissue cyclic nucleotide levels between hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation. The rise in cAMP and cGMP coincides with the onset of the respective secretory events and reaches peak values contemporarily to the excretory maxima. The following decrease in tissue cyclic nucleotides approximatively parallels juice or enzyme secretion in the isolated perfused pancreas but differs widely in vivo. Under this condition cAMP and cGMP rapidly fall to basal levels during undiminished excretory function and show a second rise after cessation of the latter. Secretin and various ecbolic secretagogues do not increase tissue content of cyclic nucleotides in the same dose-dependent manner as can be observed with pancreatic secretion. The behaviour of cAMP and cGMP after addition of secretin and CCK or acetylcholine remains widely unchanged during calcium-free perfusion in spite of an extensive excretory inhibition. The corresponding rise in cellular cAMP and cGMP in the sequence of hydrokinetic as well as of ecbolic stimulation points to an analogous intracellular mediation of various secretagogues in different target cells of the exocrine canine pancreas.

  12. [Behavior of cellular cyclic nucleotides after hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulation of the canine pancreas].

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Joseph, W; Loeschke, K; Forell, M M

    1981-05-01

    The studies deal with the influence of secretin and various ecbolic secretagogues on tissue levels of cAMP and cGMP in vivo and in the isolated perfused canine pancreas. The mutual behaviour of cellular cAMP and cGMP is observed and compared with the time course of the respective secretory events. Synthetic secretin as well as CCK, acetylcholine or Caerulein likewise elevate tissue cAMP and cGMP simultaneously. There exists no difference in the magnitude of increase and in the time course of changes in tissue cyclic nucleotide levels between hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation. The rise in cAMP and cGMP coincides with the onset of the respective secretory events and reaches peak values contemporarily to the excretory maxima. The following decrease in tissue cyclic nucleotides approximatively parallels juice or enzyme secretion in the isolated perfused pancreas but differs widely in vivo. Under this condition cAMP and cGMP rapidly fall to basal levels during undiminished excretory function and show a second rise after cessation of the latter. Secretin and various ecbolic secretagogues do not increase tissue content of cyclic nucleotides in the same dose-dependent manner as can be observed with pancreatic secretion. The behaviour of cAMP and cGMP after addition of secretin and CCK or acetylcholine remains widely unchanged during calcium-free perfusion in spite of an extensive excretory inhibition. The corresponding rise in cellular cAMP and cGMP in the sequence of hydrokinetic as well as of ecbolic stimulation points to an analogous intracellular mediation of various secretagogues in different target cells of the exocrine canine pancreas. PMID:6265336

  13. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Gehring, Chris

    2016-06-01

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities. PMID:26945740

  14. Cyclic multiverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  15. Ozone and nitric oxide induce cGMP-dependent and -independent transcription of defence genes in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Stefania; Meier, Stuart; Gehring, Chris; Madeo, Laura; Fornaciari, Marco; Romano, Bruno; Ederli, Luisa

    2009-03-01

    Here, we analyse the temporal signatures of ozone (O3)-induced hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) and the role of the second messenger guanosine3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in transcriptional changes of genes diagnostic for biotic and abiotic stress responses. Within 90 min O3 induced H2O2 and NO peaks and we demonstrate that NO donors cause rapid H2O2 accumulation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf. Ozone also causes highly significant, late (> 2 h) and sustained cGMP increases, suggesting that the second messenger may not be required in all early (< 2 h) responses to O3,but is essential and sufficient for the induction of some O3-dependent pathways.This hypothesis was tested resolving the time course of O3-induced transcript accumulation of alternative oxidase (AOX1a), glutathione peroxidase (GPX),aminocyclopropancarboxylic acid synthase (ACS2) that is critical for the synthesis of ethylene, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PALa) and the pathogenesis-related protein PR1a.The data show that early O3 and NO caused transcriptional activation of the scavenger encoding proteins AOX1a, GPX and the induction of ethylene production through ACS2 are cGMP independent. By contrast, the early response of PALa and the late response of PR1a show critical dependence on cGMP.

  16. Synthesis of Triazole-Linked Analogues of c-di-GMP and Their Interactions with Diguanylate Cyclase.

    PubMed

    Fernicola, Silvia; Torquati, Ilaria; Paiardini, Alessandro; Giardina, Giorgio; Rampioni, Giordano; Messina, Marco; Leoni, Livia; Del Bello, Fabio; Petrelli, Riccardo; Rinaldo, Serena; Cappellacci, Loredana; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2015-10-22

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a widespread second messenger that plays a key role in bacterial biofilm formation. The compound's ability to assume multiple conformations allows it to interact with a diverse set of target macromolecules. Here, we analyzed the binding mode of c-di-GMP to the allosteric inhibitory site (I-site) of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and compared it to the conformation adopted in the catalytic site of the EAL phosphodiesterases (PDEs). An array of novel molecules has been designed and synthesized by simplifying the native c-di-GMP structure and replacing the charged phosphodiester backbone with an isosteric nonhydrolyzable 1,2,3-triazole moiety. We developed the first neutral small molecule able to selectively target DGCs discriminating between the I-site of DGCs and the active site of PDEs; this molecule represents a novel tool for mechanistic studies, particularly on those proteins bearing both DGC and PDE modules, and for future optimization studies to target DGCs in vivo.

  17. In vitro and in vivo generation and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-dispersed cells via c-di-GMP manipulation.

    PubMed

    Chua, Song Lin; Hultqvist, Louise D; Yuan, Mingjun; Rybtke, Morten; Nielsen, Thomas E; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Yang, Liang

    2015-08-01

    Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a global secondary bacterial messenger that controls the formation of drug-resistant multicellular biofilms. Lowering the intracellular c-di-GMP content can disperse biofilms, and it is proposed as a biofilm eradication strategy. However, freshly dispersed biofilm cells exhibit a physiology distinct from biofilm and planktonic cells, and they might have a clinically relevant role in infections. Here we present in vitro and in vivo protocols for the generation and characterization of dispersed cells from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by reducing the intracellular c-di-GMP content through modulation of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Unlike conventional protocols that demonstrate biofilm dispersal by biomass quantification, our protocols enable physiological characterization of the dispersed cells. Biomarkers of dispersed cells are identified and quantified, serving as potential targets for treating the dispersed cells. The in vitro protocol can be completed within 4 d, whereas the in vivo protocol requires 7 d.

  18. Time-dependent inhibitory effects of cGMP-analogues on thrombin-induced platelet-derived microparticles formation, platelet aggregation, and P-selectin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Nygaard, Gyrid; Herfindal, Lars; Kopperud, Reidun; Aragay, Anna M.; Holmsen, Holm; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Kleppe, Rune; Selheim, Frode

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • We investigated the impact of cyclic nucleotide analogues on platelet activation. • Different time dependence were found for inhibition of platelet activation. • Additive effect was found using PKA- and PKG-activating analogues. • Our results may explain some of the discrepancies reported for cNMP signalling. - Abstract: In platelets, nitric oxide (NO) activates cGMP/PKG signalling, whereas prostaglandins and adenosine signal through cAMP/PKA. Cyclic nucleotide signalling has been considered to play an inhibitory role in platelets. However, an early stimulatory effect of NO and cGMP-PKG signalling in low dose agonist-induced platelet activation have recently been suggested. Here, we investigated whether different experimental conditions could explain some of the discrepancy reported for platelet cGMP-PKG-signalling. We treated gel-filtered human platelets with cGMP and cAMP analogues, and used flow cytometric assays to detect low dose thrombin-induced formation of small platelet aggregates, single platelet disappearance (SPD), platelet-derived microparticles (PMP) and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP)-induced P-selectin expression. All four agonist-induced platelet activation phases were blocked when platelets were costimulated with the PKG activators 8-Br-PET-cGMP or 8-pCPT-cGMP and low-doses of thrombin or TRAP. However, extended incubation with 8-Br-PET-cGMP decreased its inhibition of TRAP-induced P-selectin expression in a time-dependent manner. This effect did not involve desensitisation of PKG or PKA activity, measured as site-specific VASP phosphorylation. Moreover, PKG activators in combination with the PKA activator Sp-5,6-DCL-cBIMPS revealed additive inhibitory effect on TRAP-induced P-selectin expression. Taken together, we found no evidence for a stimulatory role of cGMP/PKG in platelets activation and conclude rather that cGMP/PKG signalling has an important inhibitory function in human platelet activation.

  19. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in heart and vessels: A therapeutic perspective.

    PubMed

    Bobin, Pierre; Belacel-Ouari, Milia; Bedioune, Ibrahim; Zhang, Liang; Leroy, Jérôme; Leblais, Véronique; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) degrade the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), thereby regulating multiple aspects of cardiac and vascular muscle functions. This highly diverse class of enzymes encoded by 21 genes encompasses 11 families that are not only responsible for the termination of cyclic nucleotide signalling, but are also involved in the generation of dynamic microdomains of cAMP and cGMP, controlling specific cell functions in response to various neurohormonal stimuli. In the myocardium and vascular smooth muscle, the PDE3 and PDE4 families predominate, degrading cAMP and thereby regulating cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and smooth muscle contractile tone. PDE3 inhibitors are positive inotropes and vasodilators in humans, but their use is limited to acute heart failure and intermittent claudication. PDE5 is particularly important for the degradation of cGMP in vascular smooth muscle, and PDE5 inhibitors are used to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. There is experimental evidence that these PDEs, as well as other PDE families, including PDE1, PDE2 and PDE9, may play important roles in cardiac diseases, such as hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as several vascular diseases. After a brief presentation of the cyclic nucleotide pathways in cardiac and vascular cells, and the major characteristics of the PDE superfamily, this review will focus on the current use of PDE inhibitors in cardiovascular diseases, and the recent research developments that could lead to better exploitation of the therapeutic potential of these enzymes in the future. PMID:27184830

  20. C-di-GMP Regulates Motile to Sessile Transition by Modulating MshA Pili Biogenesis and Near-Surface Motility Behavior in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher J; Utada, Andrew; Davis, Kimberly R; Thongsomboon, Wiriya; Zamorano Sanchez, David; Banakar, Vinita; Cegelski, Lynette; Wong, Gerard C L; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-10-01

    In many bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae, cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) controls the motile to biofilm life style switch. Yet, little is known about how this occurs. In this study, we report that changes in c-di-GMP concentration impact the biosynthesis of the MshA pili, resulting in altered motility and biofilm phenotypes in V. cholerae. Previously, we reported that cdgJ encodes a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase and a ΔcdgJ mutant has reduced motility and enhanced biofilm formation. Here we show that loss of the genes required for the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MshA) pilus biogenesis restores motility in the ΔcdgJ mutant. Mutations of the predicted ATPase proteins mshE or pilT, responsible for polymerizing and depolymerizing MshA pili, impair near surface motility behavior and initial surface attachment dynamics. A ΔcdgJ mutant has enhanced surface attachment, while the ΔcdgJmshA mutant phenocopies the high motility and low attachment phenotypes observed in a ΔmshA strain. Elevated concentrations of c-di-GMP enhance surface MshA pilus production. MshE, but not PilT binds c-di-GMP directly, establishing a mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling input in MshA pilus production. Collectively, our results suggest that the dynamic nature of the MshA pilus established by the assembly and disassembly of pilin subunits is essential for transition from the motile to sessile lifestyle and that c-di-GMP affects MshA pilus assembly and function through direct interactions with the MshE ATPase.

  1. C-di-GMP Regulates Motile to Sessile Transition by Modulating MshA Pili Biogenesis and Near-Surface Motility Behavior in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher J.; Utada, Andrew; Davis, Kimberly R.; Thongsomboon, Wiriya; Zamorano Sanchez, David; Banakar, Vinita; Cegelski, Lynette; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    In many bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae, cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) controls the motile to biofilm life style switch. Yet, little is known about how this occurs. In this study, we report that changes in c-di-GMP concentration impact the biosynthesis of the MshA pili, resulting in altered motility and biofilm phenotypes in V. cholerae. Previously, we reported that cdgJ encodes a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase and a ΔcdgJ mutant has reduced motility and enhanced biofilm formation. Here we show that loss of the genes required for the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MshA) pilus biogenesis restores motility in the ΔcdgJ mutant. Mutations of the predicted ATPase proteins mshE or pilT, responsible for polymerizing and depolymerizing MshA pili, impair near surface motility behavior and initial surface attachment dynamics. A ΔcdgJ mutant has enhanced surface attachment, while the ΔcdgJmshA mutant phenocopies the high motility and low attachment phenotypes observed in a ΔmshA strain. Elevated concentrations of c-di-GMP enhance surface MshA pilus production. MshE, but not PilT binds c-di-GMP directly, establishing a mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling input in MshA pilus production. Collectively, our results suggest that the dynamic nature of the MshA pilus established by the assembly and disassembly of pilin subunits is essential for transition from the motile to sessile lifestyle and that c-di-GMP affects MshA pilus assembly and function through direct interactions with the MshE ATPase. PMID:26505896

  2. Estrogen-Induced Apoptosis of Breast Epithelial Cells Is Blocked by NO/cGMP and Mediated by Extranuclear Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kastrati, Irida; Edirisinghe, Praneeth D.; Wijewickrama, Gihani T.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen action, via both nuclear and extranuclear estrogen receptors (ERs), induces a variety of cellular signals that are prosurvival or proliferative, whereas nitric oxide (NO) can inhibit apoptosis via caspase S-nitrosylation and via activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase to produce cGMP. The action of 17β-estradiol (E2) at ER is known to elicit NO signaling via activation of NO synthase (NOS) in many tissues. The MCF-10A nontumorigenic, mammary epithelial cell line is genetically stable and insensitive to estrogenic proliferation. In this cell line, estrogens or NOS inhibitors alone had no significant effect, whereas in combination, apoptosis was induced rapidly in the absence of serum; the presence of inducible NOS was confirmed by proteomic analysis. The application of pharmacological agents determined that apoptosis was dependent upon NO/cGMP signaling via cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase and could be replicated by inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/serine-threonine kinase pathway prior to addition of E2. Apoptosis was confirmed by nuclear staining and increased caspase-3 activity in E2 + NOS inhibitor-treated cells. Apoptosis was partially inhibited by a pure ER antagonist and replicated by agonists selective for extranuclear ER. Cells were rescued from E2-induced apoptosis after NOS blockade, by NO-donors and cGMP pathway agonists; preincubation with NO donors was required. The NOS and ER status of breast cancer tissues is significant in etiology, prognosis, and therapy. In this study, apoptosis of preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells was triggered by estrogens via a rapid, extranuclear ER-mediated response, after removal of an antiapoptotic NO/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase signal. PMID:20943808

  3. Cyclic diguanylic acid and cellulose synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Amikam, D.; Benziman, M. )

    1989-12-01

    The occurrence of the novel regulatory nucleotide bis(3',5')-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) and its relation to cellulose biogenesis in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens was studied. c-di-GMP was detected in acid extracts of {sup 32}P-labeled cells grown in various media, and an enzyme responsible for its formation from GTP was found to be present in cell-free preparations. Cellulose synthesis in vivo was quantitatively assessed with ({sup 14}C)glucose as a tracer. The organism produced cellulose during growth in the absence of plant cells, and this capacity was retained in resting cells. Synthesis of a cellulosic product from UDP-glucose in vitro with membrane preparations was markedly stimulated by c-di-GMP and its precursor GTP and was further enhanced by Ca2+. The calcium effect was attributed to inhibition of a c-di-GMP-degrading enzyme shown to be present in the cellulose synthase-containing membranes.

  4. The Importance of cGMP Signaling in Sensory Cilia for Body Size Regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Manabi; Hino, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Ryuta; Inada, Hitoshi; Mori, Ikue; Koga, Makoto; Miyahara, Koji; Ohshima, Yasumi; Ishihara, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    The body size of Caenorhabditis elegans is thought to be controlled by sensory inputs because many mutants with sensory cilium structure defects exhibit small body size. The EGL-4 cGMP-dependent protein kinase acts in sensory neurons to reduce body size when animals fail to perceive sensory signals. In addition to body size control, EGL-4 regulates various other behavioral and developmental pathways, including those involved in the regulation of egg laying and chemotaxis behavior. Here we have identified gcy-12, which encodes a receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, as a gene involved in the sensory regulation of body size. Analyses with GFP fusion constructs showed that gcy-12 is expressed in several sensory neurons and localizes to sensory cilia. Genetic analyses indicated that GCY-12 acts upstream of EGL-4 in body size control but does not affect other EGL-4 functions. Our studies indicate that the function of the GCY-12 guanylyl cyclase is to provide cGMP to the EGL-4 cGMP-dependent kinase only for limited tasks including body size regulation. We also found that the PDE-2 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase negatively regulates EGL-4 in controlling body size. Thus, the cGMP level is precisely controlled by GCY-12 and PDE-2 to determine body size through EGL-4, and the defects in the sensory cilium structure may disturb the balanced control of the cGMP level. The large number of guanylyl cyclases encoded in the C. elegans genome suggests that EGL-4 exerts pleiotropic effects by partnering with different guanylyl cyclases for different downstream functions.

  5. Icariin Inhibits Pulmonary Hypertension Induced by Monocrotaline through Enhancement of NO/cGMP Signaling Pathway in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-sheng; Luo, Yun-mei; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Xiao-xia; Yang, Dan-li

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that icariin (ICA) increased contents of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by improving expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5). In addition, dysfunction of the NO/cGMP pathway may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In this study, the potential protective effects of ICA on PH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 50 mg/kg) singly subcutaneous injection were investigated and the possible mechanisms involved in NO/cGMP pathway were explored in male Sprague Dawley rats. The results showed that ICA (20, 40, and 80 mg/kg/d) treatment by intragastric administration could significantly ameliorate PH and upregulate the expression of eNOS gene and downregulate the expression of PDE5 gene in MCT-treated rats. Both ICA (40 mg/kg/d) and L-arginine (200 mg/kg/d), a precursor of NO as positive control, notably increased the contents of NO and cGMP in lung tissue homogenate, which were inversed by treatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), a NOS inhibitor, and L-NAME-treatment could also inhibit the protective effects of ICA (40 mg/kg/d) on mean pulmonary artery pressure and artery remodeling and tends to inhibit right ventricle hypertrophy index. In summary, ICA is effective in protecting against MCT-induced PH in rats through enhancement of NO/cGMP signaling pathway in rats. PMID:27366192

  6. Genetic Dissection of the Regulatory Network Associated with High c-di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-González, María Isabel; Travieso, María L.; Soriano, María I.; Matilla, Miguel A.; Huertas-Rosales, Óscar; Barrientos-Moreno, Laura; Tagua, Víctor G.; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria grow in nature forming multicellular structures named biofilms. The bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a key player in the regulation of the transition from planktonic to sessile lifestyles and this regulation is crucial in the development of biofilms. In Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Rup4959, a multidomain response regulator with diguanylate cyclase activity, when overexpressed causes an increment in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP that gives rise to a pleiotropic phenotype consisting of increased biofilm formation and crinkly colony morphology. In a broad genomic screen we have isolated mutant derivatives that lose the crinkly morphology, designed as cfc (crinkle free colony). A total of 19 different genes have been identified as being related with the emergence of the cfc phenotype either because the expression or functionality of Rup4959 is compromised, or due to a lack of transduction of the c-di-GMP signal to downstream elements involved in the acquisition of the phenotype. Discernment between these possibilities was investigated by using a c-di-GMP biosensor and by HPLC-MS quantification of the second messenger. Interestingly five of the identified genes encode proteins with AAA+ ATPase domain. Among the bacterial determinants found in this screen are the global transcriptional regulators GacA, AlgU and FleQ and two enzymes involved in the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We present evidences that this pathway seems to be an important element to both the availability of the free pool of the second messenger c-di-GMP and to its further transduction as a signal for biosynthesis of biopolimers. In addition we have identified an uncharacterized hybrid sensor histidine kinase whose phosphoaceptor conserved histidine residue has been shown in this work to be required for in vivo activation of the orphan response regulator Rup4959, which suggests these two elements constitute a two-component phosphorelay system

  7. Genetic Dissection of the Regulatory Network Associated with High c-di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, María Isabel; Travieso, María L; Soriano, María I; Matilla, Miguel A; Huertas-Rosales, Óscar; Barrientos-Moreno, Laura; Tagua, Víctor G; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria grow in nature forming multicellular structures named biofilms. The bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a key player in the regulation of the transition from planktonic to sessile lifestyles and this regulation is crucial in the development of biofilms. In Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Rup4959, a multidomain response regulator with diguanylate cyclase activity, when overexpressed causes an increment in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP that gives rise to a pleiotropic phenotype consisting of increased biofilm formation and crinkly colony morphology. In a broad genomic screen we have isolated mutant derivatives that lose the crinkly morphology, designed as cfc (crinkle free colony). A total of 19 different genes have been identified as being related with the emergence of the cfc phenotype either because the expression or functionality of Rup4959 is compromised, or due to a lack of transduction of the c-di-GMP signal to downstream elements involved in the acquisition of the phenotype. Discernment between these possibilities was investigated by using a c-di-GMP biosensor and by HPLC-MS quantification of the second messenger. Interestingly five of the identified genes encode proteins with AAA+ ATPase domain. Among the bacterial determinants found in this screen are the global transcriptional regulators GacA, AlgU and FleQ and two enzymes involved in the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We present evidences that this pathway seems to be an important element to both the availability of the free pool of the second messenger c-di-GMP and to its further transduction as a signal for biosynthesis of biopolimers. In addition we have identified an uncharacterized hybrid sensor histidine kinase whose phosphoaceptor conserved histidine residue has been shown in this work to be required for in vivo activation of the orphan response regulator Rup4959, which suggests these two elements constitute a two-component phosphorelay system.

  8. Genetic Dissection of the Regulatory Network Associated with High c-di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, María Isabel; Travieso, María L; Soriano, María I; Matilla, Miguel A; Huertas-Rosales, Óscar; Barrientos-Moreno, Laura; Tagua, Víctor G; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria grow in nature forming multicellular structures named biofilms. The bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a key player in the regulation of the transition from planktonic to sessile lifestyles and this regulation is crucial in the development of biofilms. In Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Rup4959, a multidomain response regulator with diguanylate cyclase activity, when overexpressed causes an increment in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP that gives rise to a pleiotropic phenotype consisting of increased biofilm formation and crinkly colony morphology. In a broad genomic screen we have isolated mutant derivatives that lose the crinkly morphology, designed as cfc (crinkle free colony). A total of 19 different genes have been identified as being related with the emergence of the cfc phenotype either because the expression or functionality of Rup4959 is compromised, or due to a lack of transduction of the c-di-GMP signal to downstream elements involved in the acquisition of the phenotype. Discernment between these possibilities was investigated by using a c-di-GMP biosensor and by HPLC-MS quantification of the second messenger. Interestingly five of the identified genes encode proteins with AAA+ ATPase domain. Among the bacterial determinants found in this screen are the global transcriptional regulators GacA, AlgU and FleQ and two enzymes involved in the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We present evidences that this pathway seems to be an important element to both the availability of the free pool of the second messenger c-di-GMP and to its further transduction as a signal for biosynthesis of biopolimers. In addition we have identified an uncharacterized hybrid sensor histidine kinase whose phosphoaceptor conserved histidine residue has been shown in this work to be required for in vivo activation of the orphan response regulator Rup4959, which suggests these two elements constitute a two-component phosphorelay system

  9. Determinants of ligand selectivity in a cyclic nucleotide-regulated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, João; Fonseca, Fátima; Furini, Simone; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2014-07-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domains regulate the activity of channels, kinases, exchange factors, and transcription factors. These proteins are highly variable in their ligand selectivity; some are highly selective for either cAMP or cGMP, whereas others are not. Several molecular determinants of ligand selectivity in CNB domains have been defined, but these do not provide a complete view of the selectivity mechanism. We performed a thorough analysis of the ligand-binding properties of mutants of the CNB domain from the MlotiK1 potassium channel. In particular, we defined which residues specifically favor cGMP or cAMP. Inversion of ligand selectivity, from favoring cAMP to favoring cGMP, was only achieved through a combination of three mutations in the ligand-binding pocket. We determined the x-ray structure of the triple mutant bound to cGMP and performed molecular dynamics simulations and a biochemical analysis of the effect of the mutations. We concluded that the increase in cGMP affinity and selectivity does not result simply from direct interactions between the nucleotide base and the amino acids introduced in the ligand-binding pocket residues. Rather, tighter cGMP binding over cAMP results from the polar chemical character of the mutations, from greater accessibility of water molecules to the ligand in the bound state, and from an increase in the structural flexibility of the mutated binding pocket.

  10. The Structural Basis of Cyclic Diguanylate Signal Transduction by PilZ Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Benach,J.; Swaminathan, S.; Tamayo, R.; Handelman, S.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Ramos, J.; Forouhar, F.; Neely, H.; Seetharaman, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) controls the transition between motile and sessile growth in eubacteria, but little is known about the proteins that sense its concentration. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that PilZ domains bind c-di-GMP and allosterically modulate effector pathways. We have determined a 1.9 Angstroms crystal structure of c-di-GMP bound to VCA0042/PlzD, a PilZ domain-containing protein from Vibrio cholerae. Either this protein or another specific PilZ domain-containing protein is required for V. cholerae to efficiently infect mice. VCA0042/PlzD comprises a C-terminal PilZ domain plus an N-terminal domain with a similar beta-barrel fold. C-di-GMP contacts seven of the nine strongly conserved residues in the PilZ domain, including three in a seven-residue long N-terminal loop that undergoes a conformational switch as it wraps around c-di-GMP. This switch brings the PilZ domain into close apposition with the N-terminal domain, forming a new allosteric interaction surface that spans these domains and the c-di-GMP at their interface. The very small size of the N-terminal conformational switch is likely to explain the facile evolutionary diversification of the PilZ domain.

  11. Oocyte maturation and quality: role of cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, R B; Luciano, A M; Richani, D; Zeng, H T; Wang, X; Vos, M De; Sugimura, S; Smitz, J; Richard, F J; Thompson, J G

    2016-11-01

    The cyclic nucleotides, cAMP and cGMP, are the key molecules controlling mammalian oocyte meiosis. Their roles in oocyte biology have been at the forefront of oocyte research for decades, and many of the long-standing controversies in relation to the regulation of oocyte meiotic maturation are now resolved. It is now clear that the follicle prevents meiotic resumption through the actions of natriuretic peptides and cGMP - inhibiting the hydrolysis of intra-oocyte cAMP - and that the pre-ovulatory gonadotrophin surge reverses these processes. The gonadotrophin surge also leads to a transient spike in cAMP in the somatic compartment of the follicle. Research over the past two decades has conclusively demonstrated that this surge in cAMP is important for the subsequent developmental capacity of the oocyte. This is important, as oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) systems practised clinically do not recapitulate this cAMP surge in vitro, possibly accounting for the lower efficiency of IVM compared with clinical IVF. This review particularly focuses on this latter aspect - the role of cAMP/cGMP in the regulation of oocyte quality. We conclude that clinical practice of IVM should reflect this new understanding of the role of cyclic nucleotides, thereby creating a new generation of ART and fertility treatment options. PMID:27422885

  12. Properties of a cyclic 3'5'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase from Vigna mungo.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Abidin, U Z

    1989-10-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) partially purified from roots of Vigna mungo exhibited optimum activity at pH 5.5 to 6.0 and maximum enzyme activity at 50 degrees C. Levels of PDE activity in roots remained relatively constant from the first to the eleventh day after germination; on the twelfth day there was a 400% increase in PDE activity. The enzyme was stable for at least 48 hours at 28 degrees C, retaining 92% of its original activity. Plant growth hormones including gibberellic acid, indoleacetic acid and kinetin at 1.0 and 10.0 microM concentrations did not have any significant effect on enzyme activity. Nucleotides tested including cyclic 2'3' AMP, cyclic 2'3' GMP completely abolished enzyme activity at 1.0mM while cyclic 3'5' GMP, cyclic 3'5' GMP, 2'deoxy 5' ATP, 2'deoxy 5'GTP and 5'ADP were also inhibitory to the enzyme. The enzyme was stimulated by Mg2+, Fe2+ and NH4+ while Cu2+ and Fe3+ were inhibitory. Theophylline, caffeine, phosphate, pyrophosphate and EDTA were inhibitory to the enzyme.

  13. A synthetic cGMP-sensitive gene switch providing Viagra(®)-controlled gene expression in mammalian cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeuk; Folcher, Marc; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a universal second messenger that is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and hydrolyzed into guanosine monophosphate (GMP) by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Small-molecule drugs that induce high cGMP levels in specialized tissues by boosting GC activity or inhibiting PDE activity have become the predominant treatment strategy for a wide range of medical conditions, including congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis-based claudication and erectile dysfunction. By fusing the cGMP receptor protein (CRP) of Rhodospirillum centenum to the Herpes simplex-derived transactivation domain VP16, we created a novel synthetic mammalian cGMP-sensing transcription factor (GTA) that activates synthetic promoters (PGTA) containing newly identified GTA-specific operator sites in a concentration-dependent manner. In cell lines expressing endogenous natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A) (HeLa), GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression was induced by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; Nesiritide(®)) in a concentration-dependent manner, which activated NPR-A׳s intracellular GC domain and triggered a corresponding cGMP surge. Ectopic expression of NPR-A in NPR-A-negative cell lines (HEK-293T) produced high cGMP levels and mediated maximum GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression, which was suppressed by co-expression of PDEs (PDE-3A, PDE-5A and PDE-9A) and was re-triggered by the corresponding PDE inhibitor drugs (Pletal(®), Perfan(®), Primacor(®) (PDE-3A), Viagra(®), Levitra(®), Cialis(®) (PDE-5A) and BAY73-6691 (PDE-9A)). Mice implanted with microencapsulated designer cells co-expressing the GTA/PGTA device with NPR-A and PDE-5A showed control of blood SEAP levels through administration of sildenafil (Viagra(®)). Designer cells engineered for PDE inhibitor-modulated transgene expression may provide a cell-based PDE-targeting drug discovery platform and enable drug-adjusted gene- and cell

  14. [Dynamics of the cAMP and cGMP content of the heart in transient coronary insufficiency in rats].

    PubMed

    Litvitskiĭ, P F; Vinnitskiĭ, L I; Zhidkov, I L; Zuev, M B; Vorob'eva, N T

    1984-01-01

    Experiments made on 127 white random-bred male rats weighing 200 +/- 10 g with transitory coronary insufficiency (TCI) with varying duration of myocardial ischemia (MI) have revealed consistent changes in the heart cAMP and cGMP. During MI, there was a biphasic variation in the concentration of cyclic nucleotides: an initial appreciable increase in the concentration was replaced by its lowering. At the same time the time course of cGMP content was more mobile in nature as compared to cAMP Reperfusion made at an early period (within the first 40 min) did not normally bring about the normalization of heart content of cyclic nucleotides whose concentration time course depended on the duration of the preceding MI. The pattern of changes in the concentration of cyclic nucleotides in the heart in TCI correlated to a significant degree with the previously described time course of the activity of the sympath- and cholinergic mechanisms by which heart work, contractile function and rhythm are controlled during TCI.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 is involved in nitric oxide- and cGMP-induced α-Amy2/54 gene expression in GA-treated wheat aleurone layers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingzhu; Wang, Fangquan; Zhang, Chen; Xie, Yanjie; Han, Bin; Huang, Jingjing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-01-01

    Here, α-Amy2/54 gene expression was used as a molecular probe to investigate the interrelationship among nitric oxide (NO), cyclic GMP (cGMP), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in GA-treated wheat aleurone layers. The inducible expressions of α-Amy2/54 and α-amylase activity were respectively amplified by two NO-releasing compounds, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and spermine NONOate, in a GA-dependent fashion. Similar responses were observed when an inducer of HO-1, hemin-or one of its catalytic products, carbon monoxide (CO) in aqueous solution-was respectively added. The SNP-induced responses, mimicked by 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), a cGMP derivative, were NO-dependent. This conclusion was supported by the fact that endogenous NO overproduction was rapidly induced by SNP, and thereafter induction of α-Amy2/54 gene expression and increased α-amylase activity were sensitive to the NO scavenger. We further observed that the above induction triggered by SNP and 8-Br-cGMP was partially prevented by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), an inhibitor of HO-1. These blocking effects were clearly reversed by CO, confirming that the above response was HO-1-specific. Further analyses showed that both SNP and 8-Br-cGMP rapidly up-regulated HO-1 gene expression and increased HO activity, and SNP responses were sensitive to cPTIO and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY83583). Molecular evidence confirmed that GA-induced GAMYB and ABA-triggered PKABA1 transcripts were up-regulated or down-regulated by SNP, 8-Br-cGMP or CO cotreated with GA. Contrasting changes were observed when cPTIO, LY83583, or ZnPPIX was added. Together, our results suggested that HO-1 is involved in NO- and cGMP-induced α-Amy2/54 gene expression in GA-treated aleurone layers.

  16. Effects of cyclic AMP on growth and differentiation of rat retinoblastoma-like tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nishida, T; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Pomeroy, M

    1982-02-01

    We examined the effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP) on the growth and differentiation of RAO 188 cells, a cultured cell line derived from a retinoblastoma-like tumor induced in an inbred rat by intravitreous inoculation with human adenovirus serotype 12. After adding cAMP analogs (dibutyryl cAMP and 8-bromo cAMP) and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (theophylline, amino-phylline, and 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine) to the RAO 188 cell culture medium, we measured changes in cell incorporation of the DNA and RNA precursors 14C-thymidine and 3H-uridine, and we observed the morphologic alterations of RAO 188 by phase-contrast and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Incorporation of the labeled precursors decreased with increased concentrations of cAMP analogs and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Incorporation of the labeled precursors was inhibited shortly after the addition of dibutyryl cAMP to the culture medium. The effect was maximal at 8 hr and was sustained for up to 48 hr. Reversibility of cAMP effects on incorporation gradually decreased for 10 days; at 10 days these effects were essentially irreversible. Neuritelike processes developed shortly after cAMP analog treatment and formed a network after 24 hr. Transmission electron microscopy disclosed changes in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of cells treated with 8-bromo cAMP and theophylline: perturbation of the cell membrane and the appearance of intercellular junctional devices and microfilaments. The activity of glutamate decarboxylase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid, was increased in treated cells. These results show that cAMP decreases DNA and RNA synthesis and cell proliferation and facilitates morphologic and biochemical differentiation of RAO 188 cells.

  17. Structural Basis of Differential Ligand Recognition by Two Classes of bis-(3-5)-cyclic Dimeric Guanosine Monophosphate-binding Riboswitches

    SciTech Connect

    K Smith; C Shanahan; E Moore; A Simon; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) signaling pathway regulates biofilm formation, virulence, and other processes in many bacterial species and is critical for their survival. Two classes of c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches have been discovered that bind this second messenger with high affinity and regulate diverse downstream genes, underscoring the importance of RNA receptors in this pathway. We have solved the structure of a c-di-GMP-II riboswitch, which reveals that the ligand is bound as part of a triplex formed with a pseudoknot. The structure also shows that the guanine bases of c-di-GMP are recognized through noncanonical pairings and that the phosphodiester backbone is not contacted by the RNA. Recognition is quite different from that observed in the c-di-GMP-I riboswitch, demonstrating that at least two independent solutions for RNA second messenger binding have evolved. We exploited these differences to design a c-di-GMP analog that selectively binds the c-di-GMP-II aptamer over the c-di-GMP-I RNA. There are several bacterial species that contain both types of riboswitches, and this approach holds promise as an important tool for targeting one riboswitch, and thus one gene, over another in a selective fashion.

  18. cGMP levels in chronic cadmium disease and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Kagamimori, S.; Williams, W. R.; Watanabe, M.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the effect of cadmium on guanyl cyclase activity, urine levels of the nucleotide cGMP were measured in patients with bone and renal lesions resulting from chronic cadmium exposure, in patients with osteoarthritis and in a normal age-matched control population. The effects of cadmium, zinc and mercury salts on blood mononuclear cell cGMP production were also studied in vitro. The two patient groups exhibited clear differences in cGMP excretion. Lower urine cGMP (59%, P less than 0.01) and creatinine values (43%, P less than 0.01) were found in cadmium-exposed patients and higher cGMP values (56%, P less than 0.05) in patients with osteoarthritis, compared to the control group. Creatinine adjusted cGMP values were also lower in cadmium-exposed patients (28%, P less than 0.05) and higher in patients with osteoarthritis (130%, P less than 0.01). In vitro, a 10 h exposure of mononuclear cells to cadmium or mercury salts depressed guanyl cyclase activity in most experiments. At 10(-4) M, mercury was consistently more inhibitory in all cultures (95%, P less than 0.01). As cadmium has a potential for inhibiting guanyl cyclase activity in human tissue, the low urine cGMP values found in patients with cadmium disease may be attributable to chronic cadmium exposure. High guanyl cyclase activity in patients with osteoarthritis may be associated with inflammation. PMID:2874827

  19. Precision Optics Optimization for GMp Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Allada, Kalyan; Averett, Todd; Christy, Eric; Gu, Chao; Huang, Min; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; GMp Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The GMp experiment aims to improve the precision on the elastic e-p cross section measurement to 2%; up to a factor of 5 better than previous measurements, with four-momentum transfer up to 14 GeV2 using the High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS) of Hall A at Jefferson Lab. These measurements will be an important benchmark for many other cross section measurements in hadron physics. To reach this goal, it is necessary to improve the precision of many instrument systems. Knowledge of the magnetic optics of HRS is critically important for precision reconstruction of the momentum and coordinates of the scattered particles at the interaction vertex. In this talk, an improved optimization method for optics will be presented in detail and the results of a study based on recent commissioning data in 2014 will be discussed.

  20. Investigation of the role of the NO-cGMP pathway on YC-1 and DEA/NO effects on thoracic aorta smooth muscle responses in a rat preeclampsia model.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Nergiz Hacer; Temiz, Tijen Kaya; Turgut, Bülent; Karadas, Baris; Parlak, Mesut; Bagcivan, Ihsan

    2013-10-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of YC-1, a nitric oxide (NO)-independent soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activator, and DEA/NO, a NO donor, on smooth muscle responses in the preeclampsia model with suramin-treated rats and on the levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) of thoracic aorta rings isolated from term-pregnant rats. Rats of 2 groups, control group and suramin group, were given intraperitoneal injection of saline or suramin, respectively. Suramin injection caused increased blood pressure, protein in urine, and fetal growth retardation. Thoracic aorta rings were exposed to contractile and relaxant agents. KCl contraction and papaverine relaxation responses were similar. Relaxation responses of YC-1 and DEA/NO decreased in suramin group. In both groups in the presence of ODQ, a sGC inhibitor, the relaxation responses of YC-1 and DEA/NO decreased. The cGMP content was determined by radioimmunoassay technique. The content of cGMP in the suramin group decreased. In the presence of YC-1 and DEA/NO in both groups, cGMP content increased, but in ODQ-added groups, there was a significant decrease. We conclude that in preeclampsia, the decrease of relaxation responses and the decrease of cGMP content could be due to the reduction in stimulation of sGC and the decrease in cGMP levels.

  1. Analysis of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia)

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Cory D.; Pires, Anthony; Norby, Shong-Wan; Boudko, Dmitri; Moroz, Leonid L.; Hadfield, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The gas nitric oxide (NO), and in some cases its downstream second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function in different taxa to regulate the timing of life-history transitions. Increased taxonomic sampling is required to foster conclusions about the evolution and function of NO/cGMP signaling during life-history transitions. We report on the function and localization of NO and cGMP signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae. Pharmacological manipulation of NO or cGMP production in larvae modulated responses to a natural settlement cue from the coral Porites compressa in a manner that suggest inhibitory function for NO/cGMP signaling. However, these treatments were not sufficient to induce metamorphosis in the absence of cue, a result unique to this animal. We show that induction of metamorphosis in response to the settlement cue is associated with a reduction in NO production. We documented the expression of putative NO synthase (NOS) and the production of cGMP during larval development and observed no larval cells in which NOS and cGMP were both detected. The production of cGMP in a bilaterally symmetrical group of cells fated to occupy the distal tip of rhinophores is correlated with competence to respond to the coral settlement cue. These results suggest that endogenous NO and cGMP are involved in modulating responses of P. sibogae to a natural settlement cue. We discuss these results with respect to habitat selection and larval ecology. PMID:18460091

  2. C-di-GMP Synthesis: Structural Aspects of Evolution, Catalysis and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-09-25

    Cellular levels of the second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) are determined by the antagonistic activities of diguanylate cyclases and specific phosphodiesterases. In a given bacterial organism, there are often multiple variants of the two enzymes, which are tightly regulated by a variety of external and internal cues due to the presence of specialized sensory or regulatory domains. Dependent on the second messenger level, specific c-di-GMP receptors then control fundamental cellular processes, such as bacterial life style, biofilm formation, and cell cycle control. Here, I review the large body of data on structure-function relationships in diguanylate cyclases. Although the catalytic GGDEF domain is related to the respective domain of adenylate cyclases, the catalyzed intermolecular condensation reaction of two GTP molecules requires the formation of a competent GGDEF dimer with the two substrate molecules juxtaposed. This prerequisite appears to constitute the basis for GGDEF regulation with signal-induced changes within the homotypic dimer of the input domain (PAS, GAF, HAMP, etc.), which are structurally coupled with the arrangement of the GGDEF domains via a rigid coiled-coil linker. Alternatively, phosphorylation of a Rec input domain can drive GGDEF dimerization. Both mechanisms allow modular combination of input and output function that appears advantageous for evolution and rationalizes the striking similarities in domain architecture found in diguanylate cyclases and histidine kinases. PMID:27498163

  3. Effects of papaverine and vasointestinal polypeptide on penile and vascular cAMP and cGMP in control and diabetic animals: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Miller, M A; Morgan, R J; Thompson, C S; Mikhailidis, D P; Jeremy, J Y

    1995-06-01

    Adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) mediate penile erection. We have previously established that adenylate and guanylate cyclase activity is elevated in the diabetic rat penis and aorta. This study investigates the action of papaverine and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on these cyclases. The aortae and penes of Sprague Dawley rats (n = 7) were stimulated with VIP and papaverine. Diabetes mellitus (DM) was induced in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 7) with streptozotocin and the penile and aortic tissues were treated with VIP. The penes, aortae and carotid arteries of New Zealand White rabbits were similarly processed. cAMP and cGMP generation was measured by radioimmunoassay. In all tissues: VIP stimulated cAMP synthesis; VIP did not increase cGMP levels; papaverine was without effect on either cAMP or cGMP synthesis. VIP-stimulated cAMP was significantly enhanced in the diabetic rat penis and aorta; there was also a significant elevation in the basal levels of cGMP in these tissues. These data: (1) consolidate that cAMP is a mediator of penile erection, (2) indicate that papaverine and VIP elicit erection by different mechanisms, (3) suggest that an enhanced penile capacity to generate cAMP in DM may constitute an adaptive response to counteract the previously reported reduction in VIP content and VIP receptors, and (4) indicate that the penile and vascular tissues of the rabbit respond in a similar manner to VIP and papaverine. PMID:7496446

  4. Oligomer formation of the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: reaction rates and equilibrium constants indicate a monomeric state at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Martin; Allan, Martin G; Zaehringer, Franziska; Schirmer, Tilman; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2012-01-18

    Cyclic diguanosine-monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial signaling molecule that triggers a switch from motile to sessile bacterial lifestyles. This mechanism is of considerable pharmaceutical interest, since it is related to bacterial virulence, biofilm formation, and persistence of infection. Previously, c-di-GMP has been reported to display a rich polymorphism of various oligomeric forms at millimolar concentrations, which differ in base stacking and G-quartet interactions. Here, we have analyzed the equilibrium and exchange kinetics between these various forms by NMR spectroscopy. We find that the association of the monomer into a dimeric form is in fast exchange (GMP should be predominantly monomeric. This finding has important implications for the understanding of c-di-GMP recognition by protein receptors. In contrast to the monomer/dimer exchange, formation and dissociation of higher oligomers occurs on a time scale of several hours to days. The time course can be described quantitatively by a simple kinetic model where tetramers are intermediates of octamer formation. The extremely slow oligomer dissociation may generate severe artifacts in biological experiments when c-di-GMP is diluted from concentrated stock solution. We present a simple method to quantify c-di-GMP monomers and oligomers from UV spectra and a procedure to dissolve the unwanted oligomers by an annealing step.

  5. Procyanidin C1 Causes Vasorelaxation Through Activation of the Endothelial NO/cGMP Pathway in Thoracic Aortic Rings

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecific potassium channel blocker (tetraethylammonium chloride [TEA]), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine [L-NMMA]), and a store-operated calcium entry inhibitor (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-APB]). Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation was also completely abolished by an inhibitor of soluble guanyl cyclase, which suggests that the Pro C1 effects observed involved cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production. Interestingly, Pro C1 significantly enhanced basal cGMP levels. Taken together, these results indicate that Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation is associated with the activation of the calcium-dependent NO/cGMP pathway, involving potassium channel activation. Thus, Pro C1 may represent a novel and potentially therapeutically relevant compound for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24971771

  6. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D; O Toole, George A; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica. PMID:27380521

  7. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D.; O´Toole, George A.; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica PMID:27380521

  8. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D; O Toole, George A; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica.

  9. Regulation of epithelial sodium channels by cGMP/PKGII

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Hong-Guang; Chen, Lan; Han, Dong-Yun; Li, Jun; Song, Wei-Feng; Wei, Shi-Peng; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Gu, Xiu; Matalon, Sadis; Ji, Hong-Long

    2009-01-01

    Airway and alveolar fluid clearance is mainly governed by vectorial salt movement via apically located rate-limiting Na+ channels (ENaC) and basolateral Na+/K+-ATPases. ENaC is regulated by a spectrum of protein kinases, i.e. protein kinase A (PKA), C (PKC), and G (PKG). However, the molecular mechanisms for the regulation of ENaC by cGMP/PKG remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we studied the pharmacological responses of native epithelial Na+ channels in human Clara cells and human αβγδ ENaCs expressed in oocytes to cGMP. 8-pCPT-cGMP increased amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current (Isc) across H441 monolayers and heterologously expressed αβγδ ENaC activity in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, 8-pCPT-cGMP (a PKGII activator) but not 8-Br-cGMP (a PKGI activator) increased amiloride-sensitive whole cell currents in H441 cells in the presence of CFTRinh-172 and diltiazem. In all cases, the cGMP-activated Na+ channel activity was inhibited by Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP, a specific PKGII inhibitor. This was substantiated by the evidence that PKGII was the sole isoform expressed in H441 cells at the protein level. Importantly, intratracheal instillation of 8-pCPT-cGMP in BALB/c mice increased amiloride-sensitive alveolar fluid clearance by ∼30%, consistent with the in vitro results. We therefore conclude that PKGII is an activator of lung epithelial Na+ channels, which may expedite the resolution of oedematous fluid in alveolar sacs. PMID:19359370

  10. Rapid regulation of PDE-2 and PDE-4 cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity following ligation of the T cell antigen receptor on thymocytes: analysis using the selective inhibitors erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) and rolipram.

    PubMed

    Michie, A M; Lobban, M; Müller, T; Harnett, M M; Houslay, M D

    1996-02-01

    The PDE2, cyclic GMP-stimulated, and the PDE4, cyclic AMP-specific enzymes provide the major, detectable cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activities in murine thymocytes. In the absence of the cyclic GMP, PDE4 activity predominated (approximately 80% total) but in the presence of low (10 microM) cyclic GMP concentrations, PDE2 activity constituted the major PDE activity in thymocytes (approximately 80% total). The PDE4 selective inhibitor rolipram dose-dependently inhibited thymocyte PDE4 activity (IC50 approximately 65 nM). PDE2 was dose-dependently activated (EC50 approximately 1 microM) by cyclic GMP and inhibited by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) (IC50 approximately 4 microM). EHNA was shown to serve as a selective inhibitor of PDE-2 activity as assessed from studies using separated PDE1, PDE2, PDE3 and PDE4 species from hepatocytes as well as human PDE2 and PDE4 enzymes. EHNA completely ablated the ability of cyclic GMP to activate PDE2 activity, whilst having a much smaller inhibitory effect on the unstimulated PDE2 activity. EHNA exhibited normal Michaelian kinetics of inhibition for the cyclic GMP-stimulated PDE2 activity with Hill plots near unity. Apparent negative co-operative effect were seen in the absence of cyclic GMP with Hill coefficients of approximately 0.3 for inhibition of PDE2 activity. Within 5 min of challenge of thymocytes with the lectin phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) there was a transient decrease (approximately 83%) in PDE-4 activity and in PDE2 activity (approximately 40%). Both anti-TCR antibodies also caused an initial reduction in the PDE4 activity which was followed by a sustained and profound increase in activity. In contrast to that observed with PHA, anti-TCR/CD3 antisera had little effect on PDE2 activity. It is suggested that, dependent upon the intracellular concentrations of cyclic GMP, thymocyte cyclic AMP metabolism can be expected to switch from being under the predominant control of PDE4 activity to that determined

  11. Evidence for a cyclic diguanylic acid-dependent cellulose synthase in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Y; Mayer, R; Benziman, M; Delmer, D

    1991-01-01

    Because numerous attempts to detect an activity for a cellulose synthase in plants have failed, we have taken a different approach toward detecting polypeptides involved in this process. The uniqueness of the structure and function of cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) as an activator of the cellulose synthase of the bacterium Acetobacter xylinum makes it an attractive probe to use in a search for a c-di-GMP receptor that might be involved in the process in plants. Direct photolabeling with 32P-c-di-GMP has been used, therefore, to identify in plants two membrane polypeptides of 83 and 48 kD derived from cotton fibers that possess properties consistent with their being components of a c-di-GMP-dependent cellulose synthase. Based upon several criteria, the 48-kD species is proposed to be derived by proteolytic cleavage of the 83-kD polypeptide. Both polypeptides bind c-di-GMP with high affinity and specificity and show antigenic relatedness to the bacterial cellulose synthase, and the N-terminal sequence of the 48-kD polypeptide also indicates relatedness to the bacterial synthase. Ability to detect both cotton fiber polypeptides by photolabeling increases markedly in extracts derived from fibers entering the active phase of secondary wall cellulose synthesis. These results provide a basis for future work aimed at identifying and characterizing genes involved in cellulose synthesis in plants. PMID:1668373

  12. Biofilm formation and antibiotic production in Ruegeria mobilis are influenced by intracellular concentrations of cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate.

    PubMed

    D'Alvise, Paul W; Magdenoska, Olivera; Melchiorsen, Jette; Nielsen, Kristian F; Gram, Lone

    2014-05-01

    In many species of the marine Roseobacter clade, periods of attached life, in association with phytoplankton or particles, are interspersed with planktonic phases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether shifts between motile and sessile life in the globally abundant Roseobacter clade species Ruegeria mobilis are associated with intracellular concentrations of the signal compound cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate (c-di-GMP), which in bacteria regulates transitions between motile and sessile life stages. Genes for diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which are involved in c-di-GMP signalling, were found in the genome of R. mobilis strain F1926. Ion pair chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed 20-fold higher c-di-GMP concentrations per cell in biofilm-containing cultures than in planktonic cells. An introduced diguanylate cyclase gene increased c-di-GMP and enhanced biofilm formation and production of the potent antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA). An introduced phosphodiesterase gene decreased c-di-GMP and reduced biofilm formation and TDA production. tdaC, a key gene for TDA biosynthesis, was expressed only in attached or biofilm-forming cells, and expression was induced immediately after initial attachment. In conclusion, c-di-GMP signalling controls biofilm formation and biofilm-associated traits in R. mobilis and, as suggested by presence of GGDEF and EAL domain protein genes, also in other Roseobacter clade species.

  13. Inhaled Nitric Oxide Increases Urinary Nitric Oxide Metabolites and Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate in Premature Infants: Relationship to Pulmonary Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Philip L.; Keller, Roberta L.; Black, Dennis M.; Durand, David J.; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Eichenwald, Eric C.; Truog, William E.; Mammel, Mark C.; Steinhorn, Robin; Ryan, Rita M.; Courtney, Sherry E.; Horneman, Hart; Ballard, Roberta A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been tested to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants, however, the role of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is not known. We hypothesized that levels of NO metabolites (NOx) and cGMP in urine, as a noninvasive source for biospecimen collection, would reflect the dose of iNO and relate to pulmonary outcome. Study Design Studies were performed on 125 infants who required mechanical ventilation at 7 to 14 days and received 24 days of iNO at 20–2 ppm. A control group of 19 infants did not receive iNO. Results In NO-treated infants there was a dose-dependent increase of both NOx and cGMP per creatinine (maximal 3.1- and 2-fold, respectively, at 10–20 ppm iNO) compared with off iNO. NOx and cGMP concentrations at both 2 ppm and off iNO were inversely related to severity of lung disease during the 1st month, and the NOx levels were lower in infants who died or developed BPD at term. NOx was higher in Caucasian compared with other infants at all iNO doses. Conclusion Urinary NOx and cGMP are biomarkers of endogenous NO production and lung uptake of iNO, and some levels reflect the severity of lung disease. These results support a role of the NO–cGMP pathway in lung development. PMID:24968129

  14. New GMP Models for Caucasus Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorjiashvili, N.; Godoladze, T.; Tvaradze, N.; Tumanova, N.

    2014-12-01

    The Caucasus is a region of numerous natural hazards and ensuing disasters. Analysis of the losses due to past disasters indicates those most catastrophic in the region have historically been due to strong earthquakes. Estimation of expected ground motion is a fundamental earthquake hazard assessment. The most commonly used parameter for attenuation relation is peak ground acceleration because this parameter gives useful information for Seismic Hazard Assessment. Thus, many peak ground acceleration attenuation relations have been developed by different authors. However, a few attenuation relations were developed for Caucasus region: Ambraseys et al. (1996,2005) which were based on entire European region and they were not focused locally on Caucasus Region, Smit et.al.(2000) that was based on a small amount of acceleration data that really is not enough. Since 2003 construction of Georgian Digital Seismic Network has started with the help of number of International organizations, Projects and Private companies. In this study new GMP models are obtained based on new data from Georgian seismic network and also from neighboring countries. Estimation of models is obtained by classical, statistical way, regression analysis. Also site ground conditions are considered because the same earthquake recorded at the same distance may cause different damage according to ground conditions. Thus, this parameter is emphasized in the present study. Here it must be mentioned that in previous model which only one was done for Caucasus Region (Smit et. al., 2000) local conditions were not considered. Thus, it is an advantage of models from this study.

  15. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Kariisa, Ankunda T.; Weeks, Kevin; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment. PMID:26849223

  16. Selective inhibition of two soluble adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate phosphodiesterases partially purified from calf liver.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Lieberman, F; Osborne, J C; Manganiello, V C; Vaughan, M; Hidaka, H

    1984-02-14

    "Low Km" cAMP phosphodiesterase and cGMP-stimulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activities were partially purified from calf liver supernatant by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and DEAE-Sepharose and ammonium sulfate precipitation. The low Km phosphodiesterase was not retained on N6-H2N(CH2)2-cAMP-agarose and could be separated from the cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase which was absorbed by this matrix. From the proteins that did not bind, two distinct low Km cAMP phosphodiesterases were separated on Ultrogel AcA 34. One form (fraction C) hydrolyzed cAMP with an apparent Km of approximately 0.5 microM and was very sensitive to inhibition by cGMP. Lineweaver-Burk plots of cAMP hydrolysis by a second form (fraction B) were nonlinear, with an apparent low Km component of approximately 2 microM. This form was rather insensitive to inhibition by cGMP. With both fractions, hydrolysis of cAMP relative to cGMP was much greater at low (approximately 1 microM) than at high (approximately 100 microM) substrate concentrations. Maximal velocities for cAMP and cGMP were similar. From sedimentation equilibrium, the apparent weight-average molecular weight of fraction B was estimated as 174000, and that of fraction C was 85000. Another fraction (A) of cAMP phosphodiesterase eluted at the void volume of the AcA 34 column. On the basis of the relative affinities for cAMP and cGMP and inhibition by cGMP, fraction A is most likely an aggregated form of fraction B. No apparent interconversion of fractions A, B, or C was observed on high-performance liquid chromatography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6324851

  17. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Kariisa, Ankunda T; Weeks, Kevin; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment.

  18. Pharmacological elevation of cyclic AMP and transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Dryden, W F; Singh, Y N; Gordon, T; Lazarenko, G

    1988-03-01

    Intracellular recordings of spontaneous and evoked end-plate potentials have been made at the neuromuscular junction of mouse hemidiaphragms to determine a possible role of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in the release of acetylcholine from presynaptic terminals. Spontaneous release, as determined from the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials, was increased by drugs that inhibit phosphodiesterase: isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), SQ 20,009, theophylline, and caffeine; drugs that stimulate adenylate cyclase: forskolin, fluoride, and cholera toxin, and the stable analogue of cAMP: 8-bromo-cAMP but not dibutyryl cAMP. Release increased with time during maintained exposure to the drugs and generally followed a simple exponential time course with time constants ranging from 8 to 17 min at 20 degrees C, except for SQ 20,009 and cholera toxin which required longer exposure times for effect. The order of potency of the phosphodiesterase inhibitors was IBMX = SQ 20,009 greater than theophylline = caffeine. This is consistent with an effect mediated by an increase in cAMP concentrations within the nerve terminal. Evoked release, determined from the quantal content of the end-plate potential, was increased to a lesser extent than spontaneous release. The results are discussed with reference to the possible involvement of second messengers in the release of vesicles from nerve terminals in vertebrate synapses.

  19. cAMP-responsive element binding protein mediates a cGMP/protein kinase G-dependent anti-apoptotic signal induced by nitric oxide in retinal neuro-glial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagai-Kusuhara, Azusa; Nakamura, Makoto; Mukuno, Hirokazu; Kanamori, Akiyasu; Negi, Akira; Seigel, Gail M

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is cytoprotective to certain types of neuronal cells. The neuroprotective ability of NO in the retina was reportedly mediated by the cyclic GMP (cGMP) to protein kinase G (PKG) pathway. Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) plays an essential role in the NO/cGMP/PKG-mediated survival of rat cerebellar granule cells. We tested whether CREB transduces the NO/cGMP/PKG anti-apoptotic cascade in R28 neuro-glial progenitor cells. Apoptosis was induced in R28 cells by serum deprivation for 24 h. Varying concentrations of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nipradilol, were added to medium with or without an NO scavenger, a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, or a PKG inhibitor. The cells were immunostained against activated caspase-3 and counterstained with Hoechst 33258. Apoptosis was quantified by counting activated caspase-3 positive or pyknotic cells. SNP and nipradilol rescued R28 cells from apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, at an optimal concentration of 1.0 microM and 10 microM, respectively. Higher concentrations were cytotoxic. The NO scavenger and the inhibitors decreased the anti-apoptotic effect of the NO donors. Intracellular cGMP levels were increased after exposure to SNP and nipradilol. Western blotting showed that both NO donors increased CREB phosphorylation, which was blocked when pre-exposed to the inhibitors. Transfection with a dominant negative CREB construct defective of phosphorylation at Ser-133 interfered with the anti-apoptotic activity of SNP. These results indicate that CREB at least in part mediates the cGMP/PKG-dependent anti-apoptotic signal induced by NO in R28 cells. PMID:17081519

  20. Regulation of pacemaker currents in interstitial cells of Cajal from murine small intestine by cyclic nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sang Don; Kim, Tae Wan; Jun, Jae Yeol; Glasgow, Nichola J; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2000-01-01

    Electrical rhythmicity (slow waves) in gastrointestinal muscles (GI) is generated by interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Cultured ICC from the murine small intestine were studied with the patch-clamp technique to characterize regulation of pacemaker currents by cyclic nucleotides. Cyclic nucleotide agonists were also tested on intact strips of murine small intestine.Nitric oxide donors slowed the frequency of pacemaker currents in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects depended on cGMP formation and were reduced by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). The effects of nitric oxide donors were mimicked by membrane-permeable analogues of cGMP. The specific cGMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast reduced the frequency of spontaneous pacemaker currents.The cGMP-dependent effects on pacemaker currents were not affected by okadaic acid or KT-5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G.Forskolin, but not dideoxy forskolin, reduced the frequency of spontaneous pacemaker activity and activated a sustained outward current. The latter was likely to be due to ATP-dependent K+ channels because it was blocked by glibenclamide.The effects of forskolin were not mimicked by membrane-permeable cAMP analogues. A membrane-permeable inhibitor of protein kinase A, myristoylated PKA inhibitor, and the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, had no effect on responses to forskolin.Responses of intact muscles to cGMP and cAMP agonists were similar to the responses of pacemaker cells. Changes in resting membrane potential and slow wave amplitude, however, were noted in intact jejunal muscles that were not observed in ICC. Differences in responses may have been due to the effects of cyclic nucleotide agonists on smooth muscle cells that would sum with responses of ICC in intact jejunal muscle strips.A cGMP-dependent mechanism regulates slow wave frequency, but this occurs through direct action of cGMP not via protein phosphorylation. Regulation of pacemaker currents by c

  1. The search for mutations in the gene for the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB) in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Riess, O.; Weber, B.; Hayden, M.R. ); Noerremoelle, A. ); Musarella, M.A. )

    1992-10-01

    The finding of a mutation in the beta subunit of the cyclic GMP (cGMP) phosphodiesterase gene causing retinal degeneration in mice (the Pdeb gene) prompted a search for disease-causing mutations in the human phosphodiesterase gene (PDEB gene) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. All 22 exons including 196 bp of the 5[prime] region of the PDEB gene have been assessed for mutations by using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis in 14 patients from 13 unrelated families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). No disease-causing mutations were found in this group of affected individuals of seven different ancestries. However, a frequent intronic and two exonic polymorphisms (Leu[sup 489][yields]Gln and Gly[sup 842][yields]Gly) were identified. Segregation analysis using these polymorphic sites excludes linkage of ARRP to the PDEB gene in a family with two affected children. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition prevents myocardial infarction-induced increase in renal cortical cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Clauss, François; Charloux, Anne; Piquard, François; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Talha, Samy; Zoll, Joffrey; Lugnier, Claire; Geny, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether myocardial infarction (MI) enhances renal phosphodiesterases (PDE) activities, investigating particularly the relative contribution of PDE1-5 isozymes in total PDE activity involved in both cGMP and cAMP pathways, and whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi) decreases such renal PDE hyperactivities. We also investigated whether ACEi might thereby improve atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) efficiency. We studied renal cortical PDE1-5 isozyme activities in sham (SH)-operated, MI rats and in MI rats treated with perindopril (ACEi) 1 month after coronary artery ligation. Circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), its second intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cGMP/ANP ratio were also determined. Cortical cGMP-PDE2 (80.3 vs. 65.1 pmol/min/mg) and cGMP-PDE1 (50.7 vs. 30.1 pmol/min/mg), and cAMP-PDE2 (161 vs. 104.1 pmol/min/mg) and cAMP-PDE4 (307.5 vs. 197.2 pmol/min/mg) activities were higher in MI than in SH rats. Despite increased ANP plasma level, ANP efficiency tended to be decreased in MI compared to SH rats. Perindopril restored PDE activities and tended to improve ANP efficiency in MI rats. One month after coronary ligation, perindopril treatment of MI rats prevents the increase in renal cortical PDE activities. This may contribute to increase renal ANP efficiency in MI rats.

  3. Three cyanobacteriochromes work together to form a light color-sensitive input system for c-di-GMP signaling of cell aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Gen; Ni-Ni-Win; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial photoreceptors that have diverse spectral properties and domain compositions. Although large numbers of CBCR genes exist in cyanobacterial genomes, no studies have assessed whether multiple CBCRs work together. We recently showed that the diguanylate cyclase (DGC) activity of the CBCR SesA from Thermosynechococcus elongatus is activated by blue-light irradiation and that, when irradiated, SesA, via its product cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), induces aggregation of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus cells at a temperature that is suboptimum for single-cell viability. For this report, we first characterize the photobiochemical properties of two additional CBCRs, SesB and SesC. Blue/teal light-responsive SesB has only c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, which is up-regulated by teal light and GTP. Blue/green light-responsive SesC has DGC and PDE activities. Its DGC activity is enhanced by blue light, whereas its PDE activity is enhanced by green light. A ΔsesB mutant cannot suppress cell aggregation under teal-green light. A ΔsesC mutant shows a less sensitive cell-aggregation response to ambient light. ΔsesA/ΔsesB/ΔsesC shows partial cell aggregation, which is accompanied by the loss of color dependency, implying that a nonphotoresponsive DGC(s) producing c-di-GMP can also induce the aggregation. The results suggest that SesB enhances the light color dependency of cell aggregation by degrading c-di-GMP, is particularly effective under teal light, and, therefore, seems to counteract the induction of cell aggregation by SesA. In addition, SesC seems to improve signaling specificity as an auxiliary backup to SesA/SesB activities. The coordinated action of these three CBCRs highlights why so many different CBCRs exist. PMID:26080423

  4. Structures of the activator of K. pneumonia biofilm formation, MrkH, indicates PilZ domains involved in c-di-GMP and DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Klebsiella pneumonia is linked to the bacteria’s ability to form biofilms. Mannose-resistant Klebsiella-like (Mrk) hemagglutinins are critical for K. pneumonia biofilm development, and the expression of the genes encoding these proteins is activated by a 3′,5′-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)–regulated transcription factor, MrkH. To gain insight into MrkH function, we performed structural and biochemical analyses. Data revealed MrkH to be a monomer with a two-domain architecture consisting of a PilZ C-domain connected to an N domain that unexpectedly also harbors a PilZ-like fold. Comparison of apo- and c-di-GMP–bound MrkH structures reveals a large 138° interdomain rotation that is induced by binding an intercalated c-di-GMP dimer. c-di-GMP interacts with PilZ C-domain motifs 1 and 2 (RxxxR and D/NxSxxG) and a newly described c-di-GMP–binding motif in the MrkH N domain. Strikingly, these c-di-GMP–binding motifs also stabilize an open state conformation in apo MrkH via contacts from the PilZ motif 1 to residues in the C-domain motif 2 and the c-di-GMP–binding N-domain motif. Use of the same regions in apo structure stabilization and c-di-GMP interaction allows distinction between the states. Indeed, domain reorientation by c-di-GMP complexation with MrkH, which leads to a highly compacted structure, suggests a mechanism by which the protein is activated to bind DNA. To our knowledge, MrkH represents the first instance of specific DNA binding mediated by PilZ domains. The MrkH structures also pave the way for the rational design of inhibitors that target K. pneumonia biofilm formation. PMID:27551088

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition prevents myocardial infarction-induced increase in renal cortical cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Clauss, François; Charloux, Anne; Piquard, François; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Talha, Samy; Zoll, Joffrey; Lugnier, Claire; Geny, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether myocardial infarction (MI) enhances renal phosphodiesterases (PDE) activities, investigating particularly the relative contribution of PDE1-5 isozymes in total PDE activity involved in both cGMP and cAMP pathways, and whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi) decreases such renal PDE hyperactivities. We also investigated whether ACEi might thereby improve atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) efficiency. We studied renal cortical PDE1-5 isozyme activities in sham (SH)-operated, MI rats and in MI rats treated with perindopril (ACEi) 1 month after coronary artery ligation. Circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), its second intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cGMP/ANP ratio were also determined. Cortical cGMP-PDE2 (80.3 vs. 65.1 pmol/min/mg) and cGMP-PDE1 (50.7 vs. 30.1 pmol/min/mg), and cAMP-PDE2 (161 vs. 104.1 pmol/min/mg) and cAMP-PDE4 (307.5 vs. 197.2 pmol/min/mg) activities were higher in MI than in SH rats. Despite increased ANP plasma level, ANP efficiency tended to be decreased in MI compared to SH rats. Perindopril restored PDE activities and tended to improve ANP efficiency in MI rats. One month after coronary ligation, perindopril treatment of MI rats prevents the increase in renal cortical PDE activities. This may contribute to increase renal ANP efficiency in MI rats. PMID:25939307

  6. Three cyanobacteriochromes work together to form a light color-sensitive input system for c-di-GMP signaling of cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Gen; Ni-Ni-Win; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2015-06-30

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial photoreceptors that have diverse spectral properties and domain compositions. Although large numbers of CBCR genes exist in cyanobacterial genomes, no studies have assessed whether multiple CBCRs work together. We recently showed that the diguanylate cyclase (DGC) activity of the CBCR SesA from Thermosynechococcus elongatus is activated by blue-light irradiation and that, when irradiated, SesA, via its product cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), induces aggregation of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus cells at a temperature that is suboptimum for single-cell viability. For this report, we first characterize the photobiochemical properties of two additional CBCRs, SesB and SesC. Blue/teal light-responsive SesB has only c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, which is up-regulated by teal light and GTP. Blue/green light-responsive SesC has DGC and PDE activities. Its DGC activity is enhanced by blue light, whereas its PDE activity is enhanced by green light. A ΔsesB mutant cannot suppress cell aggregation under teal-green light. A ΔsesC mutant shows a less sensitive cell-aggregation response to ambient light. ΔsesA/ΔsesB/ΔsesC shows partial cell aggregation, which is accompanied by the loss of color dependency, implying that a nonphotoresponsive DGC(s) producing c-di-GMP can also induce the aggregation. The results suggest that SesB enhances the light color dependency of cell aggregation by degrading c-di-GMP, is particularly effective under teal light, and, therefore, seems to counteract the induction of cell aggregation by SesA. In addition, SesC seems to improve signaling specificity as an auxiliary backup to SesA/SesB activities. The coordinated action of these three CBCRs highlights why so many different CBCRs exist.

  7. Endogenous expression of type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase mRNA and protein in rat intestine. Implications for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Markert, T; Vaandrager, A B; Gambaryan, S; Pöhler, D; Häusler, C; Walter, U; De Jonge, H R; Jarchau, T; Lohmann, S M

    1995-01-01

    Certain pathogenic bacteria produce a family of heat stable enterotoxins (STa) which activate intestinal guanylyl cyclases, increase cGMP, and elicit life-threatening secretory diarrhea. The intracellular effector of cGMP actions has not been clarified. Recently we cloned the cDNA for a rat intestinal type II cGMP dependent protein kinase (cGK II) which is highly enriched in intestinal mucosa. Here we show that cGK II mRNA and protein are restricted to the intestinal segments from the duodenum to the proximal colon, with the highest amounts of cGK II protein in duodenum and jejunum. cGK II mRNA and protein decreased along the villus to crypt axis in the small intestine, whereas substantial amounts of both were found in the crypts of cecum. In intestinal epithelia, cGK II was specifically localized in the apical membrane, a major site of ion transport regulation. In contrast to cGK II, cGK I was localized in smooth muscle cells of the villus lamina propria. Short circuit current (ISC), a measure of Cl- secretion, was increased to a similar extent by STa and by 8-Br-cGMP, a selective activator of cGK, except in distal colon and in monolayers of T84 human colon carcinoma cells in which cGK II was not detected. In human and mouse intestine, the cyclic nucleotide-regulated Cl- conductance can be exclusively accounted for by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel. Viewed collectively, the data suggest that cGK II is the mediator of STa and cGMP effects on Cl- transport in intestinal-epithelia. Images PMID:7543493

  8. Quorum Sensing and c-di-GMP-Dependent Alterations in Gene Transcripts and Virulence-Associated Phenotypes in a Clinical Isolate of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Kozlova, Elena V.; Khajanchi, Bijay K.; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the LuxS-based quorum sensing (QS) system (AI-2) negatively regulated the virulence of a diarrheal isolate SSU of Aeromonas hydrophila, while the ahyRI-based (AI-1) N-acyl-homoserine lactone system was a positive regulator of bacterial virulence. Thus, these QS systems had opposing effects on modulating biofilm formation and bacterial motility in vitro models and in vivo virulence in a speticemic mouse model of infection. In this study, we linked these two QS systems with the bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) in the regulation of virulence in A. hydrophila SSU. To accomplish this, we examined the effect of overproducing a protein with GGDEF domain, which increases c-di-GMP levels in bacteria, on the phenotype and transcriptional profiling of genes involved in biofilm formation and bacterial motility in wild-type (WT) versus its QS null mutants. We provided evidence that c-di-GMP overproduction dramatically enhanced biofilm formation and reduced motility of the WT A. hydrophila SSU, which was equitable with that of the ΔluxS mutant. On the contrary, the ΔahyRI mutant exhibited only a marginal increase in the biofilm formation with no effect on motility when c-di-GMP was overproduced. Overall, our data indicated that c-di-GMP overproduction modulated transcriptional levels of genes involved in biofilm formation and motility phenotype in A. hydrophila SSU in a QS-dependent manner, involving both AI-1 and AI-2 systems. PMID:21256953

  9. Cyclic phosphonium ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Mukhlall, Joshua A; Romeo, Alicia R; Gohdo, Masao; Ramati, Sharon; Berman, Marc; Suarez, Sophia N

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ionic liquids (ILs) incorporating cyclic phosphonium cations are a novel category of materials. We report here on the synthesis and characterization of four new cyclic phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ILs with aliphatic and aromatic pendant groups. In addition to the syntheses of these novel materials, we report on a comparison of their properties with their ammonium congeners. These exemplars are slightly less conductive and have slightly smaller self-diffusion coefficients than their cyclic ammonium congeners. PMID:24605146

  10. 76 FR 51395 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan (DEIS/GMP), Canaveral...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... National Park Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan (DEIS/GMP... Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan (DEIS/GMP), Canaveral National... 1969 the NPS announces the availability of a DEIS/GMP for Canaveral National Seashore, Florida....

  11. Novel mixed-linkage β-glucan activated by c-di-GMP in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel Ángel; Romero-Jiménez, Lorena; Farias, Gabriela de Araujo; Lloret, Javier; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Sanjuán, Juan

    2015-02-17

    An artificial increase of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels in Sinorhizobium meliloti 8530, a bacterium that does not carry known cellulose synthesis genes, leads to overproduction of a substance that binds the dyes Congo red and calcofluor. Sugar composition and methylation analyses and NMR studies identified this compound as a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-D-glucan (ML β-glucan), not previously described in bacteria but resembling ML β-glucans found in plants and lichens. This unique polymer is hydrolyzed by the specific endoglucanase lichenase, but, unlike lichenan and barley glucan, it generates a disaccharidic → 4)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 3)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → repeating unit. A two-gene operon bgsBA required for production of this ML β-glucan is conserved among several genera within the order Rhizobiales, where bgsA encodes a glycosyl transferase with domain resemblance and phylogenetic relationship to curdlan synthases and to bacterial cellulose synthases. ML β-glucan synthesis is subjected to both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. bgsBA transcription is dependent on the exopolysaccharide/quorum sensing ExpR/SinI regulatory system, and posttranslational regulation seems to involve allosteric activation of the ML β-glucan synthase BgsA by c-di-GMP binding to its C-terminal domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-glucan produced by a bacterium. The S. meliloti ML β-glucan participates in bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation and is required for efficient attachment to the roots of a host plant, resembling the biological role of cellulose in other bacteria.

  12. Novel mixed-linkage β-glucan activated by c-di-GMP in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel Ángel; Romero-Jiménez, Lorena; Farias, Gabriela de Araujo; Lloret, Javier; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Sanjuán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    An artificial increase of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels in Sinorhizobium meliloti 8530, a bacterium that does not carry known cellulose synthesis genes, leads to overproduction of a substance that binds the dyes Congo red and calcofluor. Sugar composition and methylation analyses and NMR studies identified this compound as a linear mixed-linkage (1→3)(1→4)-β-d-glucan (ML β-glucan), not previously described in bacteria but resembling ML β-glucans found in plants and lichens. This unique polymer is hydrolyzed by the specific endoglucanase lichenase, but, unlike lichenan and barley glucan, it generates a disaccharidic →4)-β-d-Glcp-(1→3)-β-d-Glcp-(1→ repeating unit. A two-gene operon bgsBA required for production of this ML β-glucan is conserved among several genera within the order Rhizobiales, where bgsA encodes a glycosyl transferase with domain resemblance and phylogenetic relationship to curdlan synthases and to bacterial cellulose synthases. ML β-glucan synthesis is subjected to both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. bgsBA transcription is dependent on the exopolysaccharide/quorum sensing ExpR/SinI regulatory system, and posttranslational regulation seems to involve allosteric activation of the ML β-glucan synthase BgsA by c-di-GMP binding to its C-terminal domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a linear mixed-linkage (1→3)(1→4)-β-glucan produced by a bacterium. The S. meliloti ML β-glucan participates in bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation and is required for efficient attachment to the roots of a host plant, resembling the biological role of cellulose in other bacteria. PMID:25650430

  13. Novel mixed-linkage β-glucan activated by c-di-GMP in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel Ángel; Romero-Jiménez, Lorena; Farias, Gabriela de Araujo; Lloret, Javier; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Sanjuán, Juan

    2015-02-17

    An artificial increase of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels in Sinorhizobium meliloti 8530, a bacterium that does not carry known cellulose synthesis genes, leads to overproduction of a substance that binds the dyes Congo red and calcofluor. Sugar composition and methylation analyses and NMR studies identified this compound as a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-D-glucan (ML β-glucan), not previously described in bacteria but resembling ML β-glucans found in plants and lichens. This unique polymer is hydrolyzed by the specific endoglucanase lichenase, but, unlike lichenan and barley glucan, it generates a disaccharidic → 4)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 3)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → repeating unit. A two-gene operon bgsBA required for production of this ML β-glucan is conserved among several genera within the order Rhizobiales, where bgsA encodes a glycosyl transferase with domain resemblance and phylogenetic relationship to curdlan synthases and to bacterial cellulose synthases. ML β-glucan synthesis is subjected to both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. bgsBA transcription is dependent on the exopolysaccharide/quorum sensing ExpR/SinI regulatory system, and posttranslational regulation seems to involve allosteric activation of the ML β-glucan synthase BgsA by c-di-GMP binding to its C-terminal domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-glucan produced by a bacterium. The S. meliloti ML β-glucan participates in bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation and is required for efficient attachment to the roots of a host plant, resembling the biological role of cellulose in other bacteria. PMID:25650430

  14. Cyclic AMP modulates electrical signaling in a weakly electric fish.

    PubMed

    McAnelly, L; Silva, A; Zakon, H H

    2003-04-01

    Many species of electric fish show diurnal or socially elicited variation in electric organ discharge amplitude. In Sternopygus macrurus, activation of protein kinase A by 8-bromo-cAMP increases electrocyte sodium current magnitude. To determine whether the behavioral plasticity in electric organ discharge amplitude is controlled by electrocyte biophysical properties, we examined whether the effects of phosphorylation on ion currents in the electric organ translate directly into electric organ discharge changes. We injected the electric organ of restrained fish with 8-bromo-cAMP and monitored the electric organ discharge. The effect of protein kinase A activation on electrocyte action potentials was examined in isolated electric organ using two-electrode current clamp. Electric organ discharge and action potential amplitude and pulse duration increased in response to 8-bromo-cAMP. Pulse and action potential duration both increased by about 25%. However, the increase in electric organ discharge amplitude (approximately 400%) was several-fold greater than the action potential amplitude increase (approximately 40%). Resting membrane resistance decreased in electrocytes exposed to 8-bromo-cAMP. We propose that in the Thevenin equivalent circuit of the electric organ a moderate increase in action potential amplitude combined with a decrease in internal resistance produces a greater voltage drop across the external resistance (the water around the fish), accounting for the large increase in the externally recorded electric organ discharge.

  15. Are Math Grades Cyclical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gerald J.; Dial, Micah

    1998-01-01

    The cyclical nature of mathematics grades was studied for a cohort of elementary school students from a large metropolitan school district in Texas over six years (average cohort size of 8495). The study used an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. Results indicate that grades do exhibit a significant cyclical pattern. (SLD)

  16. Affordable Cyclic Voltammetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Greg; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Amend, John R.; Collins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an important component of the undergraduate chemical curriculum. Unfortunately, undergraduate students rarely have the opportunity to conduct experiments in cyclic voltammetry owing to the high cost of potentiostats, which are required to control these experiments. By using MicroLab data acquisition interfaces in conjunction…

  17. Cyclic AMP inhibits secretion from electroporated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Smolen, J E; Stoehr, S J; Kuczynski, B

    1991-02-01

    It has long been known that intracellular cAMP inhibits and cGMP enhances intact neutrophil function. However, these effects are modest and require relatively high concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides. We decided to re-examine the effects of cyclic nucleotides on Ca2(+)-induced secretion by electroporated cells. This system allowed us to bypass normal cell surface receptor-ligand interactions as well as to directly expose the intracellular space to native cyclic nucleotides. We found that concentrations of cAMP as low as 3 microM inhibited Ca2(+)-induced secretion; 30-300 microM cAMP was maximally inhibitory. cAMP was actually slightly more potent than dibutyryl cAMP, a membrane-permeant derivative. In contrast, cGMP was only slightly stimulatory at 3 microM and modestly inhibitory at 300 microM; dibutyryl cGMP was ineffective. A more detailed investigation of the effects of cAMP showed that inhibition was only obtained in the presence of Mg2+. Half-maximal inhibition by cAMP occurred at 10-30 microM. Inhibition by cAMP was achieved by shifting the Ca2+ dose-response curve for secretion to the right; this was observed for the release of both specific granules (vitamin B12 binding protein) and azurophil granules (B-glucuronidase). We previously showed that ATP could enhance Ca2(+)-induced secretion in the presence of Mg2+, apparently by interacting with a cell surface purine receptor. However, increasing concentrations of ATP could not overcome inhibition by cAMP; this suggested that cAMP acted at some site other than the purine receptor. Inhibition by cAMP was also less apparent in the presence of the protein kinase C agonist phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), suggesting that the cyclic nucleotide did not produce systemic desensitization of the neutrophils. In summary, these results demonstrate that low, physiologically relevant concentrations of cAMP can modulate neutrophil responsiveness. PMID:1846904

  18. Effect of caffeine on erectile function via up-regulating cavernous cyclic guanosine monophosphate in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Wang, Jiuling; Chen, Yun; Sun, Zeyu; Wang, Run; Dai, Yutian

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors, which inhibit the breakdown of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), are used to treat diabetic ED. Caffeine, a nonselective PDE inhibitor used in our daily diet, is controversial regarding its effect on erectile function. To investigate the effect of caffeine on erectile function in diabetic rat models and explore the mechanism, male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin to induce diabetes mellitus. The rats with blood glucose levels above 300 mg/dL were selected for the study. The rats were divided into 4 groups: group A (normal control rats), group B (diabetic rats treated with normal saline), group C (diabetic rats treated with caffeine, 10 mg/kg per day), and group D (diabetic rats treated with caffeine, 20 mg/kg per day). After 8 weeks of treatment, intracavernous pressure (ICP) was measured to assess erectile function. The radioimmunoassay was used to evaluate the level of cGMP in the cavernosum. The ICP and the cavernous cGMP decreased significantly in the diabetic rats compared with normal controls. An 8-week administration of caffeine at the given dosages increased the ICP and cavernous cGMP in diabetic rats. Caffeine consumption improved the erectile function of diabetic rats by up-regulating cavernous cGMP.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: cyclic neutropenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cyclic neutropenia cyclic neutropenia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Cyclic neutropenia is a disorder that causes frequent infections and ...

  20. Puerarin, an isoflavonoid derived from Radix puerariae, potentiates endothelium-independent relaxation via the cyclic AMP pathway in porcine coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Dennis K Y; Leung, Susan W S; Xu, Yan Chun; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Man, Ricky Y K

    2006-12-15

    Puerarin, an isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medicinal herb Radix puerariae, has been suggested to be useful in the management of various cardiovascular disorders. The present study examined the effect of acute exposure (30 min) to puerarin on vascular relaxation. Rings from porcine coronary artery of either sex were used. The highest concentration of puerarin (100 microM) produced a small but statistically significant relaxation of U46619-contracted rings. Vascular relaxations were also studied in the presence of lower concentrations of puerarin (0.1, 1 and 10 microM) which had no direct relaxation effect. Puerarin enhanced vasorelaxation to endothelium-independent relaxing agents, sodium nitroprusside and cromakalim. However, puerarin had no effect on vasorelaxation induced by endothelium-dependent relaxing agents, bradykinin and calcium ionophore A23187. The potentiating action of puerarin (10 microM) on sodium nitroprusside-mediated relaxation was not affected by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 300 microM), or by the disruption of the endothelium with Triton X-100. The effect of puerarin was reversible following a washout period. The potentiating effects were comparable with the 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) analogues, 8-bromoadenosine-3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cyclic AMP; 10 muM) and Sp-isomer [S nomenclature refers to phosphorus] of adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Sp-cyclic AMPS; 3 microM), but not the 3'-5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP) analogue, 8-bromoguanosine-3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cyclic GMP; 3 microM). The cyclic AMP antagonist, Rp-isomer [R nomenclature refers to phosphorus] of 8-bromoadenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-cyclic AMPS; 10 microM), but not cyclic GMP antagonist, Rp-isomer of 8-bromoguanosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS; 10 microM), reversed the effects of puerarin (10

  1. Dual specificity and novel structural folding of yeast phosphodiesterase-1 for hydrolysis of second messengers cyclic adenosine and guanosine 3',5'-Monophosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Yuanyuan; Cui, Wenjun; Huang, Manna; Robinson, Howard; Wan, Yiqian; Wang, Yousheng; Ke, Hengming

    2014-08-05

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s⁻¹ for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s₅⁻¹ for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural foldingmore » that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP.« less

  2. Up-regulation of 3'5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-specific phosphodiesterase in the porcine cumulus-oocyte complex affects steroidogenesis during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Maxime; Côté, Nancy; Gagnon, Marie-Claude; Richard, François J

    2008-11-01

    The 3'5'-cyclic GMP (cGMP) pathway is known to influence ovarian functions, including steroidogenesis, ovulation, and granulosa cell proliferation. We show here that cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity increased in a gonadotropin-dependent manner more than 3-fold in the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) after 24 h in vitro maturation (IVM) and up to 5-fold after 48 h. Further characterization of this increase demonstrated that the activity was located primarily in cumulus cells, and was sensitive to sildenafil and zaprinast, two inhibitors specific to both type 5 and 6 PDEs. RT-PCR experiments showed that the mRNAs for cGMP-degrading PDEs 5A and 6C are present in the COC before and after 30 h IVM. Western blotting confirmed the presence of PDE 5A in the COC. Western blotting of PDE 6C revealed a significant up-regulation in the COC during IVM. Isolation and analysis of detergent-resistant membranes suggested that PDE 6C protein, along with half of the total sildenafil-sensitive cGMP-degradation activity, is associated with detergent-resistant membrane in the COC after 30 h IVM. Treatment of porcine COC with sildenafil during IVM caused a significant decrease in gonadotropin-stimulated progesterone secretion. Together, these results constitute the first report exploring the contribution of cGMP-PDE activity in mammalian COC, supporting a functional clustering of the enzyme, and providing the first evidence of its role in steroidogenesis.

  3. Improved Long-Term Memory via Enhancing cGMP-PKG Signaling Requires cAMP-PKA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Eva; Puzzo, Daniela; Rutten, Kris; Privitera, Lucia; De Vry, Jochen; Vanmierlo, Tim; Kenis, Gunter; Palmeri, Agostino; D'Hooge, Rudi; Balschun, Detlef; Steinbusch, Harry MW; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Memory consolidation is defined by the stabilization of a memory trace after acquisition, and consists of numerous molecular cascades that mediate synaptic plasticity. Commonly, a distinction is made between an early and a late consolidation phase, in which early refers to the first hours in which labile synaptic changes occur, whereas late consolidation relates to stable and long-lasting synaptic changes induced by de novo protein synthesis. How these phases are linked at a molecular level is not yet clear. Here we studied the interaction of the cyclic nucleotide-mediated pathways during the different phases of memory consolidation in rodents. In addition, the same pathways were studied in a model of neuronal plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP). We demonstrated that cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signaling mediates early memory consolidation as well as early-phase LTP, whereas cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling mediates late consolidation and late-phase-like LTP. In addition, we show for the first time that early-phase cGMP/PKG signaling requires late-phase cAMP/PKA-signaling in both LTP and long-term memory formation. PMID:24813825

  4. STING activator c-di-GMP enhances the anti-tumor effects of peptide vaccines in melanoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zili; Celis, Esteban

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic vaccines to induce anti-tumor CD8 T cells have been used in clinical trials for advanced melanoma patients, but the clinical response rate and overall survival time have not improved much. We believe that these dismal outcomes are caused by inadequate number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells generated by most vaccines. In contrast, huge CD8 T cell responses readily occur during acute viral infections. High levels of type-I interferon (IFN-I) are produced during these infections, and this cytokine not only exhibits anti-viral activity but also promotes CD8 T cell responses. The studies described here were performed to determine whether promoting the production of IFN-I could enhance the potency of a peptide vaccine. We report that cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which activates the stimulator of interferon genes, potentiated the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of a peptide vaccine against mouse B16 melanoma. The synergistic effects of c-di-GMP required co-administration of costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody, the adjuvant poly-IC, and were mediated in part by IFN-I. These findings demonstrate that peptides representing CD8 T cell epitopes can be effective inducers of large CD8 T cell responses in vaccination strategies that mimic acute viral infections.

  5. Modulation of Compartmentalised Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling via Local Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brescia, Marcella; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are the only enzymes that degrade the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP, and play a key role in modulating the amplitude and duration of the signal delivered by these two key intracellular second messengers. Defects in cyclic nucleotide signalling are known to be involved in several pathologies. As a consequence, PDEs have long been recognized as potential drug targets, and they have been the focus of intense research for the development of therapeutic agents. A number of PDE inhibitors are currently available for the treatment of disease, including obstructive pulmonary disease, erectile dysfunction, and heart failure. However, the performance of these drugs is not always satisfactory, due to a lack of PDE-isoform specificity and their consequent adverse side effects. Recent advances in our understanding of compartmentalised cyclic nucleotide signalling and the role of PDEs in local regulation of cAMP and cGMP signals offers the opportunity for the development of novel strategies for therapeutic intervention that may overcome the current limitation of conventional PDE inhibitors. PMID:27706091

  6. Cyclic control stick

    DOEpatents

    Whitaker, Charles N.; Zimmermann, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclic control stick of the type used in helicopters for reducing the safety hazards associated with such a mechanism in the event of a crewman being thrown violently into contact with the cyclic control stick resulting from a crash or the like. The cyclic control stick is configured to break away upon the exertion of an impact force which exceeds a predetermined value and/or is exerted for more than a momentary time duration. The cyclic control stick is also configured to be adjustable so as to locate the grip thereof as far away from the crewman as possible for safety reasons without comprising the comfort of the crewman or the use of the control stick, and a crushable pad is provided on the top of the grip for impact energy absorbing purposes.

  7. Attenuation of alpha-adrenergic-induced vasoconstriction by dietary wild blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium) is mediated by the NO-cGMP pathway in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs).

    PubMed

    Kristo, Aleksandra S; Kalea, Anastasia Z; Schuschke, Dale A; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy

    2013-12-01

    The role of wild blueberries (WB) on key signaling steps of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways was examined in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) after eight weeks on a control (C) or an 8% w/w WB diet. Aortic rings from SHRs were stimulated with phenylephrine (Phe) in the absence or presence of inhibitors of: soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE(5)), prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)) synthase and thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) synthase. Additionally, enzymatic activities in these pathways were determined by the concentration of NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), PGI(2) and TXA(2). In the WB-fed SHR, attenuation of Phe-induced vasoconstriction was mediated by an increased synthesis or preservation of cGMP. Despite an increased release of PGI(2) in the WB group, neither inhibition of PGI(2) or TXA(2) synthase resulted in a different response to Phe between the control and the WB rings. Hence, in the SHR, WB decrease Phe-mediated vasoconstriction under basal conditions by enhancing NO-cGMP signaling without a significant involvement of the COX pathway. PMID:23944991

  8. Cyclic steps on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, M.; Izumi, N.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.; Yamada, T.; Greve, R.

    2016-05-01

    Boundary waves often form at the interface between ice and fluid flowing adjacent to it, such as ripples under river ice covers, and steps on the bed of supraglacial meltwater channels. They may also be formed by wind, such as the megadunes on the Antarctic ice sheet. Spiral troughs on the polar ice caps of Mars have been interpreted to be cyclic steps formed by katabatic wind blowing over ice. Cyclic steps are relatives of upstream-migrating antidunes. Cyclic step formation on ice is not only a mechanical but also a thermodynamic process. There have been very few studies on the formation of either cyclic steps or upstream-migrating antidunes on ice. In this study, we performed flume experiments to reproduce cyclic steps on ice by flowing water, and found that trains of steps form when the Froude number is larger than unity. The features of those steps allow them to be identified as ice-bed analogs of cyclic steps in alluvial and bedrock rivers. We performed a linear stability analysis and obtained a physical explanation of the formation of upstream-migrating antidunes, i.e., precursors of cyclic steps. We compared the results of experiments with the predictions of the analysis and found the observed steps fall in the range where the analysis predicts interfacial instability. We also found that short antidune-like undulations formed as a precursor to the appearance of well-defined steps. This fact suggests that such antidune-like undulations correspond to the instability predicted by the analysis and are precursors of cyclic steps.

  9. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  10. Cyclic polymers from alkynes.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christopher D; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A; Wagener, Kenneth B; Veige, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer. PMID:27442285

  11. c-di-GMP and its Effects on Biofilm Formation and Dispersion: a Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Review.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dae-Gon; O'Toole, George A

    2015-04-01

    Since its initial discovery as an allosteric factor regulating cellulose biosynthesis in Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the list of functional outputs regulated by c-di-GMP has grown. We have focused this article on one of these c-di-GMP-regulated processes, namely, biofilm formation in the organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The majority of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases encoded in the P. aeruginosa genome still remain uncharacterized; thus, there is still a great deal to be learned about the link between c-di-GMP and biofilm formation in this microbe. In particular, while a number of c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes have been identified that participate in reversible and irreversible attachment and biofilm maturation, there is a still a significant knowledge gap regarding the c-di-GMP output systems in this organism. Even for the well-characterized Pel system, where c-di-GMP-mediated transcriptional regulation is now well documented, how binding of c-di-GMP by PelD stimulates Pel production is not understood in any detail. Similarly, c-di-GMP-mediated control of swimming, swarming and twitching also remains to be elucidated. Thus, despite terrific advances in our understanding of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and the role of c-di-GMP in this process since the last version of this book (indeed there was no chapter on c-di-GMP!) there is still much to learn. PMID:26104694

  12. c-di-GMP and its Effects on Biofilm Formation and Dispersion: a Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Review.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dae-Gon; O'Toole, George A

    2015-04-01

    Since its initial discovery as an allosteric factor regulating cellulose biosynthesis in Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the list of functional outputs regulated by c-di-GMP has grown. We have focused this article on one of these c-di-GMP-regulated processes, namely, biofilm formation in the organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The majority of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases encoded in the P. aeruginosa genome still remain uncharacterized; thus, there is still a great deal to be learned about the link between c-di-GMP and biofilm formation in this microbe. In particular, while a number of c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes have been identified that participate in reversible and irreversible attachment and biofilm maturation, there is a still a significant knowledge gap regarding the c-di-GMP output systems in this organism. Even for the well-characterized Pel system, where c-di-GMP-mediated transcriptional regulation is now well documented, how binding of c-di-GMP by PelD stimulates Pel production is not understood in any detail. Similarly, c-di-GMP-mediated control of swimming, swarming and twitching also remains to be elucidated. Thus, despite terrific advances in our understanding of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and the role of c-di-GMP in this process since the last version of this book (indeed there was no chapter on c-di-GMP!) there is still much to learn.

  13. Cell cycle regulation of cyclin A gene expression by the cyclic AMP-responsive transcription factors CREB and CREM.

    PubMed Central

    Desdouets, C; Matesic, G; Molina, C A; Foulkes, N S; Sassone-Corsi, P; Brechot, C; Sobczak-Thepot, J

    1995-01-01

    Cyclin A is a pivotal regulatory protein which, in mammalian cells, is involved in the S phase of the cell cycle. Transcription of the human cyclin A gene is cell cycle regulated. We have investigated the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signalling pathway in this cell cycle-dependent control. In human diploid fibroblasts (Hs 27), induction of cyclin A gene expression at G1/S is stimulated by 8-bromo-cAMP and suppressed by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89, which was found to delay S phase entry. Transfection experiments showed that the cyclin A promoter is inducible by activation of the adenylyl cyclase signalling pathway. Stimulation is mediated predominantly via a cAMP response element (CRE) located at positions -80 to -73 with respect to the transcription initiation site and is able to bind CRE-binding proteins and CRE modulators. Moreover, activation by phosphorylation of the activators CRE-binding proteins and CRE modulator tau and levels of the inducible cAMP early repressor are cell cycle regulated, which is consistent with the pattern of cyclin A inducibility by cAMP during the cell cycle. These results suggest that the CRE is, at least partly, implicated in stimulation of cyclin A transcription at G1/S. PMID:7760825

  14. Extracellular cGMP Modulates Learning Biphasically by Modulating Glycine Receptors, CaMKII and Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Malaguarnera, Michele; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that extracellular cGMP modulates the ability to learn a Y maze task, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. Here we show that extracellular cGMP, at physiological concentrations, modulates learning in the Y maze in a biphasic way by modulating the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Extracellular cGMP reduces glycine receptors activation inducing a voltage-dependent calcium-channels-mediated increase of calcium in Purkinje neurons. This calcium increase modulates CaMKII phosphorylation in a biphasic way. When basal calcium concentration is low extracellular cGMP reduces CaMKII phosphorylation, increasing nitric oxide synthase activity, the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function and learning ability. When basal calcium is normal extracellular cGMP increases CaMKII phosphorylation, reducing nitric oxide synthase activity, the pathway function and learning. These data unveil new mechanisms modulating learning in the Y maze and likely other learning types which may be therapeutic targets to improve learning in pathological situations associated with altered cGMP levels. PMID:27634333

  15. Extracellular cGMP Modulates Learning Biphasically by Modulating Glycine Receptors, CaMKII and Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Malaguarnera, Michele; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that extracellular cGMP modulates the ability to learn a Y maze task, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. Here we show that extracellular cGMP, at physiological concentrations, modulates learning in the Y maze in a biphasic way by modulating the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Extracellular cGMP reduces glycine receptors activation inducing a voltage-dependent calcium-channels-mediated increase of calcium in Purkinje neurons. This calcium increase modulates CaMKII phosphorylation in a biphasic way. When basal calcium concentration is low extracellular cGMP reduces CaMKII phosphorylation, increasing nitric oxide synthase activity, the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function and learning ability. When basal calcium is normal extracellular cGMP increases CaMKII phosphorylation, reducing nitric oxide synthase activity, the pathway function and learning. These data unveil new mechanisms modulating learning in the Y maze and likely other learning types which may be therapeutic targets to improve learning in pathological situations associated with altered cGMP levels. PMID:27634333

  16. Structure of the SthK Carboxy-Terminal Region Reveals a Gating Mechanism for Cyclic Nucleotide-Modulated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kesters, Divya; Brams, Marijke; Nys, Mieke; Wijckmans, Eveline; Spurny, Radovan; Voets, Thomas; Tytgat, Jan; Kusch, Jana; Ulens, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-sensitive ion channels are molecular pores that open in response to cAMP or cGMP, which are universal second messengers. Binding of a cyclic nucleotide to the carboxyterminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of these channels is thought to cause a conformational change that promotes channel opening. The C-linker domain, which connects the channel pore to this CNBD, plays an important role in coupling ligand binding to channel opening. Current structural insight into this mechanism mainly derives from X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD from hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels. However, these structures reveal little to no conformational changes upon comparison of the ligand-bound and unbound form. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified prokaryote ion channel, SthK, which has functional properties that strongly resemble cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and is activated by cAMP, but not by cGMP. We determined X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD of SthK in the presence of cAMP or cGMP. We observe that the structure in complex with cGMP, which is an antagonist, is similar to previously determined HCN channel structures. In contrast, the structure in complex with cAMP, which is an agonist, is in a more open conformation. We observe that the CNBD makes an outward swinging movement, which is accompanied by an opening of the C-linker. This conformation mirrors the open gate structures of the Kv1.2 channel or MthK channel, which suggests that the cAMP-bound C-linker/CNBD from SthK represents an activated conformation. These results provide a structural framework for better understanding cyclic nucleotide modulation of ion channels, including HCN and CNG channels. PMID:25625648

  17. Structure and Energetics of Allosteric Regulation of HCN2 Ion Channels by Cyclic Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    DeBerg, Hannah A; Brzovic, Peter S; Flynn, Galen E; Zagotta, William N; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels play an important role in regulating electrical activity in the heart and brain. They are gated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a conserved, intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD), which is connected to the channel pore by a C-linker region. Binding of cyclic nucleotides increases the rate and extent of channel activation and shifts it to less hyperpolarized voltages. We probed the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotides on the CNBD and on channel gating. Electrophysiology experiments showed that cAMP, cGMP, and cCMP were effective agonists of the channel and produced similar increases in the extent of channel activation. In contrast, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on the isolated CNBD indicated that the induced conformational changes and the degrees of stabilization of the active conformation differed for the three cyclic nucleotides. We explain these results with a model where different allosteric mechanisms in the CNBD all converge to have the same effect on the C-linker and render all three cyclic nucleotides similarly potent activators of the channel. PMID:26559974

  18. Structure and Energetics of Allosteric Regulation of HCN2 Ion Channels by Cyclic Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    DeBerg, Hannah A.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Flynn, Galen E.; Zagotta, William N.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels play an important role in regulating electrical activity in the heart and brain. They are gated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a conserved, intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD), which is connected to the channel pore by a C-linker region. Binding of cyclic nucleotides increases the rate and extent of channel activation and shifts it to less hyperpolarized voltages. We probed the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotides on the CNBD and on channel gating. Electrophysiology experiments showed that cAMP, cGMP, and cCMP were effective agonists of the channel and produced similar increases in the extent of channel activation. In contrast, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on the isolated CNBD indicated that the induced conformational changes and the degrees of stabilization of the active conformation differed for the three cyclic nucleotides. We explain these results with a model where different allosteric mechanisms in the CNBD all converge to have the same effect on the C-linker and render all three cyclic nucleotides similarly potent activators of the channel. PMID:26559974

  19. CNG-modulin: a novel Ca-dependent modulator of ligand sensitivity in cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Rebrik, Tatiana I; Botchkina, Inna; Arshavsky, Vadim Y; Craft, Cheryl M; Korenbrot, Juan I

    2012-02-29

    The transduction current in several different types of sensory neurons arises from the activity of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels. The channels in these sensory neurons vary in structure and function, yet each one demonstrates calcium-dependent modulation of ligand sensitivity mediated by the interaction of the channel with a soluble modulator protein. In cone photoreceptors, the molecular identity of the modulator protein was previously unknown. We report the discovery and characterization of CNG-modulin, a novel 301 aa protein that interacts with the N terminus of the β subunit of the cGMP-gated channel and modulates the cGMP sensitivity of the channels in cone photoreceptors of striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Immunohistochemistry and single-cell PCR demonstrate that CNG-modulin is expressed in cone but not rod photoreceptors. Adding purified recombinant CNG-modulin to cone membrane patches containing the native CNG channels shifts the midpoint of cGMP dependence from ∼91 μM in the absence of Ca(2+) to ∼332 μM in the presence of 20 μM Ca(2+). At a fixed cGMP concentration, the midpoint of the Ca(2+) dependence is ∼857 nM Ca(2+). These restored physiological features are statistically indistinguishable from the effects of the endogenous modulator. CNG-modulin binds Ca(2+) with a concentration dependence that matches the calcium dependence of channel modulation. We conclude that CNG-modulin is the authentic Ca(2+)-dependent modulator of cone CNG channel ligand sensitivity. CNG-modulin is expressed in other tissues, such as brain, olfactory epithelium, and the inner ear, and may modulate the function of ion channels in those tissues as well. PMID:22378887

  20. Evaluation of a Salmonella Strain Lacking the Secondary Messenger C-di-GMP and RpoS as a Live Oral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    García, Begoña; Gil, Carmen; García-Ona, Enrique; Burgui, Saioa; Casares, Noelia; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Lasarte, Juan José; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food, with chicken and pig related products being key reservoirs of infection. Although numerous studies on animal vaccination have been performed in order to reduce Salmonella prevalence, there is still a need for an ideal vaccine. Here, with the aim of constructing a novel live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidate, we firstly analyzed the impact of the absence of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in Salmonella virulence. C-di-GMP is an intracellular second messenger that controls a wide range of bacterial processes, including biofilm formation and synthesis of virulence factors, and also modulates the host innate immune response. Our results showed that a Salmonella multiple mutant in the twelve genes encoding diguanylate cyclase proteins that, as a consequence, cannot synthesize c-di-GMP, presents a moderate attenuation in a systemic murine infection model. An additional mutation of the rpoS gene resulted in a synergic attenuating effect that led to a highly attenuated strain, referred to as ΔXIII, immunogenic enough to protect mice against a lethal oral challenge of a S. Typhimurium virulent strain. ΔXIII immunogenicity relied on activation of both antibody and cell mediated immune responses characterized by the production of opsonizing antibodies and the induction of significant levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-10. ΔXIII was unable to form a biofilm and did not survive under desiccation conditions, indicating that it could be easily eliminated from the environment. Moreover, ΔXIII shows DIVA features that allow differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. Altogether, these results show ΔXIII as a safe and effective live DIVA vaccine. PMID:27537839

  1. cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I is implicated in the regulation of the timing and quality of sleep and wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Langmesser, Sonja; Franken, Paul; Feil, Susanne; Emmenegger, Yann; Albrecht, Urs; Feil, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Many effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated by the activation of guanylyl cyclases and subsequent production of the second messenger cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP). cGMP activates cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PRKGs), which can therefore be considered downstream effectors of NO signaling. Since NO is thought to be involved in the regulation of both sleep and circadian rhythms, we analyzed these two processes in mice deficient for cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PRKG1) in the brain. Prkg1 mutant mice showed a strikingly altered distribution of sleep and wakefulness over the 24 hours of a day as well as reductions in rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) duration and in non-REM sleep (NREMS) consolidation, and their ability to sustain waking episodes was compromised. Furthermore, they displayed a drastic decrease in electroencephalogram (EEG) power in the delta frequency range (1-4 Hz) under baseline conditions, which could be normalized after sleep deprivation. In line with the re-distribution of sleep and wakefulness, the analysis of wheel-running and drinking activity revealed more rest bouts during the activity phase and a higher percentage of daytime activity in mutant animals. No changes were observed in internal period length and phase-shifting properties of the circadian clock while chi-squared periodogram amplitude was significantly reduced, hinting at a less robust oscillator. These results indicate that PRKG1 might be involved in the stabilization and output strength of the circadian oscillator in mice. Moreover, PRKG1 deficiency results in an aberrant pattern, and consequently a reduced quality, of sleep and wakefulness, possibly due to a decreased wake-promoting output of the circadian system impinging upon sleep.

  2. Evaluation of a Salmonella Strain Lacking the Secondary Messenger C-di-GMP and RpoS as a Live Oral Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Latasa, Cristina; Echeverz, Maite; García, Begoña; Gil, Carmen; García-Ona, Enrique; Burgui, Saioa; Casares, Noelia; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Lasarte, Juan José; Lasa, Iñigo; Solano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food, with chicken and pig related products being key reservoirs of infection. Although numerous studies on animal vaccination have been performed in order to reduce Salmonella prevalence, there is still a need for an ideal vaccine. Here, with the aim of constructing a novel live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidate, we firstly analyzed the impact of the absence of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in Salmonella virulence. C-di-GMP is an intracellular second messenger that controls a wide range of bacterial processes, including biofilm formation and synthesis of virulence factors, and also modulates the host innate immune response. Our results showed that a Salmonella multiple mutant in the twelve genes encoding diguanylate cyclase proteins that, as a consequence, cannot synthesize c-di-GMP, presents a moderate attenuation in a systemic murine infection model. An additional mutation of the rpoS gene resulted in a synergic attenuating effect that led to a highly attenuated strain, referred to as ΔXIII, immunogenic enough to protect mice against a lethal oral challenge of a S. Typhimurium virulent strain. ΔXIII immunogenicity relied on activation of both antibody and cell mediated immune responses characterized by the production of opsonizing antibodies and the induction of significant levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-10. ΔXIII was unable to form a biofilm and did not survive under desiccation conditions, indicating that it could be easily eliminated from the environment. Moreover, ΔXIII shows DIVA features that allow differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. Altogether, these results show ΔXIII as a safe and effective live DIVA vaccine. PMID:27537839

  3. Type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase directly inhibits HER2 activation of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Miaolin; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Min; Qian, Hai; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphorylation/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Since human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has a similar molecular structure to EGFR, the present study was designed to investigate whether PKG II also inhibits HER2 activation. The human gastric cancer cell line HGC‑27 was infected with an adenoviral construct encoding cDNA of PKG II (Ad‑PKG II) to increase the expression of PKG II and treated with 8‑(4‑chlorophenylthio)guanosine‑3',5'‑cyclic monophosphate (8‑pCPT‑cGMP) to activate the kinase. Western blotting was performed to detect the tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylation of HER2. Co‑immunoprecipitation was performed in order to determine the binding between PKG II and HER2. In addition, a QuikChange Lightning Site‑Directed Mutagenesis kit was used to mutate threonine 686 of HER2 to glutamic acid or alanine. The results demonstrated that EGF treatment increased the tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) of HER2. Increasing the PKG II activity of HGC‑27 cells through infection with Ad‑PKG II and stimulation with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP inhibited the EGF‑induced tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of HER2. PKG II bound directly with HER2 and caused phosphorylation of threonine 686. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to alanine, which could not be phosphorylated by PKG II, the inhibitory effect of PKG II on the activation of HER2 was eradicated. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to glutamic acid, which mimicked the phosphorylation of this site, treatment with EGF had no stimulating effect on tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of the mutant HER2. The results suggested that PKG II inhibits EGF‑induced activation of HER2 through binding with and causing threonine 686 phosphorylation of this oncogenic protein. PMID:26676300

  4. Involvement of Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Renal Antifibrotic Effects of Serelaxin

    PubMed Central

    Wetzl, Veronika; Schinner, Elisabeth; Kees, Frieder; Hofmann, Franz; Faerber, Lothar; Schlossmann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney fibrosis has shown to be ameliorated through the involvement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and its dependent prote