Science.gov

Sample records for 8-element phased array

  1. Experimental validation of an 8 element EMAT phased array probe for longitudinal wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) use liquid sodium as a coolant. Liquid sodium being opaque, optical techniques cannot be applied to reactor vessel inspection. This makes it necessary to develop alternative ways of assessing the state of the structures immersed in the medium. Ultrasonic pressure waves are well suited for inspection tasks in this environment, especially using pulsed electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) that generate the ultrasound directly in the liquid sodium. The work carried out at CEA LIST is aimed at developing phased array EMAT probes conditioned for reactor use. The present work focuses on the experimental validation of a newly manufactured 8 element probe which was designed for beam forming imaging in a liquid sodium environment. A parametric study is carried out to determine the optimal setup of the magnetic assembly used in this probe. First laboratory tests on an aluminium block show that the probe has the required beam steering capabilities.

  2. Simulation of Temperature Field Induced by 8-Element Phased Array HIFU Transducer with Concave Spherical Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wujun; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaojing; Jian, Xiqi; Li, Zhihua

    2011-09-01

    Multi-element High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) transducers can change their focal lengths and form multi-foci. In this paper the Westervelt formula and Pennes bio-heat transfer equation have been used along, with the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, to study the temperature distribution induced by an 8-element phased array HIFU transducer inside the human body. We evaluated the effects of the gap in the arc between two rings, the frequency of excitation function and pre-focal length on the temperature field. For HIFU therapy, skin burns were caused by high frequency, small pre-focal length, or a big gap between two rings. The focal region may be no longer an ellipsoid due to high frequency. In addition, the actual focal length is slightly different from the pre-focal length.

  3. Experimental validation of an 8 element EMAT phased array probe for longitudinal wave generation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bourdais, Florian Marchand, Benoit

    2015-03-31

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) use liquid sodium as a coolant. Liquid sodium being opaque, optical techniques cannot be applied to reactor vessel inspection. This makes it necessary to develop alternative ways of assessing the state of the structures immersed in the medium. Ultrasonic pressure waves are well suited for inspection tasks in this environment, especially using pulsed electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) that generate the ultrasound directly in the liquid sodium. The work carried out at CEA LIST is aimed at developing phased array EMAT probes conditioned for reactor use. The present work focuses on the experimental validation of a newly manufactured 8 element probe which was designed for beam forming imaging in a liquid sodium environment. A parametric study is carried out to determine the optimal setup of the magnetic assembly used in this probe. First laboratory tests on an aluminium block show that the probe has the required beam steering capabilities.

  4. Active aperture phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, R. P.

    1989-04-01

    Developments towards the realization of active aperture phased arrays are reviewed. The technology and cost aspects of the power amplifier and phase shifter subsystems are discussed. Consideration is given to research concerning T/R modules, MESFETs, side lobe control, beam steering, optical control techniques, and printed circuit antennas. Methods for configuring the array are examined, focusing on the tile and brick configurations. It is found that there is no technological impediment for introducing active aperture phased arrays.

  5. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  6. Phased array ghost elimination

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  7. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  8. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  9. Phase array calibration orthogonal phase sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorace, Ronald E. (Inventor); Reinhardt, Victor S. (Inventor); Chan, Clinton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and systems for calibrating an array antenna are described. The array antenna has a plurality of antenna elements each having a signal with a phase and an amplitude forming an array antenna signal. For calibration, the phase of each element signal is sequentially switched one at a time through four orthogonal phase states. At each orthogonal phase state, the power of the array antenna signal is measured. A phase and an amplitude error for each of the element signals is determined based on the power of the array antenna signal at each of the four orthogonal phase states. The phase and amplitude of each of the element signals is then adjusted by the corresponding phase and amplitude errors.

  10. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  11. Phase multiplying electronic scanning array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaton, A. F.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning array was designed with properties of low RF loss and phase control. The array consists of a series of special waveguides, hybrids made up of two variable reactance branch arms for input signals, an edge slot for the difference port, and a sum arm for the unradiated signal.

  12. Distributed phased array architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Variations in amplifiers and phase shifters can cause degraded antenna performance, depending also on the environmental conditions and antenna array architecture. The implementation of distributed phased array hardware was studied with the aid of the DISTAR computer program as a simulation tool. This simulation provides guidance in hardware simulation. Both hard and soft failures of the amplifiers in the T/R modules are modeled. Hard failures are catastrophic: no power is transmitted to the antenna elements. Noncatastrophic or soft failures are modeled as a modified Gaussian distribution. The resulting amplitude characteristics then determine the array excitation coefficients. The phase characteristics take on a uniform distribution. Pattern characteristics such as antenna gain, half power beamwidth, mainbeam phase errors, sidelobe levels, and beam pointing errors were studied as functions of amplifier and phase shifter variations. General specifications for amplifier and phase shifter tolerances in various architecture configurations for C band and S band were determined.

  13. Modeling of phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rais; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Phased array transducers are multi-element transducers, where different elements are activated with different time delays. The advantage of these transducers is that no mechanical movement of the transducer is needed to scan an object. Focusing and beam steering is obtained simply by adjusting the time delay. In this paper the DPSM (distributed point source method) is used to model the ultrasonic field generated by a phased array transducer and to study the interaction effect when two phased array transducers are placed in a homogeneous fluid. Earlier investigations modeled the acoustic field for conventional transducers where all transducer points are excited simultaneously. In this research, combining the concepts of delayed firing and the DPSM, the phased array transducers are modeled semi-analytically. In addition to the single transducer modeling the ultrasonic fields from two phased array transducers placed face to face in a fluid medium is also modeled to study the interaction effect. The importance of considering the interaction effect in multiple transducer modeling is discussed, pointing out that neighboring transducers not only act as ultrasonic wave generators but also as scatterers.

  14. Phased Array Theory and Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    drive the ferrite magnetization to saturation as in a latching phase shifter, or to various points on the magnetization curve with flux drive...can vary from 1 kW to as much as 150 kW peak and average power levels to 400 W. Latching phase shifters have switching times un the order of one...Circuits , and Toroid Ferrite Phase Shifted SO. ode \\rrav Network 26. Dual Slat . 27. PA\\ E PAWS Array (Courtesy of Raytheon Company) 28. Patriot

  15. EHF multifunction phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1986-07-01

    The design of a low cost demonstration EHF multifunction-phased array antenna is described. Both, the radiating elements and the phase-shifter circuits are realized on microstrip substrate material in order to allow photolithographic batch fabrication. Self-encapsulated beam-lead PIN-diodes are employed as the electronic switch elements to avoid expensive hermetic encapsulation of the semiconductors or complete circuits. A space-feed using a horn-radiator to illuminate the array from the front-side is found to be the simplest and most inexpensive feed. The phased array antenna thus operates as a reflect-array, the antenna elements employed in a dual role for the collection of energy from the feed-horn and for the re-radiation of the phase-shifted waves (in transmit-mode). The antenna is divided into modules containing the radiator/phase-shifter plate plus drive- and BITE-circuitry at the back. Both drive- and BITE-components use gate-array integrated circuits especially designed for the purpose. Several bus-systems are used to supply bias and logical data flows to the modules. The beam-steering unit utilizes several signal processors and high-speed discrete adder circuits to combine the pointing, frequency and beam-shape information from the radar system computer with the stored phase-shift codes for the array elements. Since space, weight and power consumption are prime considerations only the most advanced technology is used in the design of both the microwave and the digital/drive circuitry.

  16. Phased Array Feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. Richard; Bradley, Richard F.; Brisken, Walter F.; Cotton, William D.; Emerson, Darrel T.; Kerr, Anthony R.; Lacasse, Richard J.; Morgan, Matthew A.; Napier, Peter J.; Norrod, Roger D.; Payne, John M.; Pospieszalski, Marian W.; Symmes, Arthur; Thompson, A. Richard; Webber, John C.

    2009-03-01

    This white paper offers cautionary observations about the planning and development of new, large radio astronomy instruments. Complexity is a strong cost driver so every effort should be made to assign differing science requirements to different instruments and probably different sites. The appeal of shared resources is generally not realized in practice and can often be counterproductive. Instrument optimization is much more difficult with longer lists of requirements, and the development process is longer and less efficient. More complex instruments are necessarily further behind the technology state of the art because of longer development times. Including technology R&D in the construction phase of projects is a growing trend that leads to higher risks, cost overruns, schedule delays, and project de-scoping. There are no technology breakthroughs just over the horizon that will suddenly bring down the cost of collecting area. Advances come largely through careful attention to detail in the adoption of new technology provided by industry and the commercial market. Radio astronomy instrumentation has a very bright future, but a vigorous long-term R&D program not tied directly to specific projects needs to be restored, fostered, and preserved.

  17. Airborne electronically steerable phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of the second stage of a program for the design and development of a phased array capable of simultaneous and separate transmission and reception of radio frequency signals at S-band frequencies. The design goals of this stage were the development of three major areas of interest required for the final prototype model. These areas are the construction and testing of the low-weight, full-scale 128-element array of antenna elements, the development of the RF manifold feed system, and the construction and testing of a working module containing diplexer and transmit and receive circuits.

  18. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The Automated Array Assembly Task, Phase 2 of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project is a process development task. The contract provides for the fabrication of modules from large area tandem junction cells (TJC). During this quarter, effort was focused on the design of a large area, approximately 36 sq cm, TJC and process verification runs. The large area TJC design was optimized for minimum I squared R power losses. In the TJM activity, the cell-module interfaces were defined, module substrates were formed and heat treated and clad metal interconnect strips were fabricated.

  19. Optical phased-array ladar.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Juan; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Hatch, Robert; Payson, Harold

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a ladar with 0.5 m class range resolution obtained by integrating a continuous-wave optical phased-array transmitter with a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode receiver array. In contrast with conventional ladar systems, an array of continuous-wave sources is used to effectively pulse illuminate a target by electro-optically steering far-field fringes. From the reference frame of a point in the far field, a steered fringe appears as a pulse. Range information is thus obtained by measuring the arrival time of a pulse return from a target to a receiver pixel. This ladar system offers a number of benefits, including broad spectral coverage, high efficiency, small size, power scalability, and versatility.

  20. Cabling design for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, I. D.; Turkiewicz, L.

    1972-01-01

    The ribbon-cabling system used for the AEGIS phased array which provides minimum cable bulk, complete EMI shielding, rugged mechanical design, repeatable electrical characteristics, and ease of assembly and maintenance is described. The ribbon cables are 0.040-inch thick, and in widths up to 2 1/2 inches. Their terminations are molded connectors that can be grouped in a three-tier arrangement, with cable branching accomplished by a matrix-welding technique.

  1. EMAT phased array: A feasibility study of surface crack detection.

    PubMed

    Isla, J; Cegla, F

    2017-02-14

    Electromagnetic-acoustic transducers (EMATs) consist of a magnet and a coil. They are advantageous in some non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications because no direct contact with the specimen is needed to send and receive ultrasonic waves. However, EMATs commonly require excitation peak powers greater than 1kW and therefore the driving electronics and the EMAT coils have to be bulky. This has hindered the development of EMAT phased arrays with characteristics similar to those of conventional piezoelectric phased arrays. Phased arrays are widely used in NDE because they offer superior defect characterization in comparison to single-element transducers. In this paper, we report a series of novel techniques and design elements that make it possible to construct an EMAT phased array that performs similarly to conventional piezoelectric arrays used in NDE. One of the key enabling features is the use of coded excitation to reduce the excitation peak power to less than 4.8W (24 Vpp and 200mA) so that racetrack coils with dimensions 3.2×18mm(2) can be employed. Moreover, these racetrack coils are laid out along their shortest dimension so that 1/3 of their area is overlapped. This helps to reduce the crosstalk between the coils, i.e., the array elements, to less than -15dB. We show that an 8-element EMAT phased array operating at a central frequency of 1MHz can be used to detect defects which have a width and a depth of 0.2 and 0.8mm respectively and are located on the surface opposite to the array.

  2. Adaptive ground implemented phase array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearing, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The simulation of an adaptive ground implemented phased array of five antenna elements is reported for a very high frequency system design that is tolerant to the radio frequency interference environment encountered by a tracking data relay satellite. Signals originating from satellites are received by the VHF ring array and both horizontal and vertical polarizations from each of the five elements are multiplexed and transmitted down to ground station. A panel on the transmitting end of the simulation chamber contains up to 10 S-band RFI sources along with the desired signal to simulate the dynamic relationship between user and TDRS. The 10 input channels are summed, and desired and interference signals are separated and corrected until the resultant sum signal-to-interference ratio is maximized. Testing performed with this simulation equipment demonstrates good correlation between predicted and actual results.

  3. Imaging phased telescope array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The problems encountered in obtaining a wide field-of-view with large, space-based direct imaging phased telescope arrays were considered. After defining some of the critical systems issues, previous relevant work in the literature was reviewed and summarized. An extensive list was made of potential error sources and the error sources were categorized in the form of an error budget tree including optical design errors, optical fabrication errors, assembly and alignment errors, and environmental errors. After choosing a top level image quality requirment as a goal, a preliminary tops-down error budget allocation was performed; then, based upon engineering experience, detailed analysis, or data from the literature, a bottoms-up error budget reallocation was performed in an attempt to achieve an equitable distribution of difficulty in satisfying the various allocations. This exercise provided a realistic allocation for residual off-axis optical design errors in the presence of state-of-the-art optical fabrication and alignment errors. Three different computational techniques were developed for computing the image degradation of phased telescope arrays due to aberrations of the individual telescopes. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses were then performed for a variety of subaperture configurations and telescope design parameters in an attempt to determine how the off-axis performance of a phased telescope array varies as the telescopes are scaled up in size. The Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) multipurpose telescope testbed (MMTT) configuration was analyzed in detail with regard to image degradation due to field curvature and distortion of the individual telescopes as they are scaled up in size.

  4. Noise correlations and SNR in phased-array MRS.

    PubMed

    Martini, N; Santarelli, M F; Giovannetti, G; Milanesi, M; De Marchi, D; Positano, V; Landini, L

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) signals by multiple receiver coils can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or alternatively can reduce the scan time maintaining a reliable SNR. However, using phased array coils in MRS studies requires efficient data processing and data combination techniques in order to exploit the sensitivity improvement of the phased array coil acquisition method. This paper describes a novel method for the combination of MRS signals acquired by phased array coils, even in presence of correlated noise between the acquisition channels. In fact, although it has been shown that electric and magnetic coupling mechanisms produce correlated noise in the coils, previous algorithms developed for MRS data combination have ignored this effect. The proposed approach takes advantage of a noise decorrelation stage to maximize the SNR of the combined spectra. In particular Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was exploited to project the acquired spectra in a subspace where the noise vectors are orthogonal. In this subspace the SNR weighting method will provide the optimal overall SNR. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is carried out on simulated (1)H-MRS signals and experimental results are obtained on phantom (1)H-MR spectra using a commercially available 8-element phased array coil. Noise correlations between elements were generally low due to the optimal coil design, leading to a fair SNR gain (about 0.5%) in the center of the field of view (FOV). A greater SNR improvement was found in the peripheral FOV regions.

  5. Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar

    SciTech Connect

    2001-11-01

    The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

  6. Delamination Detection Using Guided Wave Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting multiple delaminations in composite laminates using non-contact phased arrays. The phased arrays are implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). The array imaging algorithm is performed in the frequency domain where both the guided wave dispersion effect and direction dependent wave properties are considered. By using the non-contact SLDV array with a frequency domain imaging algorithm, an intensity image of the composite plate can be generated for delamination detection. For the proof of concept, a laboratory test is performed using a non-contact phased array to detect two delaminations (created through quasi-static impact test) at different locations in a composite plate. Using the non-contact phased array and frequency domain imaging, the two impact-induced delaminations are successfully detected. This study shows that the non-contact phased array method is a potentially effective method for rapid delamination inspection in large composite structures.

  7. An experimental X band phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. P. R.; Limaye, K. U.; Ramalingam, R. P.; Gangadharan, T. S.; Bhandopadhyay, G.; Deshpande, P. A.

    1983-10-01

    The details of an X band experimental 11 x 11 element Phased Array Antenna of phased lens configuration with a monopulse space feed developed at LRDE are presented. The studies carried and the results obtained on collimation, beam steering, pattern variation with scan, array operation in two-dimensional search, dedicated track and track while scan (TWS) are also given.

  8. Quantitative ultrasonic phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    When imaging with ultrasonic phased arrays, what do we actually image? What quantitative information is contained in the image? Ad-hoc delay-and-sum methods such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and the total focusing method (TFM) fail to answer these questions. We have shown that a new quantitative approach allows the formation of flaw images by explicitly inverting the Thompson-Gray measurement model. To examine the above questions, we have set up a software simulation test bed that considers a 2-D scalar scattering problem of a cylindrical inclusion with the method of separation of variables. It is shown that in SAFT types of imaging the only part of the flaw properly imaged is the front surface specular response of the flaw. Other responses (back surface reflections, creeping waves, etc.) are improperly imaged and form artifacts in the image. In the case of TFM-like imaging the quantity being properly imaged is an angular integration of the front surface reflectivity. The other, improperly imaged responses are also averaged, leading to a reduction in some of the artifacts present. Our results have strong implications for flaw sizing and flaw characterization with delay-and-sum images.

  9. Large phased-array radars

    SciTech Connect

    Brookner, D.E.

    1988-12-15

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  10. Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The basic concept and design of a flatplate-fed transmission array are described and system performance requirements are summarized. Particular emphasis is given to the design of the aperture, the radiating element, the phase shifter, the flatplate feed, and the mechanical support structure. Fabrication and testing techniques are considered. Of the three major parameters of interest in demonstrating the performance capabilities of the transmissive array, beamwidth was shown to be the least sensitive to system amplitude and phase errors. Beam pointing angle was also shown to be relatively insensitive to errors. Close agreement between measured and calculated values was found for array gain. The greatest difference was found for array sidelone level.

  11. Phased-Antenna-Array Conical Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Antenna pointing faster than mechanical scanning. Three antenna phased array connected to receiving signal-processing system through two phase-shifting networks. Two networks simultaneously steer phased array in two slightly-different beam directions; one for scanning, one for tracking. Technique has many uses in military and civilian radar, principally in tracking aircraft, balloonborne weather instruments, and other moving signal sources or reflectors.

  12. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  13. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  14. Phased-array radar for airborne systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahim, Raghbir S.; Foshee, James J.; Chang, Kai

    2003-09-01

    Phased array antenna systems, which support high pulse rates and high transmit power, are well suited for radar and large-scale surveillance. Sensors and communication systems can function as the eyes and ears for ballistic missile defense applications, providing early warning of attack, target detection and identification, target tracking, and countermeasure decision. In such applications, active array radar systems that contain solid-state transmitter sources and low-noise preamplifiers for transmission and reception are preferred over the conventional radar antennas, because the phased array radar offers the advantages of power management and efficiency, reliability, signal reception, beam steering target detection. The current phased array radar designs are very large, complex and expensive and less efficient because of high RF losses in the phase control circuits used for beam scan. Several thousands of phase shifters and drivers may be required for a single system thus making the system very complex and expensive. This paper describes the phased array radar system based on high power T/R modules, wide-band radiating planar antenna elements and very low loss wide-band phase control circuits (requiring reduced power levels) for beam scan. The phase shifter design is based on micro-strip feed lines perturbed by the proximity of voltage controlled piezoelectric transducer (PET). Measured results have shown an added insertion loss of less than 1 dB for a phase shift of 450 degrees from 2 to 20 GHz. The new wideband phased array radar design provides significant reduction in size cost and weight. Compared to the conventional phased array systems, the cost saving is more than 15 to 1.

  15. Segmented-mirror phased-array lasers

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; Laporta, P.; Magni, V.; Svelto, O.

    1987-11-30

    A scheme for phase-locked laser arrays in both one- and two-dimensional configurations is discussed. The scheme can be applied to any laser and its validity has been proved for the case of a pulsed neodimium laser.

  16. A phased array tracking antenna for vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Mano, Kazukiko; Tanaka, Kenji; Matsunaga, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Makio

    1990-01-01

    An antenna system including antenna elements and a satellite tracking method is considered a key technology in implementing land mobile satellite communications. In the early stage of land mobile satellite communications, a mechanical tracking antenna system is considered the best candidate for vehicles, however, a phased array antenna will replace it in the near future, because it has many attractive advantages such as a low and compact profile, high speed tracking, and potential low cost. Communications Research Laboratory is now developing a new phased array antenna system for land vehicles based on research experiences of the airborne phased array antenna, which was developed and evaluated in satellite communication experiments using the ETS-V satellite. The basic characteristics of the phased array antenna for land vehicles are described.

  17. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Phased Array Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, J. N.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-10-01

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  18. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging.

    PubMed

    Potter, J N; Croxford, A J; Wilcox, P D

    2014-10-03

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  19. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the overall program is to establish technological readiness and provide verification for the elements of a manufacturing sequence which would ultimately be suitable for the large-scale production of silicon solar-array modules at a selling price of less than $500/kW. A program and process plan for accomplishing this objective was developed and put into operation. Three junction-formation processes are shown; since cost analysis shows that they do not differ greatly in cost, each should be considered for technical merits and possible future cost reduction. The progress made in the various process steps of the plan is described, and conclusions are presented.

  20. The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR). Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    NORSAR Phase 3 N-2007 Kieller- Norway ii CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE AFTAC/HQ/TGX h1no 1ORA Patrick AFB 13. NUMBER OF PAGES FL...Project Manager Frode Ringdal (02) 71 69 15 Title of Work The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) Phase 3 Amount of Contract $4.762.383 Contract Period Covered...one in the center. This gives an array of aperture about 4.45 km. For high-frequency phases ( 3 Hz and above) the outer ring does not contribute to

  1. Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-23

    PAGE 1 REPORT NUMBER F08606-76-C-0001 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO 4. TITLE (end Subtitle) rsir Report" Norwegian Seismic Array (N<$SSAR) Phase 3 # 7...34 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERf») Ftf86^6-76-C-##l, 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK AREA • JORK UNIT NUMBERS NORSAR Phase 3 23 Ju IS...0001 Nils Mar&s (02) 71 69 15 Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) Phase 3 $800 000 1 January 1976 - 30 June 1976 The views and conclusions

  2. RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF A GENERALIZED PHASED ARRAY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The phased array has become a key component in the design of advanced antenna systems. This computer program was developed to examine the radiation characteristics of a generalized phased array antenna. Using a very efficient numerical technique, this program calculates the array's radiated power and its directivity. The results can be used to determine the radiation pattern of a generalized phased array at near- or far-field observation points. This program is a key research tool at the NASA Lewis Research Center for analyzing advanced space communication antenna systems. Results from this program compare favorably with experimental Lewis results for arrays of 2x2 and 3x3 elements. Given the array geometry and element characteristics, generalized phased array attributes can be broken into two areas: 1) the power radiated and its directivity at any given point, and 2) the co- and cross-polarization field components. This program allows arbitrarily located source elements with an analytically described cosine pattern. The formulation is based on a Romberg integration scheme and takes into account arbitrary element polarization, E and H plane element patterns, and mutual coupling. The input consists of the array geometry; phase, amplitude, linear and circular polarization of each source element; and the cosine functions of the element pattern. The output is a series of observation angles with their associated field magnitude and polarizations. Total radiated power and peak directivity are also calculated. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 computer operating under TSS with a central memory requirement of approximately 22K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM Scientific Subroutine Package (SSP) is required to run the program. This program was developed in 1986.

  3. Optical signal processing of phased array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weverka, Robert T.

    This thesis develops optical processors that scale to very high processing speed. Optical signal processing is often promoted on the basis of smaller size, lower weight and lower power consumption as well as higher signal processing speed. While each of these requirements has applications, it is the ones that require processing speed beyond that available in electronics that are most compelling. Thirty years ago, optical processing was the only method fast enough to process Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), one of the more demanding signal processing tasks at this time. Since that time electronic processing speed has improved sufficiently to tackle that problem. We have sought out the problems that require significantly higher processing speed and developed optical processors that tackle these more difficult problems. The components that contribute to high signal processing speed are high input signal bandwidth, a large number of parallel input channels each with this high bandwidth, and a large number of parallel operations required on each input channel. Adaptive signal processing for phased array radar has all of these factors. The processors developed for this task scale well in three dimensions, which allows them to maximize parallelism for high speed. This thesis explores an example of a negative feedback adaptive phased array processor and an example of a positive feedback phased array processor. The negative feedback processor uses and array of inputs in up to two dimensions together with the time history of the signal in the third dimension to adapt the array pattern to null out incoming jammer signals. The positive feedback processor uses the incoming signals and assumptions about the radar scene to correct for position errors in a phased array. Discovery and analysis of these new processors are facilitated by an original volume holographic analysis technique developed in the thesis. The thesis includes a new acoustooptic Bragg cell geometry developed with

  4. Array Phase Shifters: Theory and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    While there are a myriad of applications for microwave phase shifters in instrumentation and metrology, power combining, amplifier linearization, and so on, the most prevalent use is in scanning phased-array antennas. And while this market continues to be dominated by military radar and tracking platforms, many commercial applications have emerged in the past decade or so. These new and potential applications span low-Earth-orbit (LEO) communications satellite constellations and collision warning radar, an aspect of the Intelligent Vehicle Highway System or Automated Highway System. In any case, the phase shifters represent a considerable portion of the overall antenna cost, with some estimates approaching 40 percent for receive arrays. Ferrite phase shifters continue to be the workhorse in military-phased arrays, and while there have been advances in thin film ferrite devices, the review of this device technology in the previous edition of this book is still highly relevant. This chapter will focus on three types of phase shifters that have matured in the past decade: GaAs MESFET monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), and thin film ferroelectric-based devices. A brief review of some novel devices including thin film ferrite phase shifters and superconducting switches for phase shifter applications will be provided. Finally, the effects of modulo 2 phase shift limitations, phase errors, and transient response on bit error rate degradation will be considered.

  5. Quantum Phase Transition in Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, K.; Girvin, S. M.

    1997-03-01

    One-dimensional Josephson junction arrays of SQUIDS exhibit a novel superconductor-insulator phase transition. The critical regime can be accessed by tuning the effective Josephson coupling energy using a weak magnetic field applied to the SQUIDS. The role of instantons induced by quantum fluctuations will be discussed. One novel feature of these systems which can be explained in terms of quantum phase slips is that in some regimes, the array resistance decreases with increasing length of the array. We calculate the finite temperature crossover function for the array resistance and compare our theoretical results with the recent experiments by D. Haviland and P. Delsing at Chalmers. This work is supported by DOE grant #DE-FG02-90ER45427 and by NSF DMR-9502555.

  6. Phase Noise in Photonic Phased-Array Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.; Maleki, Lute

    1998-01-01

    The total noise of a phased-array antenna system employing a photonic feed network is analyzed using a model for the individual component noise including both additive and multiplicative equivalent noise generators.

  7. The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR). Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-31

    Seismic Array (NOFSAR). Phase 3 . •■I11 111 s . ,„-,, , ■ , s m^ib^^ ^Ciiv .TlW VJ 7 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE. DISTRIBUTION UNUMfflEO...N-2007 Kjeller, Norway 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Norsar Phase 3 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12...NORSAR) Phase 3 $520,000 ^: The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as

  8. MMIC Phased Array Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A. (Compiler); Martzaklis, Konstantinos (Compiler); Zakrajsek, Robert J. (Compiler); Andro, Monty (Compiler); Turtle, John P.

    1996-01-01

    Over a one year period from May 1994 to May 1995, a number of demonstrations were conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in which voice, data, and/or video links were established via NASA's advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) between the ACTS link evaluation terminal (LET) in Cleveland, OH, and aeronautical and mobile or fixed Earth terminals having monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array antenna systems. This paper describes four of these. In one, a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice (and in one case video as well) links between the ACTS and an Army vehicle. The fourth demonstrated a high data rate downlink from ACTS to a fixed terminal. Array antenna systems used in these demonstrations were developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and Air Force experimental arrays using gallium arsenide MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The single 30 GHz transmit array was developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments. The three 20 GHz receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force array development contracts with Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The paper describes the four proof-of-concept arrays and the array control system. The system configured for each of the demonstrations is described, and results are discussed.

  9. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The solar cell module process development activities in the areas of surface preparation are presented. The process step development was carried out on texture etching including the evolution of a conceptual process model for the texturing process; plasma etching; and diffusion studies that focused on doped polymer diffusion sources. Cell processing was carried out to test process steps and a simplified diode solar cell process was developed. Cell processing was also run to fabricate square cells to populate sample minimodules. Module fabrication featured the demonstration of a porcelainized steel glass structure that should exceed the 20 year life goal of the low cost silicon array program. High efficiency cell development was carried out in the development of the tandem junction cell and a modification of the TJC called the front surface field cell. Cell efficiencies in excess of 16 percent at AM1 have been attained with only modest fill factors. The transistor-like model was proposed that fits the cell performance and provides a guideline for future improvements in cell performance.

  10. Ka-Band Phased Array System Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Johnson, S.; Sands, O.; Lambert, K.

    2001-01-01

    Phased Array Antennas (PAAs) using patch-radiating elements are projected to transmit data at rates several orders of magnitude higher than currently offered with reflector-based systems. However, there are a number of potential sources of degradation in the Bit Error Rate (BER) performance of the communications link that are unique to PAA-based links. Short spacing of radiating elements can induce mutual coupling between radiating elements, long spacing can induce grating lobes, modulo 2 pi phase errors can add to Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), phase shifters and power divider network introduce losses into the system. This paper describes efforts underway to test and evaluate the effects of the performance degrading features of phased-array antennas when used in a high data rate modulation link. The tests and evaluations described here uncover the interaction between the electrical characteristics of a PAA and the BER performance of a communication link.

  11. Phase estimation for a phased array therapeutic interstitial ultrasound probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenya; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals about high intensity ultrasound interstitial therapy simulation. The simulated phased array ultrasound probe allows a dynamic electronic focusing of the therapeutic beam. In order to maximize the power deposit at the focal point we propose a method which allows to optimally defining the phase shift of the electrical control signal for each individual element.

  12. Proposed Functional Description for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    1996-01-01

    Generally speaking, many photonic engineers, while working in a systems development mode, still focus on presenting the unique physical details of the optical elements, instead of using functional representation to describe the system. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce symbols that can be used to represent the functional intent of most of the phased array architecture.

  13. Ultrasonic fingerprinting by phased array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sednev, D.; Kataeva, O.; Abramets, V.; Pushenko, P.; Tverdokhlebova, T.

    2016-06-01

    Increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel that must be under national and international control requires a novel approach to safeguard techniques and equipment. One of the proposed approaches is utilize intrinsic features of casks with spent fuel. In this article an application of a phased array ultrasonic method is considered. This study describes an experimental results on ultrasonic fingerprinting of austenitic steel seam weld.

  14. Phase calibration scheme for a ``T'' array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, R.; Subramanian, K. R.; Sastry, Ch. V.

    1999-10-01

    A calibration scheme based on closure and redundancy techniques is described for correcting the phase errors in the complex visibilities observed with a T-shaped radio interferometer array. Practical details of the scheme are illustrated with reference to the Gauribidanur radioheliograph (GRH).

  15. Phased array antenna matching: Simulation and optimization of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudgeon, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized simulation of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements is reported using mutual coupling and wide angle impedance matching in phased arrays. Special emphasis is given to circular polarization. The aforementioned computer program has as variable inputs: frequency, polarization, grid geometry, element size, dielectric waveguide fill, dielectric plugs in the waveguide for impedance matching, and dielectric sheets covering the array surface for the purpose of wide angle impedance matching. Parameter combinations are found which produce reflection peaks interior to grating lobes, while dielectric cover sheets are successfully employed to extend the usable scan range of a phased array. The most exciting results came from the application of computer aided optimization techniques to the design of this type of array.

  16. A MRI rotary phased array head coil.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Keong; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-08-01

    A new rotary phased array (RPA) head coil that can provide homogenous brain images comparable to volumetric radiofrequency coils is proposed for magnetic resonance brain imaging applications. The design of the RPA head coil is a departure from conventional circumferential array design method, as coil elements of the RPA head coil have a "paddle-like" structure consisting of a pair of main conductors located on opposite sides, inserted equi-angularly around and over the head. A prototype 2T receive-only 4-element RPA head coil was constructed and experimentally tested against a conventional receive-only 4-element phased array head coil and a commercial receive-only quadrature birdcage head coil. Homogenous phantom images acquired by the RPA head coil show that signal intensity deep at the center of the phantom was improved as compared to the conventional phased array head coil and this improvement allow the RPA head coil to acquire homogenous brain images similar to brain images acquired with the birdcage head coil. In addition, partial parallel imaging was used in conjunction with the RPA head coil to enable rapid imaging.

  17. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  18. Phased array performance evaluation with photoelastic visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzel, Robert; Dao, Gavin

    2014-02-18

    New instrumentation and a widening range of phased array transducer options are affording the industry a greater potential. Visualization of the complex wave components using the photoelastic system can greatly enhance understanding of the generated signals. Diffraction, mode conversion and wave front interaction, together with beam forming for linear, sectorial and matrix arrays, will be viewed using the photoelastic system. Beam focus and steering performance will be shown with a range of embedded and surface targets within glass samples. This paper will present principles and sound field images using this visualization system.

  19. Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-08

    j.in|j».i,.i|ii»»m.» ■ iimjiipji pa i AD-A014 926 NORWEGIAN SEISMIC ARRAY (NORSAR) PHASE 3 K. A. Berteussen Royal Norwegian Council for...SCIENTIFIC ANO INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH Scientific Report No. 5-74/75 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT NORSAR PHASE 3 1 July 1974 - 30 June 1975 Prepared by K. A...3 RECIPIENT’S CAT ALOG NUMBER » TITLE fand Subtitle) Final Report - NORSAR Phase 3 1 July 1974 - 30 June 1975 S

  20. Photorefractive processing for large adaptive phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weverka, Robert T.; Wagner, Kelvin; Sarto, Anthony

    1996-03-01

    An adaptive null-steering phased-array optical processor that utilizes a photorefractive crystal to time integrate the adaptive weights and null out correlated jammers is described. This is a beam-steering processor in which the temporal waveform of the desired signal is known but the look direction is not. The processor computes the angle(s) of arrival of the desired signal and steers the array to look in that direction while rotating the nulls of the antenna pattern toward any narrow-band jammers that may be present. We have experimentally demonstrated a simplified version of this adaptive phased-array-radar processor that nulls out the narrow-band jammers by using feedback-correlation detection. In this processor it is assumed that we know a priori only that the signal is broadband and the jammers are narrow band. These are examples of a class of optical processors that use the angular selectivity of volume holograms to form the nulls and look directions in an adaptive phased-array-radar pattern and thereby to harness the computational abilities of three-dimensional parallelism in the volume of photorefractive crystals. The development of this processing in volume holographic system has led to a new algorithm for phased-array-radar processing that uses fewer tapped-delay lines than does the classic time-domain beam former. The optical implementation of the new algorithm has the further advantage of utilization of a single photorefractive crystal to implement as many as a million adaptive weights, allowing the radar system to scale to large size with no increase in processing hardware.

  1. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The scope of this contract entails a configuration study for a phased array fed transmit antenna operating in the frequency band of 17.7 to 20.2 GHz. This initial contract provides a basis for understanding the design limitations and advantages of advanced phased array and cluster feeds (both utilizing intergral MMIC modules) illuminating folded reflector optics (both near field and focused types). Design parametric analyses are performed utilizing as constraints the objective secondary performance requirements of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (Table 1.0). The output of the study provides design information which serves as a data base for future active phased array fed antenna studies such as detailed designs required to support the development of a ground tested breadboard. In general, this study is significant because it provides the antenna community with an understanding of the basic principles which govern near field phased scanned feed effects on secondary reflector system performance. Although several articles have been written on analysis procedures and results for these systems, the authors of this report have observed phenomenon of near field antenna systems not previously documented. Because the physical justification for the exhibited performance is provided herein, the findings of this study add a new dimension to the available knowledge of the subject matter.

  2. A Phased Array Magnetometer for Sensing IED

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-04

    of information is estimated to average 1 tiour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering...Device Organization (JIEDDO) (Contract No: FA9550-07- 1 -0107) Program Dr. Byung-Lip "Les" Lee Manager Project Title A Phased Array...Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 Voice: 310-825-6030 Fax:310-206-2302 1 . OVERALL OBJECTIVE The objective of this project was to develop the fundamental

  3. Technology Development for Millimeter Wave Phased Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    design would use the technology of integration-the same technology that has brought us computing power at such a low cost. The integrated phased array ...circuitry and/or the feed network, which can degrade sidelobe levels or polarization. A Two Layer Substrate Figure 2.8 shows a possible two-layer design ...feed substrates. Coupling is again through aper- tures in the ground plane of the antenna substrate. This design also allows the use of a low dielectric

  4. The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR). Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    21 Title of Work The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) Phase 3 Amount of Contract $ 1,902,447 Contract Period Covered by Report I Oct 1988 - 31 Mar...SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT 1400 Wilson Blvd. ELEMENT NO NO NORSAR NO SOW TAS Wb9WO. Arlington, VA 22209-2308 R&D PHASE ... 3 5.0 No.003A2 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) SEMIANNUAL TECHNICAL SUMMARY, 1 OCTOBER 1988 - 31 MARCH 1989 (UNCLASSIFIED) 12. PERSONAL

  5. Proceedings of the Third EPRI Phased Array Ultrasound Seminar

    SciTech Connect

    2003-12-01

    Phased array technology for ultrasonic examination is providing innovative solutions for nuclear in-service examination applications. EPRI has been a prime mover in the development and deployment of phased array ultrasound applications in the domestic nuclear market over the past decade. As part of this strategic effort, EPRI has hosted a series of seminars on phased array technology and its applications.

  6. An Optical Phased Array for LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wu, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated the development of an Optical Phased Array (OPA) micromechanical system (MEMS) used for beam steering, which shows great advantages over previous mechanisms such as opto-mechanical, acousto-optical (AO) or electro-optical (EO). We aim to integrate the OPA MEMS system into the application of automobile navigation, which is currently primarily dominated by opto-mechanical scanning based systems. Opto-mechanical scanning devices are usually bulky and relatively slow, while competing technologies (AO, EO) utilize devices that while small in size, cannot provide the steering speeds and versatility necessary for many applications. In drawing from phased array concepts that revolutionized RADAR technology by providing a compact, agile alternative to mechanically steered technology, the OPA based LIDAR program seeks to integrate thousands of closely packed optical emitting facets, precise relative electronic phase control of these facets, and all within a very small form factor. Comparing with other competing LIDAR system, the OPA based LIDAR system will have multiple degrees of freedom for phase control which enables not only agile beam steering but also beam forming and multiple beam generation, greatly expanding the diversity of applications.

  7. Measured aperture-array noise temperature of the Mark II phased array feed for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Shaw, R. D.; Hayman, D. B.; Macleod, A.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.; Cantrall, C.; Brothers, M. L.; Hotan, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  8. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W; Korterik, Jeroen P; Segerink, Frans B; Herek, Jennifer L; Prangsma, Jord C

    2016-04-28

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons.

  9. Photonic Multitasking Interleaved Si Nanoantenna Phased Array.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dianmin; Holsteen, Aaron L; Maguid, Elhanan; Wetzstein, Gordon; Kik, Pieter G; Hasman, Erez; Brongersma, Mark L

    2016-12-14

    Metasurfaces provide unprecedented control over light propagation by imparting local, space-variant phase changes on an incident electromagnetic wave. They can improve the performance of conventional optical elements and facilitate the creation of optical components with new functionalities and form factors. Here, we build on knowledge from shared aperture phased array antennas and Si-based gradient metasurfaces to realize various multifunctional metasurfaces capable of achieving multiple distinct functions within a single surface region. As a key point, we demonstrate that interleaving multiple optical elements can be accomplished without reducing the aperture of each subelement. Multifunctional optical elements constructed from Si-based gradient metasurface are realized, including axial and lateral multifocus geometric phase metasurface lenses. We further demonstrate multiwavelength color imaging with a high spatial resolution. Finally, optical imaging functionality with simultaneous color separation has been obtained by using multifunctional metasurfaces, which opens up new opportunities for the field of advanced imaging and display.

  10. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Segerink, Frans B.; Herek, Jennifer L.; Prangsma, Jord C.

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons. PMID:27121099

  11. Phased Antenna Array for Global Navigation Satellite System Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turbiner, Dmitry (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for phased array antennas are described. Supports for phased array antennas can be constructed by 3D printing. The array elements and combiner network can be constructed by conducting wire. Different parameters of the antenna, like the gain and directivity, can be controlled by selection of the appropriate design, and by electrical steering. Phased array antennas may be used for radio occultation measurements.

  12. Ultrasonic phased array transducers for nondestructive evaluation of steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Shin, Hyeon Jae; Jang, You Hyun

    2000-05-01

    An ultrasonic phased array transducer has been developed and demonstrated for the nondestructive evaluation of steel structures. The number of array elements is 64 and the center frequency is about 5 MHz. This phased array transducer is designed to use with the phased array system that does steering, transmission focusing and dynamic receive focusing. Each of the array elements is individually excited according to the focal laws and steering angles. Measurements of ultrasonic beam profiles for the array transducer in a reference steel block are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Some of the phased array transducer design concepts for the application in steel structures are discussed. The two-dimensional ultrasonic images of the sample steel block including flat bottom holes and side drilled holes are presented. Experimental and theoretical results demonstrate excellent feasibility of the utility of the phased array transducer in imaging and detection of defects in steel structures.

  13. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-11-19

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  14. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array. PMID:23258939

  15. [Modeling and simulation of responses from ultrasonic linear phased array].

    PubMed

    He, Wenjing; Zhu, Yuanzhong; Wang, Yufeng; He, Lingli; Lai, Siyu

    2012-10-01

    Phased array transducers are very attractive because the beam generated by the arrays can be electronically focused and steered. The present work characterizes far-field 2D properties of phased array system by functions that are deduced from rectangle source, rectangle line array and phased array based on point source. Results are presented for the distribution of ultrasound intensity on plane xoz and on x-axis by simulation using numerical calculation. It is shown that the shape of response of rectangle line array is modulated by the single array element. It is also demonstrated that the delay time of phased array is the key to steer the beam, sacrificing the value of main lobe and increasing the number of side lobes.

  16. Phased-array design for MST and ST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    All of the existing radar systems fully dedicated to clear-air radar studies use some type of phased-array antennas. The effects of beam-steering techniques including feed networks and phase shifters; sidelobe control; ground-clutter suppression; low altitude coverage; arrays with integrated radiating elements and feed networks; analysis of coaxial-collinear antennas; use of arrays with multiple beams; and array testing and measure on structural design of the antenna are discussed.

  17. S-band antenna phased array communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzer, D. R.; Chapman, J. E.; Griffin, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of an S-band antenna phased array for spacecraft to spacecraft communication is discussed. The system requirements, antenna array subsystem design, and hardware implementation are examined. It is stated that the phased array approach offers the greatest simplicity and lowest cost. The objectives of the development contract are defined as: (1) design of a medium gain active phased array S-band communications antenna, (2) development and test of a model of a seven element planar array of radiating elements mounted in the appropriate cavity matrix, and (3) development and test of a breadboard transmit/receive microelectronics module.

  18. Quantitative flaw characterization with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady John

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a critical diagnostic tool in many industries. It is used to characterize potentially dangerous flaws in critical components for aerospace, automotive, and energy applications. The use of phased array transducers allows for the extension of traditional techniques and the introduction of new methods for quantitative flaw characterization. An equivalent flaw sizing technique for use in time-of-flight diffraction setups is presented that provides an estimate of the size and orientation of isolated cracks, surface-breaking cracks, and volumetric flaws such as voids and inclusions. Experimental validation is provided for the isolated crack case. A quantitative imaging algorithm is developed that corrects for system effects and wave propagation, making the images formed directly related to the properties of the scatterer present. Simulated data is used to form images of cylindrical and spherical inclusions. The contributions of different signals to the image formation process are discussed and examples of the quantitative nature of the images are shown.

  19. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  20. PHASED ARRAY FEED CALIBRATION, BEAMFORMING, AND IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, Jonathan; Elmer, Michael; Waldron, Jacob; Jones, David; Stemmons, Alan; Jeffs, Brian D.; Warnick, Karl F.; Richard Fisher, J.; Norrod, Roger D.

    2010-03-15

    Phased array feeds (PAFs) for reflector antennas offer the potential for increased reflector field of view and faster survey speeds. To address some of the development challenges that remain for scientifically useful PAFs, including calibration and beamforming algorithms, sensitivity optimization, and demonstration of wide field of view imaging, we report experimental results from a 19 element room temperature L-band PAF mounted on the Green Bank 20 Meter Telescope. Formed beams achieved an aperture efficiency of 69% and a system noise temperature of 66 K. Radio camera images of several sky regions are presented. We investigate the noise performance and sensitivity of the system as a function of elevation angle with statistically optimal beamforming and demonstrate cancelation of radio frequency interference sources with adaptive spatial filtering.

  1. Wavelet Analysis for Acoustic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Inna; Zlotnick, Zvi

    2003-03-01

    Wavelet spectrum analysis is known to be one of the most powerful tools for exploring quasistationary signals. In this paper we use wavelet technique to develop a new Direction Finding (DF) Algorithm for the Acoustic Phased Array (APA) systems. Utilising multi-scale analysis of libraries of wavelets allows us to work with frequency bands instead of individual frequency of an acoustic source. These frequency bands could be regarded as features extracted from quasistationary signals emitted by a noisy object. For detection, tracing and identification of a sound source in a noisy environment we develop smart algorithm. The essential part of this algorithm is a special interacting procedure of the above-mentioned DF-algorithm and the wavelet-based Identification (ID) algorithm developed in [4]. Significant improvement of the basic properties of a receiving APA pattern is achieved.

  2. Multiband Photonic Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Suning

    2015-01-01

    A multiband phased-array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. Crystal Research, Inc., has developed a multiband photonic antenna that is based on a high-speed, optical, true-time-delay beamformer. It is capable of simultaneously steering multiple independent radio frequency (RF) beams in less than 1,000 nanoseconds. This high steering speed is 3 orders of magnitude faster than any existing optical beamformer. Unlike other approaches, this technology uses a single controlling device per operation band, eliminating the need for massive optical switches, laser diodes, and fiber Bragg gratings. More importantly, only one beamformer is needed for all antenna elements.

  3. Joint stars phased array radar antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnitkin, Harold

    1994-10-01

    The Joint STARS phased array radar system is capable of performing long range airborne surveillance and was used during the Persian Gulf war on two E8-A aircraft to fly many around-the-clock missions to monitor the Kuwait and Iraq battlefield from a safe distance behind the front lines. This paper is a follow-on to previous publications on the subject of the Joint STARS antenna and deals mainly with mission performance and technical aspects not previously covered. Radar data of troop movements and armament installations will be presented, a brief review of the antenna design is given, followed by technical discussions concerning the three-port interferometry, gain and sidelobe design approach, cost control, range test implementation and future improvements.

  4. COMPOSITE CERAMIC ARMOR DEFECT ANALYSIS USING PHASED ARRAY ULTRASOUND

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-30

    background variation. Such an approximation applied to the FFT results of Conclusion Phased - array ultrasonic inspection methods have been...SNR values above 2.55) were statistically defective either. CONCLUSION Phased - array ultrasonic inspection methods have been successfully applied to...4 G.P. Singh and J. W. Davies, “Multiple Transducer Ultrasonic Techniques: Phased Arrays ” In Nondestructive Testing Handbook, 2nd Ed., 7, pp. 284

  5. Receiver Would Control Phasing of a Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Charles E.; Young, Lawrence E.

    2006-01-01

    In a proposed digital signal-processing technique, a radio receiver would control the phasing of a phased-array antenna to aim the peaks of the antenna radiation pattern toward desired signal sources while aiming the nulls of the pattern toward interfering signal sources. The technique was conceived for use in a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, for which the desired signal sources would be GPS satellites and typical interference sources would be terrestrial objects that cause multipath propagation. The technique could also be used to optimize reception in spread-spectrum cellular-telephone and military communication systems. During reception of radio signals in a conventional phased-array antenna system, received signals at their original carrier frequencies are phase-shifted, then combined by analog circuitry. The combination signal is then subjected to down-conversion and demodulation. In a system according to the proposed technique (see figure), the signal received by each antenna would be subjected to down-conversion, spread-spectrum demodulation, and correlation; this processing would be performed separately from, and simultaneously with, similar processing of signals received by the other antenna elements. Following analog down-conversion to baseband, the signals would be digitized, and all subsequent processing would be digital. In the digital process, residual carriers would be removed and each signal would be correlated with a locally generated model pseudorandum-noise code, all following normal GPS procedure. As part of this procedure, accumulated values would be added in software and the resulting signals would be phase-shifted in software by the amounts necessary to synthesize the desired antenna directional gain pattern of peaks and nulls. The principal advantage of this technique over the conventional radio-frequency-combining technique is that the parallel digital baseband processing of the signals from the various antenna elements would be

  6. A novel method to design sparse linear arrays for ultrasonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Bin; Shi, Ke-Ren

    2006-12-22

    In ultrasonic phased array testing, a sparse array can increase the resolution by enlarging the aperture without adding system complexity. Designing a sparse array involves choosing the best or a better configuration from a large number of candidate arrays. We firstly designed sparse arrays by using a genetic algorithm, but found that the arrays have poor performance and poor consistency. So, a method based on the Minimum Redundancy Linear Array was then adopted. Some elements are determined by the minimum-redundancy array firstly in order to ensure spatial resolution and then a genetic algorithm is used to optimize the remaining elements. Sparse arrays designed by this method have much better performance and consistency compared to the arrays designed only by a genetic algorithm. Both simulation and experiment confirm the effectiveness.

  7. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas Keith; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation discussed a novel phased array with an emphasis to simplify the array feed. Specifically, we will demonstrate a simple, low cost feeding approach by mechanically controlling the substrate thickness. The array feed lines are constructed from parallel plate transmission lines whose thickness are adjusted to control their effective dielectric constant (Epsilon_eff). As a result the phase delay/excitation at each array element will be adjusted per desired beam direction. The proposed antenna elements will be overlapping dipoles operating over a 2:1 bandwidth in the Ku-Band spectrum. Preliminary simulation and experimental demonstration of such an array will be presented.

  8. Microstrip technology and its application to phased array compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudgeon, J. E.; Daniels, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic analysis of mutual coupling compensation using microstrip techniques is presented. A method for behind-the-array coupling of a phased antenna array is investigated as to its feasibility. The matching scheme is tried on a rectangular array of one half lambda 2 dipoles, but it is not limited to this array element or geometry. In the example cited the values of discrete components necessary were so small an L-C network is needed for realization. Such L-C tanks might limit an otherwise broadband array match, however, this is not significant for this dipole array. Other areas investigated were balun feeding and power limits of spiral antenna elements.

  9. Optimizing Satellite Communications With Adaptive and Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, Mary Ann; Romanofsky, Robert; Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix; Popovic, Zoya; Langley, John; Barott, William C.; Ahmed, M. Usman; Mandl, Dan

    2004-01-01

    A new adaptive antenna array architecture for low-earth-orbiting satellite ground stations is being investigated. These ground stations are intended to have no moving parts and could potentially be operated in populated areas, where terrestrial interference is likely. The architecture includes multiple, moderately directive phased arrays. The phased arrays, each steered in the approximate direction of the satellite, are adaptively combined to enhance the Signal-to-Noise and Interference-Ratio (SNIR) of the desired satellite. The size of each phased array is to be traded-off with the number of phased arrays, to optimize cost, while meeting a bit-error-rate threshold. Also, two phased array architectures are being prototyped: a spacefed lens array and a reflect-array. If two co-channel satellites are in the field of view of the phased arrays, then multi-user detection techniques may enable simultaneous demodulation of the satellite signals, also known as Space Division Multiple Access (SDMA). We report on Phase I of the project, in which fixed directional elements are adaptively combined in a prototype to demodulate the S-band downlink of the EO-1 satellite, which is part of the New Millennium Program at NASA.

  10. Phased Array Transmit Antenna for a Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, R. W.; Heisen, P. T.; Miller, G. E.; McMeen, D. J.; Perko, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    Active phased array antennas with electronically scanned beams offer advantages over high gain parabolic dish antennas currently used on spacecraft. Benefits include the elimination of deployable structures, no moving parts, and no torque disturbances that moving antennas impart to the spacecraft. The latter results in the conservation of spacecraft power, and the ability to take precision optical data while transmitting data. Such an antenna has been built under a contract from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the New Millennium Program EO- 1 satellite where it will act as the primary highspeed scientific data communication link. The antenna operates at X-band, has an integral controller and power conditioner, communicates with the spacecraft over a 1773 optical data bus, and is space qualified for low earth orbit (705 Km altitude). The nominal mission length is one year, and the operational requirement is for one 10 minute transmission a day over Spitsbergen, Norway. Details of the antenna and its performance will be described in the following paper.

  11. Guided wave phased array beamforming and imaging in composite plates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyu; Tian, Zhenhua

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes phased array beamforming using guided waves in anisotropic composite plates. A generic phased array algorithm is presented, in which direction dependent guided wave parameters and the energy skew effect are considered. This beamforming at an angular direction is achieved based on the classic delay-and-sum principle by applying phase delays to signals received at array elements and adding up the delayed signals. The phase delays are determined with the goal to maximize the array output at the desired direction and minimize it otherwise. For array characterization, the beam pattern of rectangular grid arrays in composite plates is derived. In addition to the beam pattern, the beamforming factor in terms of wavenumber distribution is defined to provide intrinsic explanations for phased array beamforming. The beamforming and damage detection in a composite plate are demonstrated using rectangular grid arrays made by a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Detection images of the composite plate with multiple surface defects at various directions are obtained. The results show that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  12. A Phased Array Coil for Human Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Chris D.; Westgate, Charles R.; O'Dell, Walter G.; Zerhouni, Elias A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype cardiac phased array receiver coil was constructed that comprised a cylindrical array and a separate planar array. Both arrays had two coil loops with the same coil dimensions. Data acquisition with the cylindrical array placed on the human chest, and the planar array placed under the back, yielded an overall enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over the entire heart by a factor of 1.1–2.85 over a commercially available flexible coil and a commercially available four-loop planar phased array coil. This improvement in SNR can be exploited in cardiac imaging to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the image acquisition time. PMID:7674903

  13. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nick; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Phased array antennas showcase many advantages over mechanically steered systems. However, they are also more complex, heavy and most importantly costly. This presentation paper presents a concept which overcomes these detrimental attributes by eliminating all of the phase array backend (including phase shifters). Instead, a wave velocity reconfigurable transmission line is used in a series fed array arrangement to allow phase shifting with one small (100mil) mechanical motion. Different configurations of the reconfigurable wave velocity transmission line are discussed and simulated and experimental results are presented.

  14. Rigorous investigation of the array-tilt aberration for hexagonal, optical phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Milo W; Wyman, Jason E; Tyler, Glenn A

    2014-04-10

    An investigation of the array-tilt aberration for hexagonal, optical phased arrays is presented. The investigation begins with theoretical derivations of the far-zone radiated field, the array factor, and the far-field radiated power for the seven-element hexagonal array with array tilt present. Physical insights gained from this analysis are discussed. An analytical treatment of correlation-based array-tilt estimators is also undertaken. Two novel array-tilt estimation techniques are developed from the analysis. The new techniques are shown to be significantly more efficient computationally than the traditional estimation approach. Simulation and experimental results are presented to validate the new array-tilt estimation methods.

  15. Microwave power transmitting phased array antenna research project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    An initial design study and the development results of an S band RF power transmitting phased array antenna experiment system are presented. The array was to be designed, constructed and instrumented to permit wireless power transmission technology evaluation measurements. The planned measurements were to provide data relative to the achievable performance in the state of the art of flexible surface, retrodirective arrays, as a step in technically evaluating the satellite power system concept for importing to earth, via microwave beams, the nearly continuous solar power available in geosynchronous orbit. Details of the microwave power transmitting phased array design, instrumentation approaches, system block diagrams, and measured component and breadboard characteristics achieved are presented.

  16. Coherent optical monolithic phased-array antenna steering system

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    An optical-based RF beam steering system for phased-array antennas comprising a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). The system is based on optical heterodyning employed to produce microwave phase shifting by a monolithic PIC constructed entirely of passive components. Microwave power and control signal distribution to the antenna is accomplished by optical fiber, permitting physical separation of the PIC and its control functions from the antenna. The system reduces size, weight, complexity, and cost of phased-array antenna systems.

  17. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John Frederick; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.

  18. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S; Kadlec, Emil A; Shaner, Eric A; Klem, John F; Sinclair, Michael B; Brener, Igal

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (∼5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. Proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.

  19. Phased array ultrasonic inspection of Friction Stir Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarre, André; Moles, Michael; Lupien, Vincent

    2000-05-01

    Phased array ultrasonic inspection methods have been developed for the rapid inspection of Friction Stir Weldments (FSW) on Delta rocket cryogenic tanks. A comprehensive review was performed to identify NDE methods that are suitable for the detection of defects in this new welding process. The search included a review of traditional and advanced NDE methods that were capable of demonstrating both the sensitivity and inspection rates required for this examination. This paper will discuss the theory behind phased array techniques, fundamentals of several probe designs for FSW configurations, and the advantages of using phased arrays over conventional NDE methods for this applications.

  20. Cracks measurement using fiber-phased array laser ultrasound generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Cuixiang; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Fukuchi, Tetsuo; Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2013-04-01

    A phased array laser ultrasound generation system by using fiber optic delivery and a custom-designed focusing objective lens has been developed for crack inspection. The enhancement of crack tip diffraction by using phased array laser ultrasound is simulated with finite element method and validated by experiment. A non-contact and non-destructive measurement of inner-surface cracks by time-of-flight diffraction method using fiber-phased array laser ultrasound generation and electromagnetic acoustic transducer detection has been studied.

  1. Diffraction-Coupled, Phase-Locked Semiconductor Laser Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Yariv, Amnon; Margalit, Shlomo

    1988-01-01

    Stable, narrow far field produced. Array of lasers fabricated on single chip. Individual laser waveguides isolated from each other except in end portions, where diffraction coupling takes place. Radiation pattern far from laser array has single, sharp central lobe when all lasers operate in phase with each other. Shape of lobe does not vary appreciably with array current. Applications include recording, printing, and range finding.

  2. Frequency translating phase conjugation circuit for active retrodirective antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-11-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array which has central phasing from a reference antenna element through a "tree" structured network of transmission lines utilizes a number of phase conjugate circuits (PCCs) at each node and a phase reference regeneration circuit (PRR) at each node except the initial node. Each node virtually coincides with an element of the array. A PCC generates the exact conjugate phase of an incident signal using a phase locked loop which combines the phases in an up converter, divides the sum by 2 and mixes the result with the phase in a down converter for phase detection. The PRR extracts the phase from the conjugate phase. Both the PCC and the PRR are not only exact but also free from mixer degeneracy.

  3. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spacecraft array fed reflector antenna systems were assessed for particular application to a multiple fixed spot beam/multiple scanning spot beam system. Reflector optics systems are reviewed in addition to an investigation of the feasibility of the use of monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifiers and phase shifters in each element of the array feed.

  4. Testing the Atacama Compact Array Phase-Correction Scheme Using the Submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Chen, Yu-Lin

    2010-08-01

    We conducted observational tests of a phase-correction scheme for the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) of the Atacama Large Millimeter and submillimeter Array (ALMA) using the Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Interferometers at millimeter and submillimeter waves are highly affected by refraction induced by water vapor in the troposphere, which results in phase fluctuations. The ACA is planning to compensate for the atmospheric phase fluctuation using phase information of the outermost antennas with interpolating into the inner antennas by creating a phase screen. The interpolation and extrapolation phase-correction schemes using phase screens have been tested by the SMA to study how effective they are. We produce a plane of wavefront (phase screen) from the phase information of three antennas for each integration, and this phase screen is used for interpolating the phase of the inner antenna and extrapolating that of the outer one. The interpolation scheme apparently obtains improved results, suggesting that the ACA phase-correction scheme works well. On the other hand, the extrapolation one often does not improve the results. After extrapolation, unexpectedly large phase fluctuations occur in the phases of the antennas at a distance of ˜140 m away from the center of the three reference antennas. The directions of these antennas are almost perpendicular to that of the wind, suggesting that the phase fluctuations can be well explained by the frozen phase screen in the atmosphere.

  5. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L; Shung, K Kirk; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging.

  6. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhang, Hao F.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging. PMID:23162708

  7. Genetic Algorithms as a Tool for Phased Array Radar Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. GENETIC ALGORITHMS AS A...REPORT DATE June 2002 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Genetic Algorithms as a Tool for Phased Array Radar...creative ways to design multi-function phased array radars. This thesis proposes that Genetic Algorithms, computer programs that mimic natural selection

  8. MSAT mobile electronically steered phased array antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Fred

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) breadboard antenna design demonstrates the feasibility of using a phased array in a mobile satellite application. An electronically steerable phased array capable of tracking geosynchronous satellites from anywhere in the Continental United States has been developed. The design is reviewed along with the test data. Cost analysis are presented which indicate that this design can be produced at a cost of $1620 per antenna.

  9. Designing of Phased Array Transducers for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Ph.; Poguet, J.; Fleury, G.

    2004-02-01

    By increasing inspection speed, and deflection capabilities of the transducers, Phased-array technology has proved its interest to face new ∂ NDT challenges, and is becoming more and more popular in the main industrial fields of activities. This paper describes the main effects of specifications on transducer performances, and explains how to defined them. The second part speaks about the manufacturing step, showing the influence of component choice on performances. Several Phased-array applications examples illustrating these considerations will be presented.

  10. A 32-GHz phased array transmit feed for spacecraft telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. A.; Rascoe, D. L.; Crist, R. A.; Huang, J.; Wamhof, P. D.; Lansing, F. S.

    1992-01-01

    A 21-element phased array transmit feed was demonstrated as part of an effort to develop and evaluate state-of-the-art transmitter and receiver components at 32 and 34 GHz for future deep-space missions. Antenna pattern measurements demonstrating electronic beam steering of the two-dimensional array are reported and compared with predictions based on measured performance of MMIC-based phase shifter and amplifier modules and Vivaldi slotline radiating elements.

  11. Jet Noise Source Localization Using Linear Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agboola, Ferni A.; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to further clarify the interpretation and application of linear phased array microphone results, for localizing aeroacoustics sources in aircraft exhaust jet. Two model engine nozzles were tested at varying power cycles with the array setup parallel to the jet axis. The array position was varied as well to determine best location for the array. The results showed that it is possible to resolve jet noise sources with bypass and other components separation. The results also showed that a focused near field image provides more realistic noise source localization at low to mid frequencies.

  12. Large Phased Array Radar Using Networked Small Parabolic Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, Farid

    2006-01-01

    Multifunction phased array systems with radar, telecom, and imaging applications have already been established for flat plate phased arrays of dipoles, or waveguides. In this paper the design trades and candidate options for combining the radar and telecom functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN) into a single large transmit array of small parabolic reflectors will be discussed. In particular the effect of combing the radar and telecom functions on the sizes of individual antenna apertures and the corresponding spacing between the antenna elements of the array will be analyzed. A heterogeneous architecture for the DSN large transmit array is proposed to meet the radar and telecom requirements while considering the budget, scheduling, and strategic planning constrains.

  13. An optically controlled Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, Richard Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, Alan N.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1992-01-01

    The design and development of a small, optically controlled phased array antenna suitable for communication satellite applications are discussed. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 GHz, four-bit monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shifters in customized quartz packages with corresponding optoelectronic interface circuits (OEIC's) for control signal reception.

  14. A vertically integrated Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, R. Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, A. N.; Simons, R.

    1992-01-01

    The design, development, and experimental demonstration of a small phased array antenna suitable for applications on communications satellites are discussed. Each of the vertical layers was optimized for performance, and MMICs on custom carriers were characterized prior to insertion. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 Ghz, 4-bit MMIC phase shifters on customized alumina carriers. Performance data are presented for all components, and far-field antenna radiation patterns are given.

  15. Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluation of Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) Nozzle Interference Fit and Weld Region

    SciTech Connect

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mathews, Royce; Hanson, Brady D.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2011-07-31

    Ultrasonic phased array data were collected on a removed-from-service CRDM nozzle specimen to assess a previously reported leak path. First a mock-up CRDM specimen was evaluated that contained two 0.076-mm (3.0-mil) interference fit regions formed from an actual Inconel CRDM tube and two 152.4-mm (6.0-in.) thick carbon steel blocks. One interference fit region has a series of precision crafted electric discharge machining (EDM) notches at various lengths, widths, depths, and spatial separations for establishing probe sensitivity, resolution and calibration. The other interference fit has zones of boric acid (crystal form) spaced periodically between the tube and block to represent an actively leaking CRDM nozzle assembly in the field. Ultrasonic phased-array evaluations were conducted using an immersion 8-element annular 5.0-MHz probe from the tube inner diameter (ID). A variety of focal laws were employed to evaluate the interference fit regions and J grove weld, where applicable. Responses from the mock-up specimen were evaluated to determine detection limits and characterization ability as well as contrast the ultrasonic response differences with the presence of boric acid in the fit region. Nozzle 63, from the North Anna Unit-2 nuclear power plant, was evaluated to assess leakage path(s) and was destructively dismantled to allow a visual verification of the leak path(s).

  16. Ka-Band Multibeam Aperture Phased Array Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems offer many advantages to low-Earth-orbiting satellite systems. Their large scan angles and multibeam capabilities allow for vibration-free, rapid beam scanning and graceful degradation operation for high rate downlink of data to users on the ground. Technology advancements continue to reduce the power, weight, and cost of these systems to make phased arrays a competitive alternative in comparison to the gimbled reflector system commonly used in science missions. One effort to reduce the cost of phased arrays is the development of a Ka-band multibeam aperture (MBA) phased array by Boeing Corporation under a contract jointly by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Office of Naval Research. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a space-qualifiable dual-beam Ka-band (26.5-GHz) phased-array antenna. The goals are to advance the state of the art in Ka-band active phased-array antennas and to develop and demonstrate multibeam transmission technology compatible with spacecraft in low Earth orbit to reduce the cost of future missions by retiring certain development risks. The frequency chosen is suitable for space-to-space and space-to-ground communication links. The phased-array antenna has a radiation pattern designed by combining a set of individual radiating elements, optimized with the type of radiating elements used, their positions in space, and the amplitude and phase of the currents feeding the elements. This arrangement produces a directional radiation pattern that is proportional to the number of individual radiating elements. The arrays of interest here can scan the main beam electronically with a computerized algorithm. The antenna is constructed using electronic components with no mechanical parts, and the steering is performed electronically, without any resulting vibration. The speed of the scanning is limited primarily by the control electronics. The radiation performance degrades gracefully if a portion of the elements

  17. Optical phased arrays with evanescently-coupled antennas

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Jie; Watts, Michael R; Yaacobi, Ami; Timurdogan, Erman

    2015-03-24

    An optical phased array formed of a large number of nanophotonic antenna elements can be used to project complex images into the far field. These nanophotonic phased arrays, including the nanophotonic antenna elements and waveguides, can be formed on a single chip of silicon using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Directional couplers evanescently couple light from the waveguides to the nanophotonic antenna elements, which emit the light as beams with phases and amplitudes selected so that the emitted beams interfere in the far field to produce the desired pattern. In some cases, each antenna in the phased array may be optically coupled to a corresponding variable delay line, such as a thermo-optically tuned waveguide or a liquid-filled cell, which can be used to vary the phase of the antenna's output (and the resulting far-field interference pattern).

  18. Fiber optic signal distribution for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecherle, G. S.

    1992-03-01

    The use of a 32-GHz phased-array transmitting antenna with fiberoptic signal distribution is considered in the context of a Mars relay satellite for NASA's Space Exploration Initiative. The specifications of the proposed application are assessed with specific attention given to the EIRP requirement of 86 dBW and its ramifications on the phased array, antenna, and photonic architecture. A photonic performance analysis is conducted to study phase-noise and SNR degradations to determine whether phase-locked loop (PLL) complexity is required. SNR and phase noise are examined as a function of the number of optical splits, and the number is shown to be limited to 350. Use of the PLL allows one laser to support 650 elements - as opposed to 250 - showing that only a single laser diode is needed to support the array for the Mars transmitter.

  19. A 35 MHz PCMUT phased array for NDE ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snook, Kevin; Jiang, Xiaoning; Hu, Changhong; Geng, Xuecang; Liu, Ruibin; Welter, John; Shung, Kirk; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the development of a 35 MHz 64-channel Piezoelectric Composite based Micromachined Ultrasound Transducer (PCMUT) phased array for NDE ultrasound application is presented. A 35 MHz PMN-PT single crystal 1-3 composite based PC-MUT phased array was designed with extensive acoustic field and 1D modeling. The initial modeling results demonstrated that the focused detection resolution (10% of -3 dB beam width) could be as small as 30 μm in the azimuth direction. The maximum imaging depth for ceramic samples is around 20 mm. The PC-MUT array being developed will extend the state-of-art NDE phased array technology from approximately 20 MHz to 35 MHz, which will greatly enhance the imaging resolution for a broad range of NDE ultrasound applications.

  20. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance of the following coplanar waveguide (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and printed dipole arrays is presented: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW (GCPW)/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  1. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance is presented of the following Coplanar Waveguides (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and dipole arrays: (1) CPW/Microstrip Line feed; (2) CPW/Balanced Stripline feed; (3) CPW/Slotline feed; (4) Grounded CPW/Balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/Slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  2. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance is presented of the following coplanar waveguides (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and dipole arrays: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  3. An Agile Beam Transmit Array Using Coupled Oscillator Phase Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald S.; Scaramastra, Rocco P.; Huang, John; Beckon, Robert J.; Petree, Steve M.; Chavez, Cosme

    1993-01-01

    A few years ago York and colleagues suggested that injection locking of voltage controlled oscillators could be used to implement beam steering in a phased array [I]. The scheme makes use of the fact that when an oscillator is injection locked to an external signal, the phase difference between the output of the oscillator and the injection signal is governed by the difference between the injection frequency and the free running frequency of the oscillator (the frequency to which the oscillator is tuned). Thus, if voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs) are used, this phase difference is controlled by an applied voltage. Now, if a set of such oscillators are coupled to nearest neighbors, they can be made to mutually injection lock and oscillate as an ensemble. If they are all tuned to the same frequency, they will all oscillate in phase. Thus, if the outputs are connected to radiating elements forming a linear array, the antenna will radiate normal to the line of elements. Scanning is accomplished by antisymmetrically detuning the end oscillators in the array by application of a pair of appropriate voltages to their tuning ports. This results in a linear phase progression across the array which is just the phasing required to scan the beam. The scan angle is determined by the degree of detuning. We have constructed a seven element one dimensional agile beam array at S-band based on the above principle. Although, a few such arrays have been built in the past, this array possesses two unique features. First, the VCO MMICs have buffer amplifiers which isolate the output from the tuning circuit, and second, the oscillators are weakly coupled to each other at their resonant circuits rather than their outputs. This results in a convenient isolation between the oscillator array design and the radiating aperture design. An important parameter in the design is the so called coupling phase which determines the phase shift of the signals passing from one oscillator to its

  4. Simple Array Beam-Shaping Using Phase-Only Adjustments.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-07-01

    Conventional beam-shaping for array antennas is accomplished via an amplitude-taper on the elemental radiators. It is well known that proper manipulation of the elemental phases can also shape the antenna far-field pattern. A fairly simple transformation from a desired amplitude-taper to a phase-taper can yield nearly equivalent results.

  5. Phased array antenna beamforming using optical processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. P.; Boldissar, F.; Chang, D. C. D.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of optical processor based beamforming for microwave array antennas is investigated. The primary focus is on systems utilizing the 20/30 GHz communications band and a transmit configuration exclusively to serve this band. A mathematical model is developed for computation of candidate design configurations. The model is capable of determination of the necessary design parameters required for spatial aspects of the microwave 'footprint' (beam) formation. Computed example beams transmitted from geosynchronous orbit are presented to demonstrate network capabilities. The effect of the processor on the output microwave signal to noise quality at the antenna interface is also considered.

  6. Ultrasonic Phased-Array Characterization for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, John J.; Tennis, Richard F.; Pickens, Keith S.

    1995-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) recently fabricated and delivered the 100-channel Ultrasonic Phased-Array Testbed System (UPATS) for NASA's Langley Research Center. NASA prepared the specifications and provided the funding to develop UPATS in order to provide a tool for the improvement of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and characterization of materials. UPATS incorporates state-of-the-art phased-array concepts such as beam steering, focusing, apodization, and phase-sensitive detection which make it possible to develop more sophisticated testing methodologies. It also can be used to investigate fundamental ultrasonic propagation and detection phenomena such as refraction, diffraction, scattering, and beam broadening.

  7. Optical phased array radiating optical vortex with manipulated topological charges.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoliang; Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Zhao, Bo; Cui, Jianhua; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-02-23

    Optical antennas are key elements in quantum optics emitting and sensing, and behave wide range applications in optical domain. However, integration of optical antenna radiating orbital angular momentum is still a challenge in nano-scale. We theoretically demonstrate a sub-wavelength phased optical antenna array, which manipulates the distribution of the orbital angular momentum in the near field. Orbital angular momentum with topological charge of 4 can be obtained by controlling the phase distribution of the fundamental mode orbital angular momentum in each antenna element. Our results indicate this phased array may be utilized in high integrated optical communication systems.

  8. A conformal SHF phased array for aircraft satellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, R.; Kudrna, K.

    1984-03-01

    A receive-only 7.5 GHz microstrip phased array has been developed by Ball Aerospace Systems Division (BASD). This 256 radiating element array provides a gain of 20 dBic over a conical scan region of 120 deg. Two arrays with one on either side of an aircraft would provide near hemispherical coverage. The array consists of four subarrays and can be expanded to achieve higher gain when required. The array is left-hand circularly polarized and has three-bit digital PIN diode phase shifters for steering the beam. A microprocessor-based beam steering controller is used for calculating the phase shifter settings for each beam position. Each subarray includes radiating elements, quadrature hybrids, phase shifters, corporate feed, R.F. chokes in microstrip medium and hybrid PIN diode drivers. The array is approximately 1.5 inches thick and is conformal to the aircraft skin. It is a bolt on assembly only requiring aircraft skin entries for the R.F. output and for control lines. Transmit capability can be provided by merely changing the artwork to go to 8.5 GHz.

  9. Phased Array Radiometer Calibration Using a Radiated Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutoch S.; Laymon, Charles A.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic beam steering capability of phased array antenna systems offer significant advantages when used in real aperture imaging radiometers. The sensitivity of such systems is limited by the ability to accurately calibrate variations in the antenna circuit characteristics. Passive antenna systems, which require mechanical rotation to scan the beam, have stable characteristics and the noise figure of the antenna can be characterized with knowledge of its physical temperature [1],[2]. Phased array antenna systems provide the ability to electronically steer the beam in any desired direction. Such antennas make use of active components (amplifiers, phase shifters) to provide electronic scanning capability while maintaining a low antenna noise figure. The gain fluctuations in the active components can be significant, resulting in substantial calibration difficulties [3]. In this paper, we introduce two novel calibration techniques that provide an end-to-end calibration of a real-aperture, phased array radiometer system. Empirical data will be shown to illustrate the performance of both methods.

  10. A design concept for an MMIC microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Smetana, J.; Acosta, R.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka band advanced satellite communication antenna systems. The proposed design concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required. The proposed design concept takes into consideration the RF characteristics and actual phyical dimensions of the MMIC devices. Also, solutions to spatial constraints and interconnections associated with currently available packaging designs are discussed. Finally, the design of the microstrip radiating elements and their radiation characteristics are examined.

  11. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  12. Optical RF distribution links for MMIC phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Raquet, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional methods to distribute RF signals to GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits Phased Array Antennas are inadequate for arrays having large numbers of elements. Optical RF distribution links have been proposed as a lightweight, mechanically flexible, and low volume solution. Three candidate techniques for providing optical RF distribution are discussed along with the electro-optic devices required to configure them. A discussion of the present status of applicable electro-optics devices is also included.

  13. Optoelectronic Infrastructure for Radio Frequency and Optical Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic integrated circuits offer radiation-hardened solutions for satellite systems in addition to improved size, weight, power, and bandwidth characteristics. ODIS, Inc., has developed optoelectronic integrated circuit technology for sensing and data transfer in phased arrays. The technology applies integrated components (lasers, amplifiers, modulators, detectors, and optical waveguide switches) to a radio frequency (RF) array with true time delay for beamsteering. Optical beamsteering is achieved by controlling the current in a two-dimensional (2D) array. In this project, ODIS integrated key components to produce common RF-optical aperture operation.

  14. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  15. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  16. Reconfigurable Infrared Phased-Array Semiconductor Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Jon

    The ability to engineer the scattering phase of metamaterial constituents offers tremendous potential for constructing new classes of beam steering, shaping, and focusing technologies. Current methods for engineering phase rely on static geometry-based effects. In this talk we describe methods to dynamically tune the scattering phase of infrared semiconductor nanoantennas. We fabricate spherical silicon and germanium nanoparticles via femtosecond laser ablation and demonstrate size-dependent multipolar resonances throughout the infrared frequency range. We experimentally demonstrate that the resonance frequencies shift with doping, according to simple Drude models of free-carrier refraction. Using a combination of theoretical and analytical calculations we show that dynamically tuning free-carrier concentration can enable reconfigurable optical antennas and metasurfaces. Such dynamic tuning will enable reconfigurable photonic devices based on optical antenna and metamaterial concepts.

  17. Full-matrix capture with a customizable phased array instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Gavin; Braconnier, Dominique; Gruber, Matt

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, a technique known as Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) has gained some headway in the NDE community for phased array applications. It's important to understand that FMC is the method that the instrumentation acquires the ultrasonic signals, but further post-processing is required in software to create a meaningful image for a particular application. Having a flexible software interface, small form factor, excellent signal-to-noise ratio per acquisition channel on a 64/64 or 128/128 phased array module with FMC capability proves beneficial in both industrial implementation and in further investigation of post-processing techniques. This paper will provide an example of imaging with a 5MHz linear phased array transducer with 128 elements using FMC and a popular post-processing algorithm known as Total-Focus Method (TFM).

  18. Phased arrays for satellites and the TDRSS antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbriale, W. A.

    The design and performance of satellite phased-array systems are examined by considering several specific antennas built for spacecraft use. Particular consideration is given to: (1) the JARED (Jammer Reduction Antenna System) antenna, and adaptive phased array which can be used to null jammer signals while providing coverage to specific user areas; (2) the algorithm used in the JARED antenna; and (3) a technique that can be used to detect and locate jammers. The antennas used by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) are then described. A significant aspect of the TDRSS is the multiple access antenna which is a 30-element phased array, providing a single steered beam on transmit and the ability to receive data from 20 simultaneous users. Also included on the TDRSS is a mesh deployable reflector and a C-band and K-band communications system.

  19. Research on calibration error of carrier phase against antenna arraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Hou, Xiaomin

    2016-11-01

    It is the technical difficulty of uplink antenna arraying that signals from various quarters can not be automatically aligned at the target in deep space. The size of the far-field power combining gain is directly determined by the accuracy of carrier phase calibration. It is necessary to analyze the entire arraying system in order to improve the accuracy of the phase calibration. This paper analyzes the factors affecting the calibration error of carrier phase of uplink antenna arraying system including the error of phase measurement and equipment, the error of the uplink channel phase shift, the position error of ground antenna, calibration receiver and target spacecraft, the error of the atmospheric turbulence disturbance. Discuss the spatial and temporal autocorrelation model of atmospheric disturbances. Each antenna of the uplink antenna arraying is no common reference signal for continuous calibration. So it must be a system of the periodic calibration. Calibration is refered to communication of one or more spacecrafts in a certain period. Because the deep space targets are not automatically aligned to multiplexing received signal. Therefore the aligned signal should be done in advance on the ground. Data is shown that the error can be controlled within the range of demand by the use of existing technology to meet the accuracy of carrier phase calibration. The total error can be controlled within a reasonable range.

  20. Adaptive array technique for differential-phase reflectometry in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Idei, H. Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Nagata, K.; Mishra, K.; Itado, T.; Akimoto, R.; Yamamoto, M. K.

    2014-11-15

    A Phased Array Antenna (PAA) was considered as launching and receiving antennae in reflectometry to attain good directivity in its applied microwave range. A well-focused beam was obtained in a launching antenna application, and differential-phase evolution was properly measured by using a metal reflector plate in the proof-of-principle experiment at low power test facilities. Differential-phase evolution was also evaluated by using the PAA in the Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak (QUEST). A beam-forming technique was applied in receiving phased-array antenna measurements. In the QUEST device that should be considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave effect was significantly observed with perturbed phase evolution. A new approach using derivative of measured field on propagating wavenumber was proposed to eliminate the standing wave effect.

  1. Optically controlled phased-array technology for space communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1988-01-01

    Using MMICs in phased-array applications above 20 GHz requires complex RF and control signal distribution systems. Conventional waveguide, coaxial cable, and microstrip methods are undesirable due to their high weight, high loss, limited mechanical flexibility and large volume. An attractive alternative to these transmission media, for RF and control signal distribution in MMIC phased-array antennas, is optical fiber. Presented are potential system architectures and their associated characteristics. The status of high frequency opto-electronic components needed to realize the potential system architectures is also discussed. It is concluded that an optical fiber network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but may require higher power.

  2. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil A.; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John F.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-01-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (∼5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. Proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum. PMID:26126879

  3. Phase-locked laser array through global antenna mutual coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Tsung -Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Here, phase locking of an array of lasers is a highly effective way in beam shaping, to increase the output power, and to reduce lasing threshold. In this work, we present a novel phase-locking mechanism based on "antenna mutual coupling" wherein laser elements interact through far-field radiations with definite phase relations. This allows long-range global coupling among array elements to achieve robust 2-dimensional phase-locked laser array. The new scheme is ideal for lasers with deep sub-wavelength confined cavity such as nanolasers, where the divergent beam pattern could be used to form strong coupling among elements in the array. We experimentally demonstrated such a scheme using sub-wavelength short-cavity surface-emitting lasers at terahertz frequency. More than 37 laser elements are phase-locked to each other, delivering up to 6.5 mW single-mode radiations at ~3 terahertz, with maximum 450-mW/A slope efficiency and near diffraction limit beam divergence.

  4. Phase-locked laser array through global antenna mutual coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Kao, Tsung -Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Here, phase locking of an array of lasers is a highly effective way in beam shaping, to increase the output power, and to reduce lasing threshold. In this work, we present a novel phase-locking mechanism based on "antenna mutual coupling" wherein laser elements interact through far-field radiations with definite phase relations. This allows long-range global coupling among array elements to achieve robust 2-dimensional phase-locked laser array. The new scheme is ideal for lasers with deep sub-wavelength confined cavity such as nanolasers, where the divergent beam pattern could be used to form strong coupling among elements in the array. We experimentallymore » demonstrated such a scheme using sub-wavelength short-cavity surface-emitting lasers at terahertz frequency. More than 37 laser elements are phase-locked to each other, delivering up to 6.5 mW single-mode radiations at ~3 terahertz, with maximum 450-mW/A slope efficiency and near diffraction limit beam divergence.« less

  5. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; ...

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization.more » As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.« less

  6. A novel serrated columnar phased array ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Cheng; Sun, Zhenguo; Cai, Dong; Song, Hongwei; Chen, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Traditionally, wedges are required to generate transverse waves in a solid specimen and mechanical rotation device is needed for interrogation of a specimen with a hollow bore, such as high speed railway locomotive axles, turbine rotors, etc. In order to eliminate the mechanical rotation process, a novel array pattern of phased array ultrasonic transducers named as serrated columnar phased array ultrasonic transducer (SCPAUT) is designed. The elementary transducers are planar rectangular, located on the outside surface of a cylinder. This layout is aimed to generate electrically rotating transverse waveforms so as to inspect the longitudinal cracks on the outside surface of a specimen which has a hollow bore at the center, such as the high speed railway locomotive axles. The general geometry of the SCPAUT and the inspection system are illustrated. A FEM model and mockup experiment has been carried out. The experiment results are in good agreement with the FEM simulation results.

  7. Removing Background Noise with Phased Array Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Stephens, David

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test conducted to determine how well microphone phased array processing software could pull an acoustic signal out of background noise. The array consisted of 24 microphones in an aerodynamic fairing designed to be mounted in-flow. The processing was conducted using Functional Beam forming software developed by Optinav combined with cross spectral matrix subtraction. The test was conducted in the free-jet of the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig at NASA GRC. The background noise was produced by the interaction of the free-jet flow with the solid surfaces in the flow. The acoustic signals were produced by acoustic drivers. The results show that the phased array processing was able to pull the acoustic signal out of the background noise provided the signal was no more than 20 dB below the background noise level measured using a conventional single microphone equipped with an aerodynamic forebody.

  8. Computation of the radiation characteristics of a generalized phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology, the phased array has become a key component in the design of advanced antenna systems. Array-fed antennas are used extensively in today's multiple beam satellite antennas. A computer program based on a very efficient numerical technique for calculating the radiated power (Romberg integration), directivity, and radiation pattern of a phased array is described. The formulation developed is very general, and takes into account arbitrary element polarization, E- and H-plane element pattern, element location, and complex element excitation. For comparison purposes sample cases have been presented. Excellent agreement has been obtained for all cases. Also included are a user guide and a copy of the computer program.

  9. Ku band phased array in a large angular sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubost, G.; Gueho, S.; Beguin, D.

    The feasibility of a microstrip, flat, phased, square array performing at high frequency and exhibiting proper technological behavior is demonstrated. A total of 64 three-bit digital PIN diode phase shifters are used to steer the beam. Sum and difference patterns can be formed for every deflected directivity. Data are presented on the efficiency evaluation for different deflection angles, the highest sidelobe levels, the maximum directivity, and the measured average efficiency.

  10. Infinite Phased Array of Microstrip Dipoles in Two Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Green’s function appropriate to the two-layer substrate- superstrate structure was used in the formulation of the method of moMents - (continued on back) 20...analysis is presented for an infinite phased array of microstrip dipoles embedded within a two layer substrate structure (sub- strate- superstrate ...characterization of input impedance as a function of phase scan angle. Results for several sub- strate- superstrate structures illustrate the utility of the single

  11. Coordinated Radar Resource Management for Networked Phased Array Radars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Research and Development Canada Ottawa, Canada K1A 0Z4 Email: Peter.Moo@drdc-rddc.gc.ca Abstract A phased array radar has the ability to rapidly and...search and Development Canada (DRDC) Ottawa to analyse the performance of radar resource management techniques for naval radars operating in a littoral

  12. Weak-signal Phase Calibration Strategies for Large DSN Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) is studying arrays of large numbers of small, mass-produced radio antennas as a cost-effective way to increase downlink sensitivity and data rates for future missions. An important issue for the operation of large arrays is the accuracy with which signals from hundreds of small antennas can be combined. This is particularly true at Ka band (32 GHz) where atmospheric phase variations can be large and rapidly changing. A number of algorithms exist to correct the phases of signals from individual antennas in the case where a spacecraft signal provides a useful signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on time scales shorter than the atmospheric coherence time. However, for very weak spacecraft signals it will be necessary to rely on background natural radio sources to maintain array phasing. Very weak signals could result from a spacecraft emergency or by design, such as direct-to-Earth data transmissions from distant planetary atmospheric or surface probes using only low gain antennas. This paper considers the parameter space where external real-time phase calibration will be necessary, and what this requires in terms of array configuration and signal processing. The inherent limitations of this technique are also discussed.

  13. Phased arrays. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-04-01

    The design, performance, radiation patterns, and applications of phased arrays are presented in these Federally-sponsored research reports. Applications include communications, radar, optical, spacecraft, and navigational aids. This updated bibliography contains 244 abstracts, 44 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  14. Electro-optical processing of phased-array antenna data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Casasayas, F.

    1975-01-01

    An on-line two-dimensional optical processor has been used to process simulated linear and planar phased-array radar data off-line but at real-time data rates. The input transducer is an electron-beam-addressed KD2PO4 light valve.

  15. NASA Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA): An application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Lee, S. W.; Gee, W.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed orbital geometry for the adaptive multibeam phased array (AMPA) communication system is reviewed and some of the system's capabilities and preliminary specifications are highlighted. Typical AMPA user link models and calculations are presented, the principal AMPA features are described, and the implementation of the system is demonstrated. System tradeoffs and requirements are discussed. Recommendations are included.

  16. Looking Below the Surface with Ultrasonic Phased Array

    SciTech Connect

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2010-10-01

    This article is a brief tutorial on the benefits of volumetric ultrasonic phased array line scanning. The article describes the need, the approach, and the methods/practices used to analyze the data for flaw detection and characterization in the nuclear power plant component arena.

  17. MMIC devices for active phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    The study of printed circuit discontinuities is necessary in order to design, for example, transitions between rectangular waveguides and printed circuits. New developments with respect to the analytical approaches to this problem are discussed. A summary of the progress in the experimental approach is presented. The accurate solution for the modes in various millimeter-wave waveguides is essential in the analysis of many integrated circuit components, such as filters and impedance transformers. Problems associated with the numerical computation of these modes in two frequently used waveguide forms, namely, the finline and microstrip, are presented. The spectral domain method of formulation, with a moment method solution, is considered. This approach can be readily extended to analyze an arbitrary configuration of dielectric and metallized regions in a shielded enclosure. Galerkin's method is used, where the testing and basic functions are the same. It is shown that the mode functions, or eigenfunctions, are more sensitive to errors than the phase constants, or eigenvalues. The approximate mode functions do not satisfy the orthogonality relationship well, resulting in difficulties when these modal solutions are used to form an approximate Green's function or are used in a mode matching analysis.

  18. Adaptive phase calibration of a microphone array for acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Teal, Paul D; Poletti, Mark A

    2010-04-01

    Previous work has indicated that a limitation on the performance of a circular microphone array for holographic sound field recording at low frequencies is phase mismatch between the microphones in the array. At low frequencies these variations become more significant than at mid-range and high frequencies because the high order phase mode responses at low frequencies are lower in amplitude. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a "self-calibration" method. The basis of the calibration is to estimate the location of one or more wide-band sources using mid-range frequencies and to use this source location information to perform correction to the array at low frequencies. In its simplest form the calibration must be performed in an anechoic environment, since multipath effects at widely differing frequencies are uncorrelated. The approach is first demonstrated in such an environment using recordings from an array of high quality microphones. The technique is then extended to an adaptive calibration that can be used in an environment that is somewhat reverberant. The validity of the adaptive approach is demonstrated using recordings from an array of inexpensive microphones.

  19. High-power phase-locked arrays of antiguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, D.

    1991-12-01

    Phase-locked arrays of antiguides are a unique class of (monolithic) coherent diode lasers in that they provide both strong overall interelement coupling as well as strong optical-mode confinement. The leaky-wave characteristics of antiguides allow for a resonant condition; that is, when the interelement regions are odd integer numbers of the leaky-wave (lateral) half wavelength all elements equally couple to each other creating so called parallel coupling. By contrast, for the vast majority of coherent arrays published to date interelement coupling is of the nearest-neighbor type, so called series coupling, which gives weak coherence and poor intermodal discrimination. Parallel-coupled arrays of antiguides are called resonant-optical-waveguide (ROW) arrays. ROW devices posses such desirable properties as: full coherence, uniform intensity profile, and large intermodal discrimination. Thus, high coherent powers can be achieved without active phase control. The theory of operation for ROW arrays will be outlined. Experimental results include diffraction-limited-operation from both 20- and 40-element devices to high drive levels (10×threshold) and powers (0.5-1.5 W). CW diffraction-limited operation has been achieved to 0.5 W, while in pulsed operation up to 2 W is obtained in a nearly diffraction-limited beam. Devices can be driven to 5 W with beamwidths 3×diffraction limit.

  20. A 220 GHz reflection-type phased array concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Wikner, David A.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this project is to enable light-weight, durable, and portable systems capable of performing standoff detection of person-borne improvised explosive devices (PB-IEDs) through the development of millimeter-wave reflection-type phased arrays. Electronic beam steering eliminates the need for complex mechanical scanners that are commonly implemented with millimeter-wave imaging systems and would reduce overall system size and weight. We present a concept study of a 220 GHz reflection-type phased array for the purpose of performing beam scanning of a confocal reflector system. Requirements for effective imaging of the desired target region are established, including spatial resolution, total scan angle, and number of image pixels achievable. We examine the effects of array architecture on beam characteristics as it is scanned off broadside, including Gaussicity and encircled energy. Benchmark requirements are determined and compared with the capabilities of several potential phase shifter technologies, including MEMS-based variable capacitor phase shifters, switches, and varactor diode-based phase shifters.

  1. Binary-Phase Fourier Gratings for Nonuniform Array Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Crow, Robert W.; Ashley, Paul R.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a design method for a binary-phase Fourier grating that generates an array of spots with nonuniform, user-defined intensities symmetric about the zeroth order. Like the Dammann fanout grating approach, the binary-phase Fourier grating uses only two phase levels in its grating surface profile to generate the final spot array. Unlike the Dammann fanout grating approach, this method allows for the generation of nonuniform, user-defined intensities within the final fanout pattern. Restrictions governing the specification and realization of the array's individual spot intensities are discussed. Design methods used to realize the grating employ both simulated annealing and nonlinear optimization approaches to locate optimal solutions to the grating design problem. The end-use application driving this development operates in the near- to mid-infrared spectrum - allowing for higher resolution in grating specification and fabrication with respect to wavelength than may be available in visible spectrum applications. Fabrication of a grating generating a user-defined nine spot pattern is accomplished in GaAs for the near-infrared. Characterization of the grating is provided through the measurement of individual spot intensities, array uniformity, and overall efficiency. Final measurements are compared to calculated values with a discussion of the results.

  2. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection of Seeded Titanium Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, J. H.; Gray, T. A.; Khandelwal, P.; Dunhill, T.

    2004-02-01

    As part of efforts by Rolls-Royce to evaluate the use of ultrasonic phased arrays for inspection of titanium billets, a series of ultrasonic phased array inspections were performed at the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE). The inspections were performed using a sectorial-annular array designed especially for titanium billets by R/D Tech and supplied to Rolls-Royce. The billet test piece is seeded with thirteen yttria disks, each located at successive depths below the outer diameter surface to just past the billet centerline. The phased array inspections employed both fixed-focus and dynamic-depth-focus (DDF) focal laws in conjunction with several depth gating schemes. Aperture and focal parameters were changed as a function of depth when using fixed-focus focal laws. Results include characterization of transducer performance and delay-time correction of imperfections, signal-to-noise measurements for the yttria disks in the billet test piece, and effects of probe misalignment on flaw sensitivity.

  3. Airborne ultrasonic phased arrays using ferroelectrets: a new fabrication approach.

    PubMed

    Ealo, Joao L; Camacho, Jorge J; Fritsch, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    In this work, a novel procedure that considerably simplifies the fabrication process of ferroelectret-based multielement array transducers is proposed and evaluated. Also, the potential of ferroelectrets being used as active material for air-coupled ultrasonic transducer design is demonstrated. The new construction method of multi-element transducers introduces 2 distinctive improvements. First, active ferroelectret material is not discretized into elements, and second, the need of structuring upper and/or lower electrodes in advance of the permanent polarization of the film is removed. The aperture discretization and the mechanical connection are achieved in one step using a through-thickness conductive tape. To validate the procedure, 2 linear array prototypes of 32 elements, with a pitch of 3.43 mm and a wide usable frequency range from 30 to 300 kHz, were built and evaluated using a commercial phased-array system. A low crosstalk among elements, below -30 dB, was measured by interferometry. Likewise, a homogeneous response of the array elements, with a maximum deviation of +/-1.8 dB, was obtained. Acoustic beam steering measurements were accomplished at different deflection angles using a calibrated microphone. The ultrasonic beam parameters, namely, lateral resolution, side lobe level, grating lobes, and focus depth, were congruent with theory. Acoustic images of a single reflector were obtained using one of the array elements as the receiver. Resulting images are also in accordance with numerical simulation, demonstrating the feasibility of using these arrays in pulse-echo mode. The proposed procedure simplifies the manufacturing of multidimensional arrays with arbitrary shape elements and not uniformly distributed. Furthermore, this concept can be extended to nonflat arrays as long as the transducer substrate conforms to a developable surface.

  4. Scan blindness in infinite phased arrays of printed dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozar, D. M.; Schaubert, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive study of infinite phased arrays of printed dipole antennas is presented, with emphasis on the scan blindness phenomenon. A rigorous and efficient moment method procedure is used to calculate the array impedance versus scan angle. Data are presented for the input reflection coefficient for various element spacings and substrate parameters. A simple theory, based on coupling from Floquet modes to surface wave modes on the substrate, is shown to predict the occurrence of scan blindness. Measurements from a waveguide simulator of a blindness condition confirm the theory.

  5. SAR processing with stepped chirps and phased array antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Wideband radar signals are problematic for phased array antennas. Wideband radar signals can be generated from series or groups of narrow-band signals centered at different frequencies. An equivalent wideband LFM chirp can be assembled from lesser-bandwidth chirp segments in the data processing. The chirp segments can be transmitted as separate narrow-band pulses, each with their own steering phase operation. This overcomes the problematic dilemma of steering wideband chirps with phase shifters alone, that is, without true time-delay elements.

  6. Phased Arrays of Ground and Airborne Mobile Terminals for Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1996-01-01

    Phased array antenna is beginning to play an important in the arena of mobile/satellite communications. Two examples of mobile terminal phased arrays will be shown. Their technical background, challenges, and cost drivers will be discussed. A possible solution to combat some of the deficiencies of the conventional phased array by exploiting the phased reflectarray technology will be briefly presented.

  7. High-intensity focused ultrasound with large scale spherical phased array for the ablation of deep tumors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiang; Bai, Jing-feng; Shen, Guo-feng; Chen, Ya-zhu

    2009-09-01

    Under some circumstances surgical resection is feasible in a low percentage for the treatment of deep tumors. Nevertheless, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is beginning to offer a potential noninvasive alternative to conventional therapies for the treatment of deep tumors. In our previous study, a large scale spherical HIFU-phased array was developed to ablate deep tumors. In the current study, taking into account the required focal depth and maximum acoustic power output, 90 identical circular PZT-8 elements (diameter =1.4 cm and frequency=1 MHz) were mounted on a spherical shell with a radius of curvature of 18 cm and a diameter of 21 cm. With the developed array, computer simulations and ex vivo experiments were carried out. The simulation results theoretically demonstrate the ability of the array to focus and steer in the specified volume (a 2 cmx2 cmx3 cm volume) at the focal depth of 15 to 18 cm. Ex vivo experiment results also verify the capability of the developed array to ablate deep target tissue by either moving single focal point or generating multiple foci simultaneously.

  8. Collective Quantum Phase-Slip Dynamics in Superconducting Nanowire Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skacel, Sebastian T.; Voss, Jan N.; Bier, Tobias; Radke, Lucas; Weides, Martin; Rotzinger, Hannes; Mooij, Hans E.; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting nanowire arrays exhibit quantum phase-slip (QPS) phenomenon if the superconductor has a very high normal-state sheet resistance. We experimentally study QPS effects in arrays of nanowires embedded in a resonant circuit at GHz frequencies. We probe this circuit at ultra-low microwave power, applied flux and mK temperatures. The nanowires are fabricated utilizing aluminium grown in a precisely-controlled oxygen atmosphere. In this way, we aim to control the QPS rate for a given wire width. The wires are defined with conventional electron beam lithography down to a width of 20 nm. We will present the fabrication of the nanowire arrays and first microwave measurements at mK temperatures. Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany.

  9. Subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Akihiro; Sugawara, Azusa; Ohara, Yoshikazu; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-07-01

    To accurately measure closed crack length, we proposed an imaging method using a subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic waves (SAW SPACE) with water immersion. We applied SAW SPACE to the hole specimen in a fundamental array (FA) image. The hole was imaged with high resolution. Subsequently, SAW SPACE was applied to fatigue crack and stress corrosion crack (SCC) specimens. A fatigue crack was imaged in FA and subharmonic array (SA) images, and the length of this particular fatigue crack measured in the images was almost the same as that measured by optical observation. The SCC was imaged and its length was accurately measured in the SA image, whereas it was underestimated in the FA image and by optical observation. Thus, we demonstrated that SAW SPACE with water immersion is useful for the accurate measurement of closed crack length and for imaging the distribution of open and closed parts of cracks with high resolution.

  10. Photorefractive phased array antenna beam-forming processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarto, Anthony W.; Wagner, Kelvin H.; Weverka, Robert T.; Blair, Steven M.; Weaver, Samuel P.

    1996-11-01

    A high bandwidth, large degree-of-freedom photorefractive phased-array antenna beam-forming processor which uses 3D dynamic volume holograms in photorefractive crystals to time integrate the adaptive weights to perform beam steering and jammer-cancellation signal-processing tasks is described. The processor calculates the angle-of-arrival of a desired signal of interest and steers the antenna pattern in the direction of this desired signal by forming a dynamic holographic grating proportional to the correlation between the incoming signal of interest from the antenna array and the temporal waveform of the desired signal. Experimental results of main-beam formation and measured array-functions are presented in holographic index grating and the resulting processor output.

  11. Optically addressed ultra-wideband phased antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jian

    Demands for high data rate and multifunctional apertures from both civilian and military users have motivated development of ultra-wideband (UWB) electrically steered phased arrays. Meanwhile, the need for large contiguous frequency is pushing operation of radio systems into the millimeter-wave (mm-wave) range. Therefore, modern radio systems require UWB performance from VHF to mm-wave. However, traditional electronic systems suffer many challenges that make achieving these requirements difficult. Several examples includes: voltage controlled oscillators (VCO) cannot provide a tunable range of several octaves, distribution of wideband local oscillator signals undergo high loss and dispersion through RF transmission lines, and antennas have very limited bandwidth or bulky sizes. Recently, RF photonics technology has drawn considerable attention because of its advantages over traditional systems, with the capability of offering extreme power efficiency, information capacity, frequency agility, and spatial beam diversity. A hybrid RF photonic communication system utilizing optical links and an RF transducer at the antenna potentially provides ultra-wideband data transmission, i.e., over 100 GHz. A successful implementation of such an optically addressed phased array requires addressing several key challenges. Photonic generation of an RF source with over a seven-octave bandwidth has been demonstrated in the last few years. However, one challenge which still remains is how to convey phased optical signals to downconversion modules and antennas. Therefore, a feed network with phase sweeping capability and low excessive phase noise needs to be developed. Another key challenge is to develop an ultra-wideband array antenna. Modern frontends require antennas to be compact, planar, and low-profile in addition to possessing broad bandwidth, conforming to stringent space, weight, cost, and power constraints. To address these issues, I will study broadband and miniaturization

  12. Quantum phases in circuit QED with a superconducting qubit array

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Yu, Lixian; Liang, J. -Q; Chen, Gang; Jia, Suotang; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Circuit QED on a chip has become a powerful platform for simulating complex many-body physics. In this report, we realize a Dicke-Ising model with an antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor spin-spin interaction in circuit QED with a superconducting qubit array. We show that this system exhibits a competition between the collective spin-photon interaction and the antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor spin-spin interaction, and then predict four quantum phases, including: a paramagnetic normal phase, an antiferromagnetic normal phase, a paramagnetic superradiant phase, and an antiferromagnetic superradiant phase. The antiferromagnetic normal phase and the antiferromagnetic superradiant phase are new phases in many-body quantum optics. In the antiferromagnetic superradiant phase, both the antiferromagnetic and superradiant orders can coexist, and thus the system possesses symmetry. Moreover, we find an unconventional photon signature in this phase. In future experiments, these predicted quantum phases could be distinguished by detecting both the mean-photon number and the magnetization. PMID:24522250

  13. Quantum phases in circuit QED with a superconducting qubit array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Yu, Lixian; Liang, J-Q; Chen, Gang; Jia, Suotang; Nori, Franco

    2014-02-13

    Circuit QED on a chip has become a powerful platform for simulating complex many-body physics. In this report, we realize a Dicke-Ising model with an antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor spin-spin interaction in circuit QED with a superconducting qubit array. We show that this system exhibits a competition between the collective spin-photon interaction and the antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor spin-spin interaction, and then predict four quantum phases, including: a paramagnetic normal phase, an antiferromagnetic normal phase, a paramagnetic superradiant phase, and an antiferromagnetic superradiant phase. The antiferromagnetic normal phase and the antiferromagnetic superradiant phase are new phases in many-body quantum optics. In the antiferromagnetic superradiant phase, both the antiferromagnetic and superradiant orders can coexist, and thus the system possesses Z(z)₂ ⊗ Z₂ symmetry. Moreover, we find an unconventional photon signature in this phase. In future experiments, these predicted quantum phases could be distinguished by detecting both the mean-photon number and the magnetization.

  14. Variable phase sine wave generator for active phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, W. M.

    1992-09-01

    A waveform generator is provided for generating a high frequency waveform. A pulse generator provides a pulse train at a low frequency. A pulse converter converts the pulse train into an alternatingly positive and negative groups of pulses. A bandpass filter passes the alternatingly positive and negative groups of pulses in a frequency band centered at the high frequency to output the generated waveform at the high frequency. When the groups of pulses are a pair of pulses, a sine wave is output from the bandpass filter. A pulse delay circuit can be used to variably delay the pulse train and thereby cause a phase change in the generated waveform.

  15. The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Billy C.

    2008-03-01

    Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.

  16. AlGaAs phased array laser for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    Phased locked arrays of multiple AlGaAs diode laser emitters were investigated both in edge emitting and surface emitting configurations. CSP edge emitter structures, coupled by either evanescent waves or Y-guides, could not achieve the required powers (greater than or similar to 500 mW) while maintaining a diffraction limited, single lobed output beam. Indeed, although the diffraction limit was achieved in this type of device, it was at low powers and in the double lobed radiation pattern characteristic of out-of-phase coupling. Grating surface emitting (GSE) arrays were, therefore, investigated with more promising results. The incorporation of second order gratings in distribute Bragg reflector (DBR) structures allows surface emission, and can be configured to allow injection locking and lateral coupling to populate 2-D arrays that should be able to reach power levels commensurate with the needs of high performance, free space optical communications levels. Also, a new amplitude modulation scheme was developed for GSE array operation.

  17. Wake Vortex Detection: Phased Microphone vs. Linear Infrasonic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Sullivan, Nicholas T.; Knight, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Sensor technologies can make a significant impact on the detection of aircraft-generated vortices in an air space of interest, typically in the approach or departure corridor. Current state-of-the art sensor technologies do not provide three-dimensional measurements needed for an operational system or even for wake vortex modeling to advance the understanding of vortex behavior. Most wake vortex sensor systems used today have been developed only for research applications and lack the reliability needed for continuous operation. The main challenges for the development of an operational sensor system are reliability, all-weather operation, and spatial coverage. Such a sensor has been sought for a period of last forty years. Acoustic sensors were first proposed and tested by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) early in 1970s for tracking wake vortices but these acoustic sensors suffered from high levels of ambient noise. Over a period of the last fifteen years, there has been renewed interest in studying noise generated by aircraft wake vortices, both numerically and experimentally. The German Aerospace Center (DLR) was the first to propose the application of a phased microphone array for the investigation of the noise sources of wake vortices. The concept was first demonstrated at Berlins Airport Schoenefeld in 2000. A second test was conducted in Tarbes, France, in 2002, where phased microphone arrays were applied to study the wake vortex noise of an Airbus 340. Similarly, microphone phased arrays and other opto-acoustic microphones were evaluated in a field test at the Denver International Airport in 2003. For the Tarbes and Denver tests, the wake trajectories of phased microphone arrays and lidar were compared as these were installed side by side. Due to a built-in pressure equalization vent these microphones were not suitable for capturing acoustic noise below 20 Hz. Our group at NASA Langley Research Center developed and installed an

  18. Robotic inspection of fiber reinforced composites using phased array UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Jeffrey T.; De Odorico, Walter

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound is the current NDE method of choice to inspect large fiber reinforced airframe structures. Over the last 15 years Cartesian based scanning machines using conventional ultrasound techniques have been employed by all airframe OEMs and their top tier suppliers to perform these inspections. Technical advances in both computing power and commercially available, multi-axis robots now facilitate a new generation of scanning machines. These machines use multiple end effector tools taking full advantage of phased array ultrasound technologies yielding substantial improvements in inspection quality and productivity. This paper outlines the general architecture for these new robotic scanning systems as well as details the variety of ultrasonic techniques available for use with them including advances such as wide area phased array scanning and sound field adaptation for non-flat, non-parallel surfaces.

  19. Energy efficient two-phase cooling for concentrated photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeser, Alexander Douglas

    Concentrated sunlight focused on the aperture of a photovoltaic solar cell, coupled with high efficiency, triple junction cells can produce much greater power densities than traditional 1 sun photovoltaic cells. However, the large concentration ratios will lead to very high cell temperatures if not efficiently cooled by a thermal management system. Two phase, flow boiling is an attractive cooling option for such CPV arrays. In this work, two phase flow boiling in mini/microchannels and micro pin fin arrays will be explored as a possible CPV cooling technique. The most energy efficient microchannel design is chosen based on a least-material, least-energy analysis. Heat transfer and pressure drop obtained in micro pin fins will be compared to data in the recent literature and new correlations for heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop will be presented. The work concludes with an energy efficiency comparison of micro pin fins with geometrically similar microchannel geometry.

  20. Ultrasonic Phased Array Simulations of Welded Components at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate inspections of welded components have become of increasing importance as NASA develops new hardware such as Ares rocket segments for future exploration missions. Simulation and modeling will play an increasing role in the future for nondestructive evaluation in order to better understand the physics of the inspection process, to prove or disprove the feasibility for an inspection method or inspection scenario, for inspection optimization, for better understanding of experimental results, and for assessment of probability of detection. This study presents simulation and experimental results for an ultrasonic phased array inspection of a critical welded structure important for NASA future exploration vehicles. Keywords: nondestructive evaluation, computational simulation, ultrasonics, weld, modeling, phased array

  1. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Phased Array Demonstrated With ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) arrays developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rome Laboratory were demonstrated in aeronautical terminals and in mobile or fixed Earth terminals linked with NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Four K/Ka-band experimental arrays were demonstrated between May 1994 and May 1995. Each array had GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The 30-GHz transmit array used in uplinks to ACTS was developed by Lewis and Texas Instruments. The three 20-GHz receive arrays used in downlinks from ACTS were developed in cooperation with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force integrated-circuit, active-phased-array development contracts with the Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin Corporation. Four demonstrations, each related to an application of high interest to both commercial and Department of Defense organizations, were conducted. The location, type of link, and the data rate achieved for each of the applications is shown. In one demonstration-- an aeronautical terminal experiment called AERO-X--a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the Lewis Learjet and ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice links (and in one case, interactive video links as well) between ACTS and an Army high-mobility, multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV, or "humvee"). In the fourth demonstration, the array was on a fixed mount and was electronically steered toward ACTS. Lewis served as project manager for all demonstrations and as overall system integrator. Lewis engineers developed the array system including a controller for open-loop tracking of ACTS during flight and HMMWV motion, as well as a laptop data display and recording system used in all demonstrations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory supported the AERO-X program, providing elements of the ACTS Mobile Terminal. The successful

  2. Estimating Transmitted-Signal Phase Variations for Uplink Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paal, Leslie; Mukai, Ryan; Vilntrotter, Victor; Cornish, Timothy; Lee, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    A method of estimating phase drifts of microwave signals distributed to, and transmitted by, antennas in an array involves the use of the signals themselves as phase references. The method was conceived as part of the solution of the problem of maintaining precise phase calibration required for proper operation of an array of Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas on Earth used for communicating with distant spacecraft at frequencies between 7 and 8 GHz. The method could also be applied to purely terrestrial phased-array radar and other radio antenna array systems. In the DSN application, the electrical lengths (effective signal-propagation path lengths) of the various branches of the system for distributing the transmitted signals to the antennas are not precisely known, and they vary with time. The variations are attributable mostly to thermal expansion and contraction of fiber-optic and electrical signal cables and to a variety of causes associated with aging of signal-handling components. The variations are large enough to introduce large phase drifts at the signal frequency. It is necessary to measure and correct for these phase drifts in order to maintain phase calibration of the antennas. A prior method of measuring phase drifts involves the use of reference-frequency signals separate from the transmitted signals. A major impediment to accurate measurement of phase drifts over time by the prior method is the fact that although DSN reference-frequency sources separate from the transmitting signal sources are stable and accurate enough for most DSN purposes, they are not stable enough for use in maintaining phase calibrations, as required, to within a few degrees over times as long as days or possibly even weeks. By eliminating reliance on the reference-frequency subsystem, the present method overcomes this impediment. In a DSN array to which the present method applies (see figure), the microwave signals to be transmitted are generated by exciters in a signal

  3. Range sidelobe suppression in wideband phased array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Melvin L., Jr.; Moss, Karen M.

    The authors delineate some considerations in achieving RSL (range sidelobe) suppression in wideband phased arrays. Attention is given to wideband radar characteristics suppression of spurious signals, and sources of wideband RSLs. It is suggested that the parallelism associated with the transmitter and antenna paths should mitigate associated uncorrelated time-varying error modulation. The exciter can be a major RSL contributor unless spurious signal suppression with the SSBM (single sideband modulator) is emphasized in design and calibration procedures.

  4. Adaptive multibeam phased array design for a Spacelab experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noji, T. T.; Fass, S.; Fuoco, A. M.; Wang, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    The parametric tradeoff analyses and design for an Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA) for a Spacelab experiment are described. This AMPA Experiment System was designed with particular emphasis to maximize channel capacity and minimize implementation and cost impacts for future austere maritime and aeronautical users, operating with a low gain hemispherical coverage antenna element, low effective radiated power, and low antenna gain-to-system noise temperature ratio.

  5. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  6. Simulation and data reconstruction for NDT phased array techniques.

    PubMed

    Chatillon, S; de Roumilly, L; Porre, J; Poidevin, C; Calmon, P

    2006-12-22

    Phased array techniques are now widely employed for industrial NDT applications in various contexts. Indeed, phased array present a great adaptability to the inspection configuration and the application of suitable delay laws allows to optimize the detection and characterization performances by taking into account the component geometry, the material characteristics, and the aim of the inspection. In addition, the amount of potential information issued from the inspection is in general greatly enhanced. It is the case when the employed method involve sequences of shots (sectorial scanning, multiple depth focusing etc) or when signals received on the different channels are stored. At last, application of electronic commutation make possible higher acquisition rates. Accompanying these advantages, it is clear that an optimal use of such techniques require the application of simulation-based algorithms at the different stages of the inspection process: When designing the probe by optimizing number and characteristics of element; When conceiving the inspection method by selecting suitable sequences of shots, computing optimized delay laws and evaluating the performances of the control in terms of zone coverage or flaw detection capabilities; When analysing the results by applying simulation-helped visualization and data reconstruction algorithms. For many years the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) has been being greatly involved in the development of such phased arrays simulation-based tools. In this paper, we will present recent advances of this activity and show different examples of application carried out on complex situations.

  7. PATL: A RFID Tag Localization based on Phased Array Antenna.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lanxin; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Huang, Zhangqin

    2017-03-15

    In RFID systems, how to detect the position precisely is an important and challenging research topic. In this paper, we propose a range-free 2D tag localization method based on phased array antenna, called PATL. This method takes advantage of the adjustable radiation angle of the phased array antenna to scan the surveillance region in turns. By using the statistics of the tags' number in different antenna beam directions, a weighting algorithm is used to calculate the position of the tag. This method can be applied to real-time location of multiple targets without usage of any reference tags or additional readers. Additionally, we present an optimized weighting method based on RSSI to increase the locating accuracy. We use a Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) UHF RFID reader which is integrated with a phased array antenna to evaluate our method. The experiment results from an indoor office environment demonstrate the average distance error of PATL is about 21 cm and the optimized approach achieves an accuracy of 13 cm. This novel 2D localization scheme is a simple, yet promising, solution that is especially applicable to the smart shelf visualized management in storage or retail area.

  8. Phased-Array Satcom Antennas Developed for Aeronautical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Communications (AC) for Aeronautics research at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates both aeronautics and space communications technologies to achieve the national objective of upgrading the present National Airspace System infrastructure by responding to the agency's aviation capacity and safety goals. One concept for future air traffic management, free flight, presents a significantly increased demand for communications systems capacity and performance in comparison to current air traffic management practices. Current aeronautical communications systems are incapable of supporting the anticipated demands, and the new digital data communications links that are being developed, or are in the early stages of implementation, are not primarily designed to carry the data-intensive free flight air traffic management (ATM) communications loads. Emerging satellite communications technologies are the best potential long-term solution to provide the capacity and performance necessary to enable a mature free flight concept to be deployed. NASA AC/ATM funded the development of a Boeing-designed Ku-band transmit phased-array antenna, a combined in-house and contract effort. Glenn designed and integrated an Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Communications terminal based on the transmit phased-array antenna and a companion receive phased-array antenna previously developed by Boeing.

  9. PATL: A RFID Tag Localization based on Phased Array Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lanxin; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Huang, Zhangqin

    2017-01-01

    In RFID systems, how to detect the position precisely is an important and challenging research topic. In this paper, we propose a range-free 2D tag localization method based on phased array antenna, called PATL. This method takes advantage of the adjustable radiation angle of the phased array antenna to scan the surveillance region in turns. By using the statistics of the tags’ number in different antenna beam directions, a weighting algorithm is used to calculate the position of the tag. This method can be applied to real-time location of multiple targets without usage of any reference tags or additional readers. Additionally, we present an optimized weighting method based on RSSI to increase the locating accuracy. We use a Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) UHF RFID reader which is integrated with a phased array antenna to evaluate our method. The experiment results from an indoor office environment demonstrate the average distance error of PATL is about 21 cm and the optimized approach achieves an accuracy of 13 cm. This novel 2D localization scheme is a simple, yet promising, solution that is especially applicable to the smart shelf visualized management in storage or retail area. PMID:28295014

  10. Control of complex components with Smart Flexible Phased Arrays.

    PubMed

    Casula, O; Poidevin, C; Cattiaux, G; Dumas, Ph

    2006-12-22

    The inspection is mainly performed in contact with ultrasonic wedge transducers; However, the shape cannot fit the changing geometries of components (butt weld, nozzle, elbow). The variable thickness of the coupling layer, between the wedge and the local surface, leads to beam distortions and losses of sensitivity. Previous studies have shown that these two phenomena contribute to reduce the inspection performances leading to shadow area, split beam.... Flexible phased arrays have been developed to fit the complex profile and improve such controls. The radiating surface is composed with independent piezoelectric elements mechanically assembled and a profilometer, embedded in the transducer, measures the local distortion. The computed shape is used by an algorithm to compute in real-time the adapted delay laws compensating the distortions of 2D or 3D profiles. Those delay laws are transferred to the real-time UT acquisition system, which applies them to the piezoelectric elements. This self-adaptive process preserves, during the scanning, the features of the focused beam (orientation and focal depth) in the specimen. To validate the concept of the Smart Flexible Phased Array Transducer, prototypes have been integrated to detect flaws machined in mock-ups with realistic irregular 2D and 3D shapes. Inspections have been carried out on samples showing the enhancement performances of the "Smart Flexible Phased Array" and validating the mechanical and acoustical behaviors of these probes.

  11. Interplay between vortex matter phases and arrays of pinning centers in low temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicent, Jose L.; Del Valle, Javier; Gomez, Alicia; Rodriguez, Manuel; Granados, Daniel; Galvez, Fernando; Gonzalez, Elvira M.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied vortex matter phases in Nb films grown on Si substrates with arrays of Cu nanodots. The symmetry of the pinning arrays rules the presence of vortex matter phases. Four-fold symmetry arrays enhance the vortex glass transition temperature, at matching fields, in comparison with plain Nb films. This is a similar effect that obtained using arrays of magnetic pinning centers (Villegas et al. PRB72, 174512). Breaking the symmetry of the pinning array, such that the array mimic a smectic crystal, leads to a new phase, in a very narrow temperature window between the liquid and glassy phases, which can be identified with a vortex smectic phase. Remarkably, the smectic vortex phase is enhanced increasing the array symmetry. Increasing the number of vortices vanishes this smectic phase. (H,T) phase diagrams will be presented for different types of arrays. We thank Spanish MINECO and CM.

  12. Photonic implementation of phased array antennas (rf scanning)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichter, James E.

    1999-07-01

    Phase Array Antennas provided angular scanning (beam steering) from fixed antenna structures. Photonics can accomplish the beam steering with improvements in size and weight along with the remoting benefits utilizing fiber optics. Photonic advantages include True Time Delay beam steering eliminating the beam squint imposed by phase shifted signals produced in an electronic implementation. Another benefit of beam steering is the ability to position nulls in the spacial pattern to reduce the interference signals. Hybrid circuits utilizing both photonic and electronic components take advantages of the best aspects of each technology. Various types of photonic implementations are included.

  13. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study. Volume 1: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.; Gerson, H. I.; Srinivas, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The status of the technologies for phased-array-fed dual reflector systems is reviewed. The different aspects of these technologies, including optical performances, phased array systems, problems encountered in phased array design, beamforming networks, MMIC design and its incorporation into waveguide systems, reflector antenna structures, and reflector deployment mechanisms are addressed.

  14. Ultrasonic Phased Arrays for the Inspection of Thick-Section Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    phased - array ultrasonics in NDE , with specific reference to the inspection of thick- section welds. The...likely that ultrasonic phased arrays will eventually replace conventional ultrasonic methods in many non-destructive evaluation ( NDE ) applications...embraced by the NDE community. The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the advantages and limitations of phased - array ultrasonics

  15. Inspecting Composite Ceramic Armor Using Advanced Signal Processing Together with Phased Array Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-08

    processing techniques have been developed to help improve phased array ultrasonic inspection and analysis of multi-layered ceramic armor panels. The...INSPECTING COMPOSITE CERAMIC ARMOR USING ADVANCED SIGNAL PROCESSING TOGETHER WITH PHASED ARRAY ULTRASOUND J. S. Steckenrider Illinois College...immersion phased array ultrasound system. Some of these specimens had intentional design defects inserted interior to the specimens. Because of the very

  16. Phased-array vector velocity estimation using transverse oscillations.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Michael J; Marcher, Jonne; Jensen, Jorgen A

    2012-12-01

    A method for estimating the 2-D vector velocity of blood using a phased-array transducer is presented. The approach is based on the transverse oscillation (TO) method. The purposes of this work are to expand the TO method to a phased-array geometry and to broaden the potential clinical applicability of the method. A phased-array transducer has a smaller footprint and a larger field of view than a linear array, and is therefore more suited for, e.g., cardiac imaging. The method relies on suitable TO fields, and a beamforming strategy employing diverging TO beams is proposed. The implementation of the TO method using a phased-array transducer for vector velocity estimation is evaluated through simulation and flow-rig measurements are acquired using an experimental scanner. The vast number of calculations needed to perform flow simulations makes the optimization of the TO fields a cumbersome process. Therefore, three performance metrics are proposed. They are calculated based on the complex TO spectrum of the combined TO fields. It is hypothesized that the performance metrics are related to the performance of the velocity estimates. The simulations show that the squared correlation values range from 0.79 to 0.92, indicating a correlation between the performance metrics of the TO spectrum and the velocity estimates. Because these performance metrics are much more readily computed, the TO fields can be optimized faster for improved velocity estimation of both simulations and measurements. For simulations of a parabolic flow at a depth of 10 cm, a relative (to the peak velocity) bias and standard deviation of 4% and 8%, respectively, are obtained. Overall, the simulations show that the TO method implemented on a phased-array transducer is robust with relative standard deviations around 10% in most cases. The flow-rig measurements show similar results. At a depth of 9.5 cm using 32 emissions per estimate, the relative standard deviation is 9% and the relative bias is -9

  17. Multiple beam phased array for Space Station Control Zone Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halsema, P. B.

    The Space Station Communications Control Zone is a disk shaped region 40 nautical miles in diameter and 10 nautical miles thick centered about the Space Station. It is estimated that 6 simultaneous Multiple Access (MA) channels will be required to satisfy the projected communications needs within this zone. These channels will be used to communicate with MA users located anywhere within the Control Zone. This paper details the tradeoffs and design implementation of a multiple beam integrated phased array to provide antenna coverage of the Control Zone. The array is a compact, modular assembly using Gallium Arsenide circuits, microstrip elements, and advanced packaging techniques. This results in a small, reliable antenna system capable of meeting the projected Space Station requirements and flexible enough to grow and evolve as the Space Station communications needs develop.

  18. Low Noise Performance Perspectives Of Wideband Aperture Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woestenburg, E. E. M.; Kuenen, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    A general analysis of phased array noise properties and measurements, applied to one square meter tiles of the Thousand Element Array (THEA), has resulted in a procedure to define the noise budget for a THEA-tile (Woestenburg and Dijkstra, 2003). The THEA system temperature includes LNA and receiver noise, antenna connecting loss, noise coupling between antenna elements and other possible contributions. This paper discusses the various noise contributions to the THEA system temperature and identifies the areas where improvement can be realized. We will present better understanding of the individual noise contributions using measurements and analysis of single antenna/receiver elements. An improved design for a 1-m2 Low Noise Tile (LNT) will be discussed and optimized low noise performance for the LNT is presented. We will also give future perspectives of the noise performance for such tiles, in relation to the requirements for SKA in the 1 GHz frequency range.

  19. Improved Phased Array Imaging of a Model Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2010-01-01

    An advanced phased array system, OptiNav Array 48, and a new deconvolution algorithm, TIDY, have been used to make octave band images of supersonic and subsonic jet noise produced by the NASA Glenn Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig (SHJAR). The results are much more detailed than previous jet noise images. Shock cell structures and the production of screech in an underexpanded supersonic jet are observed directly. Some trends are similar to observations using spherical and elliptic mirrors that partially informed the two-source model of jet noise, but the radial distribution of high frequency noise near the nozzle appears to differ from expectations of this model. The beamforming approach has been validated by agreement between the integrated image results and the conventional microphone data.

  20. Improved arrayed-waveguide-grating layout avoiding systematic phase errors.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nur; Sun, Fei; Sengo, Gabriel; Wörhoff, Kerstin; Driessen, Alfred; de Ridder, René M; Pollnau, Markus

    2011-04-25

    We present a detailed description of an improved arrayed-waveguide-grating (AWG) layout for both, low and high diffraction orders. The novel layout presents identical bends across the entire array; in this way systematic phase errors arising from different bends that are inherent to conventional AWG designs are completely eliminated. In addition, for high-order AWGs our design results in more than 50% reduction of the occupied area on the wafer. We present an experimental characterization of a low-order device fabricated according to this geometry. The device has a resolution of 5.5 nm, low intrinsic losses (< 2 dB) in the wavelength region of interest for the application, and is polarization insensitive over a wide spectral range of 215 nm.

  1. Complex direct comb spectroscopy with a virtually imaged phased array.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Sarah K; Anstie, James D; Hébert, Nicolas Bourbeau; White, Richard T; Genest, Jérôme; Luiten, Andre N

    2016-03-15

    We demonstrate a simple interferometric technique to directly measure the complex optical transmittance over a large spectral range using a frequency-comb spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array. A Michelson interferometer encodes the phase deviations induced by a sample contained in one of its arms into an interferogram image. When combined with an additional image taken from each arm separately, along with a frequency-calibration image, this allows full reconstruction of the sample's optical transfer function. We demonstrate the technique with a vapor cell containing H13C14N, producing transmittance and phase spectra spanning 2.9 THz (∼23  nm) with ∼1 GHz resolution.

  2. Integrated phased array for wide-angle beam steering.

    PubMed

    Yaacobi, Ami; Sun, Jie; Moresco, Michele; Leake, Gerald; Coolbaugh, Douglas; Watts, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate an on-chip optical phased array fabricated in a CMOS compatible process with continuous, fast (100 kHz), wide-angle (51°) beam-steering suitable for applications such as low-cost LIDAR systems. The device demonstrates the largest (51°) beam-steering and beam-spacing to date while providing the ability to steer continuously over the entire range. Continuous steering is enabled by a cascaded phase shifting architecture utilizing, low power and small footprint, thermo-optic phase shifters. We demonstrate these results in the telecom C-band, but the same design can easily be adjusted for any wavelength between 1.2 and 3.5 μm.

  3. High-speed 32×32 MEMS optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megens, Mischa; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Chan, Trevor; Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wu, Ming C.; Horsley, David A.

    2014-03-01

    Optical phased arrays (OPAs) with fast response time are of great interest for various applications such as displays, free space optical communications, and lidar. Existing liquid crystal OPAs have millisecond response time and small beam steering angle. Here, we report on a novel 32×32 MEMS OPA with fast response time (<4 microseconds), large field of view (+/-2°), and narrow beam divergence (0.1°). The OPA is composed of high-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors which function as phase shifters. Relative to beam steering systems based on a single rotating MEMS mirror, which are typically limited to bandwidths below 50 kHz, the MEMS OPA described here has the advantage of greatly reduced mass and therefore achieves a bandwidth over 500 kHz. The OPA is fabricated using deep UV lithography to create submicron mechanical springs and electrical interconnects, enabling a high (85%) fill-factor. Each HCG mirror is composed of only a single layer of polysilicon and achieves >99% reflectivity through the use of a subwavelength grating patterned into the mirror's polysilicon surface. Conventional metal-coated MEMS mirrors must be thick (1- 50 μm) to prevent warpage arising from thermal and residual stress. The single material construction used here results in a high degree of flatness even in a thin 400 nm HCG mirror. Beam steering is demonstrated using binary phase patterns and is accomplished with the help of a closed-loop phase control system based on a phase-shifting interferometer that provides in-situ measurement of the phase shift of each mirror in the array.

  4. RF MEMS Phase Shifters and their Application in Phase Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian; Ponchak, George E.; Zaman, Afroz J.; Lee, Richard Q.

    2005-01-01

    Electronically scanned arrays are required for space based radars that are capable of tracking multiple robots, rovers, or other assets simultaneously and for beam-hopping communication systems between the various assets. ^Traditionally, these phased array antennas used GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters, power amplifiers, and low noise amplifiers to amplify and steer the beam, but the development of RF MEMS switches over the past ten years has enabled system designers to consider replacing the GaAs MMIC phase shifters with RF Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) phase shifters. In this paper, the implication of replacing the relatively high loss GaAs MMICs with low loss MEMS phase shifters is investigated.

  5. Phased Array Ultrasonic Evaluation of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Nozzle Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Steve; Engel, J.; Kimbrough, D.; Suits, M.; Hopson, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the phased array ultrasonic evaluation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) nozzle weld. Details are given on the nondestructive testing evaluation approach, conventional shear wave and phased array techniques, and an x-ray versus phased array risk analysis. The field set-up was duplicated to the greatest extent possible in the laboratory and the phased array ultrasonic technique was developed and validated prior to weld evaluation. Results are shown for the phased array ultrasonic evaluation and conventional ultrasonic evaluation results.

  6. Demonstration Results of the Triband, Multi-Beam Airborne Telemetry Phased Array (AirPA) System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    AirPA Phase 3 test event in September 2014, the element level digital beamforming phased array was successfully demonstrated at Edwards Air Force...Phased Array, antenna, digital beam-forming, beamforming, DBF, L-band, S-band, C-band, CTEIP, NAVAIR 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...elevation. During the AirPA Phase 3 test event in September 2014, the element level digital beamforming phased array was successfully demonstrated at

  7. Novel Phased Array Scanning Employing A Single Feed Without Using Individual Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas K.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2012-01-01

    Phased arrays afford many advantages over mechanically steered systems. However, they are also more complex, heavy, and most of all costly. The high cost mainly originates from the complex feeding structure. This paper proposes a novel feeding scheme to eliminate all phase shifters and achieve scanning via one-dimensional motion. Beam scanning is achieved via a series fed array incorporating feeding transmission lines whose wave velocity can be mechanically adjusted. Along with the line design, ideal element impedances to be used in conjunction with the line are derived. Practical designs are shown which achieve scanning to +/-30deg from boresight. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and measured, demonstrating the concept.

  8. Modeling the radiation of ultrasonic phased-array transducers with Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruiju; Schmerr, Lester W; Sedov, Alexander

    2008-12-01

    A new transducer beam model, called a multi-Gaussian array beam model, is developed to simulate the wave fields radiated by ultrasonic phased-array transducers. This new model overcomes the restrictions on using ordinary multi-Gaussian beam models developed for large single-element transducers in phased-array applications. It is demonstrated that this new beam model can effectively model the steered and focused beams of a linear phased-array transducer.

  9. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-12-31

    Outline: Discuss far-side weld problem and phased array techniques applied. Describe laboratory work on flawed piping specimens using L- and S-wave arrays and provide synopsis of results. Discuss conclusions ofr capability of phased array as applied to austenitic welds. Research Approach: Evaluate phased arrays on unifornly-welded piping specimens. Apply best methods to non-uniform welds. Correlate acoustic responses as function of weld microstructures.

  10. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection Simulations of Welded Components at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.; Schumacher, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate inspections of welded components have become of increasing importance as NASA develops new hardware such as Ares rocket segments for future exploration missions. Simulation and modeling will play an increased role in the future for nondestructive evaluation in order to better understand the physics of the inspection process and help explain the experimental results. It will also help to prove or disprove the feasibility for an inspection method or inspection scenario, help optimize inspections, and allow to a first approximation limits of detectability. This study presents simulation and experimental results for an ultrasonic phased array inspection of a critical welded structure important for NASA future exploration vehicles.

  11. Ultrasonic Phased Array Simulations of Welded Components at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.

    2009-03-01

    Comprehensive and accurate inspections of welded components have become of increasing importance as NASA develops new hardware such as Ares rocket segments for future exploration missions. Simulation and modeling will play an increasing role in the future for nondestructive evaluation in order to better understand the physics of the inspection process, to prove or disprove the feasibility for an inspection method or inspection scenario, for inspection optimization, for better understanding of experimental results, and for assessment of probability of detection. This study presents simulation and experimental results for an ultrasonic phased array inspection of a critical welded structure important for NASA future exploration vehicles.

  12. In-phased second harmonic wave array generation with intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling.

    PubMed

    Hirosawa, Kenichi; Shohda, Fumio; Yanagisawa, Takayuki; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot cavity is one promising method to synchronize the phase of a laser array. However, it does not achieve the lowest array mode with the same phase but the highest array mode with the anti-phase between every two adjacent lasers, which is called out-phase locking. Consequently, their far-field images exhibit 2-peak profiles. We propose intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling. By placing a nonlinear crystal in a Talbot cavity, the Talbot cavity generates an out-phased fundamental wave array, which is converted into an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array at the nonlinear crystal. We demonstrate numerical calculations and experiments on intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling and obtain an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array for a Nd:YVO₄ array laser.

  13. Resolving phase ambiguities in the calibration of redundant interferometric arrays: implications for array design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurien, Binoy G.; Tarokh, Vahid; Rachlin, Yaron; Shah, Vinay N.; Ashcom, Jonathan B.

    2016-10-01

    We provide new results enabling robust interferometric image reconstruction in the presence of unknown aperture piston variation via the technique of redundant spacing calibration (RSC). The RSC technique uses redundant measurements of the same interferometric baseline with different pairs of apertures to reveal the piston variation among these pairs. In both optical and radio interferometry, the presence of phase-wrapping ambiguities in the measurements is a fundamental issue that needs to be addressed for reliable image reconstruction. In this paper, we show that these ambiguities affect recently developed RSC phasor-based reconstruction approaches operating on the complex visibilities, as well as traditional phase-based approaches operating on their logarithm. We also derive new sufficient conditions for an interferometric array to be immune to these ambiguities in the sense that their effect can be rendered benign in image reconstruction. This property, which we call wrap-invariance, has implications for the reliability of imaging via classical three-baseline phase closures as well as generalized closures. We show that wrap-invariance is conferred upon arrays whose interferometric graph satisfies a certain cycle-free condition. For cases in which this condition is not satisfied, a simple algorithm is provided for identifying those graph cycles which prevent its satisfaction. We apply this algorithm to diagnose and correct a member of a pattern family popular in the literature.

  14. Improved SNR of phased-array PERES coils via simulation study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alfredo O; Medina, Lucía

    2005-09-21

    A computational comparison of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was performed between a conventional phased array of two circular-shaped coils and a petal resonator surface array. The quasi-static model and phased-array optimum SNR were combined to derive an SNR formula for each array. Analysis of mutual inductance between coil petals was carried out to compute the optimal coil separation and optimum number of petal coils. Mutual interaction between coil arrays was not included in the model because this does not drastically affect coil performance. Phased arrays of PERES coils show a 114% improvement in SNR over that of the simplest circular configuration.

  15. CryoPAF4: a cryogenic phased array feed design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Lisa; Garcia, Dominic; Halman, Mark; Henke, Doug; Hovey, Gary; Jiang, Nianhua; Knee, Lewis; Lacy, Gordon; Loop, David; Rupen, Michael; Veidt, Bruce; Wierzbicki, Ramunas

    2016-07-01

    Phased array feed (PAF) receivers used on radio astronomy telescopes offer the promise of increased fields of view while maintaining the superlative performance attained with traditional single pixel feeds (SPFs). However, the much higher noise temperatures of room temperature PAFs compared to cryogenically-cooled SPFs have prevented their general adoption. Here we describe a conceptual design for a cryogenically cooled 2.8 - 5.18 GHz dual linear polarization PAF with estimated receiver temperature of 11 K. The cryogenic PAF receiver will comprise a 140 element Vivaldi antenna array and low-noise amplifiers housed in a 480 mm diameter cylindrical dewar covered with a RF transparent radome. A broadband two-section coaxial feed is integrated within each metal antenna element to withstand the cryogenic environment and to provide a 50 ohm impedance for connection to the rest of the receiver. The planned digital beamformer performs digitization, frequency band selection, beam forming and array covariance matrix calibration. Coupling to a 15 m offset Gregorian dual-reflector telescope, cryoPAF4 can expect to form 18 overlapping beams increasing the field of view by a factor of 8x compared to a single pixel receiver of equal system temperature.

  16. MSAT-X electronically steered phased array antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. H.; Foy, W.; Schaffner, G.; Pagels, W.; Vayner, M.; Nelson, J.; Peng, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A low profile electronically steered phased array was successfully developed for the Mobile Satellite Experiment Program (MSAT-X). The newly invented cavity-backed printed crossed-slot was used as the radiating element. The choice of this element was based on its low elevation angle gain coverage and low profile. A nineteen-way radial type unequal power divider and eighteen three-bit diode phase shifters constitute the beamformer module which is used to scan the beams electronically. A complete hybrid mode pointing system was also developed. The major features of the antenna system are broad coverage, low profile, and fast acquisition and tracking performance, even under fading conditions. Excellent intersatellite isolation (better than 26 dB) was realized, which will provide good quality mobile satellite communication in the future.

  17. Optically controlled phased-array antenna with PSK communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Martin J.; Sample, Peter; Lewis, Meirion F.; Wilson, Rebecca A.

    2004-11-01

    An optically controlled RF/microwave/mm-wave phased array antenna has been developed operating at 10 GHz with 30 kHz reconfiguration rate via the use of a micromachined silicon Spatial Light Modulator. A communications function has been demonstrated with a variety of Phase Shift Keying modulation schemes (BPSK, QPSK, MSK) at data rates up to 200 Mbit/s and low BER (<1×10-9). A single channel has been demonstrated at 35 GHz. The properties of photonic components are taken advantage of in several ways: (i) since the carrier frequency is derived from heterodyning of lasers, it is tuneable from almost DC-100 GHz, (ii) the use of optical fiber allows for EMI immune antenna remoting, and (iii) the wide information bandwidth of optical modulators, which in this configuration is carrier frequency independent. The above is achieved in a lightweight and compact format, with considerable scope for further reductions in size and weight.

  18. Development of the Phase Synchronization Circuit for Wirelessly Distributed Digital Phased Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    retrieved on August 2, 2009. [14] C. H. Tong, “System study and design of broad-band U-slot microstrip patch antennas for aperstuctures and...a wireless channel. Compared to conventional phased array systems, its advantages are adaptability, survivability and flexibility . Phase...more flexible and robust than the current circuit and thus more desirable for future applications of the WDDPA. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 130 14

  19. An optically controlled phased array antenna based on single sideband polarization modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Wu, Huan; Zhu, Dan; Pan, Shilong

    2014-02-24

    A novel optically controlled phased array antenna consisting a simple optical beamforming network and an N element linear patch antenna array is proposed and demonstrated. The optical beamforming network is realized by N independent phase shifters using a shared optical single sideband (OSSB) polarization modulator together with N polarization controllers (PCs), N polarization beam splitters (PBSs) and N photodetectors (PDs). An experiment is carried out. A 4-element linear patch antenna array operating at 14 GHz and a 1 × 4 optical beamforming network (OBFN) is employed to realize the phased array antenna. The radiation patterns of the phased array antenna at -30°, 0° and 30° are achieved.

  20. Ultrasonic phased arrays for nondestructive inspection of forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Wuestenberg, H.; Rotter, B. ); Klanke, H.P. ); Harbecke, D. )

    1993-06-01

    Ultrasonic examinations on large forgings like rotor shafts for turbines or components for nuclear reactors are carried out at various manufacturing stages and during in-service inspections. During the manufacture, most of the inspections are carried out manually. Special in-service conditions, such as those at nuclear pressure vessels, have resulted in the development of mechanized scanning equipment. Ultrasonic probes have improved, and well-adapted sound fields and pulse shapes and based on special imaging procedures for the representation of the reportable reflectors have been applied. Since the geometry of many forgings requires the use of a multitude of angles for the inspections in-service and during manufacture, phased-array probes can be used successfully. The main advantages of the phased-array concept, e.g. the generation of a multitude of angles with the typical increase of redundancy in detection and quantitative evaluation and the possibility to produce pictures of defect situations, will be described in this contribution.

  1. Project PARAS: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, Kenneth; Hoffmann, Christopher; Dungan, Michael; Madden, Michael; Bendakhlia, Monia

    1992-01-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) scheme, would allow higher than currently available angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps and the ability to observe rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using passive phased array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150-m diameter antenna dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data are transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory panel is a novel hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and the bottom triangle. Attitude control and station keeping functions will be performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and four hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by either a photovoltaic array or a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The total mass of the spacecraft is about 20,500 kg.

  2. Optimizing an ELF/VLF Phased Array at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimaru, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to maximize the amplitude of 1-5 kHz ELF/VLF waves generated by ionospheric HF heating and measured at a ground-based ELF/VLF receiver. The optimization makes use of experimental observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory in Gakona, Alaska. During these experiments, the amplitude, phase, and propagation delay of the ELF/VLF waves were carefully measured. The HF beam was aimed at 15 degrees zenith angle in 8 different azimuthal directions, equally spaced in a circle, while broadcasting a 3.25 MHz (X-mode) signal that was amplitude modulated (square wave) with a linear frequency-time chirp between 1 and 5 kHz. The experimental observations are used to provide reference amplitudes, phases, and propagation delays for ELF/VLF waves generated at these specific locations. The presented optimization accounts for the trade-off between duty cycle, heated area, and the distributed nature of the source region in order to construct a "most efficient" phased array. The amplitudes and phases generated by modulated heating at each location are combined in post-processing to find an optimal combination of duty cycle, heating location, and heating order.

  3. High power compatible internally sensed optical phased array.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lyle E; Ward, Robert L; Francis, Samuel P; Sibley, Paul G; Fleddermann, Roland; Sutton, Andrew J; Smith, Craig; McClelland, David E; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2016-06-13

    The technical embodiment of the Huygens-Fresnel principle, an optical phased array (OPA) is an arrangement of optical emitters with relative phases controlled to create a desired beam profile after propagation. One important application of an OPA is coherent beam combining (CBC), which can be used to create beams of higher power than is possible with a single laser source, especially for narrow linewidth sources. Here we present an all-fiber architecture that stabilizes the relative output phase by inferring the relative path length differences between lasers using the small fraction of light that is back-reflected into the fiber at the OPA's glass-air interface, without the need for any external sampling optics. This architecture is compatible with high power continuous wave laser sources (e.g., fiber amplifiers) up to 100 W per channel. The high-power compatible internally sensed OPA was implemented experimentally using commercial 15 W fiber amplifiers, demonstrating an output RMS phase stability of λ/194, and the ability to steer the beam at up to 10 kHz.

  4. Spatiotemporal Phase Synchronization in a Large Array of Convective Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Montserrat A.; Burguete, Javier

    In a quasi-1D thermal convective system consisting of a large array of nonlinearly coupled oscillators, clustering is the way to achieve a regime of mostly antiphase synchronized oscillators. This regime is characterized by a spatiotemporal doubling of traveling modes. As the dynamics is explored beyond a spatiotemporal chaos regime with weak coupling, new interacting modes emerge through a supercritical bifurcation. In this new regime, the system exhibits coherent subsystems of antiphase synchronized oscillators, which are stationary clusters following a spatiotemporal beating phenomena. This regime is the result of a stronger coupling. We show from a phase mismatch model applied to each oscillator, that these phase coherent domains undergo a global phase instability meanwhile the interactions between oscillators become nonlocal. For each value of the control parameter we find out the time-varying topology (link matrix) from the contact interactions between oscillators. The new characteristic spatiotemporal scales are extracted from the antiphase correlations at the time intervals defined by the link matrix. The interpretation of these experimental results contributes to widen the understanding of other complex systems exhibiting similar phase chaotic dynamics in 2D and 3D.

  5. Means for phase locking the outputs of a surface emitting laser diode array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, James R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An array of diode lasers, either a two-dimensional array of surface emitting lasers, or a linear array of stripe lasers, is phase locked by a diode laser through a hologram which focuses the output of the diode laser into a set of distinct, spatially separated beams, each one focused onto the back facet of a separate diode laser of the array. The outputs of the diode lasers thus form an emitted coherent beam out of the front of the array.

  6. Phased Array Beamforming and Imaging in Composite Laminates Using Guided Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Yu, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the phased array beamforming and imaging using guided waves in anisotropic composite laminates. A generic phased array beamforming formula is presented, based on the classic delay-and-sum principle. The generic formula considers direction-dependent guided wave properties induced by the anisotropic material properties of composites. Moreover, the array beamforming and imaging are performed in frequency domain where the guided wave dispersion effect has been considered. The presented phased array method is implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) to detect multiple defects at different locations in an anisotropic composite plate. The array is constructed of scan points in a small area rapidly scanned by the SLDV. Using the phased array method, multiple defects at different locations are successfully detected. Our study shows that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  7. Experimental Results for a Photonic Time Reversal Processor for Adaptive Control of an Ultra Wideband Phased Array Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Radar , Boston: Artech House, 1994. 2. H. Zmuda, “ Optical Beamforming for Phased Array Antennas,” Chapter 19, R...Beamforming, Phased Array Antennas, Time Reversal, Ultra Wideband Radar 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Photonic Processing for Microwave Phased Array ...Architecture for Broadband Adaptive Nulling with Linear and Conformal Phased Array Antennas”, Fiber and Integrated Optics , vol. 19, no. 2, March 2000, pp.

  8. Evolutionary Design of a Phased Array Antenna Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Linden, Derek; Lohn, Jason

    2006-01-01

    We present an evolved S-band phased array antenna element design that meets the requirements of NASA's TDRS-C communications satellite scheduled for launch early next decade. The original specification called for two types of elements, one for receive only and one for transmit/receive. We were able to evolve a single element design that meets both specifications thereby simplifying the antenna and reducing testing and integration costs. The highest performance antenna found using a genetic algorithm and stochastic hill-climbing has been fabricated and tested. Laboratory results are largely consistent with simulation. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years its computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Many antenna types have been investigated, including wire antennas, antenna arrays and quadrifilar helical antennas. In particular, our laboratory evolved a wire antenna design for NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft. This antenna has been fabricated, tested, and is scheduled for launch on the three spacecraft in 2006.

  9. Matrix phased arrays for the inspection of CFRP-components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzbruck, M.; Brackrock, D.; Brekow, G.; Montag, H.-J.; Boehm, R.; Illerhaus, B.

    2014-02-01

    Lightweight components are increasingly used in different industrial sectors such as transportation, energy generation and automotive. This growing field includes different types of CFRP-structures, hybrid materials and glued components showing - compared to their pure metallic counterparts- a significant more complicated structure in terms of internal interfaces and anisotropy of material parameters. In this work we present the use of matrix phased array to increase the amount of obtained information to enhance the inspection quality. We used different types of carbon materials such as 6 mm thick uni- and bidirectional prepreg specimens containing impact damages. The latter were introduced with different energy levels ranging from 1.3 to 7.2 J. By scanning a 2.25 MHz matrix array with 6 × 10 elements above the prepreg surface and using different angels of incidence a complete 3D-image was generated which allows the detection of defects as small as 1mm in a depth of 4 mm. A comparison with conventional approaches show that the signal-to-noise ratio can be highly increased. This enables us to visualize the region of damage within the impact zone, clearly showing the cone-like damage distribution along increasing material depth. The detection quality allows the estimation of the opening angles of the cone shaped damage, which can be used for further evaluation and quantitation of energy dependent impact damages.

  10. Matrix phased arrays for the inspection of CFRP-components

    SciTech Connect

    Kreutzbruck, M.; Brackrock, D.; Brekow, G.; Montag, H.-J.; Boehm, R.; Illerhaus, B.

    2014-02-18

    Lightweight components are increasingly used in different industrial sectors such as transportation, energy generation and automotive. This growing field includes different types of CFRP-structures, hybrid materials and glued components showing - compared to their pure metallic counterparts- a significant more complicated structure in terms of internal interfaces and anisotropy of material parameters. In this work we present the use of matrix phased array to increase the amount of obtained information to enhance the inspection quality. We used different types of carbon materials such as 6 mm thick uni- and bidirectional prepreg specimens containing impact damages. The latter were introduced with different energy levels ranging from 1.3 to 7.2 J. By scanning a 2.25 MHz matrix array with 6 × 10 elements above the prepreg surface and using different angels of incidence a complete 3D-image was generated which allows the detection of defects as small as 1mm in a depth of 4 mm. A comparison with conventional approaches show that the signal-to-noise ratio can be highly increased. This enables us to visualize the region of damage within the impact zone, clearly showing the cone-like damage distribution along increasing material depth. The detection quality allows the estimation of the opening angles of the cone shaped damage, which can be used for further evaluation and quantitation of energy dependent impact damages.

  11. Phased array ultrasonic processing for enhanced and affordable diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, N.; Rougeron, G.; Leberre, S.; Pautel, R.

    2013-01-01

    Phased array ultrasonic reconstruction techniques are often presented as a prospect for better and enhanced diagnosis. However to date few applications of these techniques can be found in the industry, partly because of questions on sizing but also because they often require heavy acquisitions. A way forward is then to propose techniques requiring less intensive data acquisition to make them broadly affordable in practice. Several approaches ranging from full matrix capture to paintbrush acquisitions are presented in this paper in combination with associated reconstruction processing like the Total Focusing Method (TFM) and the Time Domain Topological Energy (TDTE) techniques. Emphasis is given to their relative relevancies and practical applicability on typical configurations of interest for industries. The paper also presents recent efforts made on the acceleration of processing computation times, in particular through the use of GPU architectures.

  12. Monitoring Growth of Closed Fatigue Crack Using Subharmonic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Endo, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Shintaku, Y.; Yamanaka, K.

    2010-02-01

    To ensure the safety and reliability of atomic power plants and airplanes, the technique of monitoring closed fatigue cracks is requisite. Here we monitored the distribution of the crack depths and closure behavior in the length direction after 48000 and 87000 fatigue cycles using subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE). The crack depths in the subharmonic images were larger than those in the fundamental images. Specifically, the difference was larger at near the side surface than at the center. The percentage of the closed part varied with the crack growth in the specimen. In addition, we fabricated shoe for SPACE to facilitate mechanical scanning. Thus, it was demonstrated that SPACE is useful in monitoring closed fatigue crack growth.

  13. Tunable elastomer-based virtually imaged phased array.

    PubMed

    Metz, Philipp; Block, Hendrik; Behnke, Christopher; Krantz, Matthias; Gerken, Martina; Adam, Jost

    2013-02-11

    Virtually imaged phased arrays (VIPAs) offer a high potential for wafer-level integration and superior optical properties compared to conventional gratings. We introduce an elastomer-based tunable VIPA enabling fine tuning of the dispersion characteristics. It consists of a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer sandwiched between silver bottom and top coatings, which form the VIPA's high reflective and semi-transparent mirror, respectively. The latter also acts as an electrode for Joule heating, such that the optical PDMS resonator cavity tuning is carried out via a combination of thermal expansion and the thermo-optic effect. Analogous to the free spectral range (FSR), based on a VIPA specific dispersion law, we introduce a new characteristic VIPA performance measure, namely the free angular range (FAR). We report a tuning span of one FAR achieved by a 7.2K temperature increase of a 170μm PDMS VIPA. Both resonance quality and tunability are analyzed in numerical simulations and experiments.

  14. Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) Optics Adjustment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Scientists at Marshall's Adaptive Optics Lab demonstrate the Wave Front Sensor alignment using the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) optics adjustment. The primary objective of the PAMELA project is to develop methods for aligning and controlling adaptive optics segmented mirror systems. These systems can be used to acquire or project light energy. The Next Generation Space Telescope is an example of an energy acquisition system that will employ segmented mirrors. Light projection systems can also be used for power beaming and orbital debris removal. All segmented optical systems must be adjusted to provide maximum performance. PAMELA is an on going project that NASA is utilizing to investigate various methods for maximizing system performance.

  15. An Improved Passive Phase Conjugation Array Communication Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ning; Guo, Zhongyuan; Huang, Jianchun; Chen, Geng

    2010-09-01

    The time-varying, dispersive, multipath underwater acoustic channel is a challenging environment for reliable coherent communications. A method proposed recently to cope with intersymbol interference (ISI) is Passive-Phase-Conjugation (PPC) cascaded with Decision-Feedback Equalization (DFE). Based on the theory of signal propagation in a waveguide, PPC can mitigate channel fading and improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using a receiver array. At the same time the residual ISI will be removed by DFE. This method will lead to explosive divergence when the channel is changed by a large amount, because PPC estimates channels inaccurately. An improved algorithm is introduced in this paper to estimate the channel during all the communication process; as a result, the change of the channel can be found in time and the PPC could use more accurate channel estimated. Using simulated and at-sea data, we demonstrate that this algorithm can improve the stability of original algorithm in changed channels.

  16. Time-delayed directional beam phased array antenna

    DOEpatents

    Fund, Douglas Eugene; Cable, John William; Cecil, Tony Myron

    2004-10-19

    An antenna comprising a phased array of quadrifilar helix or other multifilar antenna elements and a time-delaying feed network adapted to feed the elements. The feed network can employ a plurality of coaxial cables that physically bridge a microstrip feed circuitry to feed power signals to the elements. The cables provide an incremental time delay which is related to their physical lengths, such that replacing cables having a first set of lengths with cables having a second set of lengths functions to change the time delay and shift or steer the antenna's main beam. Alternatively, the coaxial cables may be replaced with a programmable signal processor unit adapted to introduce the time delay using signal processing techniques applied to the power signals.

  17. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Increased capacity in future satellite systems can be achieved through antenna systems which provide multiplicity of frequency reuses at K sub a band. A number of antenna configurations which can provide multiple fixed spot beams and multiple independent spot scanning beams at 20 GHz are addressed. Each design incorporates a phased array with distributed MMIC amplifiers and phasesifters feeding a two reflector optical system. The tradeoffs required for the design of these systems and the corresponding performances are presented. Five final designs are studied. In so doing, a type of MMIC/waveguide transition is described, and measured results of the breadboard model are presented. Other hardware components developed are described. This includes a square orthomode transducer, a subarray fed with a beamforming network to measure scanning performance, and another subarray used to study mutual coupling considerations. Discussions of the advantages and disadvantages of the final design are included.

  18. Phased-Array Measurements of Single Flow Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Lee, Sang Soo

    2005-01-01

    A 16 microphone phased-array system has been successfully applied to measure jet noise source distributions. In this study, a round convergent nozzle was tested at various hot and cold flow conditions: acoustic Mach numbers are between 0.35 and 1.6 and static temperature ratios are varied from cold to 2.7. The classical beamforming method was applied on narrowband frequencies. From the measured source distributions locations of peak strength were tracked and found to be very consistent between adjacent narrowband frequencies. In low speed heated and unheated jets, the peak source locations vary smoothly from the nozzle exit to downstream as the frequency is decreased. When the static temperature ratio was kept constant, the peak source position moved downstream with increasing acoustic Mach number for the Strouhal numbers smaller than about 1.5. It was also noted that the peak source locations of low frequencies occur farther downstream than the end of potential core.

  19. Monolithic optical phased-array transceiver in a standard SOI CMOS process.

    PubMed

    Abediasl, Hooman; Hashemi, Hossein

    2015-03-09

    Monolithic microwave phased arrays are turning mainstream in automotive radars and high-speed wireless communications fulfilling Gordon Moores 1965 prophecy to this effect. Optical phased arrays enable imaging, lidar, display, sensing, and holography. Advancements in fabrication technology has led to monolithic nanophotonic phased arrays, albeit without independent phase and amplitude control ability, integration with electronic circuitry, or including receive and transmit functions. We report the first monolithic optical phased array transceiver with independent control of amplitude and phase for each element using electronic circuitry that is tightly integrated with the nanophotonic components on one substrate using a commercial foundry CMOS SOI process. The 8 × 8 phased array chip includes thermo-optical tunable phase shifters and attenuators, nano-photonic antennas, and dedicated control electronics realized using CMOS transistors. The complex chip includes over 300 distinct optical components and over 74,000 distinct electrical components achieving the highest level of integration for any electronic-photonic system.

  20. Development of ultrasonic phased array systems for applications in tube and pipe inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanming; Yuan, Qingshan; Sun, Zhigang; Logan, Kevin; Lam, Clive

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports the development of ultrasonic phased array systems used for tubular inspection. First the design of a linear phased array is discussed with considerations of both theoretically and practically important factors. Then systems utilizing the linear phased array are introduced for different applications. To evaluate the system performance, tests were performed on flat bottom holes and artificial notches, including notches in longitudinal, transverse, and oblique orientations made according to API specifications. Test results have been presented.

  1. Affordable Wideband Multifunction Phased Array Antenna Architectures Using Frequency Scaled Radiating Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-04

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/5310--14-9431 Affordable Wideband Multifunction Phased Array Antenna Architectures Using...Wideband Multifunction Phased Array Antenna Architectures Using Frequency Scaled Radiating Elements Rashmi Mital, Dharmesh P. Patel, Jaganmohan B.L. Rao...number of antennas on ships to meet the numerous functional requirements. Recently, wideband phased array antennas are being developed that can

  2. Development of an X-Band Coupled-Oscillator Transmit/Receive Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, J.; Pogorzelski, R.

    2007-08-01

    The development of an 8.4 GHz (X-band) coupled-oscillator phased array employing full-duplex transmit and receive capability is described. Attractive features of phased arrays for deep-space communication include enabling high-data-rate communication and providing low-mass electronic beam steering. The coupled-oscillator phased-array concept seeks to reduce the cost and power consumption incurred in a conventional phased array by simplifying the beam-steering mechanism of the array. In this article, the overall system-level architecture of a full-duplex transmit and receive coupled-oscillator array is described, and the progress made in designing various specific components of a linear 1 x 7 coupled-oscillator array is also detailed.

  3. Electronically controlled optical beam-steering by an active phased array of metallic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    DeRose, C T; Kekatpure, R D; Trotter, D C; Starbuck, A; Wendt, J R; Yaacobi, A; Watts, M R; Chettiar, U; Engheta, N; Davids, P S

    2013-02-25

    An optical phased array of nanoantenna fabricated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process is presented. The optical phased array is fed by low loss silicon waveguides with integrated ohmic thermo-optic phase shifters capable of 2π phase shift with ∼ 15 mW of applied electrical power. By controlling the electrical power to the individual integrated phase shifters fixed wavelength steering of the beam emitted normal to the surface of the wafer of 8° is demonstrated for 1 × 8 phased arrays with periods of both 6 and 9 μm.

  4. Development of portable phased array UT system for real-time flaw imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, M.

    1995-08-01

    Many functions and features of phased array UT technology must be useful for NDE in the industrial field. Some phased array UT systems have been developed for the inspection of nuclear pressure vessel and turbine components. However, phased array UT is still a special NDE technique and it has not been used widely in the past. The reasons of that are system size, cost, operator performance, equipment design and others. TOSHIBA has newly developed PC controlled portable phased array system to solve those problems. The portable phased array UT system is very compact and light but it is able to drive up to 32-channel linear array probe, to display real-time linear/sector B-scan, to display accumulated B-scan with an encoder and to display profile overlaid B-scan. The first applications were turbine component inspections for precise flaw investigation and flaw image data recording.

  5. PARAS program: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakubowski, Antoni K.; Haynes, David A.; Nuss, Ken; Hoffmann, Chris; Madden, Michael; Dungan, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBLI) scheme, would allow higher (than currently available) angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps, and the ability of observing rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using a passive phases array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150 meter diameter dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data is transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory pane is a hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and bottom triangle. Attitude control and stationkeeping functions are performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and six hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by a nuclear reactor. The total mass of the spacecraft is 22,060 kg.

  6. Airborne electronically steerable phased array. [steerable antennas - systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, R.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a study directed to the design of a lightweight high-gain, spaceborne communications array are presented. The array includes simultaneous transmission and receiving, automatic acquisition and tracking of a signal within a 60-degree cone from the array normal, and provides for independent forming of the transmit and receive beams. Application for this array is the space shuttle, space station, or any of the advanced manned (or unmanned) orbital vehicles. Performance specifications are also given.

  7. Phased Array Antenna Analysis Using Hybrid Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Waveguide ; (b) Geometry Model for Method of Moments ........................ 4 2. Printed Dipole Radiator: (a) Actual Geometry with Microstrip Balun and...Finite Elem ents . ............................................. 19 11. Equivalence Model for Waveguide /Cavity Problem: (a) Original Problem; (b... Waveguide Array Active Reflection Coefficient - Comparison of Results Uscig Cavity Array (CAVIARR) and General Array (PARANA) Models . 76 45. Rectangular

  8. Rate equations analysis of phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays under steady state conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Kapon, E.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1984-01-01

    Rate equations analysis of phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays has been carried out. It was found that for given (laser) current densities, the photon density distribution in the array elements is that particular one which maximizes the total photon density. The results of this analysis were then combined with the waveguide properties of the laser array waveguide, yielding a basic model of phase-locked diode laser arrays. This model explains the effects of the variation of the current combination through the array elements on its mode structure that were observed recently.

  9. A self-cohering technique for linear arrays using the Phase Gradient Autofocus Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, D.E.

    1991-02-01

    A towed linear hydrophone array is subject to snakelike bending. If the array were processed as if it were truly linear, poor array gain coupled with a degraded source bearing estimate would result. The signal phase errors produced by sensor position uncertainty in passive sonar arrays are similar to those observed in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The Phase Gradient Autofocus (PGA) Algorithm has been shown to be a robust and effective method used to extract degrading phase errors prevalent in SAR imagery. This report shows that with slight modifications, the PGA algorithm can be applied to correct phase errors resulting from sensor position uncertainty introduced into linear-passive arrays. The results of the technique applied to simulated linear array data is also presented. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Phased array feed design technology for Large Aperture Microwave Radiometer (LAMR) Earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuman, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the potential and limitations of phased array antennas in space-based geophysical precision radiometry is described. Mathematical models exhibiting the dependence of system and scene temperatures and system sensitivity on phased array antenna parameters and components such as phase shifters and low noise amplifiers (LNA) are developed. Emphasis is given to minimum noise temperature designs wherein the LNA's are located at the array level, one per element or subarray. Two types of combiners are considered: array lenses (space feeds) and corporate networks. The result of a survey of suitable components and devices is described. The data obtained from that survey are used in conjunction with the mathematical models to yield an assessment of effective array antenna noise temperature for representative geostationary and low Earth orbit systems. Practical methods of calibrating a space-based, phased array radiometer are briefly addressed as well.

  11. Manipulation of Liquids Using Phased Array Generation of Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A phased array of piezoelectric transducers is used to control and manipulate contained as well as uncontained fluids in space and earth applications. The transducers in the phased array are individually activated while being commonly controlled to produce acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. The phased array is activated to produce a single pulse, a pulse burst or a continuous pulse to agitate, segregate or manipulate liquids and gases. The phased array generated acoustic radiation pressure is also useful in manipulating a drop, a bubble or other object immersed in a liquid. The transducers can be arranged in any number of layouts including linear single or multi- dimensional, space curved and annular arrays. The individual transducers in the array are activated by a controller, preferably driven by a computer.

  12. Impact: a low cost, reconfigurable, digital beamforming common module building block for next generation phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Lee; Hoffmann, Ted; Fulton, Caleb; Yeary, Mark; Saunders, Austin; Thompson, Dan; Chen, Bill; Guo, Alex; Murmann, Boris

    2015-05-01

    Phased array systems offer numerous advantages to the modern warfighter in multiple application spaces, including Radar, Electronic Warfare, Signals Intelligence, and Communications. However, a lack of commonality in the underlying technology base for DoD Phased Arrays has led to static systems with long development cycles, slow technology refreshes in response to emerging threats, and expensive, application-specific sub-components. The IMPACT module (Integrated Multi-use Phased Array Common Tile) is a multi-channel, reconfigurable, cost-effective beamformer that provides a common building block for multiple, disparate array applications.

  13. Array designs for amplitude and phase control of millimeter-wave beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogren, L. B.; Liu, H.-X. L.; Qin, X.-H.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    1993-08-01

    New array design concepts are described for the phase and amplitude control of millimeter and submillimeter-wave beams. Phase shifter array designs providing increased phase range and wider bandwidth are described. Techniques involving the integration of gain-producing elements as well as tuning elements on a single array are proposed for application to high-performance beam control and beam shaping. These concepts should facilitate the further development of quasi-optical solid state device-based arrays for application to millimeter-wave electronic systems.

  14. Research on the effect of coherent beam combination based on array of liquid crystal optical phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenming; Kong, Lingjiang; Xiao, Feng; Chen, Jian

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of Coherent Beam Combination(CBC) based on Array of Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Arrays(LCOPA array), two major contributions are made in this article. Firstly, grating lobes and side lobes of combined beam are analyzed. Furthermore, according to interference theory the methods to suppress grating lobes and side lobes are put forward. Secondly, a new beam quality factor Q(θ0) is proposed to evaluate the beam quality of combined beam and several influence factors are discussed. These analysis results help to obtain combined beam with better beam quality.

  15. Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA)-Phase I. Volume 3 (Pre-Field Campaign Sensor Calibration)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    ARL-TR-7362 ● JULY 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA)–Phase I, Volume 3 (Pre-Field Campaign... Sensor Calibration) by Gail Vaucher and Robert Edmonds Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA)–Phase I, Volume 3 (Pre-Field Campaign Sensor Calibration) by Gail Vaucher and Robert Edmonds

  16. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly

  17. Thermal dispersion method for an ultrasonic phased-array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Euna; Lee, Wonseok; Roh, Yongrae

    2016-07-01

    When the driving voltage of an ultrasonic transducer is increased to improve the quality of ultrasound images, heat is generated inside the transducer, which can burn the patient’s skin and degrade transducer performance. In this study, the method to disperse the heat inside an ultrasonic phased-array transducer has been examined. The mechanism of temperature rise due to heat generation inside the transducer was investigated by numerical analysis and the effects of the thermal properties of the components of the transducer such as specific heat and thermal conductivity on the temperature rise were analyzed. On the basis of the results, a heat-dispersive structure was devised to reduce the temperature at the surface of the acoustic lens of the transducer. Prototype transducers were fabricated to check the efficacy of the heat-dispersive structure. By experiments, we have confirmed that the new heat-dispersive structure can reduce the internal temperature by as much as 50% in comparison with the conventional structure, which confirms the validity of the thermal dispersion mechanism developed in this work.

  18. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies.

    PubMed

    Melodelima, David; Lafon, Cyril; Prat, Frederic; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2002-12-07

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm(-2). By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled.

  19. Phased array ultrasonic approach to turbine blade attachment inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Nottingham, L.D.; Solomon, K.R.; Presson, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    In situations where particular combinations of material susceptibility, stress, steam conditions and steam chemistry come together, certain steam turbine rotors have exhibited stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on the disk side of the blade attachments, where the blades are held to the disk. Cracking has been most prevalent in multiple-hook, fir-tree attachment designs and normally occurs in the corners of the fir-tree hooks. While attempts have been made to perform ultrasonic inspection of the complex fir-tree attachment geometries, results have been mixed. False calls, poor repeatability, a general lack of resolution and lack of a meaningful sizing capability are standing issues. A unique approach to this inspection features a phased array ultrasonic test system that can both focus the ultrasonic beam and steer it to different points within the complex geometry. The focused beam leads directly to significant improvements in detection performance and resolution, as well as the ability to estimate the size of an indication. The ability to steer the beam to different points within the attachment enables comprehensive examination of all critical locations without repeatedly changing and calibrating numerous transducers. Together these features provide more rapid inspections and improved reliability.

  20. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-18

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  1. Digital Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection system with dynamic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Shin, H. J.; Song, S. J.; Song, T. K.

    2000-05-01

    Enhancement of the ultrasonic flaw detection and characterization is expected through the development of a high performance PAULI (Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection) system which can provide high resolution two-dimensional (sector scan: S-scan) images. The high-resolution S-scan image renders inspection results more readable compared to the conventional A-scan and B-scan results. Therefore, it can improve inspection efficiency and reliability. In this study, the ultrasonic imaging technologies developed in medical applications were adapted to develop a digital PAULI system for nondestructive testing. To provide real-time S-scan images, the PAULI system uses 64 independent transceiver channels controlled by proper delay laws for steering and focusing the ultrasound beams along each scan lines. The PAULI system employs a novel dynamic receive focusing technique in order to optimize the lateral resolution by focusing the ultrasound wave at all imaging points. The dynamic receive focusing is achieved in real-time by digital signal processing methods. The feasibility of PAULI system is demonstrated for the NDE of steel structures.

  2. Evolutionary Adaptive Discovery of Phased Array Sensor Signal Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Milos Manic

    2011-05-01

    Tomography, used to create images of the internal properties and features of an object, from phased array ultasonics is improved through many sophisiticated methonds of post processing of data. One approach used to improve tomographic results is to prescribe the collection of more data, from different points of few so that data fusion might have a richer data set to work from. This approach can lead to rapid increase in the data needed to be stored and processed. It also does not necessarily lead to have the needed data. This article describes a novel approach to utilizing the data aquired as a basis for adapting the sensors focusing parameters to locate more precisely the features in the material: specifically, two evolutionary methods of autofocusing on a returned signal are coupled with the derivations of the forumulas for spatially locating the feature are given. Test results of the two novel methods of evolutionary based focusing (EBF) illustrate the improved signal strength and correction of the position of feature using the optimized focal timing parameters, called Focused Delay Identification (FoDI).

  3. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-01

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  4. An Ultra-Wideband Millimeter-Wave Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Markus H.; Miranda, Felix A.; Volakis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Wideband millimeter-wave arrays are of increasing importance due to their growing use in high data rate systems, including 5G communication networks. In this paper, we present a new class of ultra-wideband millimeter wave arrays that operate from nearly 20 GHz to 90 GHz. The array is based on tightly coupled dipoles. Feeding designs and fabrication challenges are presented, and a method for suppressing feed resonances is provided.

  5. Multibeam Phased-Array Antennas Developed and Characterized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Lambert, Kevin M.

    2003-01-01

    Fixed-formation microsatellites have been proposed for future NASA missions to lower costs and improve data collection and reliability. Achieving seamless connectivity communications between these satellites requires the use of multibeam array antennas. As a result of NASA Glenn Research Center s collaborative efforts with the University of Colorado and Texas A&M University, two prototype multibeam array antennas have been developed and demonstrated at Ka-band frequencies. These arrays are designed to be dual-beam, dual-frequency arrays, with two fixed scan beams at around +/- 30 . They can be used in both ground and space systems for transmit and receive functions.

  6. Fully Printed, Flexible, Phased Array Antenna for Lunar Surface Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Hen, Ray T.; Lu, Xuejun; Chen, Maggie Yihong

    2013-01-01

    NASAs future exploration missions focus on the manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, which will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure from planetary surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back to Earth. Flexible antennas are highly desired in many scenarios. Active phased array antennas (active PAAs) with distributed control and processing electronics at the surface of an antenna aperture offer numerous advantages for radar communications. Large-area active PAAs on flexible substrates are of particular interest in NASA s space radars due to their efficient inflatable package that can be rolled up during transportation and deployed in space. Such an inflatable package significantly reduces stowage volume and mass. Because of these performance and packaging advantages, large-area inflatable active PAAs are highly desired in NASA s surface-to-orbit and surface-to-relay communications. To address the issues of flexible electronics, a room-temperature printing process of active phased-array antennas on a flexible Kapton substrate was developed. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proved feasible for the PAA system. This innovation is a new type of fully inkjet-printable, two-dimensional, high-frequency PAA on a flexible substrate at room temperature. The designed electronic circuit components, such as the FET switches in the phase shifter, metal interconnection lines, microstrip transmission lines, etc., are all printed using a special inkjet printer. Using the developed technology, entire 1x4, 2x2, and 4x4 PAA systems were developed, packaged, and demonstrated at 5.3 GHz. Several key solutions are addressed in this work to solve the fabrication issues. The source/drain contact is developed using droplets of silver ink printed on the source/drain areas prior to applying CNT thin-film. The wet silver ink droplets allow the silver to

  7. A design concept for an MMIC (Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit) microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Smetana, Jerry; Acosta, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka proposed design, which concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required.

  8. Local phase control for a planar array of fiber laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffanic, Patrick; Johannes, Benjamin T.; Sison, Claudia A.; Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; O'Neill, Hugh; Kangas, Miikka; Brashears, Travis; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Riley, Jordan; Motta, Caio

    2015-09-01

    Arrays of phase-locked lasers have been developed for numerous directed-energy applications. Phased-array designs are capable of producing higher beam intensity than similar sized multi-beam emitters, and also allow beam steering and beam profile manipulation. In phased-array designs, individual emitter phases must be controllable, based on suitable feedback. Most current control schemes sample individual emitter phases, such as with an array-wide beam splitter, and compare to a master phase reference. Reliance on a global beam splitter limits scalability to larger array sizes due to lack of design modularity. This paper describes a conceptual design and control scheme that relies only on feedback from the array structure itself. A modular and scalable geometry is based on individual hexagonal frames for each emitter; each frame cell consists of a conventional lens mounted in front of the fiber tip. A rigid phase tap structure physically connects two adjacent emitter frame cells. A target sensor is mounted on top of the phase tap, representing the local alignment datum. Optical sensors measure the relative position of the phase tap and target sensor. The tap senses the exit phase of both emitters relative to the target normal plane, providing information to the phase controller for each emitter. As elements are added to the array, relative local position data between adjacent phase taps allows accurate prediction of the relative global position of emitters across the array, providing additional constraints to the phase controllers. The approach is scalable for target distance and number of emitters without loss of control.

  9. Analysis of finite phased arrays of circular microstrip patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.; Bailey, Marion C.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for analyzing a finite planar array of circular microstrip patches fed by coaxial probes. The self- and mutual impedances between array elements are calculated using the method of moments with the dyadic Green's function for a dielectric layer on a ground plane. The patch circuits are determined by using the reaction integral equation. The active input impedance as well as the active element pattern of the array are computed from a knowledge of the resultant patch currents. The calculated results for two-element and eight-element linear arrays are in good agreement with experimental data. The active reflection coefficient and element pattern for the center and edge elements of a two-dimensional array as a function of scan angle are also presented.

  10. Detection of wheel rim by immersion scan of phased array ultrasonic flaw testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi-He; Guo, Jian-qiang; Wang, Ze-yong; Gao, Xiao-rong; Jiang, Xiang-dong; Li, Xi

    2015-02-01

    In order to achieve the in-service detection to high speed train wheel rims, this article analyzed the effects of the number of array elements to image focusing and image quality using water immersion ultrasonic phased array technology. Also, the effects of the depth of water to detecting technique had been researched. According to the results of the experiments, the number of optimal array elements, the corresponding thickness of immersion layer, and the optimal range of water's depth had been obtained. Thus, appropriate references had been provided to water immersion ultrasonic phased array testing.

  11. Phased-array ultrasonic surface contour mapping system. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Fasching, G.E.; Loudin, W.J.; Paton, D.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The development of reliable mechanistic models for prediction of conventional and fluidized-bed combustor and gasifier operation and solids flow behavior in silos or other solids handling and storage components requires knowledge of the contained solids flow characteristics. This knowledge is gained from dynamic experimental measurements of bed top surface contours in addition to measurements of bulk bed properties. The surface contour mapping system (SCMS) provides a means of generating surface contour maps in real time with a unique, automatically focused, density-compensated, digital phased-array scanning, ultrasonic-range measurement system. The system is designed to operate in environments having gas temperatures up to 1,600 {degree}F and pressures to 1,000 psig. Computer simulation of several SCMS candidates and acoustic carrier modulation techniques indicates that a surface measurement resolution of {plus_minus}2 inches over a range of 5 to 20 feet distance between the transmit/receive (T/R) transducers and the bed surface can be expected. The simulation of a particular design, a 9-T/R, 25-pixel bed surface, in which the level of each pixel was randomly set between 5 and 7 feet below the plane of the T/R transducers, then measured using two different modulation techniques, produced excellent results. The simulation of this surface contour mapping system determined the value of the level of each of the 25 pixels to within {plus_minus}1 inch for over 95 percent of more than 100 test cases for one of the modulation techniques, and for over 99 percent of about 100 test cases for a second modulation technique. A hardware implementation of the design simulated but using only a two-T/R, three-pixel SCMS produced results very closely approximating those obtained during the simulation.

  12. Target tracking and pointing for arrays of phase-locked lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macasaet, Van P.; Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Madajian, Jonathan; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Kulkarni, Neeraj; Cohen, Alexander; Brashears, Travis

    2016-09-01

    Arrays of phase-locked lasers are envisioned for planetary defense and exploration systems. High-energy beams focused on a threatening asteroid evaporate surface material, creating a reactionary thrust that alters the asteroid's orbit. The same system could be used to probe an asteroid's composition, to search for unknown asteroids, and to propel interplanetary and interstellar spacecraft. Phased-array designs are capable of producing high beam intensity, and allow beam steering and beam profile manipulation. Modular designs allow ongoing addition of emitter elements to a growing array. This paper discusses pointing control for extensible laser arrays. Rough pointing is determined by spacecraft attitude control. Lateral movement of the laser emitter tips behind the optical elements provides intermediate pointing adjustment for individual array elements and beam steering. Precision beam steering and beam formation is accomplished by coordinated phase modulation across the array. Added cells are incorporated into the phase control scheme by precise alignment to local mechanical datums using fast, optical relative position sensors. Infrared target sensors are also positioned within the datum scheme, and provide information about the target vector relative to datum coordinates at each emitter. Multiple target sensors allow refined determination of the target normal plane, providing information to the phase controller for each emitter. As emitters and sensors are added, local position data allows accurate prediction of the relative global position of emitters across the array, providing additional constraints to the phase controllers. Mechanical design and associated phase control that is scalable for target distance and number of emitters is presented.

  13. Phased Array Analysis Using a Modified Chebyshev Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    define Parray as the average power of the array, Aarray as the effective area of the array, Pelement as the average power of the unweighted element...signal to noise ratio is: (SNR)weighted = Parray Narray = [ N∑ i=1 ãt,iãr,i ]2 [ N∑ i=1 ã2r,i ] (SNR)element (43) where (SNR)element = Pelement

  14. Design for steering accuracy in antenna arrays using shared optical phase shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kam, Moshe; Herczfeld, Peter R.; Wilcox, Jeffrey

    1989-01-01

    Uniform linear phased arrays where many radiating elements share a relatively small number of phase shifters are investigated. Such architectures arise in arrays which derive the time delays in the signal paths from a small group of independent phase shifters. In particular, a true time-delay device which has been suggested recently for optically controlled arrays is used as the basic phase shifter. Different architectures, viz. alternative procedures of deriving the necessary time delay for each antenna in the face of phase-shifter inaccuracies, are examined. The variance of the steered beam's direction is used as the performance criterion. The direction-optimal architecture is obtained by means of quadratic programming, and is shown not to be unique. The nonuniqueness of the optimal architecture is exploited to improve other characteristics of the array's beam shape, and the optimal solution is shown to compare favorably with a suboptimal interleaved solution which is easier to implement.

  15. 20-GHz phased-array-fed antennas utilizing distributed MMIC modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.; Lee, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of phased-array-fed dual-reflector systems with distributed power and phase control, and utilizing monolithic microwave integrated circuit modules, is demonstrated. Secondary radiation patterns for various antenna configurations, calculated using a method in which the phased array for each scanning direction is simulated by a fictitious point source, are computed to determine the achievable EIRP levels, sidelobe isolation, and cross-polarization isolation. The focal-region-fed Cassegrain reflector was found to be best suited for fixed multiple beam applications, while the phased-array-fed dual-reflector configuration was selected for multiple scanning beams. Key elements of the phased-array design including a radiating square horn and a square orthomode transducer were fabricated and tested.

  16. Monolithic optical integrated control circuitry for GaAs MMIC-based phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Ponchak, G. E.; Kascak, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's) show promise in phased-array antenna applications for future space communications systems. Their efficient usage will depend on the control of amplitude and phase signals for each MMIC element in the phased array and in the low-loss radiofrequency feed. For a phased array contining several MMIC elements a complex system is required to control and feed each element. The characteristics of GaAs MMIC's for 20/30-GHz phased-array systems are discussed. The optical/MMIC interface and the desired characteristics of optical integrated circuits (OIC's) for such an interface are described. Anticipated fabrication considerations for eventual full monolithic integration of optical integrated circuits with MMIC's on a GaAs substrate are presented.

  17. Phased Array Inspection of Titanium Disk Forgings Targeting no. 1/2 FBH Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.A.; Friedl, J.

    2005-04-09

    The phased array implementation of a focused zoned ultrasonic inspection to achieve a >3dB signal-to-noise for no. 1/2 flat bottom holes (FBH) in titanium is reported. Previous work established the ultrasound focusing required to achieve the targeted sensitivity. This work reports on the design of a phased array transducer capable of maintaining the needed focus to the depths required in the forging inspection. The performance of the phased array inspection is verified by examining signal-to-noise of no. 1/2 FBHs contained in coupons cut from actual forgings.

  18. Analysis of array illumination generalized by the combination of a binary phase grating and a lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huai-sheng

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we propose a method to use a binary phase and a lens to fulfil array illumination. An equation is given to research the array illumination by a given binary phase grating and a lens. We use a lens with the two main excellences. One is that, the lens can raise the intensity of reflected light from a reflective object. Sometime the reflected light is too weak to be recorded. The other is the spatial structure to be conveniently adjusted by the binary phase grating and the lens. Thus industry measurement relevant to array illumination is more easily carried out.

  19. Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA)-Phase I. Volume 2 (Data Management Tool: Proof of Concept)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Meteorological Sensor Array ( MSA )–Phase I, Volume 2 (Data Management Tool: “Proof of Concept”) by Sandra Harrison and Gail Vaucher ARL...Missile Range, NM 88002-5501 ARL-TR-7133 October 2014 Meteorological Sensor Array ( MSA )–Phase I, Volume 2 (Data Management Tool: “Proof...2014–September 30, 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Meteorological Sensor Array ( MSA )–Phase I, Volume 2 (Data Management Tool: “Proof of Concept”) 5a

  20. Iterative optimization of phase-only diffractive optical elements based on a lenslet array.

    PubMed

    Arrizón, V; Testorf, M; Sinzinger, S; Jahns, J

    2000-12-01

    We describe the design of Fourier-type phase-only array generators. The numerical optimization employs the Fienup algorithm, where the parageometric design of the phase retardation profile, with the form of a lenslet array, is used as the initial guess of the optimization process. This approach provides designs with high performance that can be obtained with comparatively low computing effort. This is particularly true for elements generating large spot arrays. For symmetric reconstruction fields, the optimized phase profile typically has the same symmetry as that for the reconstruction field and can be easily unwrapped.

  1. Diffractive-optics-based beam combination of a phase-locked fiber laser array.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eric C; Ho, James G; Goodno, Gregory D; Rice, Robert R; Rothenberg, Josh; Thielen, Peter; Weber, Mark; Wickham, Michael

    2008-02-15

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) is used as a beam combiner for an actively phase-locked array of fiber lasers. Use of a DOE eliminates the far-field sidelobes and the accompanying loss of beam quality typically observed in tiled coherent laser arrays. Using this technique, we demonstrated coherent combination of five fiber lasers with 91% efficiency and M2=1.04. Combination efficiency and phase locking is robust even with large amplitude and phase fluctuations on the input laser array elements. Calculations and power handling measurements suggest that this approach can scale to both high channel counts and high powers.

  2. Pulse-Echo Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Pat H.

    2010-01-01

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading. Keywords: Phased Array, Ultrasonics, Composites, Out-of-Autoclave

  3. Optimization of the Geometric Phase Sensitivity of an Array of Atom Ring Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Sanchez, Karina; Campo, Christian; Rivera, Tabitha; Toland, John

    2015-05-01

    Sagnac, and Aharonov-Bohm phase shifts are important geometric phase shifts in atom interferometry. These phase shifts characterize rotational and magnetic field interference effects respectively. Theoretical explorations have shown that a series of ring interferometers can be connected in series to increase the sensitivity of the overall device while keeping the maximum path separation less than the coherence length of the atoms. It has also been shown that the application of an area chirp to the rings will further enhance the sensitivity of the array of rings to geometric phase shifts. Area chirp refers to characterizing all of the rings in the array to a fixed percentage of a reference ring, this allows for the phase shifts in each ring to be characterized by one ring. The goal of this project is to determine a set of parameters namely kL, the product of the ring circumference and the wave number and γ, the chirp factor for the area chirp, that optimize the geometric phase sensitivity for an array of N rings. We model the transmission coefficient of a quantum matter wave through an area chirped array of interferometers as a function of phase, using transfer matrices to represent the transmission and reflection of individual rings in the array. Isolated transmission resonances represent the domain of interest, these are regions of high phase sensitivity. After optimizing a ring array without loss we apply velocity broadening to the input matter waves to investigate a more realistic output.

  4. Control of the necrosed tissue volume during noninvasive ultrasound surgery using a 16-element phased array.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Hynynen, K

    1995-03-01

    Focused high-power ultrasound beams are well suited for noninvasive local destruction of deep target volumes. In order to avoid cavitation and to utilize only thermal tissue damage, high frequencies (1-5 MHz) are used in ultrasonic surgery. However, the focal spots generated by sharply focused transducers become so small that only small tumors can be treated in a reasonable time. Phased array ultrasound transducers can be employed to electronically scan a focal spot or to produce multiple foci in the desired region to increase the treated volume. In this article, theoretical and experimental studies of spherically curved square-element phased arrays for use in ultrasonic surgery were performed. The simulation results were compared with experimental results from a 16-element array. It was shown that the phased array could control the necrosed tissue volume by using closely spaced multiple foci. The phased array can also be used to enlarge a necrosed tissue volume in only one direction at a time, i.e., lateral or longitudinal. The spherically curved 16 square-element phased array can produce useful results by varying the phase and amplitude setting. Four focal points can be easily generated with a distance of two or four wavelengths between the two closest peaks. The maximum necrosed tissue volume generated by the array can be up to sixteen times the volume induced by a similar spherical transducer. Therefore the treatment time could be reduced compared with single transducer treatment.

  5. Designing of a small wearable conformal phased array antenna for wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sayan

    In this thesis, a unique design of a self-adapting conformal phased-array antenna system for wireless communications is presented. The antenna system is comprised of one microstrip antenna array and a sensor circuit. A 1x4 printed microstrip patch antenna array was designed on a flexible substrate with a resonant frequency of 2.47 GHz. However, the performance of the antenna starts to degrade as the curvature of the surface of the substrate changes. To recover the performance of the system, a flexible sensor circuitry was designed. This sensor circuitry uses analog phase shifters, a flexible resistor and operational-amplifier circuitry to compensate the phase of each array element of the antenna. The proposed analytical method for phase compensation has been first verified by designing an RF test platform consisting of a microstrip antenna array, commercially available analog phase shifters, analog voltage attenuators, 4-port power dividers and amplifiers. The platform can be operated through a LabVIEW GUI interface using a 12-bit digital-to-analog converter. This test board was used to design and calibrate the sensor circuitry by observing the behavior of the antenna array system on surfaces with different curvatures. In particular, this phased array antenna system was designed to be used on the surface of a spacesuit or any other flexible prototype. This work was supported in part by the Defense Miroelectronics Activity (DMEA), NASA ND EPSCoR and DARPA/MTO.

  6. Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA) - Phase I Volume 1 (Proof of Concept Overview)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    are mass produced for use by commercial solar power PV arrays . The use of the 60-cell panel necessitated the use of a maximum power point tracking...Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA) – Phase I Volume 1 (“Proof of Concept” Overview) by Gail Vaucher, Jeffrey Swanson, John Raby, Theresa...originator. Army Research Laboratory White Sands Missile Range, NM 88002-5501 ARL-TR-7058 September 2014 Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA

  7. Design and fabrication of a high temperature leading edge heating array, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Progress during a Phase 1 program to design a high temperature heating array is reported for environmentally testing full-scale shuttle leading edges (30 inch span, 6 to 15 inch radius) at flight heating rates and pressures. Heat transfer analyses of the heating array, individual modules, and the shuttle leading edge were performed, which influenced the array design, and the design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype heater module.

  8. Characterization of the system functions of ultrasonic linear phased array inspection systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruiju; Schmerr, Lester W

    2009-02-01

    This work characterizes the electrical and electromechanical aspects of an ultrasonic linear phased array inspection system, using a matrix of system functions that are obtained from the measured response of individual array elements in a simple reference experiment. It is shown that for the arrays tested all these system functions are essentially identical, allowing one to use a single system function to characterize the entire array, as done for an ordinary single element transducer. The variation of this single system function with the number of elements firing in the array or with changes of the delay law used is examined. It is also demonstrated that once such a single system function is obtained for an array, it can be used in a complete ultrasonic measurement model to accurately predict the array response measured from a reference reflector in an immersion setup.

  9. Stacked phased array coils for increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dandan Liang; Hon Tat Hui; Tat Soon Yeo; Bing Keong Li

    2013-02-01

    A new concept of using a stacked phased coil array to increase the signal-to-circuit noise ratio (SCNR) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is introduced. Unlike conventional phased coil arrays, the proposed stacked phased coil array is constructed by stacking the coil elements closely together in the vertical direction. Through a proper combination of the coil terminal voltages, the SCNR is shown to increase with the square root of the number of coil elements. A prototype two-element array is constructed and an experimental method is designed to determine the combiner coefficients in a simulated MRI electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results show that the mutual coupling effect among the array coils can be totally removed and the combiner output voltage increases with the number of coil elements. This demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  10. Frequency translating phase conjugation circuit for active retrodirective antenna array. [microwave transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array which has central phasing from a reference antenna element through a "tree" structured network of transmission lines utilizes a number of phase conjugate circuits (PCCs) at each node and a phase reference regeneration circuit (PRR) at each node except the initial node. Each node virtually coincides with an element of the array. A PCC generates the exact conjugate phase of an incident signal using a phase locked loop which combines the phases in an up converter, divides the sum by 2 and mixes the result with the phase in a down converter for phase detection. The PRR extracts the phase from the conjugate phase. Both the PCC and the PRR are not only exact but also free from mixer degeneracy.

  11. Space-time-dynamic model of passively-phased ring-geometry fiber laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Bochove, Erik J.; Aceves, Alejandro B.; Deiterding, Ralf; Crabtree, Lily I; Braiman, Yehuda; Jacobo, Adrian; Colet, Pere R.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a linearized stability analysis and preliminary simulations of passive phasing in a CW operating ring geometry fiber laser array coupled in an external cavity with a single-mode feedback fiber that functions as spatial filter. A two-element array with path length error is predicted to have a dynamically stable stationary operating state at the calculated operating wavelength.

  12. Optical phased array using single crystalline silicon high-contrast-gratings for beamsteering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byung-Wook; Chan, Trevor; Megens, Mischa; Sun, Tianbo; Yang, Weijian; Rao, Yi; Horsley, David A.; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wu, Ming C.

    2013-03-01

    We present a single crystalline silicon optical phased array using high-contrast-gratings (HCG) for fast two dimensional beamforming and beamsteering at 0.5 MHz. Since there are various applications for beamforming and beamsteering such as 3D imaging, optical communications, and light detection and ranging (LIDAR), it is great interest to develop ultrafast optical phased arrays. However, the beamsteering speed of optical phased arrays using liquid crystal and electro-wetting are typically limited to tens of milliseconds. Optical phased arrays using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies can operate in the submegahertz range, but generally require metal coatings. The metal coating unfortunately cause bending of mirrors due to thermally induced stress. The novel MEMS-based optical phased array presented here consists of electrostatically driven 8 × 8 HCG pixels fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The HCG mirror is designed to have 99.9% reflectivity at 1550 nm wavelength without any reflective coating. The size of the HCG mirror is 20 × 20 μm2 and the mass is only 140 pg, much lighter than traditional MEMS mirrors. Our 8 × 8 optical phased array has a total field of view of +/-10° × 10° and a beam width of 2°. The maximum phase shift regarding the actuation gap defined by a 2 μm buried oxide layer of a SOI wafer is 1.7π at 20 V.

  13. A parametric study of ultrasonic beam profiles for a linear phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Choi, S W

    2000-01-01

    A numerical simulation model is presented to investigate the influences of design parameters of linear phased array transducers on beam focusing and steering performance. The characteristic of ultrasonic beam profiles has been simulated on the basis of the Huygen's superposition principle. For the simulation, a linear phased array is considered as the composition of finite number of elements separated by equidistance. Individual elements are considered as two-dimensional point sources. The waves generated from piezoelectric elements are considered as simplified transient ultrasonic waves that are constructed with the cosine function enveloped with a Hanning window. The characteristic of ultrasonic wave propagation into a medium from the phased array transducer is described. The effects of the number, the interelement spacing, steering angle, the focal length, and frequency bandwidth of the piezoelectric elements on beam directivity and ultrasonic pressure field in a linear phased array transducer are systematically discussed.

  14. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  15. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  16. Development of components for an S-band phased array antenna subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The system requirements, module test data, and S-band phased array subsystem test data are discussed. Of the two approaches to achieving antenna gain (mechanically steered reflector or electronically steered phased array), the phased array approach offers the greatest simplicity and lowest cost (size, weight, power, and dollars) for this medium gain. A competitive system design is described as well as hardware evaluation which will lead to timely availability of this technology for implementing such a system. The objectives of the study were: to fabricate and test six engineering model transmit/receive microelectronics modules; to design, fabricate, and test one dc and logic multilayer manifold; and to integrate and test an S-band phased array antenna subsystem composed of antenna elements, seven T/R modules, RF manifolds and dc manifold.

  17. New customizable phased array UT instrument opens door for furthering research and better industrial implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, Gavin; Ginzel, Robert

    2014-02-18

    Phased array UT as an inspection technique in itself continues to gain wide acceptance. However, there is much room for improvement in terms of implementation of Phased Array (PA) technology for every unique NDT application across several industries (e.g. oil and petroleum, nuclear and power generation, steel manufacturing, etc.). Having full control of the phased array instrument and customizing a software solution is necessary for more seamless and efficient inspections, from setting the PA parameters, collecting data and reporting, to the final analysis. NDT researchers and academics also need a flexible and open platform to be able to control various aspects of the phased array process. A high performance instrument with advanced PA features, faster data rates, a smaller form factor, and capability to adapt to specific applications, will be discussed.

  18. Free space optical communication link using a silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Pruessner, Marcel; Mahon, Rita; Ferraro, Mike S.; Park, Doe; Fleet, Erin; DePrenger, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Many components for free space optical communication systems have shrunken in size over the last decade. However, the steering systems have remained large and power hungry. Non-mechanical beam steering offers a path to reducing the size of these systems. Optical phased arrays can allow integrated beam steering elements. One of the most important aspects of an optical phased array technology is its scalability to a large number of elements. Silicon photonics can potentially offer this scalability using CMOS foundry techniques. In this paper a small-scale silicon photonic optical phased array is demonstrated for both the transmitter and receiver functions in a free space optical link. The device using an array of thermo-optically controlled waveguide phase shifters and demonstrates one-dimensional steering with a single control electrode. Transmission of a digitized video data stream over the link is shown.

  19. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  20. Phased Array Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Larche, Michael R.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-05-31

    This study maps the phased array-generated acoustic sound fields through three types of CASS microstructure in four specimens to quantitatively assess the beam formation effectiveness in these materials.

  1. Two-dimensional beam steering using a thermo-optic silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Pruessner, Marcel W.; Mahon, Rita; Ferraro, Mike S.; Park, Doe; Fleet, Erin; DePrenger, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    Many components for free-space optical (FSO) communication systems have shrunken in size over the last decade. However, the steering systems have remained large and power hungry. Nonmechanical beam steering offers a path to reducing the size of these systems. Optical phased arrays can allow integrated beam steering elements. One of the most important aspects of an optical phased array technology is its scalability to a large number of elements. Silicon photonics can potentially offer this scalability using CMOS foundry techniques. A phased array that can steer in two dimensions using the thermo-optic effect is demonstrated. No wavelength tuning of the input laser is needed and the design allows a simple control system with only two inputs. A benchtop FSO link with the phased array in both transmit and receive mode is demonstrated.

  2. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  3. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  4. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Emergency Generator Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  5. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Clean Lubrication Oil Storage Tank & Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  6. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Supply Warehouse, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  7. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  8. Design and experiment of 256-element ultrasound phased array for noninvasive focused ultrasound surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingzhu; Wan, Mingxi; Xu, Feng; Wang, Xiaodong; Chang, Xiaozhen

    2006-12-22

    A 256-element phased array high intensity focused ultrasound system has been designed and constructed in our laboratory. The 256-element spherical-section ultrasound phased array made from piezocomposite material operates at 1.1 MHz with 11-cm radius of curvature, 14-cm outer diameter, and 3.4-cm diameter central hole for mounting diagnostic ultrasound imaging probe. First, the explicit sound field calculation approach for the spherical-section phased array and the genetic optimal algorithm are briefly introduced as the optimal focus pattern control methods. Then, the design guidelines of 256-element spherical-section focused ultrasound phased array and 256-channel driver system are given. The results of single on and off axial focus, multiple on and off axial foci, half sub-array focus pattern provide further evidence for the 3D focus steering and sub-array mode for avoiding obstacles in focused ultrasound surgery. The multi-foci pattern can enlarge the treatment volume to 22 times larger than that of a single focus in one sonication. Finally, in vitro and transparent tissue-mimicking phantom experiment results confirm the ability of 256-element spherical-section phased array system to induce thermal lesions for noninvasive ultrasound surgery.

  9. An Update on Phased Array Results Obtained on the GE Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane

    2013-01-01

    Beamform maps have been generated from 1) simulated data generated by the LINPROP code and 2) actual experimental phased array data obtained on the GE Counter-rotating open rotor model. The beamform maps show that many of the tones in the experimental data come from their corresponding Mach radius. If the phased array points to the Mach radius associated with a tone then it is likely that the tone is a result of the loading and thickness noise on the blades. In this case, the phased array correctly points to where the noise is coming from and indicates the axial location of the loudest source in the image but not necessarily the correct vertical location. If the phased array does not point to the Mach radius associated with a tone then some mechanism other than loading and thickness noise may control the amplitude of the tone. In this case, the phased array may or may not point to the actual source. If the source is not rotating it is likely that the phased array points to the source. If the source is rotating it is likely that the phased array indicates the axial location of the loudest source but not necessarily the correct vertical location. These results indicate that you have to be careful in how you interpret phased array data obtained on an open rotor since they may show the tones coming from a location other than the source location. With a subsonic tip speed open rotor the tones can come form locations outboard of the blade tips. This has implications regarding noise shielding.

  10. Control, Filtering and Prediction for Phased Arrays in Directed Energy Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS- TR-2016-0029 TR-2016-0029 CONTROL, FILTERING AND PREDICTION FOR PHASED ARRAYS IN DIRECTED ENERGY SYSTEMS Steve Gibson...UNLIMITED. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Directed Energy Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM...Filtering and Prediction for Phased Arrays in Directed Energy Systems 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  11. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, S.; Engel, J.; Kimbrough, D.; Suits, M.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination that was developed for the examination of a limited access circumferential Inconel 718 fusion weld of a Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle - Cone. The paper discusses the selection and formation criteria used for the phased array focal laws, the reference standard that simulated hardware conditions, the examination concept, and results. Several unique constraints present during this examination included limited probe movement to a single axis and one-sided access to the weld.

  12. Excitation of ultrasonic Lamb waves using a phased array system with two array probes: phantom and in vitro bone studies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim-Cuong T; Le, Lawrence H; Tran, Tho N H T; Sacchi, Mauricio D; Lou, Edmond H M

    2014-07-01

    Long bones are good waveguides to support the propagation of ultrasonic guided waves. The low-order guided waves have been consistently observed in quantitative ultrasound bone studies. Selective excitation of these low-order guided modes requires oblique incidence of the ultrasound beam using a transducer-wedge system. It is generally assumed that an angle of incidence, θi, generates a specific phase velocity of interest, co, via Snell's law, θi=sin(-1)(vw/co) where vw is the velocity of the coupling medium. In this study, we investigated the excitation of guided waves within a 6.3-mm thick brass plate and a 6.5-mm thick bovine bone plate using an ultrasound phased array system with two 0.75-mm-pitch array probes. Arranging five elements as a group, the first group of a 16-element probe was used as a transmitter and a 64-element probe was a receiver array. The beam was steered for six angles (0°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, and 60°) with a 1.6-MHz source signal. An adjoint Radon transform algorithm mapped the time-offset matrix into the frequency-phase velocity dispersion panels. The imaged Lamb plate modes were identified by the theoretical dispersion curves. The results show that the 0° excitation generated many modes with no modal discrimination and the oblique beam excited a spectrum of phase velocities spread asymmetrically about co. The width of the excitation region decreased as the steering angle increased, rendering modal selectivity at large angles. The phenomena were well predicted by the excitation function of the source influence theory. The low-order modes were better imaged at steering angle ⩾30° for both plates. The study has also demonstrated the feasibility of using the two-probe phased array system for future in vivo study.

  13. CONTROL OF RADIATION PARAMETERS Radiation phase locking in an array of globally coupled fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotskii, D. V.; Elkin, N. N.; Napartovich, A. P.

    2010-12-01

    A model of an array of globally coupled fibre lasers, with the same fraction of the total output beam returned to each laser, is considered. The basic element of the model is a single laser controlled by an external signal. The output power of each laser in the array is found as a function of small-signal gain and frequency detuning. The maximum efficiency of phase locking and minimum fraction of output radiation that is necessary to form a feedback are calculated as functions of the number of lasers in the array. It is shown that gain saturation increases the efficiency of coherent beam summation in arrays containing up to 20 lasers.

  14. Phased laser array with tailored spectral and coherence properties

    DOEpatents

    Messerly, Michael J; Dawson, Jay W; Beach, Raymond J

    2014-05-20

    Architectures for coherently combining an array of fiber-based lasers are provided. By matching their lengths to within a few integer multiples of a wavelength, the spatial and temporal properties of a single large laser are replicated, while extending the average or peak pulsed power limit.

  15. Phased laser array with tailored spectral and coherence properties

    DOEpatents

    Messerly, Michael J; Dawson, Jay W; Beach, Raymond J

    2011-03-29

    Architectures for coherently combining an array of fiber-based lasers are provided. By matching their lengths to within a few integer multiples of a wavelength, the spatial and temporal properties of a single large laser are replicated, while extending the average or peak pulsed power limit.

  16. A study program on large aperture electronic scanning phased array antennas for the shuttle imaging microwave system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Fundamental phased array theory and performance parameters are discussed in terms of their application to microwave radiometry, and four scanning phased arrays representing current examples of state-of-the-art phased array technology are evaluated for potential use as components of the multispectral antenna system for the space shuttle imaging microwave system (SIMS). A discussion of problem areas, both in performance and fabrication is included, with extrapolations of performance characteristics for phased array antennas of increased sizes up to 20 m by 20 m. The possibility of interlacing two or more phased arrays to achieve a multifrequency aperture is considered, and, finally, a specific antenna system is recommended for use with SIMS.

  17. Progress and prospects of silicon-based design for optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Peng, Chao; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2016-03-01

    The high-speed, high-efficient, compact phase modulator array is indispensable in the Optical-phased array (OPA) which has been considered as a promising technology for realizing flexible and efficient beam steering. In our research, two methods are presented to utilize high-contrast grating (HCG) as high-efficient phase modulator. One is that HCG possesses high-Q resonances that origins from the cancellation of leaky waves. As a result, sharp resonance peaks appear on the reflection spectrum thus HCGs can be utilized as efficient phase shifters. Another is that low-Q mode HCG is utilized as ultra-lightweight mirror. With MEMS technology, small HCG displacement (~50 nm) leads to large phase change (~1.7π). Effective beam steering is achieved in Connie Chang-Hasnian's group. On the other hand, we theoretically and experimentally investigate the system design for silicon-based optical phased array, including the star coupler, phased array, emission elements and far-field patterns. Further, the non-uniform optical phased array is presented.

  18. An analytical filter design method for guided wave phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyu-Sang; Kim, Jin-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for designing a spatial filter that processes the data from an array of two-dimensional guided wave transducers. An inverse problem is defined where the spatial filter coefficients are determined in such a way that a prescribed beam shape, i.e., a desired array output is best approximated in the least-squares sense. Taking advantage of the 2π-periodicity of the generated wave field, Fourier-series representation is used to derive closed-form expressions for the constituting matrix elements. Special cases in which the desired array output is an ideal delta function and a gate function are considered in a more explicit way. Numerical simulations are performed to examine the performance of the filters designed by the proposed method. It is shown that the proposed filters can significantly improve the beam quality in general. Most notable is that the proposed method does not compromise between the main lobe width and the sidelobe levels; i.e. a narrow main lobe and low sidelobes are simultaneously achieved. It is also shown that the proposed filter can compensate the effects of nonuniform directivity and sensitivity of array elements by explicitly taking these into account in the formulation. From an example of detecting two separate targets, how much the angular resolution can be improved as compared to the conventional delay-and-sum filter is quantitatively illustrated. Lamb wave based imaging of localized defects in an elastic plate using a circular array is also presented as an example of practical applications.

  19. Circumferential phased array of shear-horizontal wave magnetostrictive patch transducers for pipe inspection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoe Woong; Lee, Joo Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2013-02-01

    Several investigations report effective uses of magnetostrictive patch transducers to generate and measure longitudinal and torsional guided waves in a pipe. They can be used to form a phased array for the circumferential inspection of pipes. Although there are circumferential phased arrays employing piezoelectric transducers or EMAT's, no magnetostrictive patch transducer based array system has been attempted. In this investigation, we aim to develop a circumferential phased magnetostrictive patch transducer (PMPT) array that can focus shear-horizontal waves at any target point on a cylindrical surface of a pipe. For the development, a specific configuration of a PMPT array employing six magnetostrictive patch transducers is proposed. A wave simulation model is also developed to determine time delays and amplitudes of signals generated by the transducers of the array. This model should be able to predict accurately the angular profiles of shear-horizontal waves generated by the transducers. For wave focusing, the time reversal idea will be utilized. The wave focusing ability of the developed PMPT array is tested with multiple-crack detection experiments. Imaging of localized surface inspection regions is also attempted by using wave signals measured by the developed PMPT array system.

  20. High speed optical phased array using high contrast grating all-pass filters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Rao, Yi; Megens, Mischa; Chan, Trevor; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Horsley, David A; Wu, Ming C; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2014-08-25

    We report a high speed 8x8 optical phased array using tunable 1550 nm all-pass filters with ultrathin high contrast gratings (HCGs) as the microelectromechanical-actuated top reflectors. The all-pass filter design enables a highly efficient phase tuning (1.7 π) with a small actuation voltage (10 V) and actuation displacement of the HCG (50 nm). The microelectromechanical HCG structure facilitates a high phase tuning speed >0.5 MHz. Beam steering is experimentally demonstrated with the optical phased array.

  1. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Theory of laser array phase locking by Fourier coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotskii, D. V.; Napartovich, A. P.; Troshchieva, V. N.

    2007-04-01

    The type of coupling in a fibre laser array phase locked with the help of an external mirror located at the focal distance from the plane of output ends of individual lasers is studied analytically. The explicit expression is derived for the eigenvalue of the resonator and the restriction on the width of the tuning range in which laser array phase locking is preserved is determined. The influence of the spread in the optical lengths of fibres on the phase-locking efficiency is considered. The phase-locking efficiency is analysed for the spread of optical lengths of fibres considerably exceeding the radiation wavelength.

  2. Blue-phase liquid crystal cored optical fiber array with photonic bandgaps and nonlinear transmission properties.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Iam Choon; Hong, Kuan Lung; Zhao, Shuo; Ma, Ding; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-02-25

    Blue-phase liquid crystal (BPLC) is introduced into the pores of capillary arrays to fabricate fiber arrays. Owing to the photonic-crystals like properties of BPLC, these fiber arrays exhibit temperature dependent photonic bandgaps in the visible spectrum. With the cores maintained in isotropic as well as the Blue phases, the fiber arrays allow high quality image transmission when inserted in the focal plane of a 1x telescope. Nonlinear transmission and optical limiting action on a cw white-light continuum laser is also observed and is attributed to laser induced self-defocusing and propagation modes changing effects caused by some finite absorption of the broadband laser at the short wavelength regime. These nonlinear and other known electro-optical properties of BPLC, in conjunction with their fabrication ease make these fiber arrays highly promising for imaging, electro-optical or all-optical modulation, switching and passive optical limiting applications.

  3. EHF monolithic phased arrays - A stepping-stone to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlvenna, John F.; Schindler, John K.

    Current EHF monolithic phased-array technology is assessed; near-term technology needs are evaluated; and future developments in this field are projected. It is noted that such arrays are thought to be able to satisfy cost, real-estate, aerodynamic and radar-cross-section constraints. Test results on multielement monolithic subarrays operating at 20 and 44 GHz are examined. Finally, the connection between current state-of-the-art subarray technology and Smart Skins, the projected omnipotent phased array of the future, is discussed.

  4. Model of the self-Q-switching instability of passively phased fiber laser arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bochove, Erik J.; Aceves, Alejandro B.; Braiman, Yehuda; Colet, Pere R.; Deiterding, Ralf; Jacobo, Adrian; Miller, Casey A; Rhodes, Charles; Shakir, Sami A.

    2011-01-01

    A simple physical model is presented to explain observed self-pulsations in passively phased rare earth-doped fiber laser arrays. Their essential features are the feedback level s sensitivity to small perturbations in the phases of array fields, hence altering the cavity s Q-value, and the nonlinear changes in the refractive index of the amplifier gain media. The model s qualitative prediction for an array having at least two elements that is operated at sufficiently high power levels, of the growth of an initial disturbance, is confirmed by a linearized stability analysis of the field and medium equations.

  5. Phase aligner for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chren, William A., Jr.; Zomberg, Brian G.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype Phase Aligner (PA) or the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer instrument has been designed and tested. Implemented in a single Xilinx XC3042PC84-125 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), it is a dual-port register file which allows independent storage and phase coherent retrieval of antenna array data by the Central Processing Unit (CPU). It has dimensions of 4 x 20 bits and can be used at clock frequencies as high as 25 MHz. The ESTAR is a passive synthetic-aperture radiometer designed to sense soil moisture and ocean salinity at L-band.

  6. Circuit QED and sudden phase switching in a superconducting qubit array.

    PubMed

    Tian, L

    2010-10-15

    Superconducting qubits connected in an array can form quantum many-body systems such as the quantum Ising model. By coupling the qubits to a superconducting resonator, the combined system forms a circuit QED system. Here, we study the nonlinear behavior in the many-body state of the qubit array using a semiclassical approach. We show that sudden switchings as well as a bistable regime between the ferromagnetic phase and the paramagnetic phase can be observed in the qubit array. A superconducting circuit to implement this system is presented with realistic parameters.

  7. Optical Phased Array Using Guided Resonance with Backside Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horie, Yu (Inventor); Arbabi, Amir (Inventor); Faraon, Andrei (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and systems for controlling the phase of electromagnetic waves are disclosed. A device can consist of a guided resonance grating layer, a spacer, and a reflector. A plurality of devices, arranged in a grid pattern, can control the phase of reflected electromagnetic phase, through refractive index control. Carrier injection, temperature control, and optical beams can be applied to control the refractive index.

  8. Optical phased array using guided resonance with backside reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Yu; Arbabi, Amir; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    Methods and systems for controlling the phase of electromagnetic waves are disclosed. A device can consist of a guided resonance grating layer, a spacer, and a reflector. A plurality of devices, arranged in a grid pattern, can control the phase of reflected electromagnetic phase, through refractive index control. Carrier injection, temperature control, and optical beams can be applied to control the refractive index.

  9. Propagation of a radial phased-locked Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2011-11-21

    A radial phased-locked (PL) Lorentz beam array provides an appropriate theoretical model to describe a coherent diode laser array, which is an efficient radiation source for high-power beaming use. The propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and some mathematical techniques, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a radial PL Lorentz beam array are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are numerically calculated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are discussed in detail.

  10. Array-based hydroacoustic characterization of P, S, and T-phases in the Philippine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, S. E.; D'Spain, G. L.; Lynch, S. D.; Stephen, R. A.; Heaney, K. D.; Murray, J. J.; Baggeroer, A. B.; Worcester, P. F.; Dzieciuch, M. A.; Mercer, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Array processing using large-aperture, simultaneously recording vertical and horizontal line arrays during the 2009 Philippine Sea Engineering Test (PhilSea09) reveals the rate of occurrence and the two-dimensional arrival structure of seismic phases that couple into the deep ocean. A ship-deployed, controlled acoustic source was used to evaluate the performance of the horizontal array for a range of beamformer adaptiveness levels. Ninety T-phases from unique azimuths were recorded between Yeardays 107 to 119. For more powerful events, T-phase azimuth and S-minus-P-phase time-of-arrival range estimates were validated using United States Geological Survey (USGS) seismic monitoring network data. Analysis of phases from a seismic event that occurred on Yearday 112 near the east coast of Taiwan approximately 450 km from the arrays revealed a 22-degree clockwise evolution of T-phase azimuth over 90 s. Two hypotheses to explain such evolution (body wave excitation of multiple T-phase sources or in-water T-phase scattering) are presented based on T-phase origin sites at the intersection of azimuthal great circle paths and ridge/coastal bathymetry. Propagation timing between the source, scattering region, and the locations of the two arrays suggests that the mechanism behind the evolution involved scattering of the T-phase from the Ryukyu Ridge and a T-phase formation/scattering location estimation error of approximately 3.2 km. This study further showcases the sensitivity of hydrophone-based detection and the effect of array gain to characterize the relatively high-frequency (5 to 50 Hz) components of coastal and ridge-based seismic events. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  11. Optical techniques to feed and control GaAs MMIC modules for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Anzic, G.; Kunath, R. R.; Connolly, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A complex signal distribution system is required to feed and control GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) for phased array antenna applications above 20 GHz. Each MMIC module will require one or more RF lines, one or more bias voltage lines, and digital lines to provide a minimum of 10 bits of combined phase and gain control information. In a closely spaced array, the routing of these multiple lines presents difficult topology problems as well as a high probability of signal interference. To overcome GaAs MMIC phased array signal distribution problems optical fibers interconnected to monolithically integrated optical components with GaAs MMIC array elements are proposed as a solution. System architecture considerations using optical fibers are described. The analog and digital optical links to respectively feed and control MMIC elements are analyzed. It is concluded that a fiber optic network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but higher power will be required.

  12. Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays were investigated. The STACBEAM (stacking triangular articulated compact beam) concept was selected. The primary component, the solar array blanket, is stored in a folded configuration and is deployed by controlled linear extension. Blanket stiffness is attained by axially tensioning the blanket and by providing periodic lateral ribs and standoffs which attach the blanket to the beam at several places along its length. The STACBEAM deploys sequentially (one bay at a time) using a deployer of sufficient rigidity so that beam stiffness is not degraded during deployment. The beam does not rotate during deployment, thus making blanket beam attachment possible in the packaged condition. In addition to high bending stiffness, the STACBEAM possesses high torsional rigidity due to nonflexible diagonals. The concept is adaptable to various size and loading requirements by changing member diameter and baylength, thus affecting the ratio of packaged and deployed length.

  13. Inflatable Torus Solar Array Technology Program. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-15

    outgassing requirements as detailed in SP-R- 0022 and ASTM E595 and provides an effective barrier against atomic oxygen. The coating is currently...ABBREVIATIONS AMO - Air Mass 0 AO - Atomic Oxygen APSA - Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array AR - Anti Reflective ASTM - American Society for Testing Materials...compares the initial tear strength of various 3 mil aluminum foils, measured by ASTM D1004 test method. The buckling strength of these tubes was measured on

  14. Inflatable TORUS Solar Array Technology Program. Phase 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    95 ° C, after pyroshock * and launch vibration environments z Figure 2. The ITSAT qualification array - deployed. Pyroshock was applied to the...development unit by the cable cutters which were installed on the housing. These self-induced pyroshock environments were also applied to the qualification...maximum diameter of 46 in. The payload envelope is shown in Figure 5. The packaged canister has been designed to the worst-case vibration, pyroshock , and

  15. Tolerances for Phase Locking of Semiconductor Laser Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-18

    laser fabrication . This means that the starting material is critically important to tne success of locked laser arrays. F. TOLERANCE REQUIREMENTS ON...typically r , 0.1. Because Eq. (7) represents a small frequency deviation, and implies A - 0.5 4, this report will look into the tolerances on laser ... fabrication and operation to ensure that the free-running laser frequencies remain within this locking range. D. COMPARISON OF LOCKING CONDITION WITH

  16. Liquid Crystal Based Optical Phased Array for Steering Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    OPD3 E1 → E2a E2b Fourier T f θ1 θ2 θ r1 r2 Fig. 2.3 Scalar integral approach of three-layer decentered micro-lens array...1987). 38 Robert Guenther, “Modern Optics”, John Wiley & Sons, NY, 345-346 (1990). 39 L. Nikolova, T. Todorov, Optica Acta, vol. 31, pp. 579-588

  17. Advanced reflector characterization with ultrasonic phased arrays in NDE applications.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Paul D; Holmes, Caroline; Drinkwater, Bruce W

    2007-08-01

    Ultrasonic arrays are increasingly widely used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their greater flexibility and potentially superior performance compared to conventional monolithic probes. The characterization of small defects remains a challenge for NDE and is of great importance for determining the impact of a defect on the integrity of a structure. In this paper, a technique for characterizing reflectors with subwavelength dimensions is described. This is achieved by post-processing the complete data set of time traces obtained from an ultrasonic array using two algorithms. The first algorithm is used to obtain information about reflector orientation and the second algorithm is used to distinguish between point-like reflectors that reflect uniformly in all directions and specular reflectors that have distinct orientations. Experimental results are presented using a commercial 64-element, 5-MHZ array on two aluminum test specimens that contain a number of machined slots and side-drilled holes. The results show that the orientation of 1-mm-long slots can be determined to within a few degrees and that the signals from 1-mm-long slots can be distinguished from that from a 1-mm-diameter circular hole. Techniques for quantifying both the orientation and the specularity of measured signals are presented and the effect of processing parameters on the accuracy of results is discussed.

  18. A Novel Monopulse Technique for Adaptive Phased Array Radar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Yang; Yang, Xiaopeng; Zheng, Le; Long, Teng; Baker, Christopher J

    2017-01-08

    The monopulse angle measuring technique is widely adopted in radar systems due to its simplicity and speed in accurately acquiring a target's angle. However, in a spatial adaptive array, beam distortion, due to adaptive beamforming, can result in serious deterioration of monopulse performance. In this paper, a novel constrained monopulse angle measuring algorithm is proposed for spatial adaptive arrays. This algorithm maintains the ability to suppress the unwanted signals without suffering from beam distortion. Compared with conventional adaptive monopulse methods, the proposed algorithm adopts a new form of constraint in forming the difference beam with the merit that it is more robust in most practical situations. At the same time, it also exhibits the simplicity of one-dimension monopulse, helping to make this algorithm even more appealing to use in adaptive planar arrays. The theoretical mean and variance of the proposed monopulse estimator is derived for theoretical analysis. Mathematical simulations are formulated to demonstrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed algorithm. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can outperform the conventional adaptive monopulse methods in the presence of severe interference near the mainlobe.

  19. A Novel Monopulse Technique for Adaptive Phased Array Radar

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Yang; Yang, Xiaopeng; Zheng, Le; Long, Teng; Baker, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    The monopulse angle measuring technique is widely adopted in radar systems due to its simplicity and speed in accurately acquiring a target’s angle. However, in a spatial adaptive array, beam distortion, due to adaptive beamforming, can result in serious deterioration of monopulse performance. In this paper, a novel constrained monopulse angle measuring algorithm is proposed for spatial adaptive arrays. This algorithm maintains the ability to suppress the unwanted signals without suffering from beam distortion. Compared with conventional adaptive monopulse methods, the proposed algorithm adopts a new form of constraint in forming the difference beam with the merit that it is more robust in most practical situations. At the same time, it also exhibits the simplicity of one-dimension monopulse, helping to make this algorithm even more appealing to use in adaptive planar arrays. The theoretical mean and variance of the proposed monopulse estimator is derived for theoretical analysis. Mathematical simulations are formulated to demonstrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed algorithm. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can outperform the conventional adaptive monopulse methods in the presence of severe interference near the mainlobe. PMID:28075348

  20. Thermal infrared array, phase 1. Volume 1: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The recommended design configuration for the focal plane array of a 1,000 element linear pushbroom system consists of 32 modules; the complete configuration is built by butting together two 1024 linear arrays. Each of the linear arrays is formed by edge butting 16 modules together. By staggering the modules of the two rows, the channel outages which occur where the modules are edge butted can be eliminated. Two stages TDI operation is performed by the post processing electronics, which reduces the design complexity of the focal plane. Systems studies show that: (1) a single focal plane design can satisfy both the LEO and SEOS mission configurations; (2) available optical designs can meet mission goals; (3) MTF can be traded with optical complexity in a future study; (4) a chopping mechanism can be devised to modifying modulate radiation to a 4-inch focal plane as well as insert two calibration sources at the required frequencies for chopping and calibration; (5) radiative cooling technology should be suitable for a future sensor in either mission configuration; and (6) cold shielding is not a requirement.

  1. Array Automated Assembly Task Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, S. S.; Jones, G. T.; Allison, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of solar cells and module process steps for low-cost solar arrays is reported. Specific topics covered include: (1) a system to automatically measure solar cell electrical performance parameters; (2) automation of wafer surface preparation, printing, and plating; (3) laser inspection of mechanical defects of solar cells; and (4) a silicon antireflection coating system. Two solar cell process steps, laser trimming and holing automation and spray-on dopant junction formation, are described.

  2. Spatially Defined Oligonucleotide Arrays. Technical Report for Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-15

    The goal of the Human Genome Project is to sequence all 3 billion base pairs of the human genome. Progress in this has been rapid; GenBank{reg_sign} finished 1994 with 286 million bases of sequence and grew by 2470 in the first quarter of 1995. The challenge to the scientific community is to understand the biological relevance of this genetic information. In most cases the sequence being generated for any single region of the genome represents the genotype of a single individual. A complete understanding of the function of specific genes and other regions of the genome and their role in human disease and development will only become apparent when the sequence of many more individuals is known. Access to genetic information is ultimately limited by the ability to screen DNA sequence. Although the pioneering sequencing methods of Sanger et al. (15) and Maxam and Gilbert (11) have become standard in virtually all molecular biology laboratories, the basic protocols remain largely unchanged. The throughput of this sequencing technology is now becoming the rate-limiting step in both large-scale sequencing projects such as the Human Genome Project and the subsequent efforts to understand genetic diversity. This has inspired the development of advanced DNA sequencing technologies (9), Incremental improvements to Sanger sequencing have been made in DNA labeling and detection. High-speed electrophoresis methods using ultrathin gels or capillary arrays are now being more widely employed. However, these methods are throughput-limited by their sequential nature and the speed and resolution of separations. This limitation will become more pronounced as the need to rapidly screen newly discovered genes for biologically relevant polymorphisms increases. An alternative to gel-based sequencing is to use high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Oligonucleotide probe arrays display specific oligonucleotide probes at precise locations in a high density, information-rich format (5

  3. Experimental realization of Talbot array illumination for a 2-dimensional phase grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Puspen; Kumar, Mukund; Tiwari, Pragya; Srivastava, A. K.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present the result of a multiple phase level Talbot array illuminator (TAI) based on two dimensional phase grating. The grating was fabricated on glass by a Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) system with optimized gas combination recipe. The opening ratio of the grating is ˜0.71 with a phase step of 11π. The experimental study on Talbot array illuminations (TAI's) of this fabricated device in near-field region was carried out using a He-Ne laser. The TAI's were observed at the positions 2.81 mm, 8.59 mm, 14.28 mm, and 20.57 mm along the light propagation direction. The computer simulations of wave field distribution in near field region at different fractional Talbot distances have been generated. These simulated results are in reasonably good agreement with our experimental observed results. Our analysis on Talbot array illumination (TAI's) shows that the multiple harmonic phase modulations are transformed into intensity modulations at 1/8, 3/8, 5/8, and 7/8 fractional Talbot position. We have observed three different grating images, viz., attenuated, phase contrast, and diffraction contrast images. We also show the presence of a considerable amount of phase change at the edge of each phase sublevel that enhances the contrast of differential phase contrast imaging. Therefore, the phase contrast signal can be detected at a fractional position using single phase grating without the need of phase stepping.

  4. Spectral and picosecond temporal properties of flared guide Y-coupled phase-locked laser arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defreez, R. K.; Bossert, D. J.; Yu, N.; Hartnett, K.; Elliott, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Spatiospectral and spatiotemporal characteristics of flared waveguide Y-coupled laser arrays are studied for the cases of both CW and pulsed operation. Regular sustained self-pulsations were observed for both operation modes. It is suggested that the pulsations are due to the destabilization of phase locking which is caused by amplitude phase coupling.

  5. Laser-ablative engineering of phase singularities in plasmonic metamaterial arrays for biosensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Zywietz, Urs; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.; Reinhardt, Carsten; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2014-02-17

    By using methods of laser-induced transfer combined with nanoparticle lithography, we design and fabricate large-area gold nanoparticle-based metamaterial arrays exhibiting extreme Heaviside-like phase jumps in reflected light due to a strong diffractive coupling of localized plasmons. When employed in sensing schemes, these phase singularities provide the sensitivity of 5 × 10{sup 4} deg. of phase shift per refractive index unit change that is comparable with best values reported for plasmonic biosensors. The implementation of sensor platforms on the basis of such metamaterial arrays promises a drastic improvement of sensitivity and cost efficiency of plasmonic biosensing devices.

  6. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased-Array Ultrasonic Probes.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-08-05

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of phased-array ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of these welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm diameter, 36mm thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches range in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through wall to 64% through wall. The welds were examined with two phased-array probes, a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive longitudinal wave array and a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive shear wave array. These examinations showed that both phased-array transducers were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, all of the notches and flaws through the welds. The phased-array results were not strongly affected by the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  7. Simple model to explain instabilities in passively-phased high-power fiber laser arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bochove, Erik J.; Shakir, Sami A.; Aceves, Alejandro B.; Braiman, Yehuda; Deiterding, Ralf; Miller, Casey A; Colet, Pere R.; Jacobo, Adrian; Rhodes, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple physical mechanism to explain observed instabilities in the dynamics of passively phased fiber amplifier arrays that arises from two properties: First that a weak phase disturbance of the output field of the array is converted into a strong intensity disturbance through the mode-selective feedback mechanism. Second, that this intensity fluctuation regenerates a phase fluctuation due to the nonlinear properties of the amplifying media. At sufficiently high operating power levels this cyclic disturbance continues to grow upon each cavity round trip, creating instability. This simple picture is supported by the results of a linear stability analysis of the set of propagation and population rate equations, which are in good agreement with observed critical power levels. A third level of quantitative confirmation was obtained by comparison to the results of numerical integration of the original set of nonlinear equations. This predicted instability is entirely a property of passively phased arrays of more than one element.

  8. Fabrication and Testing of Binary-Phase Fourier Gratings for Nonuniform Array Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Crow, Robert W.; Ashley, Paul R.; Nelson, Tom R., Jr.; Parker, Jack H.; Beecher, Elizabeth A.

    2004-01-01

    This effort describes the fabrication and testing of binary-phase Fourier gratings designed to generate an incoherent array of output source points with nonuniform user-defined intensities, symmetric about the zeroth order. Like Dammann fanout gratings, these binary-phase Fourier gratings employ only two phase levels to generate a defined output array. Unlike Dammann fanout gratings, these gratings generate an array of nonuniform, user-defined intensities when projected into the far-field regime. The paper describes the process of design, fabrication, and testing for two different version of the binary-phase grating; one designed for a 12 micron wavelength, referred to as the Long-Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) grating, and one designed for a 5 micron wavelength, referred to as the Mid-Wavelength Infrared Grating (MWIR).

  9. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  10. Phase Centers of Subapertures in a Tapered Aperture Array.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2015-11-01

    Antenna apertures that are tapered for sidelobe control can also be parsed into subapertures for Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements. However, the aperture tapering complicates phase center location for the subapertures, knowledge of which is critical for proper DOA calculation. In addition, tapering affects subaperture gains, making gain dependent on subaperture position. Techniques are presented to calculate subaperture phase center locations, and algorithms are given for equalizing subapertures’ gains. Sidelobe characteristics and mitigation are also discussed.

  11. Controlled fundamental supermode operation of phase-locked arrays of gain-guided diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapon, E.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.; Katz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Uniform semiconductor laser arrays tend to oscillate in a superposition of their supermodes, thus leading to large beam divergence and spectral spread. Discrimination among the supermodes in phase-locked arrays is discussed theoretically. It is shown that supermode discrimination in gain-guided arrays, in favor of the fundamental supermode, is made possible by the near-field interference patterns which result from the complex optical fields of the gain-guided lasers. A fundamental supermode operation is demonstrated, for the first time, in GaAlAs/GaAs gain-guided laser arrays. This is achieved by control of the current (gain) profile across the array by means of individual laser contacts.

  12. Phased arrays: A strategy to lower the energy threshold for neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissel, Stephanie; Avva, Jessica; Bechtol, Keith; Chesebro, Tyler; Cremonesi, Linda; Gupta, Anusha; Ludwig, Andrew; Messino, Wesley; Miki, Christian; Nichol, Ryan; Oberla, Eric; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Saltzberg, David; Schlupf, Chandler; Shipp, Nora; Varner, Gary; Vieregg, Abigail

    2017-03-01

    In-ice radio arrays are optimized for detecting the highest energy, cosmogenic neutrinos expected to be produced though cosmic ray interactions with background photons. However, there are two expected populations of high energy neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed by IceCube ( 1 PeV) and the cosmogenic flux ( 1017 eV or 100 PeV). Typical radio arrays employ a noise-riding trigger, which limits their minimum energy threshold based on the background noise temperature of the ice. Phased radio arrays could lower the energy threshold by combining the signals from several channels before triggering, thereby improving the signal-to-noise at the trigger level. Reducing the energy threshold would allow radio experiments to more efficiently overlap with optical Cherenkov neutrino telescopes as well as for more efficient searches for cosmogenic neutrinos. We discuss the proposed technique and prototypical phased arrays deployed in an anechoic chamber and at Greenland's Summit Station.

  13. Performance of a mmWave beamformed phased array system for indoor LOS communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Kinnan; Xu, Huaping

    2016-11-01

    Millimeter waves (mmWaves) spectrum ranging from 30GHz to 300GHz is emerging as a potential solution to the bandwidth problem faced by the wireless communication now a days. The advancements in the antenna technology has enabled the fabrication of antenna arrays or phased array systems which when used with techniques like spatial multiplexing and beamforming has enabled the use of mmWaves for both indoor and outdoor communication systems by providing gain and selectivity. This has also opened the doors for its potential use in long range and cellular communications. The 60GHz band also know as the oxygen absorption band due to its higher attenuation and unlicensed operation is a good candidate for use in secure and confined communications. In this paper we have investigated the performance of a beamformed phased array system in the mmWave spectrum. The performance is measured for varying the source and noise location and compared for a Linear and Rectangular array.

  14. Method and apparatus for self-calibration and phasing of array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A technique for self-calibrating and phasing a lens-feed array antenna, while normal operation is stopped, utilizes reflected energy of a continuous and coherent wave broadcast by a transmitter through a central feed while a phase controller advances the phase angles of reciprocal phase shifters in radiation electronics of the array elements at different rates to provide a distinct frequency modulation of electromagnetic wave energy returned by reflection in one mode and leakage in another mode from the radiation electronics of each array element. The composite return signal received by a synchronous receiver goes through a Fourier transform processing system and produces a response function for each antenna element. Compensation of the phase angles for the antenna elements required to conform the antenna response to a precomputed array pattern is derived from the reciprocal square root of the response functions for the antenna elements which, for a rectangular array of NXM elements, is a response function T(n,m). A third mode of calibration uses an external pilot tone from a separate antenna element. Respective responses are thus obtained from the three modes of calibration.

  15. An RF phased array applicator designed for hyperthermia breast cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liyong; McGough, Robert J; Arabe, Omar Ali; Samulski, Thaddeus V

    2006-01-07

    An RF phased array applicator has been constructed for hyperthermia treatments in the intact breast. This RF phased array consists of four antennas mounted on a Lexan water tank, and geometric focusing is employed so that each antenna points in the direction of the intended target. The operating frequency for this phased array is 140 MHz. The RF array has been characterized both by electric field measurements in a water tank and by electric field simulations using the finite-element method. The finite-element simulations are performed with HFSS software, where the mesh defined for finite-element calculations includes the geometry of the tank enclosure and four end-loaded dipole antennas. The material properties of the water tank enclosure and the antennas are also included in each simulation. The results of the finite-element simulations are compared to the measured values for this configuration, and the results, which include the effects of amplitude shading and phase shifting, show that the electric field predicted by finite-element simulations is similar to the measured field. Simulations also show that the contributions from standing waves are significant, which is consistent with measurement results. Simulated electric field and bio-heat transfer results are also computed within a simple 3D breast model. Temperature simulations show that, although peak temperatures are generated outside the simulated tumour target, this RF phased array applicator is an effective device for regional hyperthermia in the intact breast.

  16. Measured Sensitivity of the First Mark II Phased Array Feed on an ASKAP Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Macleod, A.; Shaw, R. D.; Brothers, M. L.; Cantrall, C.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the measured sensitivity of CSIRO's first Mk. II phased array feed (PAF) on an ASKAP antenna. The Mk. II achieves a minimum system-temperature-over-efficiency T_{sys}/η of 78 K at 1.23 GHz and is 95 K or better from 835 MHz to 1.8 GHz. This PAF was designed for the Australian SKA Pathfinder telescope to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

  17. Comparison of steering angle and bandwidth for various phased array antenna concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonjour, Romain; Singleton, Matthew; Leuchtmann, Pascal; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we compare different integratable ultra-fast tunable true-time delay concepts with respect to their performances in a phased array system. The performances of the schemes are assessed with respect to the supported range, i.e. the range within which beam steering for a given fractional bandwidth can be achieved with a gain flatness better than 3 dB. We also compare the array gain as of function of steering angle and fractional bandwidth.

  18. Directed liquid phase assembly of highly ordered metallic nanoparticle arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Yueying; Dong, Nanyi; Fu, Shaofang; ...

    2014-04-01

    Directed assembly of nanomaterials is a promising route for the synthesis of advanced materials and devices. We demonstrate the directed-assembly of highly ordered two-dimensional arrays of hierarchical nanostructures with tunable size, spacing and composition. The directed assembly is achieved on lithographically patterned metal films that are subsequently pulse-laser melted; during the brief liquid lifetime, the pattened nanostructures assemble into highly ordered primary and secondary nanoparticles, with sizes below that which was originally patterned. Complementary fluid-dynamics simulations emulate the resultant patterns and show how the competition of capillary forces and liquid metal–solid substrate interaction potential drives the directed assembly. Lastly, asmore » an example of the enhanced functionality, a full-wave electromagnetic analysis has been performed to identify the nature of the supported plasmonic resonances.« less

  19. Directed liquid phase assembly of highly ordered metallic nanoparticle arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yueying; Dong, Nanyi; Fu, Shaofang; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Kondic, Lou; Vincenti, Maria A.; de Ceglia, Domenico; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-04-01

    Directed assembly of nanomaterials is a promising route for the synthesis of advanced materials and devices. We demonstrate the directed-assembly of highly ordered two-dimensional arrays of hierarchical nanostructures with tunable size, spacing and composition. The directed assembly is achieved on lithographically patterned metal films that are subsequently pulse-laser melted; during the brief liquid lifetime, the pattened nanostructures assemble into highly ordered primary and secondary nanoparticles, with sizes below that which was originally patterned. Complementary fluid-dynamics simulations emulate the resultant patterns and show how the competition of capillary forces and liquid metal–solid substrate interaction potential drives the directed assembly. Lastly, as an example of the enhanced functionality, a full-wave electromagnetic analysis has been performed to identify the nature of the supported plasmonic resonances.

  20. Application of phased array techniques to coarse grain components inspection.

    PubMed

    Mahaut, Steve; Godefroit, Jean-Louis; Roy, Olivier; Cattiaux, Gérard

    2004-04-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel components from primary and auxiliary cooling circuits of French Nuclear Power Plant has to face with major difficulties due to the coarse grained structure of these materials. Attenuation losses and structural noise are encountered, which limits the performances of defect detection ability, mostly in terms of degraded signal-to-noise ratio and poor sensitivity. To overcome such problems, theoretical and experimental studies have been achieved at the French Atomic Energy Commission, with support from the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety. Experimental studies have been performed over stainless steel specimen of known coarse structure (equiaxial grains and/or elongated grains), containing artificial reflectors (cylindrical holes and electro-eroded surface breaking notches). Those mock-ups have been inspected using contact probes of different array designs (linear or matrix splitting), and using pulse echo or dual-element techniques. Such arrays allow to control the ultrasonic beam so as to investigate different inspection angles and focusing depths. Experiments were carried out using oblique longitudinal waves, using delay laws computed by a specific model, taking account of acoustical and geometrical properties of the probes and the inspected component. In addition, specific reconstruction techniques have been investigated to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio as well as spatial resolution. These techniques are based on beam-forming summation and multi-angle inspections. Experimental results show that such techniques allow to reduce the speckle noise and to optimise the beam resolution. Those increased performances allow to detect and to size small planar defects located at the inner wall of a thick specimen, using corner and tip diffraction echoes.

  1. The radiated fields of focussing air-coupled ultrasonic phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Neild, A; Hutchins, D A; Robertson, T J; Davis, L A J; Billson, D R

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the fields radiated into air by ultrasonic phased arrays under transient excitation. In particular, it includes a theoretical prediction of spatial variations in amplitude throughout the both the near-field and far-field of such arrays. The approach has been used to predict the result of phasing to produce a focus in air, which can be seen to be particularly effective in the near-field of the array. Interesting features are observed, which are then described in terms of the performance of both individual elements and the resulting array. It is shown how some elements of design can be used to improve performance in focussing. The predictions are compared to the results of experiments in air using electrostatic arrays, where good focussing could be achieved provided the appropriate design principles were followed. The approach has been developed specifically for use in air, but the results would also hold for modelling in certain medical arrays where a focussing requirement might be needed close to the array itself.

  2. Modulation error in active-aperture phased-array radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, M. L.; Howard, R. L.; Mitchell, M. A.

    Range sidelobe (RSL) suppression is presently treated in the context of active arrays that are defined by a phased-array antenna, which is driven by either distributed solid-state element-level modules or tube-driven subarray-level transmitters and receivers. An account is given of the basic methodology for achievement of low-RSL performance in active arrays, using modulation-error compensation. Attention is given to the performance limits imposed by modulation-error decorrelation and noise-limited error characterization.

  3. Hemispheric Imaging of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen with a Phased Array Antenna System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnholds, Stefan J.; De Bruyn, A. Ger; Bregman, Jaap D.; Bij De Vaate, Jan Geralt

    2004-06-01

    The thousand element array (THEA) system is a phased array system consisting of 1 m2 tiles having 64 Vivaldi elements each, arranged on a regular 8-by-8 grid, which has been developed as a demonstrator of technology and applicability for SKA. In this paper we present imaging results of Galactic neutral hydrogen with THEA. Measurements have been taken using a dense 2-by-2 array of four tiles as a four tile adder. The results are compared with results from the Leiden-Dwingeloo Survey, showing qualitative agreement, but also indicating that further studies are needed on the instrumental characteristics.

  4. A Parameterized Pattern-Error Objective for Large-Scale Phase-Only Array Pattern Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-21

    only arrays,” in Proc. Int’l Conf. on Neural Networks and Signal Processing, vol. 2, 2003, pp. 1290–1293. 24. I. D. Olin, “Flat-top sector beams...failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE...transmitters will continue to offer only phase control . This considerably complicates the design of custom array patterns for transmit arrays, as all but

  5. Phased-array optical whispering gallery mode modulation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator device and method capable of filtering sidebands of optical modulators are provided. The method includes providing an optical resonator adapted to support whispering gallery modes and forming a first field and a second field from a first location and a second location, respectively, at the circumference of the optical resonator and being separated by an arc angle, .alpha.. The method includes adjusting relative phase between the first field and the second field in accordance to a differential phase, .beta., and combining the first and the second fields into an output. Particular selection of the arc angle, .alpha., and the differential phase, .beta., can determine the function of the output.

  6. Wavefront sensing and adaptive control in phased array of fiber collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachinova, Svetlana L.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.

    2011-03-01

    A new wavefront control approach for mitigation of atmospheric turbulence-induced wavefront phase aberrations in coherent fiber-array-based laser beam projection systems is introduced and analyzed. This approach is based on integration of wavefront sensing capabilities directly into the fiber-array transmitter aperture. In the coherent fiber array considered, we assume that each fiber collimator (subaperture) of the array is capable of precompensation of local (onsubaperture) wavefront phase tip and tilt aberrations using controllable rapid displacement of the tip of the delivery fiber at the collimating lens focal plane. In the technique proposed, this tip and tilt phase aberration control is based on maximization of the optical power received through the same fiber collimator using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) technique. The coordinates of the fiber tip after the local tip and tilt aberrations are mitigated correspond to the coordinates of the focal-spot centroid of the optical wave backscattered off the target. Similar to a conventional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, phase function over the entire fiber-array aperture can then be retrieved using the coordinates obtained. The piston phases that are required for coherent combining (phase locking) of the outgoing beams at the target plane can be further calculated from the reconstructed wavefront phase. Results of analysis and numerical simulations are presented. Performance of adaptive precompensation of phase aberrations in this laser beam projection system type is compared for various system configurations characterized by the number of fiber collimators and atmospheric turbulence conditions. The wavefront control concept presented can be effectively applied for long-range laser beam projection scenarios for which the time delay related with the double-pass laser beam propagation to the target and back is compared or even exceeds the characteristic time of the atmospheric turbulence change

  7. PMN-PT single-crystal high-frequency kerfless phased array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruimin; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor E; Lam, Kwok Ho; Hsu, Hsiu-sheng; Zheng, Fan; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of a miniature high-frequency kerfless phased array prepared from a PMN-PT single crystal for forward-looking intravascular or endoscopic imaging applications. After lapping down to around 40 μm, the PMN-PT material was utilized to fabricate 32-element kerfless phased arrays using micromachining techniques. The aperture size of the active area was only 1.0 × 1.0 mm. The measured results showed that the array had a center frequency of 40 MHz, a bandwidth of 34% at -6 dB with a polymer matching layer, and an insertion loss of 20 dB at the center frequency. Phantom images were acquired and compared with simulated images. The results suggest that the feasibility of developing a phased array mounted at the tip of a forward-looking intravascular catheter or endoscope. The fabricated array exhibits much higher sensitivity than PZT ceramic-based arrays and demonstrates that PMN-PT is well suited for this application.

  8. K-Band Phased Array Developed for Low- Earth-Orbit Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzic, Godfrey

    1999-01-01

    Future rapid deployment of low- and medium-Earth-orbit satellite constellations that will offer various narrow- to wide-band wireless communications services will require phased-array antennas that feature wide-angle and superagile electronic steering of one or more antenna beams. Antennas, which employ monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), are perfectly suited for this application. Under a cooperative agreement, an MMIC-based, K-band phased-array antenna is being developed with 50/50 cost sharing by the NASA Lewis Research Center and Raytheon Systems Company. The transmitting array, which will operate at 19 gigahertz (GHz), is a state-of-the-art design that features dual, independent, electronically steerable beam operation ( 42 ), a stand-alone thermal management, and a high-density tile architecture. This array can transmit 622 megabits per second (Mbps) in each beam from Earth orbit to small Earth terminals. The weight of the total array package is expected to be less than 8 lb. The tile integration technology (flip chip MMIC tile) chosen for this project represents a major advancement in phased-array engineering and holds much promise for reducing manufacturing costs.

  9. PMN-PT Single-Crystal High-Frequency Kerfless Phased Array

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruimin; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor E.; Lam, Kwok Ho; Hsu, Hsiu-sheng; Zheng, Fan; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of a miniature high-frequency kerfless phased array prepared from a PMN-PT single crystal for forward-looking intravascular or endoscopic imaging applications. After lapping down to around 40 μm, the PMN-PT material was utilized to fabricate 32-element kerfless phased arrays using micromachining techniques. The aperture size of the active area was only 1.0 × 1.0 mm. The measured results showed that the array had a center frequency of 40 MHz, a bandwidth of 34% at −6 dB with a polymer matching layer, and an insertion loss of 20 dB at the center frequency. Phantom images were acquired and compared with simulated images. The results suggest that the feasibility of developing a phased array mounted at the tip of a forward-looking intravascular catheter or endoscope. The fabricated array exhibits much higher sensitivity than PZT ceramic-based arrays and demonstrates that PMN-PT is well suited for this application. PMID:24859667

  10. Global phase synchronization in an array of time-delay systems.

    PubMed

    Suresh, R; Senthilkumar, D V; Lakshmanan, M; Kurths, J

    2010-07-01

    We report the identification of global phase synchronization (GPS) in a linear array of unidirectionally coupled Mackey-Glass time-delay systems exhibiting highly non-phase-coherent chaotic attractors with complex topological structure. In particular, we show that the dynamical organization of all the coupled time-delay systems in the array to form GPS is achieved by sequential synchronization as a function of the coupling strength. Further, the asynchronous ones in the array with respect to the main sequentially synchronized cluster organize themselves to form clusters before they achieve synchronization with the main cluster. We have confirmed these results by estimating instantaneous phases including phase difference, average phase, average frequency, frequency ratio, and their differences from suitably transformed phase coherent attractors after using a nonlinear transformation of the original non-phase-coherent attractors. The results are further corroborated using two other independent approaches based on recurrence analysis and the concept of localized sets from the original non-phase-coherent attractors directly without explicitly introducing the measure of phase.

  11. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2. Low-cost Solar Array Project, Task 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, M.

    1978-01-01

    Work was done to verify the technological readiness of a select process sequence with respect to satisfying the Low Cost Solar Array Project objectives of meeting the designated goals of $.50 per peak watt in 1986 (1975 dollars). The sequence examined consisted of: (1) 3 inches diameter as-sawn Czochralski grown 1:0:0 silicon, (2) texture etching, (3) ion implanting, (4) laser annealing, (5) screen printing of ohmic contacts and (6) sprayed anti-reflective coatings. High volume production projections were made on the selected process sequence. Automated processing and movement of hardware at high rates were conceptualized to satisfy the PROJECT's 500 MW/yr capability. A production plan was formulated with flow diagrams integrating the various processes in the cell fabrication sequence.

  12. System Design and Wide-field Imaging Aspects of Synthesis Arrays with Phased Array Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Jacob Dirk

    2012-12-01

    Dit proefschrift betreft het ontwerpen van synthese radiotelescopen, zoals LOFAR. Bekende ontwerpprincipes worden gecombineerd met een visie op technologische mogelijkheden die in de nabije toekomst binnen handbereik komen. De centrale vraag daarbij is hoe wetenschappelijke gebruikers met een gegeven budget een optimaal resultaat kunnen behalen. Systeemontwerp begint met een analyse van de fundamentele beperkingen van groothoek beeldvorming met apertuursynthese en van praktische beperkingen zoals verstoring door de ionosfeer. Deze analyse heeft geleid tot een aantal schaalwetten voor telescoop- en antenne-configuratie en voor de vereiste digitale processing. In een array antenne worden de signalen van een aantal antennes opgeteld tot een versterkt signaal uit een bepaalde richting. Deze array technologie geeft de mogelijkheid een gegeven aantal eenvoudige antennes optimaal te verdelen over een aantal stations. Ons onderzoek heeft laten zien dat de stations een minimum grootte nodig hebben om verstoring door de ionosfeer over het gehele beeldveld te kunnen corrigeren. Te kleine stations kunnen maar in een beperkt deel van hun grote beeldveld voldoende scherpte krijgen. Een te beperkt aantal stations leidt echter tot toename van ruis in het beeld die met extra beeldbewerking deels is te verwijderen. Een belangrijk resultaat van het werk is het ontwerp voor twee nieuwe methoden van beeldvorming waarbij de computer bewerking is teruggebracht tot een theoretisch minimum dat evenredig is met het oppervlak van het totale beeldveld gemeten in resolutie elementen. Voor een voldoend groot aantal stations is een optimale verdeling mogelijk waarmee maximale scherpte en minimale ruis is te realiseren binnen een totaal budget dat niet door de kosten van de benodigde computing faciliteiten wordt gedomineerd.

  13. Phase-Array Approach to Optical Whispering Gallery Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    This technology leverages the well-defined orbital number of a whispering gallery modulator (WGM) to expand the range of applications for such resonators. This property rigidly connects the phase variation of the field in this mode with the azimuthal angle between the coupling locations. A WGM with orbital momentum L has exactly L instant nodes around the circumference of the WGM resonator supporting such a mode. Therefore, in two locations separated by the arc alpha, the phase difference of such a field will be equal to phi= alpha L. Coupling the field out of such locations, and into a balanced interferometer, once can observe a complete constructive or distractive interference (or have any situation in between) depending on the angle alpha. Similarly, a mode L + delta L will pick up the phase phi + alpha delta L. In all applications of a WGM resonator as a modulator, the orbital numbers for the carrier and sidebands are different, and their differences delta L are known (usually, but not necessarily, delta L = 1). Therefore, the choice of the angle alpha, and of the interferometer arms difference, allows one to control the relative phase between different modes and to perform the conversion, separation, and filtering tasks necessary.

  14. Nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam models and measurement models for phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Gang, Tie

    2009-01-01

    A nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model is proposed in order to overcome the limitation that paraxial Gaussian beam models lose accuracy in simulating the beam steering behavior of phased array transducers. Using this nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model, the focusing and steering sound fields generated by an ultrasonic linear phased array transducer are calculated and compared with the corresponding results obtained by paraxial multi-Gaussian beam model and more exact Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral model. In addition, with help of this novel nonparaxial method, an ultrasonic measurement model is provided to investigate the sensitivity of linear phased array transducers versus steering angles. Also the comparisons of model predictions with experimental results are presented to certify the accuracy of this provided measurement model.

  15. Adhesive defect detection in composite adhesive joints using phased array transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2015-03-01

    Composite materials are widely used in aircraft structures due to their high specific stiffness and strength. The laminated nature of composite structures makes them subject to disbond and delamination. These types of defects will compromise the integrity of the structure and therefore need to be monitored. To monitor aircraft structures, light weight transducers capable of large area coverage are beneficial. Ultrasonic guided waves are able to travel long distance and are sensitive to localized defects. The multi-modal characteristic of propagating guided waves requires optimal mode selection and excitation. Phased array transducers provide good versatility for optimal mode excitation since they can excite different guided wave modes preferentially. Phased array transducers designed for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications are employed in this work to study the interaction between adhesive defects and guided wave modes. Amplitude ratios and wave packet composition are utilized as defect indicators that are uniquely available due to the phased array transducers.

  16. [Regularized inhomogeneity correction method for phased array image in magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongyu; Pei, Xiaomin; Luo, Weitao; Dai, Jianpin

    2011-10-01

    Phased array coils (multiple receiver coil systems) have been extensively used for acquisition of MR images owing to their ability of increasing SNR, extending field-of-view (FOV), and reducing acquisition time. But the SOS algorithm,which is main method for phased array image reconstruction,will cause inhomogeneity in reconstructed image. A regularized least square method for phased array image combination is proposed in this paper. In the method, an additional reference scan is performed in advance. By using the reference scan, coil sensitivity map can be acquired, and image reconstructed from reference scan can be used as reference data in the regulation term. Experiments showed that the image uniformity was greatly improved by this method with scanning phantom and volunteer.

  17. Experimental characterization of ultrasonic phased arrays for the nondestructive evaluation of concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, L.; Wooh, S.C.

    1999-02-01

    Novel ultrasonic phased arrays were developed and their feasibility was tested for assessing the condition of concrete structures. These sensors are based on low frequency ultrasound technology, which, to date, has been the preferred method for concrete testing. By combining multiple transducer elements in a linear configuration, dynamic phase focusing and steering of the ultrasound beam is possible. An automated testing assembly was used to assess the steering and focusing performance of the array in a cementitious medium. Experimental results demonstrate excellent steerability and accuracy when compared to the numerical simulation presented. The effective steering and focusing behavior in concrete signifies that phased arrays can be used as the primary imaging and scanning device for large scale concrete structures.

  18. The relationships between dispersion loss and sidelobe levels in wideband phased-array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Robert L., III; Belcher, Melvin L.; Corey, Larry E.

    Wideband phased-array radar systems experience significant problems created by frequency dispersion in the phased-array antenna. This phenomena has previously been studied for systems employing linear frequency modulation (LFM). LFM's vulnerability to deceptive electronic countermeasures (ECM) and signal-to-noise loss due to the amplitude weighting required to sufficiently suppress range sidelobes limit its usefulness. Pseudo-random noise (PRN) coded waveforms are capable of solving both these problems. This paper examines how the phased-array antenna affects the radar's performance when PRN coded waveforms are used. Issues of dispersion loss, grating lobe rejection, and compressed pulse shapes are considered. Where appropriate, results are compared to results from LFM systems. Sets of normalized curves are presented that quantify these effects in terms of signal bandwidth, subarray size, and antenna scan angle.

  19. Multiple wall-reflection effect in adaptive-array differential-phase reflectometry on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idei, H.; Mishra, K.; Yamamoto, M. K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hamasaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Onchi, T.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; QUEST Team

    2016-01-01

    A phased array antenna and Software-Defined Radio (SDR) heterodyne-detection systems have been developed for adaptive array approaches in reflectometry on the QUEST. In the QUEST device considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave (multiple wall-reflection) effect was significantly observed with distorted amplitude and phase evolution even if the adaptive array analyses were applied. The distorted fields were analyzed by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) in wavenumber domain to treat separately the components with and without wall reflections. The differential phase evolution was properly obtained from the distorted field evolution by the FFT procedures. A frequency derivative method has been proposed to overcome the multiple-wall reflection effect, and SDR super-heterodyned components with small frequency difference for the derivative method were correctly obtained using the FFT analysis.

  20. Shack-Hartmann Phasing of Segmented Telescopes: Systematic Effects from Lenslet Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troy, Mitchell; Chanan, Gary; Roberts, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The segments in the Keck telescopes are routinely phased using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with sub-apertures that span adjacent segments. However, one potential limitation to the absolute accuracy of this technique is that it relies on a lenslet array (or a single lens plus a prism array) to form the subimages. These optics have the potential to introduce wavefront errors and stray reflections at the subaperture level that will bias the phasing measurement. We present laboratory data to quantify this effect, using measured errors from Keck and two other lenslet arrays. In addition, as part of the design of the Thirty Meter Telescope Alignment and Phasing System we present a preliminary investigation of a lenslet-free approach that relies on Fresnel diffraction to form the subimages at the CCD. Such a technique has several advantages, including the elimination of lenslet aberrations.

  1. Identifying equivalent sound sources from aeroacoustic simulations using a numerical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignier, Nicolas J.; O'Reilly, Ciarán J.; Boij, Susann

    2017-04-01

    An application of phased array methods to numerical data is presented, aimed at identifying equivalent flow sound sources from aeroacoustic simulations. Based on phased array data extracted from compressible flow simulations, sound source strengths are computed on a set of points in the source region using phased array techniques assuming monopole propagation. Two phased array techniques are used to compute the source strengths: an approach using a Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse and a beamforming approach using dual linear programming (dual-LP) deconvolution. The first approach gives a model of correlated sources for the acoustic field generated from the flow expressed in a matrix of cross- and auto-power spectral values, whereas the second approach results in a model of uncorrelated sources expressed in a vector of auto-power spectral values. The accuracy of the equivalent source model is estimated by computing the acoustic spectrum at a far-field observer. The approach is tested first on an analytical case with known point sources. It is then applied to the example of the flow around a submerged air inlet. The far-field spectra obtained from the source models for two different flow conditions are in good agreement with the spectra obtained with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings integral, showing the accuracy of the source model from the observer's standpoint. Various configurations for the phased array and for the sources are used. The dual-LP beamforming approach shows better robustness to changes in the number of probes and sources than the pseudo-inverse approach. The good results obtained with this simulation case demonstrate the potential of the phased array approach as a modelling tool for aeroacoustic simulations.

  2. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection of Flaws on Weld Fusion Faces Using Full Matrix Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, R.; Russell, J.; Cawley, P.; Habgood, N.

    2009-03-01

    Work is being conducted to develop phased array inspection of stainless steel welded pipes. Ideally this uses waves reflected and mode converted at the inner surface of the pipe, but most commercial phased array controllers do not currently provide for this. Our solution was to use Full Matrix Capture (FMC) and process the data ourselves. This paper explains the FMC principle, describes the signal processing algorithms along with introducing the Almost Total Focusing Method (ATFM) and illustrates how the processed data was presented. The inspections were also modeled using the CEA CIVA software and compared to experimental results.

  3. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design, and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  4. Pulse-echo phased array ultrasonic inspection of pultruded rod stitched efficient unitized structure (PRSEUS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, P. H.

    2011-06-23

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading.

  5. Inspection of Spot Welds Using a Portable Ultrasonic Phased-Array System

    SciTech Connect

    Reverdy, F.; Hopkins, D.

    2005-04-09

    Results were presented last year to demonstrate the feasibility of using an ultrasonic phased array to inspect spot welds. Analysis of the signals in the Fourier domain allows identification of satisfactory, undersized and defective welds. Signal- and image-processing techniques have been implemented with the goal of extracting the dimensions of the weld nugget. The results presented here were obtained using a portable phased-array controller. Toward developing a fully portable system, a housing for the probe is under development with an integrated mechanical scanning system.

  6. Numerical generation of a polarization singularity array with modulated amplitude and phase.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dong; Peng, Xinyu; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Yanru

    2016-09-01

    A point having no defined polarized ellipse azimuthal angle (circularly polarized) in a space-variant vector field is called a polarization singularity, and it has three types: Lemon, Monstar, and Star. Recently, the connection of polarization singularities has been performed. Inspired by this, we conduct a numerical generation of a polarization singularity array. Our method is based on two orthogonal linearly polarized light beams with modulated amplitude and phase. With appropriate distribution functions of amplitudes and phases we can control the polarized states of polarization singularities, which offer a possibility to simulate a polarization singularity array.

  7. Pulse-Echo Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (prseus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2011-06-01

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading.

  8. Liquid sodium testing of in-house phased array EMAT transducer for L-wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bourdais, F.; Le Polles, T.; Baque, F.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development of an in-house phased array EMAT transducer for longitudinal wave inspection in liquid sodium. The work presented herein is part of an undergoing project aimed at improving in-service inspection techniques for the ASTRID reactor project. The design process of the phased array EMAT probe is briefly explained and followed by a review of experimental test results. We first present test results obtained in the laboratory while the last part of the paper describes the liquid sodium testing and the produced ultrasound images. (authors)

  9. Method for Fabricating and Packaging an M.Times.N Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Harish (Inventor); Xu, Xiaochuan (Inventor); Chen, Yihong (Inventor); Chen, Ray T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method for fabricating an M.times.N, P-bit phased-array antenna on a flexible substrate is disclosed. The method comprising ink jet printing and hardening alignment marks, antenna elements, transmission lines, switches, an RF coupler, and multilayer interconnections onto the flexible substrate. The substrate of the M.times.N, P-bit phased-array antenna may comprise an integrated control circuit of printed electronic components such as, photovoltaic cells, batteries, resistors, capacitors, etc. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  10. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam-forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  11. Optically controlled phased-array antenna technology for space communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1988-01-01

    Using MMICs in phased-array applications above 20 GHz requires complex RF and control signal distribution systems. Conventional waveguide, coaxial cable, and microstrip methods are undesirable due to their high weight, high loss, limited mechanical flexibility and large volume. An attractive alternative to these transmission media, for RF and control signal distribution in MMIC phased-array antennas, is optical fiber. Presented are potential system architectures and their associated characteristics. The status of high frequency opto-electronic components needed to realize the potential system architectures is also discussed. It is concluded that an optical fiber network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but may require higher power.

  12. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection for an Isogrid Structural Element with Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.; Schumacher, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this investigation, a T-shaped aluminum alloy isogrid stiffener element used in aerospace applications was inspected with ultrasonic phased array methods. The isogrid stiffener element had various crack configurations emanating from bolt holes. Computational simulation methods were used to mimic the experiments in order to help understand experimental results. The results of this study indicate that it is at least partly feasible to interrogate this type of geometry with the given flaw configurations using phased array ultrasonics. The simulation methods were critical in helping explain the experimental results and, with some limitation, can be used to predict inspection results.

  13. Visualization of phased-array sound fields and flaw interaction using the photoelastic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitte, T.; Orth, T.; Kersting, T.

    2012-05-01

    In order to visualize ultrasound in steel the photoelastic imager is a complementary technique to simulations, with the advantage that real transducers are used. In this contribution we show the linear behavior of the derived photoelastic signal and compare the results to FEM calculations. We use the result for quantitative analysis of sound-fields of immersion and phased array transducers. Interesting results are derived by analysis of the influence of missing elements on the shape and intensity of phased array (PA) ultrasonic pulses. Furthermore the formation of grating lobes from PA excitation is demonstrated and the plurality of waves generated from a small notch is displayed exemplarily.

  14. Validating Phasing and Geometry of Large Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standley, Shaun P.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Rabbette, Maura

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-sized and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone. The Kepler photometer is an array of 42 CCDs (charge-coupled devices) in the focal plane of a 95-cm Schmidt camera onboard the Kepler spacecraft. Each 50x25-mm CCD has 2,200 x 1,024 pixels. The CCDs accumulate photons and are read out every six seconds to prevent saturation. The data is integrated for 30 minutes, and then the pixel data is transferred to onboard storage. The data is subsequently encoded and transmitted to the ground. During End-to-End Information System (EEIS) testing of the Kepler Mission System (KMS), there was a need to verify that the pixels requested by the science team operationally were correctly collected, encoded, compressed, stored, and transmitted by the FS, and subsequently received, decoded, uncompressed, and displayed by the Ground Segment (GS) without the outputs of any CCD modules being flipped, mirrored, or otherwise corrupted during the extensive FS and GS processing. This would normally be done by projecting an image on the focal plane array (FPA), collecting the data in a flight-like way, and making a comparison between the original data and the data reconstructed by the science data system. Projecting a focused image onto the FPA through the telescope would normally involve using a collimator suspended over the telescope opening. There were several problems with this approach: the collimation equipment is elaborate and expensive; as conceived, it could only illuminate a limited section of the FPA (.25 percent) during a given test; the telescope cover would have to be deployed during testing to allow the image to be projected into the telescope; the equipment was bulky and difficult to situate in temperature-controlled environments; and given all the above, test setup, execution, and repeatability were significant concerns. Instead of using this complicated approach of

  15. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements Made on a Williams International FJ44 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Horvath, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire noise source localization data on a full-scale Williams International FJ44 turbofan engine. Data were acquired with the array at three different locations relative to the engine, two on the side and one in front of the engine. At the two side locations the planar microphone array was parallel to the engine centerline; at the front location the array was perpendicular to the engine centerline. At each of the three locations, data were acquired at eleven different engine operating conditions ranging from engine idle to maximum (take off) speed. Data obtained with the array off to the side of the engine were spatially filtered to separate the inlet and nozzle noise. Tones occurring in the inlet and nozzle spectra were traced to the low and high speed spools within the engine. The phased array data indicate that the Inflow Control Device (ICD) used during this test was not acoustically transparent; instead, some of the noise emanating from the inlet reflected off of the inlet lip of the ICD. This reflection is a source of error for far field noise measurements made during the test. The data also indicate that a total temperature rake in the inlet of the engine is a source of fan noise.

  16. Measuring Noise Temperatures of Phased-Array Antennas for Astronomy at CSIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Hayman, D. B.; Hay, S. G.

    We describe the development of a noise-temperature testing capability for phased-array antennas operating in receive mode from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz. Sampled voltages from each array port were recorded digitally as the zenith-pointing array under test was presented with three scenes: (1) a large microwave absorber at ambient temperature, (2) the unobstructed radio sky, and (3) broadband noise transmitted from a reference antenna centred over and pointed at the array under test. The recorded voltages were processed in software to calculate the beam equivalent noise temperature for a maximum signal-to-noise ratio beam steered at the zenith. We introduced the reference-antenna measurement to make noise measurements with reproducible, well-defined beams directed at the zenith and thereby at the centre of the absorber target. We applied a detailed model of cosmic and atmospheric contributions to the radio sky emission that we used as a noise-temperature reference. We also present a comprehensive analysis of measurement uncertainty including random and systematic effects. The key systematic effect was due to uncertainty in the beamformed antenna pattern and how efficiently it illuminates the absorber load. We achieved a combined uncertainty as low as 4 K for a 40 K measurement of beam equivalent noise temperature. The measurement and analysis techniques described in this paper were pursued to support noise-performance verification of prototype phased-array feeds for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope.

  17. Phase-Locked Semiconductor Quantum Well Laser Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    occupation by the carriers by solving the Schr ~ dinger wave equation . The Hamiltonian (in the single 1’ particle approximation) that is used in this...z, y, z) with respect to z in comparison to the other terms. Eq. (4.41) has the form of the time - dependent Schr6dinger equation in two dimensions...where z plays the role of time [811. The solution to this equation has the form (Z’, Z) = exp I P(z) + -TrI21 (4.42) + 2q(z) i4 V. CHAPTER 4. PHASE

  18. Simulation studies promote technological development of radiofrequency phased array hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Wust, P; Seebass, M; Nadobny, J; Deuflhard, P; Mönich, G; Felix, R

    1996-01-01

    A treatment planning program package for radiofrequency hyperthermia has been developed. It consists of software modules for processing three-dimensional computerized tomography (CT) data sets, manual segmentation, generation of tetrahedral grids, numerical calculation and optimisation of three-dimensional E field distributions using a volume surface integral equation algorithm as well as temperature distributions using an adaptive multilevel finite-elements code, and graphical tools for simultaneous representation of CT data and simulation results. Heat treatments are limited by hot spots in healthy tissues caused by E field maxima at electrical interfaces (bone/muscle). In order to reduce or avoid hot spots suitable objective functions are derived from power deposition patterns and temperature distributions, and are utilised to optimise antenna parameters (phases, amplitudes). The simulation and optimisation tools have been applied to estimate the improvements that could be reached by upgrades of the clinically used SIGMA-60 applicator (consisting of a single ring of four antenna pairs). The investigated upgrades are increased number of antennas and channels (triple-ring of 3 x 8 antennas and variation of antenna inclination. Significant improvement of index temperatures (1-2 degrees C) is achieved by upgrading the single ring to a triple ring with free phase selection for every antenna or antenna pair. Antenna amplitudes and inclinations proved as less important parameters.

  19. Phase-field simulation of stripe arrays on metal bcc(110) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan-Mei; Backofen, Rainer; Voigt, Axel

    2008-05-01

    By using a phase-field model, we simulate formation and growth of stripe arrays starting with anisotropic growth of islands under the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on metal bcc(110) surfaces. The anisotropy is incorporated in terms of attachment kinetics that is locally limited at the island edge aligned to the y axis (or 100 ) and instantaneous at the island edge aligned to the x axis (or 110 ). By reproducing the stripe arrays under various anisotropy magnitudes, we investigate dynamics of formation and growth of the stripe arrays. While enhancing coarsening in the y direction, the anisotropy suppresses coarsening in the x direction at the early stage, which contributes to formation of stripe arrays. At long times, the stripe arrays develop the quasiperiodic uniaxial structure with the selected transversal slope and the decreasing longitudinal slope as consequence of competition between coarsening and roughening. At the case of the large anisotropy magnitude, the fast roughening is caused by the strongly limited attachment kinetics, where the transversal coarsening turns fast and then the uniaxial growth is broken finally. For the weak roughening at the case of the reduced anisotropy magnitude, the slow transversal coarsening is achieved with the fast longitudinal coarsening, which contributes to the stripe arrays of the regular period and the increasing uniaxial length. Such arrays have the potential to be used as templates to grow one-dimensional nanostructures.

  20. Application and Operations Concepts of Large Transmit Phased Array of Parabolic Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, Farid

    2006-01-01

    The primary motive for large transmit array of parabolic reflectors, also known as Uplink Array, was to explore alternate methods in order to replace the large 70m antennas of Deep Space Network (DSN) such that the core capability for emergency support to a troubled spacecraft in deep space is preserved. Given that the Uplink Array is a new technology, the focus has always been on its feasibility and phase calibration techniques, which by itself is quite a challenge. It would be interesting to examine, however, what else could be accomplished by the Uplink Array capability other than the emergency support to a troubled spacecraft in deep space. ... The objective of this paper is to discuss a few application scenarios and the corresponding operation concepts, such as lunar positioning system, high EIRP uplink and the synergies with solar radar, and high power RF beams.

  1. Characterization of an optical phased array for use in free space optical communication antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Igor; Harris, Scott R.; Stadler, Brian K.

    2008-08-01

    Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Arrays (LCOPA) capable of steering optical beams over large angles require very large number of individually addressable electrodes that can be reduced by grouping the electrodes into periodic pattern to modulate phase profiles with consequent stepwise phase corrections made by an additional LCOPA. Such phase ramp-corrector configuration allows for reductions in the total number of the addressed electrodes and results in lower costs of development and manufacturing of LCOPA devices. Characterization of the device made by Teledyne Scientific for an experimental RF/EO antenna has been accomplished. Issues concerning optical beam steering efficiency, incident angle dependency and transparent electrodes alignment were investigated.

  2. Phase shifting technique for extended inline holographic microscopy with a pinhole array.

    PubMed

    Graulig, Christian; Kanka, Mario; Riesenberg, Rainer

    2012-09-24

    Digital inline holographic microscopy using a pinhole for sample illumination allows lensless imaging. To overcome restrictions of the sample size and density in the setup additional reference waves are generated by extending the single pinhole to a regular 2D pinhole array illumination. A technique is presented that uses phase shifting between the pinhole waves. Multiple foci with stable phase differences and a phase error (rms) of 0.027 rad generate pinhole waves which illuminate an undiluted, dense blood smear sample. Amplitude and phase images of the blood sample were successfully reconstructed.

  3. High performing phase-based surface plasmon resonance sensing from metallic nanohole arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Z. L.; Wong, S. L.; Ong, H. C.; Wu, S. Y.; Ho, H. P.

    2014-04-28

    We show the spectral figure-of-merit (FOM) from nanohole arrays can be larger than 1900/RIU by phase-based surface plasmon resonance. By using temporal coupled mode theory, we find the p-s polarization phase jump is the sharpest when both the absorption and radiative decay rates of surface plasmon polaritons are matched, yielding an extremely small spectral differential phase linewidth and thus superior FOM. The result is supported by numerical simulation and experiment. As a demonstration, we show the phase detection outperforms the conventional spectral counterpart significantly by sensing the binding of bovine serum albumin antibodies under identical condition.

  4. Phased laser array for generating a powerful laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2004-02-17

    A first injection laser signal and a first part of a reference laser beam are injected into a first laser element. At least one additional injection laser signal and at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are injected into at least one additional laser element. The first part of a reference laser beam and the at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are amplified and phase conjugated producing a first amplified output laser beam emanating from the first laser element and an additional amplified output laser beam emanating from the at least one additional laser element. The first amplified output laser beam and the additional amplified output laser beam are combined into a powerful laser beam.

  5. Design of a K-Band Transmit Phased Array For Low Earth Orbit Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Thomas; Miller, Stephen; Kershner, Dennis; Anzic, Godfrey

    2000-01-01

    The design of a light weight, low cost phased array antenna is presented. Multilayer printed wiring board (PWB) technology is utilized for Radio Frequencies (RF) and DC/Logic manifold distribution. Transmit modules are soldered on one side and patch antenna elements are on the other, allowing the use of automated assembly processes. The 19 GHz antenna has two independently steerable beams, each capable of transferring data at 622 Mbps. A passive, self-contained phase change thermal management system is also presented.

  6. A novel, flat, electronically-steered phased array transducer for tissue ablation: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellens, Nicholas P. K.; Lucht, Benjamin B. C.; Gunaseelan, Samuel T.; Hudson, John M.; Hynynen, Kullervo H.

    2015-03-01

    Flat, λ/2-spaced phased arrays for therapeutic ultrasound were examined in silico and in vitro. All arrays were made by combining modules made of 64 square elements with 1.5 mm inter-element spacing along both major axes. The arrays were designed to accommodate integrated, co-aligned diagnostic transducers for targeting and monitoring. Six arrays of 1024 elements (16 modules) and four arrays of 6144 elements (96 modules) were modelled and compared according to metrics such as peak pressure amplitude, focal size, ability to be electronically-steered far off-axis and grating lobe amplitude. Two 1024 element prototypes were built and measured in vitro, producing over 100 W of acoustic power. In both cases, the simulation model of the pressure amplitude field was in good agreement with values measured by hydrophone. Using one of the arrays, it was shown that the peak pressure amplitude dropped by only 24% and 25% of the on-axis peak pressure amplitude when steered to the edge of the array (40 mm) at depths of 30 mm and 50 mm. For the 6144 element arrays studied in in silico only, similarly high steerability was found: even when steered 100 mm off-axis, the pressure amplitude decrease at the focus was less than 20%, while the maximum pressure grating lobe was only 20%. Thermal simulations indicate that the modules produce more than enough acoustic power to perform rapid ablations at physiologically relevant depths and steering angles. Arrays such as proposed and tested in this study have enormous potential: their high electronic steerability suggests that they will be able to perform ablations of large volumes without the need for any mechanical translation.

  7. The design and characterization of an ultrasound phased array suitable for deep tissue hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Aitkenhead, Adam H; Mills, John A; Wilson, Adrian J

    2008-11-01

    In this paper we describe the design and evaluation of a planar phased-array ultrasound transducer suitable for producing localized hyperthermia in solid tumors deep within the body. Simulation using a customized version of Ultrasim has been used to determine the relationship between the size and position of the focus and parameters of the array. These parameters include the overall size of the array and the size, shape and distribution of the individual elements. A 15-element prototype array has been constructed using the results of the simulation. Beam profile measurements on this transducer made in an acoustic tank were compared with the beam profile predicted by simulation. The results showed good agreement in the shape of the focal region, but with the focus closer to the surface of the physical transducer when compared with the simulation and with small high-intensity areas between the surface of the transducer and the focus in the measured profile. A sensitivity analysis using a simulated factorial experiment indicated that the presence of a secondary vibrational mode within the elements of the array was the principal cause for both the shift in the position of the focus and for the unwanted maxima close to the surface of the array. The results also showed that the array was tolerant of a large variation in output intensity of the individual elements in the array in producing a focal region. Extrapolation of the results obtained in this study indicate that an array of 60 elements, based on the design described, driven by 550 V peak-to-peak pulses would be capable of producing a peak focal intensity of 50 Wcm(-2) at a depth of 60 mm in tissue, which would be appropriate for hyperthermia used as an adjunct to radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

  8. Real-time B-scan ultrasonic imaging using a digital phased array system for NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunki-Jacobs, Robert; Thomas, Lewis

    A demonstration is presented of the ability to produce real-time images of metals on the basis of a phased-array ultrasound system. Attention is given to the critical role played by a beam-former. It is established that the present imaging system's resolution approaches the theoretical capabilities of the given aperture size and wavelength.

  9. Two dimensional thermo-optic beam steering using a silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, Rita; Preussner, Marcel W.; Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Kozak, Dmitry A.; Ferraro, Mike S.; Murphy, James L.

    2016-03-01

    Components for free space optical communication terminals such as lasers, amplifiers, and receivers have all seen substantial reduction in both size and power consumption over the past several decades. However, pointing systems, such as fast steering mirrors and gimbals, have remained large, slow and power-hungry. Optical phased arrays provide a possible solution for non-mechanical beam steering devices that can be compact and lower in power. Silicon photonics is a promising technology for phased arrays because it has the potential to scale to many elements and may be compatible with CMOS technology thereby enabling batch fabrication. For most free space optical communication applications, two-dimensional beam steering is needed. To date, silicon photonic phased arrays have achieved two-dimensional steering by combining thermo-optic steering, in-plane, with wavelength tuning by means of an output grating to give angular tuning, out-of-plane. While this architecture might work for certain static communication links, it would be difficult to implement for moving platforms. Other approaches have required N2 controls for an NxN element phased array, which leads to complexity. Hence, in this work we demonstrate steering using the thermo-optic effect for both dimensions with a simplified steering mechanism requiring only two control signals, one for each steering dimension.

  10. A prototype high-speed optically-steered X-band phased array antenna.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengfei; Tang, Suning; Raible, Daniel E

    2013-12-30

    We develop a prototype of optically-steered X-band phased array antenna with capabilities of multi-band and multi-beam operations. It exploits high-speed wavelength tunable lasers for optical true-time delays over a dispersive optical fiber link, enabling agile, broadband and vibration-free RF beam steering with large angle.

  11. Real-time phase measurement of optical vortices based on pixelated micropolarizer array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Dong, Fengliang; Qian, Kemao; Zhang, Qingchuan; Chu, Weiguo; Zhang, Yuntian; Ma, Xuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2015-08-10

    The special spiral phase structure of an optical vortex leads to an intriguing study in modern singular optics. This paper proposes a real-time phase measurement method of vortex beam based on pixelated micropolarizer array (PMA). Four phase-shifting fringe images can be obtained from a single interference image, thus the vortex beam phase can be obtained in real-time. The proposed method can achieve full-field phase measurement of the vortex beam with the advantages of lower computation and vibration resistance. In the experiments, the typical phases of vortex with different topological charges are loaded on a spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate diffraction vortex beam, and the phase distribution of vortex beam is obtained in real-time, which confirm the robustness of this method. This method is of great significance in promoting the study of optical vortices.

  12. Frequency Tunable Antennas and Novel Phased Array Feeding Networks for Next Generation Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avser, Bilgehan

    The thesis presents three dual-band frequency tunable antennas for carrier aggregation systems and two new feeding networks for reducing the number of phase shifters in limited-scan arrays. First, single- and dual-feed, dual-frequency, low-profile antennas with independent frequency tuning using varactor diodes are presented. The dual-feed planar inverted F-antenna (PIFA) has two operating frequencies which are independently tuned at 0.7--1.1 GHz and at 1.7--2.3 GHz with better than 10 dB impedance match. The isolation between the high-band and the low-band ports is > 13 dB; hence, one resonant frequency can be tuned without affecting the other. The single-feed contiguous-dual-band antenna has two resonant frequencies, which are independently tuned at 1.2--1.6 GHz at 1.6--2.3 GHz with better than 10 dB impedance match for most of the tuning range. And the single-feed dual-band antenna has two resonant frequencies, which are independently tuned at 0.7--1.0 GHz at 1.7--2.3 GHz with better than 10 dB impedance match for most of the tuning range. The tuning is done using varactor diodes with a capacitance range from 0.8 to 3.8 pF, which is compatible with RF MEMS devices. The antenna volumes are 63 x 100 x 3.15 mm3 on epsilon r = 3.55 substrates and the measured antenna efficiencies vary between 25% and 50% over the tuning range. The application areas are in carrier aggregation systems for fourth generation (4G) wireless systems. Next, a new phased array feeding network that employs random sequences of non-uniform sub-arrays (and a single phase shifter for each sub-array) is presented. When these sequences are optimized, the resulting phased arrays can scan over a wide region with low sidelobe levels. Equations for analyzing the random arrays and an algorithm for optimizing the array sequences are presented. Multiple random-solutions with different number of phase shifters and different set of sub-array groups are analyzed and design guidelines are presented. The

  13. A K-Band Linear Phased Array Antenna Based on Ba(0.60)Sr(0.40)TiO3 Thin Film Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R.; Bernhard, J.; Washington, G.; VanKeuls, F.; Miranda, F.; Cannedy, C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a 23.675 GHz linear 16-element scanning phased array antenna based on thin ferroelectric film coupled microstripline phase shifters and microstrip patch radiators.

  14. Prostate cancer: comparison of local staging accuracy of pelvic phased-array coil alone versus integrated endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils. Local staging accuracy of prostate cancer using endorectal coil MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Fütterer, Jurgen J; Engelbrecht, Marc R; Jager, Gerrit J; Hartman, Robert P; King, Bernard F; Hulsbergen-Van de Kaa, Christina A; Witjes, J Alfred; Barentsz, Jelle O

    2007-04-01

    To compare the visibility of anatomical details and prostate cancer local staging performance of pelvic phased-array coil and integrated endorectal-pelvic phased-array coil MR imaging, with histologic analysis serving as the reference standard. MR imaging was performed in 81 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved prostate cancer, prior to radical prostatectomy, on a 1.5T scanner. T2-weighted fast spin echo images of the prostate were obtained using phased-array coil and endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils. Prospectively, one radiologist, retrospectively, two radiologists and two less experienced radiologists working in consensus, evaluated and scored all endorectal-pelvic phased-array imaging, with regard to visibility of anatomical details and local staging. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed. Anatomical details of the overall prostate were significantly better evaluated using the endorectal-pelvic phased-array coil setup (P<0.05). The overall local staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the pelvic phased-array coil was 59% (48/81), 56% (20/36) and 62% (28/45), and for the endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils 83% (67/81), 64% (23/36) and 98% (44/45) respectively, for the prospective reader. Accuracy and specificity were significantly better with endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils (P<0.05). The overall staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the retrospective readers were 78-79% (P<0.05), 56-58% and 96%, for the endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils. Area under the ROC curve (Az) was significantly higher for endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils (Az=0.74) compared to pelvic phased-array coil (Az=0.57), for the prospective reader. The use of endorectal-pelvic phased array coils resulted in significant improvement of anatomic details, extracapsular extension accuracy and specificity. Overstaging is reduced significantly with equal sensitivity when an endorectal-pelvic phased-array coil is used.

  15. Development of a C-Scan phased array ultrasonic imaging system using a 64-element 35MHz transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Hu, Changhong; Zhang, Lequan; Snook, Kevin; Liang, Yu; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Liu, Ruibin; Geng, Xuecang; Jiang, Xiaoning; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-04-01

    Phased array imaging systems provide the features of electronic beam steering and dynamic depth focusing that cannot be obtained with conventional linear array systems. This paper presents a system design of a digital ultrasonic imaging system, which is capable of handling a 64-element 35MHz center frequency phased array transducer. The system consists of 5 parts: an analog front-end, a data digitizer, a DSP based beamformer, a computer controlled motorized linear stage, and a computer for post image processing and visualization. Using a motorized linear stage, C-scan images, parallel to the surface of scanned objects may be generated. This digital ultrasonic imaging system in combination a 35 MHz phased array appears to be a promising tool for NDT applications with high spatial resolution. It may also serve as an excellent research platform for high frequency phased array design and testing as well as ultrasonic array signal algorithm developing using system's raw RF data acquisition function.

  16. Array automated assembly task low cost silicon solar array project. Phase 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Clayton

    1980-12-01

    The initial contract was a Phase II Process Development for a process sequence, but with concentration on two particular process steps: laserscribing and spray-on junction formation. The add-on portion of the contract was to further develop these tasks, to incorporate spray-on of AR Coating and aluminum and to study the application of microwave energy to solar cell fabrication. The overall process cost projection is 97.918 cents/Wp. The major contributor to this excess cost is the module encapsulation materials cost. During the span of this contract the study of microwave application to solar cell fabrication produced the ability to apply this technique to any requirement of 600/sup 0/C or less. Above this temperature, non-uniformity caused the processing to be unreliable. The process sequence is described in detail, and a SAMICS cost analysis for each valid process step studied is presented. A temporary catalog for expense items is included, and engineering specifications for the process steps are given. (WHK)

  17. The OSU self-phased array for propagation measurements using the 11.7 GHz CTS beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobold, D. M.; Hodge, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A self phased array was developed for propagation measurements on an earth-space path. The 11.7 GHz CTS beacon was used as the signal source. The self phased array was used to measure angle of arrival as well as attenuation and scintillation statistics. The performance of the array is described, and sample data are presented. The tracking capability of the self phased array was also studied. This technique permits fully electronic, nonmechanical satellite tracking, thus simplifying unmanned operation and eliminating severe weather tracking constraints.

  18. Phase-locked arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Gourley, P.L.; Vawter, G.A.; Zolper, J.C.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1994-05-01

    Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) are of increasing interest to the photonics community because of their surface-emitting structure, simple fabrication and packaging, wafer-level testability and potential for low cost. Scaling VCSELs to higher power outputs requires increasing the device area, which leads to transverse mode control difficulties if devices become larger than 10-15 microns. One approach to increasing the device size while maintaining a well controlled transverse mode profile is to form coupled or phase-locked, two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs that are individually single-transverse mode. The authors have fabricated and characterized both photopumped and electrically injected two-dimensional VCSEL arrays with apertures over 100 microns wide. Their work has led to an increased understanding of these devices and they have developed new types of devices, including hybrid semiconductor/dielectric mirror VCSEL arrays, VCSEL arrays with etched trench, self-aligned, gold grid contacts and arrays with integrated phase-shifters to correct the far-field pattern.

  19. Graphene quantum dots modified silicon nanowire array for ultrasensitive detection in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. Y.; Duan, C. Y.; Zhu, Y. X.; Chen, Y. F.; Wang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Si nanostructure-based gas detectors have attracted much attention due to their huge surface areas, relatively high carrier mobility, maneuverability for surface functionalization and compatibility to modern electronic industry. However, the unstable surface of Si, especially for the nanostructures in a corrosive atmosphere, hinders their sensitivity and reproducibility when used for detection in the gas phase. In this study, we proposed a novel strategy to fabricate a Si-based gas detector by using the vertically aligned Si nanowire (SiNW) array as a skeleton and platform, and decorated chemically inert graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to protect the SiNWs from oxidation and promote the carriers’ interaction with the analytes. The radial core–shell structures of the GQDs/SiNW array were then assembled into a resistor-based gas detection system and evaluated by using nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as the model analyte. Compared to the bare SiNW array, our novel sensor exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity for detecting trace amounts of NO2 with the concentration as low as 10 ppm in room temperature and an immensely reduced recovery time, which is of significant importance for their practical application. Meanwhile, strikingly, reproducibility and stability could also be achieved by showing no sensitivity decline after storing the GQDs/SiNW array in air for two weeks. Our results demonstrate that protecting the surface of the SiNW array with chemically inert GQDs is a feasible strategy to realize ultrasensitive detection in the gas phase.

  20. Beam shaping with satellite phased array antennas: Inmarsat-3 requirements - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, Werner M.

    1990-10-01

    The performance requirements of the Inmarsat-3 communication satellites regarding the L-band spot coverages can be met optimally with a directly radiating phased array antenna. A novel approach to the synthesis of patterns for planar arrays is used to provide contoured beams which match the required spot coverage areas. The variation in gain over each spot beam coverage area is less than the allowed 5 dB. The required isolation of at least 18 dB regarding unwanted radiation on other coverage areas or land masses can be satisfied. The results are presented in graphical form as contour plots of the beam shapes for various coverage areas. Also shown contour plots of the aperture distribution over the planar array in magnitude and phase. The directivity for the various spot beams is calculated for an array of circular horn antennas as well as circular microstrip patches as radiating elements. Thereby, the array size is kept constant while the number of elements and their spacing is changed.

  1. DAMAS Processing for a Phased Array Study in the NASA Langley Jet Noise Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Plassman, Gerald e.

    2010-01-01

    A jet noise measurement study was conducted using a phased microphone array system for a range of jet nozzle configurations and flow conditions. The test effort included convergent and convergent/divergent single flow nozzles, as well as conventional and chevron dual-flow core and fan configurations. Cold jets were tested with and without wind tunnel co-flow, whereas, hot jets were tested only with co-flow. The intent of the measurement effort was to allow evaluation of new phased array technologies for their ability to separate and quantify distributions of jet noise sources. In the present paper, the array post-processing method focused upon is DAMAS (Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources) for the quantitative determination of spatial distributions of noise sources. Jet noise is highly complex with stationary and convecting noise sources, convecting flows that are the sources themselves, and shock-related and screech noise for supersonic flow. The analysis presented in this paper addresses some processing details with DAMAS, for the array positioned at 90 (normal) to the jet. The paper demonstrates the applicability of DAMAS and how it indicates when strong coherence is present. Also, a new approach to calibrating the array focus and position is introduced and demonstrated.

  2. Finite Element Analysis of Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspections on Anisotropic Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, G.; Tweedie, A.; Carpentier, C.; Reynolds, P.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a theoretical investigation into the behaviour of anisotropic welds under phased array inspection procedures using a 128 element linear array. Two advanced inspection techniques are simulated, and their suitability compared. A finite element (FE) model, configured in PZFlex, is used to represent both the variations in crystal orientation found in a typical anisotropic weld, and also the linear array configuration. Firstly, through transmission spectra of the weld are used to determine the optimum operating frequency and configuration of the array in order to detect a 3 mm SDH in the weld. Next, the Full Matrix Capture (FMC) technique is simulated, and an image of the weld constructed using the Total Focussing Method (TFM). This is accomplished by transmitting on each element sequentially, while receiving on the remaining 127 elements. This approach provides spatial averaging over the weld area, reducing the distortion caused by the anisotropic media. Finally, Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) methods were employed to coherently focus the array at the defect and compensate for the elemental timing variations caused by the complex medium. Results illustrate the potential for inspecting anisotropic welds when using correctly designed arrays and implementing novel inspection procedures.

  3. Measurement of Phased Array Point Spread Functions for Use with Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Chris; Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Bertolucci, Brandon; Woolwine, Kyle; Liu, Fei; Li, Juan; Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Microphone arrays can be used to localize and estimate the strengths of acoustic sources present in a region of interest. However, the array measurement of a region, or beam map, is not an accurate representation of the acoustic field in that region. The true acoustic field is convolved with the array s sampling response, or point spread function (PSF). Many techniques exist to remove the PSF's effect on the beam map via deconvolution. Currently these methods use a theoretical estimate of the array point spread function and perhaps account for installation offsets via determination of the microphone locations. This methodology fails to account for any reflections or scattering in the measurement setup and still requires both microphone magnitude and phase calibration, as well as a separate shear layer correction in an open-jet facility. The research presented seeks to investigate direct measurement of the array's PSF using a non-intrusive acoustic point source generated by a pulsed laser system. Experimental PSFs of the array are computed for different conditions to evaluate features such as shift-invariance, shear layers and model presence. Results show that experimental measurements trend with theory with regard to source offset. The source shows expected behavior due to shear layer refraction when observed in a flow, and application of a measured PSF to NACA 0012 aeroacoustic trailing-edge noise data shows a promising alternative to a classic shear layer correction method.

  4. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    SciTech Connect

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim; Mackersie, John; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-18

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imaging performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.

  5. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim; Mackersie, John; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imaging performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.

  6. Integral imaging using phase-only LCoS spatial light modulators as Fresnel lenslet arrays.

    PubMed

    Yöntem, Ali Özgür; Onural, Levent

    2011-11-01

    We present a digital integral imaging system. A Fresnel lenslet array pattern is written on a phase-only LCoS spatial light modulator device (SLM) to replace the regular analog lenslet array in a conventional integral imaging system. We theoretically analyze the capture part of the proposed system based on Fresnel wave propagation formulation. Because of pixelation and quantization of the lenslet array pattern, higher diffraction orders and multiple focal points emerge. Because of the multiple focal planes introduced by the discrete lenslets, multiple image planes are observed. The use of discrete lenslet arrays also causes some other artifacts on the recorded elemental images. The results reduce to those available in the literature when the effects introduced by the discrete nature of the lenslets are omitted. We performed simulations of the capture part. It is possible to obtain the elemental images with an acceptable visual quality. We also constructed an optical integral imaging system with both capture and display parts using the proposed discrete Fresnel lenslet array written on a SLM. Optical results when self-luminous objects, such as an LED array, are used indicate that the proposed system yields satisfactory results.

  7. An Automated Dosing Method for a HIFU Device Containing Multiple Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng Jenny; Barnes, Steve; Sekins, K. Michael

    2010-03-01

    A device containing multiple 2D therapeutic and imaging ultrasound phased arrays is proposed for acoustic hemostasis applications. An automated dosing algorithm selects the optimal combination of therapeutic phased arrays and calculates the acoustic power required of each array. Simulations demonstrate that therapeutic temperatures (70° Carrays mounted in panels that embody a cuff, patch or blanket type device. Using array and tissue target positions, an algorithm automatically estimates the available power at the target using depth, beam steering angles, directivity and the tissue properties. The individual array powers are then assigned using a power balance (equalization) algorithm that adjusts the size and shape of the heated target region. The treatment volume is adjusted by dynamically scanning the individual foci through patterns in the target zone. The temperature elevation was simulated using 3D finite element models. Numerical simulations were performed on the therapeutic performance of the device. The surface acoustic intensity of the arrays was maintained below a threshold associated with avoidance of skin burning. The total absorbed power in the target volume (8 mm diameter spherical target) producing therapeutic temperatures was 4 to 5 W for 30 second continuous dosing times. The spatial-peak-time-averaged intensity in the target focal zone was ≈600 W/cm2, below the inertial cavitation threshold for these conditions. Simulations showed that the proposed ultrasound device yielded a relatively uniform temperature distribution in the target volume.

  8. Reconfigurable Transmission Line for a Series-Fed Ku-Band Phased Array Using a Single Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas K.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda. Felix, A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a novel approach to realize a lowcost phased array using a simple feeding mechanism. Specifically, a single coplanar stripline (CPS) transmission line is used to feed the antenna array elements. By controlling the CPS's dielectric properties using a movable dielectric plunger, scanning is achieved. Due to its simplicity, single feed, and no phase shifters, this approach leads to a dramatic reduction in cost which does not scale for larger arrays.

  9. Experimental realization of smectic phase in vortex matter induced by symmetric potentials arranged in two-fold symmetry arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Valle, J.; Gomez, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Osorio, M. R.; Galvez, F.; Granados, D.; Vicent, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    Smectic order has been generated in superconducting Nb films with two-fold symmetry arrays of symmetric pinning centers. Magnetic fields applied perpendicularly to the films develop a vortex matter smectic phase that is easily detected when the vortices are commensurate with the pinning center array. The smectic phase can be turned on and off with external parameters.

  10. Feasibility of in vivo transesophageal cardiac ablation using a phased ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Werner, Jacob; Park, Eun-Joo; Lee, Hotaik; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-05-01

    Over 2.2 million Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation making it one of the most common arrhythmias. Cardiac ablation has shown a high rate of success in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Prevailing modalities for this treatment are catheter based radio-frequency ablation or surgery. However, there is measurable morbidity and significant costs and time associated with these invasive procedures. Due to these issues, developing a method that is less invasive to treat atrial fibrillation is needed. In the development of such a device, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for cardiac ablation was designed, constructed and evaluated. A goal of this research was to create lesions in myocardial tissue using a phased array. Based on multiple factors from array simulations, transesophageal imaging devices and throat anatomy, a phased ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus was designed and tested. In this research, a two-dimensional sparse phased array with the aperture size of 20.7 mm x 10.2 mm with flat tapered elements as a transesophageal ultrasound applicator was fabricated and evaluated with in vivo experiments. Five pigs were anesthetized; the array was passed through the esophagus and positioned over the heart. The array was operated for 8-15 min at 1.6 MHz with the acoustic intensity of 150-300 W/cm(2) resulting in both single and multiple lesions on atrial and ventricular myocardium. The average size of lesions was 5.1 +/- 2.1 mm in diameter and 7.8 +/- 2.5 mm in length. Based on the experimental results, the array delivered sufficient power to the focal point to produce ablation while not grossly damaging nearby tissue outside the target area. These results demonstrate a potential application of the ultrasound applicator to transesophageal cardiac surgery in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  11. In Vivo Evaluations of a Phased Ultrasound Array for Transesophageal Cardiac Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Devina; Werner, Jacob; Park, Eun-Joo; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common arrhythmias that affects over 2.2 million Americans each year. Catheter ablation, one of the effective treatments, has shown high rate of success in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Currently, radiofrequency which is being used for catheter ablation is an invasive procedure. Measurable morbidity and significant costs and time are associated with this modality of treatment of permanent or persistent atrial fibrillation. In order to address these issues, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for noninvasive cardiac ablation was designed, developed and evaluated. The ultrasound energy delivered by the phased array was used to create a lesion in the myocardial tissue. Various factors, simulation results of transducer arrays, current transesophageal medical devices, and throat anatomy, were considered while designing a phased ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus. For this research, a two-dimensional sparse phased array with flat tapered elements was fabricated and evaluated in in vivo experiments. Five pigs were anesthetized; the array was passed transesophagealy and positioned over the heart. An operating frequency of 1.6 MHz and 8˜15 minutes of array operation resulted in both single and multiple lesions on atrial and ventricular myocardium. The average size of lesions was 5.1±2.1 mm in diameter and 7.8±2.5 mm in length. Experimental results indicate that the array delivered sufficient power to produce ablation at the focal point while not grossly damaging the tissue surrounding the area of interest. These results demonstrate a potential application of the ultrasound applicator for noninvasive transesophageal cardiac surgery in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  12. Phase-noise-induced resonance in arrays of coupled excitable neural models.

    PubMed

    Xiaoming Liang; Liang Zhao

    2013-08-01

    Recently, it is observed that, in a single neural model, phase noise (time-varying signal phase) arising from an external stimulating signal can induce regular spiking activities even if the signal is subthreshold. In addition, it is also uncovered that there exists an optimal phase noise intensity at which the spiking rhythm coincides with the frequency of the subthreshold signal, resulting in a phase-noise-induced resonance phenomenon. However, neurons usually do not work alone, but are connected in the form of arrays or blocks. Therefore, we study the spiking activity induced by phase noise in arrays of globally and locally coupled excitable neural models. We find that there also exists an optimal phase noise intensity for generating large neural response and such an optimal value is significantly decreased compared to an isolated single neuron case, which means the detectability in response to the subthreshold signal of neurons is sharply improved because of the coupling. In addition, we reveal two new resonance behaviors in the neuron ensemble with the presence of phase noise: there exist optimal values of both coupling strength and system size, where the coupled neurons generate regular spikes under subthreshold stimulations, which are called as coupling strength and system size resonance, respectively. Finally, the dependence of phase-noise-induced resonance on signal frequency is also examined.

  13. GPS-Like Phasing Control of the Space Solar Power System Transmission Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psiaki, Mark L.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of phasing of the Space Solar Power System's transmission array has been addressed by developing a GPS-like radio navigation system. The goal of this system is to provide power transmission phasing control for each node of the array that causes the power signals to add constructively at the ground reception station. The phasing control system operates in a distributed manner, which makes it practical to implement. A leader node and two radio navigation beacons are used to control the power transmission phasing of multiple follower nodes. The necessary one-way communications to the follower nodes are implemented using the RF beacon signals. The phasing control system uses differential carrier phase relative navigation/timing techniques. A special feature of the system is an integer ambiguity resolution procedure that periodically resolves carrier phase cycle count ambiguities via encoding of pseudo-random number codes on the power transmission signals. The system is capable of achieving phasing accuracies on the order of 3 mm down to 0.4 mm depending on whether the radio navigation beacons operate in the L or C bands.

  14. Measuring phased-array antenna beampatterns with high dynamic range for the Murchison Widefield Array using 137 MHz ORBCOMM satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neben, A. R.; Bradley, R. F.; Hewitt, J. N.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-07-01

    Detection of the fluctuations in a 21 cm line emission from neutral hydrogen during the Epoch of Reionization in thousand hour integrations poses stringent requirements on calibration and image quality, both of which necessitate accurate primary beam models. The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) uses phased-array antenna elements which maximize collecting area at the cost of complexity. To quantify their performance, we have developed a novel beam measurement system using the 137 MHz ORBCOMM satellite constellation and a reference dipole antenna. Using power ratio measurements, we measure the in situ beampattern of the MWA antenna tile relative to that of the reference antenna, canceling the variation of satellite flux or polarization with time. We employ angular averaging to mitigate multipath effects (ground scattering) and assess environmental systematics with a null experiment in which the MWA tile is replaced with a second-reference dipole. We achieve beam measurements over 30 dB dynamic range in beam sensitivity over a large field of view (65% of the visible sky), far wider and deeper than drift scans through astronomical sources allow. We verify an analytic model of the MWA tile at this frequency within a few percent statistical scatter within the full width at half maximum. Toward the edges of the main lobe and in the sidelobes, we measure tens of percent systematic deviations. We compare these errors with those expected from known beamforming errors.

  15. Manipulating electronic phase separation in strongly correlated oxides with an ordered array of antidots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Du, Kai; Liu, Hao; Zhang, X. -G.; Lan, Fanli; Lin, Hanxuan; Wei, Wengang; Zhu, Yinyan; Kou, Yunfang; Shao, Jian; Niu, Jiebin; Wang, Wenbin; Wu, Ruqian; Yin, Lifeng; Plummer, E. W.; Shen, Jian

    2015-07-20

    The interesting transport and magnetic properties in manganites depend sensitively on the nucleation and growth of electronic phase-separated domains. In this paper, by fabricating antidot arrays in La0.325Pr0.3Ca0.375MnO3 (LPCMO) epitaxial thin films, we create ordered arrays of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic metallic (FMM) rings in the LPCMO films that lead to dramatically increased metal–insulator transition temperatures and reduced resistances. The FMM rings emerge from the edges of the antidots where the lattice symmetry is broken. Based on our Monte Carlo simulation, these FMM rings assist the nucleation and growth of FMM phase domains increasing the metal–insulator transition with decreasing temperature or increasing magnetic field. Finally, this study points to a way in which electronic phase separation in manganites can be artificially controlled without changing chemical composition or applying external field.

  16. DC electric field induced phase array self-assembly of Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavali, S.; Sachan, R.; Dyck, O.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we report the discovery of phase array self-assembly, a new way to spontaneously make periodic arrangements of metal nanoparticles. An initially random arrangement of gold (Au) or silver (Ag) nanoparticles on SiO2/Si substrates was irradiated with linearly polarized (P) laser light in the presence of a dc electric (E) field applied to the insulating substrate. For E fields parallel to the laser polarization (E \\parallel P), the resulting periodic ordering was single-crystal like with extremely low defect density and covered large macroscopic areas. The E field appears to be modifying the phase between radiation scattered by the individual nanoparticles thus leading to enhanced interference effects. While phase array behavior is widely known in antenna technology, this is the first evidence that it can also aid in nanoscale self-assembly. These results provide a simple way to produce periodic metal nanoparticles over large areas.

  17. Deconvolution Methods and Systems for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Mapping coherent/incoherent acoustic sources as determined from a phased microphone array. A linear configuration of equations and unknowns are formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more cross-beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. An equation derived from the linear configuration of equations and unknowns can then be iteratively determined. The equation can be attained by the solution requirement of a constraint equivalent to the physical assumption that the coherent sources have only in phase coherence. The size of the problem may then be reduced using zoning methods. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with a phased microphone array (microphones arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations) in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  18. Manipulating electronic phase separation in strongly correlated oxides with an ordered array of antidots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Du, Kai; Liu, Hao; Zhang, X.-G.; Lan, Fanli; Lin, Hanxuan; Wei, Wengang; Zhu, Yinyan; Kou, Yunfang; Shao, Jian; Niu, Jiebin; Wang, Wenbin; Wu, Ruqian; Yin, Lifeng; Plummer, E. W.; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The interesting transport and magnetic properties in manganites depend sensitively on the nucleation and growth of electronic phase-separated domains. By fabricating antidot arrays in La0.325Pr0.3Ca0.375MnO3 (LPCMO) epitaxial thin films, we create ordered arrays of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic metallic (FMM) rings in the LPCMO films that lead to dramatically increased metal–insulator transition temperatures and reduced resistances. The FMM rings emerge from the edges of the antidots where the lattice symmetry is broken. Based on our Monte Carlo simulation, these FMM rings assist the nucleation and growth of FMM phase domains increasing the metal–insulator transition with decreasing temperature or increasing magnetic field. This study points to a way in which electronic phase separation in manganites can be artificially controlled without changing chemical composition or applying external field. PMID:26195791

  19. Manipulating electronic phase separation in strongly correlated oxides with an ordered array of antidots

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Kai; Du, Kai; Liu, Hao; ...

    2015-07-20

    The interesting transport and magnetic properties in manganites depend sensitively on the nucleation and growth of electronic phase-separated domains. In this paper, by fabricating antidot arrays in La0.325Pr0.3Ca0.375MnO3 (LPCMO) epitaxial thin films, we create ordered arrays of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic metallic (FMM) rings in the LPCMO films that lead to dramatically increased metal–insulator transition temperatures and reduced resistances. The FMM rings emerge from the edges of the antidots where the lattice symmetry is broken. Based on our Monte Carlo simulation, these FMM rings assist the nucleation and growth of FMM phase domains increasing the metal–insulator transition with decreasing temperature or increasingmore » magnetic field. Finally, this study points to a way in which electronic phase separation in manganites can be artificially controlled without changing chemical composition or applying external field.« less

  20. Development of a twin crystal membrane coupled conformable phased array for the inspection of austenitic welds

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.; Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2011-06-23

    The inspection of welded austenitic stainless steel components can be challenging. Austenitic welds contain an anisotropic, inhomogeneous grain structure which causes attenuation, scattering and beam bending. The inspection of components where the weld cap has not been removed is even more difficult due to the irregularity of the surface geometry. A twin crystal membrane coupled device has now been produced containing two linear phased arrays positioned adjacent to one another within the same housing. The arrays are angled relative to one another so that the transducer provides a pseudo-focusing effect at a depth corresponding to the beam crossing point. This type of design is used to improve the signal to noise ratio of the defect response in comparison to simple linear phased array transducer designs and to remove an internal noise signal found in linear phased array devices. Experimental results obtained from the through weld inspection of an austenitic stainless steel component with an undressed weld cap using the twin crystal membrane device are presented. These results demonstrate that small lack of side wall fusion defects can be reliably detected in large complex structures.

  1. Ultrasound array transmitter architecture with high timing resolution using embedded phase-locked loops.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter R; Cowell, David M J; Raiton, Benjamin; Ky, Chau Vo; Freear, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Coarse time quantization of delay profiles within ultrasound array systems can produce undesirable side lobes in the radiated beam profile. The severity of these side lobes is dependent upon the magnitude of phase quantization error--the deviation from ideal delay profiles to the achievable quantized case. This paper describes a method to improve interchannel delay accuracy without increasing system clock frequency by utilizing embedded phase-locked loop (PLL) components within commercial field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). Precise delays are achieved by shifting the relative phases of embedded PLL output clocks in 208-ps steps. The described architecture can achieve the necessary interelement timing resolution required for driving ultrasound arrays up to 50 MHz. The applicability of the proposed method at higher frequencies is demonstrated by extrapolating experimental results obtained using a 5-MHz array transducer. Results indicate an increase in transmit dynamic range (TDR) when using accurate delay profiles generated by the embedded-PLL method described, as opposed to using delay profiles quantized to the system clock.

  2. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  3. Phased-Array Study of Dual-Flow Jet Noise: Effect of Nozzles and Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soo Lee, Sang; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    A 16-microphone linear phased-array installed parallel to the jet axis and a 32-microphone azimuthal phased-array installed in the nozzle exit plane have been applied to identify the noise source distributions of nozzle exhaust systems with various internal mixers (lobed and axisymmetric) and nozzles (three different lengths). Measurements of velocity were also obtained using cross-stream stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). Among the three nozzle lengths tested, the medium length nozzle was the quietest for all mixers at high frequency on the highest speed flow condition. Large differences in source strength distributions between nozzles and mixers occurred at or near the nozzle exit for this flow condition. The beamforming analyses from the azimuthal array for the 12-lobed mixer on the highest flow condition showed that the core flow and the lobe area were strong noise sources for the long and short nozzles. The 12 noisy spots associated with the lobe locations of the 12-lobed mixer with the long nozzle were very well detected for the frequencies 5 KHz and higher. Meanwhile, maps of the source strength of the axisymmetric splitter show that the outer shear layer was the most important noise source at most flow conditions. In general, there was a good correlation between the high turbulence regions from the PIV tests and the high noise source regions from the phased-array measurements.

  4. Report for simultaneous, multiple independently steered beam study for Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design concepts of an array for the formation of multiple, simultaneous, independently pointed beams for satellite communication links were investigated through tradeoffs of various approaches which were conceived as possible solutions to the problem. After the preferred approach was selected, a more detailed design was configured and is presented as a candidate system that should be given further consideration for development leading to a preliminary design. This array uses an attenuator and a phase shifter with every element. The aperture excitation necessary to form the four beams is calculated and then placed across the array using these devices. Pattern analysis was performed for two beam and four beam cases with numerous patterns being presented. Parameter evaluation shown includes pointing accuracy and beam shape, sidelobe characteristics, gain control, and beam normalization. It was demonstrated that a 4 bit phase shifter and a 6 bit, 30 dB attenuator were sufficient to achieve adequate pattern performances. The phase amplitude steered multibeam array offers the flexibility of 1 to 4 beams with an increase in gain of 6 dB if only one beam is selected.

  5. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1990-01-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  6. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  7. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.

    1990-06-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  8. Flexible, phase-matched, linear receive arrays for high-field MRI in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Goense, Jozien; Logothetis, Nikos K; Merkle, Hellmut

    2010-10-01

    High signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) are essential for high-resolution anatomical and functional MRI. Phased arrays are advantageous for this but have the drawback that they often have inflexible and bulky configurations. Particularly in experiments where functional MRI is combined with simultaneous electrophysiology, space constraints can be prohibitive. To this end we developed a highly flexible multiple receive element phased array for use on anesthetized monkeys. The elements are interchangeable and different sizes and combinations of coil elements can be used, for instance, combinations of single and overlapped elements. The preamplifiers including control electronics are detachable and can serve a variety of prefabricated and phase matched arrays of different configurations, allowing the elements to always be placed in close proximity to the area of interest. Optimizing performance of the individual elements ensured high SNR at the cortical surface as well as in deeper laying structures. Performance of a variety of arrangements of gapped linear arrays was evaluated at 4.7 and 7T in high-resolution anatomical and functional MRI.

  9. Fabrication and performance of a miniaturized 64-element high-frequency endoscopic phased array.

    PubMed

    Bezanson, Andre; Adamson, Rob; Brown, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a 40-MHz, 64-element phased-array transducer packaged in a 2.5 x 3.1 mm endoscopic form factor. The array is a forward-looking semi-kerfed design based on a 0.68Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3) - 0.32PbTiO3 (PMN-32%PT) single-crystal wafer with an element-to-element pitch of 38 µm. To achieve a miniaturized form factor, a novel technique of wire bonding the array elements to a polyimide flexible circuit board oriented parallel to the forward looking ultrasound beam and perpendicular to the array was developed. A technique of partially dicing into the back of the array was also implemented to improve the directivity of the array elements. The array was fabricated with a single-layer P(VDF-TrFE)-copolymer matching layer and a polymethylpentene (TPX) lens for passive elevation focusing to a depth of 7 mm. The two-way -6-dB pulse bandwidth was measured to be 55% and the average electromechanical coupling (k(eff)) for the individual elements was measured to be 0.62. The one-way -6-dB directivities from several array elements were measured to be ±20°, which was shown to be an improvement over an identical kerfless array. The -3-dB elevation focus resulting from the TPX lens was measured to be 152 µm at the focal depth, and the focused lateral resolution was measured to be 80 µm at a steering angle of 0°. To generate beam profiles and images, the probe was connected to a commercial ultrasound imaging platform which was reprogrammed to allow for phased array transmit beamforming and receive data collection. The collected RF data were then processed offline using a numerical computing script to generate sector images. The radiation pattern for the beamformed transmit pulse was collected along with images of wire phantoms in water and tissue-equivalent medium with a dynamic range of 60 dB. Finally, ex vivo tissue images were generated of porcine brain tissue.

  10. Flat-Top Sector Beams Using Only Array Element Phase Weighting: A Metaheuristic Optimization Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-10

    Technique,” Microwave and Optical Technology Letters 23(4), 224–226 (November 1999). 11. W.T. Li and X.W. Shi, “An Improved Particle Swarm...Unequally Spaced Linear Antenna Arrays Using a Modified Tabu Search Algorithm,” Microwave and Optical Technology Letters 36(1), 16–20 (2003...DeFord, J.F., and O.P. Gandhi , “Phase-Only Synthesis of Minimum Peak Sidelobe Patterns for Linear and Planar Arrays,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 36(2

  11. Laser induced ultrasonic phased array using full matrix capture data acquisition and total focusing method.

    PubMed

    Stratoudaki, Theodosia; Clark, Matt; Wilcox, Paul D

    2016-09-19

    Laser ultrasonics is a technique where lasers are employed to generate and detect ultrasound. A data collection method (full matrix capture) and a post processing imaging algorithm, the total focusing method, both developed for ultrasonic arrays, are modified and used in order to enhance the capabilities of laser ultrasonics for nondestructive testing by improving defect detectability and increasing spatial resolution. In this way, a laser induced ultrasonic phased array is synthesized. A model is developed and compared with experimental results from aluminum samples with side drilled holes and slots at depths of 5 - 20 mm from the surface.

  12. Nonequilibriun Dynamic Phases of Driven Vortex Lattices in Superconductors with Periodic Pinning Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Olson, C. J.; Nori, F.

    1998-03-01

    We present results from extensive simulations of driven vortex lattices interacting with periodic pinning arrays. Changing an applied driving force produces an exceptionally rich variety of distinct dynamic phases which include over a dozen well defined plastic flow phases. Transitions between different dynamical phases are marked by sharp jumps in the V(I) curves that coincide with distinct changes in the vortex trajectories and vortex lattice order. A series of dynamical phase diagrams are presented which outline the onset of the different dynamical phases (C. Reichhardt, C.J. Olson, and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 2648 (1997); and to be published. Videos are avaliable at http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/ñori/. Using force balance arguments, several of the phase boundaries can be derived analyticaly.

  13. Fundamental study of molten pool depth measurement method using an ultrasonic phased array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizota, Hirohisa; Nagashima, Yoshiaki; Obana, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The molten pool depth measurement method using an ultrasonic phased array system has been developed. The molten pool depth distribution is evaluated by comparing the times taken by the ultrasonic wave to propagate through a molten pool and a solid-phase and through only the solid-phase near the molten pool. Maximum molten pool depths on a flat type-304 stainless-steel plate, formed with a gas tungsten arc welding machine for different welding currents from 70 to 150 A, were derived within an error of ±0.5 mm.

  14. Phase and vortex correlations in superconducting Josephson-junction arrays at irrational magnetic frustration.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo

    2008-07-11

    Phase coherence and vortex order in a Josephson-junction array at irrational frustration are studied by extensive Monte Carlo simulations using the parallel-tempering method. A scaling analysis of the correlation length of phase variables in the full equilibrated system shows that the critical temperature vanishes with a power-law divergent correlation length and critical exponent nuph, in agreement with recent results from resistivity scaling analysis. A similar scaling analysis for vortex variables reveals a different critical exponent nuv, suggesting that there are two distinct correlation lengths associated with a decoupled zero-temperature phase transition.

  15. The effect of variation in phased array element performance for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE).

    PubMed

    Duxbury, David; Russell, Jonathan; Lowe, Michael

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation into the effects of phased array element performance on ultrasonic beam integrity. This investigation has been performed using an array beam model based on Huygens' principle to independently investigate the effects of element sensitivity and phase, and non-functioning elements via Monte Carlo simulation. The purpose of this work is to allow a new method of array calibration for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) to be adopted that focuses on probe integrity rather than beam integrity. This approach is better suited to component inspections that utilise Full Matrix Capture (FMC) to record data as the calibration routine is uncoupled from the beams that the array is required to produce. For this approach to be adopted specifications must be placed on element performance that guarantee beam quality without carrying out any beam forming. The principal result of this investigation is that the dominant outcome following variations in array element performance is the introduction of beam artefacts such as main beam broadening, raising of the noise floor of the ultrasonic field, and the enlargement or creation of side lobes. Specifications for practical allowable limits of element sensitivity, element phase, and the number of non-functioning elements have been suggested based on a minimum amplitude difference between beam artefacts and the main beam peak of 8 dB. Simulation at a number of centre frequencies has led to a recommendation that the product of transducer bandwidth and maximum phase error should be kept below 0.051 and 0.035 for focused and plane beams respectively. Element sensitivity should be within 50% of mean value of the aperture, and no more than 9% of the elements should be non-functioning.

  16. Modeling and optimization of non-phased two-dimensional ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Alexey A.

    Ultrasonic image acquisition with non-phased 2D arrays is a relatively new method in NDE inspection. Historically, ultrasonic array development progressed mostly in the medical imaging where phased arrays found a great application. However, in the field of NDE inspection of metals, heavy plastics and composites, and many other materials the applicability of phased arrays is often restricted due to physical limitations. On the other hand, using versatile systems with mechanical scanning is not always convenient. Therefore, non-phased arrays of independent elements have a strong potential for becoming a valuable tool for rapid ultrasonic image acquisition in the industrial environment as well as in many other areas where conventional methods may not be applicable. The main motivation of this work is to build the necessary mathematical apparatus for estimating the process of signal and image formation in such systems. A model of signal penetration through a complex multilayered structure with non-parallel interfaces is discussed in the plane-wave approximation. This model is then refined to finite-size transducers and finite-size defects inside the sample. A new method of obtaining the beam structure in such multi-layered media is presented. The advantage of this method is that it allows for a very fast calculation while the precision is still comparable to more precise and more computationally expensive methods. A new method of calculating the response of the transducer to defects inside the sample is presented and discussed. The results of numerical calculations using these two methods are discussed and compared with experimental data. Using these models, image formation algorithms together with new image refining techniques are discussed.

  17. Solid-phase crystallization of amorphous silicon nanowire array and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Ryousuke; Kato, Shinya; Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2014-02-01

    An amorphous silicon nanowire (a-SiNW) array perpendicular to a glass substrate can be successfully obtained through the metal-assisted chemical etching of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. The solid-phase crystallization of a-SiNWs was carried out by thermal annealing in a forming gas in the temperature range from 600 to 900 °C. The effects of hydrogen in the film and the film morphology on the crystallization of a-SiNWs were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A higher hydrogen concentration of a-SiNWs reduced the crystallization temperature, as in a-Si thin films. It was also revealed that the large surface area of the a-SiNW array affected the crystallization process. We also studied the optical property of the fabricated SiNW array and demonstrated its high potential as an active layer in solar cells.

  18. Optimization of J-V characteristic in diode array for phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heng; Liu, Yan; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Chao; Song, Zhitang

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, current density-voltage (J-V) characteristic of dual trench diode array have been investigated by both TCAD model and experimental method. It is shown that the arsenic concentration in buried N+ layer (BNL), epitaxial (EPI) layer thickness, and the dosage of P region in PN junction are expected to be the prominent factors responsible for both of the leakage and drive current performance according to TCAD simulation. By introducing the optimal siliconbased results, the 4×4 diode arrays were successfully manufactured by 40nm CMOS technology. The median values of drive and reverse leakage current densities are 7.30×10-2 A/μm2 and 5.61×10-9 A/μm2, respectively. The breakdown voltages (BVDs) of diode array are exceeding 6V, and the Jon/Joff ratios of 109, which can satisfy the requirements of phase change memory (PCM) applications.

  19. Full-matrix capture and USB3.0 for open platform phased array instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Gavin; Lallement, Rémi; Carcreff, Ewen; Braconnier, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) using ultrasonic waves is an efficient technique to assess industrial component integrity. The use of array probes enables inspection flexibility and advanced imaging techniques such as the total focusing method (TFM). In particular, the TFM imaging approach tremendously increases the quantity of data compared to conventional ultrasonic testing. Data transfer rates from the ultrasonic equipment to the computer are therefore continuously increasing due to large quantities of data and high speed inspections. In this work, we propose to use a USB 3.0 communication protocol for high speed throughput in a phased array device. To our knowledge, such protocol has not be proposed before for such an equipment. In this paper, we show that this protocol offers high transfer rates and is suitably adapted to ultrasonic inspection with array probes.

  20. Precision SAW filters for a large phased-array radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydl, W. H.; Sander, W.; Wirth, W.-D.

    1981-05-01

    The electronically steerable radar (ELRA) at the Forschungsinstitut fuer Funk und Mathematik is an experimental S-band phased-array radar system consisting of separate transmitting and receiving arrays employing several coherent and incoherent signal-processing and data-handling techniques, incorporating multiple beam and multifunction operation for target search and tracking, adaptive interference suppression, and target resolution. This paper deals with the development and application of two types of SAW filters for the IF amplifier channel of the receiving array. Compared to conventional filters with lumped elements, these filters have some important merits. By making use of a special tuning technique, the center frequencies of all filters were adjusted, resulting in an rms deviation of less than 1 kHz. One type of the SAW filters represents an almost ideal approach of realizing a matched filter for rectangular shaped pulses. The conformity of the frequency responses of several hundred filters improved the noise suppression capability of the system.

  1. X-band printed phased array antennas using high-performance CNT/ion gel/Ag transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubb, Peter M.; Bidoky, Fazel; Mahajan, Ankit; Subbaraman, Harish; Li, Wentao; Frisbie, Daniel; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a fully printed phased array antenna developed on a 125 micron thick flexible Kapton substrate. Switching for the phase delay lines is accomplished using printed carbon nanotube transistors with ion gel dielectric layers. Design of each element of the phased array antenna is reported, including a low loss constant impedance power divider, a phase shifter network, and patch antenna design. Steering of an X-band PAA operating at 10GHz from 0 degrees to 22.15 degrees is experimentally demonstrated. In order to completely package the array with electrical interconnects, a single substrate interconnect scheme is also investigated.

  2. System-Level Integrated Circuit (SLIC) Technology Development for Phased Array Antenna Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windyka, John A.; Zablocki, Ed G.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and progress in developing a 'system-level' integrated circuit, or SLIC, for application in advanced phased array antenna systems. The SLIC combines radio-frequency (RF) microelectronics, digital and analog support circuitry, and photonic interfaces into a single micro-hybrid assembly. Together, these technologies provide not only the amplitude and phase control necessary for electronic beam steering in the phased array, but also add thermally-compensated automatic gain control, health and status feedback, bias regulation, and reduced interconnect complexity. All circuitry is integrated into a compact, multilayer structure configured for use as a two-by-four element phased array module, operating at 20 Gigahertz, using a Microwave High-Density Interconnect (MHDI) process. The resultant hardware is constructed without conventional wirebonds, maintains tight inter-element spacing, and leads toward low-cost mass production. The measured performances and development issues associated with both the two-by-four element module and the constituent elements are presented. Additionally, a section of the report describes alternative architectures and applications supported by the SLIC electronics. Test results show excellent yield and performance of RF circuitry and full automatic gain control for multiple, independent channels. Digital control function, while suffering from lower manufacturing yield, also proved successful.

  3. Wavenumber-frequency deconvolution of aeroacoustic microphone phased array data of arbitrary coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Cattafesta, Louis N.

    2016-11-01

    Deconvolution of aeroacoustic data acquired with microphone phased arrays is a computationally challenging task for distributed sources with arbitrary coherence. A new technique for performing such deconvolution is proposed. This technique relies on analysis of the array data in the wavenumber-frequency domain, allowing for fast convolution and reduced storage requirements when compared to traditional coherent deconvolution. A positive semidefinite constraint for the iterative deconvolution procedure is implemented and shows improved behavior in terms of quantifiable convergence metrics when compared to a standalone covariance inequality constraint. A series of simulations validates the method's ability to resolve coherence and phase angle relationships between partially coherent sources, as well as determines convergence criteria for deconvolution analysis. Simulations for point sources near the microphone phased array show potential for handling such data in the wavenumber-frequency domain. In particular, a physics-based integration boundary calculation is described, and can successfully isolate sources and track the appropriate integration bounds with and without the presence of flow. Magnitude and phase relationships between multiple sources are successfully extracted. Limitations of the deconvolution technique are determined from the simulations, particularly in the context of a simulated acoustic field in a closed test section wind tunnel with strong boundary layer contamination. A final application to a trailing edge noise experiment conducted in an open-jet wind tunnel matches best estimates of acoustic levels from traditional calculation methods and qualitatively assesses the coherence characteristics of the trailing edge noise source.

  4. Study on the characteristics of novel optical phase array based on waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-jing; Ye, Jia-Yu; Chen, Wen

    2016-10-01

    A novel scheme of optical phase array(OPA) based on wave-guide is represented in this paper. Fiber paths is main design of system, the single mode fibers are used as transmission paths, photonic crystal fibers(PCF) are adopted as the output array, LiNbO3 wave-guide is used as the phase modulator. The system configuration have been given in the paper, performance of main device such as LiNbO3 wave-guide and PCF array are analyzed. According to the theory of OPA and electro-optical effect of LiNbO3 wave-guide, the feasibility of system have been demonstrated. By adjusting the phase shift of each LiNbO3 wave-guide, the beam deflection have been observed. Simulation experiments have been implemented to study the influence of its structure parameter on output diffraction characteristics. The results show that the inter-elements distance, the quantity of fiber core and arrangement of fiber core affect the beam steering quality including full width at half-maximum(FWHM), output intensity distribution and normalized amplitude distribution. The grating lobes can be suppressed by smaller distance, the beam scanning accuracy is improved by more units of fiber core. Then two-dimension arrangements of fiber core is analyzed. By adjusting the arrangements of the fiber core, the coupling coefficient and the coupling length between two fiber core in the PCF array are changed, which conduct the different output amplitude distribution. So the structure parameter of PCF array is main factor to the beam steering. With the development of craft for PCF, the research result will provide assistance for the design of OPA in the future.

  5. A random phased array device for delivery of high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hand, J W; Shaw, A; Sadhoo, N; Rajagopal, S; Dickinson, R J; Gavrilov, L R

    2009-10-07

    Randomized phased arrays can offer electronic steering of a single focus and simultaneous multiple foci concomitant with low levels of secondary maxima and are potentially useful as sources of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). This work describes laboratory testing of a 1 MHz random phased array consisting of 254 elements on a spherical shell of radius of curvature 130 mm and diameter 170 mm. Acoustic output power and efficiency are measured for a range of input electrical powers, and field distributions for various single- and multiple-focus conditions are evaluated by a novel technique using an infrared camera to provide rapid imaging of temperature changes on the surface of an absorbing target. Experimental results show that the array can steer a single focus laterally to at least +/-15 mm off axis and axially to more than +/-15 mm from the centre of curvature of the array and patterns of four and five simultaneous foci +/-10 mm laterally and axially whilst maintaining low intensity levels in secondary maxima away from the targeted area in good agreement with linear theoretical predictions. Experiments in which pork meat was thermally ablated indicate that contiguous lesions several cm(3) in volume can be produced using the patterns of multiple foci.

  6. Element pattern of an axial dipole in a cylindrical phased array. I - Theory. II - Element design and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herper, J. C.; Hessel, A.; Tomasic, B.

    1985-03-01

    It is pointed out that circular cylindrical antenna arrays are of interest for radar and communication applications because of the uniformity of their circumferential radiation characteristics. In surveys of state-of-the-art arrays, most of the cited bibliographies deal with aperture arrays. On the other hand, a dipole element is an attractive choice for an array radiator due to its simplicity of manufacture, reasonably wide bandwidth and polarization purity. For this reason, a two-phase study has been conducted, taking into account a theoretical and experimental investigation. In the first phase, cylindrical stacked ring antenna arrays of uniformly spaced axial dipoles were investigated to establish the mutually coupled element pattern characteristics. The first part of the present paper is concerned with details of this investigation. The second part of the paper will provide an account of the second phase of the study, which consisted of experiments supporting the theoretical phase.

  7. Dynamic Phases in Driven Vortex Lattices in Superconductors with Periodic Pinning Arrays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Olson, C. J.; Nori, F.

    1997-03-01

    In an extensive series of simulations of driven vortices interacting with periodic pinning arrays, an extremely rich variety of novel plastic flow phases, very distinct from those observed in random arrays, are found as a function of applied driving force. We show that signatures of the transitions between these different dynamical phases appear as pronounced jumps and dips in the I-V curves, coinciding with marked changes in the microscopic structure and flow behavior of the vortex lattice. When the number of vortices is greater than the number of pinning sites, we observe up to six distinct dynamical phases, including a pinned phase, a flow of interstitial vortices between pinned vortices, a disordered flow, a 1D flow along the pinning rows, and a homogeneous flow. By varying a wide range of microscopic pinning parameters, including pinning strength, size, density, and degree of ordering, as well as varying temperature and commensurability, we obtain a series of dynamic phase diagrams. A short video will also be presented to highlight these different dynamic phases.

  8. An Integrated Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Chemical Microsensor Array for Gas-Phase Chemical Analysis Microsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Casalnuovo, stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    1999-07-20

    This paper describes preliminary results in the development of an acoustic wave (SAW) microsensor array. The array is based on a novel configuration that allows for three sensors and a phase reference. Two configurations of the integrated array are discussed: a hybrid multichip-module based on a quartz SAW sensor with GaAs microelectronics and a fully monolithic GaAs-based SAW. Preliminary data are also presented for the use of the integrated SAW array in a gas-phase chemical micro system that incorporates microfabricated sample collectors and concentrators along with gas chromatography (GC) columns.

  9. Surface-wave propagation and phase-velocity structure from observations on the USArray Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Anna E.

    We address questions relating to the velocity structure of the Earth in three ways: mapping the phase-velocity structure of the western United States, examining deviations of wave paths due to lateral variations in velocity, and demonstrating that Love wave fundamental-mode phase measurements from array methods can be significantly contaminated by overtone interference, dependent on differences in fundamental-mode and first-overtone phase-velocity structure. All of the studies presented in this work use USArray Transportable Array data, which allow for dense, high-quality measurements at an unprecedented level. To image the uppermost mantle beneath the western US, we improve upon single-station phase measurements by differencing them to produce a baseline data set of phase measurements along inter-station paths, for both Love and Rayleigh waves from 25--100 s. Additional measurements of the arrival angle and local phase velocity are made using a mini-array method similar to beamforming. The arrival-angle measurements are used to correct the two-station baseline measurements and produce a corrected data set. Both the baseline and corrected data sets are separately inverted, producing phase-velocity maps on a 0.5°-by-0.5° grid. We select the corrected maps as the preferred models for Rayleigh waves, with better fits to the data and more consistent measurements. We find that arrival-angle measurements for Love waves may be biased by overtone interference, and hence select the baseline maps as the preferred models for Love waves. The final set of phase-velocity maps is consistent with expectations from known geologic features, and is useful for both calculation of phase for regional paths and studies of radial anisotropy within the region. We use the mini-array method to make observations of the deviations of waves from the great-circle path. Measured arrival angles vary from 0° to +/-15°. We compile results from earthquakes in small source regions, allowing the

  10. Combining phase images from array coils using a short echo time reference scan (COMPOSER)

    PubMed Central

    Dymerska, Barbara; Bogner, Wolfgang; Barth, Markus; Zaric, Olgica; Goluch, Sigrun; Grabner, Günther; Deligianni, Xeni; Bieri, Oliver; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a simple method for combining phase images from multichannel coils that does not require a reference coil and does not entail phase unwrapping, fitting or iterative procedures. Theory and Methods At very short echo time, the phase measured with each coil of an array approximates to the phase offset to which the image from that coil is subject. Subtracting this information from the phase of the scan of interest matches the phases from the coils, allowing them to be combined. The effectiveness of this approach is quantified in the brain, calf and breast with coils of diverse designs. Results The quality of phase matching between coil elements was close to 100% with all coils assessed even in regions of low signal. This method of phase combination was similar in effectiveness to the Roemer method (which needs a reference coil) and was superior to the rival reference‐coil‐free approaches tested. Conclusion The proposed approach—COMbining Phase data using a Short Echo‐time Reference scan (COMPOSER)—is a simple and effective approach to reconstructing phase images from multichannel coils. It requires little additional scan time, is compatible with parallel imaging and is applicable to all coils, independent of configuration. Magn Reson Med 77:318–327, 2017. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine PMID:26712454

  11. Two-dimensional analytic modeling of acoustic diffraction for ultrasonic beam steering by phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiansi; Zhang, Chong; Aleksov, Aleksandar; Salama, Islam; Kar, Aravinda

    2017-04-01

    Phased array ultrasonic transducers enable modulating the focal position of the acoustic waves, and this capability is utilized in many applications, such as medical imaging and non-destructive testing. This type of transducers also provides a mechanism to generate tilted wavefronts in acousto-optic deflectors to deflect laser beams for high precision advanced laser material processing. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented for the diffraction of ultrasonic waves emitted by several phased array transducers into an acousto-optic medium such as TeO2 crystal. A simple analytic expression is obtained for the distribution of the ultrasonic displacement field in the crystal. The model prediction is found to be in good agreement with the results of a numerical model that is based on a non-paraxial multi-Gaussian beam (NMGB) model.

  12. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging of closed cracks using global preheating and local cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Koji; Ino, Yoshihiro; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-10-01

    Closed cracks are the main cause of underestimation in ultrasonic inspection, because the ultrasound transmits through the crack. Specifically, the measurement of closed-crack depth in coarse-grained materials, which are highly attenuative due to linear scatterings at the grains, is the most difficult issue. To solve this problem, we have developed a temporary crack opening method, global preheating and local cooling (GPLC), using tensile thermal stress, and a high-selectivity imaging method, load difference phased array (LDPA), based on the subtraction of phased array images between different stresses. To demonstrate our developed method, we formed a closed fatigue crack in coarse-grained stainless steel (SUS316L) specimen. As a result of applying it to the specimen, the high-selectivity imaging performance was successfully demonstrated. This will be useful in improving the measurement accuracy of closed-crack depths in coarse-grained material.

  13. Application of Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to the Detection of Defect in Composite Stiffened-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan-Qi; Zhan, Li-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Composite stiffened-structure consists of the skin and stringer has been widely used in aircraft fuselage and wings. The main purpose of the article is to detect the composite material reinforced structure accurately and explore the relationship between defect formation and structural elements or curing process. Based on ultrasonic phased array inspection technology, the regularity of defects in the manufacture of composite materials are obtained, the correlation model between actual defects and nondestructive testing are established. The article find that the forming quality of deltoid area in T-stiffened structure is obviously improved by pre-curing, the defects of hat-stiffened structure are affected by the mandrel. The results show that the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology can be an effectively way for the detection of composite stiffened-structures, which become an important means to control the defects of composite and improve the quality of the product.

  14. Thermal imaging of plasma with a phased array antenna in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Kishore Nagata, K.; Akimoto, R.; Banerjee, S.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Onchi, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Yamamoto, M. K.

    2014-11-15

    A thermal imaging system to measure plasma Electron Bernstein Emission (EBE) emanating from the mode conversion region in overdense plasma is discussed. Unlike conventional ECE/EBE imaging, this diagnostics does not employ any active mechanical scanning mirrors or focusing optics to scan for the emission cones in plasma. Instead, a standard 3 × 3 waveguide array antenna is used as a passive receiver to collect emission from plasma and imaging reconstruction is done by accurate measurements of phase and intensity of these signals by heterodyne detection technique. A broadband noise source simulating the EBE, is installed near the expected mode conversion region and its position is successfully reconstructed using phase array technique which is done in post processing.

  15. Deconvolution methods and systems for the mapping of acoustic sources from phased microphone arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for mapping acoustic sources determined from a phased microphone array. A plurality of microphones are arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations thereof. A linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can be formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. A full-rank equation derived from the linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can then be iteratively determined. A full-rank can be attained by the solution requirement of the positivity constraint equivalent to the physical assumption of statically independent noise sources at each N location. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with the phased microphone array in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing the beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  16. Grating lobes analysis based on blazed grating theory for liquid crystal optical-phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Cui, Guolong; Kong, Lingjiang; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2013-09-01

    The grating lobes of the liquid crystal optical-phased array (LCOPA) based on blazed grating theory is studied. Using the Fraunhofer propagation principle, the analytical expressions of the far-field intensity distribution are derived. Subsequently, we can obtain both the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes. The derived analytical functions that provide an insight into single-slit diffraction and multislit interference effect on the grating lobes are discussed. Utilizing the conventional microwave-phased array technique, the intensities of the grating lobes and the main lobe are almost the same. Different from this, the derived analytical functions demonstrate that the intensities of the grating lobes are less than that of the main lobe. The computer simulations and experiments show that the proposed method can correctly estimate the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes for a LCOPA simultaneously.

  17. The Implications of Encoder/Modulator/ Phased Array Designs for Future Broadband LEO Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderaar, Mark; Jensen, Chris A.; Terry, John D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the effects of modulation and channel coding on the design of wide angle scan, broadband, phased army antennas. In the paper we perform several trade studies. First, we investigate the amplifier back-off requirement as a function of variability of modulation envelope. Specifically, we contrast constant and non-constant envelope modulations, as well as single and multiple carrier schemes. Additionally, we address the issues an(f concerns of using pulse shaping filters with the above modulation types. Second, we quantify the effects of beam steering on the quality of data, recovery using selected modulation techniques. In particular, we show that the frequency response of the array introduces intersymbol interference for broadband signals and that the mode of operation for the beam steering controller may introduce additional burst or random errors. Finally, we show that the encoder/modulator design must be performed in conjunction with the phased array antenna design.

  18. Femtosecond laser modification of an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes intercalated with Fe phase nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Labunov, Vladimir; Prudnikava, Alena; Bushuk, Serguei; Filatov, Serguei; Shulitski, Boris; Tay, Beng Kang; Shaman, Yury; Basaev, Alexander

    2013-09-03

    Femtosecond lasers (FSL) are playing an increasingly important role in materials research, characterization, and modification. Due to an extremely short pulse width, interactions of FSL irradiation with solid surfaces attract special interest, and a number of unusual phenomena resulted in the formation of new materials are expected. Here, we report on a new nanostructure observed after the interaction of FSL irradiation with arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) intercalated with iron phase catalyst nanoparticles. It was revealed that the FSL laser ablation transforms the topmost layer of CNT array into iron phase nanospheres (40 to 680 nm in diameter) located at the tip of the CNT bundles of conical shape. Besides, the smaller nanospheres (10 to 30 nm in diameter) are found to be beaded at the sides of these bundles. Some of the larger nanospheres are encapsulated into carbon shells, which sometime are found to contain CNTs. The mechanism of creation of such nanostructures is proposed.

  19. Modeling and simulation of ultrasound fields generated by 2D phased array transducers for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Matrone, G; Quaglia, F; Magenes, G

    2010-01-01

    Modern ultrasound imaging instrumentation for clinical applications allows real-time volumetric scanning of the patients' body. 4D imaging has been made possible thanks to the development of new echographic probes which consist in 2D phased arrays of piezoelectric transducers. In these new devices it is the system electronics which properly drives the matrix elements and focuses the beam in order to obtain a sequence of volumetric images. This paper introduces an ultrasound field simulator based on the Spatial Impulse Response method which is being properly developed to analyze the characteristics of the ultrasound field generated by a 2D phased array of transducers. Thanks to its high configurability by the user, it will represent a very useful tool for electronics designers in developing 4D ultrasound imaging systems components.

  20. Feasibility of a multipurpose transceiver module for phased array radar and EW applications using RFIC technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sarawi, Said; Hansen, Hedley; Zhu, Yingbo

    2007-12-01

    Phased array antennas have a large number of civilian and military applications. In this paper we briefly review common approaches to an integrated implementation of radar and electronic warfare digital phase array module and highlight features that are common to both of these applications. Then we discuss how the promising features of the radio frequency integrated circuit (RFIC)-based technology can be utilized in building a transceiver module that meets the requirements of both radar and electronic warfare applications with minimum number of external components. This is achieved by researching the pros and cons of the different receiver architectures and their performance from the targeted applications point of view. Then, we survey current RFIC technologies and highlight the pros and cons of these technologies and how they impact the performance of the discussed receiver architectures.

  1. Design and Validation of Rugged Microwave Photonic Network for Phased-Array Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Manisha; Rai, J. K.; Sridhar, N.

    2015-11-01

    Military radar has the requirement of 24 × 7 operation in harsh environments with a high level of safety and integrity built in for equipment and personnel working with it. This article presents an application of a microwave photonic network for phased-array military radar. The design challenge is to realize faithful reproduction of the input microwave signals over extreme temperature and frequency ranges. Environmental testing has been carried out to validate the performance of the proposed microwave photonic network over 2-4 GHz and a temperature range of -20°C to +55°C. The result shows that the photonic network can be successfully utilized for phased-array radar.

  2. Frequency-domain photoacoustic phased array probe for biomedical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Telenkov, Sergey; Alwi, Rudolf; Mandelis, Andreas; Worthington, Arthur

    2011-12-01

    We report the development of a frequency-domain biomedical photoacoustic imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection, and processing coupled with a beam-forming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Sensitivity to optical contrast was demonstrated using tissue-mimicking phantoms and in-vivo tissue samples.

  3. Microphone Array Phased Processing System (MAPPS): Version 4.0 Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Mosher, Marianne; Barnes, Michael; Bardina, Jorge

    1999-01-01

    A processing system has been developed to meet increasing demands for detailed noise measurement of individual model components. The Microphone Array Phased Processing System (MAPPS) uses graphical user interfaces to control all aspects of data processing and visualization. The system uses networked parallel computers to provide noise maps at selected frequencies in a near real-time testing environment. The system has been successfully used in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel.

  4. High frequency GaAlAs modulator and photodetector for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Chorey, C. M.; Hill, S. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    A waveguide Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator and an interdigitated photoconductive detector designed to operate at 820 nm, fabricated on different GaAlAs/GaAs heterostructure materials, are being investigated for use in optical interconnects in phased array antenna systems. Measured optical attenuation effects in the modulator are discussed and the observed modulation performance up to 1 GHz is presented. Measurements of detector frequency response are described and results presented.

  5. High frequency GaAlAs modulator and photodetector for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Chorey, C. M.; Hill, S. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1988-01-01

    A waveguide Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator and an interdigitated photoconductive detector designed to operate at 820 nm, fabricated on different GaAlAs/GaAs heterostructure materials, are being investigated for use in optical interconnects in phased array antenna systems. Measured optical attenuation effects in the modulator are discussed and the observed modulation performance up to 1 GHz is presented. Measurements of detector frequency response are described and results presented.

  6. Experimental research on beam steering characteristics of liquid crystal optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Cai, Jun; Xu, Hong; Wang, Xiangru; Wu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Beam steering characteristics of transmission liquid crystal optical phased array(LC-OPA) were measured using ultra precision electronic autocollimator. A continuous beam steering with a constant angular resolution in the order of 20 μrad is obtained experimentally from 0° to 6° based on the method of variable period grating (VPG).Meanwhile, the angular repeatability of less than 4 μrad (RMS) has been achieved.

  7. The Application of Phased Array Ultrasonic Techniques for Inspection of Railway Axles from Their End Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaptsis, D.; Cooper, I.; Boyle, K.; Nicholson, P. I.

    2011-06-01

    As part of the development of a non destructive testing (NDT) system combining complementary inspection techniques, an inspection system based on phased array ultrasonic testing (PAUT) for detection of transverse cracking in solid railway axles is being developed. This paper presents the initial study, which includes the PAUT experimental setup and the initial results obtained after testing the system on railway axle blocks. The inspection of solid axles from their axle end face is investigated.

  8. Initial High-Power-CW-Laser Testing of Liquid-Crystal Optical Phased Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2010-1043 INITIAL HIGH-POWER-CW-LASER TESTING OF LIQUID-CRYSTAL OPTICAL PHASED ARRAYS Bert Whitaker OptiMetrics, Inc...Bert Whitaker (OptiMetrics, Inc.) Scott Harris (Flatiron Research, LLC) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2003 5e. TASK NUMBER 11 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...to a Carl Zeiss petrographic microscope. The crossed polarizers in this microscope highlighted the presence of LC material due to its birefringence

  9. Investigation of a Phase-Locked Loop Receiver for a Parametric Acoustic Receiving Array.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-05

    KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necesary and Identify by block number, PARRAY Nonlinear Acoustics Parametric Reception Phase-Locked Loop...loop (PLL) demodulator considered for use with the parametric acoustic receiving array ( PARRAY ). The PARRAY as an acoustic sensor is explained and the...effects of longitudinal transducer motion on the PARRAY are described. This transducer vibration produces intermodulation products between the desired

  10. Phased Array Ultrasound: Initial Development of PAUT Inspection of Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairigh, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of Phased Array Ultrasound (PAUT) as a non-destructive examination method for Self Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). PAUT is the only NDE method which has been shown to detect detrimental levels of Residual Oxide Defect (ROD), which can result in significant decrease in weld strength. The presentation reviews the PAUT process, and shows the results in comparison with x-ray radiography.

  11. RF Photonic, In-Situ, Real-Time Phased Array Antenna Calibration System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-22

    physical length of fiber. After photodetection , the RF calibration signals are applied directly to an array of electrically small dipole antennas...allows static adjustment over both the amplitude and phase. After photodetection , the RF signal is placed across the ESDA antenna located at each unit...fed using a double Marchand balun. The Marchand balun consists of a microstrip (unbalanced)-to-slotline ( balanced ) transition. The balun design uses

  12. Holographic optical elements (HOEs) for true-time delays aimed at phased-array antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ray T.; Li, Richard L.

    1996-05-01

    True time-delay beam steering in optical domain for phased-array antenna application using multiplexed substrate guided wave propagation is introduced. Limitations of practical true- time-delays are discussed. Aspects on making holographic grating couplers are considered. Finally, experimental results on the generation of 25 GHz broadband microwave signals by optical heterodyne technique and 1-to-30 massive substrate guided wave optical fanout with an uniform fanout intensity distribution are presented.

  13. Equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction sizing with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic phased array transducers can be used to extend traditional time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) crack sizing, resulting in more quantitative information about the crack being obtained. Traditional TOFD yields a single length parameter, while the equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction crack sizing method (EFTOFD) described here uses data from multiple look-angles to fit an equivalent degenerate ellipsoid to the crack. The size and orientation of the equivalent flaw can be used to estimate the actual crack size.

  14. Phased-ultrasonic receiving-planar array transducer for partial discharge location in transformer.

    PubMed

    Yongfen, Luo; Shengchang, Ji; Yanming, Li

    2006-03-01

    Partial discharge (PD) location in transformers is very important, and many methods that have been brought forward in past decades have a limitation theoretically, namely, they cannot locate multiple PDs in electrical equipment. In this paper, a new PD location method based on UHF and ultrasonic-phased arrays receiving theory has been presented, which has a possibility to locate multiple PDs. According to the method, a phased-ultrasonic receiving-planar array sensor that possesses 16 * 16 elements is designed; and, based on the phased-array theory, the characteristics of the plane sensor are studied. The laboratory experimental tests on the plane sensor element indicates that it has a good performance within the frequency band of the main ultrasonic energy produced by PD in transformer oil. Location tests are conducted on one or two piezoelectric ultrasonic sources in oil, which are both simulated as PD sources and triggered by an electrical pulse whose front is considered as a time benchmark in the locating algorithm. The test results show locations to one and two PDs can be realized in a single measurement, which lays a foundation for locating PDs in a power transformer in service.

  15. Two-dimensional refractive index modulation by phased array transducers in acousto-optic deflectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiansi; Zhang, Chong; Aleksov, Aleksandar; Salama, Islam; Kar, Aravinda

    2017-01-20

    Acousto-optic deflectors are photonic devices that are used for scanning high-power laser beams in advanced microprocessing applications such as marking and direct writing. The operation of conventional deflectors mostly relies on one-dimensional sinusoidal variation of the refractive index in an acousto-optic medium. Sometimes static phased array transducers, such as step configuration or planar configuration transducer architecture, are used to tilt the index modulation planes for achieving higher performance and higher resolution than a single transducer AO device. However, the index can be modulated in two dimensions, and the modulation plane can be tilted arbitrarily by creating dynamic phase gratings in the medium using phased array transducers. This type of dynamic two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector can provide better performance using, for example, a large deflection angle and high diffraction efficiency. This paper utilizes an ultrasonic beam steering approach to study the two-dimensional strain-induced index modulation due to the photoelastic effect. The modulation is numerically simulated, and the effects of various parameters, such as the operating radiofrequency of the transducers, the ultrasonic beam steering angle, and different combinations of pressure on each element of the transducer array, are demonstrated.

  16. Design and development of high frequency matrix phased-array ultrasonic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Spencer, Roger L.

    2012-05-01

    High frequency matrix phased-array (MPA) probes have been designed and developed for more accurate and repeatable assessment of weld conditions of thin sheet metals commonly used in the auto industry. Unlike the line focused ultrasonic beam generated by a linear phased-array (LPA) probe, a MPA probe can form a circular shaped focused beam in addition to the typical beam steering capabilities of phased-array probes. A CIVA based modeling and simulation method has been used to design the probes in terms of various probe parameters such as number of elements, element size, overall dimensions, frequency etc. Challenges associated with the thicknesses of thin sheet metals have been resolved by optimizing these probe design parameters. A further improvement made on the design of the MPA probe proved that a three-dimensionally shaped matrix element can provide a better performing probe at a much lower probe manufacturing cost by reducing the total number of elements and lowering the operational frequency. This three dimensional probe naturally matches to the indentation shape of the weld on the thin sheet metals and hence a wider inspection area with the same level of spatial resolution obtained by a twodimensional flat MPA probe operating at a higher frequency. The two aspects, a wider inspection area and a lower probe manufacturing cost, make this three-dimensional MPA sensor more attractive to auto manufacturers demanding a quantitative nondestructive inspection method.

  17. Continuous Beam Steering From A Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Titus, Charles M.; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  18. Continuous Beam Steering From a Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Charles M.; Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  19. Phase-Slip Avalanches in the Superflow of {sup 4}He through Arrays of Nanosize Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Pekker, David; Barankov, Roman; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2007-04-27

    In response to recent experiments by the Berkeley group, we construct a model of superflow through an array of nanosize apertures that incorporates two basic ingredients: (1) disorder associated with each aperture having its own random critical velocity, and (2) effective interaperture coupling, mediated through the bulk superfluid. As the disorder becomes weak there is a transition from a regime where phase slips are largely independent to a regime where interactions lead to system-wide avalanches of phase slips. We explore the flow dynamics in both regimes, and make connections to the experiments.

  20. Simulation research on beam steering technology based on optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Junlin; Pan, Xudong

    2015-02-01

    The principle of beam steering technology based on optical phased array (OPA), which is composed of individual phase-modulating units, is introduced. By use of Fraunhofer diffraction and Fourier transformation, the OPA models are established. The influence of main parameters of OPA on beam steering efficiency, including duty ratio (ratio of effective unit size to total unit size), total unit size, unit number, and steering angle, is simulated and analyzed. It shows that beam steering efficiency of OPA is improved with larger duty ratio, smaller total unit size, and smaller steering angle, while the number of units has a very small impact on beam steering efficiency.